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Sample records for mycobacterium dna elicits

  1. DNA Replication in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    DITSE, ZANELE; LAMERS, MEINDERT H.; WARNER, DIGBY F.

    2017-01-01

    Faithful replication and maintenance of the genome are essential to the ability of any organism to survive and propagate. For an obligate pathogen such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis that has to complete successive cycles of transmission, infection, and disease in order to retain a foothold in the human population, this requires that genome replication and maintenance must be accomplished under the metabolic, immune, and antibiotic stresses encountered during passage through variable host environments. Comparative genomic analyses have established that chromosomal mutations enable M. tuberculosis to adapt to these stresses: the emergence of drug-resistant isolates provides direct evidence of this capacity, so too the well-documented genetic diversity among M. tuberculosis lineages across geographic loci, as well as the microvariation within individual patients that is increasingly observed as whole-genome sequencing methodologies are applied to clinical samples and tuberculosis (TB) disease models. However, the precise mutagenic mechanisms responsible for M. tuberculosis evolution and adaptation are poorly understood. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the machinery responsible for DNA replication in M. tuberculosis, and discuss the potential contribution of the expanded complement of mycobacterial DNA polymerases to mutagenesis. We also consider briefly the possible role of DNA replication—in particular, its regulation and coordination with cell division—in the ability of M. tuberculosis to withstand antibacterial stresses, including host immune effectors and antibiotics, through the generation at the population level of a tolerant state, or through the formation of a subpopulation of persister bacilli—both of which might be relevant to the emergence and fixation of genetic drug resistance. PMID:28361736

  2. Isolation of DNA from Mycobacterium tubercolosis.

    PubMed

    van Helden, P D; Victor, T C; Warren, R M; van Helden, E G

    2001-01-01

    Research into and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis can take on a number of facets, many of which involve the use of DNA at one stage or another. The quality and quantity of DNA required will depend on the end-use requirement. For example, good yields of pure, high-molecular-weight DNA uncontaminated by DNA from other sources (i.e., homogeneous) are optimal for the generation of cosmid libraries and sequencing (1), Southern hybridization (2-6), or microarray analysis (7) for genome studies, whereas relatively crude DNA (fragmented DNA or DNA from multiple sources [i.e., heterogeneous]) may be adequate for PCR-based diagnosis (8-12) or amplification of regions of the genome for other purposes, e.g., identification of mutations conferring drug resistance (13,14).

  3. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  4. Vaccine-Elicited 10-Kilodalton Culture Filtrate Protein-Specific CD8+ T Cells Are Sufficient To Mediate Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Woodworth, Joshua S.; Shin, Daniel S.; Morris, Sheldon; Behar, Samuel M.

    2008-01-01

    The 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP-10) and 6-kDa early secretory antigen of T cells (ESAT-6) are secreted in abundance by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and are frequently recognized by T cells from infected people. The genes encoding these proteins have been deleted from the genome of the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), and it is hypothesized that these proteins are important targets of protective immunity. Indeed, vaccination with ESAT-6 elicits protective CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice. We have previously shown that M. tuberculosis infection of C3H mice elicits CFP-10-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Here we demonstrate that immunization with a CFP-10 DNA vaccine stimulates a specific T-cell response only to the H-2Kk-restricted epitope CFP-1032-39. These CFP-1032-39-specific CD8+ cells undergo a rapid expansion and accumulate in the lung following challenge of immunized mice with aerosolized M. tuberculosis. Protective immunity is induced by CFP-10 DNA vaccination as measured by a CFU reduction in the lung and spleen 4 and 8 weeks after challenge with M. tuberculosis. These data demonstrate that CFP-10 is a protective antigen and that CFP-1032-39-specific CD8+ T cells elicited by vaccination are sufficient to mediate protection against tuberculosis. PMID:18332205

  5. Mycobacterium heckeshornense lung infection that was diagnosed as Mycobacterium xenopi disease by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH).

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Kazumi, Yuko; Maeda, Shinji; Yoshimori, Kozo; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kudoh, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    The DNA sequencing analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, rpoB and hsp65 were conducted to characterize six strains that had been identified as Mycobacterium xenopi by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) for past ten years in our hospital. The results revealed Mycobacterium heckeshornense infection in one of the six cases. A 47-year-old man, who had been treated for pneumonia, had pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The sputa from the patient were culture positive for mycobacterium in three times. And it was diagnosed as M. xenopiby DDH method. Chest X-ray showed fibrocavitary lesion in right upper lobe was successfully treated with clarithromycin for four weeks.

  6. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  7. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  8. The RD1 virulence locus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulates DNA transfer in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jessica L.; Kowalski, Joseph C.; Karnati, Pavan K.; Derbyshire, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    Conjugal DNA transfer occurs by an atypical mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The transfer system is chromosomally encoded and requires recipient recombination functions for both chromosome and plasmid transfer. Cis-acting sequences have been identified that confer mobility on nontransferable plasmids, but these are larger and have different properties to canonical oriT sites found in bacterial plasmids. To identify trans-acting factors required for mediating DNA transfer, a library of transposon insertion mutants was generated in the donor strain, and individual mutants were screened for their effect on transfer. From this screen, a collection of insertion mutants was isolated that increased conjugation frequencies relative to wild type. Remarkably, the mutations map to a 25-kb region of the M. smegmatis chromosome that is syntenous with the RD1 region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is considered to be the primary attenuating deletion in the related vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin. The genes of the RD1 region encode a secretory apparatus responsible for exporting Cfp10- and Esat-6, both potent antigens and virulence factors. In crosses using two M. smegmatis donors, we show that wild-type cells can suppress the elevated transfer phenotype of mutant donors, which is consistent with the secretion of a factor that suppresses conjugation. Most importantly, the RD1 region of M. tuberculosis complements the conjugation phenotype of the RD1 mutants in M. smegmatis. Our results indicate that the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis RD1 regions are functionally equivalent and provide a unique perspective on the role of this critical secretion apparatus. PMID:15314236

  9. Detection and Identification of Mycobacterium Species Isolates by DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Masao; Kakinuma, Kenichi; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Ito, Kunihiko; Kawaguchi, Ryuji

    2003-01-01

    Rapid identification of Mycobacterium species isolates is necessary for the effective management of tuberculosis. Recently, analysis of DNA gyrase B subunit (gyrB) genes has been identified as a suitable means for the identification of bacterial species. We describe a microarray assay based on gyrB gene sequences that can be used for the identification of Mycobacteria species. Primers specific for a gyrB gene region common to all mycobacteria were synthesized and used for PCR amplification of DNA purified from clinical samples. A set of oligonucleotide probes for specific gyrB gene regions was developed for the identification of 14 Mycobacterium species. Each probe was spotted onto a silylated glass slide with an arrayer and used for hybridization with fluorescently labeled RNA derived from amplified sample DNA to yield a pattern of positive spots. This microarray produced unique hybridization patterns for each species of mycobacteria and could differentiate closely related bacterial species. Moreover, the results corresponded well with those obtained by the conventional culture method for the detection of mycobacteria. We conclude that a gyrB-based microarray can rapidly detect and identify closely related mycobacterial species and may be useful in the diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis. PMID:12791887

  10. Structural and Thermodynamic Signatures of DNA Recognition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Biswas, Tapan

    2011-09-06

    An essential protein, DnaA, binds to 9-bp DNA sites within the origin of replication oriC. These binding events are prerequisite to forming an enigmatic nucleoprotein scaffold that initiates replication. The number, sequences, positions, and orientations of these short DNA sites, or DnaA boxes, within the oriCs of different bacteria vary considerably. To investigate features of DnaA boxes that are important for binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA (MtDnaA), we have determined the crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of MtDnaA bound to a cognate MtDnaA-box (at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution) and to a consensus Escherichia coli DnaA-box (at 2.3 {angstrom}). These structures, complemented by calorimetric equilibrium binding studies of MtDnaA DBD in a series of DnaA-box variants, reveal the main determinants of DNA recognition and establish the [T/C][T/A][G/A]TCCACA sequence as a high-affinity MtDnaA-box. Bioinformatic and calorimetric analyses indicate that DnaA-box sequences in mycobacterial oriCs generally differ from the optimal binding sequence. This sequence variation occurs commonly at the first 2 bp, making an in vivo mycobacterial DnaA-box effectively a 7-mer and not a 9-mer. We demonstrate that the decrease in the affinity of these MtDnaA-box variants for MtDnaA DBD relative to that of the highest-affinity box TTGTCCACA is less than 10-fold. The understanding of DnaA-box recognition by MtDnaA and E. coli DnaA enables one to map DnaA-box sequences in the genomes of M. tuberculosis and other eubacteria.

  11. Morphological features and signature gene response elicited by inactivation of FtsI in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slayden, Richard A.; Belisle, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Universally conserved events in cell division provide the opportunity for the development of novel chemotherapeutics against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to use the β-lactam antimicrobials cefalexin and piperacillin to inhibit FtsI and characterize the morphological changes and global transcriptional activities of genes to identify a signature response to FtsI inactivation. Methods Cefalexin and piperacillin were used to block cell division, and microscopy was used to evaluate the effects on bacterial morphology and ultrastructure. Global transcriptional analysis was performed to determine the impact of FtsI inhibition on cell cycle processes and to identify molecular markers. Results Inhibition of FtsI with cefalexin and piperacillin resulted in filamentous cells with multiple concentric rings and occasional branching as visualized by light and electron microscopy. Whole genome microarray-based transcriptional profiling and transcriptional mapping allowed the evaluation of cell cycle processes in response to inhibition of FtsI and characterization of transcriptional response and cell cycle processes. Conclusions This study substantiated that FtsZ-ring constriction and septal resolution require the transpeptidase activity of FtsI, making FtsI essential for cell division in M. tuberculosis. Therefore, FtsI is a target for drug discovery, and these studies provided a molecular signature of FtsI inactivation that can be applied to screening strategies for novel FtsI inhibitors. PMID:19109339

  12. Recombinant bacille Calmette-Guerin coexpressing Ag85b, CFP10, and interleukin-12 elicits effective protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Wei; Huang, Wei-Feng; Chang, Jia-Ru; Su, Ih-Jen; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Cheng, Han-Yin; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Dou, Horng-Yunn

    2017-02-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) pandemic remains a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality, despite widespread use of the only licensed anti-TB vaccine, bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). The protective efficacy of BCG in preventing pulmonary TB is highly variable; therefore, an effective new vaccine is urgently required. In the present study, we assessed the ability of novel recombinant BCG vaccine (rBCG) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using modern immunological methods. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays demonstrated that the rBCG vaccine, which coexpresses two mycobacterial antigens (Ag85B and CFP10) and human interleukin (IL)-12 (rBCG2) elicits greater interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release in the mouse lung and spleen, compared to the parental BCG. In addition, rBCG2 triggers a Th1-polarized response. Our results also showed that rBCG2 vaccination significantly limits M. tuberculosis H37Rv multiplication in macrophages. The rBCG2 vaccine surprisingly induces significantly higher tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were exposed to a nonmycobacterial stimulus, compared to the parental BCG. In this study, we demonstrated that the novel rBCG2 vaccine may be a promising candidate vaccine against M. tuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Cytosolic Sensor cGAS Detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to Induce Type I Interferons and Activate Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert O; Bell, Samantha L; MacDuff, Donna A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Diner, Elie J; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E; Stallings, Christina L; Virgin, Herbert W; Cox, Jeffery S

    2015-06-10

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolic DNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections.

  14. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  15. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    PubMed

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+). Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  16. Antimycobacterial activity of DNA intercalator inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada; Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Shaul, Pazit; Fridman, Micha; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Posey, James E; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Owing to the rise in drug resistance in tuberculosis combined with the global spread of its causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), innovative anti mycobacterial agents are urgently needed. Recently, we developed a novel primase-pyrophosphatase assay and used it to discover inhibitors of an essential Mtb enzyme, primase DnaG (Mtb DnaG), a promising and unexplored potential target for novel antituberculosis chemotherapeutics. Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic used as an anticancer drug, was found to be a potent inhibitor of Mtb DnaG. In this study, we investigated both inhibition of Mtb DnaG and the inhibitory activity against in vitro growth of Mtb and M. smegmatis (Msm) by other anthracyclines, daunorubicin and idarubicin, as well as by less cytotoxic DNA intercalators: aloe-emodin, rhein and a mitoxantrone derivative. Generally, low-μM inhibition of Mtb DnaG by the anthracyclines was correlated with their low-μM minimum inhibitory concentrations. Aloe-emodin displayed threefold weaker potency than doxorubicin against Mtb DnaG and similar inhibition of Msm (but not Mtb) in the mid-μM range, whereas rhein (a close analog of aloe-emodin) and a di-glucosylated mitoxantrone derivative did not show significant inhibition of Mtb DnaG or antimycobacterial activity. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that several clinically used anthracyclines and aloe-emodin target mycobacterial primase, setting the stage for a more extensive exploration of this enzyme as an antibacterial target.

  17. DNA large restriction fragment patterns of sporadic and epidemic nosocomial strains of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Brown, B A; Fraser, V; Mazurek, G H; Maloney, S

    1993-01-01

    Large restriction fragment (LRF) pattern analysis of genomic DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed on three reference strains, 32 sporadic isolates, and 92 nosocomial isolates from 12 epidemics of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus. Only 17 of 30 (57%) unrelated strains of M. abscessus, compared with 10 of 11 (91%) of M. chelonae strains, gave satisfactory DNA extractions, with the remainder resulting in highly fragmented DNA. DraI, AsnI, XbaI, and SpeI gave satisfactory LRF patterns. Sporadic isolates of the two species had highly variable LRF patterns, except for one reference strain and one sporadic isolate of M. chelonae that differed by only two to five bands. Evaluation of repeat isolates from five patients monitored for 8 months to 13 years (mean, 5.8 years) revealed LRF patterns to be stable, with changes of not more than two bands. LRF analysis of the seven nosocomial outbreaks with evaluable DNA revealed identical patterns in most or all of the patient isolates and in three outbreaks revealed identity with environmental isolates. These outbreaks included endoscope contamination, postinjection abscesses, and surgical wound infections. LRF analysis of genomic DNA is a useful technique for epidemiologic studies of M. abscessus and M. chelonae, although improved technology is needed for the approximately 50% of strains of M. abscessus with unsatisfactory DNA extractions. Images PMID:8253968

  18. DNA large restriction fragment patterns of sporadic and epidemic nosocomial strains of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Brown, B A; Fraser, V; Mazurek, G H; Maloney, S

    1993-10-01

    Large restriction fragment (LRF) pattern analysis of genomic DNA using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed on three reference strains, 32 sporadic isolates, and 92 nosocomial isolates from 12 epidemics of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus. Only 17 of 30 (57%) unrelated strains of M. abscessus, compared with 10 of 11 (91%) of M. chelonae strains, gave satisfactory DNA extractions, with the remainder resulting in highly fragmented DNA. DraI, AsnI, XbaI, and SpeI gave satisfactory LRF patterns. Sporadic isolates of the two species had highly variable LRF patterns, except for one reference strain and one sporadic isolate of M. chelonae that differed by only two to five bands. Evaluation of repeat isolates from five patients monitored for 8 months to 13 years (mean, 5.8 years) revealed LRF patterns to be stable, with changes of not more than two bands. LRF analysis of the seven nosocomial outbreaks with evaluable DNA revealed identical patterns in most or all of the patient isolates and in three outbreaks revealed identity with environmental isolates. These outbreaks included endoscope contamination, postinjection abscesses, and surgical wound infections. LRF analysis of genomic DNA is a useful technique for epidemiologic studies of M. abscessus and M. chelonae, although improved technology is needed for the approximately 50% of strains of M. abscessus with unsatisfactory DNA extractions.

  19. High-throughput Method of One-Step DNA Isolation for PCR Diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, D V; Prostyakova, A I; Alexeev, Ya I; Varlamov, D A; Zubov, V P; Zavriev, S K

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of one-step and multi-step protocols of DNA isolation from lysed sputum samples containing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been compared. DNA was isolated using spin-cartridges containing a special silica-based sorbent modified with fluoroplast and polyaniline, or using an automated isolation system. One-step isolation using the obtained sorbent has been shown to ensure a significantly lower DNA loss and higher sensitivity in the PCR detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to a system based on sorption and desorption of nucleic acids during the isolation.

  20. High-throughput Method of One-Step DNA Isolation for PCR Diagnostics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, D. V.; Prostyakova, A. I.; Alexeev, Ya. I.; Varlamov, D. A.; Zubov, V. P.; Zavriev, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of one-step and multi-step protocols of DNA isolation from lysed sputum samples containing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been compared. DNA was isolated using spin-cartridges containing a special silica-based sorbent modified with fluoroplast and polyaniline, or using an automated isolation system. One-step isolation using the obtained sorbent has been shown to ensure a significantly lower DNA loss and higher sensitivity in the PCR detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as compared to a system based on sorption and desorption of nucleic acids during the isolation. PMID:25093111

  1. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture isolates collected in Brazil and spotted onto filter paper.

    PubMed

    Burger, M; Raskin, S; Brockelt, S R; Amthor, B; Geiss, H K; Haas, W H

    1998-02-01

    The usefulness of filter paper for preservation of bacterial cells was shown by mixed-linker DNA fingerprint analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 77 Brazilian patients. DNA fingerprints of samples spotted onto filter paper and conventional culture material were identical. Thus, filter paper specimens analyzed by an amplification-based typing method provide a new resource for epidemiological studies of infectious diseases.

  2. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts.

  3. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Tissues for Mycobacterium Species DNA

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhiheng; Pride, David T.; Collins, Robert D.; Cover, Timothy L.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2002-01-01

    We performed polymerase chain reaction analysis, for Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA, rpoB, and IS6110 sequences, on 25 tissue specimens from patients with sarcoidosis and on 25 control tissue specimens consisting of mediastinal or cervical lymph nodes and lung biopsies. Mycobacterium species 16S rRNA sequences were amplified from 12 (48%) rpoB sequences from 6 (24%) of the sarcoidosis specimens. In total, 16S rRNA or rpoB sequences were amplified from 15 sarcoidosis specimens (60%) but were not detected in any of the control tissues (p=0.00002, Chi square). In three specimens, the sequences resembled Mycobacterium species other than M. tuberculosis. All specimens with sequences consistent with M. tuberculosis were negative for IS6110. We provide evidence that one of a variety of Mycobacterium species, especially organisms resembling M. tuberculosis, is found in most patients with sarcoidosis. PMID:12453366

  4. Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in the Environment, Ivory Coast

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Roger Bi Diangoné; Niamké, Sébastian; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Ivory Coast is a West African country with the highest reported cases of Buruli ulcer, a disabling subcutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. However, the prevalence of environmental M. ulcerans is poorly known in this country. Methods We collected 496 environmental specimens consisting of soil (n = 100), stagnant water (n = 200), plants (n = 100) and animal feces (n = 96) in Ivory Coast over five months in the dry and wet seasons in regions which are free of Buruli ulcer (control group A; 250 specimens) and in regions where the Buruli ulcer is endemic (group B; 246 specimens). After appropriate total DNA extraction incorporating an internal control, the M. ulcerans IS2404 and KR-B gene were amplified by real-time PCR in samples. In parallel, a calibration curve was done for M. ulcerans Agy99 IS2404 and KR-B gene. Results Of 460 samples free of PCR inhibition, a positive real-time PCR detection of insertion sequence IS2404 and KR-B gene was observed in 1/230 specimens in control group A versus 9/230 specimens in group B (P = 0.02; Fisher exact test). Positive specimens comprised seven stagnant water specimens, two feces specimens confirmed to be of Thryonomys swinderianus (agouti) origin by real-time PCR of the cytb gene; and one soil specimen. Extrapolation from the calibration curves indicated low inoculums ranging from 1 to 102 mycobacteria/mL. Conclusion This study confirms the presence of M. ulcerans in the watery environment surrounding patients with Buruli ulcer in Ivory Coast. It suggests that the agouti, which is in close contacts with populations, could play a role in the environmental cycle of M. ulcerans, as previously suggested for the closely related possums in Australia. PMID:26982581

  5. Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in the Environment, Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Tian, Roger Bi Diangoné; Niamké, Sébastian; Tissot-Dupont, Hervé; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Ivory Coast is a West African country with the highest reported cases of Buruli ulcer, a disabling subcutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. However, the prevalence of environmental M. ulcerans is poorly known in this country. We collected 496 environmental specimens consisting of soil (n = 100), stagnant water (n = 200), plants (n = 100) and animal feces (n = 96) in Ivory Coast over five months in the dry and wet seasons in regions which are free of Buruli ulcer (control group A; 250 specimens) and in regions where the Buruli ulcer is endemic (group B; 246 specimens). After appropriate total DNA extraction incorporating an internal control, the M. ulcerans IS2404 and KR-B gene were amplified by real-time PCR in samples. In parallel, a calibration curve was done for M. ulcerans Agy99 IS2404 and KR-B gene. Of 460 samples free of PCR inhibition, a positive real-time PCR detection of insertion sequence IS2404 and KR-B gene was observed in 1/230 specimens in control group A versus 9/230 specimens in group B (P = 0.02; Fisher exact test). Positive specimens comprised seven stagnant water specimens, two feces specimens confirmed to be of Thryonomys swinderianus (agouti) origin by real-time PCR of the cytb gene; and one soil specimen. Extrapolation from the calibration curves indicated low inoculums ranging from 1 to 102 mycobacteria/mL. This study confirms the presence of M. ulcerans in the watery environment surrounding patients with Buruli ulcer in Ivory Coast. It suggests that the agouti, which is in close contacts with populations, could play a role in the environmental cycle of M. ulcerans, as previously suggested for the closely related possums in Australia.

  6. Glutamate racemase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits DNA gyrase by affecting its DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sugopa; Shah, Meera; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate racemase (MurI) catalyses the conversion of l-glutamate to d-glutamate, an important component of the bacterial cell wall. MurI from Escherichia coli inhibits DNA gyrase in presence of the peptidoglycan precursor. Amongst the two-glutamate racemases found in Bacillus subtilis, only one inhibits gyrase, in absence of the precursor. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a single gene encoding glutamate racemase. Action of M.tuberculosis MurI on DNA gyrase activity has been examined and its mode of action elucidated. We demonstrate that mycobacterial MurI inhibits DNA gyrase activity, in addition to its precursor independent racemization function. The inhibition is not species-specific as E.coli gyrase is also inhibited but is enzyme-specific as topoisomerase I activity remains unaltered. The mechanism of inhibition is different from other well-known gyrase inhibitors. MurI binds to GyrA subunit of the enzyme leading to a decrease in DNA-binding of the holoenzyme. The sequestration of the gyrase by MurI results in inhibition of all reactions catalysed by DNA gyrase. MurI is thus not a typical potent inhibitor of DNA gyrase and instead its role could be in modulation of the gyrase activity. PMID:17020913

  7. Cloning of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene encoding a purifed protein derivative protein that elicits strong tuberculosis-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Coler, R N; Skeiky, Y A; Ovendale, P J; Vedvick, T S; Gervassi, L; Guderian, J; Jen, S; Reed, S G; Campos-Neto, A

    2000-07-01

    The purified protein derivative (PPD) skin test has been used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis for more than 75 years. However, the test lacks specificity because all mycobacteria share antigens present in PPD. Therefore, sensitization with nontuberculous pathogenic or with environmental nonpathogenic mycobacteria can lead to positive skin tests. This communication describes a novel PPD protein present only in tuberculous complex mycobacteria. A recombinant protein was obtained and named DPPD on the basis of the first 4 amino acids of its N-terminus sequence. DPPD elicited delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in 100% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs but in no animals sensitized with several organisms representative of all members of the Mycobacterium genus. Preliminary results indicate that DPPD induces strong and specific DTH in humans. This work points to the definition of a single recombinant M. tuberculosis protein that may be an alternative to the PPD test.

  8. Rapid detection of cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Che, Nanying; Yang, Xinting; Liu, Zichen; Li, Kun; Chen, Xiaoyou

    2017-03-08

    Tuberculous pleurisy is one of the most common extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, but its diagnosis remains to be difficult. In this study, we for the first time report detection of cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in pleural effusion and evaluation of this newly developed molecular assay. A total of 78 patients with pleural effusion, 60 patients with tuberculous pleurisy and 18 patients with alternative diseases, were included in this study. Mycobacterial culture, Xpert MTB/RIF assay, adenosine deaminase assay, T-SPOT.TB assay, and cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay were performed on all the pleural effusion samples. Cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay and adenosine deaminase assay showed significantly higher sensitivities with 75.0 % and 68.3 % than those of mycobacterial culture and Xpert MTB/RIF assay with 26.7 % and 20.0 % (P < 0.01). These four tests all showed good specificities, 88.9 % for adenosine deaminase assay, and 100 % for the remaining three assays. The T-SPOT.TB assay in pleural effusion showed the highest sensitivity with 95.0 %, but the lowest specificity with 38.9 %. Cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay detected as low as 1.25 copies of IS6110 in per ml of pleural effusion and showed good accordance between repeated tests (r = 0.978, P = 2.84×10(-10)). These data suggest that cell-free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA assay is a rapid and accurate molecular test which provides direct evidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis etiology.

  9. Specific detection of Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA using dual labeled gold nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Santhosh, Devakirubakaran Jayakar; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed at the development and evaluation of a DNA electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA detection in a clinical specimen using a signal amplifier as dual-labeled AuNPs. The DNA electrochemical biosensors were fabricated using a sandwich detection strategy involving two kinds of DNA probes specific to Mycobacterium sp. genomic DNA. The probes of enzyme ALP and the detector probe both conjugated on the AuNPs and subsequently hybridized with target DNA immobilized in a SAM/ITO electrode followed by characterization with CV, EIS, and DPV analysis using the electroactive species para-nitrophenol generated by ALP through hydrolysis of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The effect of enhanced sensitivity was obtained due to the AuNPs carrying numerous ALPs per hybridization and a detection limit of 1.25 ng/ml genomic DNA was determined under optimized conditions. The dual-labeled AuNP-facilitated electrochemical sensor was also evaluated by clinical sputum samples, showing a higher sensitivity and specificity and the outcome was in agreement with the PCR analysis. In conclusion, the developed electrochemical sensor demonstrated unique sensitivity and specificity for both genomic DNA and sputum samples and can be employed as a regular diagnostics tool for Mycobacterium sp. monitoring in clinical samples.

  10. Hexameric ring structure of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaB helicase

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2009-01-15

    Hexameric DnaB helicase unwinds the DNA double helix during replication of genetic material in bacteria. DnaB is an essential bacterial protein; therefore, it is an important potential target for antibacterial drug discovery. We report a crystal structure of the N-terminal region of DnaB from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDnaBn), determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides atomic resolution details of formation of the hexameric ring of DnaB by two distinct interfaces. An extensive hydrophobic interface stabilizes a dimer of MtDnaBn by forming a four-helix bundle. The other, less extensive, interface is formed between the dimers, connecting three of them into a hexameric ring. On the basis of crystal packing interactions between MtDnaBn rings, we suggest a model of a helicase-primase complex that explains previously observed effects of DnaB mutations on DNA priming.

  11. Quinolone resistance-associated amino acid substitutions affect enzymatic activity of Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Quinolones are important antimicrobials for treatment of leprosy, a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Although it is well known that mutations in DNA gyrase are responsible for quinolone resistance, the effect of those mutations on the enzymatic activity is yet to be studied in depth. Hence, we conducted in vitro assays to observe supercoiling reactions of wild type and mutated M. leprae DNA gyrases. DNA gyrase with amino acid substitution Ala91Val possessed the highest activity among the mutants. DNA gyrase with Gly89Cys showed the lowest level of activity despite being found in clinical strains, but it supercoiled DNA like the wild type does if applied at a sufficient concentration. In addition, patterns of time-dependent conversion from relaxed circular DNA into supercoiled DNA by DNA gyrases with clinically unreported Asp95Gly and Asp95Asn were observed to be distinct from those by the other DNA gyrases.

  12. Reconstitution of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteostasis network highlights essential cofactor interactions with chaperone DnaK

    PubMed Central

    Lupoli, Tania J.; Fay, Allison; Adura, Carolina; Nathan, Carl F.

    2016-01-01

    During host infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) encounters several types of stress that impair protein integrity, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and chemotherapy. The resulting protein aggregates can be resolved or degraded by molecular machinery conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes. Eukaryotic Hsp104/Hsp70 and their bacterial homologs ClpB/DnaK are ATP-powered chaperones that restore toxic protein aggregates to a native folded state. DnaK is essential in Mycobacterium smegmatis, and ClpB is involved in asymmetrically distributing damaged proteins during cell division as a mechanism of survival in Mtb, commending both proteins as potential drug targets. However, their molecular partners in protein reactivation have not been characterized in mycobacteria. Here, we reconstituted the activities of the Mtb ClpB/DnaK bichaperone system with the cofactors DnaJ1, DnaJ2, and GrpE and the small heat shock protein Hsp20. We found that DnaJ1 and DnaJ2 activate the ATPase activity of DnaK differently. A point mutation in the highly conserved HPD motif of the DnaJ proteins abrogates their ability to activate DnaK, although the DnaJ2 mutant still binds to DnaK. The purified Mtb ClpB/DnaK system reactivated a heat-denatured model substrate, but the DnaJ HPD mutants inhibited the reaction. Finally, either DnaJ1 or DnaJ2 is required for mycobacterial viability, as is the DnaK-activating activity of a DnaJ protein. These studies lay the groundwork for strategies to target essential chaperone–protein interactions in Mtb, the leading cause of death from a bacterial infection. PMID:27872278

  13. Identification of a New DNA Region Specific for Members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Magdalena, Juana; Vachée, Anne; Supply, Philip; Locht, Camille

    1998-01-01

    The successful use of DNA amplification for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria crucially depends on the choice of the target sequence, which ideally should be present in all tuberculous mycobacteria and absent from all other bacteria. In the present study we developed a PCR procedure based on the intergenic region (IR) separating two genes encoding a recently identified mycobacterial two-component system named SenX3-RegX3. The senX3-regX3 IR is composed of a novel type of repetitive sequence, called mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRUs). In a survey of 116 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains characterized by different IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphisms, 2 Mycobacterium africanum strains, 3 Mycobacterium bovis strains (including 2 BCG strains), and 1 Mycobacterium microti strain, a specific PCR fragment was amplified in all cases. This collection included M. tuberculosis strains that lack IS6110 or mtp40, two target sequences that have previously been used for the detection of M. tuberculosis. No PCR fragment was amplified when DNA from other organisms was used, giving a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% in the confidence limit of this study. The numbers of MIRUs were found to vary among strains, resulting in six different groups of strains on the basis of the size of the amplified PCR fragment. However, the vast majority of the strains (approximately 90%) fell within the same group, containing two 77-bp MIRUs followed by one 53-bp MIRU. PMID:9542912

  14. Evaluation of Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy Elicited by Mycobacterium bovis BCG Overexpressing Ag85A Protein against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Aerosol Infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng Zhong; Chen, Xiang; Hu, Ting; Meng, Chuang; Wang, Xiao Bo; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Yin, Yue Lan; Pan, Zhi Ming; Jiao, Xin An

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only vaccine available for preventing tuberculosis (TB), however, BCG has varying success in preventing pulmonary TB. In this study, a recombinant BCG (rBCG::Ag85A) strain overexpressing the immunodominant Ag85A antigen was constructed, and its immunogenicity and protective efficacy were evaluated. Our results indicated that the Ag85A protein was successfully overexpressed in rBCG::Ag85A, and the Ag85A peptide-MHC complexes on draining lymph node dendritic cells of C57BL/6 mice infected with rBCG::Ag85A were detectable 4 h post-infection. The C57BL/6 mice infected with this strain had stronger antigen-specific interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses and higher antibody titers than those immunized with BCG, and the protective experiments showed that rBCG::Ag85A can enhance protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) H37Rv infection compared to the BCG vaccine alone. Our results demonstrate the potential of rBCG::Ag85A as a candidate vaccine against TB.

  15. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  16. Molecular modeling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase and its molecular docking study with gatifloxacin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Elaine E F; Barbosa, Edilaine F; Oliveira, Aline A; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2010-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt) is a leading cause of infectious disease in the world today. This outlook is aggravated by a growing number of Mt infections in individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of HIV infections. Thus, new and more potent anti-tuberculosis agents are necessary. Therefore, DNA gyrase was selected as a target enzyme to combat Mt. In this work, the first three-dimensional molecular model of the hypothetical structures for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase (mtDNAg) was elucidated by a homology modeling method. In addition, the orientations and binding affinities of some gatifloxacin analogs with those new structures were investigated. Our findings could be helpful for the design of new more potent gatifloxacin analogs.

  17. A recombinant adenovirus expressing CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits strong antigen-specific immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Liping; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and remains an enormous and increasing health burden worldwide. To date, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the only licensed anti-TB vaccine worldwide, which provides an important but limited protection from the Mtb infection. The development of alternative anti-TB vaccines is therefore urgently needed. Here we report, the generation of Ad5-CEAB, a recombinant adenovirus expressing Mtb antigens of CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B proteins in a form of mixture. In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of Ad5-CEAB, mice were immunized with Ad5-CEAB by intranasal instillation three times with 2-week intervals. The results demonstrated that Ad5-CEAB elicited a strong antigen-specific immune response, particularly of the Th1 immune responses that were characterized by an increased ratio of IgG2a/IgG1 and secretions of Th1 type cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-12. In addition, the Ad5-CEAB also showed an ability to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG. Furthermore, an elevated sIgA were also found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of mucosal immune responses. These data indicate that Ad5-CEAB can induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, which provides a promising and novel route for developing anti-TB vaccines and warrants further investigation.

  18. Antibodies Elicited in Response to EBNA-1 May Cross-React with dsDNA

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pragya; Tran, Hoa; Ebegbe, Roland; Gottlieb, Paul; Wei, Hui; Lewis, Rita H.; Mumbey-Wafula, Alice; Kaplan, Atira; Kholdarova, Elina; Spatz, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Background Several genetic and environmental factors have been linked to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). One environmental trigger that has a strong association with SLE is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). Our laboratory previously demonstrated that BALB/c mice expressing the complete EBNA-1 protein can develop antibodies to double stranded DNA (dsDNA). The present study was undertaken to understand why anti-dsDNA antibodies arise during the immune response to EBNA-1. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrated that mouse antibodies elicited in response to EBNA-1 cross-react with dsDNA. First, we showed that adsorption of sera reactive with EBNA-1 and dsDNA, on dsDNA cellulose columns, diminished reactivity with EBNA-1. Next, we generated mononclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EBNA-1 and showed, by several methods, that they also reacted with dsDNA. Examination of two cross-reactive MAbs—3D4, generated in this laboratory, and 0211, a commercial MAb—revealed that 3D4 recognizes the carboxyl region of EBNA-1, while 0211 recognizes both the amino and carboxyl regions. In addition, 0211 binds moderately well to the ribonucleoprotein, Sm, which has been reported by others to elicit a cross-reactive response with EBNA-1, while 3D4 binds only weakly to Sm. This suggests that the epitope in the carboxyl region may be more important for cross-reactivity with dsDNA while the epitope in the amino region may be more important for cross-reactivity with Sm. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our results demonstrate that antibodies to the EBNA-1 protein cross-react with dsDNA. This study is significant because it demonstrates a direct link between the viral antigen and the development of anti-dsDNA antibodies, which are the hallmark of SLE. Furthermore, it illustrates the crucial need to identify the epitopes in EBNA-1 responsible for this cross-reactivity so that therapeutic strategies can be designed to mask these regions from the immune system following

  19. Electroporation of a multivalent DNA vaccine cocktail elicits a protective immune response against anthrax and plague.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Mark T; Livingston, Brian D; Pesce, John T; Bell, Matt G; Hannaman, Drew; Keane-Myers, Andrea M

    2012-07-06

    Electroporation of DNA vaccines represents a platform technology well positioned for the development of multivalent biodefense vaccines. To evaluate this hypothesis, three vaccine constructs were produced using codon-optimized genes encoding Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen (PA), and the Yersinia pestis genes LcrV and F1, cloned into pVAX1. A/J mice were immunized on a prime-boost schedule with these constructs using the electroporation-based TriGrid Delivery System. Immunization with the individual pDNA vaccines elicited higher levels of antigen-specific IgG than when used in combination. DNA vaccine effectiveness was proven, the pVAX-PA titers were toxin neutralizing and fully protective against a lethal B. anthracis spore challenge when administered alone or co-formulated with the plague pDNA vaccines. LcrV and F1 pVAX vaccines against plague were synergistic, resulting in 100% survival, but less protective individually and when co-formulated with pVAX-PA. These DNA vaccine responses were Th1/Th2 balanced with high levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 in splenocyte recall assays, contrary to complimentary protein Alum vaccinations displaying a Th2 bias with increased IL-4 and low levels of IFN-γ. These results demonstrate the feasibility of electroporation to deliver and maintain the overall efficacy of an anthrax-plague DNA vaccine cocktail whose individual components have qualitative immunological differences when combined.

  20. Cloning and expression of Mycobacterium bovis BCG DNA in "Streptomyces lividans".

    PubMed

    Kieser, T; Moss, M T; Dale, J W; Hopwood, D A

    1986-10-01

    The ability of "Streptomyces lividans" to use the expression signals of genes from Mycobacterium bovis BCG was tested in vivo by using gene fusions. Random DNA fragments from M. bovis BCG were inserted into promoter-probe plasmids in Escherichia coli and in "S. lividans." Comparison with promoter activity detected with random DNA fragments from the respective hosts suggested that "S. lividans" efficiently utilizes a high proportion of mycobacterial promoters, whereas a smaller fraction are expressed, and expressed more weakly, in E. coli. M. bovis BCG DNA fragments were also inserted into the specially constructed translational fusion vector (pIJ688) in "S. lividans." pIJ688 contains the kanamycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) from transposon Tn5, truncated at its amino terminus, as the indicator. The results suggested that "S. lividans" uses M. bovis BCG translational signals almost as efficiently as its own signals. Moreover, several hybrid proteins with an M. bovis BCG-derived amino terminus seemed to be reasonably stable in "S. lividans." These experiments indicate that "S. lividans" may be a suitable host for the expression of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes from their own signals. This is a precondition for the expression of entire biosynthetic pathways, which could be valuable in the production of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The vectors may also have wider applications for the analysis of gene expression in Streptomyces.

  1. DNA vaccination elicits protective immune responses against pandemic and classic swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gorres, J Patrick; Lager, Kelly M; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L; Zanella, Eraldo L; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E; Nabel, Gary J; Rao, Srinivas S

    2011-11-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase as a target for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Ma, Zhenkun

    2007-06-01

    Bacterial DNA gyrase is an important target of antibacterial agents, including fluoroquinolones. In most bacterial species, fluoroquinolones inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and cause bacterial cell-death. Other naturally occurring bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitors, such as novobiocin, are also known to be effective as antibacterial agents. DNA gyrase is an ATP-dependent enzyme that acts by creating a transient double-stranded DNA break. It is unique in catalyzing the negative supercoiling of DNA and is essential for efficient DNA replication, transcription, and recombination. DNA gyrase is a tetrameric A2B2 protein. The A subunit carries the breakage-reunion active site, whereas the B subunit promotes ATP hydrolysis. The M. tuberculosis genome analysis has identified a gyrB-gyrA contig in which gyrA and gyrB encode the A and B subunits, respectively. There is no evidence that M. tuberculosis has homologs of the topoisomerase IV, parC and parE genes, which are present in most other bacteria. Newer fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, exhibit potent activity against M. tuberculosis, and show potential to shorten the duration for TB treatment. Resistance to fluoroquinolones remains uncommon in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase is thus a validated target for anti-tubercular drug discovery. Inhibitors of this enzyme are also active against non-replicating mycobacteria, which might be important for the eradication of persistent organisms. A novel inhibitor of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase would be effective against multi-drug resistant (MDR)-TB, and it could also be effective against fluoroquinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis.

  3. Enhancement of immune response to a DNA vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ag85B by incorporation of an autophagy inducing system.

    PubMed

    Meerak, Jomkhwan; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason P; Palaga, Tanapat

    2013-01-21

    DNA vaccines are a promising new generation of vaccines that can elicit an immune response using DNA encoding the antigen of interest. The efficacy of these vaccines, however, still needs to be improved. In this study, we investigated the effect of autophagy on increasing the efficacy of a candidate DNA vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), a causative agent of tuberculosis. Low molecular weight chitosan was used to encapsulate plasmid DNA containing a gene encoding MTB Antigen 85B (Ag85B), a secreted fibronectin-binding protein. To induce autophagy upon DNA vaccination, the kinase defective mTOR (mTOR-KD) was transfected into cells, and autophagy was detected based on the presence of LC3II. To investigate whether autophagy enhances an immune response upon DNA vaccination, we coencapsualted the Ag85B-containing plasmid with a plasmid encoding mTOR-KD. Plasmids encapsulated by chitosan particles were used for primary subcutaneous immunization and for intranasal boost in mice. After the boost vaccination, sera from the mice were measured for humoral immune response. The DNA vaccine with the autophagy-inducing construct elicited significantly higher Ag85B-specific antibody levels than the control group treated with the Ag85B plasmid alone or with the Ag85B plasmid plus the wild type mTOR construct. Upon in vitro stimulation of splenocytes from mice immunized with recombinant Ag85B, the highest levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in mice immunized with the autophagy-inducing plasmid, while no differences in IL-4 levels were detected between the groups, suggesting that the DNA vaccine regimen with autophagy induction induced primarily a Th1 immune response. Furthermore, the enhanced proliferation of CD4+ T cells from mice receiving the autophagy-inducing vaccine was observed in vitro. Based on the evidence presented, we conclude that incorporating an autophagy-inducing element into a DNA vaccine may help to improve immune response.

  4. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar M; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  5. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Sasha J.; Babrak, Lmar M.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. PMID:26010725

  6. Inhibition of DNA gyrase activity by Mycobacterium smegmatis MurI.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2008-02-01

    Glutamate racemase (MurI) catalyzes the interconversion of l-glutamate to d-glutamate, one of the essential amino acids present in the peptidoglycan. In addition to this essential enzymatic function, MurI from Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibit DNA gyrase activity. A single gene for murI found in the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome was cloned and overexpressed in a homologous expression system to obtain a highly soluble enzyme. In addition to the racemization activity, M. smegmatis MurI inhibits DNA gyrase activity by preventing DNA binding of gyrase. The sequestration of the gyrase by MurI results in inhibition of all reactions catalyzed by DNA gyrase. More importantly, MurI overexpression in vivo in mycobacterial cells provides protection against the action of ciprofloxacin. The DNA gyrase-inhibitory property thus appears to be a typical characteristic of MurI and would have probably evolved to either modulate the function of the essential housekeeping enzyme or to provide protection to gyrase against gyrase inhibitors, which cause double-strand breaks in the genome.

  7. Dieldrin elicits a widespread DNA repair and antioxidative response in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sava, Vasyl; Velasquez, Adriana; Song, Shijie; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2007-01-01

    Dieldrin is an organochlorine pesticide that is toxic for monoaminergic neurons. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that a weak DNA repair response to dieldrin by nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons results in depletion of striatal DA. The activity of the mammalian base excision repair enzyme oxyguanosine glycosylase was utilized as the index of DNA repair. Other measures of oxidative stress were also studied, including the regional distribution of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The effects of acute and slow infusion of dieldrin on striatal DA levels were biphasic with a transient initial depression followed by increases beyond normal steady-:state levels. Dieldrin administration caused a global oxidative stress evidenced by increased levels of lipid peroxidation in all brain regions, an effect consistent with its capacity to affect mitochondrial bioenergetics. Dieldrin also elicited strong antioxidative and DNA repair responses across the entire mouse brain. Although mitochondrial SOD was not as increased in midbrain as it was in other regions following a cumulative dose of 24 mg/kg, this response, along with the robust DNA repair response, appeared to be sufficient to protect potentially vulnerable DA neurons from cytotoxicity. However, the long-:term consequences of chronic low-:dose dieldrin exposure remain to be studied, especially in light of the concept of "slow excitotoxicity,'' which postulates that even a mild bioenergetic compromise can over time result in the demise of neurons.

  8. Mimicry of the Pathogenic Mycobacterium Vacuole In Vitro Elicits the Bacterial Intracellular Phenotype, Including Early-Onset Macrophage Death ▿

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) within macrophages undergoes a phenotype change that allows for more efficient entry into surrounding host cells. We hypothesized that, by developing an in vitro system resembling the intravacuolar environment, one could generate insights into the mycobacterial intracellular phenotype. MAC was incubated in “elemental mixtures” that reproduce metal concentrations and pH in the vacuoles at different time points and then used to infect fresh macrophages. Incubation of MAC with the mixture corresponding to the vacuole environment 24 h postinfection infected macrophages at a significantly higher rate than bacteria that were incubated in Middlebrook 7H9 broth. Uptake occurred by macropinocytosis, similar to the uptake of bacteria passed through macrophages. Genes reported to be upregulated in intracellular bacteria, such as Mav1365, Mav2409, Mav4487, and Mav0996, were upregulated in MAC incubated in the 24-h elemental mixture. Like MAC obtained from macrophages, the vacuoles of bacteria from the 24-h elemental mixture were more likely to contain lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1). A stepwise reduction scheme of the 24-h elemental mixture indicated that incubation in physiologically relevant concentrations of potassium chloride, calcium chloride, and manganese chloride was sufficient to induce characteristics of the intracellular phenotype. It was demonstrated that bacteria harboring the intracellular phenotype induced early-onset macrophage death more efficiently than bacteria grown in broth. This new trace elemental mixture mimicking the condition of the vacuole at different time points has the potential to become an effective laboratory tool for the study of the MAC and Mycobacterium tuberculosis disease process, increasing the understanding of the interaction with macrophages. PMID:21444666

  9. Bio-microfluidic platform for gold nanoprobe based DNA detection--application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Lopes, Paulo; Catarina Vaz, Ana; Veigas, Bruno; Jerzy Wojcik, Pawel; Simões, Pedro; Barata, David; Fortunato, Elvira; Viana Baptista, Pedro; Aguas, Hugo; Martins, Rodrigo

    2013-10-15

    We have projected and fabricated a microfluidic platform for DNA sensing that makes use of an optical colorimetric detection method based on gold nanoparticles. The platform was fabricated using replica moulding technology in PDMS patterned by high-aspect-ratio SU-8 moulds. Biochips of various geometries were tested and evaluated in order to find out the most efficient architecture, and the rational for design, microfabrication and detection performance is presented. The best biochip configuration has been successfully applied to the DNA detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using only 3 µl on DNA solution (i.e. 90 ng of target DNA), therefore a 20-fold reduction of reagents volume is obtained when compared with the actual state of the art.

  10. DNA vaccination of bison to brucellar antigens elicits elevated antibody and IFN-γ responses.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Beata; Walters, Nancy; Thornburg, Theresa; Hoyt, Teri; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W

    2011-07-01

    Brucella abortus remains a threat to the health and well-being of livestock in states bordering the Greater Yellowstone Area. During the past several years, cohabitation of infected wildlife with cattle has jeopardized the brucellosis-free status of Idaho, USA; Wyoming, USA; and Montana, USA. Current livestock B. abortus vaccines have not proven to be efficacious in bison (Bison bison) or elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). One problem with the lack of vaccine efficacy may stem from the failure to understand wildlife immune responses to vaccines. In an attempt to understand their immune responses, bison were vaccinated with eukaryotic DNA expression vectors encoding the Brucella periplasmic protein, bp26, and the chaperone protein, trigger factor (TF). These DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be protective against Brucella infection in mice. Bison were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 2, and 4 with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines plus CpG adjuvant or empty vector (control) plus CpG. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and at 8, 10, and 12 wk after primary vaccination. The results showed that bison immunized with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines developed enhanced antibody, proliferative T cell, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses upon in vitro restimulation with purified recombinant bp26 or TF antigens, unlike bison immunized with empty vector. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes from the DNA-vaccinated groups were significantly greater than they were for those bison given empty vector. These data suggest that DNA vaccination of bison may elicit strong cellular immune responses and serve as an alternative for vaccination of bison for brucellosis.

  11. Are all the DNA gyrase mutations found in Mycobacterium leprae clinical strains involved in resistance to fluoroquinolones?

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2008-02-01

    Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrases carrying various mutations, previously described in clinical strains, were investigated for quinolone susceptibility by inhibition of supercoiling and DNA cleavage promotion. We demonstrated that the gyrA mutations leading to G89C or A91V confer fluoroquinolone resistance whereas the gyrB mutation leading to D205N does not.

  12. Direct DNA Extraction from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Frozen Stocks as a Reculture-Independent Approach to Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Zallet, J; Lillebaek, T; Andersen, A B; Niemann, S; Rasmussen, E M; Kohl, T A

    2015-08-01

    Culturing before DNA extraction represents a major time-consuming step in whole-genome sequencing of slow-growing bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report a workflow to extract DNA from frozen isolates without reculturing. Prepared libraries and sequence data were comparable with results from recultured aliquots of the same stocks. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Comparison of DNA fingerprint patterns of isolates of Mycobacterium africanum from east and west Africa.

    PubMed

    Haas, W H; Bretzel, G; Amthor, B; Schilke, K; Krommes, G; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Sticht-Groh, V; Bremer, H J

    1997-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is a pathogen found in tuberculosis patients in certain parts of Africa and is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Biochemically, strains of M. africanum exhibit a high degree of variability, with some tendency to cluster according to their geographical origin. To investigate whether this phenotypic variability is reflected at the genetic level, we performed DNA fingerprint analysis of strains isolated from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Uganda and Sierra Leone. IS6110 DNA fingerprinting was carried out by the mixed-linker PCR method. A total of 138 strains of M. africanum were analyzed: 42 isolates from Uganda and 96 isolates from Sierra Leone. With few exceptions, the resulting DNA fingerprint patterns grouped together according to their country of origin. A striking lack of variability of DNA fingerprints was found for strains from Sierra Leone, where 70 of 96 isolates (61.5%) fell into clusters. The two largest clusters accounted for 41.7% of all isolates and differed by only one band, as confirmed by standard DNA fingerprinting. In contrast, only two clusters (7.1%) with two and three isolates, respectively, were found for M. africanum isolates collected in Uganda, and three of the DNA fingerprints contained fewer than seven bands. Strains of M. tuberculosis collected and processed during the same time period were highly variable in both countries. Our results support the concept of geographically defined subtypes of M. africanum. In addition, they demonstrate that natural geographic differences in the variability of IS6110 DNA fingerprints within the M. tuberculosis complex must be considered if this technique is used for epidemiologic studies.

  14. Comparison of DNA fingerprint patterns of isolates of Mycobacterium africanum from east and west Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, W H; Bretzel, G; Amthor, B; Schilke, K; Krommes, G; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Sticht-Groh, V; Bremer, H J

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is a pathogen found in tuberculosis patients in certain parts of Africa and is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Biochemically, strains of M. africanum exhibit a high degree of variability, with some tendency to cluster according to their geographical origin. To investigate whether this phenotypic variability is reflected at the genetic level, we performed DNA fingerprint analysis of strains isolated from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Uganda and Sierra Leone. IS6110 DNA fingerprinting was carried out by the mixed-linker PCR method. A total of 138 strains of M. africanum were analyzed: 42 isolates from Uganda and 96 isolates from Sierra Leone. With few exceptions, the resulting DNA fingerprint patterns grouped together according to their country of origin. A striking lack of variability of DNA fingerprints was found for strains from Sierra Leone, where 70 of 96 isolates (61.5%) fell into clusters. The two largest clusters accounted for 41.7% of all isolates and differed by only one band, as confirmed by standard DNA fingerprinting. In contrast, only two clusters (7.1%) with two and three isolates, respectively, were found for M. africanum isolates collected in Uganda, and three of the DNA fingerprints contained fewer than seven bands. Strains of M. tuberculosis collected and processed during the same time period were highly variable in both countries. Our results support the concept of geographically defined subtypes of M. africanum. In addition, they demonstrate that natural geographic differences in the variability of IS6110 DNA fingerprints within the M. tuberculosis complex must be considered if this technique is used for epidemiologic studies. PMID:9041408

  15. First detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in environmental samples from South America.

    PubMed

    Morris, Aaron; Gozlan, Rodolphe; Marion, Estelle; Marsollier, Laurent; Andreou, Demetra; Sanhueza, Daniel; Ruffine, Rolland; Couppié, Pierre; Guégan, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The occurrences of many environmentally-persistent and zoonotic infections are driven by ecosystem changes, which in turn are underpinned by land-use modifications that alter the governance of pathogen, biodiversity and human interactions. Our current understanding of these ecological changes on disease emergence however remains limited. Buruli ulcer is an emerging human skin disease caused by the mycobacterium, Mycobacterium ulcerans, for which the exact route of infection remains unclear. It can have a devastating impact on its human host, causing extensive necrosis of the skin and underlying tissue, often leading to permanent disability. The mycobacterium is associated with tropical aquatic environments and incidences of the disease are significantly higher on floodplains and where there is an increase of human aquatic activities. Although the disease has been previously diagnosed in South America, until now the presence of M. ulcerans DNA in the wild has only been identified in Australia where there have been significant outbreaks and in western and central regions of Africa where the disease is persistent. Here for the first time, we have identified the presence of the aetiological agent's DNA in environmental samples from South America. The DNA was positively identified using Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) on 163 environmental samples, taken from 23 freshwater bodies in French Guiana (Southern America), using primers for both IS2404 and for the ketoreductase-B domain of the M. ulcerans mycolactone polyketide synthase genes (KR). Five samples out of 163 were positive for both primers from three different water bodies. A further nine sites had low levels of IS2404 close to a standard CT of 35 and could potentially harbour M. ulcerans. The majority of our positive samples (8/14) came from filtered water. These results also reveal the Sinnamary River as a potential source of infection to humans.

  16. Electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection based on gold nanotubes array electrode platform.

    PubMed

    Torati, Sri Ramulu; Reddy, Venu; Yoon, Seok Soo; Kim, CheolGi

    2016-04-15

    The template assisted electrochemical deposition technique was used for the synthesis of gold nanotubes array (AuNTsA). The morphological structure of the synthesized AuNTsA was observed by scanning electron microscopy and found that the individual nanotubes are around 1.5 μm in length with a diameter of 200 nm. Nanotubes are vertically aligned to the Au thick film, which is formed during the synthesis process of nanotubes. The electrochemical performance of the AuNTsA was compared with the bare Au electrode and found that AuNTsA has better electron transfer surface than bare Au electrode which is due to the high surface area. Hence, the AuNTsA was used as an electrode for the fabrication of DNA hybridization biosensor for detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis DNA. The DNA hybridization biosensor constructed by AuNTsA electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique with Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as an electrochemical redox indicator. The selectivity of the fabricated biosensor was illustrated by hybridization with complementary DNA and non-complementary DNA with probe DNA immobilized AuNTsA electrode using methylene blue as a hybridization indicator. The developed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows good linear range of complementary DNA concentration from 0.01 ng/μL to 100 ng/μL with high detection limit.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Detection Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Modulated by Telecommunication Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2014-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be −0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment. PMID:24379050

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection using surface plasmon resonance modulated by telecommunication wavelength.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2013-12-27

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be -0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment.

  19. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in a pre-Columbian Peruvian mummy.

    PubMed Central

    Salo, W L; Aufderheide, A C; Buikstra, J; Holcomb, T A

    1994-01-01

    The existence of tuberculosis in the pre-Columbian Americas is controversial because the morphology of the lesion is not specific, the organism is culturally nonviable in ancient tissues, and nonpathogenic soil mycobacteria can contaminate buried bodies. We report the recovery of DNA unique to Mycobacterium tuberculosis from a lung lesion of a spontaneously mummified, 1000-year-old adult female body in southern Peru. This provides the most specific evidence possible for the pre-Columbian presence of human tuberculosis in the New World. Images PMID:8134354

  20. Evaluation of reformulated chemiluminescent DNA probe (AccuProbe) for culture identification of Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Simonetti, M T; Lavinia, F

    1996-01-01

    A panel of 104 isolates belonging to the species Mycobacterium kansasii and 78 mycobacterial isolates belonging to other species was tested in parallel with the present commercially available DNA probe (AccuProbe; Gen-Probe) and with a new probe just developed by the same manufacturer. While the old version of the probe confirmed the previously reported low sensitivity (only 59% of the M. kansasii isolates reacted), the new one was 100% sensitive. Only two non-M. kansasii strains, both M. gastri isolates, gave false-positive hybridization results. PMID:8897195

  1. DNA replication fidelity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by an ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lang, Ulla F; Chase, Michael R; Ford, Christopher B; Gerrick, Elias R; Gawande, Richa; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Fortune, Sarah M; Lamers, Meindert H

    2015-06-01

    The DNA replication machinery is an important target for antibiotic development in increasingly drug-resistant bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although blocking DNA replication leads to cell death, disrupting the processes used to ensure replication fidelity can accelerate mutation and the evolution of drug resistance. In Escherichia coli, the proofreading subunit of the replisome, the ɛ exonuclease, is essential for high-fidelity DNA replication; however, we find that the corresponding subunit is completely dispensable in M. tuberculosis. Rather, the mycobacterial replicative polymerase DnaE1 itself encodes an editing function that proofreads DNA replication, mediated by an intrinsic 3'-5' exonuclease activity within its PHP domain. Inactivation of the DnaE1 PHP domain increases the mutation rate by more than 3,000-fold. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of DNA replication proofreading in the bacterial kingdom suggests that E. coli is a phylogenetic outlier and that PHP domain-mediated proofreading is widely conserved and indeed may be the ancestral prokaryotic proofreader.

  2. DNA replication fidelity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by an ancestral prokaryotic proofreader

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Jeremy M.; Lang, Ulla F.; Chase, Michael R.; Ford, Christopher B.; Gerrick, Elias R.; Gawande, Richa; Coscolla, Mireia; Gagneux, Sebastien; Fortune, Sarah M.; Lamers, Meindert H.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery is an important target for antibiotic development for increasingly drug resistant bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis1. While blocking DNA replication leads to cell death, disrupting the processes used to ensure replication fidelity can accelerate mutation and the evolution of drug resistance. In E. coli, the proofreading subunit of the replisome, the ε-exonuclease, is essential for high fidelity DNA replication2; however, we find that it is completely dispensable in M. tuberculosis. Rather, the mycobacterial replicative polymerase, DnaE1, encodes a novel editing function that proofreads DNA replication, mediated by an intrinsic 3′-5′ exonuclease activity within its PHP domain. Inactivation of the DnaE1 PHP domain increases the mutation rate by greater than 3,000 fold. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of DNA replication proofreading in the bacterial kingdom suggests that E. coli is a phylogenetic outlier and that PHP-domain mediated proofreading is widely conserved and indeed may be the ancestral prokaryotic proofreader. PMID:25894501

  3. Structural Insights into the Quinolone Resistance Mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Piton, Jérémie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Delarue, Marc; André-Leroux, Gwénaëlle; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural studies of the two individual domains constituting the catalytic DNA gyrase reaction core, namely the Toprim and the breakage-reunion domains. This allowed us to produce a model of the catalytic reaction core in complex with DNA and a quinolone molecule, identifying original mechanistic properties of quinolone binding and clarifying the relationships between amino acid mutations and resistance phenotype of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase. These results are compatible with our previous studies on quinolone resistance. Interestingly, the structure of the entire breakage-reunion domain revealed a new interaction, in which the Quinolone-Binding Pocket (QBP) is blocked by the N-terminal helix of a symmetry-related molecule. This interaction provides useful starting points for designing peptide based inhibitors that target DNA gyrase to prevent its binding to DNA. PMID:20805881

  4. Structural insights into the quinolone resistance mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Piton, Jérémie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Delarue, Marc; André-Leroux, Gwénaëlle; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2010-08-18

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural studies of the two individual domains constituting the catalytic DNA gyrase reaction core, namely the Toprim and the breakage-reunion domains. This allowed us to produce a model of the catalytic reaction core in complex with DNA and a quinolone molecule, identifying original mechanistic properties of quinolone binding and clarifying the relationships between amino acid mutations and resistance phenotype of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase. These results are compatible with our previous studies on quinolone resistance. Interestingly, the structure of the entire breakage-reunion domain revealed a new interaction, in which the Quinolone-Binding Pocket (QBP) is blocked by the N-terminal helix of a symmetry-related molecule. This interaction provides useful starting points for designing peptide based inhibitors that target DNA gyrase to prevent its binding to DNA.

  5. Lsr2 of Mycobacterium leprae and Its Synthetic Peptides Elicit Restitution of T Cell Responses in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum and Reversal Reactions in Patients with Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Chaman; Prasad, H. K.; Rani, Rajni; Murtaza, A.; Misra, Namita; Shanker Narayan, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Lsr2 protein of Mycobacterium leprae and its synthetic peptides have been shown to elicit lymphoproliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with lepromatous leprosy (M. Chaduvula, A. Murtaza, N. Misra, N. P. Narayan, V. Ramesh, H. K. Prasad, R. Rani, R. K. Chinnadurai, I. Nath, Infect. Immun. 80:742–752, 2012). PBMCs from 16 patients with lepromatous leprosy who were undergoing erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (type 2) and 5 patients with reversal reactions (RR) (type 1) were stimulated with M. leprae, recombinant Lsr2, and six end-to-end synthetic peptides (A through F) spanning the Lsr2 sequence. During the reaction all patients with ENL showed lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, >2) in response to peptides A and F, with other peptides eliciting responses in 75 to 88% of the subjects. In PBMC cultures, both lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ release for peptide E were significantly higher than for peptides B and C and recombinant Lsr2 (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Five patients with RR also showed enhanced lymphoproliferative responses and IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2, M. leprae, and peptide E. Six months postreaction, 14 patients with ENL continued to exhibit responses to Lsr2 and its peptides, with the highest responses being elicited by peptide E. However, 5 subjects showed no lymphoproliferation and had reduced IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2 peptides (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test) but responded to recombinant Lsr2. Six patients with ENL had HLA-A*68.01, which the STFPEITHI program showed to have high peptide-binding scores of 20 to 21 for peptides E, B, and C. Eleven patients had HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DRB1*1502, which had high binding scores for peptides C and E. Thus, Lsr2 and its peptides are recognized in leprosy reactions during and well after the subsidence of clinical signs. PMID:23446220

  6. Target-Specific Assay for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Mycobacterium chimaera DNA.

    PubMed

    Zozaya-Valdés, Enrique; Porter, Jessica L; Coventry, John; Fyfe, Janet A M; Carter, Glen P; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Schultz, Mark B; Seemann, Torsten; Johnson, Paul D R; Stewardson, Andrew J; Bastian, Ivan; Roberts, Sally A; Howden, Benjamin P; Williamson, Deborah A; Stinear, Timothy P

    2017-06-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic environmental mycobacterium belonging to the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex. Although most commonly associated with pulmonary disease, there has been growing awareness of invasive M. chimaera infections following cardiac surgery. Investigations suggest worldwide spread of a specific M. chimaera clone, associated with contaminated hospital heater-cooler units used during the surgery. Given the global dissemination of this clone, its potential to cause invasive disease, and the laboriousness of current culture-based diagnostic methods, there is a pressing need to develop rapid and accurate diagnostic assays specific for M. chimaera Here, we assessed 354 mycobacterial genome sequences and confirmed that M. chimaera is a phylogenetically coherent group. In silico comparisons indicated six DNA regions present only in M. chimaera We targeted one of these regions and developed a TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for M. chimaera with a detection limit of 100 CFU/ml in whole blood spiked with bacteria. In vitro screening against DNA extracted from 40 other mycobacterial species and 22 bacterial species from 21 diverse genera confirmed the in silico-predicted specificity for M. chimaera Screening 33 water samples from heater-cooler units with this assay highlighted the increased sensitivity of PCR compared to culture, with 15 of 23 culture-negative samples positive by M. chimaera qPCR. We have thus developed a robust molecular assay that can be readily and rapidly deployed to screen clinical and environmental specimens for M. chimaera. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair.

  8. DNA repair systems and the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: varying activities at different stages of infection.

    PubMed

    Gorna, Alina E; Bowater, Richard P; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2010-05-25

    Mycobacteria, including most of all MTB (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), cause pathogenic infections in humans and, during the infectious process, are exposed to a range of environmental insults, including the host's immune response. From the moment MTB is exhaled by infected individuals, through an active and latent phase in the body of the new host, until the time they reach the reactivation stage, MTB is exposed to many types of DNA-damaging agents. Like all cellular organisms, MTB has efficient DNA repair systems, and these are believed to play essential roles in mycobacterial pathogenesis. As different stages of infection have great variation in the conditions in which mycobacteria reside, it is possible that different repair systems are essential for progression to specific phases of infection. MTB possesses homologues of DNA repair systems that are found widely in other species of bacteria, such as nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair and repair by homologous recombination. MTB also possesses a system for non-homologous end-joining of DNA breaks, which appears to be widespread in prokaryotes, although its presence is sporadic within different species within a genus. However, MTB does not possess homologues of the typical mismatch repair system that is found in most bacteria. Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA repair genes are expressed differentially at each stage of infection. In the present review, we focus on different DNA repair systems from mycobacteria and identify questions that remain in our understanding of how these systems have an impact upon the infection processes of these important pathogens.

  9. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  10. Zafirlukast Inhibits Complexation of Lsr2 with DNA and Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pinault, Lucile; Han, Jeong-Sun; Kang, Choong-Min; Franco, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    The mycobacterial nucleoid-associated protein Lsr2 is a DNA-bridging protein that plays a role in condensation and structural organization of the genome and acts as a global repressor of gene transcription. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that zafirlukast inhibits the complexation between Lsr2 and DNA in vitro. Zafirlukast is shown to inhibit growth in two different species of mycobacteria tested but exhibits no growth inhibition of Escherichia coli. The Lsr2 inhibitory activity is reflected in vivo as determined by monitoring of transcription levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These data suggest that zafirlukast inhibits Lsr2 function in vivo, promoting dysregulation of the expression of an array of genes typically bound by Lsr2 and hindering growth. Since zafirlukast likely operates by a mechanism distinct from current M. tuberculosis drugs and is currently used as a prophylactic treatment for asthma, it offers an intriguing lead for development of new treatments for tuberculosis. PMID:23439641

  11. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  12. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-02-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase.

  13. Mycobacterium bovis DNA detection in colostrum as a potential indicator of vaccination effectiveness against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST(-)), while TST reactor animals (TST(+)) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms.

  14. Mycobacterium bovis DNA Detection in Colostrum as a Potential Indicator of Vaccination Effectiveness against Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E.; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST−), while TST reactor animals (TST+) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms. PMID:23425597

  15. Enhanced Immune Response and Protective Effects of Nano-chitosan-based DNA Vaccine Encoding T Cell Epitopes of Esat-6 and FL against Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ganzhu; Jiang, Qingtao; Xia, Mei; Lu, Yanlai; Qiu, Wen; Zhao, Dan; Lu, Liwei; Peng, Guangyong; Wang, Yingwei

    2013-01-01

    Development of a novel and effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is a challenging for preventing TB infection. In this study, a novel nanoparticle-based recombinant DNA vaccine was developed, which contains Esat-6 three T cell epitopes (Esat-6/3e) and fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (FL) genes (termed Esat-6/3e-FL), and was enveloped with chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (nano-chitosan). The immunologic and protective efficacy of the nano-chitosan-based DNA vaccine (termed nano-Esat-6/3e-FL) was assessed in C57BL/6 mice after intramuscular prime vaccination with the plasmids DNA and nasal boost with the Esat-6/3e peptides. The results showed that the immunized mice remarkably elicited enhanced T cell responses and protection against M.tb H37Rv challenge. These findings indicate that the nano-chitosan can significantly elevate the immunologic and protective effects of the DNA vaccine, and the nano-Esat-6/3e-FL is a useful vaccine for preventing M.tb infection in mice. PMID:23637790

  16. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate.

  17. Protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine construct encoding the VP2 gene of infectious bursal disease and a truncated HSP70 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Maity, Hemanta Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan; Khulape, Sagar A; Pathak, Dinesh C; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2015-02-18

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, infectious, immunosuppressive disease affecting young chicken worldwide. The etiological agent IBD virus (IBDV) is a double stranded RNA virus with outer capsid protein VP2 of IBDV is the major antigenic determinant capable of inducing neutralizing antibody. DNA vaccines encoding VP2 has been extensively studied achieving only partial protection. However, the efficacy of DNA vaccines against IBDV can be augmented by choosing a potential molecular adjuvant. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the C-terminal domain of the heat shock protein 70 (cHSP70) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene genetically fused with the full length VP2 gene of IBDV (pCIVP2-cHSP70) in comparison to a 'DNA prime-protein boost' approach and a DNA vaccine encoding the VP2 gene (pCIVP2) alone. The results indicate that both pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' elicited humoral as well as cellular immune responses. Chickens in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' groups developed significantly higher levels of ELISA titer to IBDV antigen compared to the group immunized with pCIVP2 alone (p<0.01). However, significantly higher levels of lymphocyte proliferative response, IL-12 and IFN-γ production were found in the pCIVP2-cHSP70 group compared to 'DNA prime-protein boost' group. Additionally, chickens immunized with pCIVP2-cHSP70 and 'DNA prime-protein boost' vaccines were completely protected against the vvIBDV whereas pCIVP2 DNA vaccine alone was able to protect only 70%. These findings suggest that the truncated C-terminal HSP70 mediated DNA vaccine genetically fused with the VP2 gene construct stimulated both humoral and cell mediated immune responses and conferred complete protection against IBDV. This novel strategy is perhaps a seminal concept in utilizing HSP70 as an adjuvant molecule to elicit an immune response against IBD affecting chickens.

  18. Benzothiazinone-piperazine derivatives as efficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Manoj; Renuka, Janupally; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Pedgaonkar, Ganesh S; Asmitha, Vanaparthi; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerases are unique in maintaining the DNA topology for cell viability. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA gyrase, a sole type II topoisomerase has a larger scope as a target for developing novel therapeutics. In this study, an effort was made towards the design and synthesis of benzothiazinone-piperazine hybrid analogues to obtain the possibility of it to lead development through the molecular hybridization technique. A five-step scheme was followed to obtain a series of 36 benzothiazinone-piperazine derivatives and to evaluate them for MTB DNA gyrase inhibition, antimycobacterial and cytotoxicity studies. Compound N-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-(6-nitro-4-oxo-4H-benzo[e][1,3]thiazin-2-yl)piperazine-1-carbothioamide (18) showed greater inhibitory potential with an IC50 of 0.51 ± 0.16 μM in the DNA supercoiling assay of MTB with a moderate anti-tubercular activity of 4.41 μM. The compound even passed the safety profile of eukaryotic cell cytotoxicity with a 1.81% inhibition in the RAW 264.7 cell line at 100 μM concentration. This study describes the discovery of benzothiazinone as gyrase inhibitors with potent MTB MIC and inhibitory profiles of the gyrase enzyme with less cytotoxic effect. Furthermore, it is believed that this class of compounds has the potential to be further developed as an anti-TB drug candidate. Copyright © 2015 Asian African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  20. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases.

  1. Salmonella DNA Adenine Methylase Mutants Elicit Protective Immune Responses to Homologous and Heterologous Serovars in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dueger, E. L.; House, J. K.; Heithoff, D. M.; Mahan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Salmonella DNA adenine methylase (Dam) mutants that lack or overproduce Dam are highly attenuated for virulence in mice and confer protection against murine typhoid fever. To determine whether vaccines based on Dam are efficacious in poultry, a Salmonella Dam− vaccine was evaluated in the protection of chicken broilers against oral challenge with homologous and heterologous Salmonella serovars. A Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Dam− vaccine strain was attenuated for virulence in day-of-hatch chicks more than 100,000-fold. Vaccination of chicks elicited cross-protective immune responses, as evidenced by reduced colonization (10- to 10,000-fold) of the gastrointestinal tract (ileum, cecum, and feces) and visceral organs (bursa and spleen) after challenge with homologous (Typhimurium F98) and heterologous (Enteritidis 4973 and S. enterica O6,14,24: e,h-monophasic) Salmonella serovars that are implicated in Salmonella infection of poultry. The protection conferred was observed for the organ or the maximum CFU/tissue/bird as a unit of analysis, suggesting that Dam mutant strains may serve as the basis for the development of efficacious poultry vaccines for the containment of Salmonella. PMID:11705984

  2. Aerosol vaccination with AERAS-402 elicits robust cellular immune responses in the lungs of rhesus macaques but fails to protect against high-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Patricia A; Bolton, Diane L; Lackner, Andrew A; Kaushal, Deepak; Aye, Pyone Pyone; Mehra, Smriti; Blanchard, James L; Didier, Peter J; Roy, Chad J; Rao, Srinivas S; Hokey, David A; Scanga, Charles A; Sizemore, Donata R; Sadoff, Jerald C; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A

    2014-08-15

    Development of a vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis may require immunization strategies that induce a high frequency of Ag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in the lung. The nonhuman primate model is essential for testing such approaches because it has predictive value for how vaccines elicit responses in humans. In this study, we used an aerosol vaccination strategy to administer AERAS-402, a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd) type 35 expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ags Ag85A, Ag85B, and TB10.4, in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed or unprimed rhesus macaques. Immunization with BCG generated low purified protein derivative-specific CD4 T cell responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. In contrast, aerosolized AERAS-402 alone or following BCG induced potent and stable Ag85A/b-specific CD4 and CD8 effector T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage that largely produced IFN-γ, as well as TNF and IL-2. Such responses induced by BCG, AERAS-402, or both failed to confer overall protection following challenge with 275 CFUs M. tuberculosis Erdman, although vaccine-induced responses associated with reduced pathology were observed in some animals. Anamnestic T cell responses to Ag85A/b were not detected in blood of immunized animals after challenge. Overall, our data suggest that a high M. tuberculosis challenge dose may be a critical factor in limiting vaccine efficacy in this model. However, the ability of aerosol rAd immunization to generate potent cellular immunity in the lung suggests that using different or more immunogens, alternative rAd serotypes with enhanced immunogenicity, and a physiological challenge dose may achieve protection against M. tuberculosis.

  3. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in clinical samples by using a simple lysis method and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Noriega, A R

    1993-01-01

    We have evaluated the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples from patients with tuberculous infection. Two simple methods for mycobacterial DNA release have been compared: sonication and lysis with nonionic detergents and proteinase K. The more effective method was the enzymatic technique. By using this protocol with 75 specimens we detected M. tuberculosis DNA in all of the samples, whereas only 48 and 71 samples were positive by acid-fast staining and culture, respectively. Images PMID:8463383

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, Nn-bis-(5-deoxy-α-d-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the µM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents. PMID:16361267

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, N(n)-bis-(5-deoxy-alpha-D-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the microM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum non-homologous end-joining proteins can function together to join DNA ends in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wright, Douglas G; Castore, Reneau; Shi, Runhua; Mallick, Amrita; Ennis, Don G; Harrison, Lynn

    2016-09-09

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis express a Ku protein and a DNA ligase D and are able to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). This pathway protects against DNA damage when bacteria are in stationary phase. Mycobacterium marinum is a member of this mycobacterium family and like M. tuberculosis is pathogenic. M. marinum lives in water, forms biofilms and infects fish and frogs. M. marinum is a biosafety level 2 (BSL2) organism as it can infect humans, although infections are limited to the skin. M. marinum is accepted as a model to study mycobacterial pathogenesis, as M. marinum and M. tuberculosis are genetically closely related and have similar mechanisms of survival and persistence inside macrophage. The aim of this study was to determine whether M. marinum could be used as a model to understand M. tuberculosis NHEJ repair. We identified and cloned the M. marinum genes encoding NHEJ proteins and generated E. coli strains that express the M. marinum Ku (Mm-Ku) and ligase D (Mm-Lig) individually or together (LHmKumLig strain) from expression vectors integrated at phage attachment sites in the genome. We demonstrated that Mm-Ku and Mm-Lig are both required to re-circularize Cla I-linearized plasmid DNA in E. coli We compared repair of strain LHmKumLig with that of an E. coli strain (BWKuLig#2) expressing the M. tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) and ligase D (Mt-Lig), and found that LHmKumLig performed 3.5 times more repair and repair was more accurate than BWKuLig#2. By expressing the Mm-Ku with the Mt-Lig, or the Mt-Ku with the Mm-Lig in E. coli, we have shown that the NHEJ proteins from M. marinum and M. tuberculosis can function together to join DNA DSBs. NHEJ repair is therefore conserved between the two species. Consequently, M. marinum is a good model to study NHEJ repair during mycobacterial pathogenesis.

  7. Structural basis of DNA sequence recognition by the response regulator PhoP in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liqin; Wang, Shuishu

    2016-04-15

    The transcriptional regulator PhoP is an essential virulence factor in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and it presents a target for the development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs and attenuated tuberculosis vaccine strains. PhoP binds to DNA as a highly cooperative dimer by recognizing direct repeats of 7-bp motifs with a 4-bp spacer. To elucidate the PhoP-DNA binding mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the PhoP-DNA complex. The structure revealed a tandem PhoP dimer that bound to the direct repeat. The surprising tandem arrangement of the receiver domains allowed the four domains of the PhoP dimer to form a compact structure, accounting for the strict requirement of a 4-bp spacer and the highly cooperative binding of the dimer. The PhoP-DNA interactions exclusively involved the effector domain. The sequence-recognition helix made contact with the bases of the 7-bp motif in the major groove, and the wing interacted with the adjacent minor groove. The structure provides a starting point for the elucidation of the mechanism by which PhoP regulates the virulence of M. tuberculosis and guides the design of screening platforms for PhoP inhibitors.

  8. DNA vaccine initiates replication of live attenuated chikungunya virus in vitro and elicits protective immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hearn, Jason; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2014-06-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes outbreaks of chikungunya fever worldwide and represents an emerging pandemic threat. Vaccine development against CHIKV has proved challenging. Currently there is no approved vaccine or specific therapy for the disease. To develop novel experimental CHIKV vaccine, we used novel immunization DNA (iDNA) infectious clone technology, which combines the advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. Here we describe an iDNA vaccine composed of plasmid DNA that encode the full-length infectious genome of live attenuated CHIKV clone 181/25 downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. The iDNA approach was designed to initiate replication of live vaccine virus from the plasmid in vitro and in vivo. Experimental CHIKV iDNA vaccines were prepared and evaluated in cultured cells and in mice. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA was sufficient to initiate replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 10 μg of CHIKV iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies, and protection from experimental challenge with a neurovirulent CHIKV. Live attenuated CHIKV 181/25 vaccine can be delivered in vitro and in vivo by using DNA vaccination. The iDNA approach appears to represent a promising vaccination strategy for CHIK and other alphaviral diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in water bugs collected outside the aquatic environment in Benin].

    PubMed

    Marion, E; Deshayes, C; Chauty, A; Cassisa, V; Tchibozo, S; Cottin, J; Doannio, J; Marot, A; Marsollier, L

    2011-04-01

    Hosting of Mycobacterium ulcerans by water bugs is now well established and their vectoring role has been demonstrated experimentally. These findings were recently corroborated by detection of viable bacilli in the saliva of wild water bugs. However, the extent of water bug involvement in M. ulcerans ecology remains unclear and difficult to evaluate due to lack of understanding about water bug biology. The purpose of this study is to describe the first detection of M. ulcerans DNA in the tissue of water bugs captured outside the aquatic environment. This finding supports the hypothesis that water bug migratory behavior contributes not only to the spread of M. ulcerans but also to transmission outside the aquatic environment.

  10. Optimisation of DNA extraction and validation of PCR assays to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Timms, Verlaine J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Neilan, Brett A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate DNA extraction methods and PCR assays suitable for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. The majority of methods currently used to detect M. paratuberculosis have been developed using bovine samples, such as faeces, blood or tissue and, in many cases, have been based on detection from pooled samples from a herd. However most studies have not compared PCR results to culture results. In order to address this problem, four DNA extraction protocols and three PCR assays were employed to detect M. paratuberculosis in bovine tissue. Given that culture is reliable from cows, the results were then compared with the known M. paratuberculosis culture status. The following DNA extractions were included, two commercial kits, a boiling method, an in house extraction based on a published method and enrichment by sonication. The three PCR assays used included single round IS900 and f57 assays and a nested IS900 assay. In addition, another PCR assay was validated for the detection of any Mycobacterial species and a universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene assay was used to detect sample inhibition. The in-house DNA extraction was the most consistent in extracting good quality DNA compared to all other methods. The use of two PCR markers, IS900 and f57, and a universal PCR enabled the correct samples to be identified as M. paratuberculosis positive. In addition, when compared to the culture result, false-positives did not occur and PCR inhibition was readily identified. Using an in house DNA extraction coupled with the IS900 and f57 PCR markers, this study provides a reliable and simple method to detect M. paratuberculosis in both veterinary and spill over infections.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase: interaction with quinolones and correlation with antimycobacterial drug activity.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Alexandra; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2004-04-01

    Genome studies suggest that DNA gyrase is the sole type II topoisomerase and likely the unique target of quinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite the emerging importance of quinolones in the treatment of mycobacterial disease, the slow growth and high pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis have precluded direct purification of its gyrase and detailed analysis of quinolone action. To address these issues, we separately overexpressed the M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase GyrA and GyrB subunits as His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli from pET plasmids carrying gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. The drug concentration that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC(50)) was measured for 22 different quinolones, and values ranged from 2 to 3 microg/ml (sparfloxacin, sitafloxacin, clinafloxacin, and gatifloxacin) to >1,000 microg/ml (pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid). By comparison, MICs measured against M. tuberculosis ranged from 0.12 microg/ml (for gatifloxacin) to 128 microg/ml (both pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid) and correlated well with the gyrase IC(50)s (R(2) = 0.9). Quinolones promoted gyrase-mediated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA due to stabilization of the cleavage complex, which is thought to be the lethal lesion. Surprisingly, the measured concentrations of drug inducing 50% plasmid linearization correlated less well with the MICs (R(2) = 0.7). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test in identifying quinolones with promising activity against M. tuberculosis. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and the N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting M. tuberculosis gyrase.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Gyrase: Interaction with Quinolones and Correlation with Antimycobacterial Drug Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Alexandra; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2004-01-01

    Genome studies suggest that DNA gyrase is the sole type II topoisomerase and likely the unique target of quinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite the emerging importance of quinolones in the treatment of mycobacterial disease, the slow growth and high pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis have precluded direct purification of its gyrase and detailed analysis of quinolone action. To address these issues, we separately overexpressed the M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase GyrA and GyrB subunits as His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli from pET plasmids carrying gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. The drug concentration that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50) was measured for 22 different quinolones, and values ranged from 2 to 3 μg/ml (sparfloxacin, sitafloxacin, clinafloxacin, and gatifloxacin) to >1,000 μg/ml (pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid). By comparison, MICs measured against M. tuberculosis ranged from 0.12 μg/ml (for gatifloxacin) to 128 μg/ml (both pipemidic acid and nalidixic acid) and correlated well with the gyrase IC50s (R2 = 0.9). Quinolones promoted gyrase-mediated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA due to stabilization of the cleavage complex, which is thought to be the lethal lesion. Surprisingly, the measured concentrations of drug inducing 50% plasmid linearization correlated less well with the MICs (R2 = 0.7). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test in identifying quinolones with promising activity against M. tuberculosis. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and the N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting M. tuberculosis gyrase. PMID:15047530

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Manzanillo, Paolo S.; Shiloh, Michael U.; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between “vacuolar” and “cytosolic” pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the STING/TBK1/IRF3 axis, resulting in IFN-β production. Surprisingly, IRF3−/− mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis. PMID:22607800

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manzanillo, Paolo S; Shiloh, Michael U; Portnoy, Daniel A; Cox, Jeffery S

    2012-05-17

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens activate the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP) and induce innate immune responses, but how the host detects vacuolar pathogens like Mycobacterium tuberculosis is poorly understood. We show that M. tuberculosis also initiates the CSP upon macrophage infection via limited perforation of the phagosome membrane mediated by the ESX-1 secretion system. Although the bacterium remains within the phagosome, this permeabilization results in phagosomal and cytoplasmic mixing and allows extracellular mycobacterial DNA to access host cytosolic receptors, thus blurring the distinction between "vacuolar" and "cytosolic" pathogens. Activation of cytosolic receptors induces signaling through the Sting/Tbk1/Irf3 axis, resulting in IFN-β production. Surprisingly, Irf3(-/-) mice, which cannot respond to cytosolic DNA, are resistant to long-term M. tuberculosis infection, suggesting that the CSP promotes M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, cytosolic sensing of mycobacterial DNA plays a key role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and likely contributes to the high type I IFN signature in tuberculosis.

  15. The role of Ca2+ in the activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Karkare, Shantanu; Yousafzai, Faridoon; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the only type II topoisomerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and needs to catalyse DNA supercoiling, relaxation and decatenation reactions in order to fulfil the functions normally carried out by gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV in other bacteria. We have obtained evidence for the existence of a Ca2+-binding site in the GyrA subunit of M. tuberculosis gyrase. Ca2+ cannot support topoisomerase reactions in the absence of Mg2+, but partial removal of Ca2+ from GyrA by dialysis against EGTA leads to a modest loss in relaxation activity that can be restored by adding back Ca2+. More extensive removal of Ca2+ by denaturation of GyrA and dialysis against EGTA results in an enzyme with greatly reduced enzyme activities. Mutation of the proposed Ca2+-binding residues also leads to loss of activity. We propose that Ca2+ has a regulatory role in M. tuberculosis gyrase and suggest a model for the modulation of gyrase activity by Ca2+ binding. PMID:22844097

  16. Functional Analysis of DNA Replication Fork Reversal Catalyzed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis RuvAB Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Muniyappa, K.

    2012-01-01

    Initially discovered in Escherichia coli, RuvAB proteins are ubiquitous in bacteria and play a dual role as molecular motor proteins responsible for branch migration of the Holliday junction(s) and reversal of stalled replication forks. Despite mounting genetic evidence for a crucial role of RuvA and RuvB proteins in reversal of stalled replication forks, the mechanistic aspects of this process are still not fully understood. Here, we elucidate the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RuvAB (MtRuvAB) complex to catalyze the reversal of replication forks using a range of DNA replication fork substrates. Our studies show that MtRuvAB, unlike E. coli RuvAB, is able to drive replication fork reversal via the formation of Holliday junction intermediates, suggesting that RuvAB-catalyzed fork reversal involves concerted unwinding and annealing of nascent leading and lagging strands. We also demonstrate the reversal of replication forks carrying hemi-replicated DNA, indicating that MtRuvAB complex-catalyzed fork reversal is independent of symmetry at the fork junction. The fork reversal reaction catalyzed by MtRuvAB is coupled to ATP hydrolysis, is processive, and culminates in the formation of an extended reverse DNA arm. Notably, we found that sequence heterology failed to impede the fork reversal activity of MtRuvAB. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of recognition and processing of varied types of replication fork structures by RuvAB proteins. PMID:22094465

  17. Application of DNA markers to estimate genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Karol; Polok, Kornelia; Zieliński, Roman

    2006-01-01

    The obligatory human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is the most important etiological factor of tuberculosis. Unfortunately, there is little information about genetic diversity of this pathogen. The main aim of this research was the estimation of genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis on the basis of various categories of DNA markers. The genome of 32 strains were scanned by DNA markers such RAPD, IS6110 and catalase-peroxidase katG gene. All 162 identified loci were polymorphic. The genetic diversity coefficient (HT) of M. tuberculosis was 0.32 for RAPD and 0.27 for IS 6110. There were 14 alleles in katG gene. All strains were characterised by the individual molecular pattern. Genetic similarity varied from 0.13 to 0.94 (RAPD markers) and from 0 to 1 for (IS6110). M. tuberculosis strains did not represent a clonal structure, single source of transmission and epidemiological relationships as well. The applied DNA markers proved to be highly efficient for analysis of genetic structure of M. tuberculosis.

  18. Biomolecular identification of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in human remains from Britain and continental Europe.

    PubMed

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A; Brown, Terence A

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis is known to have afflicted humans throughout history and re-emerged towards the end of the 20th century, to an extent that it was declared a global emergency in 1993. The aim of this study was to apply a rigorous analytical regime to the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) DNA in 77 bone and tooth samples from 70 individuals from Britain and continental Europe, spanning the 1st-19th centuries AD. We performed the work in dedicated ancient DNA facilities designed to prevent all types of modern contamination, we checked the authenticity of all products obtained by the polymerase chain reaction, and we based our conclusions on up to four replicate experiments for each sample, some carried out in an independent laboratory. We identified 12 samples that, according to our strict criteria, gave definite evidence for the presence of MTBC DNA, and another 22 that we classified as "probable" or "possible." None of the definite samples came from vertebrae displaying lesions associated with TB. Instead, eight were from ribs displaying visceral new bone formation, one was a tooth from a skeleton with rib lesions, one was taken from a skeleton with endocranial lesions, one from an individual with lesions to the sacrum and sacroiliac joint and the last was from an individual with no lesions indicative of TB or possible TB. Our results add to information on the past temporal and geographical distribution of TB and affirm the suitability of ribs for studying ancient TB. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Protective antibody responses against Clostridium difficile elicited by a DNA vaccine expressing the enzymatic domain of toxin B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiao, Yanling; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2013-01-01

    A DNA vaccination approach was used in the current study to screen for the immunogenicity of different fragments of toxin A and toxin B from Clostridium difficile. With this approach, protein antigens do not need to be produced in vitro and the immunogenicity of candidate C. difficile antigens can be identified directly in animals. Codon optimized toxin gene fragments were individually cloned into the DNA vaccine vector and tested in mice and rabbits for their ability to elicit C. difficile toxin-specific antibody responses. Only a subset of the C. difficile toxin fragments, including the C-terminal receptor binding domain of toxin A and a novel N-terminal enzymatic domain of toxin B, were able to elicit protective antibody responses as determined by protection of target cells in a cytotoxicity assay or by preventing death of mice in a passive antibody protection study. Significantly, antibodies elicited by the novel N-terminus of the toxin B DNA vaccine were able to increase the level of protection when used in combination with anti-toxin A antibodies in a toxin challenge model in mice.

  20. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  1. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone-mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans.

  2. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. Methodology/Principal Findings To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone–mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. Conclusions/Significance The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans. PMID:27681932

  3. Ethanol fixation of sputum sediments for DNA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D L; Gillis, T P; Dupree, W G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of ethanol fixation on PCR detection and viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human sputum sediments was evaluated. M. tuberculosis seeded into sputum sediments was efficiently killed when treated for 1 h with 50, 70, or 95% ethanol. PCR amplification of a 123-bp fragment of the M. tuberculosis-specific IS6110 was not affected in ethanol-treated samples even when fixation was extended to 24 h. Ethanol fixation of sputum sediments did not affect the PCR detection of M. tuberculosis in clinical samples. PCR results from ethanol-treated clinical samples containing M. tuberculosis (smear positive and smear negative) or other respiratory pathogens correlated directly with the results by conventional detection methods for M. tuberculosis. Our results show that ethanol fixation of human sputum sediments containing M. tuberculosis significantly reduces the potential exposure of workers to viable M. tuberculosis without affecting DNA analysis by PCR. Also, ethanol fixation of sputum sediments provides a simple and inexpensive way to store and transport clinical specimens identified for DNA-based diagnostics without refrigeration. PMID:7650186

  4. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is an Innate Immune DNA Sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Angela C; Cai, Haocheng; Li, Tuo; Franco, Luis H; Li, Xiao-Dong; Nair, Vidhya R; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Levine, Beth; Chen, Zhijian J; Shiloh, Michael U

    2015-06-10

    Activation of the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection stimulates ubiquitin-dependent autophagy and inflammatory cytokine production, and plays an important role in host defense against M. tuberculosis. However, the identity of the host sensor for M. tuberculosis DNA is unknown. Here we show that M. tuberculosis activated cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) in macrophages to produce cGAMP, a second messenger that activates the adaptor protein stimulator of interferon genes (STING) to induce type I interferons and other cytokines. cGAS localized with M. tuberculosis in mouse and human cells and in human tuberculosis lesions. Knockdown or knockout of cGAS in human or mouse macrophages blocked cytokine production and induction of autophagy. Mice deficient in cGAS were more susceptible to lethality caused by infection with M. tuberculosis. These results demonstrate that cGAS is a vital innate immune sensor of M. tuberculosis infection.

  5. Gatifloxacin derivatives: synthesis, antimycobacterial activities, and inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Dharmarajan; Aubry, Alexandra; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Fisher, L M

    2006-06-01

    Sixteen 7-substituted gatifloxacin derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for antimycobacterial activity in vitro and in vivo against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (MTB) and multi-drug resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB), and also tested for the ability to inhibit the supercoiling activity of DNA gyrase from M. tuberculosis. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-8-methoxy-7-[[[N4-[1'-(5-isatinyl-beta-semicarbazo)]methyl]3-methyl]N1-piperazinyl]-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-3-quinoline carboxylic acid (3d) was found to be the most active compound in vitro with an MIC of 0.0125 microg/mL against MTB and MTR-TB. In the in vivo animal model 3d decreased the bacterial load in lung and spleen tissues with 3.62- and 3.76-log10 protections, respectively. Compound 3d was also found to be equally active as gatifloxacin in the inhibition of the supercoiling activity of wild-type M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase with an IC50 of 3.0 microg/mL. The results demonstrate the potential and importance of developing new quinolone derivatives against mycobacterial infections.

  6. MPT-51/CpG DNA vaccine protects mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruna Daniella de Souza; da Silva, Ediane Batista; do Nascimento, Ivan Pereira; Dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2009-07-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a severe infectious disease that kills approximately two million people worldwide every year. Because BCG protection is variable and does not protects adults, there is a great need for a new vaccine against TB that does not represent a risk for immunocompromised patients and that is also capable of protecting adult individuals. MPT-51 is a protein found in the genome of mycobacteria and binds to the fibronectin of the extracellular matrix, which may have a role in host tissue attachment and virulence. In order to test the usefulness of MPT-51 as a subunit vaccine, BALB/c were vaccinated and challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection of BALB/c with M. tuberculosis increased the number of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes specific to MPT-51 in the spleen and lungs. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA and with rMPT-51/CpG DNA in non-infected BALB/c increased the amounts of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA also induced a humoral response specific to MPT-51. CFU counts of lung tissues done 60 days after infection showed a reduction of about 2 log in the bacteria load in the group of animals inoculated with rMPT-51/CpG DNA. These results make MPT-51 a valuable component to be further evaluated in the development of other subunit vaccines.

  7. Rapid DNA detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-towards single cell sensitivity in point-of-care diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Benjamin Y.C.; Wee, Eugene J.H.; West, Nicholas P.; Trau, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been many recent advances in Tuberculosis (TB) detection technologies, there still remains a major need to develop simpler point-of-care techniques. In an effort towards such a diagnostic test for resource-poor settings, we have designed a bioassay based on detecting amplified DNA via bridging flocculation. The assay is cheap, with a sensitivity approaching a single cell of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the potential for translation into broader applications.

  8. The oxidative DNA glycosylases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit different substrate preferences from their Escherichia coli counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yin; Bandaru, Viswanath; Jaruga, Pawel; Zhao, Xiaobei; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Iwai, Shigenori; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Bond, Jeffrey P.; Wallace, Susan S.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA glycosylases that remove oxidized DNA bases fall into two general families: the Fpg/Nei family and the Nth superfamily. Based on protein sequence alignments, we identified four putative Fpg/Nei family members, as well as a putative Nth protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. All four Fpg/Nei proteins were successfully overexpressed using a bicistronic vector created in our laboratory. The MtuNth protein was also overexpressed in soluble form. The substrate specificities of the purified enzymes were characterized in vitro with oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing single lesions. Some were further characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of products released from γ-irradiated DNA. MtuFpg1 has a substrate specificity similar to that of EcoFpg. Both EcoFpg and MtuFpg1 are more efficient at removing spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) than 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). However, MtuFpg1 shows a substantially increased opposite base discrimination compared to EcoFpg. MtuFpg2 contains only the C-terminal domain of an Fpg protein and has no detectable DNA binding activity or DNA glycosylase/lyase activity and thus appears to be a pseudogene. MtuNei1 recognizes oxidized pyrimidines on both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA and exhibits uracil DNA glycosylase activity. MtuNth recognizes a variety of oxidized bases, including urea, 5,6-dihydrouracil (DHU), 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU), 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHC) and methylhydantoin (MeHyd). Both MtuNei1 and MtuNth excise thymine glycol (Tg); however, MtuNei1 strongly prefers the (5R) isomers, whereas MtuNth recognizes only the (5S) isomers. MtuNei2 did not demonstrate activity in vitro as a recombinant protein, but like MtuNei1 when expressed in Escherichia coli, it decreased the spontaneous mutation frequency of both the fpg mutY nei triple and nei nth double mutants, suggesting that MtuNei2 is functionally active in vivo recognizing both guanine and cytosine oxidation products

  9. Neonatal maternal separation stress elicits lasting DNA methylation changes in the hippocampus of stress-reactive Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Chelsea R; Rana, Samir; Stringfellow, Sara Anne; Day, Jeremy J; Wyss, J Michael; Clinton, Sarah M; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-11-01

    Early-life stress (ELS) can alter neurodevelopment in variable ways, ranging from producing deleterious outcomes to stress resilience. While most ELS studies focus on its harmful effects, recent work by our laboratory and others shows that ELS elicits positive effects in certain individuals. We exposed Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, known for a stress reactive, anxiety/depression-like phenotype, to maternal separation (MS), a model of ELS. MS exposure elicited anxiolytic and antidepressant behavioral effects as well as improved cardiovascular function in adult WKY offspring. This study interrogates an epigenetic mechanism (DNA methylation) that may confer the adaptive effects of MS in WKY offspring. We quantified global genome methylation levels in limbic brain regions of adult WKYs exposed to daily 180-min MS or neonatal handling from postnatal day 1-14. MS exposure triggered dramatic DNA hypermethylation specifically in the hippocampus. Next-generation sequencing methylome profiling revealed reduced methylation at intragenic sites within two key nodes of insulin signaling pathways: the insulin receptor and one of its major downstream targets, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (Map3k5). We then tested the hypothesis that enhancing DNA methylation in WKY rats would elicit adaptive changes akin to the effects of MS. Dietary methyl donor supplementation improved WKY rats' anxiety/depression-like behaviors and also improved cardiovascular measures, similar to previous observations following MS. Overall, these data suggest a potential molecular mechanism that mediates a predicted adaptive response, whereby ELS induces DNA methylation changes in the brain that may contribute to successful stress coping and adaptive physiological changes in adulthood. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasmid DNA Initiates Replication of Yellow Fever Vaccine In Vitro and Elicits Virus-Specific Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20µg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. PMID:25129436

  12. Identification of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare isolated in Puerto Rico from clinical samples by the use of a non-radioactive DNA probe.

    PubMed

    García, M T; Peña, I; Zlotnik, H

    1994-06-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), especially M. avium, is an important opportunistic pathogen of AIDS patients in the United States. In Puerto Rico, the incidence of infections caused by MAC has not been determined. This is due, in part, to the difficulties associated to the microbiological identification of the microorganisms. In this work, a commercially available kit (AccuProbe, Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, CA) utilizing a DNA probe complementary to rRNA of M. avium and M. intracellulare was used to identify seventeen MAC strains and one unknown atypical mycobacterium recovered in culture in Puerto Rico from clinical samples. The results obtained revealed that M. avium was the predominant species recovered (83% of isolates tested). Only two cultures were identified as M. intracellulare. The unknown culture, which did not react with either probe, turned out to be M. gordonae. The probe tests not only are simple to perform, but provide cultural identification results in as little as two hours. This study, the first one of its kind in Puerto Rico, demonstrates that the nucleic acid probes for the cultural identification of M. avium and M. intracellulare offer the potential of providing a prompt diagnosis and much needed data on the epidemiology of MAC infections in Puerto Rico.

  13. Immune Response Elicited by DNA Vaccination Using Lactococcus lactis Is Modified by the Production of Surface Exposed Pathogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Daniela; Azevedo, Marcela; Innocentin, Silvia; Blugeon, Sébastien; Lefévre, François; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared immune responses elicited by DNA immunization using Lactococcus lactis or L. lactis expressing the Staphylococcus aureus invasin Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) at its surface. Both strains carried pValac:BLG, a plasmid containing the cDNA of Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG), and were designated LL-BLG and LL-FnBPA+ BLG respectively. A TH2 immune response characterized by the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 in medium of BLG reactivated splenocytes was detected after either oral or intranasal administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG. In contrast, intranasal administration of LL-BLG elicited a TH1 immune response. After BLG sensitization, mice previously intranasally administered with LL-BLG showed a significantly lower concentration of BLG-specific IgE than the mice non-administered. Altenatively administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG didn't modify the BLG-specific IgE concentration obtained after sensitization, thus confirming the TH2 orientation of the immune response. To determine if the TH2-skewed immune response obtained with LL-FnBpA+ BLG was FnBPA-specific or not, mice received another L. lactis strain producing a mutated form of the Listeria monocytogenes invasin Internalin A intranasally, allowing thus the binding to murine E-cadherin, and containing pValac:BLG (LL-mInlA+ BLG). As with LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG was not able to elicit a TH1 immune response. Furthermore, we observed that these difference were not due to the peptidoglycan composition of the cell wall as LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG and LL-BLG strains shared a similar composition. DNA vaccination using LL-BLG elicited a pro-inflammatory TH1 immune response while using LL-FnBPA+ BLG or LL-mInlA+ BLG elicited an anti-inflammatory TH2 immune response. PMID:24465412

  14. Immune response elicited by DNA vaccination using Lactococcus lactis is modified by the production of surface exposed pathogenic protein.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Daniela; Azevedo, Marcela; Innocentin, Silvia; Blugeon, Sébastien; Lefévre, François; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared immune responses elicited by DNA immunization using Lactococcus lactis or L. lactis expressing the Staphylococcus aureus invasin Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) at its surface. Both strains carried pValac:BLG, a plasmid containing the cDNA of Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG), and were designated LL-BLG and LL-FnBPA+ BLG respectively. A TH2 immune response characterized by the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 in medium of BLG reactivated splenocytes was detected after either oral or intranasal administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG. In contrast, intranasal administration of LL-BLG elicited a TH1 immune response. After BLG sensitization, mice previously intranasally administered with LL-BLG showed a significantly lower concentration of BLG-specific IgE than the mice non-administered. Altenatively administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG didn't modify the BLG-specific IgE concentration obtained after sensitization, thus confirming the TH2 orientation of the immune response. To determine if the TH2-skewed immune response obtained with LL-FnBpA+ BLG was FnBPA-specific or not, mice received another L. lactis strain producing a mutated form of the Listeria monocytogenes invasin Internalin A intranasally, allowing thus the binding to murine E-cadherin, and containing pValac:BLG (LL-mInlA+ BLG). As with LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG was not able to elicit a TH1 immune response. Furthermore, we observed that these difference were not due to the peptidoglycan composition of the cell wall as LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG and LL-BLG strains shared a similar composition. DNA vaccination using LL-BLG elicited a pro-inflammatory TH1 immune response while using LL-FnBPA+ BLG or LL-mInlA+ BLG elicited an anti-inflammatory TH2 immune response.

  15. Mycobacterium smegmatis Lhr Is a DNA-dependent ATPase and a 3′-to-5′ DNA Translocase and Helicase That Prefers to Unwind 3′-Tailed RNA:DNA Hybrids*

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Heather; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the distinctive roster of helicases of Mycobacterium, a genus of the phylum Actinobacteria that includes the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its avirulent relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we identify and characterize M. smegmatis Lhr as the exemplar of a novel clade of superfamily II helicases, by virtue of its biochemical specificities and signature domain organization. Lhr is a 1507-amino acid monomeric nucleic acid-dependent ATPase that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive unidirectional 3′-to-5′ translocation along single strand DNA and to unwind duplexes en route. The ATPase is more active in the presence of calcium than magnesium. ATP hydrolysis is triggered by either single strand DNA or single strand RNA, yet the apparent affinity for a DNA activator is 11-fold higher than for an RNA strand of identical size and nucleobase sequence. Lhr is 8-fold better at unwinding an RNA:DNA hybrid than it is at displacing a DNA:DNA duplex of identical nucleobase sequence. The truncated derivative Lhr-(1–856) is an autonomous ATPase, 3′-to-5′ translocase, and RNA:DNA helicase. Lhr-(1–856) is 100-fold better RNA:DNA helicase than DNA:DNA helicase. Lhr homologs are found in bacteria representing eight different phyla, being especially prevalent in Actinobacteria (including M. tuberculosis) and Proteobacteria (including Escherichia coli). PMID:23549043

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase ATPase domain.

    PubMed

    Roué, Mélanie; Agrawal, Alka; Volker, Craig; Mossakowska, Danuta; Mayer, Claudine; Bax, Benjamin D

    2013-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of tuberculosis. The ATPase domain provides the energy required for catalysis by ATP hydrolysis. Two constructs corresponding to this 43 kDa domain, Mtb-GyrB47(C1) and Mtb-GyrB47(C2), have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from three crystal forms. The crystals belonged to space groups P1 and P21 and diffracted to resolutions of 2.9 and 3.3 Å, respectively.

  17. Characterization of guinea pig T cell responses elicited after EP-assisted delivery of DNA vaccines to the skin.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Katherine; Schaefer, Hubert; Yung, Bryan S; Oh, Janet; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Humeau, Laurent; Broderick, Kate E; Smith, Trevor R F

    2017-01-03

    The skin is an ideal target tissue for vaccine delivery for a number of reasons. It is highly accessible, and most importantly, enriched in professional antigen presenting cells. Possessing strong similarities to human skin physiology and displaying a defined epidermis, the guinea pig is an appropriate model to study epidermal delivery of vaccine. However, whilst we have characterized the humoral responses in the guinea pig associated with skin vaccine protocols we have yet to investigate the T cell responses. In response to this inadequacy, we developed an IFN-γ ELISpot assay to characterize the cellular immune response in the peripheral blood of guinea pigs. Using a nucleoprotein (NP) influenza pDNA vaccination regimen, we characterized host T cell responses. After delivery of the DNA vaccine to the guinea pig epidermis we detected robust and rapid T cell responses. The levels of IFN-γ spot-forming units averaged approximately 5000 per million cells after two immunizations. These responses were broad in that multiple regions across the NP antigen elicited a T cell response. Interestingly, we identified a number of NP immunodominant T cell epitopes to be conserved across an outbred guinea pig population, a phenomenon which was also observed after immunization with a RSV DNA vaccine. We believe this data enhances our understanding of the cellular immune response elicited to a vaccine in guinea pigs, and globally, will advance the use of this model for vaccine development, especially those targeting skin as a delivery site.

  18. Characterization of guinea pig T cell responses elicited after EP-assisted delivery of DNA vaccines to the skin

    PubMed Central

    Schultheis, Katherine; Schaefer, Hubert; Yung, Bryan S.; Oh, Janet; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Humeau, Laurent; Broderick, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an ideal target tissue for vaccine delivery for a number of reasons. It is highly accessible, and most importantly, enriched in professional antigen presenting cells. Possessing strong similarities to human skin physiology and displaying a defined epidermis, the guinea pig is an appropriate model to study epidermal delivery of vaccine. However, whilst we have characterized the humoral responses in the guinea pig associated with skin vaccine protocols we have yet to investigate the T cell responses. In response to this inadequacy, we developed an IFN-γ ELISpot assay to characterize the cellular immune response in the peripheral blood of guinea pigs. Using a nucleoprotein (NP) influenza pDNA vaccination regimen, we characterized host T cell responses. After delivery of the DNA vaccine to the guinea pig epidermis we detected robust and rapid T cell responses. The levels of IFN-γ spot-forming units averaged approximately 5000 per million cells after two immunizations. These responses were broad in that multiple regions across the NP antigen elicited a T cell response. Interestingly, we identified a number of NP immunodominant T cell epitopes to be conserved across an outbred guinea pig population, a phenomenon which was also observed after immunization with a RSV DNA vaccine. We believe this data enhances our understanding of the cellular immune response elicited to a vaccine in guinea pigs, and globally, will advance the use of this model for vaccine development, especially those targeting skin as a delivery site. PMID:27894716

  19. DNA Vaccination Elicits Protective Immune Responses against Pandemic and Classic Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, J. Patrick; Lager, Kelly M.; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L.; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L.; Zanella, Eraldo L.; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Nabel, Gary J.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2011-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration. PMID:21918118

  20. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  1. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  2. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation.

  3. Minicircle DNA is Superior to Plasmid DNA in Eliciting Antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Wynette M; Skinner, Nicole E B; Hamilton, Sara E; Jund, Michelle D; Heitfeld, Suzanne M; Litterman, Adam J; Hwu, Patrick; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Salazar, Andres M; Ohlfest, John R; Blazar, Bruce R; Pennell, Christopher A; Osborn, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials reveal that plasmid DNA (pDNA)–based gene delivery must be improved to realize its potential to treat human disease. Current pDNA platforms suffer from brief transgene expression, primarily due to the spread of transcriptionally repressive chromatin initially deposited on plasmid bacterial backbone sequences. Minicircle (MC) DNA lacks plasmid backbone sequences and correspondingly confers higher levels of sustained transgene expression upon delivery, accounting for its success in preclinical gene therapy models. In this study, we show for the first time that MC DNA also functions as a vaccine platform. We used a luciferase reporter transgene to demonstrate that intradermal delivery of MC DNA, relative to pDNA, resulted in significantly higher and persistent levels of luciferase expression in mouse skin. Next, we immunized mice intradermally with DNA encoding a peptide that, when presented by the appropriate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule, was recognized by endogenous CD8+ T cells. Finally, immunization with peptide-encoding MC DNA, but not the corresponding full-length (FL) pDNA, conferred significant protection in mice challenged with Listeria monocytogenes expressing the model peptide. Together, our results suggest intradermal delivery of MC DNA may prove more efficacious for prophylaxis than traditional pDNA vaccines. PMID:23689601

  4. Evaluation of a high-throughput repetitive-sequence-based PCR system for DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex strains.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Gerard A; Freeman, Robert J; Lewis, Kaeryn N; Livingston-Rosanoff, Devon; Shah, Ketan S; Milan, Sparrow Joy; Goldberg, Stefan V

    2004-06-01

    Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) is useful for generating DNA fingerprints of diverse bacterial and fungal species. Rep-PCR amplicon fingerprints represent genomic segments lying between repetitive sequences. A commercial system that electrophoretically separates rep-PCR amplicons on microfluidic chips, and provides computer-generated readouts of results has been adapted for use with Mycobacterium species. The ability of this system to type M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) isolates was evaluated. M. tuberculosis strains (n = 56) were typed by spoligotyping with rep-PCR as a high-resolution adjunct. Results were compared with those generated by a standard approach of spoligotyping with IS6110-targeted restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) as the high-resolution adjunct. The sample included 11 epidemiologically and genotypically linked outbreak isolates and a population-based sample of 45 isolates from recent immigrants to Seattle, Wash., from the African Horn countries of Somalia, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. Twenty isolates exhibited unique spoligotypes and were not analyzed further. Of the 36 outbreak and African Horn isolates with nonunique spoligotypes, 23 fell into four clusters identified by IS6110-RFLP and rep-PCR, with 97% concordance observed between the two methods. Both approaches revealed extensive strain heterogeneity within the African Horn sample, consistent with a predominant pattern of reactivation of latent infections in this immigrant population. Rep-PCR exhibited 89% concordance with IS1245-RFLP typing of 28 M. avium subspecies avium strains. For M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium subspecies avium, the discriminative power of rep-PCR equaled or exceeded that of RFLP. Rep-PCR also generated DNA fingerprints from M. intracellulare (n = 8) and MAC(x) (n = 2) strains. It shows promise as a fast, unified method for high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species.

  5. In Vivo DNA Re-replication Elicits Lethal Tissue Dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Sergio; Búa, Sabela; Rodríguez-Acebes, Sara; Megías, Diego; Ortega, Sagrario; de Martino, Alba; Méndez, Juan

    2017-05-02

    Mammalian DNA replication origins are "licensed" by the loading of DNA helicases, a reaction that is mediated by CDC6 and CDT1 proteins. After initiation of DNA synthesis, CDC6 and CDT1 are inhibited to prevent origin reactivation and DNA overreplication before cell division. CDC6 and CDT1 are highly expressed in many types of cancer cells, but the impact of their deregulated expression had not been investigated in vivo. Here, we have generated mice strains that allow the conditional overexpression of both proteins. Adult mice were unharmed by the individual overexpression of either CDC6 or CDT1, but their combined deregulation led to DNA re-replication in progenitor cells and lethal tissue dysplasias. This study offers mechanistic insights into the necessary cooperation between CDC6 and CDT1 for facilitation of origin reactivation and describes the physiological consequences of DNA overreplication. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Discriminatory power and reproducibility of novel DNA typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Kristin; Arnold, Catherine; Cataldi, Angel; Gutiérrez, M Cristina; Haas, Walter H; Panaiotov, Stefan; Skuce, Robin A; Supply, Philip; van der Zanden, Adri G M; van Soolingen, Dick

    2005-11-01

    In recent years various novel DNA typing methods have been developed which are faster and easier to perform than the current internationally standardized IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing method. However, there has been no overview of the utility of these novel typing methods, and it is largely unknown how they compare to previously published methods. In this study, the discriminative power and reproducibility of nine recently described PCR-based typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were investigated using the strain collection of the interlaboratory study of Kremer et al. This strain collection contains 90 M. tuberculosis complex and 10 non-M. tuberculosis complex mycobacterial strains, as well as 31 duplicated DNA samples to assess reproducibility. The highest reproducibility was found with variable numbers of tandem repeat typing using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU VNTR) and fast ligation-mediated PCR (FLiP), followed by second-generation spoligotyping, ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR), VNTR typing using five repeat loci identified at the Queens University of Belfast (QUB VNTR), and the Amadio speciation PCR. Poor reproducibility was associated with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism typing, which was performed in three different laboratories. The methods were ordered from highest discrimination to lowest by the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index as follows: QUB VNTR typing, MIRU VNTR typing, FLiP, LM-PCR, and spoligotyping. We conclude that both VNTR typing methods and FLiP typing are rapid, highly reliable, and discriminative epidemiological typing methods for M. tuberculosis and that VNTR typing is the epidemiological typing method of choice for the near future.

  7. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  8. Real-Time PCR Using Mycobacteriophage DNA for Rapid Phenotypic Drug Susceptibility Results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 103 PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (CT) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and CT control-CT drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and −6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔCT values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC. PMID:22170929

  9. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  10. Transcutaneous DNA immunization following waxing-based hair depilation elicits both humoral and cellular immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Gang; Li, Xinran; Kumar, Amit; Cui, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we showed that transcutaneous (TC) DNA immunization by applying plasmid DNA onto a mouse skin area wherein the hair follicles were induced into growth stage by plucking the hair using warm waxing induced strong and functional antigen-specific antibody responses. In the present study, using plasmids that encode β-galactosidase gene or ovalbumin (OVA) gene, we showed that this mode of TC DNA immunization not only induced specific antibody responses, but also induced antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. In fact, TC DNA immunization using a plasmid that encodes OVA gene prevented the growth of OVA-expressing B16-OVA tumor cells in the immunized mice. Moreover, we provided additional evidence supporting that hair follicles are essential for this mode of TC DNA immunization. PMID:22771558

  11. Evaluation of DNA extraction techniques for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in Asian elephant trunk wash samples.

    PubMed

    Kay, Meagan K; Linke, Lyndsey; Triantis, Joni; Salman, M D; Larsen, R Scott

    2011-02-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic assays for the detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in elephants are lacking. DNA extraction with PCR analysis is useful for tuberculosis screening in many species but has not been validated on elephant trunk wash samples. We estimated the analytical sensitivity and specificity of three DNA extraction methods to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms in trunk wash specimens. A ZR soil microbe DNA kit (ZR) and a traditional salt and ethanol precipitation (TSEP) approach were evaluated under three different treatment conditions: heat treatment, phenol treatment, and contamination with Mycobacterium avium. A third approach, using a column filtration method, was evaluated for samples contaminated with soil. Trunk wash samples from uninfected elephants were spiked with various concentrations of M. bovis cells and subjected to the described treatment conditions prior to DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was amplified using IS6110-targeted PCR analysis. The ZR and TSEP methods detected as low as 1 to 5 M. bovis cells and 10 M. bovis cells, respectively, per 1.5 ml of trunk wash under all three conditions. Depending on the amount of soil present, the column filtration method detected as low as 5 to 50 M. bovis cells per 1.5 ml of trunk wash. Analytical specificity was assessed by DNA extraction from species of nontuberculous mycobacteria and amplification using the same PCR technique. Only M. bovis DNA was amplified, indicating 100% analytical specificity of this PCR technique. Our results indicate that these DNA extraction techniques offer promise as useful tests for detection of M. tuberculosis complex organisms in elephant trunk wash specimens.

  12. Development of a novel DNA SynCon tetravalent dengue vaccine that elicits immune responses against four serotypes.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Mathura P; Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Selling, Bernard H; Li, Qianjun; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B

    2009-10-30

    The increased transmission and geographic spread of dengue fever (DF) and its most severe presentations, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), make it one of the most important mosquito-borne viral disease of humans. Four distinct serotypes of dengue viruses are transmitted to humans through the bites of the mosquitoes. Currently there is no vaccine or antiviral drug against DV infections. Cross-protection between dengue virus serotypes is limited and antibody dependent enhancement (ADE) contributes significantly to the severity of the disease. The major challenge is to induce a broad durable immune response against all four serotypes of dengue virus simultaneously while avoiding the possible exacerbation of risk of developing the severe forms of disease through incomplete or modified responses. In order to address this worldwide concern, we present a synthetic consensus (SynCon) human codon optimized DNA vaccine that elicits immunity against all four dengue serotypes. We cloned consensus DIII domain of E protein from all serotypes and expressed them as a single open reading frame in a mammalian expression vector, called pDV-U-DIII (dengue-vaccine universal). In mice, this dengue-universal construct elicits significant level of anti-DIII antibody that neutralizes all four dengue subtypes and prevents cell death induced by dengue infection. This is the first SynCon DNA vaccine that provides tetravalent immunity against all four serotypes of dengue virus.

  13. DNA Ligase C1 Mediates the LigD-Independent Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3′ phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. PMID:24957619

  14. DNA ligase C1 mediates the LigD-independent nonhomologous end-joining pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3' phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Rapid method for testing susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Casabona, N; Xairó Mimó, D; González, T; Rossello, J; Arcalis, L

    1997-01-01

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has stimulated the interest of investigators in finding a rapid method for susceptibility testing. We used commercially available rRNA DNA-bioluminescence-labelled probes (Accu-Probe, Gen Probe, Inc. San Diego, Calif.) for this purpose. The study was performed in three chronological steps. (i) We studied the correlation between the photometric light units (PLUs) given by the hybridization method, the numbers of CFU per milliliter, and turbidity as nephelometric units for six different inocula of an M. tuberculosis strain over 14 days. A good correlation (c > 0.9; P < 0.05) was found from the third day for all concentrations used. (ii) Over a period of 14 days we studied the evolution of the PLUs for 20 strains growing in medium with 0.2 microl of isoniazid (H) per ml and 18 strains in medium with 1 microl of rifampin (R) per ml to standardize the method. Susceptible and resistant strains were used according to the reference proportions method in Middlebrook 7H10, and the MICs were determined in solid and liquid media. The final inoculum of a 10(-2) dilution from a McFarland no. 1 standard and reading at 3 and 5 days provided the best results. A quotient was established to find a cutoff point between resistant and susceptible strains. (iii) We used the standardized parameters in 117 tests with H and R. On day 3, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detecting resistant strains were 86.8, 100, 100, and 90.1%, respectively, and on day 5 they were 96.2, 100, 100, and 94%, respectively. We concluded that the method is readily available, is easy to perform, and could be useful for screening resistant M. tuberculosis strains. PMID:9316900

  16. Dendritic Cell Targeting Effectively Boosts T Cell Responses Elicited by an HIV Multiepitope DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Lunardelli, Victória Alves Santos; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Souza, Higo Fernando Santos; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Rosa, Daniela Santoro

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decades, an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine is still not available. Different approaches have been evaluated, such as recombinant proteins, viral vectors, DNA vaccines, and, most recently, dendritic cell (DC) targeting. This strategy is based on DC features that place them as central for induction of immunity. Targeting is accomplished by the use of chimeric monoclonal antibodies directed to DC surface receptors fused to the antigen of interest. In this work, we targeted eight promiscuous HIV-derived CD4+ T cell epitopes (HIVBr8) to the DEC205+ DCs by fusing the multiepitope immunogen to the heavy chain of αDEC205 (αDECHIVBr8), in the presence of the TLR3 agonist poly (I:C). In addition, we tested a DNA vaccine encoding the same epitopes using homologous or heterologous prime-boost regimens. Our results showed that mice immunized with αDECHIVBr8 presented higher CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses when compared to mice that received the DNA vaccine (pVAXHIVBr8). In addition, pVAXHIVBr8 priming followed by αDECHIVBr8 boosting induced higher polyfunctional proliferative and cytokine-producing T cell responses to HIV-1 peptides than homologous DNA immunization or heterologous αDEC prime/DNA boost. Based on these results, we conclude that homologous prime-boost and heterologous boosting immunization strategies targeting CD4+ epitopes to DCs are effective to improve HIV-specific cellular immune responses when compared to standalone DNA immunization. Moreover, our results indicate that antigen targeting to DC is an efficient strategy to boost immunity against a multiepitope immunogen, especially in the context of DNA vaccination. PMID:28223987

  17. Dendritic Cell Targeting Effectively Boosts T Cell Responses Elicited by an HIV Multiepitope DNA Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza; Lunardelli, Victória Alves Santos; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Souza, Higo Fernando Santos; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Rosa, Daniela Santoro

    2017-01-01

    Despite several efforts in the last decades, an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine is still not available. Different approaches have been evaluated, such as recombinant proteins, viral vectors, DNA vaccines, and, most recently, dendritic cell (DC) targeting. This strategy is based on DC features that place them as central for induction of immunity. Targeting is accomplished by the use of chimeric monoclonal antibodies directed to DC surface receptors fused to the antigen of interest. In this work, we targeted eight promiscuous HIV-derived CD4(+) T cell epitopes (HIVBr8) to the DEC205(+) DCs by fusing the multiepitope immunogen to the heavy chain of αDEC205 (αDECHIVBr8), in the presence of the TLR3 agonist poly (I:C). In addition, we tested a DNA vaccine encoding the same epitopes using homologous or heterologous prime-boost regimens. Our results showed that mice immunized with αDECHIVBr8 presented higher CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to mice that received the DNA vaccine (pVAXHIVBr8). In addition, pVAXHIVBr8 priming followed by αDECHIVBr8 boosting induced higher polyfunctional proliferative and cytokine-producing T cell responses to HIV-1 peptides than homologous DNA immunization or heterologous αDEC prime/DNA boost. Based on these results, we conclude that homologous prime-boost and heterologous boosting immunization strategies targeting CD4(+) epitopes to DCs are effective to improve HIV-specific cellular immune responses when compared to standalone DNA immunization. Moreover, our results indicate that antigen targeting to DC is an efficient strategy to boost immunity against a multiepitope immunogen, especially in the context of DNA vaccination.

  18. Expression and purification of an active form of the Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrase and its inhibition by quinolones.

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2007-05-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, is noncultivable in vitro; therefore, evaluation of antibiotic activity against M. leprae relies mainly upon the mouse footpad system, which requires at least 12 months before the results become available. We have developed an in vitro assay for studying the activities of quinolones against the DNA gyrase of M. leprae. We overexpressed in Escherichia coli the M. leprae GyrA and GyrB subunits separately as His-tagged proteins by using a pET plasmid carrying the gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97.5-kDa GyrA and 74.5-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and were reconstituted as an enzyme with DNA supercoiling activity. Based on the drug concentrations that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% or that induced DNA cleavage by 25%, the 13 quinolones tested clustered into three groups. Analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrates that the most active quinolones against M. leprae DNA gyrase share the following structural features: a substituted carbon at position 8, a cyclopropyl substituent at N-1, a fluorine at C-6, and a substituent ring at C-7. We conclude that the assays based on DNA supercoiling inhibition and drug-induced DNA cleavage on purified M. leprae DNA gyrase are rapid, efficient, and safe methods for the screening of quinolone derivatives with potential in vivo activities against M. leprae.

  19. Expression and Purification of an Active Form of the Mycobacterium leprae DNA Gyrase and Its Inhibition by Quinolones▿

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, is noncultivable in vitro; therefore, evaluation of antibiotic activity against M. leprae relies mainly upon the mouse footpad system, which requires at least 12 months before the results become available. We have developed an in vitro assay for studying the activities of quinolones against the DNA gyrase of M. leprae. We overexpressed in Escherichia coli the M. leprae GyrA and GyrB subunits separately as His-tagged proteins by using a pET plasmid carrying the gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97.5-kDa GyrA and 74.5-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and were reconstituted as an enzyme with DNA supercoiling activity. Based on the drug concentrations that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% or that induced DNA cleavage by 25%, the 13 quinolones tested clustered into three groups. Analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrates that the most active quinolones against M. leprae DNA gyrase share the following structural features: a substituted carbon at position 8, a cyclopropyl substituent at N-1, a fluorine at C-6, and a substituent ring at C-7. We conclude that the assays based on DNA supercoiling inhibition and drug-induced DNA cleavage on purified M. leprae DNA gyrase are rapid, efficient, and safe methods for the screening of quinolone derivatives with potential in vivo activities against M. leprae. PMID:17325221

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonator Using High Sensitive Resonance Telecommunication Wavelengths for DNA Sensors of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with Thiol-Modified Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5′-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:25609049

  1. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  2. Effectiveness of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis isolation from raw milk by means of direct isolation of DNA and classic culture.

    PubMed

    Szteyn, J; Wiszniewska-Laszczych, A; Ruszczyńska, A

    2008-01-01

    Detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis (MAP) in tissues of patients suffering from Crohn's disease has given rise to speculation that this mycobacterium may play some role in the development of this disease in humans. Food products, especially milk obtained from animals infected with paratuberculosis, may be a potential vector of MAP to humans, yet the detection of this pathogen poses a number of difficulties. This study was aimed at comparing the effectiveness of MAP isolation from milk samples. Mycobacteria were detected by means of two methods: direct isolation of DNA using a QIAamp DNA Mini Kit by Qiagen, and a culture method with the use of HEYM culture medium. Analyses were carried out on 87 samples of udder cow milk originating from a herd that exhibited seropositive and serodoubtful reactions against paratuberculosis. The presence of an insertion sequence IS-900 was detected in 18 samples of udder milk analyzed with the method of direct DNA isolation and in two samples analyzed by means of the culture method.

  3. Induction of in vivo resistance to Mycobacterium avium infection by intramuscular injection with DNA encoding interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Cho, D; Kim, T S

    2001-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is closely associated with the generation of cell-mediated immunity and resistance to intracellular parasites. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) was known to strongly induce IFN-γ production by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to determine whether injection with DNA encoding IL-18 can stimulate the resistance to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, the mature IL-18 cDNA with κ leader sequence was cloned under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (TcCMVIL-18) and its effect on MAC infection was investigated in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. Injection with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA during intranasal infection with MAC resulted in a significant decrease in bacterial load of lung during the entire 8-week observation period, while injection with the TcCMV control DNA did not. Lung cells in mice injected with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA showed persistent production of IFN-γ throughout the 8-week period. Furthermore, immunization with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA induced and maintained significantly higher levels of cytotoxic activity and nitric oxide production by lung cells than immunization with the TcCMV control vector. This work suggests that IL-18 DNA vaccination may be useful in the immunotherapeutic or immunoprotection approaches of infections by intracellular parasites such as mycobacteria. PMID:11260329

  4. Carbon nanotubes elicit DNA damage and inflammatory response relative to their size and shape.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Morishita, Yuki; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Fujimura, Maho; Kayamuro, Hiroyuki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yamashita, Takuya; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kawai, Yuichi; Mayumi, Tadanori; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Itoh, Norio; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been one of the most extensively researched and developed nanomaterials. However, little concern has been placed on their safety. The biological effects of CNTs are believed to differ relative to size and shape. Thus, the relationship between the characteristics of CNTs and their safety needs to be evaluated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of different-sized multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) and single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Long and thick MWCNTs induced the strongest DNA damage while similar SWCNTs caused little effect. Comparison of inflammatory responses of various types of CNTs found that peritoneal CNT administration of long and thick MWCNTs increased the total cell number in abdominal lavage fluid in mice. These results indicate that long and thick MWCNT, but not short and thin MWCNT, cause DNA damage and severe inflammatory effects. These findings might provide useful information for constructing novel CNTs with safety.

  5. Characterization of the Apa antigen from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a conserved Mycobacterium antigen that elicits a strong humoral response in cattle.

    PubMed

    Gioffré, A; Echeverría-Valencia, G; Arese, A; Morsella, C; Garbaccio, S; Delgado, F; Zumárraga, M; Paolicchi, F; Cataldi, A; Romano, M I

    2009-12-15

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is widespread in almost all countries and remains difficult to eradicate. Nowadays, diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MPTB) infection is one of the main concerns. In this work, we evaluated the expression, biochemical properties and antigenicity of the Apa antigen, encoded by the gene annotated as MAP1569, in the MPTB genome. We confirmed its expression in MPTB and its glycosylation by the ConA binding assay. Although the MPTB-Apa is not an immunodominant antigen, MPTB-infected cattle showed a strong humoral response to recombinant Apa by Western blot and ELISA. Milk was also a suitable sample to be tested by ELISA. We comparatively analysed the humoral cross-reactivity to the Apa from MPTB (MPTB-Apa) and the orthologue from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT-Apa, identical to that from Mycobacterium bovis) in both infected and control cows. Response of M. bovis- and MPTB-infected animals against MT-Apa was similar (P=0.6985) but the response of the M. bovis-infected ones to MPTB-Apa was differential, being significantly diminished (P<0.0001). Although 6 out 45 animals from MPTB-infected herds responded to MPTB-Apa stimulation in the IFNgamma release assay, we found no significant differences when compared infected herds with non-infected ones (P=0.34). This antigen, in contrast to bovine Purified Protein Derivative (PPDb), was strongly represented in avian PPD (PPDa), as shown by the recognition of BALB/c mice hyperimmune sera against MPTB-Apa by Dot-blot immunoassay. We therefore demonstrated the antigenicity of Apa in MPTB-infected animals and a differential response to the recombinant antigen when compared to M. bovis-infected animals. These traits herein described, added to the usefulness of milk samples to detect IgG anti-Apa, could be important for routine screening in dairy cattle, considering a multiantigenic approach to overcome the lack of immunodominance.

  6. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  7. Design and synthesis of novel quinoline-aminopiperidine hybrid analogues as Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyraseB inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Medapi, Brahmam; Renuka, Janupally; Saxena, Shalini; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Medishetti, Raghavender; Kulkarni, Pushkar; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotics with good therapeutic value and novel mechanism of action are becoming increasingly important in today's battle against bacterial resistance. One of the popular targets being DNA gyrase, is currently becoming well-established and clinically validated for the development of novel antibacterials. In the present work, a series of forty eight quinoline-aminopiperidine based urea and thiourea derivatives were synthesized as pharmacophoric hybrids and evaluated for their biological activity. Compound, 1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(1-(6-methoxy-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)piperidin-4-yl)thiourea (45) was found to exhibit promising in vitro Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB IC₅₀ of 0.95 ± 0.12 μM and a well correlated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA gyrase supercoiling IC₅₀ of 0.62 ± 0.16 μM. Further, compound 45 also exhibited commendable MTB MIC, safe eukaryotic cytotoxic profile with no signs of cardiotoxicity in zebrafish ether-a-go-go-related gene (zERG). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Integration Host Factor Reveals Novel Insights into the Mode of DNA Binding and Nucleoid Compaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sharadamma, Narayanaswamy; Harshavardhana, Yadumurthy; Ravishankar, Apoorva; Anand, Praveen; Chandra, Nagasuma; Muniyappa, K.

    2014-01-01

    The annotated whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that Rv1388 (Mtihf) is likely to encode for a putative 20-kDa integration host factor (mIHF). However, very little is known about the functional properties of mIHF or the organization of the mycobacterial nucleoid. Molecular modeling of the mIHF three-dimensional structure, based on the cocrystal structure of Streptomyces coelicolor IHF duplex DNA, a bona fide relative of mIHF, revealed the presence of Arg-170, Arg-171, and Arg-173, which might be involved in DNA binding, and a conserved proline (Pro-150) in the tight turn. The phenotypic sensitivity of Escherichia coli ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains to UV and methyl methanesulfonate could be complemented with the wild-type Mtihf but not its alleles bearing mutations in the DNA-binding residues. Protein-DNA interaction assays revealed that wild-type mIHF, but not its DNA-binding variants, binds with high affinity to fragments containing attB and attP sites and curved DNA. Strikingly, the functionally important amino acid residues of mIHF and the mechanism(s) underlying its binding to DNA, DNA bending, and site-specific recombination are fundamentally different from that of E. coli IHFαβ. Furthermore, we reveal novel insights into IHF-mediated DNA compaction depending on the placement of its preferred binding sites; mIHF promotes DNA compaction into nucleoid-like or higher order filamentous structures. We therefore propose that mIHF is a distinct member of a subfamily of proteins that serve as essential cofactors in site-specific recombination and nucleoid organization and that these findings represent a significant advance in our understanding of the role(s) of nucleoid-associated proteins. PMID:25324543

  9. Immune response of neonates elicited by somatic transgene vaccination with naked DNA.

    PubMed

    Bot, A; Antohi, S; Bona, C

    1997-05-01

    Neonates display lower immune responsiveness and higher susceptibility for high-dose tolerance. Quantitative as well as functional differences between the neonatal and adult lymphocytes or antigen presenting cells (APC) respectively, explain the particular immune responsiveness during the early stages of the postnatal development. Reduced numbers of lymphocytes and APCs as well as a modified responsiveness of T cells in neonates, are the main factors that account for the low threshold of tolerance in newborns. Taking into account these particularities, the design of effective vaccines for neonates poses significant difficulties. We hypothesized that a continuous exposure to low doses of antigens may avoid high-zone tolerance and may lead instead, to effective expansion of effector and memory cells. Indeed, inoculation of newborn mice with plasmids encoding nucleoprotein (NP) or hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus, led to the priming of specific cytotoxic (CTL), helper (Th) and B cells, rather than induction of unresponsiveness. Mice immunized as neonates with naked DNA and challenged later with lethal doses of influenza virus, displayed significant protection. Thus, DNA immunization may be a promising strategy for vaccination against serious infectious diseases of infants and children.

  10. A DNA sequence capture extraction method for detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in feces and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Vansnick, Elke; de Rijk, Pim; Vercammen, Francis; Rigouts, Leen; Portaels, Françoise; Geysen, Dirk

    2007-05-16

    Culturing of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) remains difficult and is time consuming. An alternative for the rapid detection of Map in samples is PCR. We have developed a sensitive DNA-extraction method based on sequence capture for the rapid detection of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis by PCR in fecal and tissue samples. The method detected 10(2)Map/g feces using spiked samples, and reached a diagnostic sensitivity of 33,7% compared to 22% for culture. Analysis of tissue samples gave 65 polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive (42.2%) and 49 culture-positive samples (31.8%). Therefore, the detection limit of the DNA-extraction is the same as previously reported for culture, the PCR assay could detect more positive samples than the culture method.

  11. Comparison of Fixatives, Fixation Time, and Severity of Infection on PCR Amplification and Detection of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae DNA in Paraffin-Embedded Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Kent, Michael L.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Whipps, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a common disease of laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio). Different infection patterns occur in zebrafish depending on mycobacterial species. Mycobacterium marinum and M. haemophilum produce virulent infections associated with high mortality, whereas M. chelonae is more wide spread and not associated with high mortality. Identification of mycobacterial infections to the species level provides important information for making management decisions. Observation of acid-fast bacilli in histological sections or tissue imprints is the most common diagnostic method for mycobacteriosis in fish, but only allows for diagnosis to the genus level. Mycobacterial culture, followed by molecular or biochemical identification is the traditional approach, but recently it has been shown that DNA of diagnostic value can be retrieved from paraffin blocks. We investigated effects of the following parameters on the ability of our qPCR test for the hsp gene (primer set HS5F/hsp667R) to retrieve specific DNA from paraffin-embedded zebrafish: type of fixative, time in fixative before processing, species of mycobacteria, and severity of infection. Whole zebrafish were experimentally infected with either M. chelonae or M. marinum, and then preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin or Dietrich’s fixative for 3, 7, 21 and 45 days. Subsequently, fish were evaluated by H&E and Fite’s acid-fast stains to detect mycobacteria within granulomatous lesions. The PCR assay was quite effective, and obtained PCR product from 75% and 88% of the M. chelonae and M. marinum infected fish, respectively. Fixative type, time in fixative, and mycobacterial species showed no statistical relationship with the efficacy of the PCR test. PMID:23709464

  12. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  13. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnostics of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and r...

  14. Presence of intestinal Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) DNA is not associated with altered MMP expression in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is suspected to be a causative agent in human Crohn's disease (CD). Recent evidence suggests that pathogenic mycobacteria and MAP can induce the expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMP), which are the main proteases in the pathogenesis of mucosal ulcerations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Within this study we assessed the prevalence of intestinal MAP specific DNA in patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC), and healthy controls. We further analysed regulation patterns of MMPs in mucosal tissues of UC patients with and without intestinal MAP DNA detection. Methods Colonic biopsy samples were obtained from 63 Norwegian and German IBD patients and 21 healthy controls. RNA was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to study MMP gene expression in both pathological and healthy mucosal specimens. The presence of MAP DNA in colonic mucosa was examined using MAP specific PCR. Results MAP DNA was detected in 20% of UC patients and 33% of healthy controls but only in 7% of patients with CD. UC patients treated with corticosteroids exhibited a significantly increased frequency of intestinal MAP DNA compared to those not receiving corticosteroids. Expression of MMP-1, -2, -7, -9, -13, -19, -28 and TNF-α did not differ between UC patients with presence of intestinal MAP DNA compared to those without. MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13 were significantly decreased in UC patients receiving corticosteroids. Conclusions The presence of intestinal MAP specific DNA is not associated with altered MMP expression in UC in vivo. Corticosteroids are associated with increased detection of intestinal MAP DNA and decreased expression of certain MMPs. Frequent detection of MAP DNA in healthy controls might be attributable to the wide environmental distribution of MAP and its presence in the food-chain. PMID:21477272

  15. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides and Biogenic Silver Nanoparticles Kill Mycobacteria without Eliciting DNA Damage and Cytotoxicity in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jena, Prajna; Mehta, Ranjit; Pati, Rashmirekha; Banerjee, Birendranath; Patil, Satish

    2013-01-01

    With the emergence of multidrug-resistant mycobacterial strains, better therapeutic strategies are required for the successful treatment of the infection. Although antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are becoming one of the popular antibacterial agents, their antimycobacterial potential is not fully evaluated. In this study, we synthesized biogenic-silver nanoparticles using bacterial, fungal, and plant biomasses and analyzed their antibacterial activities in combination with AMPs against mycobacteria. Mycobacterium smegmatis was found to be more susceptible to AgNPs compared to M. marinum. We found that NK-2 showed enhanced killing effect with NP-1 and NP-2 biogenic nanoparticles at a 0.5-ppm concentration, whereas LLKKK-18 showed antibacterial activity only with NP-2 at 0.5-ppm dose against M. smegmatis. In case of M. marinum NK-2 did not show any additive activity with NP-1 and NP-2 and LLKKK-18 alone completely inhibited the bacterial growth. Both NP-1 and NP-2 also showed increased killing of M. smegmatis in combination with the antituberculosis drug rifampin. The sizes and shapes of the AgNPs were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. AgNPs showed no cytotoxic or DNA damage effects on macrophages at the mycobactericidal dose, whereas treatment with higher doses of AgNPs caused toxicity and micronuclei formation in cytokinesis blocked cells. Macrophages actively endocytosed fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled AgNPs resulting in nitric oxide independent intracellular killing of M. smegmatis. Apoptosis and cell cycle studies showed that treatment with higher dose of AgNPs arrested macrophages at the G1-phase. In summary, our data suggest the combined effect of biogenic-AgNPs and antimicrobial peptides as a promising antimycobacterial template. PMID:23689720

  16. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA in nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) from the Andean region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, N; Beltrán, J C; Ortiz-Bernal, A; Vissa, V

    2009-12-01

    To use DNA detection methodologies to test for M. leprae in nine-banded armadillos inhabiting forested regions located around the cities and towns where leprosy patients have been identified. Ear lobe biopsies of 22 nine-banded armadillos were studied during a 2 year period. The biopsies were processed for DNA extraction and amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR) of a fragment of the high copy DNA locus of M. leprae known as R-LEP. Nine of the 22 (40.9%) armadillos evaluated showed positive signals for M. leprae. Sequencing confirmed that PCR products were identical to the corresponding region of M. leprae DNA. In Colombia, South America, the consumption of and contact with the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) are common, ignoring the fact that this animal can host and be a possible zoonotic reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy. This is the first study demonstrating that M. leprae is present in nine-banded armadillos in a region of Colombia using specific DNA detection. The possibility of leprosy transmission due to contact and consumption of armadillo meat or use of blood for therapeutic purposes should be further investigated.

  17. Mycobacterium hsp65 DNA entrapped into TDM-loaded PLGA microspheres induces protection in mice against Leishmania (Leishmania) major infection.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Lima, Karla de Melo; Silva, Célio Lopes; Rodrigues, José Maciel; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2006-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved among different organisms. A mycobacterial HSP65 DNA vaccine was previously shown to have prophylactic and immunotherapeutic effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice. Here, BALB/c mice were immunized with mycobacterial DNA-hsp65 or with DNA-hsp65 and trehalose dymicolate (TDM), both carried by biodegradable microspheres (MHSP/TDM), and challenged with Leishmania (Leishmania) major. MHSP/TDM conferred protection against L. major infection, as indicated by a significant reduction of edema and parasite loads in infected tissues. Although high levels of interferon-gamma and low levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 were detected in mice immunized with DNA-hsp65 or MHSP/TDM, only animals immunized with MHSP/TDM displayed a consistent Th1 immune response, i.e., significantly higher levels of anti-soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a and low anti-SLA IgG1 antibodies. These findings indicate that encapsulated MHSP/TDM is more immunogenic than naked hsp65 DNA, and has great potential to improve vaccine effectiveness against leishmaniasis and tuberculosis.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions.

    PubMed

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V; Laerdahl, Jon K; Homberset, Håvard; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-08-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecG(Mtb)) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecG(Mtb) preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecG(Mtb) helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Cu(2+) or Fe(2+). Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecG(Mtb) is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG binds and unwinds model DNA substrates with a preference for Holliday junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Balasingham, Seetha V.; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Homberset, Håvard

    2012-01-01

    The RecG enzyme, a superfamily 2 helicase, is present in nearly all bacteria. Here we report for the first time that the recG gene is also present in the genomes of most vascular plants as well as in green algae, but is not found in other eukaryotes or archaea. The precise function of RecG is poorly understood, although ample evidence shows that it plays critical roles in DNA repair, recombination and replication. We further demonstrate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG (RecGMtb) DNA binding activity had a broad substrate specificity, whereas it only unwound branched-DNA substrates such as Holliday junctions (HJs), replication forks, D-loops and R-loops, with a strong preference for the HJ as a helicase substrate. In addition, RecGMtb preferentially bound relatively long (≥40 nt) ssDNA, exhibiting a higher affinity for the homopolymeric nucleotides poly(dT), poly(dG) and poly(dC) than for poly(dA). RecGMtb helicase activity was supported by hydrolysis of ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, Cu2+ or Fe2+. Like its Escherichia coli orthologue, RecGMtb is also a strictly DNA-dependent ATPase. PMID:22628485

  20. Chimeras between single-stranded DNA-binding proteins from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal that their C-terminal domains interact with uracil DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Handa, P; Acharya, N; Varshney, U

    2001-05-18

    Uracil, a promutagenic base in DNA can arise by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or incorporation of dUMP by DNA polymerase. Uracil is removed from DNA by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), the first enzyme in the uracil excision repair pathway. We recently reported that the Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) facilitated uracil excision from certain structured substrates by E. coli UDG (EcoUDG) and suggested the existence of interaction between SSB and UDG. In this study, we have made use of the chimeric proteins obtained by fusion of N- and C-terminal domains of SSBs from E. coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis to investigate interactions between SSBs and UDGs. The EcoSSB or a chimera containing its C-terminal domain interacts with EcoUDG in a binary (SSB-UDG) or a ternary (DNA-SSB-UDG) complex. However, the chimera containing the N-terminal domain from EcoSSB showed no interactions with EcoUDG. Thus, the C-terminal domain (48 amino acids) of EcoSSB is necessary and sufficient for interaction with EcoUDG. The data also suggest that the C-terminal domain (34 amino acids) of MtuSSB is a predominant determinant for mediating its interaction with MtuUDG. The mechanism of how the interactions between SSB and UDG could be important in uracil excision repair pathway has been discussed.

  1. Comparison of four DNA extraction methods for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Fuentes, Jenny Laura; Díaz, Alexis; Entenza, Anayma Elena; Frión, Yahima; Suárez, Odelaisy; Torres, Pedro; de Armas, Yaxsier; Acosta, Lucrecia

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of leprosy has been a challenge due to the low sensibility of the conventional methods and the impossibility of culturing the causative organism. In this study, four methods for Mycobacterium leprae nucleic-acid extraction from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained slides (ZNS slides) were compared: Phenol/chloroform, Chelex 100 resin, and two commercial kits (Wizard Genomic DNA Purification Kit and QIAamp DNA Mini Kit). DNA was extracted from four groups of slides: a high-codification-slide group (bacteriological index [BI]⩾4), a low-codification-slide group (BI=1), a negative-slide group (BI=0), and a negative-control-slide group (BI=0). Quality DNA was evidenced by the amplification of specific repetitive element present in M. leprae genomic DNA (RLEP) using a nested polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report comparing four different extraction methods for obtaining M. leprae DNA from ZNS slides in Cuban patients, and applied in molecular diagnosis. Good-quality DNA and positive amplification were detected in the high-codification-slide group with the four methods, while from the low-codification-slide group only the QIAGEN and phenol-chloroform methods obtained amplification of M. leprae. In the negative-slide group, only the QIAGEN method was able to obtain DNA with sufficient quality for positive amplification of the RLEP region. No amplification was observed in the negative-control-slide group by any method. Patients with ZNS negative slides can still transmit the infection, and molecular methods can help identify and treat them, interrupting the chain of transmission and preventing the onset of disabilities. The ZNS slides can be sent easily to reference laboratories for later molecular analysis that can be useful not only to improve the diagnosis, but also for the application of other molecular techniques. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Ofloxacin Interaction with Mutated (A91V) Quinolone Resistance Determining Region of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium Leprae through Computational Simulation.

    PubMed

    Nisha, J; Shanthi, V

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy is non-cultivable in vitro. Thus, the assessment of antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium leprae depends primarily upon the time-consuming mouse footpad system. The GyrA protein of Mycobacterium leprae is the target of the antimycobacterial drug, Ofloxacin. In recent times, the GyrA mutation (A91V) has been found to be resistant to Ofloxacin. This phenomenon has necessitated the development of new, long-acting antimycobacterial compounds. The underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not completely known. Currently, experimentally crystallized GyrA-DNA-OFLX models are not available for highlighting the binding and mechanism of Ofloxacin resistance. Hence, we employed computational approaches to characterize the Ofloxacin interaction with both the native and mutant forms of GyrA complexed with DNA. Binding energy measurements obtained from molecular docking studies highlights hydrogen bond-mediated efficient binding of Ofloxacin to Asp47 in the native GyrA-DNA complex in comparison with that of the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. Further, molecular dynamics studies highlighted the stable binding of Ofloxacin with native GyrA-DNA complex than with the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. This mechanism provided a plausible reason for the reported, reduced effect of Ofloxacin to control leprosy in individuals with the A91V mutation. Our report is the first of its kind wherein the basis for the Ofloxacin drug resistance mechanism has been explored with the help of ternary Mycobacterium leprae complex, GyrA-DNA-OFLX. These structural insights will provide useful information for designing new drugs to target the Ofloxacin-resistant DNA gyrase.

  3. Protective immunity elicited by a divalent DNA vaccine encoding both the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can.

  4. Label-free DNA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance through hydration induced stress in microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Kosaka, Priscila M; Sotillo, Alma; Mingorance, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-02-03

    We have developed a label-free assay for the genomic detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance. The method relies on the quantification of the hydration induced stress on microcantilever biosensors functionalized with oligonucleotide probes, before and after hybridization with specific targets. We have found a limit of detection of 10 fg/mL for PCR amplified products of 122 bp. Furthermore, the technique can successfully target genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments of length >500 bp, and it can successfully discriminate single mismatches. We have used both loci IS6110 and rpoB as targets to detect the mycobacteria and the rifampicin resistance from gDNA directly extracted from bacterial culture and without PCR amplification. We have been able to detect 2 pg/mL target concentration in samples with an excess of interfering DNA and in a total analysis time of 1 h and 30 min. The detection limit found demonstrates the capability to develop direct assays without the need for long culture steps or PCR amplification. The methodology can be easily translated to different microbial targets, and it is suitable for further development of miniaturized devices and multiplexed detection.

  5. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernando L; Stokes, Kevin D; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Stabel, Judith R

    2013-01-01

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from feces has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis for many years. However, direct fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is becoming more widely used, demonstrating similar sensitivity and specificity to culture. To ensure efficient and reproducible PCR results from a difficult sample matrix such as feces, there are many obstacles that a DNA extraction method must overcome, including the presence of inhibitors and the thick waxy cell wall of MAP. In the current study, 6 commercial DNA extraction kits were evaluated using fecal samples from naturally infected cattle shedding various amounts of MAP. Upon extraction, DNA purity and yield were measured, and real-time PCR was performed for detection of the insertion sequence (IS)900 and ISMAP02 targets. The kits evaluated showed significant differences in the purity and yield of DNA obtained. The best results were observed with kits E and A, having identified 94% (16/17) and 76% (13/17) of the positive samples by IS900 PCR, respectively. Both of these kits utilized bead beating in a lysis solution for cell disruption, followed by spin column technology (kit E) or magnetic bead-based technology (kit A) for nucleic acid isolation and purification. Two kits (A and F) demonstrated improved performance when used in conjunction with the respective manufacturer's PCR test. The present study demonstrates the importance of choosing the correct methodology for the most accurate diagnosis of paratuberculosis through fecal PCR.

  6. Attomolar quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by asymmetric helicase-dependent isothermal DNA-amplification and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Barreda-García, Susana; González-Álvarez, María José; de-los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Palacios-Gutiérrez, Juan José; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, María Jesús

    2015-06-15

    A highly sensitive and robust method for the quantification of specific DNA sequences based on coupling asymmetric helicase-dependent DNA amplification to electrochemical detection is described. This method relies on the entrapment of the amplified ssDNA sequences on magnetic beads followed by a post-amplification hybridization assay to provide an added degree of specificity. As a proof-of-concept a 84-bases long sequence specific of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is amplified at 65°C, providing 3×10(6) amplification after 90 min. Using this system 0.5 aM, corresponding to 15 copies of the target gene in 50 µL of sample, can be successfully detected and reliably quantified under isothermal conditions in less than 4h. The assay has been applied to the detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum, pleural fluid and urine samples. Besides this application, the proposed assays is a powerful and general tool for molecular diagnostic that can be applied to the detection of other specific DNA sequences, taking full advantage of the plethora of genomic information now available.

  7. Molecular cloning and immunologic reactivity of a novel low molecular mass antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coler, R N; Skeiky, Y A; Vedvick, T; Bement, T; Ovendale, P; Campos-Neto, A; Alderson, M R; Reed, S G

    1998-09-01

    Polypeptide Ags present in the culture filtrate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were purified and evaluated for their ability to stimulate PBMC from purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive healthy donors. One such Ag, which elicited strong proliferation and IFN-gamma production, was further characterized. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this polypeptide was determined and used to design oligonucleotides for screening a recombinant M. tuberculosis genomic DNA library. The gene (Mtb 8.4) corresponding to the identified polypeptide was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The predicted m.w. of the recombinant protein without its signal peptide was 8.4 kDa. By Southern analysis, the DNA encoding this mycobacterial protein was found in the M. tuberculosis substrains H37Rv, H37Ra, Erdman, and "C" strain, as well as in certain other mycobacterial species, including Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guerin, Pasteur). The Mtb 8.4 gene appears to be absent from the environmental mycobacterial species examined thus far, including Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium gordonae, Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. Recombinant Mtb 8.4 Ag induced significant proliferation as well as production of IFN-gamma, IL-10, and TNF-alpha, but not IL-5, from human PBMC isolated from PPD-positive healthy donors. Mtb 8.4 did not stimulate PBMC from PPD-negative donors. Furthermore, immunogenicity studies in mice indicate that Mtb 8.4 elicits a Th1 cytokine profile, which is considered important for protective immunity to tuberculosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Mtb 8.4 is an immunodominant T cell Ag of M. tuberculosis.

  8. Search for Mycobacterium paratuberculosis DNA in orofacial granulomatosis and oral Crohn's disease tissue by polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, M; Gibson, J; Lennon, A; Wray, D; MacDonald, D

    1997-01-01

    Background—Although intestinal Crohn's disease has long been suspected to have a mycobacterial cause, possible mycobacterial involvement in orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) and oral lesions of Crohn's disease has not yet been investigated.
Aims—As the slow growing Mycobacterium paratuberculosis has been implicated in the aetiology of intestinal Crohn's disease, the potential involvement of this mycobacterial species in OFG and oral lesions of Crohn's disease was investigated.
Patients—To attempt detection of the organism in OFG and oral Crohn's disease tissue samples, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used on archival formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded oral tissue sections from 30 patients with OFG, seven with Crohn's disease, and 12 normal controls.
Methods—The PCR assay used was based on primers targeting the 5' region of the multicopy IS900 DNA insertion element of the M paratuberculosis genome. In order to achieve maximum sensitivity, two rounds of PCR were carried out and amplicons confirmed by Southern blot hybridisation to a digoxigenin labelled IS900 DNA probe.
Results—None of the OFG and oral lesions of Crohn's disease samples were positive for M paratuberculosis and all normal controls were also negative. 
Conclusions—These results suggest that M paratuberculosis may not be a major aetiological agent in OFG or oral Crohn's disease lesions, although the use of paraffin wax embedded tissue as opposed to fresh tissue as a sample source could underestimate the true prevalence of the organism. 

 Keywords: oral Crohn's disease; Mycobacterium paratuberculosis; orofacial granulomatosis; polymerase chain reaction PMID:9414972

  9. Deficiency of double-strand DNA break repair does not impair Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence in multiple animal models of infection.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Brook E; Barkan, Daniel; Bongiorno, Paola; Karakousis, Petros C; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persistence within its human host requires mechanisms to resist the effector molecules of host immunity, which exert their bactericidal effects through damaging pathogen proteins, membranes, and DNA. Substantial evidence indicates that bacterial pathogens, including M. tuberculosis, require DNA repair systems to repair the DNA damage inflicted by the host during infection, but the role of double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair systems is unclear. Double-strand DNA breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage and must be repaired for chromosome replication to proceed. M. tuberculosis elaborates three genetically distinct DSB repair systems: homologous recombination (HR), nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). NHEJ, which repairs DSBs in quiescent cells, may be particularly relevant to M. tuberculosis latency. However, very little information is available about the phenotype of DSB repair-deficient M. tuberculosis in animal models of infection. Here we tested M. tuberculosis strains lacking NHEJ (a Δku ΔligD strain), HR (a ΔrecA strain), or both (a ΔrecA Δku strain) in C57BL/6J mice, C3HeB/FeJ mice, guinea pigs, and a mouse hollow-fiber model of infection. We found no difference in bacterial load, histopathology, or host mortality between wild-type and DSB repair mutant strains in any model of infection. These results suggest that the animal models tested do not inflict DSBs on the mycobacterial chromosome, that other repair pathways can compensate for the loss of NHEJ and HR, or that DSB repair is not required for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  10. Evidence for the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG helicase in DNA repair and recombination.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Roshan S; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Somyajit, Kumar; Jain, Akshatha; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Muniyappa, Kalappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2013-04-01

    In order to survive and replicate in a variety of stressful conditions during its life cycle, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must possess mechanisms to safeguard the integrity of the genome. Although DNA repair and recombination related genes are thought to play key roles in the repair of damaged DNA in all organisms, so far only a few of them have been functionally characterized in the tubercle bacillus. In this study, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) expression was induced in response to different genotoxic agents. Strikingly, expression of MtRecG in Escherichia coli ∆recG mutant strain provided protection against mitomycin C, methyl methane sulfonate and UV induced cell death. Purified MtRecG exhibited higher binding affinity for the Holliday junction (HJ) compared with a number of canonical recombinational DNA repair intermediates. Notably, although MtRecG binds at the core of the mobile and immobile HJs, and with higher binding affinity for the immobile HJ, branch migration was evident only in the case of the mobile HJ. Furthermore, immobile HJs stimulate MtRecG ATPase activity less efficiently than mobile HJs. In addition to HJ substrates, MtRecG exhibited binding affinity for a variety of branched DNA structures including three-way junctions, replication forks, flap structures, forked duplex and a D-loop structure, but demonstrated strong unwinding activity on replication fork and flap DNA structures. Together, these results support that MtRecG plays an important role in processes related to DNA metabolism under normal as well as stress conditions. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  11. Mycobacterium avium complex in day care hot water systems, and persistence of live cells and DNA in hot water pipes.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Annette S; Roslev, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a group of opportunistic human pathogens that may thrive in engineered water systems. MAC has been shown to occur in drinking water supplies based on surface water, but less is known about the occurrence and persistence of live cells and DNA in public hot water systems based on groundwater. In this study, we examined the occurrence of MAC in hot water systems of public day care centers and determined the persistence of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA in model systems with the modern plumbing material cross-linked polyethylene (PEX). The occurrence of MAC and co-occurrence of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila were determined using cultivation and qPCR. Co-occurrences of MAC and Legionella were detected in water and/or biofilms in all hot water systems at temperatures between 40 and 54 °C. Moderate correlations were observed between abundance of culturable MAC and that of MAC genome copies, and between MAC and total eubacterial genome copies. No quantitative relationship was observed between occurrence of Legionella and that of MAC. Persistence in hot water of live and dead M. avium cells and naked DNA was studied using PEX laboratory model systems at 44 °C. Naked DNA and DNA in dead M. avium cells persisted for weeks. Live M. avium increased tenfold in water and biofilms on PEX. The results suggest that water and biofilms in groundwater-based hot water systems can constitute reservoirs of MAC, and that amplifiable naked DNA is relatively short-lived, whereas PEX plumbing material supports persistence and proliferation of M. avium.

  12. E-DNA sensor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on electrochemical assembly of nanomaterials (MWCNTs/PPy/PAMAM).

    PubMed

    Miodek, Anna; Mejri, Nawel; Gomgnimbou, Michel; Sola, Christophe; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2015-09-15

    Two-step electrochemical patterning methods have been employed to elaborate composite nanomaterials formed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with polypyrrole (PPy) and redox PAMAM dendrimers. The nanomaterial has been demonstrated as a molecular transducer for electrochemical DNA detection. The nanocomposite MWCNTs-PPy has been formed by wrapping the PPy film on MWCNTs during electrochemical polymerization of pyrrole on the gold electrode. The MWCNTs-PPy layer was modified with PAMAM dendrimers of fourth generation (PAMAM G4) with covalent bonding by electro-oxidation method. Ferrocenyl groups were then attached to the surface as a redox marker. The electrochemical properties of the nanomaterial (MWCNTs-PPy-PAMAM-Fc) were studied using both square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry to demonstrate efficient electron transfer. The nanomaterial shows high performance in the electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization leading to a variation in the electrochemical signal of ferrocene with a detection limit of 0.3 fM. Furthermore, the biosensor demonstrates ability for sensing DNA of rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in real PCR samples. Developed biosensor was suitable for detection of sequences with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) T (TCG/TTG), responsible for resistance of M. tuberculosis to rifampicin drug, and discriminating them from wild-type samples without such mutation. This shows potential of such systems for further application in pathogens diagnostic and therapeutic purpose.

  13. From the mouths of monkeys: detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA from buccal swabs of synanthropic macaques.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Alicia K; Engel, Gregory A; Rompis, Aida; A Putra, I G A; Lee, Benjamin P Y-H; Aggimarangsee, Nantiya; Chalise, Mukesh; Shaw, Eric; Oh, Gunwha; Schillaci, Michael A; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2012-07-01

    Although the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) infects a third of all humans, little is known regarding the prevalence of mycobacterial infection in nonhuman primates (NHP). For more than a century, tuberculosis has been regarded as a serious infectious threat to NHP species. Advances in the detection of MTBC open new possibilities for investigating the effects of this poorly understood pathogen in diverse populations of NHP. Here, we report results of a cross-sectional study using well-described molecular methods to detect a nucleic acid sequence (IS6110) unique to the MTBC. Sample collection was focused on the oral cavity, the presumed route of transmission of MTBC. Buccal swabs were collected from 263 macaques representing 11 species in four Asian countries and Gibraltar. Contexts of contact with humans included free ranging, pets, performing monkeys, zoos, and monkey temples. Following DNA isolation from buccal swabs, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified IS6110 from 84 (31.9%) of the macaques. In general, prevalence of MTBC DNA was higher among NHP in countries where the World Health Organization reports higher prevalence of humans infected with MTBC. This is the first demonstration of MTBC DNA in the mouths of macaques. Further research is needed to establish the significance of this finding at both the individual and population levels. PCR of buccal samples holds promise as a method to elucidate the mycobacterial landscape among NHP, particularly macaques that thrive in areas of high human MTBC prevalence. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  15. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  16. DNA Gyrase Inhibition Assays Are Necessary To Demonstrate Fluoroquinolone Resistance Secondary to gyrB Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Pantel, Alix; Petrella, Stéphanie; Matrat, Stéphanie; Brossier, Florence; Bastian, Sylvaine; Reitter, Delphine; Jarlier, Vincent; Mayer, Claudine; Aubry, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The main mechanism of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mutation in DNA gyrase (GyrA2GyrB2), especially in gyrA. However, the discovery of unknown mutations in gyrB whose implication in FQ resistance is unclear has become more frequent. We investigated the impact on FQ susceptibility of eight gyrB mutations in M. tuberculosis clinical strains, three of which were previously identified in an FQ-resistant strain. We measured FQ MICs and also DNA gyrase inhibition by FQs in order to clarify the role of these mutations in FQ resistance. Wild-type GyrA, wild-type GyrB, and mutant GyrB subunits produced from engineered gyrB alleles by mutagenesis were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and used to reconstitute highly active gyrase complexes. MICs and DNA gyrase inhibition were determined for moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and enoxacin. We demonstrated that the eight substitutions in GyrB (D473N, P478A, R485H, S486F, A506G, A547V, G551R, and G559A), recently identified in FQ-resistant clinical strains or encountered in M. tuberculosis strains isolated in France, are not implicated in FQ resistance. These results underline that, as opposed to phenotypic FQ susceptibility testing, the DNA gyrase inhibition assay is the only way to prove the role of a DNA gyrase mutation in FQ resistance. Therefore, the use of FQ in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) patients should not be ruled out only on the basis of the presence of mutations in gyrB. PMID:21768507

  17. DNA gyrase inhibition assays are necessary to demonstrate fluoroquinolone resistance secondary to gyrB mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Alix; Petrella, Stéphanie; Matrat, Stéphanie; Brossier, Florence; Bastian, Sylvaine; Reitter, Delphine; Jarlier, Vincent; Mayer, Claudine; Aubry, Alexandra

    2011-10-01

    The main mechanism of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mutation in DNA gyrase (GyrA(2)GyrB(2)), especially in gyrA. However, the discovery of unknown mutations in gyrB whose implication in FQ resistance is unclear has become more frequent. We investigated the impact on FQ susceptibility of eight gyrB mutations in M. tuberculosis clinical strains, three of which were previously identified in an FQ-resistant strain. We measured FQ MICs and also DNA gyrase inhibition by FQs in order to clarify the role of these mutations in FQ resistance. Wild-type GyrA, wild-type GyrB, and mutant GyrB subunits produced from engineered gyrB alleles by mutagenesis were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and used to reconstitute highly active gyrase complexes. MICs and DNA gyrase inhibition were determined for moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and enoxacin. We demonstrated that the eight substitutions in GyrB (D473N, P478A, R485H, S486F, A506G, A547V, G551R, and G559A), recently identified in FQ-resistant clinical strains or encountered in M. tuberculosis strains isolated in France, are not implicated in FQ resistance. These results underline that, as opposed to phenotypic FQ susceptibility testing, the DNA gyrase inhibition assay is the only way to prove the role of a DNA gyrase mutation in FQ resistance. Therefore, the use of FQ in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) patients should not be ruled out only on the basis of the presence of mutations in gyrB.

  18. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. PMID:25999340

  19. Novel mechanism of gene regulation: the protein Rv1222 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits transcription by anchoring the RNA polymerase onto DNA.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2015-07-13

    We propose a novel mechanism of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis where the protein Rv1222 inhibits transcription by anchoring RNA polymerase (RNAP) onto DNA. In contrast to our existing knowledge that transcriptional repressors function either by binding to DNA at specific sequences or by binding to RNAP, we show that Rv1222-mediated transcription inhibition requires simultaneous binding of the protein to both RNAP and DNA. We demonstrate that the positively charged C-terminus tail of Rv1222 is responsible for anchoring RNAP on DNA, hence the protein slows down the movement of RNAP along the DNA during transcription elongation. The interaction between Rv1222 and DNA is electrostatic, thus the protein could inhibit transcription from any gene. As Rv1222 slows down the RNA synthesis, upon expression of the protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis or Escherichia coli, the growth rate of the bacteria is severely impaired. The protein does not possess any significant affinity for DNA polymerase, thus, is unable to inhibit DNA synthesis. The proposed mechanism by which Rv1222 inhibits transcription reveals a new repertoire of prokaryotic gene regulation. © Crown copyright 2015.

  20. Extraction and detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from ZNCF-stained skin smear slides for better identification of negative skin smears.

    PubMed

    Kamble, R R; Shinde, V S; Madhale, S P; Kamble, A A; Ravikumar, B P; Jadhav, R S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Identification of Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy, is done by Ziehl Neelsen Carbol Fuchsin (ZNCF) stained slit skin smear microscopy that aids in the diagnosis and quantification of approximate bacterial load carried by the patient. We attempted M. leprae DNA extraction from 46 stained slit skin smear negative slides, using Proteinase K and SDS lysis, followed by ethanol precipitation. M. leprae specific primers (16SrRNA) were used for PCR-based amplification of DNA. We could detect M. leprae DNA in 15 (32.6%) samples. The method can be useful in the diagnosis of apparently slit skin smear negative leprosy cases.

  1. Use of DNA microarray chips for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Tang, Peijun; Wang, Xiafang; Shen, Xinghua; Shi, Meihua; Zhu, Xuefeng; Yu, Xin; Liu, Jia; Ling, Chunhua; Wu, Meiying

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential development of DNA microarray chips to detect rifampicin (RFP) and isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), using samples from clinical tuberculosis (TB) patients in Soochow City, China. The sputum samples of 42 patients with TB in the Affiliated Hospital of Infectious Diseases of Soochow University (Soochow, China) were collected. The conventional Lowenstein-Jensen culture medium (Gold Standard) was used to assess drug sensitivity using the absolute concentration method. GeeDom MTB drug detection kits were also used to create a DNA microarray chip and examine the RFP-resistance associated gene mutation points rpoB-RRDR 511, 513, 516, 526, 531 and 533, and the INH-resistance associated gene mutation points katG315 and inhA-15 of the sputum samples. Compared with the results from the absolute concentration method, the susceptibility and specificity of RFP sensitivity detected by the DNA microarray chip were 92.8 and 93.8%, respectively. The susceptibility and specificity of INH sensitivity detected were 66.7 and 81%, respectively. The rpoB-RRDR 526, 531 mutations were the primary causes of MTB RFP resistance and the katG315 mutation was the primary cause of INH resistance. The detection of rpoB and katG gene mutation points by a DNA microarray chip may be used as a rapid, accurate and bulk clinical detection method for RFP and INH resistance in MTB. This is very valuable for the control of TB epidemics.

  2. Mycobacterium leprae DNA in peripheral blood may indicate a bacilli migration route and high-risk for leprosy onset.

    PubMed

    Reis, E M; Araujo, S; Lobato, J; Neves, A F; Costa, A V; Gonçalves, M A; Goulart, L R; Goulart, I M B

    2014-05-01

    Leprosy epidemiological studies have been restricted to Mycobacterium leprae DNA detection in nasal and oral mucosa samples with scarce literature on peripheral blood. We present the largest study applying quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection of M. leprae DNA in peripheral blood samples of 200 untreated leprosy patients and 826 household contacts, with results associated with clinical and laboratory parameters. To detect M. leprae DNA a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting the M. leprae ML0024 genomic region was performed. The ML0024 qPCR in blood samples detected the presence of bacillus DNA in 22.0% (44/200) of the leprosy patients: 23.2% (16/69) in paucibacillary (PB), and 21.4% (28/131) in multibacillary (MB) patients. Overall positivity among contacts was 1.2% (10/826), with similar percentages regardless of whether the index case was PB or MB. After a follow-up period of 7 years, 26 contacts have developed leprosy. Comparing the results of healthy contacts with those that become ill, ML0024 qPCR positivity at the time of diagnosis of their index case represented an impressive 14.78-fold greater risk for leprosy onset (95% CI 3.6-60.8; p <0.0001). In brief, contacts with positive PCR in blood at diagnosis of index cases are at higher risk of later leprosy onset and this marker might be combined with other prognostic markers for management of contacts, which requires further studies.

  3. Comparison of fecal pooling methods and DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mita, Akiko; Mori, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Tetsuo; Tasaki, Tomoko; Utiyama, Katsuo; Mori, Hitomi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive method using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with pooled fecal samples for the screening of Johne's disease (JD). Manufacturer-specified and our new pooling method in combination with five commercial kits for DNA extraction and purification were compared. Different volumes of pooled fecal suspensions were tested, and the results were compared for individual samples and three pool sizes (5, 10, and 50 samples); each of the fecal suspensions, which were prepared from healthy dairy and beef cattle was spiked with 0, 10, 100, or 1000 cultured Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) organisms or was mixed with fecal suspensions from experimentally infected cattle. The MAP DNA detection proportion with our pooling method in combination with Johne-Spin kit (Fasmac, Japan) was 100% for all models and all pool sizes, except for the low shedder model with a pool size of 50. There was no loss of sensitivity in pools of 10 subjects or less by using the new method. These results suggest that new method is a sensitive, practical, and cost-effective screening test for the detection of MAP-infected cattle and the monitoring of JD-free herds.

  4. Rapid and sensitive method to identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cow's milk by DNA methylase genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José; Lopez, Osvaldo Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time.

  5. Rapid and Sensitive Method To Identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cow's Milk by DNA Methylase Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time. PMID:23275511

  6. Amplification of a species-specific DNA fragment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its possible use in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Del Portillo, P; Murillo, L A; Patarroyo, M E

    1991-01-01

    In recent work, a species-specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA fragment was cloned and sequenced. On the basis of its nucleotide sequence, two oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. A 396-bp fragment was specifically amplified from the M. tuberculosis genome. No amplification was observed from any of 10 different mycobacterial strains, included those belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex. Neither was this fragment amplified from genomes of humans or different species of clinically important bacteria. The PCR product was detected by dot blot hybridization even when as little as 10 fg of purified M. tuberculosis DNA was used. This amplification method was subsequently used to detect and identify bacilli in different clinical samples, such as sputum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. A good correlation was observed between the results obtained with the PCR method that we describe and other diagnostic tests currently used. Thus, PCR amplification of this genomic fragment is proposed as a specific, rapid, and sensitive test for the diagnosis of infection with M. tuberculosis. Images PMID:1939567

  7. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S

    2012-12-21

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3'-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotides and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologues of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both from a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5'-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ.

  8. Functional analysis of DNA gyrase mutant enzymes carrying mutations at position 88 in the A subunit found in clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Truffot-Pernot, Chantal; Camuset, Juliette; Bouvet, Elisabeth; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the enzymatic efficiency and inhibition by quinolones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrases carrying the previously described GyrA G88C mutation and the novel GyrA G88A mutation harbored by two multidrug-resistant clinical strains and reproduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Fluoroquinolone MICs and 50% inhibitory concentrations for both mutants were 2- to 43-fold higher than for the wild type, demonstrating that these mutations confer fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  9. Functional Analysis of DNA Gyrase Mutant Enzymes Carrying Mutations at Position 88 in the A Subunit Found in Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistant to Fluoroquinolones▿

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Truffot-Pernot, Chantal; Camuset, Juliette; Bouvet, Elisabeth; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the enzymatic efficiency and inhibition by quinolones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrases carrying the previously described GyrA G88C mutation and the novel GyrA G88A mutation harbored by two multidrug-resistant clinical strains and reproduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Fluoroquinolone MICs and 50% inhibitory concentrations for both mutants were 2- to 43-fold higher than for the wild type, demonstrating that these mutations confer fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:17015625

  10. A novel non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K.; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z′ = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery. PMID:23267008

  11. DNA consensus sequence motif for binding response regulator PhoP, a virulence regulator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Shuishu

    2014-12-30

    Tuberculosis has reemerged as a serious threat to human health because of the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant strains and synergetic infection with HIV, prompting an urgent need for new and more efficient treatments. The PhoP-PhoR two-component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays an important role in the virulence of the pathogen and thus represents a potential drug target. To study the mechanism of gene transcription regulation by response regulator PhoP, we identified a high-affinity DNA sequence for PhoP binding using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. The sequence contains a direct repeat of two 7 bp motifs separated by a 4 bp spacer, TCACAGC(N4)TCACAGC. The specificity of the direct-repeat sequence for PhoP binding was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PhoP binds to the direct repeat as a dimer in a highly cooperative manner. We found many genes previously identified to be regulated by PhoP that contain the direct-repeat motif in their promoter sequences. Synthetic DNA fragments at the putative promoter-binding sites bind PhoP with variable affinity, which is related to the number of mismatches in the 7 bp motifs, the positions of the mismatches, and the spacer and flanking sequences. Phosphorylation of PhoP increases the affinity but does not change the specificity of DNA binding. Overall, our results confirm the direct-repeat sequence as the consensus motif for PhoP binding and thus pave the way for identification of PhoP directly regulated genes in different mycobacterial genomes.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DinG is a structure-specific helicase that unwinds G4 DNA: implications for targeting G4 DNA as a novel therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Desingu, Ambika; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Rao, Desirazu N; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2014-09-05

    The significance of G-quadruplexes and the helicases that resolve G4 structures in prokaryotes is poorly understood. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is GC-rich and contains >10,000 sequences that have the potential to form G4 structures. In Escherichia coli, RecQ helicase unwinds G4 structures. However, RecQ is absent in M. tuberculosis, and the helicase that participates in G4 resolution in M. tuberculosis is obscure. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis DinG (MtDinG) exhibits high affinity for ssDNA and ssDNA translocation with a 5' → 3' polarity. Interestingly, MtDinG unwinds overhangs, flap structures, and forked duplexes but fails to unwind linear duplex DNA. Our data with DNase I footprinting provide mechanistic insights and suggest that MtDinG is a 5' → 3' polarity helicase. Notably, in contrast to E. coli DinG, MtDinG catalyzes unwinding of replication fork and Holliday junction structures. Strikingly, we find that MtDinG resolves intermolecular G4 structures. These data suggest that MtDinG is a multifunctional structure-specific helicase that unwinds model structures of DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as G4 structures. We finally demonstrate that promoter sequences of M. tuberculosis PE_PGRS2, mce1R, and moeB1 genes contain G4 structures, implying that G4 structures may regulate gene expression in M. tuberculosis. We discuss these data and implicate targeting G4 structures and DinG helicase in M. tuberculosis could be a novel therapeutic strategy for culminating the infection with this pathogen.

  13. Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR and DosR-DNA Complex Involved in Gene Activation during Adaptation to Hypoxic Latency

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Wu, Meiting; Rice, Adrian E; Roberts, David M; Sherman, David R; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    On encountering low oxygen conditions, DosR activates the transcription of 47 genes, promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a non-replicating state. Here, we report the crystal structures of the DosR C-terminal domain and its complex with a consensus DNA sequence of the hypoxia-induced gene promoter. The DosR C-terminal domain contains four {alpha}-helices and forms tetramers consisting of two dimers with non-intersecting dyads. In the DNA-bound structure, each DosR C-terminal domain in a dimer places its DNA-binding helix deep into the major groove, causing two bends in the DNA. DosR makes numerous protein-DNA base contacts using only three amino acid residues per subunit: Lys179, Lys182, and Asn183. The DosR tetramer is unique among response regulators with known structures.

  14. Diversity of DNA Fingerprints of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenhua; Barnes, Peter F.; Chaves, Fernando; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Weis, Stephen E.; Bates, Joseph H.; Cave, M. Donald

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the diversity of IS6110 fingerprints of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in the United States and to determine if matching IS6110 fingerprints represent recent interstate tuberculosis transmission, we performed restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,326 patients in three geographically separated states. Seven hundred ninety-five different IS6110 fingerprint patterns were generated, and pattern diversity was similar in each state. Ninety-six percent of the fingerprint patterns were observed in only one state, demonstrating that most IS6110 fingerprint patterns are confined to a single geographic location. Of the IS6110 fingerprint patterns that were shared by isolates from more than one state, most isolates with 1 to 5 IS6110 copies were separable by pTBN12 fingerprinting whereas those with >15 copies were not. One high-copy-number M. tuberculosis strain had identical IS6110 and pTBN12 fingerprints and included 57 isolates from three states. Epidemiological data demonstrated significant recent transmission of tuberculosis within each city but not among the states. This suggests that identical fingerprints of isolates from geographically separate locations most likely reflect interstate tuberculosis transmission in the past, with subsequent intrastate spread of disease. Further evaluation of M. tuberculosis strains that cause outbreaks in different geographic locations will provide insight into the epidemiological and bacteriological factors that facilitate the spread of tuberculosis. PMID:9542926

  15. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  16. Evaluation of method for secondary DNA typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with pTBN12 in epidemiologic study of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Chaves, F; Barnes, P F; Burman, W J; Koehler, J; Eisenach, K D; Bates, J H; Cave, M D

    1996-12-01

    Secondary fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA with a probe containing the polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence present in pTBN12 has been found to have greater discriminating power than does fingerprinting with the insertion sequence IS6110 for strains carrying few copies of IS6110. To validate the use of pTBN12 fingerprinting in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis, M. tuberculosis isolates from 67 patients in five states in the United States and in Spain were fingerprinted with both IS6110 and pTBN12. Epidemiologic links among the 67 patients were evaluated by patient interview and/or review of medical records. The 67 isolates had 5 IS6110 fingerprint patterns with two to five copies of IS6110 and 18 pTBN12 patterns, of which 10 were shared by more than 1 isolate. Epidemiologic links are consistently found among patients whose isolates had identical pTBN12 patterns, whereas no links were found among patients whose isolates had unique pTBN12 patterns. This suggests that pTBN12 fingerprinting is a useful tool to identify epidemiologically linked tuberculosis patients whose isolates have identical IS6110 fingerprints containing fewer than six fragments.

  17. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Based on Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats Used Alone and in Association with Spoligotyping

    PubMed Central

    Filliol, Ingrid; Ferdinand, Severine; Negroni, Laetitia; Sola, Christophe; Rastogi, Nalin

    2000-01-01

    Fingerprinting based on variable numbers of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), a recently described methodology, was evaluated for molecular typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an insular setting. In this study, VNTR fingerprinting was used alone or as a second-line test in association with spoligotyping, double-repetitive-element PCR (DRE-PCR), and IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and the discriminatory power for each method or the combination of methods was compared by calculating the Hunter-Gaston discriminative index (HGI). The results obtained showed that in 6 out of 12 (50%) cases, VNTR-defined clusters were further subdivided by spoligotyping, compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) cases where spoligotyping-defined clusters were further subdivided by VNTR. When used alone, VNTR was the least discriminatory method (HGI = 0.863). Although VNTR was significantly more discriminatory when used in association with spoligotyping (HGI = 0.982), the combination of spoligotyping and DRE-PCR (HGI = 0.992) was still the most efficient among rapid, PCR-based methodologies, giving results comparable to IS6110 RFLP analysis. Nonetheless, VNTR typing may provide additional phylogenetical information that may be helpful to trace the molecular evolution of tubercle bacilli. PMID:10878036

  18. Immune responses elicited by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant antigens and DNA constructs with potential for use in vaccination against porcine enzootic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Gonchoroski, Taylor; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Schuck, Desirée Cigaran; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2014-10-07

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia (PEP) and causes major economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Commercially available vaccines provide only partial protection and are relatively expensive. In this study, we assessed the humoral and cellular immune responses to three recombinant antigens of M. hyopneumoniae. Immune responses to selected domains of the P46, HSP70 and MnuA antigens (P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378), delivered as recombinant subunit or DNA vaccines, were evaluated in BALB/c mice. All purified recombinant antigens and two DNA vaccines, pcDNA3.1(+)/HSP70212-601 and pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378, elicited a strong humoral immune response, indicated by high IgG levels in the serum. The cellular immune response was assessed by detection of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 in splenocyte culture supernatants. The recombinant subunit and DNA vaccines induced Th1-polarized immune responses, as evidenced by increased levels of IFN-γ. All recombinant subunit vaccines and the pcDNA3.1(+)/MnuA182-378 vaccine also induced the secretion of IL-10, a Th2-type cytokine, in large quantities. The mixed Th1/Th2-type response may elicit an effective immune response against M. hyopneumoniae, suggesting that P46102-253, HSP70212-601 and MnuA182-378 are potential novel and promising targets for the development of vaccines against PEP.

  19. DNA vaccine with discontinuous T-cell epitope insertions into HSP65 scaffold as a potential means to improve immunogenicity of multi-epitope Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Manli; Li, Min; Yue, Yan; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    DNA-based vaccine is a promising candidate for immunization and induction of a T-cell-focused protective immune response against infectious pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). To induce multi-functional T response against multi-TB antigens, a multi-epitope DNA vaccine and a 'protein backbone grafting' design method is adopted to graft five discontinuous T-cell epitopes into HSP65 scaffold protein of M. tb for enhancement of epitope processing and immune presentation. A DNA plasmid with five T-cell epitopes derived from ESAT-6, Ag85B, MTB10.4, PPE25 and PE19 proteins of H37Rv strain of M. tb genetically inserted into HSP65 backbone was constructed and designated as pPES. After confirmation of its in vitro expression efficiency, pPES DNA was i.m. injected into C57BL/6 mice with four doses of 50 µg DNA followed by mycobacterial challenge 4 weeks after the final immunization. It was found that pPES DNA injection maintained the ability of HSP65 backbone to induce specific serum IgG. ELISPOT assay demonstrated that pPES epitope-scaffold construct was significantly more potent to induce IFN-γ(+) T response to five T-cell epitope proteins than other DNA constructs (with epitopes alone or with epitope series connected to HSP65), especially in multi-functional-CD4(+) T response. It also enhanced granzyme B(+) CTL and IL-2(+) CD8(+) T response. Furthermore, significantly improved protection against Mycobacterium bovis BCG challenge was achieved by pPES injection compared to other DNA constructs. Taken together, HSP65 scaffold grafting strategy for multi-epitope DNA vaccine represents a successful example of rational protein backbone engineering design and could prove useful in TB vaccine design. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Efficient diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis by detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in cerebrospinal fluid filtrates using PCR.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sagarika; Sharma, Neera; Gupta, V K; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2009-05-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most devastating form of meningitis and prompt diagnosis holds the key to its management. Conventional microbiology has limited utility and nucleic acid-based methods have not been widely accepted for various reasons. In view of the paucibacillary nature of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the recent demonstration of free Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in clinical specimens, the present study was designed to evaluate the utility of CSF 'filtrates' for the diagnosis of TBM using PCR. One hundred and sixty-seven CSF samples were analysed from patients with 'suspected' TBM (n=81) and a control group including other cases of meningitis or neurological disorders (n=86). CSF 'sediments' and 'filtrates' were analysed individually for M. tuberculosis DNA by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and conventional PCR. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were generated from qRT-PCR data and cut-off values of 84 and 30 were selected for calling a 'filtrate' or 'sediment' sample positive, respectively. Based on these, TBM was diagnosed with 87.6% and 53.1% sensitivity (P<0.001) in 'filtrates' and 'sediments', respectively, and with 92% specificity each. Conventional devR and IS6110 PCR were also significantly more sensitive in 'filtrates' versus 'sediments' (sensitivity of 87.6% and 85.2% vs 31% and 39.5%, respectively; P<0.001). The qRT-PCR test yielded a positive likelihood ratio of 11 and 6.6 by analysing 'filtrate' and 'sediment' fractions, respectively, which establishes the superiority of the 'filtrate'-based assay over the 'sediment' assay. PCR findings were separately verified in 10 confirmed cases of TBM, where M. tuberculosis DNA was detected using devR PCR assays in 'sediment' and 'filtrate' fractions of all samples. From this study, we conclude that (i) CSF 'filtrates' contain a substantial amount of M. tuberculosis DNA and (ii) 'filtrates' and not 'sediments' are likely to reliably provide a PCR-based diagnosis in 'suspected

  1. A dengue DNA vaccine formulated with Vaxfectin® is well tolerated, and elicits strong neutralizing antibody responses to all four dengue serotypes in New Zealand white rabbits.

    PubMed

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Luke, Thomas; Doukas, John; Danko, Janine; Porter, Kevin; Burgess, Timothy; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2012-12-01

    A tetravalent DNA vaccine formulated with Vaxfectin adjuvant was shown to elicit high levels of neutralizing antibody against all four dengue virus serotypes (Porter et al., ( 16) ), warranting further testing in humans. In preparation for a phase 1 clinical testing, the vaccine and the adjuvant were manufactured under current good manufacturing practice guidelines. The formulated vaccine and the adjuvant were tested for safety and/or immunogenicity in New Zealand white rabbits using a repeat dose toxicology study. The formulated vaccine and the adjuvant were found to be well tolerated by the animals. Animals injected with formulated vaccine produced strong neutralizing antibody response to all four dengue serotypes.

  2. Aroclor 1254 pretreatment effects on DNA repair in rat hepatocytes elicited by in vivo or in vitro exposure to various chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.; Dietz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Inducers of liver mixed function oxidase (MFO) activities have profound effects on the genotoxicity of substances that undergo metabolic activation by the MFO system. The polychlorinated biphenyl mixture Aroclor 1254 is a broad-spectrum inducer of liver MFO activities that has been employed as a pretreatment to augment the metabolic activation capabilities of rat liver fractions used in a number of short-term tests for genotoxicity, including the Ames Salmonella/bacterial mutagenicity assay. The present study was designed to characterize the effects of Aroclor pretreatment of rats on the DNA repair responses elicited by various chemicals in the in vitro hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay as well as the in vivo/in vitro HPC/DR assay. The amount of DNA repair produced in vitro by diethylnitrosamine (DEN), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P0, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC), 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), o-aminoazotoluene (o-AT), and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was significantly greater in hepatocytes derived from Aroclor-pretreated rats than in control rat hepatocytes. The pretreatment-related potentiation of DNA repair observed for 6 out of 12 compounds tested in vitro was considered to be due to enhanced metabolic activation. These results suggested that pretreatment with Aroclor may increase the sensitivity of the in vitro HPC/DR assay to certain compounds. In contrast, Aroclor pretreatment had little effect on the amount of hepatocellular DNA repair elicited by in vivo administration of DMN, DEN, o-AT, 2-AFF, 3-MC, or AFB1, which indicated that this pretreatment regimen may have little utility for improving the sensitivity of the in vivo/in vitro HPC/DR assay.

  3. Dynamics of fluoroquinolones induced resistance in DNA gyrase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Bharati; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Kaur, Jagdeep; Grover, Abhinav

    2017-01-27

    DNA gyrase is a validated target of fluoroquinolones which are key components of multidrug resistance tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Most frequent occurring mutations associated with high level of resistance to fluoroquinolone in clinical isolates of TB patients are A90V, D94G, and A90V-D94G (double mutant [DM]), present in the larger subunit of DNA Gyrase. In order to explicate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance corresponding to these mutations, molecular dynamics (MD) and mechanics approach was applied. Structure-based molecular docking of complex comprised of DNA bound with Gyrase A (large subunit) and Gyrase C (small subunit) with moxifloxacin (MFX) revealed high binding affinity to wild type with considerably high Glide XP docking score of -7.88 kcal/mol. MFX affinity decreases toward single mutants and was minimum toward the DM with a docking score of -3.82 kcal/mol. Docking studies were also performed against 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin which exhibited higher binding affinity against wild and mutants DNA gyrase when compared to MFX. Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area method predicted the binding free energy of the wild, A90V, D94G, and DM complexes to be -55.81, -25.87, -20.45, and -12.29 kcal/mol, respectively. These complexes were further subjected to 30 ns long MD simulations to examine significant interactions and conformational flexibilities in terms of root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, and strength of hydrogen bond formed. This comparative drug interaction analysis provides systematic insights into the mechanism behind drug resistance and also paves way toward identifying potent lead compounds that could combat drug resistance of DNA gyrase due to mutations.

  4. Development of acridine derivatives as selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Medapi, Brahmam; Meda, Nikhila; Kulkarni, Pushkar; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2016-02-15

    In this study we have designed p-phenylene diamine linked acridine derivative from our earlier reported quinoline-aminopiperidine hybrid MTB DNA gyrase inhibitors with aiming more potency and less cardiotoxicity. We synthesized thirty six compounds using four step synthesis from 2-chloro benzoic acid. Among them compound 4-chloro-N-(4-((2-methylacridin-9-yl)amino)phenyl)benzenesulphonamide (6) was found to be more potent with MTB DNA gyrase super coiling IC50 of 5.21±0.51μM; MTB MIC of 6.59μM and no zHERG cardiotoxicity at 30μM and 11.78% inhibition at 50μM against mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Double Mutants in DNA Gyrase Lead to Ofloxacin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Bharati; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Kaur, Jagdeep; Grover, Abhinav

    2017-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are among the most important classes of highly effective antibacterial drugs, exhibiting wide range of activity to cure infectious diseases. Ofloxacin is second generation fluoroquinolone approved by FDA for the treatment of tuberculosis by selectively inhibiting DNA gyrase. However, the emergence of drug resistance owing to mutations in DNA gyrase poses intimidating challenge for the effective therapy of this drug. The double mutants GyrA(A90V) GyrB(D500N) and GyrA(A90V) GyrB(T539N) are reported to be implicated in conferring higher levels of OFX resistance. The present study was designed to unravel the molecular principles behind development of resistance by the bug against fluoroquinolones. Our results highlighted that polar interactions play critical role in the development of drug resistance and highlight the significant correlation between the free energy calculations predicted by MM-PBSA and stability of the ligand-bound complexes. Modifications at the OFX binding pocket due to amino acid substitution leads to fewer hydrogen bonds in mutants DNA gyrase-OFX complex, which determined the low susceptibility of the ligand in inhibiting the mutant protein. This study provides a structural rationale to the mutation-based resistance to ofloxacin and will pave way for development potent fluoroquinolone-based resistant-defiant drugs. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2950-2957, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. DNA vaccine elicits an efficient antitumor response by targeting the mutant Kras in a transgenic mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Weng, T-Y; Yen, M-C; Huang, C-T; Hung, J-J; Chen, Y-L; Chen, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, J-Y; Lai, M-D

    2014-10-01

    Mutant Kras (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) is observed in more than 20% of non-small-cell lung cancers; however, no effective Kras target therapy is available at present. The Kras DNA vaccine may represent as a novel immunotherapeutic agent in lung cancer. In this study, we investigated the antitumor efficacy of the Kras DNA vaccine in a genetically engineered inducible mouse lung tumor model driven by Kras(G12D). Lung tumors were induced by doxycycline, and the therapeutic effects of Kras DNA vaccine were evaluated with delivery of Kras(G12D) plasmids. Mutant Kras(G12D) DNA vaccine significantly decreased the tumor nodules. A dominant-negative mutant Kras(G12D)N17, devoid of oncogenic activity, achieved similar therapeutic effects. The T-helper 1 immune response was enhanced in mice treated with Kras DNA vaccine. Splenocytes from mice receiving Kras DNA vaccine presented an antigen-specific response by treatment with peptides of Kras but not Hras or OVA. The number of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells increased after Kras vaccination. In contrast, Kras DNA vaccine was not effective in the lung tumor in transgenic mice, which was induced by mutant L858R epidermal growth factor receptor. Overall, these results indicate that Kras DNA vaccine produces an effective antitumor response in transgenic mice, and may be useful in treating lung cancer-carrying Ras mutation.

  7. Rapid Identification of Mycobacteria and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Use of a Single Multiplex PCR and DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Boyle, David S.; Ingham, Zachary K.; Ostash, Alla; Gautom, Romesh K.; Colombel, Craig; Houze, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant global health problem for which rapid diagnosis is critical to both treatment and control. This report describes a multiplex PCR method, the Mycobacterial IDentification and Drug Resistance Screen (MID-DRS) assay, which allows identification of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and the simultaneous amplification of targets for sequencing-based drug resistance screening of rifampin-resistant (rifampinr), isoniazidr, and pyrazinamider TB. Additionally, the same multiplex reaction amplifies a specific 16S rRNA gene target for rapid identification of M. avium complex (MAC) and a region of the heat shock protein 65 gene (hsp65) for further DNA sequencing-based confirmation or identification of other mycobacterial species. Comparison of preliminary results generated with MID-DRS versus culture-based methods for a total of 188 bacterial isolates demonstrated MID-DRS sensitivity and specificity as 100% and 96.8% for MTBC identification; 100% and 98.3% for MAC identification; 97.4% and 98.7% for rifampinr TB identification; 60.6% and 100% for isoniazidr TB identification; and 75.0% and 98.1% for pyrazinamider TB identification. The performance of the MID-DRS was also tested on acid-fast-bacterium (AFB)-positive clinical specimens, resulting in sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 78.6% for detection of MTBC and 100% and 97.8% for detection of MAC. In conclusion, use of the MID-DRS reduces the time necessary for initial identification and drug resistance screening of TB specimens to as little as 2 days. Since all targets needed for completing the assay are included in a single PCR amplification step, assay costs, preparation time, and risks due to user errors are also reduced. PMID:22162548

  8. Xpert MTB/RIF Assay Shows Faster Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA with Higher Levels of Rifapentine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A.; Savic, R. M.; Everett, C. K.; Benator, D.; Alland, D.; Heilig, C. M.; Weiner, M.; Friedrich, S. O.; Martinson, N. A.; Kerrigan, A.; Zamudio, C.; Goldberg, S. V.; Whitworth, W. C.; Davis, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Xpert MTB/RIF assay is both sensitive and specific as a diagnostic test. Xpert also reports quantitative output in cycle threshold (CT) values, which may provide a dynamic measure of sputum bacillary burden when used longitudinally. We evaluated the relationship between Xpert CT trajectory and drug exposure during tuberculosis (TB) treatment to assess the potential utility of Xpert CT for treatment monitoring. We obtained serial sputum samples from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB who were consecutively enrolled at 10 international clinical trial sites participating in study 29X, a CDC-sponsored Tuberculosis Trials Consortium study evaluating the tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of rifapentine at daily doses of up to 20 mg/kg of body weight. Xpert was performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Longitudinal CT data were modeled using a nonlinear mixed effects model in relation to rifapentine exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]). The rate of change of CT was higher in subjects receiving rifapentine than in subjects receiving standard-dose rifampin. Moreover, rifapentine exposure, but not assigned dose, was significantly associated with rate of change in CT (P = 0.02). The estimated increase in CT slope for every additional 100 μg · h/ml of rifapentine drug exposure (as measured by AUC) was 0.11 CT/week (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.17). Increasing rifapentine exposure is associated with a higher rate of change of Xpert CT, indicating faster clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. These data suggest that the quantitative outputs of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay may be useful as a dynamic measure of TB treatment response. PMID:27733634

  9. Xpert MTB/RIF Assay Shows Faster Clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA with Higher Levels of Rifapentine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, A; Savic, R M; Everett, C K; Benator, D; Alland, D; Heilig, C M; Weiner, M; Friedrich, S O; Martinson, N A; Kerrigan, A; Zamudio, C; Goldberg, S V; Whitworth, W C; Davis, J L; Nahid, P

    2016-12-01

    The Xpert MTB/RIF assay is both sensitive and specific as a diagnostic test. Xpert also reports quantitative output in cycle threshold (CT) values, which may provide a dynamic measure of sputum bacillary burden when used longitudinally. We evaluated the relationship between Xpert CT trajectory and drug exposure during tuberculosis (TB) treatment to assess the potential utility of Xpert CT for treatment monitoring. We obtained serial sputum samples from patients with smear-positive pulmonary TB who were consecutively enrolled at 10 international clinical trial sites participating in study 29X, a CDC-sponsored Tuberculosis Trials Consortium study evaluating the tolerability, safety, and antimicrobial activity of rifapentine at daily doses of up to 20 mg/kg of body weight. Xpert was performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Longitudinal CT data were modeled using a nonlinear mixed effects model in relation to rifapentine exposure (area under the concentration-time curve [AUC]). The rate of change of CT was higher in subjects receiving rifapentine than in subjects receiving standard-dose rifampin. Moreover, rifapentine exposure, but not assigned dose, was significantly associated with rate of change in CT (P = 0.02). The estimated increase in CT slope for every additional 100 μg · h/ml of rifapentine drug exposure (as measured by AUC) was 0.11 CT/week (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05 to 0.17). Increasing rifapentine exposure is associated with a higher rate of change of Xpert CT, indicating faster clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. These data suggest that the quantitative outputs of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay may be useful as a dynamic measure of TB treatment response.

  10. Robust vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses in breast milk following systemic simian immunodeficiency virus DNA prime and live virus vector boost vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew B; Christian, Elizabeth C; Seaman, Michael S; Sircar, Piya; Carville, Angela; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Barouch, Dan H; Letvin, Norman L; Permar, Sallie R

    2010-12-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Enhancement of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in milk of HIV-infected mothers through vaccination may reduce milk virus load or protect against virus transmission in the infant gastrointestinal tract. However, the ability of HIV/SIV strategies to induce virus-specific immune responses in milk has not been studied. In this study, five uninfected, hormone-induced lactating, Mamu A*01(+) female rhesus monkey were systemically primed and boosted with rDNA and the attenuated poxvirus vector, NYVAC, containing the SIVmac239 gag-pol and envelope genes. The monkeys were boosted a second time with a recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 vector containing matching immunogens. The vaccine-elicited immunodominant epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte response in milk was of similar or greater magnitude than that in blood and the vaginal tract but higher than that in the colon. Furthermore, the vaccine-elicited SIV Gag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte polyfunctional cytokine responses were more robust in milk than in blood after each virus vector boost. Finally, SIV envelope-specific IgG responses were detected in milk of all monkeys after vaccination, whereas an SIV envelope-specific IgA response was only detected in one vaccinated monkey. Importantly, only limited and transient increases in the proportion of activated or CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T lymphocytes in milk occurred after vaccination. Therefore, systemic DNA prime and virus vector boost of lactating rhesus monkeys elicits potent virus-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in milk and may warrant further investigation as a strategy to impede breast milk transmission of HIV.

  11. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future.

  12. An efficient synthesis and biological screening of benzofuran and benzo[d]isothiazole derivatives for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA GyrB inhibition.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kummetha Indrasena; Srihari, Konduri; Renuka, Janupally; Sree, Komanduri Shruthi; Chuppala, Aruna; Jeankumar, Variam Ullas; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Babu, Kondra Sudhakar; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2014-12-01

    A series of twenty eight molecules of ethyl 5-(piperazin-1-yl)benzofuran-2-carboxylate and 3-(piperazin-1-yl)benzo[d]isothiazole were designed by molecular hybridization of thiazole aminopiperidine core and carbamide side chain in eight steps and were screened for their in vitro Mycobacterium smegmatis (MS) GyrB ATPase assay, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA gyrase super coiling assay, antitubercular activity, cytotoxicity and protein-inhibitor interaction assay through differential scanning fluorimetry. Also the orientation and the ligand-protein interactions of the top hit molecules with MS DNA gyrase B subunit active site were investigated applying extra precision mode (XP) of Glide. Among the compounds studied, 4-(benzo[d]isothiazol-3-yl)-N-(4-chlorophenyl)piperazine-1-carboxamide (26) was found to be the most promising inhibitor with an MS GyrB IC50 of 1.77 ± 0.23 μM, 0.42 ± 0.23 against MTB DNA gyrase, MTB MIC of 3.64 μM, and was not cytotoxic in eukaryotic cells at 100 μM. Moreover the interaction of protein-ligand complex was stable and showed a positive shift of 3.5 °C in differential scanning fluorimetric evaluations

  13. DNA vaccine encoding avian influenza virus H5 and Esat-6 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis improved antibody responses against AIV in chickens.

    PubMed

    Oveissi, Sara; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Yusoff, Khatijah; Jahanshiri, Fatemeh; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2010-12-01

    The H5 gene of avian influenza virus (AIV) strain A/chicken/Malaysia/5744/2004(H5N1) was cloned into pcDNA3.1 vector, and Esat-6 gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was fused into downstream of the H5 gene as a genetic adjuvant for DNA vaccine candidates. The antibody level against AIV was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Sera obtained from specific-pathogen-free chickens immunized with pcDNA3.1/H5 and pcDNA3.1/H5/Esat-6 demonstrated antibody responses as early as 2 weeks after the first immunization. Furthermore, the overall HI antibody titer in chickens immunized with pcDNA3.1/H5/Esat-6 was higher compared to the chickens immunized with pcDNA3.1/H5 (p<0.05). The results suggested that Esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis is a potential genetic adjuvant for the development of effective H5 DNA vaccine in chickens. Crown Copyright © 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Administration of HPV DNA vaccine via electroporation elicits the strongest CD8+ T cell immune responses compared to intramuscular injection and intradermal gene gun delivery.

    PubMed

    Best, Simon R; Peng, Shiwen; Juang, Chi-Mou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2009-09-04

    DNA vaccines are an attractive approach to eliciting antigen-specific immunity. Intracellular targeting of tumor antigens through its linkage to immunostimulatory molecules such as calreticulin (CRT) can improve antigen processing and presentation through the MHC class I pathway and increase cytotoxic CD8+ T cell production. However, even with these enhancements, the efficacy of such immunotherapeutic strategies is dependent on the identification of an effective route and method of DNA administration. Electroporation and gene gun-mediated particle delivery are leading methods of DNA vaccine delivery that can generate protective and therapeutic levels of immune responses in experimental models. In this study, we perform a head-to-head comparison of three methods of vaccination--conventional intramuscular injection, electroporation-mediated intramuscular delivery, and epidermal gene gun-mediated particle delivery--in the ability to generate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses as well as anti-tumor immune responses against an HPV-16 E7 expressing tumor cell line using the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Vaccination via electroporation generated the highest number of E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which correlated to improved outcomes in the treatment of growing tumors. In addition, we demonstrate that electroporation results in significantly higher levels of circulating protein compared to gene gun or intramuscular vaccination, which likely enhances calreticulin's role as a local tumor anti-angiogenesis agent. We conclude that electroporation is a promising method for delivery of HPV DNA vaccines and should be considered for DNA vaccine delivery in human clinical trials.

  15. Administration of HPV DNA vaccine via electroporation elicits the strongest CD8+ T cell immune responses compared to intramuscular injection and intradermal gene gun delivery

    PubMed Central

    Best, Simon R.; Peng, Shiwen; Juang, Chi-Mou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R.; Wu, T.-C.; Pai, Sara I.

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccines are an attractive approach to eliciting antigen-specific immunity. Intracellular targeting of tumor antigens through its linkage to immunostimulatory molecules such as calreticulin (CRT) can improve antigen processing and presentation through the MHC Class I pathway and increase cytotoxic CD8+ T cell production. However, even with these enhancements, the efficacy of such immunotherapeutic strategies is dependent on the identification of an effective route and method of DNA administration. Electroporation and gene gun-mediated particle delivery are leading methods of DNA vaccine delivery that can generate protective and therapeutic levels of immune responses in experimental models. In this study, we perform a head-to-head comparison of three methods of vaccination – conventional intramuscular injection, electroporation mediated intramuscular delivery, and epidermal gene gun-mediated particle delivery - in the ability to generate antigen specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses as well as anti-tumor immune responses against an HPV-16 E7 expressing tumor cell line using the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Vaccination via electroporation generated the highest number of E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which correlated to improved outcomes in the treatment of growing tumors. In addition, we demonstrate that electroporation results in significantly higher levels of circulating protein compared to gene gun or intramuscular vaccination, which likely enhances calreticulin’s role as a local tumor anti-angiogenesis agent. We conclude that electroporation is a promising method for delivery of HPV DNA vaccines and should be considered for DNA vaccine delivery in human clinical trials. PMID:19622402

  16. Priming with two DNA vaccines expressing hepatitis C virus NS3 protein targeting dendritic cells elicits superior heterologous protective potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yin, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    Development an effective vaccine may offer an alternative preventive and therapeutic strategy against HCV infection. DNA vaccination has been shown to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity and overcome many problems associated with conventional vaccines. In this study, mice were primed with either conventional pVRC-based or suicidal pSC-based DNA vaccines carrying DEC-205-targeted NS3 antigen (DEC-NS3) and boosted with type 5 adenoviral vectors encoding the partial NS3 and core antigens (C44P). The prime boost regimen induced a marked increase in antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses in comparison with either rAd5-based vaccines or DEC-205-targeted DNA immunization in isolation. The protective effect against heterogeneous challenge was correlated with high levels of anti-NS3 IgG and T-cell-mediated immunity against NS3 peptides. Moreover, priming with a suicidal DNA vaccine (pSC-DEC-NS3), which elicited increased TNF-α-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against NS3-2 peptides (aa 1245-1461), after boosting, showed increased heterogeneous protective potential compared with priming with a conventional DNA vaccine (pVRC-DEC-NS3). In conclusion, a suicidal DNA vector (pSC-DEC-NS3) expressing DEC-205-targeted NS3 combined with boosting using an rAd5-based HCV vaccine (rAd5-C44P) is a good candidate for a safe and effective vaccine against HCV infection.

  17. DNA polymorphism in Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, "wood pigeon mycobacteria," and related mycobacteria analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Frébault, V V; Thorel, M F; Varnerot, A; Gicquel, B

    1989-01-01

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis strains, mycobacteria from patients suffering from Crohn's disease, "wood pigeon mycobacteria," and representatives of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare were compared by restriction endonuclease DraI digestion and field inversion gel electrophoresis. Characteristic profiles were seen for M. paratuberculosis, including isolates from patients suffering from Crohn's disease, for wood pigeon mycobacteria, and for M. avium-M. intracellulare serotypes 2, 16, 18, and 19. Two M. paratuberculosis strains used for vaccine production (St 18 and 316 F) presented patterns different from those of the other M. paratuberculosis strains. Strains St 18 yielded a pattern identical to that of the M. avium type strain serotype 2, whereas 316 F gave a unique pattern. The method developed in this study represents a useful taxonomic tool for the identification and classification of mycobacteria. Images PMID:2574186

  18. A novel vaccine p846 encoding Rv3615c, Mtb10.4, and Rv2660c elicits robust immune response and alleviates lung injury induced by Mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hongmei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective anti-tuberculosis (TB) vaccines is one of the important steps to improve control of TB. Cell-mediated immune response significantly affects the control of M. tuberculosis infection. Thus, vaccines able to elicit strong cellular immune response hold special advantages against TB. In this study, three well-defined mycobacterial antigens (Rv3615c, Mtb10.4 [Rv0228], and Rv2660c) were engineered as a novel triple-antigen fusion DNA vaccine p846. The p846 vaccine consists of a high density of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. Intramuscular immunization of p846 induced robust T cells mediated immune response comparable to that of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination but more effective than that of individual antigen vaccination. After mycobacterial challenge, p846 immunization decreased bacterial burden at least 15-fold compared with individual antigen-based vaccination. Notably, the lungs of mice immunized with p846 exhibited fewer inflammatory cell infiltrates and less damage than those of control group mice. Our data demonstrate that the potential of p846 vaccine to protect against TB and the feasibility of this design strategy for further TB vaccine development.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB1 is an essential DNA-binding protein with a nitric oxide-sensitive iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura J; Stapleton, Melanie R; Fullstone, Gavin J M; Crack, Jason C; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E; Hunt, Debbie M; Harvey, Evelyn; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Buxton, Roger S; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-12-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major pathogen that has the ability to establish, and emerge from, a persistent state. Wbl family proteins are associated with developmental processes in actinomycetes, and M. tuberculosis has seven such proteins. In the present study it is shown that the M. tuberculosis H37Rv whiB1 gene is essential. The WhiB1 protein possesses a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is stable in air but reacts rapidly with eight equivalents of nitric oxide to yield two dinuclear dinitrosyl-iron thiol complexes. The [4Fe-4S] form of WhiB1 did not bind whiB1 promoter DNA, but the reduced and oxidized apo-WhiB1, and nitric oxide-treated holo-WhiB1 did bind to DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis RNA polymerase induced transcription of whiB1 in vitro; however, in the presence of apo-WhiB1, transcription was severely inhibited, irrespective of the presence or absence of the CRP (cAMP receptor protein) Rv3676, which is known to activate whiB1 expression. Footprinting suggested that autorepression of whiB1 is achieved by apo-WhiB1 binding at a region that overlaps the core promoter elements. A model incorporating regulation of whiB1 expression in response to nitric oxide and cAMP is discussed with implications for sensing two important signals in establishing M. tuberculosis infections.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis WhiB1 is an essential DNA-binding protein with a nitric oxide sensitive iron-sulphur cluster

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura J.; Stapleton, Melanie R.; Fullstone, Gavin J. M.; Crack, Jason C.; Thomson, Andrew J.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Hunt, Debbie M.; Harvey, Evelyn; Adinolfi, Salvatore; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major pathogen that has the ability to establish, and emerge from, a persistent state. Wbl family proteins are associated with developmental processes in actinomycetes, and M. tuberculosis has seven such proteins. Here it is shown that the M. tuberculosis H37Rv whiB1 gene is essential. The WhiB1 protein possesses a [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster that is stable in air but reacts rapidly with eight equivalents of nitric oxide to yield two dinuclear dinitrosyl-iron thiol complexes. The [4Fe-4S] form of WhiB1 did not bind whiB1 promoter DNA, but the reduced and oxidized apo-WhiB1, and nitric oxide-treated holo-WhiB1 did bind to DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis RNA polymerase induced transcription of whiB1 in vitro; however in the presence of apo-WhiB1 transcription was severely inhibited, irrespective of the presence or absence of the CRP protein Rv3676, which is known to activate whiB1 expression. Footprinting suggested that autorepression of whiB1 is achieved by apo-WhiB1 binding at a region that overlaps the core promoter elements. A model incorporating regulation of whiB1 expression in response to nitric oxide and cAMP is discussed with implications for sensing two important signals in establishing M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:20929442

  1. A Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) DNA Vaccine Delivered Using a Spring-powered Jet Injector Elicits a Potent Neutralizing Antibody
Response in Rabbits and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M.; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W.

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis® (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis® and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found that

  2. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  3. Paleopathological Evidence and Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from Archaeological Skeletal Remains of Nabe-kaburi (Head-Covered with Iron Pots) Burials in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Kazunari; Luo, Yuqian; Ishido, Yuko; Mori, Shuichi; Hirata, Kazuaki; Ishii, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    The Nabe-kaburi is a unique burial method, the purpose of which is shrouded in mystery. The burials were performed during the 15th to 18th centuries in eastern Japan, and involved covering the heads of the deceased with iron pots or mortars. The identification of leprosy-specific osteological lesions among some of the excavated remains has led to the suggestion that Nabe-kaburi burials were a reflection of the social stigma against certain infectious diseases, such as leprosy, tuberculosis or syphilis. However, molecular evidence for the presence of disease has been lacking. The goal of this study was to detect Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) DNA in archaeological human skeletal remains from Nabe-kaburi burials. The paleopathological data from three Nabe-kaburi burials were re-evaluated before small samples were taken from affected and control areas. DNA was extracted and used as a template to target the M. leprae-specific DNA using a combination of whole genome amplification, PCR analysis and DNA sequencing. M. leprae DNA fragments were detected in the two sets of skeletal remains that had also shown paleopathological evidence of leprosy. These findings provide definitive evidence that some of the Nabe-kaburi burials were performed for people affected by leprosy. Demonstration of the presence of M. leprae DNA, combined with archeological and anthropological examinations, will aid in solving the mystery of why Nabe-kaburi burials were performed in medieval Japan. PMID:24516638

  4. Paleopathological evidence and detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from archaeological skeletal remains of Nabe-kaburi (head-covered with iron pots) burials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Saso, Aiko; Hoshino, Keigo; Sakurai, Junya; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Luo, Yuqian; Ishido, Yuko; Mori, Shuichi; Hirata, Kazuaki; Ishii, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    The Nabe-kaburi is a unique burial method, the purpose of which is shrouded in mystery. The burials were performed during the 15(th) to 18(th) centuries in eastern Japan, and involved covering the heads of the deceased with iron pots or mortars. The identification of leprosy-specific osteological lesions among some of the excavated remains has led to the suggestion that Nabe-kaburi burials were a reflection of the social stigma against certain infectious diseases, such as leprosy, tuberculosis or syphilis. However, molecular evidence for the presence of disease has been lacking. The goal of this study was to detect Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) DNA in archaeological human skeletal remains from Nabe-kaburi burials. The paleopathological data from three Nabe-kaburi burials were re-evaluated before small samples were taken from affected and control areas. DNA was extracted and used as a template to target the M. leprae-specific DNA using a combination of whole genome amplification, PCR analysis and DNA sequencing. M. leprae DNA fragments were detected in the two sets of skeletal remains that had also shown paleopathological evidence of leprosy. These findings provide definitive evidence that some of the Nabe-kaburi burials were performed for people affected by leprosy. Demonstration of the presence of M. leprae DNA, combined with archeological and anthropological examinations, will aid in solving the mystery of why Nabe-kaburi burials were performed in medieval Japan.

  5. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  6. Clinical value of polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of joint tuberculosis by detecting the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Lou, Si-quan; Wen, Jian-min; Lv, Wei-xin; Jiao, Chang-geng; Yang, Su-min; Xu, Hai-bin

    2011-02-01

    To assess the clinical value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of joint tuberculosis (TB). PCR was used blindly to detect the DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.TB) in five specimens of M.TB, 5 of BCG, and 10 of other bacteria. Then, M. TB in 98 samples from patients with joint TB and 100 samples from patients with non-tubercular joint disorders were detected by PCR, acid-fast staining and culture,. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PCR were calculated. The χ2 test was used for statistical analysis of the frequency of various factors. At the same time, some problems with PCR were also systematically analyzed. (1) In the "standard samples", both M. TB and BCG showed positive while other bacteria were negative. (2) In 98 cases from patients with joint TB, 81 were positive by PCR, 6 by acid-fast staining, and 17 by culture. In 100 cases from patients with non-tuberculous joint disorders, 9 were positive by PCR, and none by either acid-fast staining or culture. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive value of PCR were 82.65% (81/98), 91.00% (91/100), 86.87% (172/198), 90.00% (81/90) and 84.26% (91/108), respectively. (3) The positive rates for PCR, acid-fast staining and culture in detection of M. TB were 82.65% (81/98), 6.12% (6/98), and 17.34% (17/98), respectively. There were statistically significant differences between the three methods (P < 0.001). (4) The process of PCR is automatic, and can be completed within 3 to 6 hours, whereas 4 to 8 weeks are required for the conventional culture of M. TB. PCR is a sensitive, specific, rapid, simple and minimally invasive method for detection of M. TB in samples from joint TB, and can play an important role in early and rapid diagnosis and differential diagnosis of joint TB. But it also has some limitations, such as false positivity and false negativity. © 2011 Tianjin Hospital

  7. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-10-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8(+) T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses.

  8. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  9. Broad humoral and cellular immunity elicited by a bivalent DNA vaccine encoding HA and NP genes from an H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Ling, Zhi-Yang; Sun, Liang; Xu, Ying; Bian, Chao; He, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Chen, Ze; Sun, Bing

    2011-02-01

    Influenza A virus is highly variable and a major viral respiratory pathogen that can cause severe illness in humans. Therefore it is important to induce a sufficient immune response specific to current strains and to heterosubtypic viruses with vaccines. In this study, we developed a dual-promoter-based bivalent DNA vaccine that encodes both hemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) proteins from a highly pathogenic A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004 (H5N1) virus. Our results show that the expression levels of HA and NP genes from the dual-promoter plasmid are similar to those seen when they are expressed individually in independent plasmids. When the bivalent DNA vaccine was inoculated via intramuscular injection and in vivo electroporation, high levels of both humoral and cellular immune responses were elicited against homologous H5N1 virus and heterosubtypic H9N2 virus. Furthermore, no obvious antigenic competition was observed between HA and NP proteins in the dual-promoter-based bivalent vaccine compared to monovalent vaccines. Our data suggest that a combination of influenza surface and internal viral genes in a dual-promoter-expressing plasmid may provide a new approach for developing a DNA vaccine that may protect not only specifically against a currently circulating strain, but also may cross-protect broadly against new heterosubtypic viruses.

  10. Using DNA fingerprinting to detect transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among AIDS patients in two health-care facilities in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, K A; Schulte, J M; Valway, S E; Joglar, O T; Rios, N; Sheppard, J D; Onorato, I M

    2000-08-01

    Fourteen cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Puerto Rico, diagnosed from April 1993 to April 1995, had the same DNA fingerprint, documenting disease caused by the same strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The 14 cases were retrospectively investigated for epidemiologic links. Records were reviewed and staffs of the TB program, hospital/clinic, and AIDS residential facilities were interviewed. Half of the AIDS cases were epidemiologically related, providing evidence of TB transmission in an emergency department, an AIDS inpatient ward, and an AIDS residential facility. DNA fingerprinting allowed detection of M tuberculosis transmission, but contact investigators could have documented it sooner. Factors contributing to transmission included delayed diagnosis, prolonged infectiousness, inadequate discharge planning and infection control procedures, and poor communication between health-care facilities. The numbers of AIDS residential facilities are increasing and must understand proper monitoring of TB patients and infection control measures that prevent transmissions.

  11. A microfluidic electrochemical biosensor based on multiwall carbon nanotube/ferrocene for genomic DNA detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, B.; Roy, E.; Pallandre, A.; Chebil, S.; Koubaa, M.; Mejri, N.; Magdinier Gomez, H.; Sola, C.; Korri-Youssoufi, H.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present a microfluidic-multiplexed platform that integrates electrochemical sensors based on carbon nanotubes associated with ferrocene as redox marker (carbon nanotube (CNT)/ferrocene) for direct detection of pathogenic viral DNA from Hepatitis C and genomic DNA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical isolates. By operating the fluidic device under high flow (150 μl/min), the formation of a very thin depletion layer at the sensor surface (δS = 230 nm) enhances the capture rate up to one DNA strand per second. By comparison, this capture rate is only 0.02 molecule/s in a static regime without flow. This fluidic protocol allows thus enhancing the limit of detection of the electrochemical biosensor from picomolar in bulk solution to femtomolar with a large dynamic range from 0.1 fM to 1 pM. Kinetics analysis also demonstrates an enhancement of the rate constant of electron transfer (kS) of the electrochemical process from 1 s−1 up to 6 s−1 thanks to the geometry of the miniaturized fluidic electrochemical cell. This microfluidic device working under high flow allows selective direct detection of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv) rpoB allele from clinical isolate extracted DNA. We envision that a microfluidic approach under high flow associated with a multiwall CNT/ferrocene sensor could find useful applications as the point-of-care for multi-target diagnostics of biomarkers in real samples. PMID:26865908

  12. TRF2 dysfunction elicits DNA damage responses associated with senescence in proliferating neural cells and differentiation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Opresko, Patricia L; Xu, Xiangru; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Mattson, Mark P

    2006-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of chromosomes that consist of tandem repeats of the DNA sequence TTAGGG and several proteins that protect the DNA and regulate the plasticity of the telomeres. The telomere-associated protein TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is critical for the control of telomere structure and function; TRF2 dysfunction results in the exposure of the telomere ends and activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasin mutated)-mediated DNA damage response. Recent findings suggest that telomere attrition can cause senescence or apoptosis of mitotic cells, but the function of telomeres in differentiated neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the impact of telomere dysfunction via TRF2 inhibition in neurons (primary embryonic hippocampal neurons) and mitotic neural cells (astrocytes and neuroblastoma cells). We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction induced by adenovirus-mediated expression of dominant-negative TRF2 (DN-TRF2) triggers a DNA damage response involving the formation of nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX and activated ATM in each cell type. In mitotic neural cells DN-TRF2 induced activation of both p53 and p21 and senescence (as indicated by an up-regulation of beta-galactosidase). In contrast, in neurons DN-TRF2 increased p21, but neither p53 nor beta-galactosidase was induced. In addition, TRF2 inhibition enhanced the morphological, molecular and biophysical differentiation of hippocampal neurons. These findings demonstrate divergent molecular and physiological responses to telomere dysfunction in mitotic neural cells and neurons, indicate a role for TRF2 in regulating neuronal differentiation, and suggest a potential therapeutic application of inhibition of TRF2 function in the treatment of neural tumors.

  13. Hantaan/Andes virus DNA Vaccine Elicits a Broadly Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibody Response in Nonhuman Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    pulmonary syndrome (HPS). The most prevalent and lethal hantaviruses associated with HFRS and HPS are Hantaan virus (HTNV) and Andes virus (ANDV...Published by Elsevier Inc.Keywords: Hantavirus; DNA vaccine; Hantaan virus; Andes virus; Neutralizing antibodiesIntroduction Hantaviruses are rodent...borne viruses that cause hemor- rhagic fever in humans. Different hantaviruses are associated with different disease syndromes with varying degrees of

  14. Immunization of neonatal mice with LAMP/p55 HIV gag DNA elicits robust immune responses that last to adulthood

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonhez Rigato, Paula; Maciel, Milton; Goldoni, Adriana Leticia; Piubelli, Orlando; Alves de Brito, Cyro; Fusaro, Ana Elisa; Eurico de Alencar, Liciana Xavier; August, Thomas; Torres Azevedo Marques, Ernesto; Silva Duarte, Alberto Jose da; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2010-10-10

    Successful T cell priming in early postnatal life that can generate effective long-lasting responses until adulthood is critical in HIV vaccination strategies because it prevents early sexual initiation and breastfeeding transmission of HIV. A chimeric DNA vaccine encoding p55 HIV gag associated with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1; which drives the antigen to the MIIC compartment), has been used to enhance cellular and humoral antigen-specific responses in adult mice and macaques. Herein, we investigated LAMP-1/gag vaccine immunogenicity in the neonatal period in mice and its ability to generate long-lasting effects. Neonatal vaccination with chimeric LAMP/gag generated stronger Gag-specific immune responses, as measured by the breadth of the Gag peptide-specific IFN-{gamma}, proliferative responsiveness, cytokine production and antibody production, all of which revealed activation of CD4+ T cells as well as the generation of a more robust CTL response compared to gag vaccine alone. To induce long-lived T and B cell memory responses, it was necessary to immunize neonates with the chimeric LAMP/gag DNA vaccine. The LAMP/gag DNA vaccine strategy could be particularly useful for generating an anti-HIV immune response in the early postnatal period capable of inducing long-term immunological memory.

  15. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from feces has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis for many years. However, direct fecal PCR is becoming more widely used today, demonstrating similar sensitivity and specificity to culture. To ensure ef...

  16. Immunization with a DNA Vaccine Cocktail Induces a Th1 Response and Protects Mice Against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several novel antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have been studied as vaccine components and their immunogenicity has been evaluated. Previously, we reported that 85 antigen complex (85A, 85B, and 85C), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 35kDa protein could induce significant lymph...

  17. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphisms resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for subspecies identification of mycobacteria in the Mycobacterium avium complex and for isolation of DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, J W; Condon, C; Compston, C A; Potter, K N; Lamontagne, L R; Shafiq, J; Kunimoto, D Y

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterial strains from the Mycobacterium avium complex were compared with each other and with Mycobacterium phlei isolates by restriction endonuclease digestion of chromosomal DNA with SspI and analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Characteristic profiles were observed for known typed strains, and five groups were identified. Primary bovine isolates identified as Mycobacterium paratuberculosis by classical methods were shown to fall into both the M. paratuberculosis- and M. avium-like groups. M. paratuberculosis 18 was in the latter category. Two Mycobacterium intracellulare strains of different Schaefer serotypes had different digestion profiles. In addition, this system was exploited for the preparation of DNA probes by the isolation, digestion, and subcloning of DNA fragments separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Probe JC12 hybridized only to M. avium complex strains, but not to M. phlei, showing characteristic hybridization profiles for each of the groups previously identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The approach taken in the study lends itself to the comparative analysis of members of the M. avium complex and to the isolation and characterization of DNA probes with specificity for these mycobacteria. Images PMID:1352787

  18. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fabiana F.; Ammar, Dib; Bourckhardt, Gilian F.; Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Müller, Yara M. R.; Nazari, Evelise M.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg) is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation. PMID:26793240

  19. RF-EMF exposure at 1800 MHz did not elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in different neurogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Liling; Wei, Xiaoxia; Xu, Zhengping; Chen, Guangdi

    2017-04-01

    Despite many years of studies, the debate on genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) continues. To systematically evaluate genotoxicity of RF-EMF, this study examined effects of RF-EMF on DNA damage and cellular behavior in different neurogenic cells. Neurogenic A172, U251, and SH-SY5Y cells were intermittently (5 min on/10 min off) exposed to 1800 MHz RF-EMF at an average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4.0 W/kg for 1, 6, or 24 h. DNA damage was evaluated by quantification of γH2AX foci, an early marker of DNA double-strand breaks. Cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and cell viability were examined by flow cytometry, hemocytometer, and cell counting kit-8 assay, respectively. Results showed that exposure to RF-EMF at an SAR of 4.0 W/kg neither significantly induced γH2AX foci formation in A172, U251, or SH-SY5Y cells, nor resulted in abnormal cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, or cell viability. Furthermore, prolonged incubation of these cells for up to 48 h after exposure did not significantly affect cellular behavior. Our data suggest that 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure at 4.0 W/kg is unlikely to elicit DNA damage or abnormal cellular behaviors in neurogenic cells. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:175-185, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mucosal vaccination with a live recombinant rhinovirus followed by intradermal DNA administration elicits potent and protective HIV-specific immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Tomusange, Khamis; Wijesundara, Danushka; Gummow, Jason; Wesselingh, Steve; Suhrbier, Andreas; Gowans, Eric J.; Grubor-Bauk, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal immunity is deemed crucial to control sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Herein we report the efficacy of a mucosal HIV vaccine strategy comprising intranasal (IN) vaccination with a cocktail of live recombinant human rhinoviruses (HRVs) encoding overlapping fragments of HIV Gag and full length Tat (rHRV-Gag/Tat) followed by intradermal (ID) vaccination with DNA vaccines encoding HIV Gag and Tat (pVAX-Gag-Tat). This heterologous prime-boost strategy will be referred to hereafter as rHRV-DNA. As a control, IN vaccination with wild type (wt)-HRV-A1 followed by a single ID dose of pVAX (wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination) was included. rHRV-DNA vaccination elicited superior multi-functional CD8+T cell responses in lymphocytes harvested from mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens, and higher titres of Tat-specific antibodies in blood and vaginal lavages, and reduced the viral load more effectively after challenge with EcoHIV, a murine HIV challenge model, in peritoneal macrophages, splenocytes and blood compared compared with wt-HRV-A1/pVAX vaccination or administration of 3 ID doses of pVAX-Gag-Tat (3X pVAX-Gag-Tat vaccination). These data provide the first evidence that a rHRV-DNA vaccination regimen can induce HIV-specific immune responses in the gut, vaginal mucosa and systemically, and supports further testing of this regimen in the development of an effective mucosally-targeted HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:27853256

  1. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  2. Design and use of mouse control DNA for DNA biomarker extraction and PCR detection from urine: Application for transrenal Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Bordelon, Hali; Ricks, Keersten M; Pask, Megan E; Russ, Patricia K; Solinas, Francesca; Baglia, Mark L; Short, Philip A; Nel, Andrew; Blackburn, Jonathan; Dheda, Keertan; Zamudio, Carlos; Cáceres, Tatiana; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R; Pettit, April C

    2017-05-01

    Urine samples are increasingly used for diagnosing infections including Escherichia coli, Ebola virus, and Zika virus. However, extraction and concentration of nucleic acid biomarkers from urine is necessary for many molecular detection strategies such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since urine samples typically have large volumes with dilute biomarker concentrations making them prone to false negatives, another impediment for urine-based diagnostics is the establishment of appropriate controls particularly to rule out false negatives. In this study, a mouse glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) DNA target was added to retrospectively collected urine samples from tuberculosis (TB)-infected and TB-uninfected patients to indicate extraction of intact DNA and removal of PCR inhibitors from urine samples. We tested this design on surrogate urine samples, retrospective 1milliliter (mL) urine samples from patients in Lima, Peru and retrospective 5mL urine samples from patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction/PCR control DNA was detectable in 97% of clinical samples with no statistically significant differences among groups. Despite the inclusion of this control, there was no difference in the amount of TB IS6110 Tr-DNA detected between TB-infected and TB-uninfected groups except for samples from known HIV-infected patients. We found an increase in TB IS6110 Tr-DNA between TB/HIV co-infected patients compared to TB-uninfected/HIV-infected patients (N=18, p=0.037). The inclusion of an extraction/PCR control DNA to indicate successful DNA extraction and removal of PCR inhibitors should be easily adaptable as a sample preparation control for other acellular sample types.

  3. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kamal R.; Dhand, Navneet K.; Whittington, Richard J.; Plain, Karren M.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne’s disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne’s test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne’s disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples. PMID:28210245

  4. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Kamal R; Dhand, Navneet K; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne's disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne's test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne's disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples.

  5. Two alternative DNA extraction methods to improve the detection of Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-complex members in cattle and red deer tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Fell, Shari; Bröckl, Stephanie; Büttner, Mathias; Rettinger, Anna; Zimmermann, Pia; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-09-15

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), which is caused by Mycobacterium bovis and M. caprae, is a notifiable animal disease in Germany. Diagnostic procedure is based on a prescribed protocol that is published in the framework of German bTB legislation. In this protocol small sample volumes are used for DNA extraction followed by real-time PCR analyses. As mycobacteria tend to concentrate in granuloma and the infected tissue in early stages of infection does not necessarily show any visible lesions, it is likely that DNA extraction from only small tissue samples (20-40 mg) of a randomly chosen spot from the organ and following PCR testing may result in false negative results. In this study two DNA extraction methods were developed to process larger sample volumes to increase the detection sensitivity of mycobacterial DNA in animal tissue. The first extraction method is based on magnetic capture, in which specific capture oligonucleotides were utilized. These nucleotides are linked to magnetic particles and capture Mycobacterium-tuberculosis-complex (MTC) DNA released from 10 to 15 g of tissue material. In a second approach remaining sediments from the magnetic capture protocol were further processed with a less complex extraction protocol that can be used in daily routine diagnostics. A total number of 100 tissue samples from 34 cattle (n = 74) and 18 red deer (n = 26) were analyzed with the developed protocols and results were compared to the prescribed protocol. All three extraction methods yield reliable results by the real-time PCR analysis. The use of larger sample volume led to a sensitivity increase of DNA detection which was shown by the decrease of Ct-values. Furthermore five samples which were tested negative or questionable by the official extraction protocol were detected positive by real time PCR when the alternative extraction methods were used. By calculating the kappa index, the three extraction protocols resulted in a moderate (0.52; protocol 1 vs 3

  6. Malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP elicits both CSP-specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhangping; Zhou, TaoLi; Zheng, Hong; Ding, Yan; Xu, Wenyue

    2015-06-01

    It is ideal for the pre-erythrocytic stage subunit vaccine to induce both CSP-specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell response. Here, we designed a novel malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP, which was constructed by fusing the full-length of CSP with the N-terminal domain of gp96 that deleted the endoplasmic reticulum-localized motif KDEL, and investigated its protective efficacy. We found that the fusion protein gp96NTD-CSP was mainly distributed on the surface of eukaryotic cells after transfection and could be sensed as a "danger signal" by the host immune system. Interestingly, both liver parasite burden and parasitemia in mice immunized with gp96NTD-CSP were significantly lower than those in the mice immunized either with gp96NTD, CSP, or gp96NTD-SYVPSAEQI, which was constructed by fusing the CSP-specific CD8(+) T cell epitope with the N-terminal domain of gp96 deleted with KDEL. Consistently, both the level of CSP-specific antibody and the frequency of IFN-γ secreted-CSP-specific CD8(+) T cells were much higher in mice immunized with gp96NTD-CSP than those in the mice immunized either with gp96NTD, CSP, or gp96NTD-SYVPSAEQI. Our results suggest that the malaria DNA vaccine gp96NTD-CSP could induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, which is attributed to the adjuvant effect of gp96NTD and full-length CSP.

  7. Direct identification of Mycobacterium abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ziying; Liu, Yuan; Zhu, Bing; Zeng, Ping

    2014-07-01

    A growing number of nontuberculous mycobacteria infection cases, especially those caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM), have been reported in the past decade. Conventional methods for mycobacteria diagnosis are inefficient and easily lead to misdiagnosis. New detection methods, such as gene sequencing, have been reported but are not widely used. The aim of the present case report was to provide a quick and exact method of identifying Myobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) infections. The particular case reported in this study initially manifested as hyperglycemia and papules in the right leg. Routine cultures for fungus were repeatedly negative. However, cultures of the purulent material under aerobic cultivation for five days yielded a rapidly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium. A Ziehl-Neelsen staining of this mycobacterium revealed the presence of acid-fast bacilli that were finally identified as M. abscessus through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and a citrate utilization test. The current report may help other clinicians to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of RGM infection.

  8. Biosafety evaluation of the DNA extraction protocol for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species, as implemented at the Instituto Nacional de Salud, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castro, Claudia; González, Liliana; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Puerto, Gloria; Ribón, Wellman

    2009-12-01

    Manipulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical specimens and cultures represents a risk factor for laboratory personnel. One of the processes that requires high concentrations of microorganisms is DNA extraction for molecular procedures. Pulmonary tuberculosis cases have occurred among professionals in charge of molecular procedures that require manipulation of massive quantities of microorganisms. This has prompted research studies on biosafety aspects of extraction protocols; however, as yet, no consensus has been reached regarding risks associated with the process. The biosafety was evaluated for the DNA extraction protocol of van Soolingen, et al. 2002 by determining M. tuberculosis viability at each process stage. Eight hundred eighty cultures were grown from 220 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates that had been processed through the first three DNA extraction stages. Molecular identifications of positive cultures used a PCR isolation of a fragment of the heat shock protein PRA-hsp65 and examination of its restriction enzyme profile (spoligotyping). Growth was seen in one culture with one of the procedures used. The molecular characterization did not correspond to the initially analyzed isolate, and therefore was deduced to be the product of a cross-contamination. The DNA extraction protocol, as described by van Soolingen, et al. 2002 and as implemented at the Instituto Nacional de Salud, was established to be safe for laboratory personnel as well as for the environment.

  9. Comparison of three methods for extraction of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis DNA for polymerase chain reaction from broth-based culture systems.

    PubMed

    Okwumabua, Ogi; Shull, Eileen; O'Connor, Mike; Moua, Tou Vue; Danz, Tonya; Strelow, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to measure the recovery of DNA from Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) extracted with 3 different methods (MagMAX, DNeasy(R), and phenol-chloroform) after growth in a broth-based culture system. Of the 304 samples tested, bacterial DNA was detected in 197 (65%) of samples after MagMAX, 156 (51%) after phenol-chloroform, and 123 (40%) after DNeasy extractions. By acid-fast stain, 177 (58%) of the samples yielded acid-fast-positive bacilli, of which 4 were PCR negative by the 3 extraction methods. The results demonstrated that the amplifiable MAP DNA, as evidenced by the number of PCR-positive cultures and amplicon intensity on ethidium bromide-stained agarose gel, was best for MagMAX, intermediate for phenol-chloroform, and least for DNeasy. When subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction, the MagMAX extracts produced the best results, thereby making it an excellent kit for the efficient extraction of MAP DNA from the broth-based culture system.

  10. HuR silencing elicits oxidative stress and DNA damage and sensitizes human triple-negative breast cancer cells to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, James N.; Andrade, Daniel; Babu, Anish; Amreddy, Narsireddy; Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Gorospe, Myriam; Herman, Terence; Ding, Wei-Qun; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Munshi, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    HuR is an mRNA-binding protein whose overexpression in cancer cells has been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. While reports on HuR overexpression contributing to chemoresistance exist, limited information is available on HuR and radioresistance especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In this study we investigated the role of HuR in radiation resistance in three TNBC (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and Hs578t) cell lines. Endogenous HuR expression was higher in TNBC cells compared to normal cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of HuR (siHuR) markedly reduced HuR mRNA and protein levels compared to scrambled siRNA (siScr) treatment. Further, siHuR treatment sensitized TNBC cells to ionizing radiation at 2 Gy compared to siScr treatment as evidenced by the significant reduction in clonogenic cell survival from 59%, 49%, and 65% in siScr-treated cells to 40%, 33%, and 46% in siHuR-treated MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and Hs578t cells, respectively. Molecular studies showed increased ROS production and inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in HuR knockdown cells contributed to radiosensitization. Associated with increased ROS production was evidence of increased DNA damage, demonstrated by a significant increase (p < 0.05) in γ-H2AX foci that persisted for up to 24 h in siHuR plus radiation treated cells compared to control cells. Further, comet assay revealed that HuR-silenced cells had larger and longer-lasting tails than control cells, indicating higher levels of DNA damage. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that HuR knockdown in TNBC cells elicits oxidative stress and DNA damage resulting in radiosensitization. PMID:27588488

  11. CpG-containing immunostimulatory DNA sequences elicit TNF-alpha-dependent toxicity in rodents but not in humans.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John D; Cho, Yan; Foster, Martyn L; Kanzler, Holger; Kachura, Melissa A; Lum, Jeremy A; Ratcliffe, Marianne J; Sathe, Atul; Leishman, Andrew J; Bahl, Ash; McHale, Mark; Coffman, Robert L; Hessel, Edith M

    2009-09-01

    CpG-containing immunostimulatory DNA sequences (ISS), which signal through TLR9, are being developed as a therapy for allergic indications and have proven to be safe and well tolerated in humans when administrated via the pulmonary route. In contrast, ISS inhalation has unexplained toxicity in rodents, which express TLR9 in monocyte/macrophage lineage cells as well as in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and B cells, the principal TLR9-expressing cells in humans. We therefore investigated the mechanisms underlying this rodent-specific toxicity and its implications for humans. Mice responded to intranasally administered 1018 ISS, a representative B class ISS, with strictly TLR9-dependent toxicity, including lung inflammation and weight loss, that was fully reversible and pDC and B cell independent. Knockout mouse experiments demonstrated that ISS-induced toxicity was critically dependent on TNF-alpha, with IFN-alpha required for TNF-alpha induction. In contrast, human PBMCs, human alveolar macrophages, and airway-derived cells from Ascaris suum-allergic cynomolgus monkeys did not produce appreciable TNF-alpha in vitro in response to ISS stimulation. Moreover, sputum of allergic humans exposed to inhaled ISS demonstrated induction of IFN-inducible genes but minimal TNF-alpha induction. These data demonstrate that ISS induce rodent-specific TNF-alpha-dependent toxicity that is absent in humans and reflective of differential TLR9 expression patterns in rodents versus humans.

  12. CpG-containing immunostimulatory DNA sequences elicit TNF-α–dependent toxicity in rodents but not in humans

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John D.; Cho, Yan; Foster, Martyn L.; Kanzler, Holger; Kachura, Melissa A.; Lum, Jeremy A.; Ratcliffe, Marianne J.; Sathe, Atul; Leishman, Andrew J.; Bahl, Ash; McHale, Mark; Coffman, Robert L.; Hessel, Edith M.

    2009-01-01

    CpG-containing immunostimulatory DNA sequences (ISS), which signal through TLR9, are being developed as a therapy for allergic indications and have proven to be safe and well tolerated in humans when administrated via the pulmonary route. In contrast, ISS inhalation has unexplained toxicity in rodents, which express TLR9 in monocyte/macrophage lineage cells as well as in plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and B cells, the principal TLR9-expressing cells in humans. We therefore investigated the mechanisms underlying this rodent-specific toxicity and its implications for humans. Mice responded to intranasally administered 1018 ISS, a representative B class ISS, with strictly TLR9-dependent toxicity, including lung inflammation and weight loss, that was fully reversible and pDC and B cell independent. Knockout mouse experiments demonstrated that ISS-induced toxicity was critically dependent on TNF-α, with IFN-α required for TNF-α induction. In contrast, human PBMCs, human alveolar macrophages, and airway-derived cells from Ascaris suum–allergic cynomolgus monkeys did not produce appreciable TNF-α in vitro in response to ISS stimulation. Moreover, sputum of allergic humans exposed to inhaled ISS demonstrated induction of IFN-inducible genes but minimal TNF-α induction. These data demonstrate that ISS induce rodent-specific TNF-α–dependent toxicity that is absent in humans and reflective of differential TLR9 expression patterns in rodents versus humans. PMID:19726873

  13. Comparison of C18-Carboxypropylbetaine and Glass Bead DNA Extraction Methods for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine Milk Samples and Analysis of Samples by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo, Brandon J.; Sahagún-Ruiz, Alfredo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Thornton, Charles G.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Adams, L. Garry

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to compare two different milk preparation methods to assay for the presence of Mycobacterium bovis by PCR. Detection by a C18-carboxypropylbetaine (CB-18)-based sample processing method was compared to extraction of DNA from milk with glass beads. Samples from 17 skin test-positive cattle were analyzed. Following CB-18 processing and glass bead extraction, the sensitivity of IS6110-based PCR was 94.1 and 58.8%, respectively (P < 0.025). Because CB-18 processing will permit the proficient use of PCR for diagnosis and surveillance of bovine tuberculosis, it will contribute to the more efficient detection and control of tuberculosis. PMID:9687483

  14. Analysis of the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Ethiopia, Tunisia, and The Netherlands: usefulness of DNA typing for global tuberculosis epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hermans, P W; Messadi, F; Guebrexabher, H; van Soolingen, D; de Haas, P E; Heersma, H; de Neeling, H; Ayoub, A; Portaels, F; Frommel, D

    1995-06-01

    The genetic heterogeneity among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 501 patients in Ethiopia, Tunisia, and the Netherlands was compared by analysis of DNA polymorphism driven by insertion element IS6110. The percentage of isolates displaying two or more identical patterns differed greatly in the three countries: It was highest among Tunisian isolates and lowest in Dutch isolates. In contrast to isolates from Dutch subjects infected with M. tuberculosis, the majority of strains from Ethiopia and Tunisia were from a few families of genetically highly related strains. Furthermore, little overlap was observed among isolates from the three countries, indicating strict isolation of the bacterial reservoirs in the countries. A few strains from the Netherlands matched strains from Ethiopia and Tunisia. Those strains were invariably isolated from refugees, immigrants, or persons who visited Ethiopia or Tunisia.

  15. Sequence-Based Identification of Mycobacterium Species Using the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Leonard, Debra G. B.; Pan, Xai; Musser, James M.; Berman, Richard E.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Sequencing Kit (PE Applied Biosystems), a 500-bp sequence-based identification system, for its ability to identify clinical Mycobacterium isolates. The organism identity was determined by comparing the 16S rDNA sequence to the MicroSeq database, which consists primarily of type strain sequences. A total of 113 isolates (18 different species), previously recovered and identified by routine methods from two clinical laboratories, were analyzed by the MicroSeq method. Isolates with discordant results were analyzed by hsp65 gene sequence analysis and in some cases repeat phenotypic identification, AccuProbe rRNA hybridization (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.), or high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. For 93 (82%) isolates, the MicroSeq identity was concordant with the previously reported identity. For 18 (16%) isolates, the original identification was discordant with the MicroSeq identification. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 7 (six unique sequences) were originally misidentified by phenotypic analysis or the AccuProbe assay but were correctly identified by the MicroSeq assay. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 11 (seven unique sequences) were unusual species that were difficult to identify by phenotypic methods and, in all but one case, by molecular methods. The remaining two isolates (2%) failed definitive phenotypic identification, but the MicroSeq assay was able to definitively identify one of these isolates. The MicroSeq identification system is an accurate and rapid method for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. PMID:10618095

  16. Oral mucosa as a source of Mycobacterium leprae infection and transmission, and implications of bacterial DNA detection and the immunological status.

    PubMed

    Martinez, T S; Figueira, M M N R; Costa, A V; Gonçalves, M A; Goulart, L R; Goulart, I M B

    2011-11-01

    Leprosy is an important health problem in Brazil despite extensive use of multidrug therapy. The nasal mucosa is the preferential site of entry and exit of Mycobacterium leprae, and although lesions have been found in the oral mucosa, its potential involvement in the transmission of leprosy bacilli has never been investigated. We investigated the presence of the M. leprae DNA in buccal swabs of leprosy patients (334) and household contacts (1288) through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and correlated this with clinical and laboratorial evaluations. The overall positivity for patients and contacts was 18.26% and 6.83%, respectively. Subclinical infection among contacts was considered when PCR and anti-PGL-1 ELISA presented positive results. This study provides evidence that the oral mucosa may be a secondary site of M. leprae transmission and infection, and contacts with bacillary DNA may be actively involved in transmission. We have also shown that bacilli DNA is more frequently found in the oral mucosa of PB patients. Our findings have great epidemiological relevance and indicate an additional strategy for leprosy control programmes and dental clinics.

  17. Extending the definition of the GyrB quinolone resistance-determining region in Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase for assessing fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Alix; Petrella, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Brossier, Florence; Bastian, Sylvaine; Jarlier, Vincent; Mayer, Claudine; Aubry, Alexandra

    2012-04-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is emerging in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The main mechanism of FQ resistance is amino acid substitution within the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase, the sole FQ target in M. tuberculosis. However, substitutions in GyrB whose implication in FQ resistance is unknown are increasingly being reported. The present study clarified the role of four GyrB substitutions identified in M. tuberculosis clinical strains, two located in the QRDR (D500A and N538T) and two outside the QRDR (T539P and E540V), in FQ resistance. We measured FQ MICs and also DNA gyrase inhibition by FQs in order to unequivocally clarify the role of these mutations in FQ resistance. Wild-type GyrA, wild-type GyrB, and mutant GyrB subunits produced from engineered gyrB alleles by mutagenesis were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and used to reconstitute highly active gyrase complexes. MICs and DNA gyrase inhibition were determined for moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and enoxacin. All these substitutions are clearly implicated in FQ resistance, underlining the presence of a hot spot region housing most of the GyrB substitutions implicated in FQ resistance (residues NTE, 538 to 540). These findings help us to refine the definition of GyrB QRDR, which is extended to positions 500 to 540.

  18. Extending the Definition of the GyrB Quinolone Resistance-Determining Region in Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Gyrase for Assessing Fluoroquinolone Resistance in M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pantel, Alix; Petrella, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Brossier, Florence; Bastian, Sylvaine; Jarlier, Vincent; Mayer, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance is emerging in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The main mechanism of FQ resistance is amino acid substitution within the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase, the sole FQ target in M. tuberculosis. However, substitutions in GyrB whose implication in FQ resistance is unknown are increasingly being reported. The present study clarified the role of four GyrB substitutions identified in M. tuberculosis clinical strains, two located in the QRDR (D500A and N538T) and two outside the QRDR (T539P and E540V), in FQ resistance. We measured FQ MICs and also DNA gyrase inhibition by FQs in order to unequivocally clarify the role of these mutations in FQ resistance. Wild-type GyrA, wild-type GyrB, and mutant GyrB subunits produced from engineered gyrB alleles by mutagenesis were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and used to reconstitute highly active gyrase complexes. MICs and DNA gyrase inhibition were determined for moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and enoxacin. All these substitutions are clearly implicated in FQ resistance, underlining the presence of a hot spot region housing most of the GyrB substitutions implicated in FQ resistance (residues NTE, 538 to 540). These findings help us to refine the definition of GyrB QRDR, which is extended to positions 500 to 540. PMID:22290942

  19. NAD+-dependent DNA Ligase (Rv3014c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crystal structure of the adenylation domain and identification of novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-08-26

    DNA ligases utilize either ATP or NAD+ as cofactors to catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds in nicked DNA. Those utilizing NAD+ are attractive drug targets because of the unique cofactor requirement for ligase activity. We report here the crystal structure of the adenylation domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent ligase with bound AMP. The adenosine nucleoside moiety of AMP adopts a syn-conformation. The structure also captures a new spatial disposition between the two subdomains of the adenylation domain. Based on the crystal structure and an in-house compound library, we have identified a novel class of inhibitors for the enzyme using in silico docking calculations. The glycosyl ureide-based inhibitors were able to distinguish between NAD+- and ATP-dependent ligases as evidenced by in vitro assays using T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I. Moreover, assays involving an Escherichia coli strain harboring a temperature-sensitive ligase mutant and a ligase-deficient Salmonella typhimurium strain suggested that the bactericidal activity of the inhibitors is due to inhibition of the essential ligase enzyme. The results can be used as the basis for rational design of novel antibacterial agents.

  20. M2, a novel anthracenedione, elicits a potent DNA damage response that can be subverted through checkpoint kinase inhibition to generate mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Evison, Benny J; Pastuovic, Mile; Bilardi, Rebecca A; Forrest, Robert A; Pumuye, Paul P; Sleebs, Brad E; Watson, Keith G; Phillips, Don R; Cutts, Suzanne M

    2011-12-01

    Pixantrone is a promising anti-cancer aza-anthracenedione that has prompted the development of new anthracenediones incorporating symmetrical side-chains of increasing length varying from two to five methylene units in each pair of drug side-chains. A striking relationship has emerged in which anthracenedione-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis was inversely associated with side-chain length, a relationship that was attributable to a differential ability to stabilise the topoisomerase II (TOP2) cleavage complex. Processing of the complex to a DNA double strand break (DSB) flanked by γH2AX in nuclear foci is likely to occur, as the generation of the primary lesion was antecedent to γH2AX induction. M2, bearing the shortest pair of side-chains, induced TOP2-mediated DSBs efficiently and activated cell cycle checkpoints via Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation, implicating the involvement of ATM and ATR, and induced a protracted S phase and subsequent G2/M arrest. The inactive analogue M5, containing the longest pair of side-chains, only weakly stimulated any of these responses, suggesting that efficient stabilisation of the TOP2 cleavage complex was crucial for eliciting a strong DNA damage response (DDR). An M2 induced DDR in p53-defective MDA-MB-231 cells was abrogated by UCN-01, a ubiquitous inhibitor of kinases including Chk1, in a response associated with substantial mitotic catastrophe and strong synergy. The rational selection of checkpoint kinase inhibitors may significantly enhance the therapeutic benefit of anthracenediones that efficiently stabilise the TOP2 cleavage complex.

  1. DNA prime and virus-like particle boost from a single H5N1 strain elicits broadly neutralizing antibody responses against head region of H5 hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiqin; Zhou, Fan; Buchy, Philippe; Zuo, Teng; Hu, Hongxing; Liu, Jingjing; Song, Yufeng; Ding, Heng; Tsai, Cheguo; Chen, Ze; Zhang, Linqi; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Since 1996, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has presented a persistent threat to public health. Its high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous challenges in developing effective vaccines. To search for vaccine regimens that could elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses against diverse HPAI H5N1 strains, in the present study we tested H5 hemagglutinin (HA) from an A/Thailand/1(KAN)-1/2004 strain in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination. We demonstrated that priming mice with DNA and boosting with virus-like particle induced antibody responses that cross-neutralize all reported clades and subclades of HPAI H5N1 viruses and protect mice from high lethal dose HPAI H5N1 challenge in both active and passive immunizations. Unexpectedly, cross-divergent H5 neutralizing antibodies are directed to the HA head and block both attachment and postattachment of virus entry. Thus, we conclude that as a promising pan-H5 vaccine candidate this prime-boost regimen could be further developed in ferrets and in humans.

  2. Development of a novel DNA extraction method for identification and quantification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from tissue samples by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Park, Kun Taek; Allen, Andrew J; Davis, William C

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease in ruminants and possibly associated with human Crohn's disease. One impediment in furthering our understanding of this potential association has been the lack of an accurate method for detection of Map in affected tissues. Real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods have been reported to have different sensitivities in detection of Map. This is in part attributable to the difficulties of extracting Map DNA and removing PCR inhibitors from the clinical specimens. The maximum efficiency of RT-PCR can only be achieved by using high quality DNA samples. In this study, we present a novel pre-treatment method which significantly increases Map DNA recovery and decreases PCR inhibitors (p<0.05). When the pre-treatment method was combined with the DNeasy Blood and Tissue kit (Qiagen), PCR inhibition was not detected in any of three different RT-PCR methods tested in this study. The results obtained with the IS900 probe showed an excellent Kappa value (0.849) and a high correlation coefficient r (0.940) compared to the results of culture method. When used to examine unknown field samples (n=15), more positive tissues were identified with DNA extracts prepared with pre-treatment method than without (5 vs 3). This improved Map DNA extraction method from tissue samples will make RT-PCR a more powerful tool for a wide range of applications for Map identification and quantification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Bivalent Heterologous DNA Virus-Like-Particle Prime-Boost Vaccine Elicits Broad Protection against both Group 1 and 2 Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenbo; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Ren, Huanhuan; Huang, Xun; Wang, Guiqin; Chen, Ze; Chen, Ling; Chen, Zhiwei; Zhou, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines are efficacious when vaccine strains are matched with circulating strains. However, they do not protect antigenic variants and newly emerging pandemic and outbreak strains. Thus, there is a critical need for developing so-called "universal" vaccines that protect against all influenza viruses. In the present study, we developed a bivalent heterologous DNA virus-like particle prime-boost vaccine strategy. We show that mice immunized with this vaccine were broadly protected against lethal challenge from group 1 (H1, H5, and H9) and group 2 (H3 and H7) viruses, with 94% aggregate survival. To determine the immune correlates of protection, we performed passive immunizations and in vitro assays. We show that this vaccine elicited antibody responses that bound HA from group 1 (H1, H2, H5, H6, H8, H9, H11, and H12) and group 2 (H3, H4, H7, H10, H14, and H15) and neutralized homologous and intrasubtypic H5 and H7 and heterosubtypic H1 viruses and hemagglutinin-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. As a result, passive immunization with immune sera fully protected mice against H5, H7, and H1 challenge, whereas with both immune sera and T cells the mice survived heterosubtypic H3 and H9 challenge. Thus, it appears that (i) neutralizing antibodies alone fully protect against homologous and intrasubtypic H5 and H7 and (ii) neutralizing and binding antibodies are sufficient to protect against heterosubtypic H1, (iii) but against heterosubtypic H3 and H9, binding antibodies and T cells are required for complete survival. We believe that this vaccine regimen could potentially be a candidate for a "universal" influenza vaccine.IMPORTANCE Influenza virus infection is global health problem. Current seasonal influenza vaccines are efficacious only when vaccine strains are matched with circulating strains. However, these vaccines do not protect antigenic variants and newly emerging pandemic and outbreak strains. Because of this, there is an urgent

  4. An efficient DNA extraction method for polymerase chain reaction-based detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in bovine fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Michael Z; Zhang, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Due to the lipid rich cell wall of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the complex nature of bovine feces, and intermittent organism shedding by infected cattle, it is difficult to recover a sufficient amount of high-quality MAP DNA from fecal samples, directly affecting the sensitivity of downstream polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. In the current study, a DNA extraction method, designated the Mississippi Veterinary Research and Diagnostic Laboratory (MVRDL) method, was developed for PCR-based detection of MAP in bovine fecal samples. The MVRDL method combined multiple procedures, including chemical pretreatment, 1-tube cell lysis and extraction, chelex matrix absorption, and mini-column purification. The DNA yield and purity, as measured by spectrophotometry, was 3.36 fg per colony forming unit (CFU) MAP and A260/280 absorbance ratio of 2, respectively. This method was further evaluated by real-time PCR. A linear correlation was found between cycle-threshold (Ct) and log input CFU (ranging from 7.2 to 7.2 × 10(7) CFU per ml or CFU per g). The detection limit of the real-time PCR assay was 3 CFU per ml of MAP culture or per g of MAP-spiked feces. In addition, the MVRDL method was validated by performing 7 Johne's direct fecal PCR proficiency tests administered by the National Veterinary Service Laboratories. Based on culture results as the "gold standard," the specificity of MVRDL PCR was 100%, and the sensitivity was 98.46% for samples containing more than 1.5 CFU per tube of fecal cultures. To the authors' knowledge, this is the most efficient MAP DNA extraction method in comparison with all previously published protocols.

  5. Presence of Mycobacterium leprae DNA and PGL-1 antigen in household contacts of leprosy patients from a hyperendemic area in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, J D; Rivas, P M S; Mendes, M B P; Soares, R E P; Costa, G C; Nascimento, F R F; Paiva, M F L; Aquino, D M C; Figueireido, I A; Santos, A M; Pereira, S R F

    2015-11-19

    Leprosy is a highly infectious disease endemic to underdeveloped countries. In Maranhão State, Northeastern Brazil, the hyperendemic rate of 56.11 cases/100,000 inhabitants increased the necessity of better understanding the epidemiological profile of this population, particularly regarding efficient methods for evaluating individuals residing with diagnosed patients to understand disease transmission and the risk of infection. In this study, we examined the percentage of contacts with positive indices for Mycobacterium leprae DNA and phenol-glycolipid-1 antigen (PGL-1). PGL-1 was analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the ML-Flow test, and polymerase chain reaction of oral and nasal secretions of 808 leprosy contacts from Maranhão. PGL-1 was detected in 14.0% of patients and differed by operational classification of the index case (P < 0.05). Seropositive results of ML-Flow were 15.0% and identified individuals with and without Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine scars. Molecular diagnosis detected M. leprae DNA in 5.6% of oral samples and 4.6% of nasal tissues, and 87% of subjects resided with high bacillary load patients. This study reinforces the efficacy of combining molecular and serological techniques to identify potential bacillus carriers in the asymptomatic stage of infection, such as in household contacts, highlighting the importance of these meth-ods for monitoring hyperendemic populations.

  6. A novel low-cost method for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA extraction from an automated broth culture system for real-time PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Verdugo, Cristobal; Heuer, Cord; Castillo, Pedro; Zamorano, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    PCR is a highly accurate technique for confirming the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in broth culture. In this study, a simple, efficient, and low-cost method of harvesting DNA from Map cultured in liquid medium was developed. The proposed protocol (Universidad Austral de Chile [UACH]) was evaluated by comparing its performance to that of two traditional techniques (a QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit and cethyltrimethylammonium bromide [CTAB] method). The results were statistically assessed by agreement analysis for which differences in the number of cycles to positive (CP) were compared by Student's t-test for paired samples and regression analysis. Twelve out of 104 fecal pools cultured were positive. The final PCR results for 11 samples analyzed with the QIAamp and UACH methods or ones examined with the QIAamp and CTAB methods were in agreement. Complete (100%) agreement was observed between data from the CTAB and UACH methods. CP values for the UACH and CTAB techniques were not significantly different, while the UACH method yielded significantly lower CP values compared to the QIAamp kit. The proposed extraction method combines reliability and efficiency with simplicity and lower cost.

  7. Sensitivities of ciprofloxacin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates to fluoroquinolones: role of mutant DNA gyrase subunits in drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Nakajima, Chie; Tamaru, Aki; Kim, Hyun; Matsuba, Takashi; Saito, Hajime

    2012-05-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations of sitafloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against 59 ciprofloxacin-resistant clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Japan were determined. The isolates were most susceptible to sitafloxacin and gatifloxacin. To understand better the basis for drug resistance, nucleotide sequences encoding the gyrA and gyrB quinolone resistance-determining region were determined. Predicted amino acid sequences revealed distinct mutational patterns likely to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance. Double gyrA mutations as well as mutations in both gyrA and gyrB correlated with increased resistance to all fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of avian influenza virus H5 DNA vaccine and MDP-1 gene of Mycobacterium bovis as genetic adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that DNA vaccines can induce protective immunity, which demonstrated the high potential of DNA vaccines as an alternative to inactivated vaccines. Vaccines are frequently formulated with adjuvants to improve their release, delivery and presentation to the host immune system. Methods The H5 gene of H5N1 virus (A/Ck/Malaysia/5858/04) was cloned separately into pcDNA3.1 + vector. The immunogenicity of the cloned H5 DNA vaccine was tested on SPF chickens using two different approaches. First approach was using H5 DNA vaccine (pcDNA3.1/H5) and the second was using H5 DNA vaccine in addition to the pcDNA3.1/MDP1 vaccine. Ten days old chickens inoculated three times with two weeks intervals. The spleen and muscle samples from chickens immunized with H5 (pcDNA3.1/H5) and H5 + MDP1 (pcDNA3.1/H5 + pcDNA3.1/MDP1) vaccines were collected after sacrificing the chickens and successfully expressed H5 and MDP1 RNA transcripts. The sera of immunized chickens were collected prior to first immunization and every week after immunization; and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Results Results of competitive ELISA showed successful antibody responses two weeks post immunization. The HI test showed an increased in antibody titers during the course of experiment in group immunized with H5 and H5 + MDP1 vaccines. The result showed that the constructed DNA vaccines were able to produce detectable antibody titer in which the group immunized with H5 + MDP1 vaccine produced higher antibody comparing to H5 vaccine alone. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the usefulness of MDP1 as a genetic adjuvant for H5 DNA vaccine. PMID:20497569

  9. DNA-based and alphavirus-vectored immunisation with prM and E proteins elicits long-lived and protective immunity against the flavivirus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Colombage, G; Hall, R; Pavy, M; Lobigs, M

    1998-10-10

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA-based vaccination with plasmids encoding the membrane proteins prM and E of the flavivirus Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVE) were investigated. Gene gun-mediated intradermal delivery of DNA encoding the prM and E proteins elicited long-lived, virus-neutralising antibody responses in three inbred strains of mice and provided protection from challenge with a high titer inoculum of MVE. Intramuscular DNA vaccination by needle injection also induced MVE-specific antibodies that conferred resistance to challenge with live virus but failed to reduce virus infectivity in vitro. The two routes of DNA-based vaccination with prM and E encoding plasmids resulted in humoral immunty with distinct IgG subtypes. MVE-specific IgG1 antibodies were always prevalent after intradermal DNA vaccination via a gene gun but not detected when mice were immunised with DNA by the intramuscular route or infected with live virus. We also tested a Semliki Forest virus replicon as vector for a flavivirus prM and E protein-based subunit vaccine. Single-cycle infections in mice vaccinated with packaged recombinant replicon particles elicited durable, MVE-specific, and virus-neutralising antibody responses.

  10. Cloning of the Gene Encoding a 22-Kilodalton Cell Surface Antigen of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Analysis of Its Potential for DNA Vaccination against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Philippe; Denis, Olivier; De Wit, Lucas; Tanghe, Audrey; Vandenbussche, Paul; Content, Jean; Huygen, Kris

    2000-01-01

    Using spleen cells from mice vaccinated with live Mycobacterium bovis BCG, we previously generated three monoclonal antibodies reactive against a 22-kDa protein present in mycobacterial culture filtrate (CF) (K. Huygen et al., Infect. Immun. 61:2687–2693, 1993). These monoclonal antibodies were used to screen an M. bovis BCG genomic library made in phage λgt11. The gene encoding a 233-amino-acid (aa) protein, including a putative 26-aa signal sequence, was isolated, and sequence analysis indicated that the protein was 98% identical with the M. tuberculosis Lppx protein and that it contained a sequence 94% identical with the M. leprae 38-mer polypeptide 13B3 recognized by T cells from killed M. leprae-immunized subjects. Flow cytometry and cell fractionation demonstrated that the 22-kDa CF protein is also highly expressed in the bacterial cell wall and membrane compartment but not in the cytosol. C57BL/6, C3H, and BALB/c mice were vaccinated with plasmid DNA encoding the 22-kDa protein and analyzed for immune response and protection against intravenous M. tuberculosis challenge. Whereas DNA vaccination induced elevated antibody responses in C57BL/6 and particularly in C3H mice, Th1-type cytokine response, as measured by interleukin-2 and gamma interferon secretion, was only modest, and no protection against intravenous M. tuberculosis challenge was observed in any of the three mouse strains tested. Therefore, the 22-kDa antigen seems to have little potential for a DNA vaccine against tuberculosis, but it may be a good candidate for a mycobacterial antigen detection test. PMID:10678905

  11. DNA polymorphism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 gene among clinical isolates of pediatric TB patients and its associations with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Aihua; Zhu, Chaomin; Yang, Zhenhua; Xu, Hongmei

    2011-07-01

    In vitro and in animal studies have suggested an important role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis of TB. A significant level of PE_PGRS33 gene DNA polymorphism among clinical isolates from adult tuberculosis (TB) patients and its association with clinical and epidemiological phenotypes of the disease has been found. To better understand the role of PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis pediatric TB, we investigated DNA polymorphism of the PE_PGRS33 gene among 101 of pediatric TB patients' isolates and assessed the relationship between the PE_PGRS33 sequence variation and clinical characteristics of TB. Twelve different PE_PGRS33 sequence variations representing 12 different alleles were observed among the 101 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates investigated. Of these 101 isolates, 62(59.41%) had PE_PGRS33 alleles that would result in a change in the amino acid sequence of the PE_PGRS33 protein. The degree of DNA polymorphism within individual M. tuberculosis isolates from pediatric TB patients was remarkably lower than that previously found in M. tuberculosis isolates from adults TB patients. The frequency distribution of isolates having PE_PGRS33 gene sequence variations was similar between Beijing and non-Beijing families of the pathogen. Patients having TB meningitis and negative PPD skin test results appeared to be more likely to be infected by isolates having a mutant type of the PE_PGRS33 gene than patients who had no TB meningitis (OR 2.54, 95% CI [1.11-5.84]) and patients who had positive PPD-skin test results (OR 4.26, 95% CI [1.14-12.86]), respectively. This study provides new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of pediatric TB.

  12. Assessment of the quality of dna extracted by two techniques from Mycobacterium tuberculosis for fast molecular identification and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Marcelo; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Mendes, Natália Helena; Cunha, Eunice Atsuko; de Melo, Fernando Augusto Fiúza; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura

    2011-01-01

    We report a comparative study of two DNA extraction techniques, thermolysis and chemical lysis (CTAB), for molecular identification and genotyping of M. tuberculosis. Forty DNA samples were subjected to PCR and the results demonstrated that with thermolysis it is possible to obtain useful data that enables fast identification and genotyping. PMID:24031692

  13. Characterization of the antibody response elicited by immunization with pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) as recombinant protein or DNA vaccine and analysis of protection against an intranasal lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Moreno, Adriana T; Chavez-Olortegui, Carlos; Machado de Avila, Ricardo A; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2012-01-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is an important candidate for a vaccine against pneumococcal infections. DNA vaccines expressing PspA were shown to protect mice against intraperitoneal and colonization challenge models in mice. We now show that a DNA vaccine expressing PspA from clade 4 (pSec-pspA4Pro) is also able to elicit protection against an intranasal lethal challenge model at levels similar to the recombinant protein PspA4Pro adjuvanted with alum. PspA4Pro + alum induced an IgG response characterized by a high IgG1/IgG2a ratio, leading to a lack of binding of anti-PspA IgG2a antibodies to intact pneumococci in vitro, which is in contrast to the response elicited by pSec-pspA4Pro. Epitopes recognized by the sera were mapped and antibodies induced by immunization with PspA4Pro + alum showed positive reaction with several synthetic peptides, mostly located in the first half of the protein. On the other hand, antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine showed reactivity with only two peptides. Though both strategies were protective against the intranasal lethal challenge model, the elicited humoral responses differ significantly, with the detection of important differences in the Fc (IgG1/IgG2a ratios) and Fab (recognized epitopes) regions of the induced antibodies.

  14. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  15. Comparison of a DNA Based PCR Approach with Conventional Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Zakham, Fathiah; Lahlou, Oufae; Akrim, Mohammed; Bouklata, Nada; Jaouhari, Sanae; Sadki, Khalid; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Elmzibri, Mohammed; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Ennaji, Mustapha; Elaouad, Rajae

    2012-01-01

    Background Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem and the rapid diagnosis and appropriate chemotherapy become the first priority and a serious challenge to improve TB treatment. In the objective of early TB diagnosis and rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the clinical specimens, the utility of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using the Insertion Sequence 6110 “IS6110" as target was compared to conventional methods. Methods Out of 305 patients with different clinical manifestations: suspected, new, drug relapse, drug failure and chronic cases were enrolled in this study and tested by mycobacteriological and PCR techniques for the investigation about the tubercle bacilli. Results The results of the in house “IS6110" PCR showed a good sensitivity (92.4%) and high specificity (98.0%), the positive and negative predictive values were 96.4 % and 95.3 % respectively. Conclusion This study showed clearly that the PCR testing using the “IS6110" in the routine analysis is a potential tool for the rapid TB diagnosis, especially for critical cases and would be of great interest to help the clinician in the misdiagnosed critical cases by the traditional radiology. PMID:22973493

  16. Progression toward an improved DNA amplification-based typing technique in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Gopaul, Krishna K; Brown, Timothy J; Gibson, Andrea L; Yates, Malcolm D; Drobniewski, Francis A

    2006-07-01

    While high-copy-number IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (HCN-RFLP) is the gold standard for typing most Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, the time taken for culturing and low throughput make it impractical for large-scale prospective typing of large numbers of isolates. The development of a new method, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU), a variation of the original variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) technique, may provide a viable alternative. Panels based on the original 12-loci MIRU (12MIRU), a combination of 12MIRU and remaining ETR loci (15MIRU-VNTR), and an extended panel with an additional 10 novel regions (25VNTR) were used to study three populations with varying degrees of epidemiological data. MIRU discrimination increased with panel size and the addition of spoligotyping. Combining these two techniques enabled a reduction in the panel size from 25 to 14 loci without a significant loss in discrimination. However, 25VNTR alone or in combination with spoligotyping still possessed weaker discrimination than RFLP for high-copy-number isolates.

  17. Differentiation of strains in Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by DNA sequence polymorphisms, including rapid identification of M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Frothingham, R

    1995-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. microti, and M. africanum. Seven strains of the M. tuberculosis complex were sequenced in a region of about 300 bp which contains multiple 15-bp tandem repeats and which is part of a 1,551-bp open reading frame. Four distinct sequences were obtained, each defining a sequevar. A sequevar includes the strain or strains with a given sequence. The type strain M. tuberculosis TMC 102 (H37Rv) was designated sequevar MED-G. When compared to MED-G, sequevar LONG had an insertion of one 15-bp tandem repeat and sequevar SHORT had a deletion of one tandem repeat. Sequevar MED-C had a G-->C substitution, coding for the conservative change Ser-->Thr. BanI cuts only sequevar MED-C at the site of the substitution. PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was used to determine the sequevars of 92 M. tuberculosis complex strains. All 23 M. bovis BCG strains belonged to sequevar MED-C. The M. africanum type strain was sequevar SHORT. The remaining 68 strains of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis (not BCG), and M. microti were sequevars LONG (3 strains) or MED-G (65 strains). PCR-restriction enzyme analysis was applied to reference strains and clinical isolates with a worldwide distribution. This method provides rapid, sensitive, and specific identification of the important vaccine strain M. bovis BCG. PMID:7790448

  18. A Two-Component DNA-Prime/Protein-Boost Vaccination Strategy for Eliciting Long-Term, Protective T Cell Immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivali; Garg, Nisha J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the long-term efficacy of a two-component subunit vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P) approach and challenged with T. cruzi at 120 or 180 days post-vaccination (dpv). We examined whether vaccine-primed T cell immunity was capable of rapid expansion and intercepting the infecting T. cruzi. Our data showed that D/P vaccine elicited CD4+ (30-38%) and CD8+ (22-42%) T cells maintained an effector phenotype up to 180 dpv, and were capable of responding to antigenic stimulus or challenge infection by a rapid expansion (CD8>CD4) with type 1 cytokine (IFNγ+ and TFNα+) production and cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Subsequently, challenge infection at 120 or 180 dpv, resulted in 2-3-fold lower parasite burden in vaccinated mice than was noted in unvaccinated/infected mice. Co-delivery of IL-12- and GMCSF-encoding expression plasmids provided no significant benefits in enhancing the anti-parasite efficacy of the vaccine-induced T cell immunity. Booster immunization (bi) with recombinant TcG2/TcG4 proteins 3-months after primary vaccine enhanced the protective efficacy, evidenced by an enhanced expansion (1.2-2.8-fold increase) of parasite-specific, type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a potent CTL response capable of providing significantly improved (3-4.5-fold) control of infecting T. cruzi. Further, CD8+T cells in vaccinated/bi mice were predominantly of central memory phenotype, and capable of responding to challenge infection 4-6-months post bi by a rapid expansion to a poly-functional effector phenotype, and providing a 1.5-2.3-fold reduction in tissue parasite replication. We conclude that the TcG2/TcG4 D/P vaccine provided long-term anti-T. cruzi T cell immunity, and bi would be an effective strategy to maintain or enhance the vaccine-induced protective immunity against T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease. PMID:25951312

  19. Taxonomic variation in the Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex: description of Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov., Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov., Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. and recognition of Mycobacterium porcinum from human clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Schinsky, Mark F; Morey, Roger E; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Douglas, Michael P; Wilson, Rebecca W; Floyd, Margaret M; Butler, W Ray; Daneshvar, Maryam I; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; McNeil, Michael M; Brenner, Don J; Brown, June M

    2004-09-01

    The Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex (sorbitol-negative and sorbitol-positive) contains unnamed taxa first characterized in 1991. These organisms can cause respiratory infections, a spectrum of soft tissue and skeletal infections, bacteraemia and disseminated disease. To evaluate this group of organisms, clinical reference isolates and the type strains of M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-negative (n = 21), M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-positive (n = 3), M. fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium peregrinum (pipemidic acid-susceptible) (n = 1), Mycobacterium porcinum (n = 1), Mycobacterium senegalense (n = 2) and Mycobacterium septicum (n = 1) were characterized by using conventional phenotypic (morphological, physiological and antimicrobial susceptibilities), chemotaxonomic (HPLC and cellular fatty acids) and genotypic [RFLP of the rRNA gene (ribotyping), PCR-RFLP of a 439 bp segment of the 65 kDa hsp gene (PCR restriction analysis) and 16S rRNA gene sequence] analysis, DNA G + C content and DNA-DNA relatedness analyses. The results of these studies indicated that the strains comprised M. porcinum (n = 13), M. septicum (n = 1) and four novel closely related genetic groups within the M. fortuitum third biovariant complex: Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov. (n = 6), Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov. (n = 2), Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. (n = 1) and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. (n = 1), with type strains ATCC 49935T (= W5998T = DSM 44677T), ATCC 49403T (= W5198T = DSM 44676T) ATCC 49404T (= W6705T = DSM 44679T) and ATCC 49938T (= W6743T = DSM 44680T), respectively.

  20. Ru(II)/clotrimazole/diphenylphosphine/bipyridine complexes: Interaction with DNA, BSA and biological potential against tumor cell lines and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Colina-Vegas, Legna; Dutra, Jocely Lucena; Villarreal, Wilmer; de A Neto, João Honorato; Cominetti, Marcia Regina; Pavan, Fernando; Navarro, Maribel; Batista, Alzir A

    2016-09-01

    Three ruthenium complexes [RuCl(CTZ)(bipy)(P-P)]PF6 [P-P=1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (dppe-1), 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (dppb-2) and 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene (dppf-3), bipy=2,2'-bipiridine and clotrimazole (CTZ) 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-imidazole] were synthesized. These complexes were characterized by a combination of elemental analysis, molar conductivity, infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy, (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P{(1)H} nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, cyclic voltammetry and mass spectroscopy. Bovine serum albumin binding constants, which were in the range of 1.30-36.00×10(4)M(-1), and thermodynamic parameters suggest spontaneous interactions with this protein by electrostatic forces due to the positive charge of the complexes. DNA interactions studied by spectroscopic titration, viscosity measurements, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, ethidium bromide displacement and reactions with guanosine and guanosine monophosphate indicated the DNA binding affinity primarily through non-covalent interactions. All complexes 1-3 were tested against the human carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 (breast), A549 (lung) and DU-145 (prostate) presenting promising IC50 values, between 0.50 and 14.00μM, in some cases lower than the IC50 for the reference drug (cisplatin). The antimicrobial activity assays of the complexes provided evidence that they are potential agents against mycobacterial infections, specifically against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of DNA binding motifs of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Mena; Thomas, Christophe; Namouchi, Amine; Dubrac, Sarah; Gicquel, Brigitte; Gopaul, Deshmukh N

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system controls the expression of about 2% of the genome and plays a major role in pathogenicity. However, its regulon has not been well characterized. The binding site of PhoP transcription regulator was identified in the upstream regions of msl3, pks2, lipF and fadD21 genes, by using gene fusions, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. A consensus sequence for PhoP binding was deduced. It consists of two direct repeats, DR1/DR2, associated with a third repeat, DR3, important in some cases for PhoP binding to DR1/DR2 but located at a variable distance from these direct repeats. DR1/DR2 and DR3 consensus sequences were used to screen the whole-genome sequence for other putative binding sites potentially corresponding to genes directly regulated by PhoP. The identified 87 genes, encoding transcription regulators, and proteins involved in secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism are proposed to belong to the PhoP regulon. A consensus sequence derived from the analysis of PhoP binding to four gene promoter regions is proposed. We show for the first time the involvement of a third direct repeat motif in this binding reaction. The consensus sequence was instrumented to study the global regulation mediated by PhoP in M. tuberculosis. This analysis leads to the identification of several genes that are potentially regulated by this key player.

  2. Characterization of the phylogenetic distribution and chromosomal insertion sites of five IS6110 elements in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: non-random integration in the dnaA-dnaN region.

    PubMed

    Kurepina, N E; Sreevatsan, S; Plikaytis, B B; Bifani, P J; Connell, N D; Donnelly, R J; van Sooligen, D; Musser, J M; Kreiswirth, B N

    1998-01-01

    Five IS6110 chromosomal insertion sites were characterized in the multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis 'W' strain. To use insertion site probes to study the phylogenetic distribution of IS6110 in the M. tuberculosis genome. A total of 722 M. tuberculosis isolates, previously genotyped using the standard IS6110 Southern blot hybridization methodology, were re-hybridized with the Region A insertion site probe and representative strains were further hybridized with the Region B and C probes. Strains were grouped on the basis of having IS6110 insertions in these different regions and their relatedness was further compared by sequencing the IS6110 insertion sites. The insertion site probes revealed that the collection of Chinese isolates previously grouped as the Beijing strain family shared IS6110 insertions in common with the W and other genotypic group 1 strains. Unexpectedly, we found that IS6110 integrated at least 10 independent times between the dnaA and dnaN genes encoding deoxyribonucleic acid replication proteins. IS6110 insertion site mapping is able to identify genetic relatedness among a collection of M. tuberculosis clinical strains representing the breadth of species diversity. The mapping data indicate that IS6110 insertion sites are not always random.

  3. The Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime-Rv0577 DNA boost vaccination induces a durable Th1 immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dongqing; Chen, Wei; Mi, Youjun; Gong, Xueli; Luo, Tao; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major global health problem and effective vaccines are urgently needed. In this study, we used the combined DNA- and protein-based vaccines of immunodominant antigen Rv0577 to boost BCG and evaluated their immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. Our data suggest that the booster vaccine may substantially enhance the immunogenicity of BCG and strengthen both CD4+ T cell-mediated Th1 and CD8+ T cell-mediated cytolytic responses. Compared with the protein-based vaccine, the DNA-based vaccine can induce more durable Th1 immune response, characterized by high levels of antibody response, proliferation response, percentages of CD4+/CD8+ and cytokine secretion in antigen-stimulated splenocyte cultures. In conclusion, we for the first time, developed a protein- and plasmid DNA-based booster vaccine based on Rv0577. Our findings suggest that antigen Rv0577-based DNA vaccine is immunogenic and can efficiently boost BCG, which could be helpful in the design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  4. Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov., a rapidly growing mycobacterium closely related to members of the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Whipps, Christopher M.; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Droz, Sara; Tortoli, Enrico; de Freitas, Denise; Cnockaert, Margo; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Five isolates of non-pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from three patients and, in an earlier study, from zebrafish. Phenotypic and molecular tests confirmed that these isolates belong to the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group, but they could not be confidently assigned to any known species of this group. Phenotypic analysis and biochemical tests were not helpful for distinguishing these isolates from other members of the M. chelonae–M. abscessus group. The isolates presented higher drug resistance in comparison with other members of the group, showing susceptibility only to clarithromycin. The five isolates showed a unique PCR restriction analysis pattern of the hsp65 gene, 100 % similarity in 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences and 1–2 nt differences in rpoB and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated dataset including 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, and rpoB sequences from type strains of more closely related species placed the five isolates together, as a distinct lineage from previously described species, suggesting a sister relationship to a group consisting of M. chelonae, Mycobacterium salmoniphilum, Mycobacterium franklinii and Mycobacterium immunogenum. DNA–DNA hybridization values >70 % confirmed that the five isolates belong to the same species, while values < 70 % between one of the isolates and the type strains of M. chelonae and M. abscessus confirmed that the isolates belong to a distinct species. The polyphasic characterization of these isolates, supported by DNA–DNA hybridization results, demonstrated that they share characteristics with M. chelonae–M. abscessus members, but constitute a different species, for which the name Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EPM 10906T ( = CCUG 66554T = LMG 28586T = INCQS 0733T). PMID:26358475

  5. Peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay for specific detection of Mycobacterium immunogenum and DNA-FISH assay for analysis of pseudomonads in metalworking fluids and sputum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2008-01-01

    Specific and rapid detection and quantification of mycobacteria in contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF) are problematic due to complexity of the matrix and heavy background co-occurring microflora. Furthermore, cross-reactivity among neighboring species of Mycobacterium makes species differentiation difficult for this genus. Here, we report for the first time a species-specific peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for Mycobacterium immunogenum, a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species prevalent in MWF and implicated in occupational lung disease hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pseudo-outbreaks. A novel species-specific 14-bp PNA probe was designed for M. immunogenum based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and was validated for specificity, by testing against a panel of other phylogenetically closely related rapidly growing mycobacteria and representative species of gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid fast organisms. In addition, a DNA-FISH protocol was optimized for co-detection of Pseudomonas, the most predominantly co-occurring genus in contaminated MWF. Reliable quantification for both the test organisms was achieved at or above a cell density of 10(3)cellsml(-1), a recognized minimum limit for microscopic quantification. The mycobacterial PNA-FISH assay was successfully adapted to human sputum demonstrating its potential for clinical diagnostic applications in addition to industrial MWF monitoring, to assess MWF-associated exposures and pseudo-outbreaks.

  6. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey.

  7. VNTR typing of Mycobacterium leprae in South Indian leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vidyagouri; Newton, Hema; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Reddy, Venkateshwar; Jain, Suman; Joseph, Abraham; Gillis, Tom; Nath, Indira; Norman, Gift; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    To study the suitability, stability and diversity of short tandem repeat (STR) genomic markers to elicit strain variation in the Mycobacterium leprae isolates within leprosy patients from Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu states in South India. Slit skin smear (SSS) samples were collected from lesions and various body sites of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. The SSSs from each patient were pooled, except in the case of five patients. Total DNA was extracted from SSS samples. M. leprae STRs were amplified from the DNA either by multiplex PCR (MP) or single PCR methods. The number of repeats for each STR locus (the STR allele) was obtained either by fragment length analysis (FLA) or by DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Multiplex PCR minimised the use of DNA and reagents, and together with FLA, was time and cost effective for STR strain typing. After examination of the isolates of South Indian origin at 13 STR loci, it was determined that the alleles for (AC)8b, (GGT)5, 6-3a (rpoT), 21-3, 27-5, and 23-3 were conserved in two study populations. In a family from Andhra Pradesh, the M. leprae STR patterns in two patients were identical in 16 of 18 loci which indicate a common source of infection. Fourteen of 15 STR loci showed no intra-patient variation in the five patients tested in Tamil Nadu. Altogether, these studies indicate the suitability of STR strain typing for assessing short-range transmission chains.

  8. Impact of amino acid substitutions in B subunit of DNA gyrase in Mycobacterium leprae on fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Ofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (FQ) used for the treatment of leprosy. FQs are known to interact with both A and B subunits of DNA gyrase and inhibit supercoiling activity of this enzyme. Mutations conferring FQ resistance have been reported to be found only in the gene encoding A subunit of this enzyme (gyrA) of M. leprae, although there are many reports on the FQ resistance-associated mutation in gyrB in other bacteria, including M. tuberculosis, a bacterial species in the same genus as M. leprae. To reveal the possible contribution of mutations in gyrB to FQ resistance in M. leprae, we examined the inhibitory activity of FQs against recombinant DNA gyrases with amino acid substitutions at position 464, 502 and 504, equivalent to position 461, 499 and 501 in M. tuberculosis, which are reported to contribute to reduced sensitivity to FQ. The FQ-inhibited supercoiling assay and FQ-induced cleavage assay demonstrated the important roles of these amino acid substitutions in reduced sensitivity to FQ with marked influence by amino acid substitution, especially at position 502. Additionally, effectiveness of sitafloxacin, a FQ, to mutant DNA gyrases was revealed by low inhibitory concentration of this FQ. Data obtained in this study suggested the possible emergence of FQ-resistant M. leprae with mutations in gyrB and the necessity of analyzing both gyrA and gyrB for an FQ susceptibility test. In addition, potential use of sitafloxacin for the treatment of problematic cases of leprosy by FQ resistant M. leprae was suggested.

  9. Impact of Amino Acid Substitutions in B Subunit of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium leprae on Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Background Ofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (FQ) used for the treatment of leprosy. FQs are known to interact with both A and B subunits of DNA gyrase and inhibit supercoiling activity of this enzyme. Mutations conferring FQ resistance have been reported to be found only in the gene encoding A subunit of this enzyme (gyrA) of M. leprae, although there are many reports on the FQ resistance-associated mutation in gyrB in other bacteria, including M. tuberculosis, a bacterial species in the same genus as M. leprae. Methodology/Principal Findings To reveal the possible contribution of mutations in gyrB to FQ resistance in M. leprae, we examined the inhibitory activity of FQs against recombinant DNA gyrases with amino acid substitutions at position 464, 502 and 504, equivalent to position 461, 499 and 501 in M. tuberculosis, which are reported to contribute to reduced sensitivity to FQ. The FQ-inhibited supercoiling assay and FQ-induced cleavage assay demonstrated the important roles of these amino acid substitutions in reduced sensitivity to FQ with marked influence by amino acid substitution, especially at position 502. Additionally, effectiveness of sitafloxacin, a FQ, to mutant DNA gyrases was revealed by low inhibitory concentration of this FQ. Significance Data obtained in this study suggested the possible emergence of FQ-resistant M. leprae with mutations in gyrB and the necessity of analyzing both gyrA and gyrB for an FQ susceptibility test. In addition, potential use of sitafloxacin for the treatment of problematic cases of leprosy by FQ resistant M. leprae was suggested. PMID:23071850

  10. Analysis of the Vaccine Potential of Plasmid DNA Encoding Nine Mycolactone Polyketide Synthase Domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roupie, Virginie; Pidot, Sacha J.; Einarsdottir, Tobba; Van Den Poel, Christophe; Jurion, Fabienne; Stinear, Timothy P.; Huygen, Kris

    2014-01-01

    There is no effective vaccine against Buruli ulcer. In experimental footpad infection of C57BL/6 mice with M. ulcerans, a prime-boost vaccination protocol using plasmid DNA encoding mycolyltransferase Ag85A of M. ulcerans and a homologous protein boost has shown significant, albeit transient protection, comparable to the one induced by M. bovis BCG. The mycolactone toxin is an obvious candidate for a vaccine, but by virtue of its chemical structure, this toxin is not immunogenic in itself. However, antibodies against some of the polyketide synthase domains involved in mycolactone synthesis, were found in Buruli ulcer patients and healthy controls from the same endemic region, suggesting that these domains are indeed immunogenic. Here we have analyzed the vaccine potential of nine polyketide synthase domains using a DNA prime/protein boost strategy. C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated against the following domains: acyl carrier protein 1, 2, and 3, acyltransferase (acetate) 1 and 2, acyltransferase (propionate), enoylreductase, ketoreductase A, and ketosynthase load module. As positive controls, mice were vaccinated with DNA encoding Ag85A or with M. bovis BCG. Strongest antigen specific antibodies could be detected in response to acyltransferase (propionate) and enoylreductase. Antigen-specific Th1 type cytokine responses (IL-2 or IFN-γ) were induced by vaccination against all antigens, and were strongest against acyltransferase (propionate). Finally, vaccination against acyltransferase (propionate) and enoylreductase conferred some protection against challenge with virulent M. ulcerans 1615. However, protection was weaker than the one conferred by vaccination with Ag85A or M. bovis BCG. Combinations of these polyketide synthase domains with the vaccine targeting Ag85A, of which the latter is involved in the integrity of the cell wall of the pathogen, and/or with live attenuated M. bovis BCG or mycolactone negative M. ulcerans may eventually lead to the development of an

  11. An efficient system for deletion of large DNA fragments in Escherichia coli via introduction of both Cas9 and the non-homologous end joining system from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuan; Li, Shi-Yuan; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2017-04-15

    Accompanied with the internal non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) system, Cas9 can be used to easily inactivate a gene or delete a fragment through introduction of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in eukaryotic cells. While in most prokaryotes (e.g. Escherichia coli), due to the lack of NHEJ, homologous recombination (HR) is required for repair of DSBs, which is less convenient. Here, a markerless system was developed for rapid gene inactivation or fragment deletion in E. coli via introduction of both Cas9 and a bacterial NHEJ system. Three bacterial NHEJ systems, i.e. Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Bacillus subtilis (Bs), were tested in E. coli, and the MsmNHEJ system showed the best efficiency. With the employment of Cas9 and MsmNHEJ, we efficiently mutated lacZ gene, deleted glnALG operon and two large DNA fragments (67 kb and 123 kb) in E. coli, respectively. Moreover, the system was further designed to allow for continuous inactivation of genes or deletion of DNA fragments in E. coli. We envision this system can be extended to other bacteria, especially those with low HR efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3’-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotide and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologs of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both, in an M. smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5’-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ. PMID:23198659

  13. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Sonya L.; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F.; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E.; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S.; Kwa, Suefen

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156 PMID

  14. A triclade DNA vaccine designed on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study elicits neutralizing antibody responses against all clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent; Zhou, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted.

  15. A Triclade DNA Vaccine Designed on the Basis of a Comprehensive Serologic Study Elicits Neutralizing Antibody Responses against All Clades and Subclades of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted. PMID:22496212

  16. Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., two rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Chen, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Ji-Cheng; Jiang, Yi; Xiong, Zhi; Li, Wen-jun

    2013-11-01

    Two novel isolates of rapidly growing, Gram-stain-positive, non-chromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium, strain YIM M13028(T) from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea (19° 30.261' N 111° 0.247' E) at a depth of 42 m and strain YIM 121001(T) from a coastal zone sand sample collected in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were obtained in our laboratory. Their taxonomic positions were determined by a polyphasic approach. Good growth of the two strains was observed at 28 °C and pH 7.0 with 0-2 % NaCl on tryptic soy agar medium. Both strains formed round orange-red colonies, strain YIM M13028(T) had a rough surface, while YIM 121001(T) was smooth. Cellular fatty acids, whole-cell protein profiles and TLC analysis of their mycolic acids show significant differences from reference stains. Phenotypic characteristics and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, rpoB and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicated that both strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) belong to the genus Mycobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization values revealed a low relatedness (<70 %) of the two isolates with the type strains Mycobacterium neoaurum DSM 44074(T) and Mycobacterium hodleri DSM 44183(T). The low DNA-DNA hybridization values (40.4±3.5 %) between strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) and phenotypic distinctiveness indicated that the two strains were representatives of different novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The names proposed for these novel species are Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., and the type strains are YIM M13028(T) ( = DSM 45643(T) = KCTC 19999(T)) and YIM 121001(T) ( = DSM 45768(T) = JCM 18538(T)), respectively.

  17. Discovery of cofactor-specific, bactericidal Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA inhibitors using DNA-encoded library technology

    PubMed Central

    Soutter, Holly H.; Centrella, Paolo; Clark, Matthew A.; Cuozzo, John W.; Dumelin, Christoph E.; Guie, Marie-Aude; Habeshian, Sevan; Keefe, Anthony D.; Kennedy, Kaitlyn M.; Sigel, Eric A.; Troast, Dawn M.; Zhang, Ying; Ferguson, Andrew D.; Davies, Gareth; Stead, Eleanor R.; Breed, Jason; Madhavapeddi, Prashanti; Read, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals are infected with and die from tuberculosis (TB) each year, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of TB are increasingly prevalent. As such, there is an urgent need to identify novel drugs to treat TB infections. Current frontline therapies include the drug isoniazid, which inhibits the essential NADH-dependent enoyl–acyl-carrier protein (ACP) reductase, InhA. To inhibit InhA, isoniazid must be activated by the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Isoniazid resistance is linked primarily to mutations in the katG gene. Discovery of InhA inhibitors that do not require KatG activation is crucial to combat MDR TB. Multiple discovery efforts have been made against InhA in recent years. Until recently, despite achieving high potency against the enzyme, these efforts have been thwarted by lack of cellular activity. We describe here the use of DNA-encoded X-Chem (DEX) screening, combined with selection of appropriate physical properties, to identify multiple classes of InhA inhibitors with cell-based activity. The utilization of DEX screening allowed the interrogation of very large compound libraries (1011 unique small molecules) against multiple forms of the InhA enzyme in a multiplexed format. Comparison of the enriched library members across various screening conditions allowed the identification of cofactor-specific inhibitors of InhA that do not require activation by KatG, many of which had bactericidal activity in cell-based assays. PMID:27864515

  18. Discovery of cofactor-specific, bactericidal Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA inhibitors using DNA-encoded library technology.

    PubMed

    Soutter, Holly H; Centrella, Paolo; Clark, Matthew A; Cuozzo, John W; Dumelin, Christoph E; Guie, Marie-Aude; Habeshian, Sevan; Keefe, Anthony D; Kennedy, Kaitlyn M; Sigel, Eric A; Troast, Dawn M; Zhang, Ying; Ferguson, Andrew D; Davies, Gareth; Stead, Eleanor R; Breed, Jason; Madhavapeddi, Prashanti; Read, Jon A

    2016-12-06

    Millions of individuals are infected with and die from tuberculosis (TB) each year, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of TB are increasingly prevalent. As such, there is an urgent need to identify novel drugs to treat TB infections. Current frontline therapies include the drug isoniazid, which inhibits the essential NADH-dependent enoyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) reductase, InhA. To inhibit InhA, isoniazid must be activated by the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Isoniazid resistance is linked primarily to mutations in the katG gene. Discovery of InhA inhibitors that do not require KatG activation is crucial to combat MDR TB. Multiple discovery efforts have been made against InhA in recent years. Until recently, despite achieving high potency against the enzyme, these efforts have been thwarted by lack of cellular activity. We describe here the use of DNA-encoded X-Chem (DEX) screening, combined with selection of appropriate physical properties, to identify multiple classes of InhA inhibitors with cell-based activity. The utilization of DEX screening allowed the interrogation of very large compound libraries (10(11) unique small molecules) against multiple forms of the InhA enzyme in a multiplexed format. Comparison of the enriched library members across various screening conditions allowed the identification of cofactor-specific inhibitors of InhA that do not require activation by KatG, many of which had bactericidal activity in cell-based assays.

  19. Rapid and Simultaneous Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Beijing/W Genotype in Sputum by an Optimized DNA Extraction Protocol and a Novel Multiplex Real-Time PCR ▿

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Eric T. Y.; Zheng, L.; Wong, Rity Y. K.; Chan, Edward W. C.; Au, T. K.; Chan, Raphael C. Y.; Lui, Grace; Lee, Nelson; Ip, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis and genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by molecular methods are often limited by the amount and purity of DNA extracted from body fluids. In this study, we evaluated 12 DNA extraction methods and developed a highly sensitive protocol for mycobacterial DNA extraction directly from sputa using surface-coated magnetic particles. We have also developed a novel multiplex real-time PCR for simultaneous identification of M. tuberculosis complex and the Beijing/W genotype (a hypervirulent sublineage of M. tuberculosis) by using multiple fluorogenic probes targeting both the M. tuberculosis IS6110 and the Rv0927c-pstS3 intergenic region. With reference strains and clinical isolates, our real-time PCR accurately identified 20 non-Beijing/W and 20 Beijing/W M. tuberculosis strains from 17 different species of nontuberculosis Mycobacterium (NTM). Further assessment of our DNA extraction protocol and real-time PCR with 335 nonduplicate sputum specimens correctly identified all 74 M. tuberculosis culture-positive specimens. In addition, 15 culture-negative specimens from patients with confirmed tuberculosis were also identified. No cross-reactivity was detected with NTM specimens (n = 31). The detection limit of the assay is 10 M. tuberculosis bacilli, as determined by endpoint dilution analysis. In conclusion, an optimized DNA extraction protocol coupled with a novel multiprobe multiplex real-time PCR for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis, including Beijing/W M. tuberculosis, was found to confer high sensitivity and specificity. The combined procedure has the potential to compensate for the drawbacks of conventional mycobacterial culture in routine clinical laboratory setting, such as the lengthy incubation period and the limitation to viable organisms. PMID:21593264

  20. Vaccination with the T cell antigen Mtb 8.4 protects against challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coler, R N; Campos-Neto, A; Ovendale, P; Day, F H; Fling, S P; Zhu, L; Serbina, N; Flynn, J L; Reed, S G; Alderson, M R

    2001-05-15

    The development of an effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a research area of intense interest. Mounting evidence suggests that protective immunity to M. tuberculosis relies on both MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells and MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells. By purifying polypeptides present in the culture filtrate of M. tuberculosis and evaluating these molecules for their ability to stimulate PBMC from purified protein derivative-positive healthy individuals, we previously identified a low-m.w. immunoreactive T cell Ag, Mtb 8.4, which elicited strong Th1 T cell responses in healthy purified protein derivative-positive human PBMC and in mice immunized with recombinant Mtb 8.4. Herein we report that Mtb 8.4-specific T cells can be detected in mice immunized with the current live attenuated vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis-bacillus Calmette-Guérin as well as in mice infected i.v. with M. tuberculosis. More importantly, immunization of mice with either plasmid DNA encoding Mtb 8.4 or Mtb 8.4 recombinant protein formulated with IFA elicited strong CD4(+) T cell and CD8(+) CTL responses and induced protection on challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. Thus, these results suggest that Mtb 8.4 is a potential candidate for inclusion in a subunit vaccine against TB.

  1. Small ocean temperature increases elicit stage-dependent changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in a fish, the European sea bass.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadi, Dafni; Díaz, Noelia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2017-09-29

    In natural fish populations, temperature increases can result in shifts in important phenotypic traits. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism mediating phenotypic changes. However, whether temperature increases of the magnitude predicted by the latest global warming models can affect DNA methylation is unknown. Here, we exposed European sea bass to moderate temperature increases in different periods within the first two months of age. We show that increases of even 2 °C in larvae significantly changed global DNA methylation and the expression of ecologically-relevant genes related to DNA methylation, stress response, muscle and organ formation, while 4 °C had no effect on juveniles. Furthermore, DNA methylation changes were more marked in larvae previously acclimated to a different temperature. The expression of most genes was also affected by temperature in the larvae but not in juveniles. In conclusion, this work constitutes the first study of DNA methylation in fish showing that temperature increases of the magnitude predicted by the latest global warming models result in stage-dependent alterations in global DNA methylation and gene expression levels. This study, therefore, provides insights on the possible consequences of climate change in fish mediated by genome-wide epigenetic modifications.

  2. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    PubMed

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB.

  3. A Single Dose of a DNA Vaccine Encoding Apa Coencapsulated with 6,6′-Trehalose Dimycolate in Microspheres Confers Long-Term Protection against Tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Primed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6′-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB. PMID:23740922

  4. Human plasmacytoid dentritic cells elicit a Type I Interferon response by sensing DNA via the cGAS-STING signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Bode, Christian; Fox, Mario; Tewary, Poonam; Steinhagen, Almut; Ellerkmann, Richard K; Klinman, Dennis; Baumgarten, Georg; Hornung, Veit; Steinhagen, Folkert

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a major source of type I interferon (IFN) and are important for host defense by sensing microbial DNA via TLR9. pDCs also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of IFN-driven autoimmune diseases. Yet, this autoimmune reaction is caused by the recognition of self-DNA and has been linked to TLR9-independent pathways. Increasing evidence suggests that the cytosolic DNA receptor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a critical component in the detection of pathogens and contributes to autoimmune diseases. It has been shown that binding of DNA to cGAS results in the synthesis of cGAMP and the subsequent activation of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) adaptor to induce IFNs. Our results show that the cGAS-STING pathway is expressed and activated in human pDCs by cytosolic DNA leading to a robust type I IFN response. Direct activation of STING by cyclic dinucleotides including cGAMP also activated pDCs and knockdown of STING abolished this IFN response. These results suggest that pDCs sense cytosolic DNA and cyclic dinucleotides via the cGAS-STING pathway and that targeting this pathway could be of therapeutic interest. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection from ocular fluids in patients with various types of choroiditis in a referral eye center in India

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Jyotirmay; Kazi, Mohmmad Salman; Agarwal, Vishvesh Ashokkumar; Alam, Md. Shahid; Therese, K Lily

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in aqueous or vitreous samples of patients suffering from choroiditis presumed to be infectious origin. Settings and Design: Hospital-based, retrospective case–control study. Subjects and Methods: In all, forty eyes of forty patients with choroiditis divided into two groups – Group A (serpiginous-like choroiditis, ampiginous choroiditis, multifocal choroiditis) and Group B (choroidal abscess, miliary tuberculosis (TB), choroidal tubercle) were analyzed retrospectively. In 27 controls (patients without uveitis undergoing phacoemulsification), anterior chamber aspirate was done and sample subjected to real-time PCR. Patients underwent nested PCR for MTB using IS6110 and MPB64 primers from aqueous (n = 39) or vitreous (n = 1). All patients underwent detailed ophthalmological examination by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus examination by indirect ophthalmoscopy, and fundus photograph and fundus fluorescein angiography if required. Statistical Analysis: Positive results of PCR for MTB within the group and between two groups were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: There were 25 males and 15 females. Mean age at presentation was 34.66 years (range, 14–62). PCR positivity rates were 41.3% (n = 12/29) and 81.82% (n = 9/11) in Groups A and B, respectively. No controls had PCR-positive result. Comparison of PCR positivity rates showed statistically significant difference between Groups A and B (P = 0.028). Systemic TB was detected in 57.14% (n = 12/21) of all PCR-positive cases (Group A - 33.3%, n = 4/12; Group B - 88.9%, n = 8/9). Systemic antitubercular treatment (ATT) for 9 months and oral steroids were successful in resolution of choroiditis in all PCR-positive patients (n = 21) without disease recurrence. Conclusions: Eyes with choroiditis of suspected/presumed tubercular origin should be subjected to PCR for diagnosis of TB and

  6. Ludic Elicitation: Using Games for Knowledge Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation from human beings is important for many fields, such as decision support systems, risk communication, and customer preference studying. Traditional approaches include observations, questionnaires, structured and semi-structured interviews, and group discussions. Many publications have been studying different techniques for a…

  7. Ludic Elicitation: Using Games for Knowledge Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation from human beings is important for many fields, such as decision support systems, risk communication, and customer preference studying. Traditional approaches include observations, questionnaires, structured and semi-structured interviews, and group discussions. Many publications have been studying different techniques for a…

  8. Mycobacterium smegmatis RqlH defines a novel clade of bacterial RecQ-like DNA helicases with ATP-dependent 3'-5' translocase and duplex unwinding activities.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Heather; Unciuleac, Mihaela; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-05-01

    The Escherichia coli RecQ DNA helicase participates in a pathway of DNA repair that operates in parallel to the recombination pathway driven by the multisubunit helicase-nuclease machine RecBCD. The model mycobacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis executes homologous recombination in the absence of its helicase-nuclease machine AdnAB, though it lacks a homolog of E. coli RecQ. Here, we identify and characterize M. smegmatis RqlH, a RecQ-like helicase with a distinctive domain structure. The 691-amino acid RqlH polypeptide consists of a RecQ-like ATPase domain (amino acids 1-346) and tetracysteine zinc-binding domain (amino acids 435-499), separated by an RqlH-specific linker. RqlH lacks the C-terminal HRDC domain found in E. coli RecQ. Rather, the RqlH C-domain resembles bacterial ComF proteins and includes a phosphoribosyltransferase-like module. We show that RqlH is a DNA-dependent ATPase/dATPase that translocates 3'-5' on single-stranded DNA and has 3'-5' helicase activity. These functions inhere to RqlH-(1-505), a monomeric motor unit comprising the ATPase, linker and zinc-binding domains. RqlH homologs are distributed widely among bacterial taxa. The mycobacteria that encode RqlH lack a classical RecQ, though many other Actinobacteria have both RqlH and RecQ. Whereas E. coli K12 encodes RecQ but lacks a homolog of RqlH, other strains of E. coli have both RqlH and RecQ.

  9. NEDD8-targeting drug MLN4924 elicits DNA rereplication by stabilizing Cdt1 in S phase, triggering checkpoint activation, apoptosis, and senescence in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie Jessie; Milhollen, Michael A; Smith, Peter G; Narayanan, Usha; Dutta, Anindya

    2010-12-15

    MLN4924 is a first-in-class experimental cancer drug that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme, thereby inhibiting cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases and stabilizing many cullin substrates. The mechanism by which MLN4924 inhibits cancer cell proliferation has not been defined, although it is accompanied by DNA rereplication and attendant DNA damage. Here we show that stabilization of the DNA replication factor Cdt1, a substrate of cullins 1 and 4, is critical for MLN4924 to trigger DNA rereplication and inhibit cell proliferation. Even only 1 hour of exposure to MLN4924, which was sufficient to elevate Cdt1 for 4-5 hours, was found to be sufficient to induce DNA rereplication and to activate apoptosis and senescence pathways. Cells in S phase were most susceptible, suggesting that MLN4924 will be most toxic on highly proliferating cancers. Although MLN4924-induced cell senescence seems to be dependent on induction of p53 and its downstream effector p21(Waf1), we found that p53(-/-) and p21(-/-) cells were even more susceptible than wild-type cells to MLN4924. Our results suggested that apoptosis, not senescence, might be more important for the antiproliferative effect of MLN4924. Furthermore, our findings show that transient exposure to this new investigational drug should be useful for controlling p53-negative cancer cells, which often pose significant clinical challenge.

  10. Mycobacterium riyadhense infections.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mustafa M; Alshukairi, Abeer N; Qutub, Mohammed O; Elkhizzi, Noura A; Hilluru, Haris M; Omrani, Ali S

    2015-05-01

    Mycobacterium riyadhense is a newly described slowly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacterium species. We describe 2 new cases of Mycobacterium riyadhense infections presenting with extra-pulmonary involvement, and reviewed all previously reported cases in the literature. We also describe the spectrum of the disease and explore treatment options based on the experience with the current and previously reported cases.

  11. A DNA vaccine encoding MPB83 from Mycobacterium bovis reduces M. bovis dissemination to the kidneys of mice and is expressed in primary cell cultures of the European badger (Meles meles).

    PubMed

    Chambers, M A; Stagg, D; Gavier-Widén, D; Lowrie, D; Newell, D; Hewinson, R G

    2001-10-01

    Nucleic acid (DNA) vaccination against tuberculosis in the European badger (Meles meles) is one approach to addressing the escalating problem of bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain. The aim of vaccination is to reduce the burden of tuberculosis within the badger population and the shedding of Mycobacterium bovis to levels that would break the transmission of infection to cattle. To this end, the vaccine would be required to limit the amount of disseminated tuberculosis in the badger, especially dissemination to the kidney from where M. bovis can be shed in the urine. A promising candidate DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa major antigen (MPB83) of M. bovis was evaluated in a mouse model of disseminated M. bovis infection. Using the DNA vaccine, protection against infection of the kidney was found to be greater than that achieved with the current live vaccine, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Kidney tissue and skeletal muscle from the badger was used to derive primary cell cultures in which to examine the expression of MPB83 following transfection with the DNA vaccine. Kidney cortex gave rise to a monotypic culture of epithelial cells whilst the muscle gave rise to a mixed culture of fibroblasts and myoblasts. During culture the myoblasts differentiated into multinucleated myotubes, verified by immunofluorescent detection of mammalian desmin. Successful expression of MPB83 by transfected epithelial and myotube cells was confirmed by immunofluorescence using a monoclonal antibody specific to the protein. These observations fulfil the early requirements for the development of a DNA vaccine for badger tuberculosis.

  12. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A chimeric multi-epitope DNA vaccine elicited specific antibody response against severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus which attenuated the virulence of SARS-CoV in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohua; Xu, Wei; Tong, Deyan; Ni, Jing; Gao, Haifeng; Wang, Ying; Chu, Yiwei; Li, Pingping; Yang, Xiaoming; Xiong, Sidong

    2008-08-15

    Epitope-based vaccines designed to induce antibody responses specific for severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) are being developed as a means for increasing vaccine potency. In this study, we identified four B cell epitopes from the spike (S) and membrane (M) protein through bioinformatics analysis and constructed a multi-epitope DNA vaccine. Intramuscular immunization of mice with this vaccine was sufficient to induce specific prime as well as a long-term memory humoral immune response to at least two candidate epitopes, S(437-459) and M(1-20). A DNA prime-protein boost strategy greatly enhanced the antibody generation and the immune sera not only reacted with the lysates of SARS-CoV-infected Vero cells but also neutralized the cytopathic effect of SARS by 75% at 1:160 dilution. The novel immunogenic S protein peptide revealed in this study provides new target for SARS vaccine design; and our work indicated multi-epitope DNA vaccine as an effective means for eliciting polyvalent humoral immune response against SARS-CoV.

  14. Perforin and gamma interferon expression are required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-dependent protective immunity against a human parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, elicited by heterologous plasmid DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Bruna C G; Persechini, Pedro M; Haolla, Filipe A; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M

    2009-10-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8(+) T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-gamma or IFN-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-gamma in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-gamma-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-gamma in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy.

  15. Perforin and Gamma Interferon Expression Are Required for CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell-Dependent Protective Immunity against a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, Elicited by Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Bruna C. G.; Persechini, Pedro M.; Haolla, Filipe A.; de Oliveira, Gabriel; Silverio, Jaline C.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA, followed by replication-defective recombinant adenovirus 5, is being proposed as a powerful way to elicit CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. We confirmed this concept and furthered existing research by providing evidence that the heterologous prime-boost regimen using the gene encoding amastigote surface protein 2 elicited CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity (reduction of acute parasitemia and prolonged survival) against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Protective immunity correlated with the presence of in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxic activity prior to challenge. Based on this, our second goal was to determine the outcome of infection after heterologous prime-boost immunization of perforin-deficient mice. These mice were highly susceptible to infection. A detailed analysis of the cell-mediated immune responses in immunized perforin-deficient mice showed an impaired gamma interferon (IFN-γ) secretion by immune spleen cells upon restimulation in vitro with soluble recombinant antigen. In spite of a normal numeric expansion, specific CD8+ T cells presented several functional defects detected in vivo (cytotoxicity) and in vitro (simultaneous expression of CD107a/IFN-γ or IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha) paralleled by a decreased expression of CD44 and KLRG-1. Our final goal was to determine the importance of IFN-γ in the presence of highly cytotoxic T cells. Vaccinated IFN-γ-deficient mice developed highly cytotoxic cells but failed to develop any protective immunity. Our study thus demonstrated a role for perforin and IFN-γ in a number of T-cell-mediated effector functions and in the antiparasitic immunity generated by a heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination strategy. PMID:19651871

  16. Lipid exposure elicits differential responses in gene expression and DNA methylation in primary human skeletal muscle cells from severely obese women

    PubMed Central

    Maples, Jill M.; Shewchuk, Brian M.; Zou, Kai; Rowland, Naomi; Hubal, Monica J.; Weber, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    The skeletal muscle of obese individuals exhibits an impaired ability to increase the expression of genes linked with fatty acid oxidation (FAO) upon lipid exposure. The present study determined if this response could be attributed to differential DNA methylation signatures. RNA and DNA were isolated from primary human skeletal muscle cells (HSkMC) from lean and severely obese women following lipid incubation. mRNA expression and DNA methylation were quantified for genes that globally regulate FAO [PPARγ coactivator (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs)]. With lipid oversupply, increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, PPARα, and PPARδ expression were dampened in skeletal muscle from severely obese compared with lean women. The expression of genes downstream of the PPARs and NRFs also exhibited a pattern of not increasing as robustly upon lipid exposure with obesity. Increases in CpG methylation near the transcription start site with lipid oversupply were positively related to PPARδ expression; increases in methylation with lipid were depressed in HSkMC from severely obese women. With severe obesity, there is an impaired ability to upregulate global transcriptional regulators of FAO in response to lipid exposure. Transient changes in DNA methylation patterns and differences in the methylation signature with severe obesity may play a role in the transcriptional regulation of PPARδ in response to lipid. The persistence of differential responses to lipid in HSkMC derived from lean and obese subjects supports the possibility of stable epigenetic programming of skeletal muscle cells by the respective environments. PMID:25670728

  17. Lipid exposure elicits differential responses in gene expression and DNA methylation in primary human skeletal muscle cells from severely obese women.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jill M; Brault, Jeffrey J; Shewchuk, Brian M; Witczak, Carol A; Zou, Kai; Rowland, Naomi; Hubal, Monica J; Weber, Todd M; Houmard, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    The skeletal muscle of obese individuals exhibits an impaired ability to increase the expression of genes linked with fatty acid oxidation (FAO) upon lipid exposure. The present study determined if this response could be attributed to differential DNA methylation signatures. RNA and DNA were isolated from primary human skeletal muscle cells (HSkMC) from lean and severely obese women following lipid incubation. mRNA expression and DNA methylation were quantified for genes that globally regulate FAO [PPARγ coactivator (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs)]. With lipid oversupply, increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, PPARα, and PPARδ expression were dampened in skeletal muscle from severely obese compared with lean women. The expression of genes downstream of the PPARs and NRFs also exhibited a pattern of not increasing as robustly upon lipid exposure with obesity. Increases in CpG methylation near the transcription start site with lipid oversupply were positively related to PPARδ expression; increases in methylation with lipid were depressed in HSkMC from severely obese women. With severe obesity, there is an impaired ability to upregulate global transcriptional regulators of FAO in response to lipid exposure. Transient changes in DNA methylation patterns and differences in the methylation signature with severe obesity may play a role in the transcriptional regulation of PPARδ in response to lipid. The persistence of differential responses to lipid in HSkMC derived from lean and obese subjects supports the possibility of stable epigenetic programming of skeletal muscle cells by the respective environments.

  18. DNA Vaccines delivered by dermal electroporation elicit durable protective immunity against individual or simultaneous infections with lassa and ebola viruses in guinea pigs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-22

    Pharmaceuticals , Inc., Blue Bell, PA., 4Office of the Chief Scientists, Headquarters, 11  USAMRIID, Fort Detrick, MD. 12  13  ABSTRACT 14  We...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. an additional cross-challenge experiment in which the guinea pigs vaccinated with both 70  DNA...exposures were separated temporally. To our 74  knowledge, this study is the first report of a LASV/EBOV coinfection model, so in 75  addition to the

  19. 3-Methylcholanthrene elicits DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region and attenuates reporter gene expression in rat H4IIE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, Bhagavatula . E-mail: bmoorthy@bcm.tmc.edu; Muthiah, Kathirvel; Fazili, Inayat S.; Kondraganti, Sudha R.; Wang Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Jiang Weiwu

    2007-03-23

    Cytochrome CYP1A (CYP1A) enzymes catalyze bioactivation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) to genotoxic metabolites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CYP1A2 catalyzes formation of MC-DNA adducts that are preferentially formed in the promoter region of CYP1A1, resulting in modulation of CYP1A1 gene expression. MC bound covalently to plasmid DNA (50 {mu}g) containing human CYP1A1 promoter (pGL3-1A1), when incubated with wild-type (WT) liver microsomes (2 mg) and NAPPH 37 {sup o}C for 2 h, giving rise to 9 adducts, as determined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling. Eighty percent of adducts was located in the promoter region. Transient transfection of the adducted plasmids into rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells for 16 h, followed by MC (1 {mu}M) treatment for 24 h inhibited reporter (luciferase) gene expression by 75%, compared to unadducted controls. Our results suggest that CYP1A2 plays a key role in sequence-specific MC-DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region, leading to attenuation of CYP1A1 gene expression.

  20. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  1. Stable antigen is most effective for eliciting CD8+ T-cell responses after DNA vaccination and infection with recombinant vaccinia virus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schliehe, Christopher; Bitzer, Annegret; van den Broek, Maries; Groettrup, Marcus

    2012-09-01

    The induction of strong CD8(+) T-cell responses against infectious diseases and cancer has remained a major challenge. Depending on the source of antigen and the infectious agent, priming of CD8(+) T cells requires direct and/or cross-presentation of antigenic peptides on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, both pathways show distinct preferences concerning antigen stability. Whereas direct presentation was shown to efficiently present peptides derived from rapidly degraded proteins, cross-presentation is dependent on long-lived antigen species. In this report, we analyzed the role of antigen stability on DNA vaccination and recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) infection using altered versions of the same antigen. The long-lived nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can be targeted for degradation by N-terminal fusion to ubiquitin or, as we show here, to the ubiquitin-like modifier FAT10. Direct presentation by cells either transfected with NP-encoding plasmids or infected with recombinant VV in vitro was enhanced in the presence of short-lived antigens. In vivo, however, the highest induction of NP-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses was achieved in the presence of long-lived NP. Our experiments provide evidence that targeting antigens for proteasomal degradation does not improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines and recombinant VVs. Rather, it is the long-lived antigen that is superior for the efficient activation of MHC class I-restricted immune responses in vivo. Hence, our results suggest a dominant role for antigen cross-priming in DNA vaccination and recombinant VV infection.

  2. Fusion-Expressed CTB Improves Both Systemic and Mucosal T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Intranasal DNA Priming/Intramuscular Recombinant Vaccinia Boosting Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Sugan; Ren, Xiaonan; Ben, Yinyin; Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wan, Yanmin; Xu, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Previous study showed that CTB (Cholera toxin subunit B) can be used as a genetic adjuvant to enhance the systemic immune responses. To further investigate whether it can also be used as a genetic adjuvant to improve mucosal immune responses, we constructed DNA and recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV) vaccines expressing OVA-CTB fusion antigen. Female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with an intranasal DNA priming/intramuscular rTTV boosting regimen. OVA specific T-cell responses were measured by IFN-γ ELISPOT and specific antibody responses were determined by ELISA. Compared to the nonadjuvant group (pSV-OVA intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA intramuscular boosting), pSV-OVA-CTB intranasal priming/rTTV-OVA-CTB intramuscular boosting group significantly improved the magnitudes of T-cell responses at spleen (1562 ± 567 SFCs/106 splenocytes versus 330 ± 182 SFCs/106 splenocytes, P < 0.01), mesenteric LN (96 ± 83 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 1 ± 2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.05), draining LNs of respiratory tract (109 ± 60 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 2 ± 2 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.01) and female genital tract (89 ± 48 SFCs/106 lymphocytes versus 23 ± 21 SFCs/106 lymphocytes, P < 0.01). These results collectively demonstrated that fusion-expressed CTB could act as a potent adjuvant to improve both systemic and mucosal T-cell responses. PMID:24741585

  3. Comparison of two DNA extractions and nested PCR, real-time PCR, a new commercial PCR assay, and bacterial culture for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine feces.

    PubMed

    Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Dammen, Matthew A; Weeks, Shelleen R; Epperson, William B; Singh, Shri N; Steinlicht, Gina L; Fang, Ying; Skaare, Jessica L; Larsen, Jill L; Payeur, Janet B; Nelson, Eric A

    2003-03-01

    In this study, 5 combinations of 2 DNA extractions and 3 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were compared with culture for the detection of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis directly from bovine feces. These combinations included a new commercial extraction technique combined with a commercial PCR/Southern blot technique, nested PCR (nPCR), or real-time PCR, and a university-developed extraction combined with nPCR or real-time PCR. Four of the 5 combinations had statistically similar sensitivities between 93% and 100% and specificity between 95% and 100%, when compared with culture results from 63 bovine fecal samples. These results indicated that using a commercial extraction with a commercial PCR/Southern blot, nPCR, or real-time PCR, or a university-developed extraction with real-time PCR would result in similar sensitivities to culture for the identification of M. paratuberculosis from bovine feces and are valid alternatives to culture.

  4. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  5. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  6. Inhibition by acetaminophen of neoplastic initiation elicited in rat liver by the DNA-reactive hepatocarcinogen N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gary M; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Jeffrey, Alan M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Perrone, Carmen E

    2007-12-01

    Acetaminophen, a monocyclic phenolic compound and analgesic, when fed at 8900 p.p.m. in the diet, was reported to inhibit the hepatocarcinogenicity in rats of the aromatic amine proximate carcinogen N-hydroxy-N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of this anticarcinogenicity, the present study examined whether acetaminophen at lower doses has the ability to inhibit the initiating effects in the rat liver of the precursor hepatocarcinogen N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene. Male F344 rats were allocated to six groups, which were maintained under reverse light cycle conditions to assure acetaminophen ingestion at the time of N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene administration during the dark phase, which was imposed from 07.00 to 19.00 h. Group 1 served as vehicle control (0.5% carboxymethylcellulose) for N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene, which was administered intragastrically 3 days per week at 2.6 mg/kg for 8 weeks (group 4) to achieve initiation. Acetaminophen was given in the diet either alone at 2400 or 4800 p.p.m. for 9 weeks (groups 2 and 3), or with N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (groups 5 and 6), starting 1 week before N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene administration. Acetaminophen blood levels were about 1 and 4 microg/ml at the two dietary concentrations. N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene induced hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions measured as hepatocellular altered foci expressing glutathione S-transferase-P, reflecting initiation. Induced foci were reduced with administration of both concentrations of acetaminophen. Acetaminophen by itself produced no DNA adducts nor did it alter the high formation of N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene-DNA adducts, about 200 in 10 nucleotides, measured by nucleotide postlabeling. Acetaminophen did not affect background liver cell proliferation, but significantly reduced N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene-induced increased proliferation measured by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining. Thus, acetaminophen effectively protected hepatocytes from the initiating

  7. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  8. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  9. M cell-targeting strategy facilitates mucosal immune response and enhances protection against CVB3-induced viral myocarditis elicited by chitosan-DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Yue, Yan; Fan, Xiangmei; Dong, Chunsheng; Xu, Wei; Xiong, Sidong

    2014-07-31

    Efficient delivery of antigen to mucosal associated lymphoid tissue is a first and critical step for successful induction of mucosal immunity by vaccines. Considering its potential transcytotic capability, M cell has become a more and more attractive target for mucosal vaccines. In this research, we designed an M cell-targeting strategy by which mucosal delivery system chitosan (CS) was endowed with M cell-targeting ability via conjugating with a CPE30 peptide, C terminal 30 amino acids of clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and then evaluated its immune-enhancing ability in the context of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-specific mucosal vaccine consisting of CS and a plasmid encoding CVB3 predominant antigen VP1. It had shown that similar to CS-pVP1, M cell-targeting CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine appeared a uniform spherical shape with about 300 nm diameter and +22 mV zeta potential, and could efficiently protect DNA from DNase I digestion. Mice were orally immunized with 4 doses of CPE30-CS-pVP1 containing 50 μg pVP1 at 2-week intervals and challenged with CVB3 4 weeks after the last immunization. Compared with CS-pVP1 vaccine, CPE30-CS-pVP1 vaccine had no obvious impact on CVB3-specific serum IgG level and splenic T cell immune responses, but significantly increased specific fecal SIgA level and augmented mucosal T cell immune responses. Consequently, much milder myocarditis and lower viral load were witnessed in CPE30-CS-pVP1 immunized group. The enhanced immunogenicity and immunoprotection were associated with the M cell-targeting ability of CPE30-CS-pVP1 which improved its mucosal uptake and transcytosis. Our findings indicated that CPE30-CS-pVP1 may represent a novel prophylactic vaccine against CVB3-induced myocarditis, and this M cell-targeting strategy indeed could be applied as a promising and universal platform for mucosal vaccine development.

  10. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  11. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T).

  12. Noncanonical SMC protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis restricts maintenance of Mycobacterium fortuitum plasmids.

    PubMed

    Panas, Michael W; Jain, Paras; Yang, Hui; Mitra, Shimontini; Biswas, Debasis; Wattam, Alice Rebecca; Letvin, Norman L; Jacobs, William R

    2014-09-16

    Research on tuberculosis and leprosy was revolutionized by the development of a plasmid transformation system in the fast-growing surrogate, Mycobacterium smegmatis. This transformation system was made possible by the successful isolation of a M. smegmatis mutant strain mc(2)155, whose efficient plasmid transformation (ept) phenotype supported the replication of Mycobacterium fortuitum pAL5000 plasmids. In this report, we identified the EptC gene, the loss of which confers the ept phenotype. EptC shares significant amino acid sequence homology and domain structure with the MukB protein of Escherichia coli, a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein. Surprisingly, M. smegmatis has three paralogs of SMC proteins: EptC and MSMEG_0370 both share homology with Gram-negative bacterial MukB; and MSMEG_2423 shares homology with Gram-positive bacterial SMCs, including the single SMC protein predicted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Purified EptC was shown to bind ssDNA and stabilize negative supercoils in plasmid DNA. Moreover, an EptC-mCherry fusion protein was constructed and shown to bind to DNA in live mycobacteria, and to prevent segregation of plasmid DNA to daughter cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of impaired plasmid maintenance caused by a SMC homolog, which has been canonically known to assist the segregation of genetic materials.

  13. Issues in Requirements Elicitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    systems approach: characterized by Checkland’s Soft Systems Methodology (SSM), which is discussed briefly in Appendix A.6; emphasizes the subjectivity of...methodology for requirements elicitation. A.6 Notes on SSM Both the definition of methodology and the philosophy behind soft systems methodology (SSM...1986. [Checkland 89a] Checkland, Peter. Soft Systems Methodology . Rational Analysis for a Problematic World. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 71-100

  14. STING-Dependent 2'-5' Oligoadenylate Synthetase-Like Production Is Required for Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae Survival.

    PubMed

    de Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Batista-Silva, Leonardo Ribeiro; Silva, Bruno Jorge de Andrade; Lemes, Robertha Mariana Rodrigues; Martinez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Shannon, Edward Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Antunes, Sérgio Luís Gomes; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lara, Flávio Alves; Williams, Diana Lynn; Ozório Moraes, Milton

    2016-07-15

    Cytosolic detection of nucleic acids elicits a type I interferon (IFN) response and plays a critical role in host defense against intracellular pathogens. Herein, a global gene expression profile of Mycobacterium leprae-infected primary human Schwann cells identified the genes differentially expressed in the type I IFN pathway. Among them, the gene encoding 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like (OASL) underwent the greatest upregulation and was also shown to be upregulated in M. leprae-infected human macrophage cell lineages, primary monocytes, and skin lesion specimens from patients with a disseminated form of leprosy. OASL knock down was associated with decreased viability of M. leprae that was concomitant with upregulation of either antimicrobial peptide expression or autophagy levels. Downregulation of MCP-1/CCL2 release was also observed during OASL knock down. M. leprae-mediated OASL expression was dependent on cytosolic DNA sensing mediated by stimulator of IFN genes signaling. The addition of M. leprae DNA enhanced nonpathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin intracellular survival, downregulated antimicrobial peptide expression, and increased MCP-1/CCL2 secretion. Thus, our data uncover a promycobacterial role for OASL during M. leprae infection that directs the host immune response toward a niche that permits survival of the pathogen.

  15. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  16. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4+ CD45RO+ CCR7+) responses corr...

  17. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4 plus CD45RO plus CCR7 plus) re...

  18. [Frontier of mycobacterium research--host vs. mycobacterium].

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaji; Shirakawa, Taro

    2005-09-01

    During the past decade, we have observed advance in tuberculosis research including novel vaccines, innate immunity (TLR), SNIP analysis and molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Worldwide genome project enabled the whole genome sequence of host resistant against tuberculosis as well as the whole genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. DNA technology has also provided a great impact on the development of novel vaccine against TB. In this symposium, we have invited leading researchers in the field of the frontier study of Mycobacterium research in order to provide general overview of the cutting edge of frontier research. Molecular mechanism of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis has been clarified. On the other hand, molecular mechanism of host-defence (insusceptibility of host) against M. tuberculosis has not yet elucidated. Dr. Taro Shirakawa (Kyoto University) reviewed the susceptibility genes of host in TB infection and presented candidate genes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Naoto Keicho (International Medical Center of Japan) tried to identify host genetic factors involved in susceptibility to pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection by candidate gene approach and genome-wide approach. In Japan, Dr. Masaji Okada (National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center) has been engaged actively in the development of new tuberculosis vaccines (HVJ-liposome/Hsp65 DNA + IL-12 DNA vaccine and recombinant 72f BCG vaccine). He showed basic strategy for construction of new candidate vaccines and also showed significant efficacy on the protection of tuberculosis infection using cynomolgus monkeys, which are very similar to human tuberculosis. Dr. Hatsumi Taniguchi (University of Occupational and Environmental Health) presented that M. tuberculosis mIHF and the neighbor genes went into a dormacy-like state of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophage cells. This study might provide a weapon for elucidating the mechanism of dormacy

  19. PLGA-polymer encapsulating tumor antigen and CpG DNA administered into the tumor microenvironment elicits a systemic antigen-specific IFN-γ response and enhances survival

    PubMed Central

    Nikitczuk, Kevin P.; Schloss, Rene S; Yarmush, Martin L.; Lattime, Edmund C.

    2013-01-01

    Critical to the generation of an effective therapeutic antitumor immune response is the elicitation of effective antigen presentation coupled with overcoming tumor-immune escape mechanisms. Towards this end, we aimed to understand the therapeutic effectiveness of a polymer based vaccine approach at enhancing the anti-tumor responses in a tumor-bearing mouse model. While we and others have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of PLGA based systems in delivering antigen etc., studies scarcely focus on understanding the immunological mechanisms of polymer based therapies in tumor bearing treatment models. Considering tumors modulate the immune system and consequently the efficacy of therapies, understanding treatment mechanisms in the presence of tumor will help lead to more efficacious treatment options. We demonstrate here that a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based delivery system encapsulating tumor antigen (OVA) and the TLR9 agonist CpG motif DNA administered into the tumor microenvironment initiates an effective type 1 mediated (IFN-γ producing) anti-tumor response in a syngeneic murine model of T cell lymphoma (E.G7-OVA). Although E.G7-OVA tumors spontaneously generate antigen specific CTLs in draining lymph nodes (LN), tumors progress rapidly. Modulation of the tumor microenvironment via local PLGA based therapy led to the generation of a systemic antigen specific Th1 response, absent in the non-polymer delivery method, subsequently associated with reduced tumor growth and prolongation of survival. These studies provide further insight into the use of a PLGA-based therapeutic approach at modulating the tumor microenvironment and highlight the need for analyzing the treatment effects in a tumor bearing model. PMID:23741626

  20. Rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) extract and its component, piceatannol, enhance the activity of DNA polymerase and suppress the inflammatory response elicited by UVB‑induced DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Sawako; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Iwahashi, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takefumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    A number of naturally occurring agents are hypothesized to protect against ultraviolet (UV)‑induced skin damage. The present study screened >50 plant extracts for inhibitors of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity, using cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and identified that the fruit of rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) was the most marked inhibitor of cell death. The protective effect of rose myrtle extract and the two key components, piceatannol and piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside, on UVB‑induced damage and inflammation in cultured NHEK was investigated. The 80% ethanol extract from rose myrtle fruit with piceatannol exhibited protection of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity in NHEK; however, piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside exhibited no protection, as determined by a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This extract and piceatannol reduced the production of UVB‑induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced the cellular enzyme activity of the DNA polymerases in UVB‑irradiated NHEK, suggesting that UVB‑stimulated DNA damage was repaired by the polymerases. In addition, the secretion of prostaglandin E2, which is an inflammatory mediator, was decreased. These results indicated that rose myrtle fruit extract and its key constituent, piceatannol, are potential photoprotective candidates for UV‑induced skin damage.

  1. Association between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA in blood and cellular and humoral immune response in inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Juste, Ramón A; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pavón, Andrés; Garrido, Joseba M; Geijo, Mariví; Sevilla, Iker; Cabriada, José L; Tejada, Angel; García-Campos, Francisco; Casado, Roberto; Ochotorena, Itziar; Izeta, Ander

    2009-03-01

    Similarities between human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and ruminant paratuberculosis have fueled a heated discussion on the role of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in the etiology of IBD. In order to determine microbiological and immunological evidence of an association between MAP and IBD, blood from 222 inflammatory bowel disease patients and 80 healthy donors from the Basque Country (Spain) were subjected to nested PCR for MAP-specific insertion sequence IS900, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) release test with PPA-3 MAP antigen (IFNMAP) or phosphate-buffered saline (IFNPBS), and antibody ELISA with PPA-3 MAP antigen (ABMAP). Highly significant differences in the proportion of PCR-positive IBD patients (17%) and healthy controls (43%) as well as lower IFNMAP and higher ABMAP and IFNPBS responses were observed. Treatment was associated with decreases in IFNMAP and PCR-positive frequency. These results indicate the existence of immune responses and treatment interactions with MAP that strongly support an etiological role of this agent in IBD.

  2. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-11-30

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish).

  3. Rapid and accurate detection of RMP- and INH- resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in spinal tuberculosis specimens by CapitalBio™ DNA microarray: a prospective validation study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zehua; Li, Litao; Luo, Fei; Cheng, Peng; Wu, Feng; Wu, Zheng; Hou, Tianyong; Zhong, Min; Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-11-14

    DNA microarrays can detect tuberculosis and its multi-drug resistant form in M. tuberculosis isolates and sputum specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. However, no performance data currently exists for its use in spinal tuberculosis specimens. This study was aimed to assess the performance of the CapitalBio™ DNA microarray in the detection of isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RMP) resistance in spinal tuberculosis compared with the BACT/MGIT 960 system. From March 2009 to December 2011, 153 consecutive patients from Southwest Hospital, Chongqing with clinically and pathologically diagnosed spinal tuberculosis were enrolled into this study. Specimens collected during surgery from the tuberculosis patients were subjected to M. tuberculosis species identification and drug-resistance detection by the CapitalBio™ DNA microarray, and results were compared with those obtained from the absolute concentration drug susceptibility testing. The CapitalBio™ DNA microarray achieved 93.55% sensitivity for the correct M. tuberculosis species identification of the 93 specimens that tested positive for spinal tuberculosis through culture. In addition, twenty-seven additional patients (45.0%) were detected by the DNA microarray to be positive for M. tuberculosis among sixty spinal tuberculosis patients who were culture negative. Moreover, the DNA microarray had a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specificity of 90.7% for RMP resistance, and the microarray had a sensitivity of 80.0% and a specificity of 91.0% for INH resistance. The mean turn-around time of M. tuberculosis species identification and drug resistance detection using the DNA microarray was 5.8 (range, 4-9) hours. The CapitalBio™ DNA microarray is a feasible and accurate tool for the species identification of M. tuberculosis and for directly detecting RMP and INH resistance from spinal tuberculosis specimens in fewer than 9 hours.

  4. Mycobacteriophage-drived diversification of Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging opportunistic pathogen which diversity was acknowledged by the recent description of two subspecies accommodating M. abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense isolates. Results Here, genome analysis found 1–8 prophage regions in 47/48 M. abscessus genomes ranging from small prophage-like elements to complete prophages. A total of 20,304 viral and phage proteins clustered into 853 orthologous groups. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic analyses based on prophage region homology found three main clusters corresponding to M. abscessus, M. bolletii and M. massiliense. Analysing 135 annotated Tape Measure Proteins found thirteen clusters and four singletons, suggesting that at least 17 mycobacteriophages had infected M. abscessus during its evolution. The evolutionary history of phages differed from that of their mycobacterial hosts. In particular, 33 phage-related proteins have been horizontally transferred within M. abscessus genomes. They comprise of an integrase, specific mycobacteriophage proteins, hypothetical proteins and DNA replication and metabolism proteins. Gene exchanges, loss and gains which occurred in M. abscessus genomes have been driven by several mycobacteriophages. Conclusions This analysis of phage-mycobacterium co-evolution suggests that mycobacteriophages are playing a key-role in the on-going diversification of M. abscessus. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, Patrick Forterre and Eugene Koonin. PMID:25224692

  5. Performance assessment of the GenoType MTBDRsl test and DNA sequencing for detection of second-line and ethambutol drug resistance among patients infected with multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lun; Chi, Ting-Lin; Wu, Mei-Hua; Jou, Ruwen

    2011-07-01

    The GenoType MTBDRsl test and DNA sequencing were used to rapidly detect second-line drug- and ethambutol (EMB)-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ability of these two assays to detect the presence of mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones (FLQ), aminoglycosides/cyclic peptide (AG/CP), and EMB in the gyrA, rrs, and embB genes (for the GenoType MTBDRsl test) and gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, embC, embA, embB, and embR genes (for DNA sequencing) was compared to that of conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility testing (DST). We evaluated 234 multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis isolates. The two molecular methods had high levels of specificity (95.8 to 100%). The sensitivities for FLQ resistance detection for both methods were 85.1%. For AG (kanamycin [KM] and amikacin [AM]) and CP (capreomycin CAP]), the sensitivities of resistance detection using the GenoType MTBDRsl test were 43.2%, 84.2%, and 71.4%, respectively, while with the inclusion of an extra gene, eis, in sequencing, the sensitivity reached 70.3% for detection of KM resistance. The sensitivities of EMB resistance detection were 56.2% and 90.7% with the GenoType MTBDRsl test and sequencing, respectively. We found that the GenoType MTBDRsl test can rapidly detect resistance to FLQ, CAP, and AM. The accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRsl test for the detection of FLQ and AM resistance was comparable to that of conventional DST; however, the test was less accurate for the detection of KM and EMB resistance and demonstrated a poor predictive value for CAP resistance. We recommend including new alleles consisting of the eis promoter and embB genes in molecular analysis. However, conventional DST is necessary to rule out false-negative results from molecular assays.

  6. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  7. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  8. Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov., a non-chromogenic, fast-growing strain isolated from sputum.

    PubMed

    Nouioui, Imen; Carro, Lorena; Teramoto, Kanae; Igual, José M; Jando, Marlen; Del Carmen Montero-Calasanz, Maria; Sutcliffe, Iain; Sangal, Vartul; Goodfellow, Michael; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2017-09-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to establish the taxonomic position of a non-chromogenic, rapidly growing Mycobacterium strain that had been isolated from sputum. The strain, CECT 8775T, has chemotaxonomic and cultural properties consistent with its classification in the genus Mycobacterium and was distinguished from the type strains of closely related mycobacterial species, notably from Mycobacterium paraense DSM 46749T, its nearest phylogenetic neighbour, based on 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB gene sequence data. These organisms were also distinguished by a broad range of chemotaxonomic and phenotypic features and by a digital DNA-DNA relatedness value of 22.8 %. Consequently, the strain is considered to represent a novel species of Mycobacterium for which the name Mycobacterium eburneum sp. nov is proposed; the type strain is X82T (CECT 8775T=DSM 44358T).

  9. Mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yujiao, Zhang; Xiaojing, Li; Kaixia, Mi

    2016-10-20

    Tuberculosis, caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest bacterial infectious disease. It is still a global-health threat, particularly because of the drug-resistant forms. Fluoroquinolones, with target of gyrase, are among the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. However, their widespread use has led to bacterial resistance. The molecular mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported, such as DNA gyrase mutations, drug efflux pumps system, bacterial cell wall thickness and pentapeptide proteins (MfpA) mediated regulation of gyrase. Mutations in gyrase conferring quinolone resistance play important roles and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have shown that the regulation of DNA gyrase affects mycobacterial drug resistance, but the mechanisms, especially by post-translational modification and regulatory proteins, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the fluoroquinolone drug development, and the molecular genetics of fluoroquinolone resistance in mycobacteria. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis will open a new view on understanding drug resistance in mycobacteria and lead to novel strategies to develop new accurate diagnosis methods.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  11. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading species isolated from Hawaiian soils: Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov., Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov., Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov., Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. and Mycobacterium aromaticivorans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hennessee, Christiane T; Seo, Jong-Su; Alvarez, Anne M; Li, Qing X

    2009-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental contaminants. In this study, both pristine and contaminated soils were sampled as a source of PAH-degrading organisms. Nine strains isolated from these soils were identified as rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium through basic phenotypic characteristics and through sequence similarity of three genes. Because the sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene is relatively high among members of this genus, additional conserved genes encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) and a heat-shock protein (hsp65) were sequenced. Several analyses were completed to differentiate the strains from one another and to determine their species-level taxonomy, including fatty acid methyl ester analysis, biochemical tests and substrate-utilization profiling. A phylogenetic tree incorporating sequences for all three genes was constructed with the isolates and their close described relatives. Results for biochemical tests, substrate-utilization tests and DNA sequencing were compared with those of the phylogenetically similar organisms to establish the isolated strains as representatives of novel species with characteristics unlike those of previously described species of Mycobacterium. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed between strains and their close relatives to confirm their position within novel species. Our results demonstrated that the isolates represent five novel species, which were named Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov. (type strain czh-42(T) =ATCC BAA-1373(T) =CIP 109262(T); reference strains czh-1A =ATCC BAA-1370 =CIP 109266 and czh-3 =ATCC BAA-1371=CIP 109267), Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov. (type strain czh-8(T) =ATCC BAA-1372(T) =CIP 109268(T)), Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov. (type strain czh-117(T) =ATCC BAA-1375(T) =CIP 109271(T); reference strains czh-107 =ATCC BAA-1374 =CIP 109270 and czh-132 =ATCC BAA-1376 =CIP 109272), Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. (type strain JS14(T

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP Receptor Protein (Rv3676) Differs from the Escherichia coli Paradigm in Its cAMP Binding and DNA Binding Properties and Transcription Activation Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Melanie; Haq, Ihtshamul; Hunt, Debbie M.; Arnvig, Kristine B.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a burst of cAMP upon infection of macrophages. Bacterial cyclic AMP receptor proteins (CRP) are transcription factors that respond to cAMP by binding at target promoters when cAMP concentrations increase. Rv3676 (CRPMt) is a CRP family protein that regulates expression of genes (rpfA and whiB1) that are potentially involved in M. tuberculosis persistence and/or emergence from the dormant state. Here, the CRPMt homodimer is shown to bind two molecules of cAMP (one per protomer) at noninteracting sites. Furthermore, cAMP binding by CRPMt was relatively weak, entropy driven, and resulted in a relatively small enhancement in DNA binding. Tandem CRPMt-binding sites (CRP1 at −58.5 and CRP2 at −37.5) were identified at the whiB1 promoter (PwhiB1). In vitro transcription reactions showed that CRP1 is an activating site and that CRP2, which was only occupied in the presence of cAMP or at high CRPMt concentrations in the absence of cAMP, is a repressing site. Binding of CRPMt to CRP1 was not essential for open complex formation but was required for transcription activation. Thus, these data suggest that binding of CRPMt to the PwhiB1 CRP1 site activates transcription at a step after open complex formation. In contrast, high cAMP concentrations allowed occupation of both CRP1 and CRP2 sites, resulting in inhibition of open complex formation. Thus, M. tuberculosis CRP has evolved several distinct characteristics, compared with the Escherichia coli CRP paradigm, to allow it to regulate gene expression against a background of high concentrations of cAMP. PMID:20028978

  14. Enhanced protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis afforded by BCG prime-DNA boost regimen in an early challenge mouse model is associated with increased splenic interleukin-2-producing CD4 T-cell frequency post-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Han, De-Ping; Wu, Kang; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2014-12-01

    The development of improved vaccines and vaccination strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been hindered by a limited understanding of the immune correlates of anti-tuberculosis protective immunity. Simple measurement of interferon-γ frequency or production per se does not provide adequate prediction of immune protection. In this study, we examined the relationship between T-cell immune responses and protective efficacy conferred by the heterologous vaccination strategy, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) prime-Ag85A DNA boost (B/D), in an early challenge mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. The results demonstrated that mice vaccinated with the B/D regimen had a significantly reduced bacillary load compared with BCG-vaccinated mice, and the reduction in colony-forming units was associated with decreased pathology and lower levels of inflammatory cytokines in the infected lungs. Further analysis of immunogenicity showed that the superior protection afforded by the B/D regimen was associated with significantly increased frequency of splenic interleukin-2 (IL-2) -producing CD4 T cells and increased IL-2 production when measured as integrated mean fluorescence intensity post-vaccination as well. These data suggest that measurement of elevated frequency of IL-2-producing CD4 T cells or IL-2 production in the spleens of vaccinated mice can predict vaccine efficacy, at least in the B/D strategy, and add to the accumulating body of evidence suggesting that BCG prime-boost strategies may be a useful approach to the control of M. tuberculosis infection.

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection interference with Mycobacterium bovis diagnostics: natural infection cases and a pilot experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum and at least 1 unidentified species of soil mycobacteria were isolated from lymph nodes from 4 of 5 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that had been culled because of positive test results using the Bovigam assay. The buffalo were part of a group of 16 free-ranging buffalo captured in the far north of the Kruger National Park (South Africa) assumed to be free of bovine tuberculosis. No Mycobacterium bovis was isolated. To investigate the possible cause of the apparent false-positive diagnosis, the Mycobacterium isolates were inoculated into 4 experimental cattle and their immune responses monitored over a 13-week period, using the gamma interferon assay. The immune reactivity was predominantly directed toward avian tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and lasted for approximately 8 weeks. During that period 3 of 4 cattle yielded positive test results on 1 or 2 occasions. The immune responsiveness was boosted when the inoculations were repeated after 15 weeks, which led to 2 subsequent positive reactions in the experimental animal that did not react previously. Including an additional stimulatory antigen, sensitin prepared from M. fortuitum in the gamma interferon assay, showed that it was able to elicit a detectable gamma interferon response in all 4 experimentally inoculated cattle when applied in parallel with bovine and avian tuberculin PPD for the stimulation of blood samples. The implications of occasional cross-reactive responses in natural cases of infection with environmental mycobacteria in the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo and cattle in South Africa are discussed.

  16. Histologic and Genotypic Characterization of a Novel Mycobacterium Species Found in Three Cats

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Greg D.; Clark, Edward G.

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of feline atypical mycobacteriosis from different geographical regions in North America were characterized by large clusters of filamentous bacteria visible on hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained tissue sections. PCR amplification demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium-specific nucleic acid in samples of skin lesions from these cases. PCR-assisted cloning and DNA sequence analysis of a 541-bp length of the Mycobacterium 16S rRNA gene generated DNA sequences which were >95% identical, suggesting that the three isolates were closely related. Two of the sequences were 99% identical and may represent the same species. Alignment with comparable 16S rRNA gene sequences from 66 Mycobacterium species and partially characterized isolates highlighted similarities (>94%) with Mycobacterium bohemicum, Mycobacterium haemophilum, Mycobacterium ulcerans, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and isolate IWGMT 90242. Parsimony analysis of sequence data suggested relatedness to M. leprae. Significant molecular genetic and pathobiological differences between these three similar isolates and other known species of mycobacteria suggested that the organisms may not have been described previously and that these cases may represent a new form of mycobacterial disease in cats. We suggest the term “Mycobacterium visibilis” to describe the organism from which the two nearly identical sequences were obtained. PMID:12089257

  17. Evaluation of combined high-efficiency DNA extraction and real-time PCR for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in subclinically infected dairy cattle: comparison with faecal culture, milk real-time PCR and milk ELISA.

    PubMed

    Logar, Katarina; Kopinč, Rok; Bandelj, Petra; Starič, Jože; Lapanje, Aleš; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2012-05-02

    Johne's disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) and it is one of the most important diseases in cattle worldwide. Several laboratory tests for Map detection are available; however, these are limited by inadequate sensitivity and specificity when used in subclinically infected populations. To identify Map shedders in subclinically infected cattle, we used a new, high-yield method for DNA-extraction from Map in faeces combined with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for amplification of the insertion sequence IS900 of Map (HYDEqPCR). Evaluation of HYDEqPCR was carried out in comparison with faecal culture, milk qPCR, and milk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), on 141 faecal and 91 milk samples, from 141 subclinically infected dairy cattle. The qPCR proved to be highly sensitive, with a detection limit of 2 IS900 DNA copies/μl in 67 % of the reactions. It also showed 100 % specificity, as determined from 50 Map and non-Map strains, and by the sequencing of qPCR amplicons. The detection limit of HYDEqPCR was 90 Map/g Map-spiked faeces, which corresponds to 2.4 colony forming units/g Map-spiked faeces, with an estimated efficiency of 85 % (±21 %). When tested on the field samples, HYDEqPCR showed 89 % of the samples as positive for Map, whereas faecal culture, milk qPCR, and milk ELISA detected 19 %, 36 % and 1 %, respectively. Fisher's exact tests only show statistical significance (p ≤0.05) for the correlation between HYDEqPCR and faecal culture. The agreement between HYDEqPCR and milk qPCR and milk ELISA was poor, slight, and non-significant. This study highlights the advantages of HYDEqPCR for detection of Map in subclinically infected populations, in comparison with faecal culture, milk qPCR and milk ELISA. HYDEqPCR can detect low-level Map shedders that go undetected using these other methods, which will thus underestimate the proportions of Map-shedders in herds. Identification of these shedding animals is

  18. Evaluation of combined high-efficiency DNA extraction and real-time PCR for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in subclinically infected dairy cattle: comparison with faecal culture, milk real-time PCR and milk ELISA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Johne’s disease is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) and it is one of the most important diseases in cattle worldwide. Several laboratory tests for Map detection are available; however, these are limited by inadequate sensitivity and specificity when used in subclinically infected populations. To identify Map shedders in subclinically infected cattle, we used a new, high-yield method for DNA-extraction from Map in faeces combined with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for amplification of the insertion sequence IS900 of Map (HYDEqPCR). Evaluation of HYDEqPCR was carried out in comparison with faecal culture, milk qPCR, and milk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), on 141 faecal and 91 milk samples, from 141 subclinically infected dairy cattle. Results The qPCR proved to be highly sensitive, with a detection limit of 2 IS900 DNA copies/μl in 67 % of the reactions. It also showed 100 % specificity, as determined from 50 Map and non-Map strains, and by the sequencing of qPCR amplicons. The detection limit of HYDEqPCR was 90 Map/g Map-spiked faeces, which corresponds to 2.4 colony forming units/g Map-spiked faeces, with an estimated efficiency of 85 % (±21 %). When tested on the field samples, HYDEqPCR showed 89 % of the samples as positive for Map, whereas faecal culture, milk qPCR, and milk ELISA detected 19 %, 36 % and 1 %, respectively. Fisher’s exact tests only show statistical significance (p ≤0.05) for the correlation between HYDEqPCR and faecal culture. The agreement between HYDEqPCR and milk qPCR and milk ELISA was poor, slight, and non-significant. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of HYDEqPCR for detection of Map in subclinically infected populations, in comparison with faecal culture, milk qPCR and milk ELISA. HYDEqPCR can detect low-level Map shedders that go undetected using these other methods, which will thus underestimate the proportions of Map-shedders in herds

  19. Enhancement of HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunogenicity by BCG-PSN, a novel adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hou, Jue; Li, Dingfeng; Liu, Yong; Hu, Ningzhu; Hao, Yanling; Fu, Jingjing; Hu, Yunzhang; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-07

    Although the importance of DNA vaccines, especially as a priming immunization has been well established in numerous HIV vaccine studies, the immunogenictiy of DNA vaccines is generally moderate. Novel adjuvant is in urgent need for improving the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine. Polysaccharide and nucleic acid fraction extracted by hot phenol method from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin, known as BCG-PSN, is a widely used immunomodulatory product in China clinical practice. In this study, we evaluated whether the BCG-PSN could serve as a novel adjuvant of DNA vaccine to trigger better cellular and humoral immune responses against the HIV-1 Env antigen in Balb/C mouse model. The BCG-PSN was mixed with 10 μg or 100 μg of pDRVI1.0gp145 (HIV-1 CN54 gp145 gene) DNA vaccine and intramuscularly immunized two or three times. We found that BCG-PSN could significantly improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine when co-administered with DNA vaccine. Further, at the same vaccination schedule, BCG-PSN co-immunization with 10 μg DNA vaccine could elicit cellular and humoral immune responses which were comparable to that induced by 100 μg DNA vaccine alone. Moreover, our results demonstrate that BCG-PSN can activate TLR signaling pathways and induce Th1-type cytokines secretion. These findings suggest that BCG-PSN can serve as a novel and effective adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  20. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  1. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  2. Characterization of the Secreted MPT53 Antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sadie; Brusasca, PierNatale; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Spencer, John S.; Wiker, Harald G.; Bifani, Pablo; Shashkina, Elena; Kreiswirth, Barry; Harboe, Morten; Schluger, Neil; Gomez, Manuel; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2001-01-01

    MPT53 is a secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Southern transfer and hybridization showed mpt53 to be conserved in the M. tuberculosis complex and to have homology with DNA from Mycobacterium avium and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. However, anti-MPT53 polyclonal antibodies detected no antigen in the culture filtrates of M. avium and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. MPT53 of M. tuberculosis induced strong, tuberculosis-specific antibody responses in guinea pigs but induced no delayed-type hypersensitivity. Involvement in immune responses during human tuberculosis was very modest. PMID:11500477

  3. Drosophila melanogaster model for Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chun-Taek; Moon, Cheol; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Jang, Jichan

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a human pathogen that is responsible for a broad spectrum of tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunodeficient patients. This pathogen is one of the most resistant organisms to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a genetically tractable model host for M. abscessus. In this context, we infected D. melanogaster with M. abscessus. This M. abscessus infection results in dissemination in the fly body, followed by death, which is accompanied by severe indirect flight muscle and brain damage. Our data show that M. abscessus can grow and replicate in D. melanogaster w(1118) and that it elicited a humoral immune response, especially of the Toll antimicrobial peptide pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that mycobacteria induce the production of antimicrobial peptides in D. melanogaster.

  4. Synthetic oligonucleotides with particular base sequences from the cDNA encoding proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG induce interferons and activate natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, T; Yano, O; Kuramoto, E; Kimura, Y; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Yamamoto, S

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of 45-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide, having sequence randomly selected from the known cDNA encoding BCG proteins, were tested for their capability to augment natural killer (NK) cell activity of mouse spleen cells in vitro. Six out of the 13 oligonucleotides showed the activity, while the others did not. In order to know the minimal and essential sequence(s) responsible for the biological activity, 2 kinds of 30-mer and 5 kinds of 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments of an active 45-mer nucleotide were tested for their activity. One of the 30-mer oligonucleotides, designated BCG-A4a, was active, but the other 30-mer was inactive. All of the 15-mer oligonucleotide fragments were inactive. The BCG-A4a also stimulated the spleen cells to produce interferon (IFN)-alpha and -gamma. An experiment using anti-IFN antisera showed that the NK cell activation by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to the IFN-alpha produced. It was noticed that all of the biologically active oligonucleotides possessed one or more palindrome sequence(s), and the inactive ones did not, with an exception of a 45-mer inactive oligonucleotide containing overlapping palindrome sequences (GGGCCCGGG). These findings strongly suggest that certain palindrome sequences, like GACGTC, GGCGCC and TGCGCA, are essential for 30-mer oligonucleotides, like BCG-A4a, to induce IFNs.

  5. Sequences of conserved region in the A subunit of DNA gyrase from nine species of the genus Mycobacterium: phylogenetic analysis and implication for intrinsic susceptibility to quinolones.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, I; Cambau, E; Jarlier, V

    1995-09-01

    The sequences of a conserved region in the A subunit of DNA gyrase corresponding to the quinolone resistance-determining region were determined for nine mycobacterial species and were compared. Although the nucleotide sequences were highly conserved, they clearly differentiated one species from another. The results of the phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions were compared with those provided by the 16S rRNA sequences. Deduced amino acid sequences were identical within the nine species except for amino acid 83, which was frequently involved in acquired resistance to quinolones in many genera, including mycobacteria. The presence at position 83 of an alanine for seven mycobacterial species (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis BCG, M. leprae, M. avium, M. kansasii, M. chelonae, and M. smegmatis) and of a serine for the two remaining mycobacterial species (M. fortuitum and M. aurum) correlated well with the MICs of ofloxacin for both groups of species, suggesting the role of this residue in intrinsic susceptibility to quinolones in mycobacteria.

  6. Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay and GenoType MTBDRplus DNA Probes for Detection of Mutations Associated with Rifampicin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Arfatur; Sahrin, Mahfuza; Afrin, Sadia; Earley, Keith; Ahmed, Shahriar; Rahman, S M Mazidur; Banu, Sayera

    2016-01-01

    GeneXpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) and Genotype MTBDRplus (DRplus) are two World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed probe based molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods for rapid diagnosis of drug resistant tuberculosis. Both methods target the same 81 bp Rifampicin Resistance Determining Region (RRDR) of bacterial RNA polymerase β subunit (rpoB) for detection of Rifampicin (RIF) resistance associated mutations using DNA probes. So there is a correspondence of the probes of each other and expected similarity of probe binding. We analyzed 92 sputum specimens by Xpert, DRplus and LJ proportion method (LJ-DST). We compared molecular DSTs with gold standard LJ-DST. We wanted to see the agreement level of two molecular methods for detection of RIF resistance associated mutations. The 81bp RRDR region of rpoB gene of discrepant cases between the two molecular methods was sequenced by Sanger sequencing. The agreement of Xpert and DRplus with LJ-DST for detection of RIF susceptibility was found to be 93.5% and 92.4%, respectively. We also found 92.4% overall agreement of two molecular methods for the detection of RIF susceptibility. A total of 84 out of 92 samples (91.3%) had agreement on the molecular locus of RRDR mutation by DRplus and Xpert. Sanger sequencing of 81bp RRDR revealed that Xpert probes detected seven of eight discrepant cases correctly and DRplus was erroneous in all the eight cases. Although the overall concordance with LJ-DST was similar for both Xpert and DRplus assay, Xpert demonstrated more accuracy in the detection of RIF susceptibility for discrepant isolates compared with DRplus. This observation would be helpful for the improvement of probe based detection of drug resistance associated mutations especially rpoB mutation in M. tuberculosis.

  7. Tuberculous Granuloma Formation Is Enhanced by a Mycobacterium Virulence Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jennifer C. W; Sherman, David R

    2004-01-01

    Granulomas are organized host immune structures composed of tightly interposed macrophages and other cells that form in response to a variety of persistent stimuli, both infectious and noninfectious. The tuberculous granuloma is essential for host containment of mycobacterial infection, although it does not always eradicate it. Therefore, it is considered a host-beneficial, if incompletely efficacious, immune response. The Mycobacterium RD1 locus encodes a specialized secretion system that promotes mycobacterial virulence by an unknown mechanism. Using transparent zebrafish embryos to monitor the infection process in real time, we found that RD1-deficient bacteria fail to elicit efficient granuloma formation despite their ability to grow inside of infected macrophages. We showed that macrophages infected with virulent mycobacteria produce an RD1-dependent signal that directs macrophages to aggregate into granulomas. This Mycobacterium-induced macrophage aggregation in turn is tightly linked to intercellular bacterial dissemination and increased bacterial numbers. Thus, mycobacteria co-opt host granulomas for their virulence. PMID:15510227

  8. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis.

  9. Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae in sheep.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Mendoza, Marta; Juan, Lucía de; Menéndez, Santiago; Ocampo, Antón; Mourelo, Jorge; Sáez, José L; Domínguez, Lucas; Gortázar, Christian; García Marín, Juan F; Balseiro, Ana

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis was diagnosed in three flocks of sheep in Galicia, Spain, in 2009 and 2010. Two flocks were infected with Mycobacterium bovis and one flock was infected with Mycobacterium caprae. Infection was confirmed by the comparative intradermal tuberculin test, bacteriology, molecular analysis and histopathology. Sheep have the potential to act as a reservoir for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  11. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  12. Genetic heterogeneity within Mycobacterium fortuitum complex species: genotypic criteria for identification.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, P; Kiekenbeck, M; Meissner, D; Wolters, J; Böttger, E C

    1992-01-01

    A 1.5-kb segment of the DNA that encodes 16S rRNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and 880 nucleotide positions were determined from each of the described biovariants of Mycobacterium fortuitum. Signature sequences which allow rapid identification of M. fortuitum strains at the biovariant level are described. Our data demonstrate a close phylogenetic relationship between Mycobacterium senegalense and M. fortuitum and indicate that the described biovariants of M. fortuitum represent genetically distinct taxa. PMID:1280641

  13. Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Used for Production of Purified Protein Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Inwald, Jacqueline; Hinds, Jason; Palmer, Si; Dale, James; Butcher, Philip D.; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Gordon, Stephen V.

    2003-01-01

    The genomes of the tuberculin production strains Mycobacterium bovis AN5 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DT were compared to genome-sequenced tubercle bacilli by using DNA microarrays. Neither the AN5 nor DT strain suffered extensive gene deletions during in vitro passage. This suggests that bovine tuberculin made from M. bovis AN5 is suitable to detect infection with presently prevalent M. bovis strains. PMID:12904421

  14. Usefulness of the GenoType MTBC Assay for Differentiating Species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Cultures Obtained from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elvira; Weizenegger, Michael; Fahr, Anne-Marie; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    A novel DNA strip assay, GenoType MTBC, was evaluated for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species from 77 positive liquid cultures in clinical practice. Species identification (M. tuberculosis [71 strains], Mycobacterium bovis subsp. bovis [5 strains], and Mycobacterium africanum subtype I [1 strain]) results were identical to conventional results. The sensitivity was slightly higher for this test than for the AccuProbe assay. PMID:15365028

  15. New PCR systems to confirm real-time PCR detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herthnek, David; Bölske, Göran

    2006-01-01

    Background Johne's disease, a serious chronic form of enteritis in ruminants, is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). As the organism is very slow-growing and fastidious, several PCR-based methods for detection have been developed, based mainly on the MAP-specific gene IS900. However, because this gene is similar to genes in other mycobacteria, there is a need for sensitive and reliable methods to confirm the presence of MAP. As described here, two new real-time PCR systems on the IS900 gene and one on the F57 gene were developed and carefully validated on 267 strains and 56 positive clinical faecal samples. Results Our confirmatory PCR systems on IS900 were found sensitive and specific, only yielding weak false positive reactions in one strain for each system. The PCR system on F57 did not elicit any false positives and was only slightly less sensitive than our primary IS900-system. DNA from both naturally infected and spiked faeces that tested positive with our primary system could be confirmed with all new systems, except one low-level infected sample that tested negative with the F57 system. Conclusion We recommend using the newly constructed DH3 PCR system on the F57 gene as the primary confirmatory test for PCR positives, but should it fail due to its lower sensitivity, the DH1 and DH2 PCR systems should be used. PMID:17020599

  16. Zirconia based nucleic acid sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Maumita; Sumana, Gajjala; Nagarajan, R.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconium oxide (ZrO2) film (particle size˜35 nm), electrochemically deposited onto gold(Au) surface, has been used to immobilize 21-mer oligonucleotide probe (ssDNA) specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by utilizing affinity between oxygen atom of phosphoric group and zirconium to fabricate DNA biosensor. This DNA-ZrO2/Au bioelectrode, characterized using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques, can be used for early and rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis with detection limit of 0.065 ng/μL within 60s.

  17. A photoelectrocatalytic process that disinfects water contaminated with Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Michelle Fernanda; Miyata, Marcelo; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2013-11-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatment; indeed, they have been recovered from a wide variety of environmental sources. Here, we applied the photoelectrocatalytic technique using a Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode to inactivate mycobacteria. For a mycobacteria population of 5 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), we achieved 99.9 and 99.8% inactivation of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium with rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-3) and 4.2 × 10(-3) min(-1), respectively, after 240 min. We compared the proposed method with the photolytic and photocatalytic methods. Using a mycobacteria population of 7.5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), the proposed Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode elicited total mycobacteria inactivation within 3 min of treatment; the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the electrode provided 1.5 larger degradation rate constant as compared with the Ti/TiO2 anode (1.75 × 10(-2) for M. kansassi and 1.98 × 10(-2) for M. avium). We monitored the degradation of the metabolites released during cellular lysis by TOC removal, sugar release, chromatography, and mass spectrometry measurements; photoelectrocatalysis and Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanodes furnished the best results.

  18. Mutagenesis in the α3α4 GyrA Helix and in the Toprim Domain of GyrB Refines the Contribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA Gyrase to Intrinsic Resistance to Quinolones▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2008-01-01

    The replacement of M74 in GyrA, A83 in GyrA, and R447 in GyrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase by their Escherichia coli homologs resulted in active enzymes as quinolone susceptible as the E. coli gyrase. This demonstrates that the primary structure of gyrase determines intrinsic quinolone resistance and was supported by a three-dimensional model of N-terminal GyrA. PMID:18426901

  19. Mutagenesis in the alpha3alpha4 GyrA helix and in the Toprim domain of GyrB refines the contribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase to intrinsic resistance to quinolones.

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2008-08-01

    The replacement of M74 in GyrA, A83 in GyrA, and R447 in GyrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase by their Escherichia coli homologs resulted in active enzymes as quinolone susceptible as the E. coli gyrase. This demonstrates that the primary structure of gyrase determines intrinsic quinolone resistance and was supported by a three-dimensional model of N-terminal GyrA.

  20. Toxoplasma gondii: Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding T- and B-cell epitopes of SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 elicits protection against acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xun; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Qunli; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-11-27

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate, intracellular, protozoan parasite that infects large variety of warm-blooded animals including humans, livestock, and marine mammals, and causes the disease toxoplasmosis. Although T. gondii infection rates differ significantly from country to country, it still has a high morbidity and mortality. In these circumstances, developing an effective vaccine against T. gondii is urgently needed for preventing and treating toxoplasmosis. The aim of this study was to construct a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine and evaluate the immune protective efficacy against acute toxoplasmosis in mice. Therefore, twelve T- and B-cell epitopes from SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 of T. gondii were predicted by bioinformatics analysis, and then a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine was constructed. Mice immunized with the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine gained higher levels of IgG titers and IgG2a subclass titers, significant production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), percentage of T lymphocyte subsets, and longer survival times against the acute infection of T. gondii compared with those of mice administered with empty plasmid and those in control groups. Furthermore, a genetic adjuvant pEGFP-RANTES (pRANTES) could enhance the efficacy of the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine associating with humoral and cellular (Th1, CD8(+) T cell) immune responses. Above all, the DNA vaccine and the genetic adjuvant revealed in this study might be new candidates for further vaccine development against T. gondii infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  2. Opinion Elicitation in Second Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vliet, Marijn; Neviarouskaya, Alena; Prendinger, Helmut

    The paper describes a novel method for opinion elicitation, which is based on the popular 3D online world of “Second Life”. Here people, as avatars, are put into a somewhat realistic context related to the topic for which opinions are sought. We hypothesize that this kind of concrete, interactive context supports the evocation of opinions better than non-context methods, e.g. only showing related images. To confirm our hypothesis, we conducted a small pilot study, which compares the influence of static and interactive context methods on the opinions expressed by subjects. The opinion elicitation scenario in Second Life is supported by the automatic retrieval of opinions from the web. The results of a study indicate that subjects show more reasoned opinions in the interactive condition. A demo illustrating the content of this paper is available.

  3. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  4. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  5. Requirements Elicitation Using Paper Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Jaya; Raju, G.

    Requirements engineering is both the hardest and critical part of software development since errors at this beginning stage propagate through the development process and are the hardest to repair later. This paper proposes an improved approach for requirements elicitation using paper prototype. The paper progresses through an assessment of the new approach using student projects developed for various organizations. The scope of implementation of paper prototype and its advantages are unveiled.

  6. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  7. Mycobacterium avium in a shower linked to pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Iseman, Michael D; de Haas, Petra; van Soolingen, Dick

    2008-06-01

    Mycobacterium avium was isolated from hot and cold water samples and from sediment (biofilm) collected from the showerhead in the home of a woman with M. avium pulmonary disease lacking known M. avium risk factors. IS1245/IS1311 DNA fingerprinting demonstrated that M. avium isolates from the hot and cold water and showerhead sediment demonstrated a clonal relationship with the patient's M. avium isolate. The data provide evidence that showers may serve as sources of infection by waterborne M. avium.

  8. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  9. Identification and pathogenicity analysis of a novel non-tuberculous mycobacterium clinical isolate with nine-antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-Y; Sun, Z-Q; Wang, Z-L; Hu, H-R; Wen, Z-L; Song, Y-Z; Zhao, J-W; Wang, H-H; Guo, X-K; Zhang, S-L

    2013-01-01

    With mycobacteriosis increasing, the study of non-tuberculous mycobacteria is imperative for clinical therapy and management. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are naturally resistant to most anti-tuberculosis drugs. Accordingly, it is important to decipher the biology of the novel non-tuberculous mycobacteria through complete genomic analysis of novel pathogenic mycobacteria. We describe Mycobacterium sinense JDM601, a novel, slow-growing mycobacterium of the Mycobacterium terrae complex resistant to nine antibiotics, by clinical presentation, cultural and biochemical characteristics, minimal inhibitory concentrations, and genome-sequencing analysis. JDM601 is closest to Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum according to mycolic acid composition, but closest to Mycobacterium algericum sp. nov according to 16S rDNA. JDM601 is resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, euteropas, protionamide, capromycin, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and levofloxacin but not ethambutol. The clinical information, mycolic acid composition, and virulence genes indicate that JDM601 is an opportunistic pathogen.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, Iñaki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention. PMID:25988174

  11. High resolution melting analysis for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Issa, Rahizan; Abdul, Hatijah; Hashim, Siti Hasmah; Seradja, Valentinus H; Shaili, Nurul 'Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Akma Mohd

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) followed by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was developed for the differentiation of Mycobacterium species. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium species is necessary for the effective diagnosis and management of tuberculosis. In this study, the 16S rRNA gene was tested as the target since this has been identified as a suitable target for the identification of mycobacteria species. During the temperature gradient and primer optimization process, the melting peak (Tm) analysis was determined at a concentration of 50 ng DNA template and 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 µM primer. The qPCR assay for the detection of other mycobacterial species was done at the Tm and primer concentration of 62 °C and 0.4 µM, respectively. The HRM analysis generated cluster patterns that were specific and sensitive to distinguished small sequence differences of the Mycobacterium species. This study suggests that the 16S rRNA-based real-time PCR followed by HRM analysis produced unique cluster patterns for species of Mycobacterium and could differentiate the closely related mycobacteria species. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  13. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Johnson, R. Christian; Phillips, Richard; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Portaels, Françoise; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is an important health problem in several west African countries. It is prevalent in scattered foci around the world, predominantly in riverine areas with a humid, hot climate. We review the epidemiology, bacteriology, transmission, immunology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of infections. M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. The mode of transmission is unknown. Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, particularly on the limbs. Spontaneous healing may occur. Many patients in endemic areas present late with advanced, severe lesions. BCG vaccination yields a limited, relatively short-lived, immune protection. Recommended treatment consists of surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting if necessary. Many patients have functional limitations after healing. Better understanding of disease transmission and pathogenesis is needed for improved control and prevention of Buruli ulcer. PMID:16283056

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Digby F.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism underpins the physiology and pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, although experimental mycobacteriology has provided key insights into the metabolic pathways that are essential for survival and pathogenesis, determining the metabolic status of bacilli during different stages of infection and in different cellular compartments remains challenging. Recent advances—in particular, the development of systems biology tools such as metabolomics—have enabled key insights into the biochemical state of M. tuberculosis in experimental models of infection. In addition, their use to elucidate mechanisms of action of new and existing antituberculosis drugs is critical for the development of improved interventions to counter tuberculosis. This review provides a broad summary of mycobacterial metabolism, highlighting the adaptation of M. tuberculosis as specialist human pathogen, and discusses recent insights into the strategies used by the host and infecting bacillus to influence the outcomes of the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of metabolic functions. PMID:25502746

  15. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  16. Outer Membrane Vesicles from the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the Commensal ECOR12 Enter Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Elicit Differential Effects on DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Fábrega, María-José; Toloza, Lorena; Badia, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal microbiota and the human host are complex. The gut mucosal surface is covered by a mucin layer that prevents bacteria from accessing the epithelial cells. Thus, the crosstalk between microbiota and the host mainly rely on secreted factors that can go through the mucus layer and reach the epithelium. In this context, vesicles released by commensal strains are seen as key players in signaling processes in the intestinal mucosa. Studies with Gram-negative pathogens showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are internalized into the host cell by endocytosis, but the entry mechanism for microbiota-derived vesicles is unknown. Escherichia coli strains are found as part of normal human gut microbiota. In this work, we elucidate the pathway that mediate internalization of OMVs from the probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the commensal ECOR12 strains in several human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Time course measurement of fluorescence and microscopy analysis performed with rhodamine B-R18-labeled OMVs in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors showed that OMVs from these strains enter epithelial cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Vesicles use the same endocytosis pathway in polarized epithelial monolayers. Internalized OMVs are sorted to lysosomal compartments as shown by their colocalization with clathrin and specific markers of endosomes and lysosomes. OMVs from both strains did not affect cell viability, but reduce proliferation of HT-29 cells. Labeling of 8-oxo-dG adducts in DNA revealed that neither OMVs from EcN nor from ECOR12 promoted oxidative DNA damage. In contrast, flow cytometry analysis of phosphorylated γH2AX evidenced that OMVs from the probiotic EcN significantly produced more double strand breaks in DNA than ECOR12 OMVs. The EcN genotoxic effects have been attributed to the synthesis of colibactin. However, it is not known how colibactin is exported and delivered into host cells. Whether colibactin is secreted

  17. A new evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, R.; Gordon, S. V.; Marmiesse, M.; Brodin, P.; Buchrieser, C.; Eiglmeier, K.; Garnier, T.; Gutierrez, C.; Hewinson, G.; Kremer, K.; Parsons, L. M.; Pym, A. S.; Samper, S.; van Soolingen, D.; Cole, S. T.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of 20 variable regions resulting from insertion-deletion events in the genomes of the tubercle bacilli has been evaluated in a total of 100 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium canettii, Mycobacterium microti, and Mycobacterium bovis. This approach showed that the majority of these polymorphisms did not occur independently in the different strains of the M. tuberculosis complex but, rather, resulted from ancient, irreversible genetic events in common progenitor strains. Based on the presence or absence of an M. tuberculosis specific deletion (TbD1), M. tuberculosis strains can be divided into ancestral and “modern” strains, the latter comprising representatives of major epidemics like the Beijing, Haarlem, and African M. tuberculosis clusters. Furthermore, successive loss of DNA, reflected by region of difference 9 and other subsequent deletions, was identified for an evolutionary lineage represented by M. africanum, M. microti, and M. bovis that diverged from the progenitor of the present M. tuberculosis strains before TbD1 occurred. These findings contradict the often-presented hypothesis that M. tuberculosis, the etiological agent of human tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis, the agent of bovine disease. M. canettii and ancestral M. tuberculosis strains lack none of these deleted regions, and, therefore, seem to be direct descendants of tubercle bacilli that existed before the M. africanum→M. bovis lineage separated from the M. tuberculosis lineage. This observation suggests that the common ancestor of the tubercle bacilli resembled M. tuberculosis or M. canettii and could well have been a human pathogen already. PMID:11891304

  18. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  19. Epidemiologic Consequences of Microvariation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia; Yang, Guibin; Shashkina, Elena; Manca, Claudia; Mehaffy, Carolina; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Ahuja, Shama; Fallows, Dorothy A.; Izzo, Angelo; Bifani, Pablo; Dobos, Karen; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Background. Evidence from genotype-phenotype studies suggests that genetic diversity in pathogens have clinically relevant manifestations that can impact outcome of infection and epidemiologic success. We studied 5 closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains that collectively caused extensive disease (n = 862), particularly among US-born tuberculosis patients. Methods. Representative isolates were selected using population-based genotyping data from New York City and New Jersey. Growth and cytokine/chemokine response were measured in infected human monocytes. Survival was determined in aerosol-infected guinea pigs. Results. Multiple genotyping methods and phylogenetically informative synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms showed that all strains were related by descent. In axenic culture, all strains grew similarly. However, infection of monocytes revealed 2 growth phenotypes, slower (doubling ∼55 hours) and faster (∼25 hours). The faster growing strains elicited more tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β than the slower growing strains, even after heat killing, and caused accelerated death of infected guinea pigs (∼9 weeks vs 24 weeks) associated with increased lung inflammation/pathology. Epidemiologically, the faster growing strains were associated with human immunodeficiency virus and more limited in spread, possibly related to their inherent ability to induce a strong protective innate immune response in immune competent hosts. Conclusions. Natural variation, with detectable phenotypic changes, among closely related clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis may alter epidemiologic patterns in human populations. PMID:22315279

  20. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  1. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain by molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Menendez, M C; Palenque, E; Navarro, M C; Nuñez, M C; Rebollo, M J; Garcia, M J

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members.

  2. Mycobacterium caprae infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Wolfgang M; Indra, Alexandra; Koksalan, Orhan K; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Richter, Elvira

    2014-12-01

    Mycobacterium caprae, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, causes tuberculosis (TB) in man and animals. Some features distinguish M. caprae from its epidemiological twin, Mycobacterium bovis: M. caprae is evolutionarily older, accounts for a smaller burden of zoonotic TB and is not globally distributed, but primarily restricted to European countries. M. caprae occurs only in a low proportion of human TB cases and this proportion may even decrease, if progress toward eradication of animal TB in Europe continues. So why bother, if M. caprae is not an enigma for diagnostic TB tests and if resistance against first-line drugs is a rarity with M. caprae? This 'European' pathogen of zoonotic TB asks interesting questions regarding the definition of a species. The latter, seemingly only an academic question, particularly requires and challenges the collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

  3. PCR-Based Method To Differentiate the Subspecies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex on the Basis of Genomic Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Richard C.; de Oliveira Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio; Butler, W. Ray; van Soolingen, Dick; Ho, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The classical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC) subspecies include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum (subtypes I and II), Mycobacterium bovis (along with the attenuated M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]), and Mycobacterium microti; increasingly recognized MtbC groupings include Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae and “Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canettii.” Previous investigations have documented each MtbC subspecies as a source of animal and/or human tuberculosis. However, study of these organisms is hindered by the lack of a single protocol that quickly and easily differentiates all of the MtbC groupings. Towards this end we have developed a rapid, simple, and reliable PCR-based MtbC typing method that makes use of MtbC chromosomal region-of-difference deletion loci. Here, seven primer pairs (which amplify within the loci 16S rRNA, Rv0577, IS1561′, Rv1510, Rv1970, Rv3877/8, and Rv3120) were run in separate but simultaneous reactions. Each primer pair either specifically amplified a DNA fragment of a unique size or failed, depending upon the source mycobacterial DNA. The pattern of amplification products from all of the reactions, visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed immediate identification either as MtbC composed of M. tuberculosis (or M. africanum subtype II), M. africanum subtype I, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. caprae, M. microti, or “M. canettii” or as a Mycobacterium other than MtbC (MOTT). This MtbC PCR typing panel provides an advanced approach to determine the subspecies of MtbC isolates and to differentiate them from clinically important MOTT species. It has proven beneficial in the management of Mycobacterium collections and may be applied for practical clinical and epidemiological use. PMID:12682155

  4. Safety and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis {Delta}lysA {Delta}panCD Vaccine in Domestic Cats Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)+ and FIV- cats (n = 4/group) received 2 x 10**6 cfu Mycobacterium tuberculosis Delta-lysA Delta-panCD intramuscularly. Vaccination elicited antibody responses; albeit, at lower levels in FIV+ cats as compared to FIV- cats. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses ...

  5. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  6. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in Household Water and Biofilm Samples of Patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium Complex Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D.; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S.; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC. PMID:23536397

  7. Outbreak of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections after permanent makeup of the eyebrows.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, Stefano; Morisod, Benoit; Edney, Timothy; Odman, Micaela; Genné, Daniel; Malinverni, Raffaele; Hammann, Catherine; Musumeci, Enrico; Voide, Cathy; Greub, Gilbert; Masserey, Eric; Bille, Jacques; Cavassini, Matthias; Jaton, Katia

    2011-02-15

    We report a Mycobacterium haemophilum outbreak after permanent make-up of the eyebrows performed by the same freelance artist. Twelve patients presented an eyebrow lesion and cervical lymphadenitis. All were treated with antibiotics. Surgery was required in 10 cases. M. haemophilum DNA was identified in the make-up ink.

  8. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Obtained from Multiple Host Species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comparative genomic approach was used to identify large sequence polymorphisms among Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) subspecies obtained from a variety of host animals. DNA microarrays were used as a platform for comparing mycobacterial isolates with the sequenced bovine isolate M. avium subsp. p...

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meets the Cytosol: The Role of cGAS in Anti-mycobacterial Immunity.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2015-06-10

    The intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a subject of long debate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, three independent studies reveal the detection of cytosolic mycobacterial DNA by the nucleotidyltransferase cGAS, emphasizing the concept of cytosolic access by M. tuberculosis and its role in balancing immune-protection and immune-pathogenesis.

  10. Use of restriction fragment length polymorphism as a genetic marker for typing Mycobacterium avium strains.

    PubMed

    Roiz, M P; Palenque, E; Guerrero, C; Garcia, M J

    1995-05-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to study 75 clinical isolates identified as Mycobacterium avium. Two repetitive insertion sequences, IS1311 and IS900, were used as DNA probes. Although less than 25% of isolates showed RFLP patterns with IS900, all strains gave banding patterns with IS1311. M. avium strains isolated from patients with AIDS exhibited marked polymorphism with both probes.

  11. Rapid and accurate identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and common non-tuberculous mycobacteria by multiplex real-time PCR targeting different housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria isolates from primary culture is important due to timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Conventional methods for identification of Mycobacterium species based on biochemical tests needs several weeks and may remain inconclusive. In this study, a novel multiplex real-time PCR was developed for rapid identification of Mycobacterium genus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and the most common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria species including M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and the M. gordonae in three reaction tubes but under same PCR condition. Genetic targets for primer designing included the 16S rDNA gene, the dnaJ gene, the gyrB gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Multiplex real-time PCR was setup with reference Mycobacterium strains and was subsequently tested with 66 clinical isolates. Results of multiplex real-time PCR were analyzed with melting curves and melting temperature (T (m)) of Mycobacterium genus, MTC, and each of non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species were determined. Multiplex real-time PCR results were compared with amplification and sequencing of 16S-23S rDNA ITS for identification of Mycobacterium species. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primers were each 100 % for MTC, M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primer for genus Mycobacterium was 96 and 100 %, respectively. According to the obtained results, we conclude that this multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis and these novel primers can be used for rapid and accurate identification of genus Mycobacterium, MTC, and the most common non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kethireddy, Shravan; Light, R Bruce; Mirzanejad, Yazdan; Maki, Dennis; Arabi, Yaseen; Lapinsky, Stephen; Simon, David; Kumar, Aseem; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand

    2013-08-01

    Septic shock due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an uncommon but well-recognized clinical syndrome. The objective of this study was to describe the unique clinical characteristics, epidemiologic risk factors, and covariates of survival of patients with MTB septic shock in comparison with other bacterial septic shock. A retrospective nested cohort study was conducted of patients given a diagnosis of MTB septic shock derived from a trinational, 8,670-patient database of patients with septic shock between 1996 and 2007. In the database, 53 patients had been given a diagnosis of MTB shock compared with 5,419 with septic shock associated with isolation of more common bacterial pathogens. Patients with MTB and other bacterial septic shock had in-hospital mortality rates of 79.2% and 49.7%, respectively (P < .0001). Of the cases of MTB shock, all but five patients had recognized respiratory tract involvement. Fifty-five percent of patients (29 of 53) were documented (by direct culture or stain) as having disseminated extrapulmonary involvement. Inappropriate and appropriate initial empirical therapy was delivered in 28 patients (52.8%) and 25 patients (47.2%); survival was 7.1% and 36.0%, respectively (P = .0114). Ten patients (18.9%) did not receive anti-MTB therapy; all died. The median time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy for MTB septic shock was 31.0 h (interquartile range, 18.9-71.9 h). Only 11 patients received anti-MTB therapy within 24 h of documentation of hypotension; six of these (54.5%) survived. Only one of 21 patients (4.8%) who started anti-MTB therapy after 24 h survived (P = .0003 vs < 24 h). Survival differences between these time intervals are not significantly different from those seen with bacterial septic shock due to more common bacterial pathogens. MTB septic shock behaves similarly to bacterial septic shock. As with bacterial septic shock, early appropriate antimicrobial therapy appears to improve mortality.

  13. Ectoine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Naomi; Wishkautzan, Marina; Meijler, Michael; Wang, Ying; Speer, Alexander; Niederweis, Michael; Gur, Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a commonly used mycobacterial model system. Here, we show that M. smegmatis protects itself against elevated salinity by synthesizing ectoine and hydroxyectoine and characterize the phenotype of a nonproducing mutant. This is the first analysis of M. smegmatis halotolerance and of the molecular mechanism that supports it.

  14. Leukotrienes are not essential for the efficacy of a heterologous vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, L H; Paula, M Oliveira e; Wowk, P F; Fonseca, D M da; Sérgio, C A; Fedatto, P F; Gembre, A F; Ramos, S G; Silva, C L; Medeiros, A I; Faccioli, L H; Bonato, V L D

    2010-07-01

    Leukotrienes are reported to be potent proinflammatory mediators that play a role in the development of several inflammatory diseases such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal disease. Leukotrienes have also been associated with protection against infectious diseases. However, the role of leukotrienes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is not understood. To answer this question, we studied the role of leukotrienes in the protective immune response conferred by prime-boost heterologous immunization against tuberculosis. We immunized BALB/c mice (4-11/group) with subcutaneous BCG vaccine (1 x 10(5) M. bovis BCG) (prime) followed by intramuscular DNA-HSP65 vaccine (100 microg) (boost). During the 30 days following the challenge, the animals were treated by gavage daily with MK-886 (5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) to inhibit leukotriene synthesis. We showed that MK-886-treated mice were more susceptible to M. tuberculosis infection by counting the number of M. tuberculosis colony-forming units in lungs. The histopathological analysis showed an impaired influx of leukocytes to the lungs of MK-886-treated mice after infection, confirming the involvement of leukotrienes in the protective immune response against experimental tuberculosis. However, prime-boost-immunized mice treated with MK-886 remained protected after challenge with M. tuberculosis, suggesting that leukotrienes are not required for the protective effect elicited by immunization. Protection against M. tuberculosis challenge achieved by prime-boost immunization in the absence of leukotrienes was accompanied by an increase in IL-17 production in the lungs of these animals, as measured by ELISA. Therefore, these data suggest that the production of IL-17 in MK-886-treated, immunized mice could contribute to the generation of a protective immune response after infection with M. tuberculosis.

  15. The Secreted Protein Rv1860 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Stimulates Human Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Kumar, Naveen; Biswas, Sunetra; Jumani, Rajiv S; Jain, Chandni; Rani, Rajni; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Jaya; Kotnur, Mohan Rao; Sridharan, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that Rv1860 protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulated CD4(+)and CD8(+)T cells secreting gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals and protected guinea pigs immunized with a DNA vaccine and a recombinant poxvirus expressing Rv1860 from a challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis We now show Rv1860-specific polyfunctional T (PFT) cell responses in the blood of healthy latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals dominated by CD8(+) T cells, using a panel of 32 overlapping peptides spanning the length of Rv1860. Multiple subsets of CD8(+) PFT cells were significantly more numerous in healthy latently infected volunteers (HV) than in tuberculosis (TB) patients (PAT). The responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from PAT to the peptides of Rv1860 were dominated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretions, the former coming predominantly from non-T cell sources. Notably, the pattern of the T cell response to Rv1860 was distinctly different from those of the widely studied M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT-6, CFP-10, Ag85A, and Ag85B, which elicited CD4(+) T cell-dominated responses as previously reported in other cohorts. We further identified a peptide spanning amino acids 21 to 39 of the Rv1860 protein with the potential to distinguish latent TB infection from disease due to its ability to stimulate differential cytokine signatures in HV and PAT. We suggest that a TB vaccine carrying these and other CD8(+) T-cell-stimulating antigens has the potential to prevent progression of latent M. tuberculosis infection to TB disease.

  16. The Secreted Protein Rv1860 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Stimulates Human Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Biswas, Sunetra; Jumani, Rajiv S.; Jain, Chandni; Rani, Rajni; Aggarwal, Bharti; Singh, Jaya; Kotnur, Mohan Rao; Sridharan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Rv1860 protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells secreting gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals and protected guinea pigs immunized with a DNA vaccine and a recombinant poxvirus expressing Rv1860 from a challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. We now show Rv1860-specific polyfunctional T (PFT) cell responses in the blood of healthy latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals dominated by CD8+ T cells, using a panel of 32 overlapping peptides spanning the length of Rv1860. Multiple subsets of CD8+ PFT cells were significantly more numerous in healthy latently infected volunteers (HV) than in tuberculosis (TB) patients (PAT). The responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from PAT to the peptides of Rv1860 were dominated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretions, the former coming predominantly from non-T cell sources. Notably, the pattern of the T cell response to Rv1860 was distinctly different from those of the widely studied M. tuberculosis antigens ESAT-6, CFP-10, Ag85A, and Ag85B, which elicited CD4+ T cell-dominated responses as previously reported in other cohorts. We further identified a peptide spanning amino acids 21 to 39 of the Rv1860 protein with the potential to distinguish latent TB infection from disease due to its ability to stimulate differential cytokine signatures in HV and PAT. We suggest that a TB vaccine carrying these and other CD8+ T-cell-stimulating antigens has the potential to prevent progression of latent M. tuberculosis infection to TB disease. PMID:26843486

  17. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  18. Isolation, identification, and structural analysis of the mycobactins of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium paratuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, R; Ewing, D F; Ratledge, C

    1985-01-01

    Methods were devised to purify the cell-associated, iron-binding compounds known as mycobactins from the closely related species Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (i.e., the MAIS complex of organisms). The mycobactins from these three species showed a structure that is common to the mycobactins from all the mycobacteria examined to date. However, these mycobactins were unique in that they had more than one alkyl chain. The M. scrofulaceum mycobactins differed from other MAIS mycobactins by a shift in the position of the double bond in the R1 alkyl chain. Traces of other mycobactin types were observed in ethanol extracts of the three species, and examination of the chromatographic properties of these mycobactins showed that each species produced five mycobactin types. Each mycobactin could be subdivided further by the length of its R1 alkyl chain. No differences in the production of these novel mycobactin were observed among species. Mycobactins from three strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and two wood pigeon strains of Mycobacterium avium which had lost their original growth requirements for mycobactin after repeated subculturing in laboratory growth media were examined by thin-layer chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Each organism produced a mycobactin with similar chromatographic properties to those synthesized by MAIS organisms. M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 produced at least two components in our laboratory, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the major component showed this mycobactin to be identical to that produced by M. intracellulare M12. However, a sample of mycobactin J isolated by Merkal and McCullough (Curr. Microbiol. 7:333-335, 1982) from M. paratuberculosis NADC 18 was different from our isolates and appeared to correspond to a minor mycobactin component we had seen by thin-layer chromatography. No reason for this difference could be evinced. Our findings indicate that

  19. Genetic engineering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Genetic engineering has been used for decades to mutate and delete genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome with the translational goal of producing attenuated mutants with conserved susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics. The development of plasmids and mycobacteriophages that can transfer DNA into the M. tuberculosis chromosome has effectively overcome M. tuberculosis slow growth rate and the capsule and mycolic acid wall, which limit DNA uptake. The use of genetic engineering techniques has shed light on many aspects of pathogenesis mechanisms, including cellular growth, mycolic acid biosynthesis, metabolism, drug resistance and virulence. Moreover, such research gave clues to the development of new vaccines or new drugs for routine clinical practice. The use of genetic engineering tools is mainly based on the underlying concept that altering or reducing the M. tuberculosis genome could decrease its virulence. A contrario, recent post-genomic analyses indicated that reduced bacterial genomes are often associated with increased bacterial virulence and that M. tuberculosis acquired genes by lateral genetic exchange during its evolution. Therefore, ancestors utilizing genetic engineering to add genes to the M. tuberculosis genome may lead to new vaccines and the availability of M. tuberculosis isolates with increased susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics.

  20. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  1. Adherence and biofilm formation of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus to household plumbing materials.

    PubMed

    Mullis, S N; Falkinham, J O

    2013-09-01

    Measure adherence and biofilm formation by cells of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium abscessus on common household plumbing materials namely stainless steel, glass, zinc-galvanized steel, copper and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Coupons in a CDC biofilm reactor were exposed to cell suspensions containing 10(5) NTM colony forming units (CFU) per ml and adherence measured for 6 h. Biofilm formation (increased numbers of adherent CFU) was measured weekly to 21 days in the absence of substantial numbers of suspended mycobacterial cells. Adherence was rapid and substantial with 2000-15 000 CFU cm(-2) adhering within 1-6 h at room temperature. Biofilm numbers reached as high as 10(7)  CFU cm(-2) . Biofilm-grown cells of Myco. avium were more adherent compared with suspension-grown cells. Mycobacterium avium, Myco. intracellulare and Myco. abscessus readily adhered and formed biofilms on all types of plumbing materials. Factors influencing adherence and biofilm formation were species, plumbing material and prior growth. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  3. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  4. Numerical taxonomy of mycobactin-dependent mycobacteria, emended description of Mycobacterium avium, and description of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium subsp. nov., Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis subsp. nov., and Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Thorel, M F; Krichevsky, M; Lévy-Frébault, V V

    1990-07-01

    We performed a numerical taxonomy analysis of 38 Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and related mycobacterial strains, including wood pigeon mycobacteria; this analysis was based on 22 tests, which were selected for their potential discriminative value from a total of 51 tests studied and produced four well-defined clusters. Cluster 1 contained the M. paratuberculosis strains, including two strains isolated from Crohn's disease patients; cluster 2 contained Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare reference strains; cluster 3 consisted of the wood pigeon mycobacteria; and the only strain in cluster 4 was M. paratuberculosis 316F, which is used for antigen and vaccine production. Strains in cluster 1 were mycobactin dependent even when they were subcultured, whereas strains in cluster 3 were unable to grow on egg medium and their growth was stimulated by pH 5.5. Growth stimulation by pyruvate, resistance to D-cycloserine (50 micrograms/ml), and alkaline phosphatase activity also were characteristics that were useful for discriminating between clusters 1 and 3. The results of previous DNA-DNA hybridization studies have demonstrated that M. avium Chester 1901, M. paratuberculosis Bergey et al. 1923, and the wood pigeon mycobacteria belong to a single genomic species, and we propose that the name of this species should be M. avium. On the basis of the results of previous genomic analyses based on restriction fragment length, the results of polymorphism studies, and DNA patterns determined by field inversion gel electrophoresis as well as the results of our phenotypic study, we propose that the species should be divided into subspecies which correspond to pathogenicity and host range characteristics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Global Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Analysis: Insights into Tuberculosis Evolution, Phylogenetic Accuracy of Other DNA Fingerprinting Systems, and Recommendations for a Minimal Standard SNP Set†

    PubMed Central

    Filliol, Ingrid; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Cavatore, Magali; Qi, Weihong; Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; Rastogi, Nalin; Sola, Christophe; Zozio, Thierry; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; León, Clara Inés; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Sam; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Durmaz, Riza; Joloba, Moses L.; Rendón, Adrian; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Cave, M. Donald; Fleischmann, Robert; Whittam, Thomas S.; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed a global collection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains using 212 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. SNP nucleotide diversity was high (average across all SNPs, 0.19), and 96% of the SNP locus pairs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. Cluster analyses identified six deeply branching, phylogenetically distinct SNP cluster groups (SCGs) and five subgroups. The SCGs were strongly associated with the geographical origin of the M. tuberculosis samples and the birthplace of the human hosts. The most ancestral cluster (SCG-1) predominated in patients from the Indian subcontinent, while SCG-1 and another ancestral cluster (SCG-2) predominated in patients from East Asia, suggesting that M. tuberculosis first arose in the Indian subcontinent and spread worldwide through East Asia. Restricted SCG diversity and the prevalence of less ancestral SCGs in indigenous populations in Uganda and Mexico suggested a more recent introduction of M. tuberculosis into these regions. The East African Indian and Beijing spoligotypes were concordant with SCG-1 and SCG-2, respectively; X and Central Asian spoligotypes were also associated with one SCG or subgroup combination. Other clades had less consistent associations with SCGs. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) analysis provided less robust phylogenetic information, and only 6 of the 12 MIRU microsatellite loci were highly differentiated between SCGs as measured by GST. Finally, an algorithm was devised to identify two minimal sets of either 45 or 6 SNPs that could be used in future investigations to enable global collaborations for studies on evolution, strain differentiation, and biological differences of M. tuberculosis. PMID:16385065

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Presenting as Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moutsoglou, Daphne M; Merritt, Frank; Cumbler, Ethan

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex, is a slow-growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium associated with outbreaks in cardiac-surgery patients supported on heart-lung machines. We report a case of an elderly woman on chronic prednisone who presented with a six-month history of worsening chronic back pain, recurrent low-grade fevers, and weight loss. Imaging identified multilevel vertebral osteomyelitis and lumbar soft-tissue abscess. Abscess culture identified M. chimaera.

  7. Genome-wide comparison of medieval and modern Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Singh, Pushpendra; Mendum, Thomas A; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Jäger, Günter; Bos, Kirsten I; Herbig, Alexander; Economou, Christos; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Nebel, Almut; Boldsen, Jesper L; Kjellström, Anna; Wu, Huihai; Stewart, Graham R; Taylor, G Michael; Bauer, Peter; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tucker, Katie; Roffey, Simon; Sow, Samba O; Cole, Stewart T; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes

    2013-07-12

    Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.

  8. Quantitative PCR assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and application to environmental samples and fishes from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Reece, K S; Xiao, J; Rhodes, M W; Kator, H I; Latour, R J; Bonzek, C F; Hoenig, J M; Vogelbein, W K

    2010-09-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass.

  9. Quantitative PCR Assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and Application to Environmental Samples and Fishes from the Chesapeake Bay▿

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, D. T.; Reece, K. S.; Xiao, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Kator, H. I.; Latour, R. J.; Bonzek, C. F.; Hoenig, J. M.; Vogelbein, W. K.

    2010-01-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass. PMID:20656856

  10. RNase HI Is Essential for Survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Minias, Alina E.; Brzostek, Anna M.; Korycka- Machala, Malgorzata; Dziadek, Bozena; Minias, Piotr; Rajagopalan, Malini; Madiraju, Murty; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    RNases H are involved in the removal of RNA from RNA/DNA hybrids. Type I RNases H are thought to recognize and cleave the RNA/DNA duplex when at least four ribonucleotides are present. Here we investigated the importance of RNase H type I encoding genes for model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. By performing gene replacement through homologous recombination, we demonstrate that each of the two presumable RNase H type I encoding genes, rnhA and MSMEG4305, can be removed from M. smegmatis genome without affecting the growth rate of the mutant. Further, we demonstrate that deletion of both RNases H type I encoding genes in M. smegmatis leads to synthetic lethality. Finally, we question the possibility of existence of RNase HI related alternative mode of initiation of DNA replication in M. smegmatis, the process initially discovered in Escherichia coli. We suspect that synthetic lethality of double mutant lacking RNases H type I is caused by formation of R-loops leading to collapse of replication forks. We report Mycobacterium smegmatis as the first bacterial species, where function of RNase H type I has been found essential. PMID:25965344

  11. Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense sp. nov., members of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Cayrou, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2009-11-01

    An rpoB sequence-based evaluation of 100 Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) clinical isolates led to the identification of five respiratory tract isolates that were potential representatives of three novel MAC species. Distinctive phenotypic features of isolates 62863 and 5356591(T) included a pseudomycelium morphology and both esterase and acid phosphatase activities. These two isolates exhibited sequence similarities of 99.8 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 86.3 and 86.1 % for 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence, 96.7 and 97.8 % for rpoB and 97.6 and 97.4 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of Mycobacterium chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolates 3256799 and 5351974(T) lacked alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase activities. They exhibited sequence similarities of 99.6 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 90.1 and 90.4 % for ITS-1, 97.8 % for rpoB and 98.0 and 98.1 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of M. chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolate 4355387(T) lacked urease and alpha-glucosidase activities, but it exhibited valine arylamidase, cystine arylamidase and acid phosphatase activities. It had sequence similarities of 99.3 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 51.8 % for ITS-1, 97.1 % for rpoB and 97.8 % for hsp65 with the type strain of Mycobacterium colombiense, the most closely related species. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated 16S rRNA gene, ITS-1, rpoB and hsp65 sequences showed the uniqueness of these five isolates as representatives of three novel species, with bootstrap values >/=95 % in all nodes. On the basis of these phenotypic and genetic characteristics, these five isolates are proposed as representatives of three novel MAC species: Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., with strain 5356591(T) (=CCUG 56325(T) =CIP 109828(T) =CSUR P30(T)) as the type strain; Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov., with strain 5351974(T) (=CCUG 56329(T) =CIP 109830(T) =CSUR P32(T)) as the type strain; and Mycobacterium

  12. New Insights into Mycobacterium bovis Prevalence in Wild Mammals in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, A C; Figueira, L; Martins, M H; Pinto, M L; Matos, M; Coelho, A C

    2016-10-01

    A survey to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis in wild mammals in Portugal was conducted by testing samples from hunted animals and those found dead between 2009 and 2013. In this study, we investigated 2116 wild mammals. Post-mortem examinations were performed, and tissues were collected from wild mammals representing 8 families and 11 different species, with a total of 393 animals analysed. Cultures were performed, and acid-fast isolates were identified by PCR. Tissues were also screened for Mycobacterium bovis by directly extracting DNA and testing for the Mycobacterium bovis-specific sequences. Mycobacterium bovis prevalence was 26.9% (95% CI: 22.8-31.5%). Mycobacterium bovis was recorded in 106 of the 393 studied species: prevalence by species were 26.9% (95% CI: 16.8-40.2%) in red foxes, 20.0% (95% CI: 7.0-45.2%) in Egyptian mongooses, 21.4% (95% CI: 16.2-27.7%) in wild boar and 38.3% (95% CI: 29.9-47.4%) in red deer. Mycobacterium bovis infection was detected in six of eight taxonomic families. For some species, the small sample sizes obtained were a reflection of their restricted range and low abundance, making estimates of infection prevalence very difficult (1 beech marten of 4; 1 Eurasian otter of 3; 2 common genet of 3). Infection was not detected in European badgers, hedgehog, wild rabbits and hare. The results of this study confirm the presence of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild carnivores in Portugal. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Rhizobacterial exopolysaccharides elicit induced resistance on cucumber.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungseok; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2008-06-01

    The role of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) from a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Burkholderia gladioli IN26, on elicitation of induced systemic resistance was investigated. A purified EPS induced expression of PR- 1a::GUS on tobacco and elicited induced resistance against Colletotrichum orbiculare on cucumber. The maximum level of disease protection was noted when seeds were soaked in 200 ppm of the EPS. Our results indicate that EPS from specific rhizobacteria can elicit induced resistance and suggest that bacterial EPS might be a useful elicitor of resistance under field conditions.

  14. Identification of non-tuberculous mycobacteria: utility of the GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay compared with HPLC and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andie S; Jelfs, Peter; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2009-07-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) causing clinical disease have become increasingly common and more diverse. A new reverse line probe assay, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (Hain Lifescience), was evaluated for identification of a broad range of NTM. It was compared with phenotypic (HPLC) and molecular (DNA probes, in-house real-time multiplex species-specific PCR, 16S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing) identification techniques, which together provided the reference 'gold standard'. A total of 131 clinical isolates belonging to 31 Mycobacterium species and 19 controls, including 5 non-Mycobacterium species, was used. Concordant results between the GenoType Mycobacterium assay and the reference identification were obtained in 119/131 clinical isolates (90.8 %). Identification of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium lentiflavum by the assay was problematic. The GenoType Mycobacterium assay enables rapid identification of a broad range of potentially clinically significant Mycobacterium species, but some species require further testing to differentiate or confirm ambiguous results.

  15. [Infections due to Mycobacterium simiae].

    PubMed

    García-Martos, Pedro; García-Agudo, Lidia; González-Moya, Enrique; Galán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium simiae is a slow-growing photochromogenic environmental mycobacterium, first described in 1965. Rarely associated with human infections, possibly due to its limited pathogenicity, it mainly produces lung infection in immunocompetent elderly patients with underlying lung disease, and in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed young patients with AIDS. A microbiological culture is needed to confirm the clinical suspicion, and genetic sequencing techniques are essential to correctly identify the species. Treating M. simiae infections is complicated, owing to the multiple resistance to tuberculous drugs and the lack of correlation between in vitro susceptibility data and in vivo response. Proper treatment is yet to be defined, but must include clarithromycin combined with other antimicrobials such as moxifloxacin and cotrimoxazole. It is possible that M. simiae infections are undiagnosed.

  16. Identification and characterization of an immunogenic 22 kDa exported protein of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Chris; Thompson, Keith; Heuer, Cord; Gicquel, Brigitte; Murray, Alan

    2005-11-01

    An exported 22 kDa putative lipoprotein was identified in an alkaline phosphatase gene fusion library of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The full nucleic acid sequence of the gene encoding P22 was determined and the ORF was cloned into a mycobacterial expression vector, enabling full-length P22 to be produced as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged protein in M. smegmatis. N-terminal sequencing of the recombinant protein confirmed cleavage of a signal sequence. Native P22 was detected in culture supernatants and cell sonicates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain 316F using rabbit antibody raised to recombinant P22. Investigation of the presence of similar genes in other mycobacterial species revealed that the gene was present in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and similar genes existed in Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum. Database searches showed that P22 belonged to the LppX/LprAFG family of mycobacterial lipoproteins also found in Mycobacterium leprae and in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. P22 shared less than 75% identity to these proteins. Recombinant P22 was able to elicit interferon-gamma secretion in blood from eight of a group of nine sheep vaccinated with a live attenuated strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (strain 316F) compared to none from a group of five unvaccinated sheep. Antibody to P22 was detected by Western blot analysis in 10 out of 11 vaccinated sheep, in two out of two clinically affected cows and in 11 out of 13 subclinically infected cows.

  17. Preparation, standardization and in vitro safety testing of Mycobacterium nosodes (Emtact- polyvalent nosode).

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suvarna; Mukerjee, Sandeepan; Vaidya, Shashikant; Talele, Gitanjali; Chowdhary, Abhay; Shah, Rajesh

    2016-08-01

    Most of the nosodes in the homeopathic pharmacopeia have been sourced from obscure pathological material over a century ago; of which no scientific documentation is available. A method for preparation and standardization of univalent and polyvalent Mycobacterium nosodes (labeled as Emtact), using different strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was developed. The committee comprising microbiologists, scientist, pharmacist, homeopaths and clinicians had reviewed and approved the method of preparation of nosode. Preparation of the nosode was based on the reference in the Homeopathy Pharmacopoeia of India (HPI), group N-IV. Strains of M. tuberculosis viz. Standard strain H37Rv, multi-drug resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG vaccine) and Mycobacterium avium were identified, procured and documented. Twenty billion viable cells for each strain were taken for Original Stock Nosode (OSN). The original stock was prepared by suspending the microbial cells into water for injection (WFI) (1 ml). As per the Indian Pharmacopoeia (IP) monograph, sterility testing was done for different potencies. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was performed for 30c potency for detection of any DNA material of the source organisms. A polyvalent (multi-strain) and univalent M. tuberculosis nosodes were prepared for research and clinical use. No growth of Mycobacterium was observed in any of the samples above 5c potency. The in-vitro testing for nosode (30c) was found to be free from any organism and DNA material. Mycobacterium nosodes sourced from individual strain and polyvalent Emtact nosode in vitro testing results found to be satisfactory for its handling and utilization. The nosode seems to be safe and may be tested further in vivo to explore its therapeutic application. Copyright © 2016 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae in human archaeological samples: a possible explanation for the historical decline of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Helen D.; Marcsik, Antónia; Matheson, Carney; Vernon, Kim; Nuorala, Emilia; Molto, Joseph E.; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Spigelman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe during the first millennium but thereafter leprosy declined. It is not known why this occurred, but one suggestion is that cross-immunity protected tuberculosis patients from leprosy. To investigate any relationship between the two diseases, selected archaeological samples, dating from the Roman period to the thirteenth century, were examined for both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA, using PCR. The work was carried out and verified in geographically separate and independent laboratories. Several specimens with palaeopathological signs of leprosy were found to contain DNA from both pathogens, indicating that these diseases coexisted in the past. We suggest that the immunological changes found in multi-bacillary leprosy, in association with the socio-economic impact on those suffering from the disease, led to increased mortality from tuberculosis and therefore to the historical decline in leprosy. PMID:15734693

  19. A Knowledge Elicitation Study of Military Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    66027-0347 Ba. NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING 8b. OFFICE SYMBOL 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORPANIZATION U.S. Army Research (If...Method (CDM) has been developed as a knowledge elicitation tool for probing proficient decision making. This report describes the use of CDM during...knowledge elicitation can be used in Army Command and Control (Ce) exercises as a means of understanding decision-making dynamics. Such a tool could

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium colombiense

    PubMed Central

    Bouam, Amar; Robert, Catherine; Levasseur, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium colombiense is a rapidly growing mycobacterium initially isolated from the blood of an HIV-positive patient in Colombia. Its 5,854,893-bp draft genome exhibits a G+C content of 67.64%, 5,233 protein-coding genes, and 54 predicted RNA genes. PMID:28385843

  1. Human Infections Due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Erba, Maria Luigia; Levrè, Egle; Lombardi, Natalia; Mantella, Antonia; Mecocci, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of human disease due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum are reported. In the first, the mycobacterium was responsible for chronic pulmonary disease in an elderly woman; in the second, it gave rise to cervical lymphadenitis in a child; and in the third, it caused a liver abscess in a young AIDS patient. PMID:11826009

  2. Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Lepra bacilli.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, L; Kim, K S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that certain key markers of lepra bacilli reside collectively in Proprionibacterium acnes, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Mycobacterium leprae. The unrestricted replication of Mycobacterium leprae depends most probably upon the presence of an immune-deficiency-inducing viral agent or possibly on the combined effects of the organisms considered.

  3. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  4. Preseptal cellulitis due to Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Benton, J; Karkanevatos, A

    2007-06-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an atypical mycobacterium found in both salt and fresh water. It occasionally causes soft tissue infections after minor trauma, principally affecting the limbs. A 17-year-old male aquarium worker presented with preseptal cellulitis of his right eye, after attempting to lance a hordeolum some days previously. The condition failed to respond to antibiotics and a necrotic area developed, which subsequently required debridement. Histology of the debrided area demonstrated granulomatous inflammation which when considered with his occupation led to the diagnosis of Mycobacterium marinum--'fish-tank granuloma'. A Medline search did not demonstrate any previous cases of Mycobacterium marinum infection occurring peri-orbitally. The current literature regarding diagnosis and management is reviewed. Although infection with Mycobacterium marinum is rare in the general population, this case demonstrates the importance of considering the diagnosis when dealing with patients frequently exposed to fresh or salt water.

  5. Development of a diagnostic test for Johne's disease using a DNA hybridization probe.

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, S S; Splitter, G A; Welch, R A

    1989-01-01

    A DNA probe, M13 mpHAW71, that detects Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in the fecal material of infected animals was developed for use in the diagnosis of Johne's disease. The probe detected as few as 10(5) M. paratuberculosis when hybridized under stringent conditions to total genomic DNA purified from bovine fecal material. When the probe was used diagnostically, it did not differentiate members of the Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare-M. paratuberculosis complex. Compared with culturing, the DNA probe identified 34.4% more mycobacterium-containing fecal samples, and testing took only 72 h to complete. Images PMID:2768445

  6. Revisiting the Evolution of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Inwald, Jackie; Gordon, Steve; Martin, Carlos; Warren, Rob; Kremer, Kristin; Cousins, Debby; Behr, Marcel A.

    2005-01-01

    Though careful consideration has been placed towards genetic characterization of tubercle bacillus isolates causing disease in humans, those causing disease predominantly among wild and domesticated mammals have received less attention. In contrast to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whose host range is largely specific to humans, M. bovis and “M bovis-like” organisms infect a broad range of animal species beyond their most prominent host in cattle. To determine whether strains of variable genomic content are associated with distinct distributions of disease, the DNA contents of M. bovis or M. bovis-like isolates from a variety of hosts were investigated via Affymetrix GeneChip. Consistent with previous genomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC), large sequence polymorphisms of putative diagnostic and biological consequence were able to unambiguously distinguish interrogated isolates. The distribution of deleted regions indicates organisms genomically removed from M. bovis and also points to structured genomic variability within M. bovis. Certain genomic profiles spanned a variety of hosts but were clustered by geography, while others associated primarily with host type. In contrast to the prevailing assumption that M. bovis has broad host capacity, genomic profiles suggest that distinct MTC lineages differentially infect a variety of mammals. From this, a phylogenetic stratification of genotypes offers a predictive framework upon which to base future genetic and phenotypic studies of the MTC. PMID:16159772

  7. Amplicon DNA melting analysis for the simultaneous detection of Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Potential use in rapid differential diagnosis between extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Jimenez, Rocio; Colmenero, Juan D; Bermúdez, Pilar; Alonso, Antonio; Morata, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Some sites of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis are very difficult to differentiate clinically, radiologically, and even histopathologically. Conventional microbiological methods for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated brucellosis not only lack adequate sensitivity, they are also time consuming, which could lead to an unfavourable prognosis. The aim of this work was to develop a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I to simultaneously detect Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and evaluate the efficacy of the technique with different candidate genes. The IS711, bcsp31 and omp2a genes were used for the identification of Brucella spp and the IS6110, senX3-regX3 and cfp31 genes were targeted for the detection of the M. tuberculosis complex. As a result of the different combinations of primers, nine different reactions were evaluated. A test was defined as positive only when the gene combinations were capable of co-amplifying both pathogens in a single reaction tube and showed distinguishable melting temperatures for each microorganism. According to the melting analysis, only three combinations of amplicons (senX3-regX3+bcsp31, senX3-regX3+IS711 and IS6110+IS711) were visible. Detection limits of senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 were of 2 and 3 genome equivalents for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella while for IS6110+IS711 they were of 200 and 300 genome equivalents, respectively. The three assays correctly identified all the samples, showing negative results for the control patients. The presence of multicopy elements and GC content were the components most influencing the efficiency of the test; this should be taken into account when designing a multiplex-based SYBR Green I assay. In conclusion, multiplex real time PCR assays based on the targets senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 using SYBR Green I are highly sensitive and reproducible. This may therefore be a

  8. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  9. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  10. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  11. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Je, Sungmo; Quan, Hailian; Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria.

  12. Gene expression profile and immunological evaluation of unique hypothetical unknown proteins of Mycobacterium leprae by using quantitative real-time PCR.