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Sample records for mycobacterium dna elicits

  1. Intraspleen DNA inoculation elicits protective cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Fragoso, G; Gevorkian, G; Terrazas, L I; Petrossian, P; Govezensky, T; Sciutto, E; Manoutcharian, K

    2001-04-01

    DNA immunization or inoculation is a recent vaccination method that induces both humoral and cellular immune responses in a range of hosts. Independent of the route or site of vaccination, the transfer of antigen-presenting cells (APC) or antigens into lymphoid organs is necessary. The aim of this investigation was to test whether intraspleen (i.s.) DNA inoculation is capable of inducing a protective immune response. We immunized mice by a single i.s. injection of a DNA construct expressing the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable domain (VH) in which the complementarity-determining regions (CDR) had been replaced by a Taenia crassiceps T-cell epitope. In these mice, immune responses and protective effects elicited by the vaccine were measured. We have shown here for the first time that i.s. DNA inoculation can induce protective cellular immune responses and activate CD8(+) T cells. Also, Ig V(H) appeared to be the minimal delivery unit of "antigenized" Ig capable of inducing T-cell activation in a lymphoid organ. The strategy of introducing T-cell epitopes into the molecular context of the V(H) domain in combination with i.s. DNA immunization could have important implications and applications for human immunotherapy.

  2. Inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for DNA Typing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bemer-Melchior, P.; Drugeon, H. B.

    1999-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used for epidemiological studies and the control of laboratory cross-contamination. Because standardized procedures are not entirely safe for mycobacteriology laboratory staff, the paper proposes a new technique for the processing of specimens. The technique ensures the inactivation of M. tuberculosis before DNA extraction without the loss of DNA integrity. The control of inactivated cultures should be rigorous and should involve the use of two different culture media incubated for at least 4 months. PMID:10364613

  3. Structural and Thermodynamic Signatures of DNA Recognition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Biswas, Tapan

    2011-09-06

    An essential protein, DnaA, binds to 9-bp DNA sites within the origin of replication oriC. These binding events are prerequisite to forming an enigmatic nucleoprotein scaffold that initiates replication. The number, sequences, positions, and orientations of these short DNA sites, or DnaA boxes, within the oriCs of different bacteria vary considerably. To investigate features of DnaA boxes that are important for binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA (MtDnaA), we have determined the crystal structures of the DNA binding domain (DBD) of MtDnaA bound to a cognate MtDnaA-box (at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution) and to a consensus Escherichia coli DnaA-box (at 2.3 {angstrom}). These structures, complemented by calorimetric equilibrium binding studies of MtDnaA DBD in a series of DnaA-box variants, reveal the main determinants of DNA recognition and establish the [T/C][T/A][G/A]TCCACA sequence as a high-affinity MtDnaA-box. Bioinformatic and calorimetric analyses indicate that DnaA-box sequences in mycobacterial oriCs generally differ from the optimal binding sequence. This sequence variation occurs commonly at the first 2 bp, making an in vivo mycobacterial DnaA-box effectively a 7-mer and not a 9-mer. We demonstrate that the decrease in the affinity of these MtDnaA-box variants for MtDnaA DBD relative to that of the highest-affinity box TTGTCCACA is less than 10-fold. The understanding of DnaA-box recognition by MtDnaA and E. coli DnaA enables one to map DnaA-box sequences in the genomes of M. tuberculosis and other eubacteria.

  4. Mycobacterium avium serovars 2 and 8 infections elicit unique activation of the host macrophage immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cebula, B R; Rocco, J M; Maslow, J N; Irani, V R

    2012-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen whose pathogenesis is attributed to its serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL), which varies among its 31 serovars. To determine if the presence and type of ssGPLs contribute to M. avium pathogenesis, we infected murine macrophages (mφs) with two M. avium wild type (wt) serovars (2 and 8) and their serovar-null strains. We examined the influence of ssGPL (presence and type) on cytokine production in non-activated (-IFN-γ) and activated (+IFN-γ) mφs, and the bacterial intra-mφ survival over a 6-day infection process. Serovar-2 infections activated TNF-α production that increased over the 6 day period and was capable of controlling the intra-mφ serovar-2 null strain. In contrast, the serovar-8 infection stimulated a strong pro-inflammatory response, but was incapable of removing the invading pathogen, maybe through IL-10 production. It was clear that the intracellular growth of serovar-null in contrast to the wt M. avium strains was easily controlled. Based on our findings and the undisputed fact that M. avium ssGPL is key to its pathogenesis, we conclude that it is not appropriate to dissect the pathogenesis of one M. avium serovar and apply those findings to other serovars. PMID:22991047

  5. The cytosolic sensor cGAS detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA to induce type I interferons and activate autophagy

    PubMed Central

    MacDuff, Donna A.; Kimmey, Jacqueline M.; Diner, Elie J.; Olivas, Joanna; Vance, Russell E.; Stallings, Christina L.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Type I interferons (IFNs) are critical mediators of antiviral defense, but their elicitation by bacterial pathogens can be detrimental to hosts. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, induce type I IFNs following phagosomal membrane perturbations. Cytosolic M. tuberculosis DNA has been implicated as a trigger for IFN production, but the mechanisms remain obscure. We report that the cytosolic DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is required for activating IFN production via the STING/TBK1/IRF3 pathway during M. tuberculosis and L. pneumophila infection of macrophages, whereas L. monocytogenes short-circuits this pathway by producing the STING agonist, c-di-AMP. Upon sensing cytosolicDNA, cGAS also activates cell-intrinsic antibacterial defenses, promoting autophagic targeting of M. tuberculosis. Importantly, we show that cGAS binds M. tuberculosis DNA during infection, providing direct evidence that this unique host-pathogen interaction occurs in vivo. These data uncover a mechanism by which IFN is likely elicited during active human infections. PMID:26048136

  6. Hepatitis E virus DNA vaccine elicits immunologic memory in mice.

    PubMed

    He, J; Hayes, C G; Binn, L N; Seriwatana, J; Vaughn, D W; Kuschner, R A; Innis, B L

    2001-01-01

    Injection of an expression vector pJHEV containing hepatitis E virus (HEV) structural protein open reading frame 2 gene generates a strong antibody response in BALB/c mice that can bind to and agglutinate HEV. In this study, we tested for immunologic memory in immunized mice whose current levels of IgG to HEV were low or undetectable despite 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine 18 months earlier. Mice previously vaccinated with vector alone were controls. All mice were administered a dose of HEV DNA vaccine to simulate an infectious challenge with HEV. The endpoint was IgG to HEV determined by ELISA. Ten days after the vaccine dose, 5 of 9 mice previously immunized with HEV DNA vaccine had a slight increase in IgG to HEV. By 40 days after the vaccine dose, the level of IgG to HEV had increased dramatically in all 9 mice (108-fold increase in geometric mean titer). In contrast, no control mice became seropositive. These results indicate that mice vaccinated with 3 doses of HEV DNA vaccine retain immunologic memory. In response to a small antigenic challenge delivered as DNA, possibly less than delivered by a human infective dose of virus, mice with memory were able to generate high levels of antibody in less time than the usual incubation period of hepatitis E. We speculate that this type of response could protect a human from overt disease.

  7. Differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from animals by DNA typing.

    PubMed Central

    Skuce, R A; Brittain, D; Hughes, M S; Neill, S D

    1996-01-01

    The insertion sequence IS6110 and the direct repeat (DR) specific to tuberculosis complex mycobacteria and the highly repeated DNA sequence, the polymorphic GC-rich repeat sequence (PGRS), were systematically used to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within 210 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis. The isolates were primarily of bovine origin, but isolates from badgers, feral deer, sheep, humans, and a pig were included. The RFLP probes IS6110, DR, and PGRS individually identified 17, 18, and 18 different RFLP types, respectively, but in combination these probes identified a total of 39 different M. bovis RFLP types. The recommendations (J. D. A. van Embden, M. D. Cave, J. T. Crawford, J. W. Dale, K. D. Eisenach, B. Gicquel, P. W. M. Hermans, C. Martin, R. McAdam, T. M. Shinnick, and P. M. Small, J. Clin. Microbiol. 31:406-409, 1993) for a standardized RFLP analysis for M. tuberculosis were adapted to facilitate gel documentation, image analysis, and construction of a database of RFLP types. In the present study the same M. bovis RFLP types were evident in the various animal species included, indicating that the strains were not host restricted. Application of these techniques to defined field studies should help elucidate more accurately aspects of the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis in different countries. PMID:8880502

  8. Enzymatic activities and DNA substrate specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA helicase XPB.

    PubMed

    Balasingham, Seetha V; Zegeye, Ephrem Debebe; Homberset, Håvard; Rossi, Marie L; Laerdahl, Jon K; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Tønjum, Tone

    2012-01-01

    XPB, also known as ERCC3 and RAD25, is a 3' → 5' DNA repair helicase belonging to the superfamily 2 of helicases. XPB is an essential core subunit of the eukaryotic basal transcription factor complex TFIIH. It has two well-established functions: in the context of damaged DNA, XPB facilitates nucleotide excision repair by unwinding double stranded DNA (dsDNA) surrounding a DNA lesion; while in the context of actively transcribing genes, XPB facilitates initiation of RNA polymerase II transcription at gene promoters. Human and other eukaryotic XPB homologs are relatively well characterized compared to conserved homologs found in mycobacteria and archaea. However, more insight into the function of bacterial helicases is central to understanding the mechanism of DNA metabolism and pathogenesis in general. Here, we characterized Mycobacterium tuberculosis XPB (Mtb XPB), a 3'→5' DNA helicase with DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed DNA unwinding in the presence of significant excess of enzyme. The unwinding activity was fueled by ATP or dATP in the presence of Mg(2+)/Mn(2+). Consistent with the 3'→5' polarity of this bacterial XPB helicase, the enzyme required a DNA substrate with a 3' overhang of 15 nucleotides or more. Although Mtb XPB efficiently unwound DNA model substrates with a 3' DNA tail, it was not active on substrates containing a 3' RNA tail. We also found that Mtb XPB efficiently catalyzed ATP-independent annealing of complementary DNA strands. These observations significantly enhance our understanding of the biological roles of Mtb XPB.

  9. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts.

  10. Immune response and protection elicited by DNA immunisation against Taenia cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-min; Sun, Shu-han; Hu, Zhen-lin; Wu, Dan; Wang, Zhong-chuan

    2003-04-01

    The study evaluated DNA vaccination in Taenia solium cysticercosis prevention by using cDNA of an antigen (cC1) from T. solium metacestode. pcDNA3-cC1 DNA vaccine was constructed by inserting the cDNA into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3. Positive expression of the pcDNA3-cC1 product was confirmed by its transfection into COS7 cell and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay using serum of pigs infected with T. solium metacestode. Immunisation of BALB/c mice with three injections of pcDNA3-cC1 induced antigen-specific immune responses of the Th1 phenotype. Inoculation of new-born pigs induced protection against challenge with T. solium by 73.3% reduction of the metacestode number. Antibodies elicited by DNA immunisation with pcDNA3-cC1 specifically reacted with native cC1 protein, which was mainly restricted to the cyst wall of T. solium metacestode. Positive apoptosis signals were also detected in the cyst wall cells of metacestode slices from pigs immunised with pcDNA3-cC1 by TUNEL staining method. Those suggested that apoptosis played a role in protecting pigs immunised with pcDNA3-cC1 nucleic acid vaccine from pathogen challenge.

  11. Hexameric ring structure of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaB helicase

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Tapan; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2009-01-15

    Hexameric DnaB helicase unwinds the DNA double helix during replication of genetic material in bacteria. DnaB is an essential bacterial protein; therefore, it is an important potential target for antibacterial drug discovery. We report a crystal structure of the N-terminal region of DnaB from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDnaBn), determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides atomic resolution details of formation of the hexameric ring of DnaB by two distinct interfaces. An extensive hydrophobic interface stabilizes a dimer of MtDnaBn by forming a four-helix bundle. The other, less extensive, interface is formed between the dimers, connecting three of them into a hexameric ring. On the basis of crystal packing interactions between MtDnaBn rings, we suggest a model of a helicase-primase complex that explains previously observed effects of DnaB mutations on DNA priming.

  12. Hexameric ring structure of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaB helicase.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tapan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2008-06-01

    Hexameric DnaB helicase unwinds the DNA double helix during replication of genetic material in bacteria. DnaB is an essential bacterial protein; therefore, it is an important potential target for antibacterial drug discovery. We report a crystal structure of the N-terminal region of DnaB from the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtDnaBn), determined at 2.0 A resolution. This structure provides atomic resolution details of formation of the hexameric ring of DnaB by two distinct interfaces. An extensive hydrophobic interface stabilizes a dimer of MtDnaBn by forming a four-helix bundle. The other, less extensive, interface is formed between the dimers, connecting three of them into a hexameric ring. On the basis of crystal packing interactions between MtDnaBn rings, we suggest a model of a helicase-primase complex that explains previously observed effects of DnaB mutations on DNA priming.

  13. Eliciting antigen-specific egg-yolk IgY with naked DNA.

    PubMed

    Romito, M; Viljoen, G J; Du Plessis, D H

    2001-09-01

    Immunization with naked DNA was used to elicit chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY). Layer hens were inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein, the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus, and VP2 of African horse sickness virus. IgY was extracted from egg yolks by polyethylene glycol precipitation. Specific antibodies were present in the yolks of eggs from hens immunized with each of the three different plasmids. This approach to raising polyclonal antibodies obviates the need to produce and purify large quantities of proteins for immunization and can potentially yield large amounts of diagnostically or therapeutically useful reagents. PMID:11570510

  14. Purification and cDNA Cloning of Isochorismate Synthase from Elicited Cell Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    van Tegelen, Léon J.P.; Moreno, Paolo R.H.; Croes, Anton F.; Verpoorte, Robert; Wullems, George J.

    1999-01-01

    Isochorismate is an important metabolite formed at the end of the shikimate pathway, which is involved in the synthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites. It is synthesized from chorismate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme isochorismate synthase (ICS; EC 5.4.99.6). We have purified ICS to homogeneity from elicited Catharanthus roseus cell cultures. Two isoforms with an apparent molecular mass of 64 kD were purified and characterized. The Km values for chorismate were 558 and 319 μm for isoforms I and II, respectively. The isoforms were not inhibited by aromatic amino acids and required Mg2+ for enzyme activity. Polymerase chain reaction on a cDNA library from elicited C. roseus cells with a degenerated primer based on the sequence of an internal peptide from isoform II resulted in an amplification product that was used to screen the cDNA library. This led to the first isolation, to our knowledge, of a plant ICS cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 64 kD with an N-terminal chloroplast-targeting signal. The deduced amino acid sequence shares homology with bacterial ICS and also with anthranilate synthases from plants. Southern analysis indicates the existence of only one ICS gene in C. roseus. PMID:9952467

  15. Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis: humoral immune response and protection elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Rosas, G; Cruz-Revilla, C; Fragoso, G; López-Casillas, F; Pérez, A; Bonilla, M A; Rosales, R; Sciutto, E

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate DNA vaccination in cysticercosis prevention by using a Taenia crassiceps cDNA of a recombinant antigen (KETc7) that has been reported as protective against murine cysticercosis. The KETc7 cDNA was cloned into the pcDNA3 plasmid alone or with the betaglycan signal peptide sequence (pTc-7 and pTc-sp7, respectively). Positive expression of the pTc-sp7 product was confirmed by transfection of C33 cells and immunofluorescence using sera of mice infected with T. crassiceps. Immunization of mice with 3 injections of pTc-sp7 DNA at the higher dose (200 microg) was the most effective to induce antibody with or without bupivacaine. Immunization with pTc-sp7 induced protection against challenge with T. crassiceps cysticerci as successfully as previously observed with the KETc7 recombinant protein. Antibodies elicited by DNA immunization with pTc-sp7 specifically reacted with the native protein of 56 kDa previously reported, which is immunolocalized in the tegument of T. crassiceps cysticerci. The 56-kDa antigen is also present in Taenia solium oncospheres, cysticerci, and adult tissue. The protection induced in DNA-immunized mice and the observation that the injected plasmid remains as an episomic form within muscle cells, encouraged us to continue testing this procedure to prevent T. solium cysticercosis.

  16. A recombinant adenovirus expressing CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B of Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits strong antigen-specific immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Deng, Guangcun; Li, Min; Zeng, Jin; Zhao, Liping; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2014-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and remains an enormous and increasing health burden worldwide. To date, Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) is the only licensed anti-TB vaccine worldwide, which provides an important but limited protection from the Mtb infection. The development of alternative anti-TB vaccines is therefore urgently needed. Here we report, the generation of Ad5-CEAB, a recombinant adenovirus expressing Mtb antigens of CFP10, ESAT6, Ag85A and Ag85B proteins in a form of mixture. In order to evaluate the immunogenicity of Ad5-CEAB, mice were immunized with Ad5-CEAB by intranasal instillation three times with 2-week intervals. The results demonstrated that Ad5-CEAB elicited a strong antigen-specific immune response, particularly of the Th1 immune responses that were characterized by an increased ratio of IgG2a/IgG1 and secretions of Th1 type cytokines, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-12. In addition, the Ad5-CEAB also showed an ability to enhance humoral responses with a dramatically augmented antigen-specific serum IgG. Furthermore, an elevated sIgA were also found in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the immunized mice, suggesting the elicitation of mucosal immune responses. These data indicate that Ad5-CEAB can induce a broad range of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, which provides a promising and novel route for developing anti-TB vaccines and warrants further investigation.

  17. Solution Structure of the PhoP DNA-Binding Domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Ramsay; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Amer, Brendan R.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a leading cause of death world-wide. The PhoP protein is required for virulence and is part of the PhoPR two-component system that regulates gene expression. The NMR-derived solution structure of the PhoP C-terminal DNA-binding domain is reported. Residues 150 to 246 form a structured domain that contains a winged helix-turn-helix motif. We provide evidence that the transactivation loop postulated to contact RNA polymerase is partially disordered in solution, and that the polypeptide that connects the DNA-binding domain to the regulatory domain is unstructured. PMID:26209027

  18. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Sasha J.; Babrak, Lmar M.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. PMID:26010725

  19. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sasha J; Babrak, Lmar M; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain) and MAH 104 (reference strain) were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  20. DNA methylation in leprosy-associated bacteria: Mycobacterium leprae and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum.

    PubMed

    Hottat, F; Coene, M; Cocito, C

    1988-01-01

    The DNAs of two kinds of microorganisms from human leprosy lesion, Mycobacterium leprae and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum (also known as "leprosy-derived corynebacterium" or LDC), have been analysed and compared with the genomes of reference bacteria of the CMN group (genera Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Nocardia). The guanine-plus-cytosine content (% GC) of DNA was determined by a double-labelling procedure, which is unaffected by the presence of modified and unusual bases (that alter both buoyant density and mid-melting-point determinations). Accordingly, the DNAs of seven LDC strains had GC values of 54-56 mol %, and that of armadillo-grown M. leprae a value of 54.8 +/- 0.9 mol %. Restriction patterns disclosed no methylated cytosine in the DNA sequences CCGG, GGCC, AGCT and GATC of either LDC or M. leprae DNA. N6-methyl adenine was present in the sequence GATC of all LDC strains, but was missing from the genomes of all others CMN organisms analysed, including M. leprae. By HPLC analysis of LDC-DNA hydrolysates, it was found that N6-methyladenine amounted to 1.8% of total DNA adenine, and was present exclusively within GATC sequences, which appeared all to be methylated. It is concluded that LDC represent a group of corynebacteria endowed with high genetic homogeneity and a unique restriction pattern, whereby their genome is easily distinguished from that of M. leprae, which has a similar base composition.

  1. DNA vaccination of bison to brucellar antigens elicits elevated antibody and IFN-γ responses.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Beata; Walters, Nancy; Thornburg, Theresa; Hoyt, Teri; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W

    2011-07-01

    Brucella abortus remains a threat to the health and well-being of livestock in states bordering the Greater Yellowstone Area. During the past several years, cohabitation of infected wildlife with cattle has jeopardized the brucellosis-free status of Idaho, USA; Wyoming, USA; and Montana, USA. Current livestock B. abortus vaccines have not proven to be efficacious in bison (Bison bison) or elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). One problem with the lack of vaccine efficacy may stem from the failure to understand wildlife immune responses to vaccines. In an attempt to understand their immune responses, bison were vaccinated with eukaryotic DNA expression vectors encoding the Brucella periplasmic protein, bp26, and the chaperone protein, trigger factor (TF). These DNA vaccines have previously been shown to be protective against Brucella infection in mice. Bison were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0, 2, and 4 with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines plus CpG adjuvant or empty vector (control) plus CpG. Blood samples were collected before vaccination and at 8, 10, and 12 wk after primary vaccination. The results showed that bison immunized with bp26 and TF DNA vaccines developed enhanced antibody, proliferative T cell, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses upon in vitro restimulation with purified recombinant bp26 or TF antigens, unlike bison immunized with empty vector. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes from the DNA-vaccinated groups were significantly greater than they were for those bison given empty vector. These data suggest that DNA vaccination of bison may elicit strong cellular immune responses and serve as an alternative for vaccination of bison for brucellosis.

  2. Bio-microfluidic platform for gold nanoprobe based DNA detection--application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Lopes, Paulo; Catarina Vaz, Ana; Veigas, Bruno; Jerzy Wojcik, Pawel; Simões, Pedro; Barata, David; Fortunato, Elvira; Viana Baptista, Pedro; Aguas, Hugo; Martins, Rodrigo

    2013-10-15

    We have projected and fabricated a microfluidic platform for DNA sensing that makes use of an optical colorimetric detection method based on gold nanoparticles. The platform was fabricated using replica moulding technology in PDMS patterned by high-aspect-ratio SU-8 moulds. Biochips of various geometries were tested and evaluated in order to find out the most efficient architecture, and the rational for design, microfabrication and detection performance is presented. The best biochip configuration has been successfully applied to the DNA detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using only 3 µl on DNA solution (i.e. 90 ng of target DNA), therefore a 20-fold reduction of reagents volume is obtained when compared with the actual state of the art.

  3. Direct DNA Extraction from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Frozen Stocks as a Reculture-Independent Approach to Whole-Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Zallet, J; Lillebaek, T; Andersen, A B; Niemann, S; Rasmussen, E M; Kohl, T A

    2015-08-01

    Culturing before DNA extraction represents a major time-consuming step in whole-genome sequencing of slow-growing bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report a workflow to extract DNA from frozen isolates without reculturing. Prepared libraries and sequence data were comparable with results from recultured aliquots of the same stocks.

  4. Non-Replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis Elicits a Reduced Infectivity Profile with Corresponding Modifications to the Cell Wall and Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Joanna; Alderwick, Luke J.; Allnutt, Jon A.; Gabasova, Evelina; Watson, Robert; Hatch, Kim A.; Clark, Simon O.; Jeeves, Rose E.; Marriott, Alice; Rayner, Emma; Tolley, Howard; Pearson, Geoff; Hall, Graham; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wernisch, Lorenz; Williams, Ann; Marsh, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to become dormant in the host. Little is known of the mechanisms by which these bacilli are able to persist in this state. Therefore, the focus of this study was to emulate environmental conditions encountered by M. tuberculosis in the granuloma, and determine the effect of such conditions on the physiology and infectivity of the organism. Non-replicating persistent (NRP) M. tuberculosis was established by the gradual depletion of nutrients in an oxygen-replete and controlled environment. In contrast to rapidly dividing bacilli, NRP bacteria exhibited a distinct phenotype by accumulating an extracellular matrix rich in free mycolate and lipoglycans, with increased arabinosylation. Microarray studies demonstrated a substantial down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism in NRP bacteria. Despite this reduction in metabolic activity, cells were still able to infect guinea pigs, but with a delay in the development of disease when compared to exponential phase bacilli. Using these approaches to investigate the interplay between the changing environment of the host and altered physiology of NRP bacteria, this study sheds new light on the conditions that are pertinent to M. tuberculosis dormancy and how this organism could be establishing latent disease. PMID:24516549

  5. Non-replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits a reduced infectivity profile with corresponding modifications to the cell wall and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Joanna; Alderwick, Luke J; Allnutt, Jon A; Gabasova, Evelina; Watson, Robert; Hatch, Kim A; Clark, Simon O; Jeeves, Rose E; Marriott, Alice; Rayner, Emma; Tolley, Howard; Pearson, Geoff; Hall, Graham; Besra, Gurdyal S; Wernisch, Lorenz; Williams, Ann; Marsh, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to become dormant in the host. Little is known of the mechanisms by which these bacilli are able to persist in this state. Therefore, the focus of this study was to emulate environmental conditions encountered by M. tuberculosis in the granuloma, and determine the effect of such conditions on the physiology and infectivity of the organism. Non-replicating persistent (NRP) M. tuberculosis was established by the gradual depletion of nutrients in an oxygen-replete and controlled environment. In contrast to rapidly dividing bacilli, NRP bacteria exhibited a distinct phenotype by accumulating an extracellular matrix rich in free mycolate and lipoglycans, with increased arabinosylation. Microarray studies demonstrated a substantial down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism in NRP bacteria. Despite this reduction in metabolic activity, cells were still able to infect guinea pigs, but with a delay in the development of disease when compared to exponential phase bacilli. Using these approaches to investigate the interplay between the changing environment of the host and altered physiology of NRP bacteria, this study sheds new light on the conditions that are pertinent to M. tuberculosis dormancy and how this organism could be establishing latent disease.

  6. First detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in environmental samples from South America.

    PubMed

    Morris, Aaron; Gozlan, Rodolphe; Marion, Estelle; Marsollier, Laurent; Andreou, Demetra; Sanhueza, Daniel; Ruffine, Rolland; Couppié, Pierre; Guégan, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The occurrences of many environmentally-persistent and zoonotic infections are driven by ecosystem changes, which in turn are underpinned by land-use modifications that alter the governance of pathogen, biodiversity and human interactions. Our current understanding of these ecological changes on disease emergence however remains limited. Buruli ulcer is an emerging human skin disease caused by the mycobacterium, Mycobacterium ulcerans, for which the exact route of infection remains unclear. It can have a devastating impact on its human host, causing extensive necrosis of the skin and underlying tissue, often leading to permanent disability. The mycobacterium is associated with tropical aquatic environments and incidences of the disease are significantly higher on floodplains and where there is an increase of human aquatic activities. Although the disease has been previously diagnosed in South America, until now the presence of M. ulcerans DNA in the wild has only been identified in Australia where there have been significant outbreaks and in western and central regions of Africa where the disease is persistent. Here for the first time, we have identified the presence of the aetiological agent's DNA in environmental samples from South America. The DNA was positively identified using Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) on 163 environmental samples, taken from 23 freshwater bodies in French Guiana (Southern America), using primers for both IS2404 and for the ketoreductase-B domain of the M. ulcerans mycolactone polyketide synthase genes (KR). Five samples out of 163 were positive for both primers from three different water bodies. A further nine sites had low levels of IS2404 close to a standard CT of 35 and could potentially harbour M. ulcerans. The majority of our positive samples (8/14) came from filtered water. These results also reveal the Sinnamary River as a potential source of infection to humans. PMID:24498449

  7. Electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection based on gold nanotubes array electrode platform.

    PubMed

    Torati, Sri Ramulu; Reddy, Venu; Yoon, Seok Soo; Kim, CheolGi

    2016-04-15

    The template assisted electrochemical deposition technique was used for the synthesis of gold nanotubes array (AuNTsA). The morphological structure of the synthesized AuNTsA was observed by scanning electron microscopy and found that the individual nanotubes are around 1.5 μm in length with a diameter of 200 nm. Nanotubes are vertically aligned to the Au thick film, which is formed during the synthesis process of nanotubes. The electrochemical performance of the AuNTsA was compared with the bare Au electrode and found that AuNTsA has better electron transfer surface than bare Au electrode which is due to the high surface area. Hence, the AuNTsA was used as an electrode for the fabrication of DNA hybridization biosensor for detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis DNA. The DNA hybridization biosensor constructed by AuNTsA electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique with Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as an electrochemical redox indicator. The selectivity of the fabricated biosensor was illustrated by hybridization with complementary DNA and non-complementary DNA with probe DNA immobilized AuNTsA electrode using methylene blue as a hybridization indicator. The developed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows good linear range of complementary DNA concentration from 0.01 ng/μL to 100 ng/μL with high detection limit.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection using surface plasmon resonance modulated by telecommunication wavelength.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Lin, Yan-Yu; Lu, Shao-Hsi; Tsai, I-Fang; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ho, Hsin-Tsung

    2013-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is developed using repeatable telecommunication wavelength modulation based on optical fiber communications laser wavelength and stability. MTB DNA concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL were successfully demonstrated to have the same spectral half-width in the dip for optimum coupling. The sensitivity was shown to be -0.087 dB/(μg/mL) at all applied telecommunication wavelengths and the highest sensitivity achieved was 115 ng/mL without thiolated DNA immobilization onto a gold plate, which is better than the sensor limit of 400 ng/mL possible with commercial biosensor equipment.

  9. DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate nanoparticles elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Gajadhar; Nurcombe, Victor; Maitra, Amarnath; Shrivastava, Anju

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of pEGFP (plasmid expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein)-encapsulated PEGylated (meaning polyethylene glycol coated) magnesium phosphate nanoparticles (referred to as MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles) for the induction of immune responses was investigated in a mouse model. MgPi-pEGFP nanoparticles induced enhanced serum antibody and antigen-specific T-lymphocyte responses, as well as increased IFN-? and IL-12 levels compared to naked pEGFP when administered via intravenous, intraperitoneal or intramuscular routes. A significant macrophage response, both in size and activity, was also observed when mice were immunized with the nanoparticle formulation. The response was highly specific for the antigen, as the increase in interaction between macrophages and lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte proliferation took place only when they were re-stimulated with recombinant green fluorescence protein (rGFP). Thus the nanoparticle formulation elicited both humoral as well as cellular responses. Cytokine profiling revealed the induction of Th-1 type responses. The results suggest DNA-encapsulated magnesium phosphate (MgPi) nanoparticles may constitute a safer, more stable and cost-efficient DNA vaccine formulation. PMID:24936399

  10. Use of magnetic beads for tissue DNA extraction and IS6110 Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Caldarelli-Stefano, R; Vago, L; Bonetto, S; Nebuloni, M; Costanzi, G

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are used increasingly for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and can be used on the DNA obtained from both frozen and formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues. However, the extraction of DNA by means of the conventional phenol/chloroform method is time consuming and requires the use of potentially dangerous chemical reagents. This paper describes a method based upon the use of magnetic beads for the extraction of M tuberculosis DNA from both routinely formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissues and frozen tissues. Magnetic bead extracted DNA from brain, lymph node, and lung tissues collected from patients with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis was compared with that extracted using the phenol/chloroform method. The magnetic bead extraction procedure requires less than two hours, including the time necessary to dewax the tissue sections. In all cases, the DNA extracted with both methods was amplified successfully by PCR for the M tuberculosis IS6110 sequence. Magnetic bead DNA extraction can be used on both frozen and archival tissues: the method is reliable, simple, sensitive, and rapid; in addition, it does not use hazardous procedures or specialised laboratory equipment and can be used for routine DNA isolation from various human tissues. PMID:10621838

  11. Cell penetrating synthetic antimicrobial peptides (SAMPs) exhibiting potent and selective killing of mycobacterium by targeting its DNA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash; Jain, Vikas; Srivastava, Aasheesh

    2015-02-23

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are powerful defence tools to tackle pathogenic microbes. However, limited natural production and high synthetic costs in addition to poor selectivity limit large-scale use of AMPs in clinical settings. Here, we present a series of synthetic AMPs (SAMPs) that exhibit highly selective and potent killing of Mycobacterium (minimum inhibitory concentration <20 μg mL(-1)) over E. coli or mammalian cells. These SAMPs are active against rapidly multiplying as well as growth saturated Mycobacterium cultures. These SAMPs are not membrane-lytic in nature, and are readily internalized by Mycobacterium and mammalian cells; whereas in E. coli, the lipopolysaccharide layer inhibits their cellular uptake, and hence, their antibacterial action. Upon internalization, these SAMPs interact with the unprotected genomic DNA of mycobacteria, and impede DNA-dependent processes, leading to bacterial cell death.

  12. Mycobacterium bovis DNA detection in colostrum as a potential indicator of vaccination effectiveness against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST(-)), while TST reactor animals (TST(+)) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms. PMID:23425597

  13. Mycobacterium bovis DNA detection in colostrum as a potential indicator of vaccination effectiveness against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST(-)), while TST reactor animals (TST(+)) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms.

  14. Mycobacterium bovis DNA Detection in Colostrum as a Potential Indicator of Vaccination Effectiveness against Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E.; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST−), while TST reactor animals (TST+) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms. PMID:23425597

  15. Protective Immunity to H7N9 Influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O.; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S.; Walters, Jewell N.; Morrow, Matthew P.; Khan, Amir S.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses’ ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. PMID:24631084

  16. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases.

  17. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  18. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. PMID:25516959

  19. Analysis of a genomic DNA expression library of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using tuberculosis patient sera: evidence for modulation of host immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, R R; Satchidanandam, V

    1996-01-01

    DNA obtained from a human sputum isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, NTI-64719, which showed extensive dissemination in the guinea pig model resulting in a high score for virulence was used to construct an expression library in the lambda ZAP vector. The size of DNA inserts in the library ranged from 1 to 3 kb, and recombinants represented 60% of the total plaques obtained. When probed with pooled serum from chronically infected tuberculosis patients, the library yielded 176 recombinants with a range of signal intensities. Among these, 93 recombinants were classified into 12 groups on the basis of DNA hybridization experiments. The polypeptides synthesized by the recombinants were predominantly LacZ fusion proteins. Serum obtained from patients who were clinically diagnosed to be in the early phase of M. tuberculosis infection was used to probe the 176 recombinants obtained. Interestingly, some recombinants that gave very strong signals in the original screen did not react with early-phase serum; conversely, other whose signals were extremely weak in the original screen gave very intense signals with serum from recently infected patients. This indicates the differential nature of either the expression of these antigens or the immune response elicited by them as a function of disease progression. PMID:8751927

  20. DNA fragment length polymorphism analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Palittapongarnpim, P; Chomyc, S; Fanning, A; Kunimoto, D

    1993-04-01

    Strain identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis would prove whether transmission had occurred between individuals. A method to characterize strains of M. tuberculosis has been developed utilizing polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Purified chromosomal DNA of cultured clinical samples of M. tuberculosis were subjected to PCR using short (10-12 nucleotide) oligonucleotide primers. PCR products visualized after agarose gel electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining demonstrated that different strains of M. tuberculosis give different banding patterns. This technique was used to confirm the relationship between cases of tuberculosis in several clusters, prove the lack of relationship between 2 isolates with the same antibiotic-resistance pattern, confirm a suspected mislabeling event, and suggest the source of infection in a case of tuberculous meningitis. This method is rapid and simple and does not require radioactive probes.

  1. [Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in water bugs collected outside the aquatic environment in Benin].

    PubMed

    Marion, E; Deshayes, C; Chauty, A; Cassisa, V; Tchibozo, S; Cottin, J; Doannio, J; Marot, A; Marsollier, L

    2011-04-01

    Hosting of Mycobacterium ulcerans by water bugs is now well established and their vectoring role has been demonstrated experimentally. These findings were recently corroborated by detection of viable bacilli in the saliva of wild water bugs. However, the extent of water bug involvement in M. ulcerans ecology remains unclear and difficult to evaluate due to lack of understanding about water bug biology. The purpose of this study is to describe the first detection of M. ulcerans DNA in the tissue of water bugs captured outside the aquatic environment. This finding supports the hypothesis that water bug migratory behavior contributes not only to the spread of M. ulcerans but also to transmission outside the aquatic environment.

  2. [Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA in water bugs collected outside the aquatic environment in Benin].

    PubMed

    Marion, E; Deshayes, C; Chauty, A; Cassisa, V; Tchibozo, S; Cottin, J; Doannio, J; Marot, A; Marsollier, L

    2011-04-01

    Hosting of Mycobacterium ulcerans by water bugs is now well established and their vectoring role has been demonstrated experimentally. These findings were recently corroborated by detection of viable bacilli in the saliva of wild water bugs. However, the extent of water bug involvement in M. ulcerans ecology remains unclear and difficult to evaluate due to lack of understanding about water bug biology. The purpose of this study is to describe the first detection of M. ulcerans DNA in the tissue of water bugs captured outside the aquatic environment. This finding supports the hypothesis that water bug migratory behavior contributes not only to the spread of M. ulcerans but also to transmission outside the aquatic environment. PMID:21695876

  3. Biomolecular identification of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA in human remains from Britain and continental Europe.

    PubMed

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A; Brown, Terence A

    2014-02-01

    Tuberculosis is known to have afflicted humans throughout history and re-emerged towards the end of the 20th century, to an extent that it was declared a global emergency in 1993. The aim of this study was to apply a rigorous analytical regime to the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) DNA in 77 bone and tooth samples from 70 individuals from Britain and continental Europe, spanning the 1st-19th centuries AD. We performed the work in dedicated ancient DNA facilities designed to prevent all types of modern contamination, we checked the authenticity of all products obtained by the polymerase chain reaction, and we based our conclusions on up to four replicate experiments for each sample, some carried out in an independent laboratory. We identified 12 samples that, according to our strict criteria, gave definite evidence for the presence of MTBC DNA, and another 22 that we classified as "probable" or "possible." None of the definite samples came from vertebrae displaying lesions associated with TB. Instead, eight were from ribs displaying visceral new bone formation, one was a tooth from a skeleton with rib lesions, one was taken from a skeleton with endocranial lesions, one from an individual with lesions to the sacrum and sacroiliac joint and the last was from an individual with no lesions indicative of TB or possible TB. Our results add to information on the past temporal and geographical distribution of TB and affirm the suitability of ribs for studying ancient TB.

  4. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  5. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: from phage typing to whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-06-01

    Current typing methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex evolved from simple phenotypic approaches like phage typing and drug susceptibility profiling to DNA-based strain typing methods, such as IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) typing. Examples of the usefulness of molecular typing are source case finding and epidemiological linkage of tuberculosis (TB) cases, international transmission of MDR/XDR-TB, the discrimination between endogenous reactivation and exogenous re-infection as a cause of relapses after curative treatment of tuberculosis, the evidence of multiple M. tuberculosis infections, and the disclosure of laboratory cross-contaminations. Simultaneously, phylogenetic analyses were developed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genomic deletions usually referred to as regions of difference (RDs) and spoligotyping which served both strain typing and phylogenetic analysis. National and international initiatives that rely on the application of these typing methods have brought significant insight into the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis. However, current DNA fingerprinting methods have important limitations. They can often not distinguish between genetically closely related strains and the turn-over of these markers is variable. Moreover, the suitability of most DNA typing methods for phylogenetic reconstruction is limited as they show a high propensity of convergent evolution or misinfer genetic distances. In order to fully explore the possibilities of genotyping in the molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis and to study the phylogeny of the causative bacteria reliably, the application of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis for all M. tuberculosis isolates is the optimal, although currently still a costly solution. In the last years WGS for typing of pathogens has been explored and yielded important additional information on strain diversity in comparison to the

  6. Transcription analysis of the dnaA gene and oriC region of the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and its regulation by the DnaA protein.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Leiria; Guerrero, Elba; Casart, Yveth; Turcios, Lilia; Bartoli, Fulvia

    2003-03-01

    The regions flanking the Mycobacterium dnaA gene have extensive sequence conservation, and comprise various DnaA boxes. Comparative analysis of the dnaA promoter and oriC region from several mycobacterial species revealed that the localization, spacing and orientation of the DnaA boxes are conserved. Detailed transcriptional analysis in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG shows that the dnaN gene of both species and the dnaA gene of M. bovis BCG are transcribed from two promoters, whereas the dnaA gene of M. smegmatis is transcribed from a single promoter. RT-PCR with total RNA showed that dnaA and dnaN were expressed in both species at all growth stages. Analysis of the promoter activity using dnaA-gfp fusion plasmids and DnaA expression plasmids indicates that the dnaA gene is autoregulated, although the degree of transcriptional autorepression was moderate. Transcription was also detected in the vicinity of oriC of M. bovis BCG, but not of M. smegmatis. These results suggest that a more complex transcriptional mechanism may be involved in the slow-growing mycobacteria, which regulates the expression of dnaA and initiation of chromosomal DNA replication.

  7. Use of the bead beater for preparation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis template DNA in milk.

    PubMed

    Odumeru, J; Gao, A; Chen, S; Raymond, M; Mutharia, L

    2001-10-01

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is a recognized chronic enteric pathogen that can affect many different species of animals, including primates. It has been suggested that this organism is associated with Crohn's disease in humans, and that milk is a potential source of human exposure to this organism. The limit of the detection of M. paratuberculosis in milk samples by direct PCR was 10(5) cfu/mL if the traditional boiling method was used for template DNA preparation. In this study, an improved method for template DNA preparation was examined. The method involves the use of a bead beater, which breaks up bacterial cell wall mechanically by vibrating bacteria with microbeads at high speed. The effectiveness of this method for lysing M. paratuberculosis cells was compared to that of the freeze-thaw method, and use of commercial kits such as the InstaGene Matrix and the QIAamp Tissue Kit. The bead beater procedure was tested in combination with various cell lysis and template DNA preparation procedures to determine which of these steps improved the limit of detection of PCR assay that amplifies a 413 bp fragment of the IS900 gene. Results showed that the use of the bead beater, in combination with the use of lysis buffer, boiling, and isopropanol precipitation, decreased the limit of detection of M. paratuberculosis in milk by the PCR to 10(2) cfu/mL. The limit of detection was further decreased to 10 cfu/mL when 0.0037% bovine serum albumin was included in the PCR reaction mixtures. The improved assay was 10- to 10(4)-fold more sensitive than the PCR assays using template DNA prepared by other lysis procedures including boiling alone, freeze-thaw plus boiling, or use of commercial kits for lysis.

  8. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. Methodology/Principal Findings To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone–mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. Conclusions/Significance The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans. PMID:27681932

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DinG Is a Structure-specific Helicase That Unwinds G4 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Desingu, Ambika; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Rao, Desirazu N.; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    The significance of G-quadruplexes and the helicases that resolve G4 structures in prokaryotes is poorly understood. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is GC-rich and contains >10,000 sequences that have the potential to form G4 structures. In Escherichia coli, RecQ helicase unwinds G4 structures. However, RecQ is absent in M. tuberculosis, and the helicase that participates in G4 resolution in M. tuberculosis is obscure. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis DinG (MtDinG) exhibits high affinity for ssDNA and ssDNA translocation with a 5′ → 3′ polarity. Interestingly, MtDinG unwinds overhangs, flap structures, and forked duplexes but fails to unwind linear duplex DNA. Our data with DNase I footprinting provide mechanistic insights and suggest that MtDinG is a 5′ → 3′ polarity helicase. Notably, in contrast to E. coli DinG, MtDinG catalyzes unwinding of replication fork and Holliday junction structures. Strikingly, we find that MtDinG resolves intermolecular G4 structures. These data suggest that MtDinG is a multifunctional structure-specific helicase that unwinds model structures of DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as G4 structures. We finally demonstrate that promoter sequences of M. tuberculosis PE_PGRS2, mce1R, and moeB1 genes contain G4 structures, implying that G4 structures may regulate gene expression in M. tuberculosis. We discuss these data and implicate targeting G4 structures and DinG helicase in M. tuberculosis could be a novel therapeutic strategy for culminating the infection with this pathogen. PMID:25059658

  10. MPT-51/CpG DNA vaccine protects mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruna Daniella de Souza; da Silva, Ediane Batista; do Nascimento, Ivan Pereira; Dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Kipnis, André; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula

    2009-07-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a severe infectious disease that kills approximately two million people worldwide every year. Because BCG protection is variable and does not protects adults, there is a great need for a new vaccine against TB that does not represent a risk for immunocompromised patients and that is also capable of protecting adult individuals. MPT-51 is a protein found in the genome of mycobacteria and binds to the fibronectin of the extracellular matrix, which may have a role in host tissue attachment and virulence. In order to test the usefulness of MPT-51 as a subunit vaccine, BALB/c were vaccinated and challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The infection of BALB/c with M. tuberculosis increased the number of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes specific to MPT-51 in the spleen and lungs. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA and with rMPT-51/CpG DNA in non-infected BALB/c increased the amounts of IFN-gamma(+) T lymphocytes. Inoculation with rMPT-51/FIA also induced a humoral response specific to MPT-51. CFU counts of lung tissues done 60 days after infection showed a reduction of about 2 log in the bacteria load in the group of animals inoculated with rMPT-51/CpG DNA. These results make MPT-51 a valuable component to be further evaluated in the development of other subunit vaccines.

  11. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF.

  12. Immune Response Elicited by DNA Vaccination Using Lactococcus lactis Is Modified by the Production of Surface Exposed Pathogenic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Daniela; Azevedo, Marcela; Innocentin, Silvia; Blugeon, Sébastien; Lefévre, François; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Courtin, Pascal; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared immune responses elicited by DNA immunization using Lactococcus lactis or L. lactis expressing the Staphylococcus aureus invasin Fibronectin Binding Protein A (FnBPA) at its surface. Both strains carried pValac:BLG, a plasmid containing the cDNA of Beta-Lactoglobulin (BLG), and were designated LL-BLG and LL-FnBPA+ BLG respectively. A TH2 immune response characterized by the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5 in medium of BLG reactivated splenocytes was detected after either oral or intranasal administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG. In contrast, intranasal administration of LL-BLG elicited a TH1 immune response. After BLG sensitization, mice previously intranasally administered with LL-BLG showed a significantly lower concentration of BLG-specific IgE than the mice non-administered. Altenatively administration of LL-FnBPA+ BLG didn't modify the BLG-specific IgE concentration obtained after sensitization, thus confirming the TH2 orientation of the immune response. To determine if the TH2-skewed immune response obtained with LL-FnBpA+ BLG was FnBPA-specific or not, mice received another L. lactis strain producing a mutated form of the Listeria monocytogenes invasin Internalin A intranasally, allowing thus the binding to murine E-cadherin, and containing pValac:BLG (LL-mInlA+ BLG). As with LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG was not able to elicit a TH1 immune response. Furthermore, we observed that these difference were not due to the peptidoglycan composition of the cell wall as LL-FnBPA+ BLG, LL-mInlA+ BLG and LL-BLG strains shared a similar composition. DNA vaccination using LL-BLG elicited a pro-inflammatory TH1 immune response while using LL-FnBPA+ BLG or LL-mInlA+ BLG elicited an anti-inflammatory TH2 immune response. PMID:24465412

  13. DNA Vaccination Elicits Protective Immune Responses against Pandemic and Classic Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, J. Patrick; Lager, Kelly M.; Kong, Wing-Pui; Royals, Michael; Todd, John-Paul; Vincent, Amy L.; Wei, Chih-Jen; Loving, Crystal L.; Zanella, Eraldo L.; Janke, Bruce; Kehrli, Marcus E.; Nabel, Gary J.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2011-01-01

    Swine influenza is a highly contagious viral infection in pigs that significantly impacts the pork industry due to weight loss and secondary infections. There is also the potential of a significant threat to public health, as was seen in 2009 when the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus strain emerged from reassortment events among avian, swine, and human influenza viruses within pigs. As classic and pandemic H1N1 strains now circulate in swine, an effective vaccine may be the best strategy to protect the pork industry and public health. Current inactivated-virus vaccines available for swine influenza protect only against viral strains closely related to the vaccine strain, and egg-based production of these vaccines is insufficient to respond to large outbreaks. DNA vaccines are a promising alternative since they can potentially induce broad-based protection with more efficient production methods. In this study we evaluated the potentials of monovalent and trivalent DNA vaccine constructs to (i) elicit both humoral and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and (ii) protect pigs against viral shedding and lung disease after challenge with pandemic H1N1 or classic swine H1N1 influenza virus. We also compared the efficiency of a needle-free vaccine delivery method to that of a conventional needle/syringe injection. We report that DNA vaccination elicits robust serum antibody and cellular responses after three immunizations and confers significant protection against influenza virus challenge. Needle-free delivery elicited improved antibody responses with the same efficiency as conventional injection and should be considered for development as a practical alternative for vaccine administration. PMID:21918118

  14. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  15. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  16. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  17. Antibodies elicited by pneumococcal antigens bear an anti-DNA--associated idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Grayzel, A; Solomon, A; Aranow, C; Diamond, B

    1991-01-01

    There is evidence in both murine and human lupus that the production of anti-DNA antibodies may be triggered by environmental antigens. To explore this further, we studied the serum of 10 nonautoimmune individuals immunized with a polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. All 10 patients showed a rise in the titer of antipneumococcal antibodies bearing an anti-DNA-associated idiotype. The antipneumococcal response was specific as no idiotypic antitetanus antibodies were detected. Furthermore, no anti-DNA antibodies were present in postvaccination sera. The molecular analysis of antipneumococcal and anti-DNA antibodies bearing a common idiotype will help elucidate how foreign antigen might lead to the production of anti-DNA antibodies in susceptible individuals. PMID:1999497

  18. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  19. Characterization of DNA substrate specificities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abeldenov, Sailau; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Ramanculov, Erlan; Saparbaev, Murat; Khassenov, Bekbolat

    2015-09-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases are key enzymes involved in the repair of abasic sites and DNA strand breaks. Pathogenic bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two AP endonucleases: MtbXthA and MtbNfo members of the exonuclease III and endonuclease IV families, which are exemplified by Escherichia coli Xth and Nfo, respectively. It has been shown that both MtbXthA and MtbNfo contain AP endonuclease and 3'→5' exonuclease activities. However, it remains unclear whether these enzymes hold 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and nucleotide incision repair (NIR) activities. Here, we report that both mycobacterial enzymes have 3'-repair phosphodiesterase and 3'-phosphatase, and MtbNfo contains in addition a very weak NIR activity. Interestingly, depending on pH, both enzymes require different concentrations of divalent cations: 0.5mM MnCl2 at pH 7.6 and 10 mM at pH 6.5. MtbXthA requires a low ionic strength and 37 °C, while MtbNfo requires high ionic strength (200 mM KCl) and has a temperature optimum at 60 °C. Point mutation analysis showed that D180 and N182 in MtbXthA and H206 and E129 in MtbNfo are critical for enzymes activities. The steady-state kinetic parameters indicate that MtbXthA removes 3'-blocking sugar-phosphate and 3'-phosphate moieties at DNA strand breaks with an extremely high efficiency (kcat/KM=440 and 1280 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively), while MtbNfo exhibits much lower 3'-repair activities (kcat/KM=0.26 and 0.65 μM(-1)∙min(-1), respectively). Surprisingly, both MtbXthA and MtbNfo exhibited very weak AP site cleavage activities, with kinetic parameters 100- and 300-fold lower, respectively, as compared with the results reported previously. Expression of MtbXthA and MtbNfo reduced the sensitivity of AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli xth nfo strain to methylmethanesulfonate and H2O2 to various degrees. Taken together, these data establish the DNA substrate specificity of M. tuberculosis AP endonucleases and suggest their possible role

  20. A ROS-Activatable Agent Elicits Homologous Recombination DNA Repair and Synergizes with Pathway Compounds.

    PubMed

    Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; AbdulSalam, Safnas F; Wunderlich, Mark; Wyder, Michael; Greis, Kenneth D; Kadekaro, Ana L; Mulloy, James C; Merino, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    We designed ROS-activated cytotoxic agents (RACs) that are active against AML cancer cells. In this study, the mechanism of action and synergistic effects against cells coexpressing the AML oncogenes MLL-AF9 fusion and FLT3-ITD were investigated. One RAC (RAC1) had an IC50 value of 1.8±0.3 μm, with ninefold greater selectivity for transformed cells compared to untransformed cells. Treatment induced DNA strand breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Proteomics and transcriptomics revealed enhanced expression of the pentose phosphate pathway, DNA repair, and pathways common to cell stress. Western blotting confirmed repair by homologous recombination. Importantly, RAC1 treatment was synergistic in combination with multiple pathway-targeting therapies in AML cells but less so in untransformed cells. Together, these results demonstrate that RAC1 can selectively target poor prognosis AML and that it does so by creating DNA double-strand breaks that require homologous recombination.

  1. A ROS-Activatable Agent Elicits Homologous Recombination DNA Repair and Synergizes with Pathway Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; AbdulSalam, Safnas F.; Wunderlich, Mark; Wyder, Michael; Greis, Kenneth D.; Kadekaro, Ana L.; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    We designed ROS-activated cytotoxic agents (RACs) that are active against AML cancer cells. In this study, the mechanism of action and synergistic effects against cells coexpressing the AML oncogenes MLL-AF9 fusion and FLT3-ITD were investigated. One RAC (RAC1) had an IC50 value of 1.8 ± 0.3 µm, with ninefold greater selectivity for transformed cells compared to untransformed cells. Treatment induced DNA strand breaks, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. Proteomics and transcriptomics revealed enhanced expression of the pentose phosphate pathway, DNA repair, and pathways common to cell stress. Western blotting confirmed repair by homologous recombination. Importantly, RAC1 treatment was synergistic in combination with multiple pathway-targeting therapies in AML cells but less so in untransformed cells. Together, these results demonstrate that RAC1 can selectively target poor prognosis AML and that it does so by creating DNA double-strand breaks that require homologous recombination. PMID:26419938

  2. DNA sequence and expression analysis of root-knot nematode-elicited giant cell transcripts.

    PubMed

    Bird, D M; Wilson, M A

    1994-01-01

    Fifty-eight cDNA clones isolated from a library of transcripts exhibiting up regulation in tomato root giant cells induced by infection with the parasitic nematode Meloidogyne incognita were characterized. A survey of plant tissues identified 31 transcripts present in tissues other than root, including actively dividing and expanding tissues and mature leaf tissues. The identities of approximately 20% of the giant cell transcripts were inferred from DNA sequence data; they include sequences encoding a plasmalemma proton ATPase, a putative Myb-type transcription factor, and the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

  3. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonator Using High Sensitive Resonance Telecommunication Wavelengths for DNA Sensors of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with Thiol-Modified Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5′-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:25609049

  5. NF-κB activation during intradermal DNA vaccination is essential for eliciting tumor protective antigen-specific CTL responses.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; Kiessling, Rolf; Lladser, Alvaro

    2013-10-01

    DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit tumor-protective cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity in preclinical models, but have shown limited efficacy in cancer patients. Plasmids used for DNA vaccines can stimulate several innate immune receptors, triggering the activation of master transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB). These transcription factors drive the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, which promote the induction of CTL responses. Understanding the innate immune signaling pathways triggered by DNA vaccines that control the generation of CTL responses will increase our ability to design more effective vaccines. To gain insight into the contribution of these pathways, we vaccinated mice lacking different signaling components with plasmids encoding tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) or ovalbumin (OVA) using intradermal electroporation. Antigen-specific CTL responses were detected by intracellular IFN-γ staining and in vivo cytotoxicity. Mice lacking IRF3, IFN-α receptor, IL-1β/IL-18, TLR9 or MyD88 showed similar CTL responses to wild-type mice, arguing that none of these molecules were required for the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. To elucidate the role of NF-κB activation we co-vaccinated mice with pIκBα-SR, a plasmid encoding a mutant IκBα that blocks NF-κB activity. Mice vaccinated with pIκBα-SR and the TRP2-encoding plasmid (pTRP2) drastically reduced the frequencies of TRP2-specific CTLs and were unable to suppress lung melanoma metastasis in vivo, as compared with mice vaccinated only with pTRP2. Taken together these results indicate that the activation of NF-κB is essential for the immunogenicity of intradermal DNA vaccines. PMID:23884215

  6. Immunogenicity and therapeutic effects of Ag85A/B chimeric DNA vaccine in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Wu, Xueqiong; Zhang, Junxian; Xiao, Li; Yang, Yourong; Bai, Xuejuan; Yu, Qi; Li, Zhongming; Bi, Lan; Li, Ning; Wu, Xiaoli

    2012-12-01

    The situation of tuberculosis (TB) is very severe in China. New therapeutic agents or regimens to treat TB are urgently needed. In this study, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were given immunotherapy intramuscularly with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA or saline, plasmid vector pVAX1, or Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine. The mice treated with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA showed significantly higher numbers of T cells secreting interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), more IFN-γ in splenocyte culture supernatant, more Th1 and Tc1 cells, and higher ratios of Th1/Th2 and Tc1/Tc2 cells in whole blood, indicating a predominant Th1 immune response to treatment. Infected mice treated with doses of 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA had an extended time until death of 50% of the animals that was markedly longer than the saline and vector control groups, and the death rate at 1 month after the last dose was lower than that in the other groups. Compared with the saline group, 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA and 100 μg Ag85A DNA reduced the pulmonary bacterial loads by 0.79 and 0.45 logs, and the liver bacterial loads by 0.52 and 0.50 logs, respectively. Pathological changes in the lungs were less, and the lesions were more limited. These results show that Ag85A/B chimeric DNA was effective for the treatment of TB, significantly increasing the cellular immune response and inhibiting the growth of M. tuberculosis.

  7. Characterization of the Apa antigen from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a conserved Mycobacterium antigen that elicits a strong humoral response in cattle.

    PubMed

    Gioffré, A; Echeverría-Valencia, G; Arese, A; Morsella, C; Garbaccio, S; Delgado, F; Zumárraga, M; Paolicchi, F; Cataldi, A; Romano, M I

    2009-12-15

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is widespread in almost all countries and remains difficult to eradicate. Nowadays, diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MPTB) infection is one of the main concerns. In this work, we evaluated the expression, biochemical properties and antigenicity of the Apa antigen, encoded by the gene annotated as MAP1569, in the MPTB genome. We confirmed its expression in MPTB and its glycosylation by the ConA binding assay. Although the MPTB-Apa is not an immunodominant antigen, MPTB-infected cattle showed a strong humoral response to recombinant Apa by Western blot and ELISA. Milk was also a suitable sample to be tested by ELISA. We comparatively analysed the humoral cross-reactivity to the Apa from MPTB (MPTB-Apa) and the orthologue from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT-Apa, identical to that from Mycobacterium bovis) in both infected and control cows. Response of M. bovis- and MPTB-infected animals against MT-Apa was similar (P=0.6985) but the response of the M. bovis-infected ones to MPTB-Apa was differential, being significantly diminished (P<0.0001). Although 6 out 45 animals from MPTB-infected herds responded to MPTB-Apa stimulation in the IFNgamma release assay, we found no significant differences when compared infected herds with non-infected ones (P=0.34). This antigen, in contrast to bovine Purified Protein Derivative (PPDb), was strongly represented in avian PPD (PPDa), as shown by the recognition of BALB/c mice hyperimmune sera against MPTB-Apa by Dot-blot immunoassay. We therefore demonstrated the antigenicity of Apa in MPTB-infected animals and a differential response to the recombinant antigen when compared to M. bovis-infected animals. These traits herein described, added to the usefulness of milk samples to detect IgG anti-Apa, could be important for routine screening in dairy cattle, considering a multiantigenic approach to overcome the lack of immunodominance.

  8. A robust elicitation algorithm for discovering DNA motifs using fuzzy self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianhui; Tapan, Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    It is important to identify DNA motifs in promoter regions to understand the mechanism of gene regulation. Computational approaches for finding DNA motifs are well recognized as useful tools to biologists, which greatly help in saving experimental time and cost in wet laboratories. Self-organizing maps (SOMs), as a powerful clustering tool, have demonstrated good potential for problem solving. However, the current SOM-based motif discovery algorithms unfairly treat data samples lying around the cluster boundaries by assigning them to one of the nodes, which may result in unreliable system performance. This paper aims to develop a robust framework for discovering DNA motifs, where fuzzy SOMs, with an integration of fuzzy c-means membership functions and a standard batch-learning scheme, are employed to extract putative motifs with varying length in a recursive manner. Experimental results on eight real datasets show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the other searching tools such as SOMBRERO, SOMEA, MEME, AlignACE, and WEEDER in terms of the F-measure and algorithm reliability. It is observed that a remarkable 24.6% improvement can be achieved compared to the state-of-the-art SOMBRERO. Furthermore, our algorithm can produce a 20% and 6.6% improvement over SOMBRERO and SOMEA, respectively, in finding multiple motifs on five artificial datasets. PMID:24808603

  9. Induction of in vivo resistance to Mycobacterium avium infection by intramuscular injection with DNA encoding interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Cho, D; Kim, T S

    2001-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is closely associated with the generation of cell-mediated immunity and resistance to intracellular parasites. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) was known to strongly induce IFN-γ production by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to determine whether injection with DNA encoding IL-18 can stimulate the resistance to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, the mature IL-18 cDNA with κ leader sequence was cloned under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (TcCMVIL-18) and its effect on MAC infection was investigated in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. Injection with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA during intranasal infection with MAC resulted in a significant decrease in bacterial load of lung during the entire 8-week observation period, while injection with the TcCMV control DNA did not. Lung cells in mice injected with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA showed persistent production of IFN-γ throughout the 8-week period. Furthermore, immunization with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA induced and maintained significantly higher levels of cytotoxic activity and nitric oxide production by lung cells than immunization with the TcCMV control vector. This work suggests that IL-18 DNA vaccination may be useful in the immunotherapeutic or immunoprotection approaches of infections by intracellular parasites such as mycobacteria. PMID:11260329

  10. Evaluation of the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis for delivery of Mycobacterium T cell antigen ESAT-6 into cytosol of antigen presenting cells to elicit effective cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subhash; Kaur, Manpreet; Midha, Shuchi; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com; Banerjee-Bhatnagar, Nirupama . E-mail: nirupama@icgeb.res.in

    2006-12-22

    We report the ability of N-terminal fragment of lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis to deliver genetically fused ESAT-6 (early secretory antigen target), a potent T cell antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, into cytosol to elicit Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. In vitro Th1 cytokines data and CTL assay proved that efficient delivery of LFn.ESAT-6 occurs in cytosol, in the presence of protective antigen (PA), and leads to generation of effective CTL response. Since CTL response is essential for protection against intracellular pathogens and, it is well known that only single T cell epitope or single antigenic protein is not sufficient to elicit protective CTL response due to variation or polymorphism in MHC-I alleles among the individuals, we suggest that as a fusion protein LFn can be used to deliver multiepitopes of T cells or multiproteins which can generate effective CTLs against intracellular pathogens like M. tuberculosis. It can be used to enhance the protective efficacy of BCG vaccine.

  11. Interleukin-15 enhance DNA vaccine elicited mucosal and systemic immunity against foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Xinyu; Kang, Youming; Jin, Huali; Du, Xiaogang; Zhao, Gan; Yu, Yang; Li, Jinyao; Su, Baowei; Huang, Chang; Wang, Bin

    2008-09-19

    Aerosol transmission of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is believed to be an important route of infection. Induction of mucosal response is thought to be effective way against such infection. Various approaches have been developed including the use of molecules adjuvant and polymers delivery for the mucosal delivery of DNA vaccine. In this study, using low molecular weight chitosan as a delivery vehicle, we investigated whether co-administration intranasally of the FMDV DNA vaccine, pcD-VP1 and a construct expressing IL-15 as the molecular adjuvant can enhance mucosal and systemic immune responses in animals. Compared to the group intranasally immunized with pcD-VP1 alone, the group immunized with the molecular adjuvant not only was induced higher level of mucosal sIgA but also serum IgG. Interestingly, intranasal delivery of the IL-15 construct with pcD-VP1 significantly enhanced the cell-mediated immunity (CMI) compared to the pcD-VP1 alone, as evidenced by the higher level of antigen-specific T-cell proliferation, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response and higher expressions of IFN-gamma in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells inform the spleen and mucosal sites. Consistently, IL-15 as adjuvant provided higher level of FMDV neutralizing antibody against FMDV and high secretions of IgA producing cells in mucosal tissues. Taken together, the results demonstrated that intranasal delivery of IL-15 as a mucosal adjuvant can enhance the antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses, which may provide a protection against the FMDV initial infection.

  12. Comparison of Fixatives, Fixation Time, and Severity of Infection on PCR Amplification and Detection of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae DNA in Paraffin-Embedded Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Kent, Michael L.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Whipps, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a common disease of laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio). Different infection patterns occur in zebrafish depending on mycobacterial species. Mycobacterium marinum and M. haemophilum produce virulent infections associated with high mortality, whereas M. chelonae is more wide spread and not associated with high mortality. Identification of mycobacterial infections to the species level provides important information for making management decisions. Observation of acid-fast bacilli in histological sections or tissue imprints is the most common diagnostic method for mycobacteriosis in fish, but only allows for diagnosis to the genus level. Mycobacterial culture, followed by molecular or biochemical identification is the traditional approach, but recently it has been shown that DNA of diagnostic value can be retrieved from paraffin blocks. We investigated effects of the following parameters on the ability of our qPCR test for the hsp gene (primer set HS5F/hsp667R) to retrieve specific DNA from paraffin-embedded zebrafish: type of fixative, time in fixative before processing, species of mycobacteria, and severity of infection. Whole zebrafish were experimentally infected with either M. chelonae or M. marinum, and then preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin or Dietrich’s fixative for 3, 7, 21 and 45 days. Subsequently, fish were evaluated by H&E and Fite’s acid-fast stains to detect mycobacteria within granulomatous lesions. The PCR assay was quite effective, and obtained PCR product from 75% and 88% of the M. chelonae and M. marinum infected fish, respectively. Fixative type, time in fixative, and mycobacterial species showed no statistical relationship with the efficacy of the PCR test. PMID:23709464

  13. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras.

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Garcia, L; Ferrera, A; Hoffner, S E

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 84 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Seventy-three different IS6110 patterns were found; 63 of these were unique and 10 were shared by two to three strains each. Thus, no ongoing spread of any specific clone of bacteria could be demonstrated. PMID:9276422

  14. In silico screening for novel inhibitors of DNA polymerase III alpha subunit of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbDnaE2, H37Rv).

    PubMed

    Jadaun, Alka; Sudhakar D, Raja; Subbarao, N; Dixit, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a pandemic disease is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). DNA polymerase III encoded by DnaE2 of Mtb is specifically required for its survival in vivo, and hence can be considered to be a potential drug target. Amino acid sequence analysis of the MtbDnaE2 and its human counterpart does not show any significant similarity. Therefore, a 3D model of the MtbDnaE2 was generated using Modeller 9v10 with the template structure of E. Coli DNA polymerase III alpha subunit (2HNH_A). The generated models were validated using a number of programmes such as RAMPAGE/PROCHECK, VERIFY_3D, and ProSA. MtbDnaE2 has few conserved residues and four conserved domains similar to that present in DNA polymerase III of E. coli. In silico screening was performed with bioactive anti-tuberculosis compounds and 6-AU (a known inhibitor of DNA polymerase III of Bacillus subtilis) and its analogues against the modeled MtbDnaE2 structure. Docking was performed using GOLD v5.2 software which resulted in the identification of top ten compounds with high GOLD fitness scores and binding affinity (X-Score). To further evaluate the efficacy of these compounds, in silico ADMET analysis was performed using MedChem Designer v3. Given their high binding affinity to the targeted MtbDnaE2, which is essential for DNA replication in the Mtb and good ADMET properties, these compounds are promising candidates for further evaluation and development as anti-tubercular agents.

  15. In Silico Screening for Novel Inhibitors of DNA Polymerase III Alpha Subunit of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbDnaE2, H37Rv)

    PubMed Central

    Jadaun, Alka; Sudhakar D, Raja; Subbarao, N.; Dixit, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a pandemic disease is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). DNA polymerase III encoded by DnaE2 of Mtb is specifically required for its survival in vivo, and hence can be considered to be a potential drug target. Amino acid sequence analysis of the MtbDnaE2 and its human counterpart does not show any significant similarity. Therefore, a 3D model of the MtbDnaE2 was generated using Modeller 9v10 with the template structure of E. Coli DNA polymerase III alpha subunit (2HNH_A). The generated models were validated using a number of programmes such as RAMPAGE/PROCHECK, VERIFY_3D, and ProSA. MtbDnaE2 has few conserved residues and four conserved domains similar to that present in DNA polymerase III of E. coli. In silico screening was performed with bioactive anti-tuberculosis compounds and 6-AU (a known inhibitor of DNA polymerase III of Bacillus subtilis) and its analogues against the modeled MtbDnaE2 structure. Docking was performed using GOLD v5.2 software which resulted in the identification of top ten compounds with high GOLD fitness scores and binding affinity (X-Score). To further evaluate the efficacy of these compounds, in silico ADMET analysis was performed using MedChem Designer v3. Given their high binding affinity to the targeted MtbDnaE2, which is essential for DNA replication in the Mtb and good ADMET properties, these compounds are promising candidates for further evaluation and development as anti-tubercular agents. PMID:25811866

  16. Mycobacterium hsp65 DNA entrapped into TDM-loaded PLGA microspheres induces protection in mice against Leishmania (Leishmania) major infection.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; Tavares, Carlos Alberto Pereira; Lima, Karla de Melo; Silva, Célio Lopes; Rodrigues, José Maciel; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2006-05-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved among different organisms. A mycobacterial HSP65 DNA vaccine was previously shown to have prophylactic and immunotherapeutic effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice. Here, BALB/c mice were immunized with mycobacterial DNA-hsp65 or with DNA-hsp65 and trehalose dymicolate (TDM), both carried by biodegradable microspheres (MHSP/TDM), and challenged with Leishmania (Leishmania) major. MHSP/TDM conferred protection against L. major infection, as indicated by a significant reduction of edema and parasite loads in infected tissues. Although high levels of interferon-gamma and low levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 were detected in mice immunized with DNA-hsp65 or MHSP/TDM, only animals immunized with MHSP/TDM displayed a consistent Th1 immune response, i.e., significantly higher levels of anti-soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA) immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a and low anti-SLA IgG1 antibodies. These findings indicate that encapsulated MHSP/TDM is more immunogenic than naked hsp65 DNA, and has great potential to improve vaccine effectiveness against leishmaniasis and tuberculosis. PMID:16432754

  17. Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques with Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Env V3 Elicits Neutralizing Antibody-Mediated Protection against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus with a Homologous but Not a Heterologous V3 Motif

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Kenji; Cecilia, Dayaraj; Ami, Yasushi; Nakasone, Tadashi; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Burda, Sherri; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yoshino, Naoto; Kaizu, Masahiko; Ando, Shuji; Okuda, Kenji; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Yamazaki, Shudo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2005-01-01

    Although the correlates of vaccine-induced protection against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not fully known, it is presumed that neutralizing antibodies (NAb) play a role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we examined immune responses elicited in rhesus macaques following vaccination with recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin expressing an HIV-1 Env V3 antigen (rBCG Env V3). We also determined the effect of vaccination on protection against challenge with either a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MN) or a highly pathogenic SHIV strain (SHIV-89.6PD). Immunization with rBCG Env V3 elicited significant levels of NAb for the 24 weeks tested that were predominantly HIV-1 type specific. Sera from the immunized macaques neutralized primary HIV-1 isolates in vitro, including HIV-1BZ167/X4, HIV-1SF2/X4, HIV-1CI2/X4, and, to a lesser extent, HIV-1MNp/X4, all of which contain a V3 sequence homologous to that of rBCG Env V3. In contrast, neutralization was not observed against HIV-1SF33/X4, which has a heterologous V3 sequence, nor was it found against primary HIV-1 R5 isolates from either clade A or B. Furthermore, the viral load in the vaccinated macaques was significantly reduced following low-dose challenge with SHIV-MN, and early plasma viremia was markedly decreased after high-dose SHIV-MN challenge. In contrast, replication of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD was not affected by vaccination in any of the macaques. Thus, we have shown that immunization with an rBCG Env V3 vaccine elicits a strong, type-specific V3 NAb response in rhesus macaques. While this response was not sufficient to provide protection against a pathogenic SHIV challenge, it was able to significantly reduce the viral load in macaques following challenge with a nonpathogenic SHIV. These observations suggest that rBCG vectors have the potential to deliver an appropriate virus immunogen for desirable immune elicitations. PMID:15650171

  18. Label-free DNA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance through hydration induced stress in microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Kosaka, Priscila M; Sotillo, Alma; Mingorance, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a label-free assay for the genomic detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance. The method relies on the quantification of the hydration induced stress on microcantilever biosensors functionalized with oligonucleotide probes, before and after hybridization with specific targets. We have found a limit of detection of 10 fg/mL for PCR amplified products of 122 bp. Furthermore, the technique can successfully target genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments of length >500 bp, and it can successfully discriminate single mismatches. We have used both loci IS6110 and rpoB as targets to detect the mycobacteria and the rifampicin resistance from gDNA directly extracted from bacterial culture and without PCR amplification. We have been able to detect 2 pg/mL target concentration in samples with an excess of interfering DNA and in a total analysis time of 1 h and 30 min. The detection limit found demonstrates the capability to develop direct assays without the need for long culture steps or PCR amplification. The methodology can be easily translated to different microbial targets, and it is suitable for further development of miniaturized devices and multiplexed detection. PMID:25599922

  19. Label-free DNA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance through hydration induced stress in microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Kosaka, Priscila M; Sotillo, Alma; Mingorance, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a label-free assay for the genomic detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance. The method relies on the quantification of the hydration induced stress on microcantilever biosensors functionalized with oligonucleotide probes, before and after hybridization with specific targets. We have found a limit of detection of 10 fg/mL for PCR amplified products of 122 bp. Furthermore, the technique can successfully target genomic DNA (gDNA) fragments of length >500 bp, and it can successfully discriminate single mismatches. We have used both loci IS6110 and rpoB as targets to detect the mycobacteria and the rifampicin resistance from gDNA directly extracted from bacterial culture and without PCR amplification. We have been able to detect 2 pg/mL target concentration in samples with an excess of interfering DNA and in a total analysis time of 1 h and 30 min. The detection limit found demonstrates the capability to develop direct assays without the need for long culture steps or PCR amplification. The methodology can be easily translated to different microbial targets, and it is suitable for further development of miniaturized devices and multiplexed detection.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Elicits Tuberculosis-Specific Humoral Immune Response Independent of Mycobacterial Load in Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Ganji, Rakesh; Sivangala, Ramya; Jakkala, Kiran; Gaddam, Sumanlatha; Penmetsa, Sitaramaraju; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, facultative intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacilli in human is cleared by cell-mediated immunity (CMI) with CD4+ T cells playing instrumental role in protective immunity, while antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) is considered non-protective. This longstanding convention has been challenged with recent evidences of increased susceptibility of hosts with compromised AMI and monoclonal antibodies conferring passive protection against TB and other intracellular pathogens. Therefore, novel approaches toward vaccine development include strategies aiming at induction of humoral response along with CMI. This necessitates the identification of mycobacterial proteins with properties of immunomodulation and strong immunogenicity. In this study, we determined the immunogenic potential of M. tuberculosis Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1), a secretory protein essential for intracellular survival and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We observed that Zmp1 was secreted by in vitro grown M. tuberculosis under granuloma-like stress conditions (acidic, oxidative, iron deficiency, and nutrient deprivation) and generated Th2 cytokine microenvironment upon exogenous treatment of peripheral blood mononulear cells PBMCs with recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1). This was supported by recording specific and robust humoral response in TB patients in a cohort of 295. The anti-Zmp1 titers were significantly higher in TB patients (n = 121) as against healthy control (n = 62), household contacts (n = 89) and non-specific infection controls (n = 23). A significant observation of the study is the presence of equally high titers of anti-Zmp1 antibodies in a range of patients with high bacilli load (sputum bacilli load of 300+ per mL) to paucibacillary smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases. This clearly indicated the potential of Zmp1 to evoke an effective humoral response independent of mycobacterial load. Such mycobacterial proteins can

  2. Structure of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Response Regulator PhoP from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,S.; Engohang-Ndong, J.; Smith, I.

    2007-01-01

    The PhoP-PhoR two-component signaling system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essential for the virulence of the tubercle bacillus. The response regulator, PhoP, regulates expression of over 110 genes. In order to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of PhoP, we determined the crystal structure of its DNA-binding domain (PhoPC). PhoPC exhibits a typical fold of the winged helix-turn-helix subfamily of response regulators. The structure starts with a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet, followed by a three-helical bundle of a-helices, and then a C-terminal {beta}-hairpin, which together with a short {beta}-strand between the first and second helices forms a three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet. Structural elements are packed through a hydrophobic core, with the first helix providing a scaffold for the rest of the domain to pack. The second and third helices and the long, flexible loop between them form the helix-turn-helix motif, with the third helix being the recognition helix. The C-terminal {beta}-hairpin turn forms the wing motif. The molecular surfaces around the recognition helix and the wing residues show strong positive electrostatic potential, consistent with their roles in DNA binding and nucleotide sequence recognition. The crystal packing of PhoPC gives a hexamer ring, with neighboring molecules interacting in a head-to-tail fashion. This packing interface suggests that PhoPC could bind DNA in a tandem association. However, this mode of DNA binding is likely to be nonspecific because the recognition helix is partially blocked and would be prevented from inserting into the major groove of DNA. Detailed structural analysis and implications with respect to DNA binding are discussed.

  3. Oral Vaccination with Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium-Delivered TsPmy DNA Vaccine Elicits Protective Immunity against Trichinella spiralis in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohuan; Bi, Kuo; Sun, Ximeng; Yang, Jing; Gu, Yuan; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-01-01

    Background Our previous studies showed that Trichinella spiralis paramyosin (TsPmy) is an immunomodulatory protein that inhibits complement C1q and C8/C9 to evade host complement attack. Vaccination with recombinant TsPmy protein induced protective immunity against T. spiralis larval challenge. Due to the difficulty in producing TsPmy as a soluble recombinant protein, we prepared a DNA vaccine as an alternative approach in order to elicit a robust immunity against Trichinella infection. Methods and Findings The full-length TsPmy coding DNA was cloned into the eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1, and the recombinant pVAX1/TsPmy was transformed into attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain SL7207. Oral vaccination of mice with this attenuated Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine elicited a significant mucosal sIgA response in the intestine and a systemic IgG antibody response with IgG2a as the predominant subclass. Cytokine analysis also showed a significant increase in the Th1 (IFN-γ, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-4, 5, 6, 10) responses in lymphocytes from the spleen and MLNs of immunized mice upon stimulation with TsPmy protein. The expression of the homing receptors CCR9/CCR10 on antibody secreting B cells may be related to the translocation of IgA-secreted B cells to local intestinal mucosa. The mice immunized with Salmonella-delivered TsPmy DNA vaccine produced a significant 44.8% reduction in adult worm and a 46.6% reduction in muscle larvae after challenge with T. spiralis larvae. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that oral vaccination with TsPmy DNA delivered by live attenuated S. typhimurium elicited a significant local IgA response and a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response that elicited a significant protection against T. spiralis infection in mice. PMID:27589591

  4. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M. . E-mail: tmr15@pitt.edu

    2004-10-25

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d{sub 3}) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}. In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d{sub 3} or sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3}-DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d{sub 3} had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d.

  5. E-DNA sensor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on electrochemical assembly of nanomaterials (MWCNTs/PPy/PAMAM).

    PubMed

    Miodek, Anna; Mejri, Nawel; Gomgnimbou, Michel; Sola, Christophe; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2015-09-15

    Two-step electrochemical patterning methods have been employed to elaborate composite nanomaterials formed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with polypyrrole (PPy) and redox PAMAM dendrimers. The nanomaterial has been demonstrated as a molecular transducer for electrochemical DNA detection. The nanocomposite MWCNTs-PPy has been formed by wrapping the PPy film on MWCNTs during electrochemical polymerization of pyrrole on the gold electrode. The MWCNTs-PPy layer was modified with PAMAM dendrimers of fourth generation (PAMAM G4) with covalent bonding by electro-oxidation method. Ferrocenyl groups were then attached to the surface as a redox marker. The electrochemical properties of the nanomaterial (MWCNTs-PPy-PAMAM-Fc) were studied using both square wave voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry to demonstrate efficient electron transfer. The nanomaterial shows high performance in the electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization leading to a variation in the electrochemical signal of ferrocene with a detection limit of 0.3 fM. Furthermore, the biosensor demonstrates ability for sensing DNA of rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in real PCR samples. Developed biosensor was suitable for detection of sequences with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) T (TCG/TTG), responsible for resistance of M. tuberculosis to rifampicin drug, and discriminating them from wild-type samples without such mutation. This shows potential of such systems for further application in pathogens diagnostic and therapeutic purpose.

  6. Extraction and detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from ZNCF-stained skin smear slides for better identification of negative skin smears.

    PubMed

    Kamble, R R; Shinde, V S; Madhale, S P; Kamble, A A; Ravikumar, B P; Jadhav, R S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Identification of Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy, is done by Ziehl Neelsen Carbol Fuchsin (ZNCF) stained slit skin smear microscopy that aids in the diagnosis and quantification of approximate bacterial load carried by the patient. We attempted M. leprae DNA extraction from 46 stained slit skin smear negative slides, using Proteinase K and SDS lysis, followed by ethanol precipitation. M. leprae specific primers (16SrRNA) were used for PCR-based amplification of DNA. We could detect M. leprae DNA in 15 (32.6%) samples. The method can be useful in the diagnosis of apparently slit skin smear negative leprosy cases.

  7. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates. PMID:24484478

  8. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates.

  9. Novel wide-range quantitative nested real-time PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA: development and methodology.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Tamura, Masato; Asami, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Eiko; Saito, Kosuke; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Takahashi, Sachiko Nonaka; Matsumoto, Koichi; Sawada, Shigemasa; Yokoyama, Eise; Takasu, Toshiaki

    2008-05-01

    Previously, we designed an internally controlled quantitative nested real-time (QNRT) PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in order to rapidly diagnose tuberculous meningitis. This technique combined the high sensitivity of nested PCR with the accurate quantification of real-time PCR. In this study, we attempted to improve the original QNRT-PCR assay and newly developed the wide-range QNRT-PCR (WR-QNRT-PCR) assay, which is more accurate and has a wider detection range. For use as an internal-control "calibrator" to measure the copy number of M. tuberculosis DNA, an original new-mutation plasmid (NM-plasmid) was developed. It had artificial random nucleotides in five regions annealing specific primers and probes. The NM-plasmid demonstrated statistically uniform amplifications (F = 1.086, P = 0.774) against a range (1 to 10(5)) of copy numbers of mimic M. tuberculosis DNA and was regarded as appropriate for use as a new internal control in the WR-QNRT-PSR assay. In addition, by the optimization of assay conditions in WR-QNRT-PCR, two-step amplification of target DNA was completely consistent with the standard curve of this assay. Due to the development of the NM-plasmid as the new internal control, significantly improved quantitative accuracy and a wider detection range were realized with the WR-QNRT-PCR assay. In the next study, we will try to use this novel assay method with actual clinical samples and examine its clinical usefulness.

  10. Characterization of the major formamidopyrimidine–DNA glycosylase homolog in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its linkage to variable tandem repeats

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Balasingham, Seetha V; Davidsen, Tonje; Debebe, Ephrem; Rødland, Einar A; van Soolingen, Dick; Kremer, Kristin; Alseth, Ingrun; Tønjum, Tone; Brennan, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The ability to repair DNA damage is likely to play an important role in the survival of facultative intracellular parasites because they are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen intermediates inside phagocytes. Correcting oxidative damage in purines and pyrimidines is the primary function of the enzymes formamidopyrimidine (faPy)–DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease VIII (Nei) of the base excision repair pathway, respectively. Four gene homologs, belonging to the fpg/nei family, have been identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The recombinant protein encoded by M. tuberculosis Rv2924c, termed Mtb-Fpg1, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized. The enzyme removed faPy and 5-hydroxycytosine lesions, as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8oxoG) opposite to C, T and G. Mtb-Fpg1 thus exhibited substrate specificities typical for Fpg enzymes. Although Mtb-fpg1 showed nearly complete nucleotide sequence conservation in 32 M. tuberculosis isolates, the region upstream of Mtb-fpg1 in these strains contained tandem repeat motifs of variable length. A relationship between repeat length and Mtb-fpg1 expression level was demonstrated in M. tuberculosis strains, indicating that an increased length of the tandem repeats positively influenced the expression levels of Mtb-fpg1. This is the first example of such a tandem repeat region of variable length being linked to the expression level of a bacterial gene. PMID:19496823

  11. Amplification of a species-specific DNA fragment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its possible use in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Del Portillo, P; Murillo, L A; Patarroyo, M E

    1991-01-01

    In recent work, a species-specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA fragment was cloned and sequenced. On the basis of its nucleotide sequence, two oligonucleotides were synthesized and used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. A 396-bp fragment was specifically amplified from the M. tuberculosis genome. No amplification was observed from any of 10 different mycobacterial strains, included those belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex. Neither was this fragment amplified from genomes of humans or different species of clinically important bacteria. The PCR product was detected by dot blot hybridization even when as little as 10 fg of purified M. tuberculosis DNA was used. This amplification method was subsequently used to detect and identify bacilli in different clinical samples, such as sputum, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. A good correlation was observed between the results obtained with the PCR method that we describe and other diagnostic tests currently used. Thus, PCR amplification of this genomic fragment is proposed as a specific, rapid, and sensitive test for the diagnosis of infection with M. tuberculosis. Images PMID:1939567

  12. A novel non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z' = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery.

  13. A novel non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K.; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase–pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z′ = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery. PMID:23267008

  14. Structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR and DosR-DNA Complex Involved in Gene Activation during Adaptation to Hypoxic Latency

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Wu, Meiting; Rice, Adrian E; Roberts, David M; Sherman, David R; Hol, Wim G.J.

    2010-07-20

    On encountering low oxygen conditions, DosR activates the transcription of 47 genes, promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a non-replicating state. Here, we report the crystal structures of the DosR C-terminal domain and its complex with a consensus DNA sequence of the hypoxia-induced gene promoter. The DosR C-terminal domain contains four {alpha}-helices and forms tetramers consisting of two dimers with non-intersecting dyads. In the DNA-bound structure, each DosR C-terminal domain in a dimer places its DNA-binding helix deep into the major groove, causing two bends in the DNA. DosR makes numerous protein-DNA base contacts using only three amino acid residues per subunit: Lys179, Lys182, and Asn183. The DosR tetramer is unique among response regulators with known structures.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  16. Molecular Identification of Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Polymerase Chain Reaction and ERIC PCR

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Farahani, Abbas; Jamali, Hooshang

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds Non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are of importance now-a-days due to their increasing virulence outbreaks and emerging antibiotic resistance. Since the most common NTM in Iran is reportedly Mycobacterium fortuitum, the present study was designed with the aim of molecular identification of clinical isolates of M. foruitum to analyse their heterogeneity. Materials and Methods A total of 81 isolates of NTM isolated from various samples were collected. The clinical isolates were assigned to species M. fortuitum by using conventional and molecular methods. The DNA banding patterns of ERIC- PCR and RAPD- PCR were analysed by using Bionumeric 7.5 software. Results Out of 81 tested NTM, 36 strains of M. fortuitum were identified. 33 isolates were selected for molecular typing in this study. Based on RAPD and ERIC analysis, M. fortuitum isolates were divided into 3 and 6 clusters, respectively. Most of the isolates were distributed into types of II RAPD (20 members/ 60.6 %) and V (14 members/ 42.4% with sub cluster I & II) of ERIC. In RAPD analysis, the major fragments were 300 bp, followed by fragment 1000. In ERIC analysis, the major fragments were 280 bp followed by fragment 1200 bp. Conclusion In conclusion, though the results from this study represented higher discriminatory power of ERIC, however the combination of RAPD and ERIC analysis were able to sufficiently discriminate the genotypic diversity, infection control, and gain useful epidemiological information regarding M. fortuitum isolates. PMID:26816886

  17. Combination of DNA Prime – Adenovirus Boost Immunization with Entecavir Elicits Sustained Control of Chronic Hepatitis B in the Woodchuck Model

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Anna D.; Zhang, Ejuan; Johrden, Lena; Liu, Jia; Seiz, Pia L.; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ma, Zhiyong; Kemper, Thekla; Fiedler, Melanie; Glebe, Dieter; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A potent therapeutic T-cell vaccine may be an alternative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Previously, we developed a DNA prime-adenovirus (AdV) boost vaccination protocol that could elicit strong and specific CD8+ T-cell responses to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in mice. In the present study, we first examined whether this new prime-boost immunization could induce WHcAg-specific T-cell responses and effectively control WHV replication in the WHV-transgenic mouse model. Secondly, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of this new vaccination strategy in chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in combination with a potent antiviral treatment. Immunization of WHV-transgenic mice by DNA prime-AdV boost regimen elicited potent and functional WHcAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response that consequently resulted in the reduction of the WHV load below the detection limit in more than 70% of animals. The combination therapy of entecavir (ETV) treatment and DNA prime-AdV boost immunization in chronic WHV carriers resulted in WHsAg- and WHcAg-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, which were not detectable in ETV-only treated controls. Woodchucks receiving the combination therapy showed a prolonged suppression of WHV replication and lower WHsAg levels compared to controls. Moreover, two of four immunized carriers remained WHV negative after the end of ETV treatment and developed anti-WHs antibodies. These results demonstrate that the combined antiviral and vaccination approach efficiently elicited sustained immunological control of chronic hepadnaviral infection in woodchucks and may be a new promising therapeutic strategy in patients. PMID:23785279

  18. Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccine coding for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) polyprotein gene and that for avian influenza virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene have been shown to induce immunity and provide protection against the respective disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether an IBDV polyprotein gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene could trigger immune response to both IBDV and AIV. After transfection, VP2 and HA were detected in the cytoplasm and at cell membrane, respectively, by immunofluorescent antibody double staining method, suggesting the fusion strategy did not affect the location of protein expression. VP4 cleavage between VP2 and HA was confirmed by Western blot, indicating the fusion strategy did not affect VP4 function in transfected cells. After vaccination in chickens, the DNA construct VP24-HA/pcDNA induced ELISA and virus neutralizing antibodies against VP2 and hemagglutination inhibition antibody against the HA subtype. The results indicated that a single plasmid construct carrying IBDV VP243 gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene can elicit specific antibody responses to both IBDV and AIV by DNA vaccination.

  19. DNA methylation impacts gene expression and ensures hypoxic survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shell, Scarlet S; Prestwich, Erin G; Baek, Seung-Hun; Shah, Rupal R; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dedon, Peter C; Fortune, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression in many organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA methylation is associated with gene repression, while it exerts both activating and repressive effects in the Proteobacteria through largely locus-specific mechanisms. Here, we identify a critical DNA methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis, which we term MamA. MamA creates N⁶-methyladenine in a six base pair recognition sequence present in approximately 2,000 copies on each strand of the genome. Loss of MamA reduces the expression of a number of genes. Each has a MamA site located at a conserved position relative to the sigma factor -10 binding site and transcriptional start site, suggesting that MamA modulates their expression through a shared, not locus-specific, mechanism. While strains lacking MamA grow normally in vitro, they are attenuated in hypoxic conditions, suggesting that methylation promotes survival in discrete host microenvironments. Interestingly, we demonstrate strikingly different patterns of DNA methyltransferase activity in different lineages of M. tuberculosis, which have been associated with preferences for distinct host environments and different disease courses in humans. Thus, MamA is the major functional adenine methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage while strains of the Beijing lineage harbor a point mutation that largely inactivates MamA but possess a second functional DNA methyltransferase. Our results indicate that MamA influences gene expression in M. tuberculosis and plays an important but strain-specific role in fitness during hypoxia.

  20. DNA Methylation Impacts Gene Expression and Ensures Hypoxic Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Scarlet S.; Prestwich, Erin G.; Baek, Seung-Hun; Shah, Rupal R.; Sassetti, Christopher M.; Dedon, Peter C.; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression in many organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA methylation is associated with gene repression, while it exerts both activating and repressive effects in the Proteobacteria through largely locus-specific mechanisms. Here, we identify a critical DNA methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis, which we term MamA. MamA creates N6-methyladenine in a six base pair recognition sequence present in approximately 2,000 copies on each strand of the genome. Loss of MamA reduces the expression of a number of genes. Each has a MamA site located at a conserved position relative to the sigma factor −10 binding site and transcriptional start site, suggesting that MamA modulates their expression through a shared, not locus-specific, mechanism. While strains lacking MamA grow normally in vitro, they are attenuated in hypoxic conditions, suggesting that methylation promotes survival in discrete host microenvironments. Interestingly, we demonstrate strikingly different patterns of DNA methyltransferase activity in different lineages of M. tuberculosis, which have been associated with preferences for distinct host environments and different disease courses in humans. Thus, MamA is the major functional adenine methyltransferase in M. tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage while strains of the Beijing lineage harbor a point mutation that largely inactivates MamA but possess a second functional DNA methyltransferase. Our results indicate that MamA influences gene expression in M. tuberculosis and plays an important but strain-specific role in fitness during hypoxia. PMID:23853579

  1. [DNA vaccination via in vivo electroporation can elicit specific immune response against highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viral structural antigens in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Chen, Hong; Tan, Wen-jie; Deng, Yao; Wang, Min; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Xiao; Zhang, Ke; Guan, Jie; Zhou, Jian-fang; Shu, Yue-long; Ruan, Li

    2010-05-01

    This study aims to develop inexpensive and effective experimental vaccines against highly pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus and to optimize their immunization programs. To this end, we first synthesized the codon-optimized hemagglutinin gene (HAop) and neuraminidase gene (NAop), both of which were derived from a H5N1 virus (Anhui strain), and constructed successfully the DNA vaccines containing a single cistronic construct (HAwt, HAop, or NAop) or a bicistronic construct (HAop/M2 or NAop/M1) of H5N1 influenza virus origin. Their expression was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and Western blotting. Then twice vaccination of mice with the DNA vaccines by injection intramuscularly or in vivo electroporation (EP) via two different routes was evaluated and analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, NA-specific antibody detection, micro-neutralizing antibody test and IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. Our results showed that the DNA vaccines with coden-optimized HAop and NAop constructs could quickly elicit a strong immune response by in vivo EP, especially the cellular immune response against HA and NA; the in vivo EP via intradermal route induced stronger humoral immune responses than those via intramuscular route. Our findings will pave a way for further development of novel DNA-based H5N1 vaccine and for the optimization of the immunization programs of DNA vaccine. PMID:20572336

  2. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future.

  3. Extract from Agaricus blazei Murill can enhance immune responses elicited by DNA vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shao, Hanjuan

    2006-01-15

    The fungus Agaricus blazei Murill (ABM) is particularly rich in polysaccharides, which have shown particularly strong results in treating and preventing cancers. The goal of this study was to investigate whether co-administration of the ABM extract with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) DNA vaccine could increase the immune responses. Compared with the control mice, which received FMDV DNA vaccine alone, significant increase in not only the FMDV-specific antibody response but also T cell proliferation was observed in mice which received FMDV DNA vaccine plus the ABM extract. Taken together, these results demonstrated that application of the ABM extract might provide a strategy to improve the efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  4. Priming with two DNA vaccines expressing hepatitis C virus NS3 protein targeting dendritic cells elicits superior heterologous protective potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jie; Deng, Yao; Chen, Hong; Yin, Xiao; Yang, Yang; Tan, Wenjie

    2015-10-01

    Development an effective vaccine may offer an alternative preventive and therapeutic strategy against HCV infection. DNA vaccination has been shown to induce robust humoral and cellular immunity and overcome many problems associated with conventional vaccines. In this study, mice were primed with either conventional pVRC-based or suicidal pSC-based DNA vaccines carrying DEC-205-targeted NS3 antigen (DEC-NS3) and boosted with type 5 adenoviral vectors encoding the partial NS3 and core antigens (C44P). The prime boost regimen induced a marked increase in antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses in comparison with either rAd5-based vaccines or DEC-205-targeted DNA immunization in isolation. The protective effect against heterogeneous challenge was correlated with high levels of anti-NS3 IgG and T-cell-mediated immunity against NS3 peptides. Moreover, priming with a suicidal DNA vaccine (pSC-DEC-NS3), which elicited increased TNF-α-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells against NS3-2 peptides (aa 1245-1461), after boosting, showed increased heterogeneous protective potential compared with priming with a conventional DNA vaccine (pVRC-DEC-NS3). In conclusion, a suicidal DNA vector (pSC-DEC-NS3) expressing DEC-205-targeted NS3 combined with boosting using an rAd5-based HCV vaccine (rAd5-C44P) is a good candidate for a safe and effective vaccine against HCV infection.

  5. A hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) DNA vaccine delivered using a spring-powered jet injector elicits a potent neutralizing antibody response in rabbits and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kwilas, Steve; Kishimori, Jennifer M; Josleyn, Matthew; Jerke, Kurt; Ballantyne, John; Royals, Michael; Hooper, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and Andes virus (ANDV) cause most of the hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in North and South America, respectively. The chances of a patient surviving HPS are only two in three. Previously, we demonstrated that SNV and ANDV DNA vaccines encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals, and (for ANDV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs). In those studies, the vaccines were delivered by gene gun or muscle electroporation. Here, we tested whether a combined SNV/ANDV DNA vaccine (HPS DNA vaccine) could be delivered effectively using a disposable syringe jet injection (DSJI) system (PharmaJet, Inc). PharmaJet intramuscular (IM) and intradermal (ID) needle-free devices are FDA 510(k)-cleared, simple to use, and do not require electricity or pressurized gas. First, we tested the SNV DNA vaccine delivered by PharmaJet IM or ID devices in rabbits and NHPs. Both IM and ID devices produced high-titer anti-SNV neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits and NHPs. However, the ID device required at least two vaccinations in NHP to detect neutralizing antibodies in most animals, whereas all animals vaccinated once with the IM device seroconverted. Because the IM device was more effective in NHP, the Stratis(®) (PharmaJet IM device) was selected for follow-up studies. We evaluated the HPS DNA vaccine delivered using Stratis(®) and found that it produced high-titer anti-SNV and anti-ANDV neutralizing antibodies in rabbits (n=8/group) as measured by a classic plaque reduction neutralization test and a new pseudovirion neutralization assay. We were interested in determining if the differences between DSJI delivery (e.g., high-velocity liquid penetration through tissue) and other methods of vaccine injection, such as needle/syringe, might result in a more immunogenic DNA vaccine. To accomplish this, we compared the HPS DNA vaccine delivered by DSJI versus needle/syringe in NHPs (n=8/group). We found

  6. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  7. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  8. TRF2 dysfunction elicits DNA damage responses associated with senescence in proliferating neural cells and differentiation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Opresko, Patricia L; Xu, Xiangru; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Mattson, Mark P

    2006-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of chromosomes that consist of tandem repeats of the DNA sequence TTAGGG and several proteins that protect the DNA and regulate the plasticity of the telomeres. The telomere-associated protein TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is critical for the control of telomere structure and function; TRF2 dysfunction results in the exposure of the telomere ends and activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasin mutated)-mediated DNA damage response. Recent findings suggest that telomere attrition can cause senescence or apoptosis of mitotic cells, but the function of telomeres in differentiated neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the impact of telomere dysfunction via TRF2 inhibition in neurons (primary embryonic hippocampal neurons) and mitotic neural cells (astrocytes and neuroblastoma cells). We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction induced by adenovirus-mediated expression of dominant-negative TRF2 (DN-TRF2) triggers a DNA damage response involving the formation of nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX and activated ATM in each cell type. In mitotic neural cells DN-TRF2 induced activation of both p53 and p21 and senescence (as indicated by an up-regulation of beta-galactosidase). In contrast, in neurons DN-TRF2 increased p21, but neither p53 nor beta-galactosidase was induced. In addition, TRF2 inhibition enhanced the morphological, molecular and biophysical differentiation of hippocampal neurons. These findings demonstrate divergent molecular and physiological responses to telomere dysfunction in mitotic neural cells and neurons, indicate a role for TRF2 in regulating neuronal differentiation, and suggest a potential therapeutic application of inhibition of TRF2 function in the treatment of neural tumors. PMID:16539655

  9. Immunization of neonatal mice with LAMP/p55 HIV gag DNA elicits robust immune responses that last to adulthood

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonhez Rigato, Paula; Maciel, Milton; Goldoni, Adriana Leticia; Piubelli, Orlando; Alves de Brito, Cyro; Fusaro, Ana Elisa; Eurico de Alencar, Liciana Xavier; August, Thomas; Torres Azevedo Marques, Ernesto; Silva Duarte, Alberto Jose da; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2010-10-10

    Successful T cell priming in early postnatal life that can generate effective long-lasting responses until adulthood is critical in HIV vaccination strategies because it prevents early sexual initiation and breastfeeding transmission of HIV. A chimeric DNA vaccine encoding p55 HIV gag associated with lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1; which drives the antigen to the MIIC compartment), has been used to enhance cellular and humoral antigen-specific responses in adult mice and macaques. Herein, we investigated LAMP-1/gag vaccine immunogenicity in the neonatal period in mice and its ability to generate long-lasting effects. Neonatal vaccination with chimeric LAMP/gag generated stronger Gag-specific immune responses, as measured by the breadth of the Gag peptide-specific IFN-{gamma}, proliferative responsiveness, cytokine production and antibody production, all of which revealed activation of CD4+ T cells as well as the generation of a more robust CTL response compared to gag vaccine alone. To induce long-lived T and B cell memory responses, it was necessary to immunize neonates with the chimeric LAMP/gag DNA vaccine. The LAMP/gag DNA vaccine strategy could be particularly useful for generating an anti-HIV immune response in the early postnatal period capable of inducing long-term immunological memory.

  10. Potent Functional Antibody Responses Elicited by HIV-I DNA Priming and Boosting with Heterologous HIV-1 Recombinant MVA in Healthy Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, Agricola; Nilsson, Charlotta; Aboud, Said; Bakari, Muhammad; Lyamuya, Eligius F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Marovich, Mary A.; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Wahren, Britta; Mhalu, Fred; Sandström, Eric; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Ferrari, Guido; Polonis, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA) virus boosting (HIVIS03). The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC) was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely) reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK) cells from PBMC (p=0.006), indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080) PMID:25874723

  11. MeHg Developing Exposure Causes DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Elicits Cell Cycle Arrest in Spinal Cord Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fabiana F.; Ammar, Dib; Bourckhardt, Gilian F.; Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Müller, Yara M. R.; Nazari, Evelise M.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury (MeHg) is well documented; however, the developmental neurotoxicity in spinal cord is still not fully understood. Here we investigated whether MeHg affects the spinal cord layers development. Chicken embryos at E3 were treated in ovo with 0.1 μg MeHg/50 μL saline solution and analyzed at E10. Thus, we performed immunostaining using anti-γ-H2A.X to recognize DNA double-strand breaks and antiphosphohistone H3, anti-p21, and anti-cyclin E to identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins. Also, to identify neuronal cells, we used anti-NeuN and anti-βIII-tubulin antibodies. After the MeHg treatment, we observed the increase on γ-H2A.X in response to DNA damage. MeHg caused a decrease in the proliferating cells and in the thickness of spinal cord layers. Moreover, we verified that MeHg induced an increase in the number of p21-positive cells but did not change the cyclin E-positive cells. A significantly high number of TUNEL-positive cells indicating DNA fragmentation were observed in MeHg-treated embryos. Regarding the neuronal differentiation, MeHg induced a decrease in NeuN expression and did not change the expression of βIII-tubulin. These results showed that in ovo MeHg exposure alters spinal cord development by disturbing the cell proliferation and death, also interfering in early neuronal differentiation. PMID:26793240

  12. Evaluation of molecular-Beacon, TaqMan, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes for detection of antibiotic resistance-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms in mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA extracts.

    PubMed

    Yesilkaya, Hasan; Meacci, Francesca; Niemann, Stefan; Hillemann, Doris; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Barer, Michael R; Andrew, Peter W; Oggioni, Marco R

    2006-10-01

    The ability of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, molecular-beacon, and TaqMan probes to detect single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the presence of a wild-type allele was evaluated using drug resistance-conferring SNPs in mixed Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. It was found that both the absolute quantity and the ratio of alleles determine the detection sensitivity of the probe systems.

  13. Long-Term Central and Effector SHIV-Specific Memory T Cell Responses Elicited after a Single Immunization with a Novel Lentivector DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Moussa, Maha; Baccard-Longere, Monique; Villinger, François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of HIV acquisition and replication requires long lasting and effective immunity. Given the state of HIV vaccine development, innovative vectors and immunization strategies are urgently needed to generate safe and efficacious HIV vaccines. Here, we developed a novel lentivirus-based DNA vector that does not integrate in the host genome and undergoes a single-cycle of replication. Viral proteins are constitutively expressed under the control of Tat-independent LTR promoter from goat lentivirus. We immunized six macaques once only with CAL-SHIV-IN− DNA using combined intramuscular and intradermal injections plus electroporation. Antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored for 47 weeks post-immunization (PI). PBMCs were assessed directly ex vivo or after 6 and 12 days of in vitro culture using antigenic and/or homeostatic proliferation. IFN-γ ELISPOT was used to measure immediate cytokine secretion from antigen specific effector cells and from memory precursors with high proliferative capacity (PHPC). The memory phenotype and functions (proliferation, cytokine expression, lytic content) of specific T cells were tested using multiparametric FACS-based assays. All immunized macaques developed lasting peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses mainly against Gag and Nef antigens. During the primary expansion phase, immediate effector cells as well as increasing numbers of proliferating cells with limited effector functions were detected which expressed markers of effector (EM) and central (CM) memory phenotypes. These responses contracted but then reemerged later in absence of antigen boost. Strong PHPC responses comprising vaccine-specific CM and EM T cells that readily expanded and acquired immediate effector functions were detected at 40/47 weeks PI. Altogether, our study demonstrated that a single immunization with a replication-limited DNA vaccine elicited persistent vaccine-specific CM and EM CD8+ and CD4+ T cells with immediate and readily

  14. Glucopyranosyl lipid A adjuvant significantly enhances HIV specific T and B cell responses elicited by a DNA-MVA-protein vaccine regimen.

    PubMed

    McKay, Paul F; Cope, Alethea V; Mann, Jamie F S; Joseph, Sarah; Esteban, Mariano; Tatoud, Roger; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Weber, Jonathan; Shattock, Robin J

    2014-01-01

    Using a unique vaccine antigen matched and single HIV Clade C approach we have assessed the immunogenicity of a DNA-poxvirus-protein strategy in mice and rabbits, administering MVA and protein immunizations either sequentially or simultaneously and in the presence of a novel TLR4 adjuvant, GLA-AF. Mice were vaccinated with combinations of HIV env/gag-pol-nef plasmid DNA followed by MVA-C (HIV env/gag-pol-nef) with HIV CN54gp140 protein (+/-GLA-AF adjuvant) and either co-administered in different muscles of the same animal with MVA-C or given sequentially at 3-week intervals. The DNA prime established a population of B cells that were able to mount a statistically significant anamnestic response to the boost vaccines. The greatest antigen-specific antibody response was observed in animals that received all vaccine components. Moreover, a high proportion of the total mucosal IgG (20 - 50%) present in the vaginal vault of these vaccinated animals was vaccine antigen-specific. The potent elicitation of antigen-specific immune responses to this vaccine modality was also confirmed in rabbits. Importantly, co-administration of MVA-C with the GLA-AF adjuvanted HIV CN54gp140 protein significantly augmented the antigen-specific T cell responses to the Gag antigen, a transgene product expressed by the MVA-C vector in a separate quadriceps muscle. We have demonstrated that co-administration of MVA and GLA-AF adjuvanted HIV CN54gp140 protein was equally effective in the generation of humoral responses as a sequential vaccination modality thus shortening and simplifying the immunization schedule. In addition, a significant further benefit of the condensed vaccination regime was that T cell responses to proteins expressed by the MVA-C were potently enhanced, an effect that was likely due to enhanced immunostimulation in the presence of systemic GLA-AF.

  15. Sequence-Based Identification of Mycobacterium Species Using the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification System

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Leonard, Debra G. B.; Pan, Xai; Musser, James M.; Berman, Richard E.; Nachamkin, Irving

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Sequencing Kit (PE Applied Biosystems), a 500-bp sequence-based identification system, for its ability to identify clinical Mycobacterium isolates. The organism identity was determined by comparing the 16S rDNA sequence to the MicroSeq database, which consists primarily of type strain sequences. A total of 113 isolates (18 different species), previously recovered and identified by routine methods from two clinical laboratories, were analyzed by the MicroSeq method. Isolates with discordant results were analyzed by hsp65 gene sequence analysis and in some cases repeat phenotypic identification, AccuProbe rRNA hybridization (Gen-Probe, Inc., San Diego, Calif.), or high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. For 93 (82%) isolates, the MicroSeq identity was concordant with the previously reported identity. For 18 (16%) isolates, the original identification was discordant with the MicroSeq identification. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 7 (six unique sequences) were originally misidentified by phenotypic analysis or the AccuProbe assay but were correctly identified by the MicroSeq assay. Of the 18 discrepant isolates, 11 (seven unique sequences) were unusual species that were difficult to identify by phenotypic methods and, in all but one case, by molecular methods. The remaining two isolates (2%) failed definitive phenotypic identification, but the MicroSeq assay was able to definitively identify one of these isolates. The MicroSeq identification system is an accurate and rapid method for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. PMID:10618095

  16. Immune and histopathologic responses of DNA-vaccinated hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops after acute Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Smith, Stephen A

    2006-11-21

    The post-challenge immune and histopathologic responses of hybrid striped bass vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the Mycobacterium marinum Ag85A gene and subsequently challenged with M. marinum were investigated. Juvenile hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops were injected intramuscularly with 25 or 50 microg DNA plasmid and developed significant specific protective responses to live bacterial challenge 120 d post-vaccination. Both vaccine groups demonstrated increased survival, reduced splenic bacterial counts, and reduced granuloma formation compared to the control groups 14 d after challenge with approximately 8 x 10(5) cfu M. marinum g(-1) fish body wt. The vaccine groups also developed more rapidly and significantly increased antibody and lymphoproliferative responses post-challenge compared to control groups, and these post-challenge immune responses appear to be vital against M. marinum infection in vaccinated hybrid striped bass. No significant differences in immune responses were recognized between the 25 and 50 microg vaccination groups, and these groups eventually experienced mortalities, splenic bacterial counts, and granuloma formation 28 d post-challenge comparable to those of the control groups at 14 d post-challenge. Therefore, vaccination of hybrid striped bass with a DNA vaccine encoding the M. marinum Ag85A gene provided significant but limited duration of protection against an acute high-dose M. marinum challenge.

  17. A DNA Vaccine Coding for the Brucella Outer Membrane Protein 31 Confers Protection against B. melitensis and B. ovis Infection by Eliciting a Specific Cytotoxic Response

    PubMed Central

    Cassataro, Juliana; Velikovsky, Carlos A.; de la Barrera, Silvia; Estein, Silvia M.; Bruno, Laura; Bowden, Raúl; Pasquevich, Karina A.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.

    2005-01-01

    The development of an effective subunit vaccine against brucellosis is a research area of intense interest. The outer membrane proteins (Omps) of Brucella spp. have been extensively characterized as potential immunogenic and protective antigens. This study was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the B. melitensis Omp31 gene cloned in the pCI plasmid (pCIOmp31). Immunization of BALB/c mice with pCIOmp31 conferred protection against B. ovis and B. melitensis infection. Mice vaccinated with pCIOmp31 developed a very weak humoral response, and in vitro stimulation of their splenocytes with recombinant Omp31 did not induced the secretion of gamma interferon. Splenocytes from Omp31-vaccinated animals induced a specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity, which leads to the in vitro lysis of Brucella-infected macrophages. pCIOmp31 immunization elicited mainly CD8+ T cells, which mediate cytotoxicity via perforins, but also CD4+ T cells, which mediate lysis via the Fas-FasL pathway. In vivo depletion of T-cell subsets showed that the pCIOmp31-induced protection against Brucella infection is mediated predominantly by CD8+ T cells, although CD4+T cells also contribute. Our results demonstrate that the Omp31 DNA vaccine induces cytotoxic responses that have the potential to contribute to protection against Brucella infection. The protective response could be related to the induction of CD8+ T cells that eliminate Brucella-infected cells via the perforin pathway. PMID:16177328

  18. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protect against DNA Damage but Are Dispensable for the Growth of the Pathogen in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rupangi Verma; Reddy, P. Vineel; Tyagi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    In host cells, Mycobacterium tuberculosis encounters an array of reactive molecules capable of damaging its genome. Non-bulky DNA lesions are the most common damages produced on the exposure of the pathogen to reactive species and base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of such damage. During BER, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease enzymes repair the abasic sites that are generated after spontaneous DNA base loss or by the action of DNA glycosylases, which if left unrepaired lead to inhibition of replication and transcription. However, the role of AP endonucleases in imparting protection against DNA damage and in the growth and pathogenesis of M.tuberculosis has not yet been elucidated. To demonstrate the biological significance of these enzymes in M.tuberculosis, it would be desirable to disrupt the relevant genes and evaluate the resulting mutants for their ability to grow in the host and cause disease. In this study, we have generated M.tuberculosis mutants of the base excision repair (BER) system, disrupted in either one (MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA) or both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA). We demonstrate that these genes are crucial for bacteria to withstand alkylation and oxidative stress in vitro. In addition, the mutant disrupted in both the AP endonucleases (MtbΔendΔxthA) exhibited a significant reduction in its ability to survive inside human macrophages. However, infection of guinea pigs with either MtbΔend or MtbΔxthA or MtbΔendΔxthA resulted in the similar bacillary load and pathological damage in the organs as observed in the case of infection with wild-type M.tuberculosis. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:24800740

  19. Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies have provided a refined understanding of the genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium genus, and more specifically within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results have informed a new perspective on the macro- and micro-evolution of the tubercle bacillus. In the first step, a M. kansasii-like opportunistic pathogen acquired new genes, through horizontal gene transfer, that enabled it to better exploit an intracellular niche and ultimately evolve into a professional pathogen. In the second step, different subspecies and strains of the M. tuberculosis complex emerged through mutation and deletion of unnecessary DNA. Understanding the differences between M. tuberculosis and related less pathogenic mycobacteria is expected to reveal key bacterial virulence mechanisms and provide opportunities to understand host resistance to mycobacterial infection. Understanding differences within the M. tuberculosis complex and the evolutionary forces shaping these differences is important for investigating the basis of its success as both a symbiont and a pathogen.

  20. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis cleaves single strand DNA within the human c-myc promoter in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Verma, Anjali; Saini, Adesh Kumar; Chopra, Puneet; Chakraborti, Pradip K; Singh, Yogendra; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    The reason for secretion of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NdK), an enzyme involved in maintaining the cellular pool of nucleoside triphosphates in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is intriguing. We recently observed that NdK from M.tuberculosis (mNdK) localizes within nuclei of HeLa and COS-1 cells and also nicks chromosomal DNA in situ (A. K. Saini, K. Maithal, P. Chand, S. Chowdhury, R. Vohra, A. Goyal, G. P. Dubey, P. Chopra, R. Chandra, A. K. Tyagi, Y. Singh and V. Tandon (2004) J. Biol. Chem., 279, 50142-50149). In the current study, using a molecular beacon approach, we demonstrate that the mNdK catalyzes the cleavage of single strand DNA. It displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a kcat/K(M) of 9.65 (+/-0.88) x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). High affinity (K(d) approximately K(M) of approximately 66 nM) and sequence-specific binding to the sense strand of the nuclease hypersensitive region in the c-myc promoter was observed. This is the first study demonstrating that the cleavage reaction is also enzyme-catalyzed in addition to the enzymatic kinase activity of multifunctional NdK. Using our approach, we demonstrate that GDP competitively inhibits the nuclease activity with a K(I) of approximately 1.9 mM. Recent evidence implicates mNdK as a potent virulence factor in tuberculosis owing to its DNase-like activity. In this context, our results demonstrate a molecular mechanism that could be the basis for assessing in situ DNA damage by secretory mNdK.

  1. Intranasal delivery of cationic PLGA nano/microparticles-loaded FMDV DNA vaccine encoding IL-6 elicited protective immunity against FMDV challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu; Zhang, Zhongwang; Lü, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Fang, Yuzhen; Jiang, Shoutian

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination has been demonstrated to be an effective means of eliciting protective immunity against aerosol infections of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and various approaches have been used to improve mucosal response to this pathogen. In this study, cationic PLGA (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) nano/microparticles were used as an intranasal delivery vehicle as a means administering FMDV DNA vaccine encoding the FMDV capsid protein and the bovine IL-6 gene as a means of enhancing mucosal and systemic immune responses in animals. Three eukaryotic expression plasmids with or without bovine IL-6 gene (pc-P12A3C, pc-IL2AP12A3C and pc-P12AIL3C) were generated. The two latter plasmids were designed with the IL-6 gene located either before or between the P12A and 3C genes, respectively, as a means of determining if the location of the IL-6 gene affected capsid assembly and the subsequent immune response. Guinea pigs and rats were intranasally vaccinated with the respective chitosan-coated PLGA nano/microparticles-loaded FMDV DNA vaccine formulations. Animals immunized with pc-P12AIL3C (followed by animals vaccinated with pc-P12A3C and pc-IL2AP12A3C) developed the highest levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgA antibody responses and the highest levels of sIgA (secretory IgA) present in mucosal tissues. However, the highest levels of neutralizing antibodies were generated in pc-IL2AP12A3C-immunized animals (followed by pc-P12AIL3C- and then in pc-P12A3C-immunized animals). pc-IL2AP12A3C-immunized animals also developed stronger cell mediated immune responses (followed by pc-P12AIL3C- and pc-P12A3C-immunized animals) as evidenced by antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and expression levels of IFN-γ by both CD4+ and CD8+ splenic T cells. The percentage of animals protected against FMDV challenge following immunizations with pc-IL2AP12A3C, pc-P12AIL3C or pc-P12A3C were 3/5, 1/5 and 0/5, respectively. These data suggested that intranasal delivery of cationic

  2. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  3. Mycobacterium leprae DNA associated with type 1 reactions in single lesion paucibacillary leprosy treated with single dose rifampin, ofloxacin, and minocycline.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Lucia O M; Stefani, Mariane M A; Pereira, Gisner A S; Costa, Mauricio B; Rebello, Paula F; Gomes, Maria Katia; Narahashi, Kazue; Gillis, Thomas P; Krahenbuhl, James L; Martelli, Celina M T

    2007-11-01

    Leprosy affects skin and peripheral nerves, and acute inflammatory type 1 reactions (reversal reaction) can cause neurologic impairment and disabilities. Single skin lesion paucibacillary leprosy volunteers (N = 135) recruited in three Brazilian endemic regions, treated with single-dose rifampin, ofloxacin, and minocycline (ROM), were monitored for 3 years. Poor outcome was defined as type 1 reactions with or without neuritis. IgM anti-phenolic glycolipid I, histopathology, Mitsuda test, and Mycobacterium leprae DNA polymerase chain reaction (ML-PCR) were performed at baseline. chi(2) test, Kaplan-Meir curves, and Cox proportional hazards were applied. The majority of volunteers were adults with a mean age of 30.5 +/- 15.4 years; 44.4% were ML-PCR positive. During follow-up, 14.8% of the patients had a poor clinical outcome, classified as a type 1 reaction. Older age (> or = 40 years), ML-PCR positivity, and lesion size > 5 cm were associated with increased risk. In multivariate analysis, age (> or = 40 years) and ML-PCR positivity remained baseline predictors of type 1 reaction among monolesion leprosy patients.

  4. Peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay for specific detection of Mycobacterium immunogenum and DNA-FISH assay for analysis of pseudomonads in metalworking fluids and sputum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Suresh B; Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2008-01-01

    Specific and rapid detection and quantification of mycobacteria in contaminated metalworking fluid (MWF) are problematic due to complexity of the matrix and heavy background co-occurring microflora. Furthermore, cross-reactivity among neighboring species of Mycobacterium makes species differentiation difficult for this genus. Here, we report for the first time a species-specific peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method for Mycobacterium immunogenum, a non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species prevalent in MWF and implicated in occupational lung disease hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pseudo-outbreaks. A novel species-specific 14-bp PNA probe was designed for M. immunogenum based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and was validated for specificity, by testing against a panel of other phylogenetically closely related rapidly growing mycobacteria and representative species of gram-positive, gram-negative, and acid fast organisms. In addition, a DNA-FISH protocol was optimized for co-detection of Pseudomonas, the most predominantly co-occurring genus in contaminated MWF. Reliable quantification for both the test organisms was achieved at or above a cell density of 10(3)cellsml(-1), a recognized minimum limit for microscopic quantification. The mycobacterial PNA-FISH assay was successfully adapted to human sputum demonstrating its potential for clinical diagnostic applications in addition to industrial MWF monitoring, to assess MWF-associated exposures and pseudo-outbreaks.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Mycobacterium africanum Clinical Isolates Based on IS6110-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis, Spoligotyping, and Variable Number of Tandem DNA Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Viana-Niero, Cristina; Gutierrez, Cristina; Sola, Christophe; Filliol, Ingrid; Boulahbal, Fadila; Vincent, Véronique; Rastogi, Nalin

    2001-01-01

    A collection of 105 clinical isolates originally identified as Mycobacterium africanum were characterized using both phenotypic and genotyping methods. The phenotypic methods included routine determination of cultural properties and biochemical tests used to discriminate among the members of the M. tuberculosis complex, whereas genotypic characterization was based on IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) analysis, IS1081-RFLP analysis, direct repeat-based spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping), variable number of tandem DNA repeats (VNTR), and the polymorphism of the oxyR, pncA, and mtp40 loci. The results obtained showed that a majority of M. africanum isolates were characterized by a specific spoligotyping pattern that was intermediate between those of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, which do not hybridize with spacers 33 to 36 and spacers 39 to 43, respectively. A tentative M. africanum-specific spoligotyping signature appeared to be absence of spacers 8, 9, and 39. Based on spoligotyping, as well as the polymorphism of oxyR and pncA, a total of 24 isolates were excluded from the final study (19 were identified as M. tuberculosis, 2 were identified as M. canetti, and 3 were identified as M. bovis). The remaining 81 M. africanum isolates were efficiently subtyped in three distinct subtypes (A1 to A3) by IS6110-RFLP analysis and spoligotyping. The A1 and A2 subgroups were relatively more homogeneous upon spoligotyping than A3. Further analysis of the three subtypes by VNTR corroborated the highly homogeneous nature of the A2 subtype but showed significant variations for subtypes A1 and A3. A phylogenetic tree based on a selection of isolates representing the three subtypes using VNTR and spoligotyping alone or in combination confirmed the subtypes described as well as the heterogeneity of subtype A3. PMID:11136749

  6. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey. PMID:26597137

  7. Characterization of a functional C-terminus of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MtrA responsible for both DNA binding and interaction with its two-component partner protein, MtrB.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqing; Zeng, Jumei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2010-11-01

    Virulence in pathogenic bacteria is due in part to the action of two-component systems. However, in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms underlying these systems are as yet unclear. In this study, MtrA was shown to contain a functional C-terminus and also to have Ca(2+) as its preferred cofactor for DNA binding. Further mutation experiments demonstrated that the C-terminus of MtrA was responsible for specific interactions with the target DNA motif and also with its partner protein, MtrB. The physical interaction between MtrA and MtrB inhibited DNA binding by MtrA. These findings yield critical information about the unique regulatory mechanisms of the essential MtrAB two-component system in this pathogen.

  8. A DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Delivered by Intramuscular Electroporation Elicits High Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies in Multiple Animal Models and Provides Protective Immunity to Mice and Nonhuman Primates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Lesley C.; Richards, Michelle J.; Ellefsen, Barry; Chau, Lillian; Luxembourg, Alain; Hannaman, Drew; Livingston, Brian D.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine expressing codon-optimized envelope glycoprotein genes of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) when delivered by intramuscular electroporation. Mice vaccinated with the DNA vaccine developed robust VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses that were comparable to those observed after administration of the live-attenuated VEEV vaccine TC-83 and were completely protected from a lethal aerosol VEEV challenge. The DNA vaccine also elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits that persisted at high levels for at least 6 months and could be boosted by a single additional electroporation administration of the DNA performed approximately 6 months after the initial vaccinations. Cynomolgus macaques that received the vaccine by intramuscular electroporation developed substantial neutralizing antibody responses and after an aerosol challenge had no detectable serum viremia and had reduced febrile reactions, lymphopenia, and clinical signs of disease compared to those of negative-control macaques. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this DNA vaccine provides a potent means of protecting against VEEV infections and represents an attractive candidate for further development. PMID:21450977

  9. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3’-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotide and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologs of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both, in an M. smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5’-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ. PMID:23198659

  10. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Sonya L.; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F.; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E.; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S.; Kwa, Suefen

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156 PMID

  11. A Triclade DNA Vaccine Designed on the Basis of a Comprehensive Serologic Study Elicits Neutralizing Antibody Responses against All Clades and Subclades of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Wang, Guiqin; Buchy, Philippe; Cai, Zhipeng; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng, Genhong; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Deubel, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Because of their rapid evolution, genetic diversity, broad host range, ongoing circulation in birds, and potential human-to-human transmission, H5N1 influenza viruses remain a major global health concern. Their high degree of genetic diversity also poses enormous burdens and uncertainties in developing effective vaccines. To overcome this, we took a new approach, i.e., the development of immunogens based on a comprehensive serologic study. We constructed DNA plasmids encoding codon-optimized hemagglutinin (HA) from 17 representative strains covering all reported clades and subclades of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses. Using DNA plasmids, we generated the corresponding H5N1 pseudotypes and immune sera. We performed an across-the-board pseudotype-based neutralization assay and determined antigenic clusters by cartography. We then designed a triclade DNA vaccine and evaluated its immunogenicity and protection in mice. We report here that (sub)clades 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.1, and 9 were grouped into antigenic cluster 1, (sub)clades 2.1.3.2, 2.3.4, 2.4, 2.5, and 8 were grouped into another antigenic cluster, with subclade 2.2.1 loosely connected to it, and each of subclades 2.3.2.1 and 7.2 was by itself. Importantly, the triclade DNA vaccine encoding HAs of (sub)clades 0, 2.3.2.1, and 7.2 elicited broadly neutralizing antibody responses against all H5 clades and subclades and protected mice against high-lethal-dose heterologous H5N1 challenge. Thus, we conclude that broadly neutralizing antibodies against all H5 clades and subclades can indeed be elicited with immunogens on the basis of a comprehensive serologic study. Further evaluation and optimization of such an approach in ferrets and in humans is warranted. PMID:22496212

  12. Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., two rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Chen, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Ji-Cheng; Jiang, Yi; Xiong, Zhi; Li, Wen-jun

    2013-11-01

    Two novel isolates of rapidly growing, Gram-stain-positive, non-chromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium, strain YIM M13028(T) from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea (19° 30.261' N 111° 0.247' E) at a depth of 42 m and strain YIM 121001(T) from a coastal zone sand sample collected in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were obtained in our laboratory. Their taxonomic positions were determined by a polyphasic approach. Good growth of the two strains was observed at 28 °C and pH 7.0 with 0-2 % NaCl on tryptic soy agar medium. Both strains formed round orange-red colonies, strain YIM M13028(T) had a rough surface, while YIM 121001(T) was smooth. Cellular fatty acids, whole-cell protein profiles and TLC analysis of their mycolic acids show significant differences from reference stains. Phenotypic characteristics and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, rpoB and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicated that both strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) belong to the genus Mycobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization values revealed a low relatedness (<70 %) of the two isolates with the type strains Mycobacterium neoaurum DSM 44074(T) and Mycobacterium hodleri DSM 44183(T). The low DNA-DNA hybridization values (40.4±3.5 %) between strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) and phenotypic distinctiveness indicated that the two strains were representatives of different novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The names proposed for these novel species are Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., and the type strains are YIM M13028(T) ( = DSM 45643(T) = KCTC 19999(T)) and YIM 121001(T) ( = DSM 45768(T) = JCM 18538(T)), respectively.

  13. Synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB is essential for high-affinity binding, DNA supercoiling and inhibition of RecA-promoted strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Sharadamma, N; Khan, Krishnendu; Kumar, Sandeep; Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Hasnain, Seyed E; Muniyappa, K

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of DNA architectural proteins containing two functional domains derived from two different architectural proteins is an interesting emerging research theme in the field of nucleoid structure and function. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HupB, unlike Escherichia coli HU, is a two-domain protein that, in the N-terminal region, shows broad sequence homology with bacterial HU. The long C-terminal extension, on the other hand, contains seven PAKK/KAAK motifs, which are characteristic of the histone H1/H5 family of proteins. In this article, we describe several aspects of HupB function, in comparison with its truncated derivatives lacking either the C-terminus or N-terminus. We found that HupB binds a variety of DNA repair and replication intermediates with K(d) values in the nanomolar range. By contrast, the N-terminal fragment of M. tuberculosis HupB (HupB(MtbN)) showed diminished DNA-binding activity, with K(d) values in the micromolar range, and the C-terminal domain was completely devoid of DNA-binding activity. Unlike HupB(MtbN) , HupB was able to constrain DNA in negative supercoils and introduce negative superhelical turns into relaxed DNA. Similarly, HupB exerted a robust inhibitory effect on DNA strand exchange promoted by cognate and noncognate RecA proteins, whereas HupB(MtbN), even at a 50-fold molar excess, had no inhibitory effect. Considered together, these results suggest that synergy between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of HupB is essential for its DNA-binding ability, and to modulate the topological features of DNA, which has implications for processes such as DNA compaction, gene regulation, homologous recombination, and DNA repair.

  14. Ludic Elicitation: Using Games for Knowledge Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation from human beings is important for many fields, such as decision support systems, risk communication, and customer preference studying. Traditional approaches include observations, questionnaires, structured and semi-structured interviews, and group discussions. Many publications have been studying different techniques for a…

  15. Rapid and simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Beijing/W genotype in sputum by an optimized DNA extraction protocol and a novel multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Leung, Eric T Y; Zheng, L; Wong, Rity Y K; Chan, Edward W C; Au, T K; Chan, Raphael C Y; Lui, Grace; Lee, Nelson; Ip, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis and genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by molecular methods are often limited by the amount and purity of DNA extracted from body fluids. In this study, we evaluated 12 DNA extraction methods and developed a highly sensitive protocol for mycobacterial DNA extraction directly from sputa using surface-coated magnetic particles. We have also developed a novel multiplex real-time PCR for simultaneous identification of M. tuberculosis complex and the Beijing/W genotype (a hypervirulent sublineage of M. tuberculosis) by using multiple fluorogenic probes targeting both the M. tuberculosis IS6110 and the Rv0927c-pstS3 intergenic region. With reference strains and clinical isolates, our real-time PCR accurately identified 20 non-Beijing/W and 20 Beijing/W M. tuberculosis strains from 17 different species of nontuberculosis Mycobacterium (NTM). Further assessment of our DNA extraction protocol and real-time PCR with 335 nonduplicate sputum specimens correctly identified all 74 M. tuberculosis culture-positive specimens. In addition, 15 culture-negative specimens from patients with confirmed tuberculosis were also identified. No cross-reactivity was detected with NTM specimens (n = 31). The detection limit of the assay is 10 M. tuberculosis bacilli, as determined by endpoint dilution analysis. In conclusion, an optimized DNA extraction protocol coupled with a novel multiprobe multiplex real-time PCR for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis, including Beijing/W M. tuberculosis, was found to confer high sensitivity and specificity. The combined procedure has the potential to compensate for the drawbacks of conventional mycobacterial culture in routine clinical laboratory setting, such as the lengthy incubation period and the limitation to viable organisms.

  16. Mycobacterium ulcerans DNA Not Detected in Faecal Samples from Buruli Ulcer Patients: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred S.; Lavender, Caroline J.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Phillips, Richard O.

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been shown that in a Buruli ulcer (BU) endemic region of southeastern Australia, significant numbers of possums (native tree-dwelling marsupials) have clinical BU disease. Furthermore, based on quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis, animals with BU lesions (and some without) shed M. ulcerans DNA in their faeces, indicative of bacterial loads of up to 108 organisms/gram. These findings led us to propose that humans might also harbour M. ulcerans in their gastrointestinal tract and shed the bacterium in their faeces. We conducted a pilot study and collected faecal swabs from 26 patients with confirmed BU and 31 healthy household controls. Faecal samples were also collected from 10 healthy controls from non-endemic regions in Ghana. All 67 specimens were negative when tested by IS2404 PCR. The detection sensitivity of this method was ≥104 bacteria per gram (wet-weight) of human faecal material. We conclude that the human gastrointestinal tract is unlikely to be a significant reservoir of M. ulcerans. PMID:21573192

  17. Generation and application of ssDNA aptamers against glycolipid antigen ManLAM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for TB diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Shi-Min; Xie, Yan; Song, Neng; Guan, Qing; Yuan, Chunhui; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2016-05-01

    The development of effective Mycobacterial antigen diagnostic reagents remains a high priority. Mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) is a lipoglycan serving as a major cell wall component. ManLAM is also an early released antigen in the blood circulation system during Mycobacteria tuberculosis (M.tb) infection and is a perfect target antigen for TB diagnosis. In this study, ssDNA aptamers "antibodies" against ManLAM of the predominant clinical epidemic M.tb Beijing genotype strains were generated by the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) technique. The selected single aptamer T9 demonstrated the highest specificity and binding affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 668 ± 159 nmol/L. We further detected ManLAM antigens in serum and sputum samples from active pulmonary tuberculosis (aPTB) patients, extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients and healthy donors by using a T9 based enzyme-linked oligonucleotide assay (ELONA). The results showed that the specificity and sensitivity were 95.31% and 83.00% (for 100 aPTB serum samples), 98.70% and 92.71% (for 96 aPTB sputum samples), and 94.44% and 88.71% (for 62 EPTB serum samples), respectively. A good correlation was observed between the T9 aptamer-based ELONA and the clinical T-SPOT.TB. Thus, T9 based ELONA has potentials for diagnosis of TB, including inactive TB, smear-negative TB, EPTB, and TB with immunodeficiency, and assist the diagnosis of LTBI albeit it could not distinguish LTBI and active TB.

  18. A single dose of a DNA vaccine encoding apa coencapsulated with 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate in microspheres confers long-term protection against tuberculosis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-primed mice.

    PubMed

    Carlétti, Dyego; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Gembre, Ana Flávia; Masson, Ana Paula; Weijenborg Campos, Lívia; Leite, Luciana C C; Rodrigues Pires, Andréa; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Lopes Silva, Célio; Bonato, Vânia Luiza Deperon; Horn, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG prime DNA (Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes)-booster vaccinations have been shown to induce greater protection against tuberculosis (TB) than BCG alone. This heterologous prime-boost strategy is perhaps the most realistic vaccination for the future of TB infection control, especially in countries where TB is endemic. Moreover, a prime-boost regimen using biodegradable microspheres seems to be a promising immunization to stimulate a long-lasting immune response. The alanine proline antigen (Apa) is a highly immunogenic glycoprotein secreted by M. tuberculosis. This study investigated the immune protection of Apa DNA vaccine against intratracheal M. tuberculosis challenge in mice on the basis of a heterologous prime-boost regimen. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously primed with BCG and intramuscularly boosted with a single dose of plasmid carrying apa and 6,6'-trehalose dimycolate (TDM) adjuvant, coencapsulated in microspheres (BCG-APA), and were evaluated 30 and 70 days after challenge. This prime-boost strategy (BCG-APA) resulted in a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs, thus leading to better preservation of the lung parenchyma, 70 days postinfection compared to BCG vaccinated mice. The profound effect of this heterologous prime-boost regimen in the experimental model supports its development as a feasible strategy for prevention of TB.

  19. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories.

  20. Unwounded plants elicit Agrobacterium vir gene induction and T-DNA transfer: transformed plant cells produce opines yet are tumour free.

    PubMed

    Brencic, Anja; Angert, Esther R; Winans, Stephen C

    2005-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is well known to cause crown gall tumours at plant wound sites and to benefit from this plant association by obtaining nutrients called opines that are produced by these tumours. Tumourigenesis requires expression of the vir regulon in response to chemical signals that are thought to be released from wound sites. Here, we examine chemical interactions between A. tumefaciens and unwounded plants. To determine whether unwounded plants can release significant amounts of vir gene inducers, we constructed an A. tumefaciens strain carrying a PvirB-gfp fusion. This fusion was strongly induced by co-culture with tobacco seedlings that have been germinated without any intentional wounding. The release of phenolic vir gene inducers was confirmed by GC/MS analysis. We also constructed a strain containing the gfp reporter located on an artificial T-DNA and expressed from a plant promoter. A. tumefaciens efficiently transferred this T-DNA into cells of unwounded plants in the absence of exogenous vir gene inducers. Many cells of seedlings colonized by the bacteria also produced octopine, which was detected using a Pocc-gfp reporter strain. This indicates transfer of the native T-DNA. However, these transformed plant cells did not form tumours. These results suggest that successful colonization of plants by A. tumefaciens, including T-DNA transfer and opine production, does not require wounding and does not necessarily cause cell proliferation. Transformation of plant cells without inciting tumours may represent a colonization strategy for this pathogen that has largely been overlooked. PMID:16135221

  1. 3-Methylcholanthrene elicits DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region and attenuates reporter gene expression in rat H4IIE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, Bhagavatula . E-mail: bmoorthy@bcm.tmc.edu; Muthiah, Kathirvel; Fazili, Inayat S.; Kondraganti, Sudha R.; Wang Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Jiang Weiwu

    2007-03-23

    Cytochrome CYP1A (CYP1A) enzymes catalyze bioactivation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) to genotoxic metabolites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CYP1A2 catalyzes formation of MC-DNA adducts that are preferentially formed in the promoter region of CYP1A1, resulting in modulation of CYP1A1 gene expression. MC bound covalently to plasmid DNA (50 {mu}g) containing human CYP1A1 promoter (pGL3-1A1), when incubated with wild-type (WT) liver microsomes (2 mg) and NAPPH 37 {sup o}C for 2 h, giving rise to 9 adducts, as determined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling. Eighty percent of adducts was located in the promoter region. Transient transfection of the adducted plasmids into rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells for 16 h, followed by MC (1 {mu}M) treatment for 24 h inhibited reporter (luciferase) gene expression by 75%, compared to unadducted controls. Our results suggest that CYP1A2 plays a key role in sequence-specific MC-DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region, leading to attenuation of CYP1A1 gene expression.

  2. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  3. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  4. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  5. Detection of Mycobacterium avium in pet birds

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Silvia Neri; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; de Paula, Cátia Dejuste; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2009-01-01

    The present study is a report on the presence of Mycobacterium avium in four birds of the psittaciform order kept as pets. Anatomopathological diagnosis showed lesions suggestive of the agent and presence of alcohol-acid resistant bacilli (AARB) shown by the Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The identification of Mycobacterium avium was performed by means of PRA (PCR Restriction Analysis). DNA was directly extracted from tissue of the lesions and blocked in paraffin. The role of this agent in pet bird infection is discussed, as well as its zoonotic potential. PMID:24031356

  6. Whole genome analyses of marine fish pathogenic isolate, Mycobacterium sp. 012931.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Hwang, Seong Don; Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Mori, Tetsushi; Aoki, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium is a genus within the order Actinomycetales that comprises of a large number of well-characterized species, several of which includes pathogens known to cause serious disease in human and animal. Here, we report the whole genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931 isolated from the marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). Mycobacterium sp. 012931 is a fish pathogen causing serious damage to aquaculture farms in Japan. DNA dot plot analysis showed that Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was more closely related to Mycobacterium marinum when compared across several Mycobacterium species. However, little conservation of the gene order was observed between Mycobacterium sp. 012931 and M. marinum genome. The annotated 5,464 genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was classified into 26 subsystems. The insertion/deletion gene analysis shows Mycobacterium sp. 012931 had 643 unique genes that were not found in the M. marinum strains. In the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem, both insertion and deletion genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 were associated with the PPE gene cluster of Mycobacteria. Of seven plcB genes in Mycobacterium sp. 012931, plcB_2 and plcB_3 showed low identities with those of M. marinum strains. Therefore, Mycobacterium sp. 012931 has differences on genetic and virulence from M. marinum and may induce different interaction mechanisms between host and pathogen. PMID:24879010

  7. Whole genome analyses of marine fish pathogenic isolate, Mycobacterium sp. 012931.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Hwang, Seong Don; Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Mori, Tetsushi; Aoki, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium is a genus within the order Actinomycetales that comprises of a large number of well-characterized species, several of which includes pathogens known to cause serious disease in human and animal. Here, we report the whole genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931 isolated from the marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). Mycobacterium sp. 012931 is a fish pathogen causing serious damage to aquaculture farms in Japan. DNA dot plot analysis showed that Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was more closely related to Mycobacterium marinum when compared across several Mycobacterium species. However, little conservation of the gene order was observed between Mycobacterium sp. 012931 and M. marinum genome. The annotated 5,464 genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was classified into 26 subsystems. The insertion/deletion gene analysis shows Mycobacterium sp. 012931 had 643 unique genes that were not found in the M. marinum strains. In the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem, both insertion and deletion genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 were associated with the PPE gene cluster of Mycobacteria. Of seven plcB genes in Mycobacterium sp. 012931, plcB_2 and plcB_3 showed low identities with those of M. marinum strains. Therefore, Mycobacterium sp. 012931 has differences on genetic and virulence from M. marinum and may induce different interaction mechanisms between host and pathogen.

  8. Mutational analysis of active-site residues in the Mycobacterium leprae RecA intein, a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease: Asp(122) and Asp(193) are crucial to the double-stranded DNA cleavage activity whereas Asp(218) is not.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan; Tripathi, Pankaj; Muniyappa, K

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae recA harbors an in-frame insertion sequence that encodes an intein homing endonuclease (PI-MleI). Most inteins (intein endonucleases) possess two conserved LAGLIDADG (DOD) motifs at their active center. A common feature of LAGLIDADG-type homing endonucleases is that they recognize and cleave the same or very similar DNA sequences. However, PI-MleI is distinctive from other members of the family of LAGLIDADG-type HEases for its modular structure with functionally separable domains for DNA-binding and cleavage, each with distinct sequence preferences. Sequence alignment analyses of PI-MleI revealed three putative LAGLIDADG motifs; however, there is conflicting bioinformatics data in regard to their identity and specific location within the intein polypeptide. To resolve this conflict and to determine the active-site residues essential for DNA target site recognition and double-stranded DNA cleavage, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of presumptive catalytic residues in the LAGLIDADG motifs. Analysis of target DNA recognition and kinetic parameters of the wild-type PI-MleI and its variants disclosed that the two amino acid residues, Asp(122) (in Block C) and Asp(193) (in functional Block E), are crucial to the double-stranded DNA endonuclease activity, whereas Asp(218) (in pseudo-Block E) is not. However, despite the reduced catalytic activity, the PI-MleI variants, like the wild-type PI-MleI, generated a footprint of the same length around the insertion site. The D122T variant showed significantly reduced catalytic activity, and D122A and D193A mutations although failed to affect their DNA-binding affinities, but abolished the double-stranded DNA cleavage activity. On the other hand, D122C variant showed approximately twofold higher double-stranded DNA cleavage activity, compared with the wild-type PI-MleI. These results provide compelling evidence that Asp(122) and Asp(193) in DOD motif I and II, respectively, are bona fide active

  9. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae. PMID:27649868

  10. In vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae to ticarcillin in combination with clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Casal, M J; Rodriguez, F C; Luna, M D; Benavente, M C

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae (M. chelonei) to ticarcillin in combination with calvulanic acid (CA) was studied by the agar dilution method. All the M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and M. africanum strains were inhibited at a ticarcillin concentration of 32 micrograms/ml or lower in combination with 5 micrograms of CA. M. chelonae and M. avium strains proved resistant to more than 128 micrograms of ticarcillin plus 5 micrograms of CA per ml. M. fortuitum strains needed 128 micrograms of ticarcillin plus 5 micrograms of CA to inhibit approximately 30% of the isolates. PMID:3105441

  11. Direct identification of slowly growing Mycobacterium species by analysis of the intergenic 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR) using a GelCompar II database containing sequence based optimization for restriction fragment site polymorphisms (RFLPs) for 12 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Volker; Harford, Cate; Bywater, Judy; Mayall, Barrie C

    2006-02-01

    To obtain Mycobacterium species identification directly from clinical specimens and cultures, the 16S-23S rDNA spacer (ISR) was amplified using previously published primers that detect all Mycobacterium species. The restriction enzyme that could potentially produce the most restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) was determined from all available ISR DNA sequences in GenBank to produce a novel data set of RFLPs for 31 slowly growing Mycobacterium species. Subsequently a GelCompar II database was constructed from RFLPs for 10 enzymes that have been used in the literature to differentiate slowly growing Mycobacterium species. The combination of Sau96I and HaeIII were the best choice of enzymes for differentiating clinically relevant slowly growing Mycobacterium species. A total of 392 specimens were studied by PCR with 195 negative and 197 positive specimens. The ISR-PCR product was digested with HaeIII (previously reported) and Sau96I (new to this study) to obtain a Mycobacterium species identification based on the ISR-RFLPs. The species identification obtained by ISR-RFLP was confirmed by DNA sequencing (isolate numbers are shown in parentheses) for M. avium (3), M. intracellulare (4), M. avium complex (1), M. gordonae (2) and M. tuberculosis (1). The total number of specimens (99) identified were from culture (67), Bactectrade mark 12B culture bottles (11), EDTA blood (3), directly from smear positive specimens (13), tissue (4) and urine (1). Direct species identification was obtained from all 13/13 smear positive specimens. The total number of specimens (99) were identified as M. tuberculosis (41), M. avium (7), M. avium complex (11), M. intracellulare MIN-A (20), M. flavescens (2), M. fortuitum (10), M. gordonae (4), M. shimoidei (1), M. ulcerans (1) and M. chelonae (2). This method reduces the time taken for Mycobacterium species identification from 8-10 weeks for culture and biochemical identification; to 4-6 weeks for culture and ISR-RFLP; to 2 days

  12. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T). PMID:27189351

  13. STING-Dependent 2'-5' Oligoadenylate Synthetase-Like Production Is Required for Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae Survival.

    PubMed

    de Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Batista-Silva, Leonardo Ribeiro; Silva, Bruno Jorge de Andrade; Lemes, Robertha Mariana Rodrigues; Martinez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Shannon, Edward Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Antunes, Sérgio Luís Gomes; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lara, Flávio Alves; Williams, Diana Lynn; Ozório Moraes, Milton

    2016-07-15

    Cytosolic detection of nucleic acids elicits a type I interferon (IFN) response and plays a critical role in host defense against intracellular pathogens. Herein, a global gene expression profile of Mycobacterium leprae-infected primary human Schwann cells identified the genes differentially expressed in the type I IFN pathway. Among them, the gene encoding 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like (OASL) underwent the greatest upregulation and was also shown to be upregulated in M. leprae-infected human macrophage cell lineages, primary monocytes, and skin lesion specimens from patients with a disseminated form of leprosy. OASL knock down was associated with decreased viability of M. leprae that was concomitant with upregulation of either antimicrobial peptide expression or autophagy levels. Downregulation of MCP-1/CCL2 release was also observed during OASL knock down. M. leprae-mediated OASL expression was dependent on cytosolic DNA sensing mediated by stimulator of IFN genes signaling. The addition of M. leprae DNA enhanced nonpathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin intracellular survival, downregulated antimicrobial peptide expression, and increased MCP-1/CCL2 secretion. Thus, our data uncover a promycobacterial role for OASL during M. leprae infection that directs the host immune response toward a niche that permits survival of the pathogen. PMID:27190175

  14. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4 plus CD45RO plus CCR7 plus) re...

  15. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4+ CD45RO+ CCR7+) responses corr...

  16. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  17. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex: Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. In non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), multiple copies of genes encoding homologous proteins have mainly been identified in pathogenic Mycobacterium species phylogenically related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Only ancestral copies of these genes have been identified in nonpathogenic NTM species like Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. KMS, Mycobacterium sp. MCS, and Mycobacterium sp. JLS. In this study we elucidated the genomes of four nonpathogenic NTM species, viz Mycobacterium komanii sp. nov., Mycobacterium malmesburii sp. nov., Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, and Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 6841. These genomes were investigated for genes encoding for the Esx and PE/PPE (situated in the esx cluster) family of proteins as well as adjacent genes situated in the ESX-1 to ESX-5 regions. To identify proteins actually expressed, comparative proteomic analyses of purified protein derivatives from three of the NTM as well as Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478 and the commercially available purified protein derivatives from Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium was performed. The genomic analysis revealed the occurrence in each of the four NTM, orthologs of the genes encoding for the Esx family, the PE and PPE family proteins in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. The identification of genes of the ESX-1, ESX-3, and ESX-4 region including esxA, esxB, ppe68, pe5, and pe35 adds to earlier reports of these genes in nonpathogenic NTM like M. smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. JLS and Mycobacterium KMS. This report is also the first to identify esxN gene situated within the ESX-5 locus in M. nonchromogenicum. Our proteomics analysis

  18. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex: Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. In non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), multiple copies of genes encoding homologous proteins have mainly been identified in pathogenic Mycobacterium species phylogenically related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Only ancestral copies of these genes have been identified in nonpathogenic NTM species like Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. KMS, Mycobacterium sp. MCS, and Mycobacterium sp. JLS. In this study we elucidated the genomes of four nonpathogenic NTM species, viz Mycobacterium komanii sp. nov., Mycobacterium malmesburii sp. nov., Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, and Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 6841. These genomes were investigated for genes encoding for the Esx and PE/PPE (situated in the esx cluster) family of proteins as well as adjacent genes situated in the ESX-1 to ESX-5 regions. To identify proteins actually expressed, comparative proteomic analyses of purified protein derivatives from three of the NTM as well as Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478 and the commercially available purified protein derivatives from Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium was performed. The genomic analysis revealed the occurrence in each of the four NTM, orthologs of the genes encoding for the Esx family, the PE and PPE family proteins in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. The identification of genes of the ESX-1, ESX-3, and ESX-4 region including esxA, esxB, ppe68, pe5, and pe35 adds to earlier reports of these genes in nonpathogenic NTM like M. smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. JLS and Mycobacterium KMS. This report is also the first to identify esxN gene situated within the ESX-5 locus in M. nonchromogenicum. Our proteomics analysis

  19. Rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) extract and its component, piceatannol, enhance the activity of DNA polymerase and suppress the inflammatory response elicited by UVB‑induced DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Sawako; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Iwahashi, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takefumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    A number of naturally occurring agents are hypothesized to protect against ultraviolet (UV)‑induced skin damage. The present study screened >50 plant extracts for inhibitors of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity, using cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and identified that the fruit of rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) was the most marked inhibitor of cell death. The protective effect of rose myrtle extract and the two key components, piceatannol and piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside, on UVB‑induced damage and inflammation in cultured NHEK was investigated. The 80% ethanol extract from rose myrtle fruit with piceatannol exhibited protection of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity in NHEK; however, piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside exhibited no protection, as determined by a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This extract and piceatannol reduced the production of UVB‑induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced the cellular enzyme activity of the DNA polymerases in UVB‑irradiated NHEK, suggesting that UVB‑stimulated DNA damage was repaired by the polymerases. In addition, the secretion of prostaglandin E2, which is an inflammatory mediator, was decreased. These results indicated that rose myrtle fruit extract and its key constituent, piceatannol, are potential photoprotective candidates for UV‑induced skin damage.

  20. Rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) extract and its component, piceatannol, enhance the activity of DNA polymerase and suppress the inflammatory response elicited by UVB‑induced DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Sawako; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Iwahashi, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takefumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    A number of naturally occurring agents are hypothesized to protect against ultraviolet (UV)‑induced skin damage. The present study screened >50 plant extracts for inhibitors of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity, using cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and identified that the fruit of rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) was the most marked inhibitor of cell death. The protective effect of rose myrtle extract and the two key components, piceatannol and piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside, on UVB‑induced damage and inflammation in cultured NHEK was investigated. The 80% ethanol extract from rose myrtle fruit with piceatannol exhibited protection of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity in NHEK; however, piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside exhibited no protection, as determined by a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This extract and piceatannol reduced the production of UVB‑induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced the cellular enzyme activity of the DNA polymerases in UVB‑irradiated NHEK, suggesting that UVB‑stimulated DNA damage was repaired by the polymerases. In addition, the secretion of prostaglandin E2, which is an inflammatory mediator, was decreased. These results indicated that rose myrtle fruit extract and its key constituent, piceatannol, are potential photoprotective candidates for UV‑induced skin damage. PMID:26239705

  1. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  2. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish). PMID:15748591

  3. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization. PMID:16177367

  4. [Frontier of mycobacterium research--host vs. mycobacterium].

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaji; Shirakawa, Taro

    2005-09-01

    During the past decade, we have observed advance in tuberculosis research including novel vaccines, innate immunity (TLR), SNIP analysis and molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Worldwide genome project enabled the whole genome sequence of host resistant against tuberculosis as well as the whole genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. DNA technology has also provided a great impact on the development of novel vaccine against TB. In this symposium, we have invited leading researchers in the field of the frontier study of Mycobacterium research in order to provide general overview of the cutting edge of frontier research. Molecular mechanism of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis has been clarified. On the other hand, molecular mechanism of host-defence (insusceptibility of host) against M. tuberculosis has not yet elucidated. Dr. Taro Shirakawa (Kyoto University) reviewed the susceptibility genes of host in TB infection and presented candidate genes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Naoto Keicho (International Medical Center of Japan) tried to identify host genetic factors involved in susceptibility to pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection by candidate gene approach and genome-wide approach. In Japan, Dr. Masaji Okada (National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center) has been engaged actively in the development of new tuberculosis vaccines (HVJ-liposome/Hsp65 DNA + IL-12 DNA vaccine and recombinant 72f BCG vaccine). He showed basic strategy for construction of new candidate vaccines and also showed significant efficacy on the protection of tuberculosis infection using cynomolgus monkeys, which are very similar to human tuberculosis. Dr. Hatsumi Taniguchi (University of Occupational and Environmental Health) presented that M. tuberculosis mIHF and the neighbor genes went into a dormacy-like state of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophage cells. This study might provide a weapon for elucidating the mechanism of dormacy

  5. Rapid Detection and Immune Characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayatepek, Ertan; Mackenzie, Colin R.; Schramm, Dirk; Jacobsen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients are highly susceptible to infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Especially Mycobacterium abscessus infections are common but reliable diagnosis is hampered by non-specific clinical symptoms and insensitive mycobacterial culture. In the present study we established novel methods for rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We performed Mycobacterium abscessus specific DNA-strip- and quantitative PCR-based analyses of non-cultured sputum samples to detect and characterize Mycobacterium abscessus infections. Concomitantly in vitro T-cell reactivation with purified protein derivatives (PPDs) from different mycobacterial species was used to determine Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cell cytokine expression of infected cystic fibrosis patients. Four of 35 cystic fibrosis patients (11.4%) were Mycobacterium abscessus culture positive and showed concordant DNA-strip-test results. Quantitative PCR revealed marked differences of mycobacterial burden between cystic fibrosis patients and during disease course. Tandem-repeat analysis classified distinct Mycobacterium abscessus strains of infected cystic fibrosis patients and excluded patient-to-patient transmission. Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cells were detected in the blood of cystic fibrosis patients with confirmed chronic infection and a subgroup of patients without evidence of Mycobacterium abscessus infection. Comparison of cytokine expression and phenotypic markers revealed increased proportions of CD40L positive T-cells that lack Interleukin-2 expression as a marker for chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Direct sputum examination enabled rapid diagnosis and quantification of Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients. T-cell in vitro reactivation and cytokine expression analyses may contribute to diagnosis of chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infection. PMID:25742660

  6. Rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Steindor, Mathis; Nkwouano, Vanesa; Mayatepek, Ertan; Mackenzie, Colin R; Schramm, Dirk; Jacobsen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients are highly susceptible to infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Especially Mycobacterium abscessus infections are common but reliable diagnosis is hampered by non-specific clinical symptoms and insensitive mycobacterial culture. In the present study we established novel methods for rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We performed Mycobacterium abscessus specific DNA-strip- and quantitative PCR-based analyses of non-cultured sputum samples to detect and characterize Mycobacterium abscessus infections. Concomitantly in vitro T-cell reactivation with purified protein derivatives (PPDs) from different mycobacterial species was used to determine Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cell cytokine expression of infected cystic fibrosis patients. Four of 35 cystic fibrosis patients (11.4%) were Mycobacterium abscessus culture positive and showed concordant DNA-strip-test results. Quantitative PCR revealed marked differences of mycobacterial burden between cystic fibrosis patients and during disease course. Tandem-repeat analysis classified distinct Mycobacterium abscessus strains of infected cystic fibrosis patients and excluded patient-to-patient transmission. Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cells were detected in the blood of cystic fibrosis patients with confirmed chronic infection and a subgroup of patients without evidence of Mycobacterium abscessus infection. Comparison of cytokine expression and phenotypic markers revealed increased proportions of CD40L positive T-cells that lack Interleukin-2 expression as a marker for chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Direct sputum examination enabled rapid diagnosis and quantification of Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients. T-cell in vitro reactivation and cytokine expression analyses may contribute to diagnosis of chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infection. PMID:25742660

  7. The new vaccines: building viruses that elicit antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Restifo, Nicholas P

    2007-01-01

    Whereas cancer cells are poor immunogens, some viruses are capable of eliciting powerful and lifelong immunity. Recombinant viruses and plasmid DNA encoding tumor-associated antigens can elicit powerful and specific immune responses that can be enhanced by the use of cytokines and costimulatory molecules. These immune responses have destroyed growing tumor cells in experimental animal models. For the first time, immunotherapeutic strategies that employ recombinant viruses are being tested in clinical trials with cancer patients. PMID:8902391

  8. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  9. Unconsciously elicited perceptual prior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond; Baria, Alexis T.; Flounders, Matthew W.; He, Biyu J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence over the past decade suggests that vision is not simply a passive, feed-forward process in which cortical areas relay progressively more abstract information to those higher up in the visual hierarchy, but rather an inferential process with top-down processes actively guiding and shaping perception. However, one major question that persists is whether such processes can be influenced by unconsciously perceived stimuli. Recent psychophysics and neuroimaging studies have revealed that while consciously perceived stimuli elicit stronger responses in higher visual and frontoparietal areas than those that fail to reach conscious awareness, the latter can still drive high-level brain and behavioral responses. We investigated whether unconscious processing of a masked natural image could facilitate subsequent conscious recognition of its degraded counterpart (a black-and-white “Mooney” image) presented many seconds later. We found that this is indeed the case, suggesting that conscious vision may be influenced by priors established by unconscious processing of a fleeting image. PMID:27595010

  10. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  11. Histologic and Genotypic Characterization of a Novel Mycobacterium Species Found in Three Cats

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Greg D.; Clark, Edward G.

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of feline atypical mycobacteriosis from different geographical regions in North America were characterized by large clusters of filamentous bacteria visible on hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained tissue sections. PCR amplification demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium-specific nucleic acid in samples of skin lesions from these cases. PCR-assisted cloning and DNA sequence analysis of a 541-bp length of the Mycobacterium 16S rRNA gene generated DNA sequences which were >95% identical, suggesting that the three isolates were closely related. Two of the sequences were 99% identical and may represent the same species. Alignment with comparable 16S rRNA gene sequences from 66 Mycobacterium species and partially characterized isolates highlighted similarities (>94%) with Mycobacterium bohemicum, Mycobacterium haemophilum, Mycobacterium ulcerans, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and isolate IWGMT 90242. Parsimony analysis of sequence data suggested relatedness to M. leprae. Significant molecular genetic and pathobiological differences between these three similar isolates and other known species of mycobacteria suggested that the organisms may not have been described previously and that these cases may represent a new form of mycobacterial disease in cats. We suggest the term “Mycobacterium visibilis” to describe the organism from which the two nearly identical sequences were obtained. PMID:12089257

  12. A recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis induces potent bactericidal immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Kari A; Dao, Dee N; Goldberg, Michael F; Hsu, Tsungda; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Ordway, Diane; Sellers, Rani S; Jain, Paras; Chen, Bing; Chen, Mei; Kim, John; Lukose, Regy; Chan, John; Orme, Ian M; Porcelli, Steven A; Jacobs, William R

    2011-01-01

    We report the involvement of an evolutionarily conserved set of mycobacterial genes, the esx-3 region, in evasion of bacterial killing by innate immunity. Whereas high-dose intravenous infections of mice with the rapidly growing mycobacterial species Mycobacterium smegmatis bearing an intact esx-3 locus were rapidly lethal, infection with an M. smegmatis Δesx-3 mutant (here designated as the IKE strain) was controlled and cleared by a MyD88-dependent bactericidal immune response. Introduction of the orthologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis esx-3 genes into the IKE strain resulted in a strain, designated IKEPLUS, that remained susceptible to innate immune killing and was highly attenuated in mice but had a marked ability to stimulate bactericidal immunity against challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. Analysis of these adaptive immune responses indicated that the highly protective bactericidal immunity elicited by IKEPLUS was dependent on CD4+ memory T cells and involved a distinct shift in the pattern of cytokine responses by CD4+ cells. Our results establish a role for the esx-3 locus in promoting mycobacterial virulence and also identify the IKE strain as a potentially powerful candidate vaccine vector for eliciting protective immunity to M. tuberculosis. PMID:21892180

  13. Annotated genome sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense strain M154, belonging to the recently created taxon Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Wong, Yan Ling; Tan, Joon Liang; Ong, Chia Sui; Wong, Guat Jah; Ng, Kee Peng; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2012-09-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense has recently been proposed as a member of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov. Strain M154, a clinical isolate from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of a Malaysian patient presenting with lower respiratory tract infection, was subjected to shotgun DNA sequencing with the Illumina sequencing technology to obtain whole-genome sequence data for comparison with other genetically related strains within the M. abscessus species complex. PMID:22887675

  14. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  15. Identification of distinct lymphocyte subsets responding to subcellular fractions of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)

    PubMed Central

    Batoni, G; Esin, S; Pardini, M; Bottai, D; Senesi, S; Wigzell, H; Campa, M

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination to induce immune responses toward different classes of mycobacterial antigens and the cell populations involved in such responses, proliferation of distinct human lymphocyte subsets from BCG-vaccinated donors in response to different subcellular fractions of BCG was analysed and compared with that of not sensitized subjects. Proliferation of different cell subsets was evaluated by flow cytometric determination of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated into DNA of dividing cells and simultaneous identification of cell surface markers. Although a certain degree of variability was observed among different donors, after 6 days of in vitro stimulation BCG-vaccinated subjects displayed, as a mean, a stronger blastogenic response to all the classes of antigens compared with non-sensitized ones. PPD, culture filtrates and membrane antigens induced a predominant proliferation of CD4+ T cells. In contrast, preparations enriched in cytosolic antigens elicited strong proliferation of γδ+ T cells which, as a mean, represented 55% of the proliferating cells. Although to a lesser extent, proliferation of γδ+ T cells was also elicited by preparations enriched in membrane and cell wall antigens. In response to the latter preparation proliferation of CD4+ T cells and CD16+/CD3− (natural killer (NK)) cells was observed, as well. In particular, cell wall antigens were found to induce significantly higher levels of proliferation of NK cells compared with all the other classes of antigens. PMID:10632662

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Najiah, M; Lee, K L; Noorasikin, H; Nadirah, M; Lee, S W

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacteriosis due to mycobacteria is one of the most common bacterial diseases in ornamental fish. We describe here the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. using ATCC Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae as references. A total of four isolates (M1, M2, M3, M4) were obtained from four out of 106 fish samples using selective agar, and identified to Mycobacterium genus using acid-fast staining and 16s rRNA gene-based genus specific polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing and NCBI-BLAST analysis further identified isolate M1 as M. marinum and isolates M2, M3, M4 as M. fortuitum. Morphological, physiological and biochemical tests were carried out for phenotypic characterizations. Universal M13 and wild-type phage M13 RAPD dendogram was generated to illustrate the genetic relationship of the isolates and reference strains.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Najiah, M; Lee, K L; Noorasikin, H; Nadirah, M; Lee, S W

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacteriosis due to mycobacteria is one of the most common bacterial diseases in ornamental fish. We describe here the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. using ATCC Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae as references. A total of four isolates (M1, M2, M3, M4) were obtained from four out of 106 fish samples using selective agar, and identified to Mycobacterium genus using acid-fast staining and 16s rRNA gene-based genus specific polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing and NCBI-BLAST analysis further identified isolate M1 as M. marinum and isolates M2, M3, M4 as M. fortuitum. Morphological, physiological and biochemical tests were carried out for phenotypic characterizations. Universal M13 and wild-type phage M13 RAPD dendogram was generated to illustrate the genetic relationship of the isolates and reference strains. PMID:20971487

  18. Mycobacterium chelonae Is an Ubiquitous Atypical Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Gameiro, Ana; Ramos, Leonor; Cardoso, José Carlos; Brites, Maria Manuel; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2015-01-01

    The type of cutaneous infection varies mainly according to the patient's immune status, and the disseminated form is mostly found in the context of immunosuppression. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who was under long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy and presented with a 7-month history of multiple painless cutaneous lesions at various stages of development: papules, nodules, pustules and hemorrhagic crusts, as well as small erosions and ulcers distributed over the limbs and scalp. Cutaneous biopsy showed a suppurative granulomatous infiltrate with abscess formation. Fite stain revealed numerous extracellular bacilli, suggesting mycobacterial infection, particularly by atypical mycobacteria. Culture of a skin sample revealed Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient started multidrug therapy and showed clinical improvement despite of resistance to one of the antibiotics. This striking presentation underlines the role of immunosuppression with corticotherapy as a major risk factor for these infections. Multidrug therapy is advised and antibiogram is essential in directing treatment. PMID:26351432

  19. Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay and GenoType MTBDRplus DNA Probes for Detection of Mutations Associated with Rifampicin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Arfatur; Sahrin, Mahfuza; Afrin, Sadia; Earley, Keith; Ahmed, Shahriar; Rahman, S. M. Mazidur; Banu, Sayera

    2016-01-01

    Background GeneXpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) and Genotype MTBDRplus (DRplus) are two World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed probe based molecular drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods for rapid diagnosis of drug resistant tuberculosis. Both methods target the same 81 bp Rifampicin Resistance Determining Region (RRDR) of bacterial RNA polymerase β subunit (rpoB) for detection of Rifampicin (RIF) resistance associated mutations using DNA probes. So there is a correspondence of the probes of each other and expected similarity of probe binding. Methods We analyzed 92 sputum specimens by Xpert, DRplus and LJ proportion method (LJ-DST). We compared molecular DSTs with gold standard LJ-DST. We wanted to see the agreement level of two molecular methods for detection of RIF resistance associated mutations. The 81bp RRDR region of rpoB gene of discrepant cases between the two molecular methods was sequenced by Sanger sequencing. Results The agreement of Xpert and DRplus with LJ-DST for detection of RIF susceptibility was found to be 93.5% and 92.4%, respectively. We also found 92.4% overall agreement of two molecular methods for the detection of RIF susceptibility. A total of 84 out of 92 samples (91.3%) had agreement on the molecular locus of RRDR mutation by DRplus and Xpert. Sanger sequencing of 81bp RRDR revealed that Xpert probes detected seven of eight discrepant cases correctly and DRplus was erroneous in all the eight cases. Conclusion Although the overall concordance with LJ-DST was similar for both Xpert and DRplus assay, Xpert demonstrated more accuracy in the detection of RIF susceptibility for discrepant isolates compared with DRplus. This observation would be helpful for the improvement of probe based detection of drug resistance associated mutations especially rpoB mutation in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27054344

  20. Genotypic characteristics of a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata and striped jack Pseudocaranx dentex in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Sugiura, Hidehiro; Hashida, Yumiko; Hatai, Kishio; Oshima, Syun-ichirou; Daibata, Masanori; Kawai, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, a Mycobacterium marinum-like mycobacterium was isolated from the yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata. The species was identified as M. marinum by a commercial mycobacterial DNA-DNA hybridization kit. Nevertheless, PCR restriction analysis of the DNA of its RNA polymerase β-subunit gene definitively showed that this Mycobacterium sp. was M. ulcerans. PCR analysis revealed the genotypic characteristics of M. ulcerans in the Mycobacterium sp., only the mup053 gene sequence being absent, as has been found previously in other piscine mycobacteria such as M. marinum strains DL240490 and DL045 and M. pseudoshottsii. With one exception, this Mycobacterium sp. and M. pseudoshottsii had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, which is also probably true of M. marinum strains DL240490 and DL045. Similarly, according to comparisons of the 16S rRNA gene, ITS region, and hsp65 gene sequences, this Mycobacterium sp. is more closely related to M. pseudoshottsii than to M. ulcerans or M. marinum. A PCR product of approximately 2000 bp was amplified from region of difference 9 in the Mycobacterium sp. The nucleotide sequence revealed insertion of IS2404, the sequence of which is 1366 bp long. The novel single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in this region distinguished this Mycobacterium sp. from M. marinum strain DL240490 and M. pseudoshottsii. The present findings raise the possibility that these species have a common ancestor. Further studies are required to improve our understanding of the relationship between their geographical origin and genetic diversity. PMID:23043488

  1. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis.

  2. Nanobiotechnological approaches to delivery of DNA vaccine against fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A M; Souza, A C O; Amaral, A C; Vasconcelos, N M; Jeronimo, M S; Carneiro, F P; Faccioli, L H; Felipe, M S S; Silva, C L; Bocca, A L

    2013-02-01

    Vaccines play an essential role in keeping humans healthy. Innovative approaches to their use include the utilization of plasmid DNA encoding sequences to express foreign antigens. DNAhsp65 from Mycobacterium leprae is suitable for this purpose due to its ability to elicit a powerful immune response. Controlled release systems represent a promising approach to delivering vaccines. In this work, we used liposomes or PLGA systems to deliver DNAhsp65 to treat the pulmonary fungal infection Paracoccidioidomycosis. Both formulations modulated a protective immune response and reduced the pulmonary fungal burden even in the groups receiving less than four times the amount of the DNAhps65 entrapped within the nanoparticles. Although both systems had the same effective therapeutic results, the advantage of the liposome formulation was that it was administered intranasally, which may be more easily accepted by patients. These systems are a great alternative to be considered as adjuvant vaccine therapy for systemic mycosis.

  3. A Cutaneous Ulcer Resulting from Mycobacterium ulcerans—Leishmania braziliensis Coinfection in South America

    PubMed Central

    Mougin, Benjamin; Avenel-Audran, Martine; Hasseine, Lilia; Martin, Ludovic; Cottin, Jane; Pomares, Christelle; Delaunay, Pascal; Marty, Pierre; Ravel, Christophe; Chabasse, Dominique; Abgueguen, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Its mode of transmission is not yet clearly understood. We report here a cutaneous ulcer in a European traveler in South America resulting from a coinfection detected specifically for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Leishmania braziliensis DNA with real-time polymerase chain reaction. This observation of a unique cutaneous ulcer raises the issue about possible modes of transmission of those two pathogens by the same vector. PMID:22049045

  4. Genetic regulation of vesiculogenesis and immunomodulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Poonam; Huang, Chengdong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Tianzhi; Li, Huilin; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Elemento, Olivier; Casadevall, Arturo; Nathan, Carl F.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) restrains immune responses well enough to escape eradication but elicits enough immunopathology to ensure its transmission. Here we provide evidence that this host–pathogen relationship is regulated in part by a cytosolic, membrane-associated protein with a unique structural fold, encoded by the Mtb gene rv0431. The protein acts by regulating the quantity of Mtb-derived membrane vesicles bearing Toll-like receptor 2 ligands, including the lipoproteins LpqH and SodC. We propose that rv0431 be named “vesiculogenesis and immune response regulator.” PMID:24248369

  5. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  6. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by m-AMSA, a eukaryotic type II topoisomerase poison.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-18

    m-AMSA, an established inhibitor of eukaryotic type II topoisomerases, exerts its cidal effect by binding to the enzyme-DNA complex thus inhibiting the DNA religation step. The molecule and its analogues have been successfully used as chemotherapeutic agents against different forms of cancer. After virtual screening using a homology model of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I, we identified m-AMSA as a high scoring hit. We demonstrate that m-AMSA can inhibit the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase I from M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. In a whole cell assay, m-AMSA inhibited the growth of both the mycobacteria.

  7. Optimization of a Whole-Blood Gamma Interferon Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigens of Mycobacterium bovis elicit a cell-mediated immune response upon intradermalinjection in cattle. In vitro, such antigens stimulate the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma by bovine T-cells in whole blood culture (IFN-gamma assay). We have analyzed various parameters of the in vitro IFN-g...

  8. Toxoplasma gondii: Vaccination with a DNA vaccine encoding T- and B-cell epitopes of SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 elicits protection against acute toxoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Aiping; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Xun; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Qunli; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Huaiyu

    2015-11-27

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate, intracellular, protozoan parasite that infects large variety of warm-blooded animals including humans, livestock, and marine mammals, and causes the disease toxoplasmosis. Although T. gondii infection rates differ significantly from country to country, it still has a high morbidity and mortality. In these circumstances, developing an effective vaccine against T. gondii is urgently needed for preventing and treating toxoplasmosis. The aim of this study was to construct a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine and evaluate the immune protective efficacy against acute toxoplasmosis in mice. Therefore, twelve T- and B-cell epitopes from SAG1, GRA2, GRA7 and ROP16 of T. gondii were predicted by bioinformatics analysis, and then a multi-epitopes DNA vaccine was constructed. Mice immunized with the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine gained higher levels of IgG titers and IgG2a subclass titers, significant production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), percentage of T lymphocyte subsets, and longer survival times against the acute infection of T. gondii compared with those of mice administered with empty plasmid and those in control groups. Furthermore, a genetic adjuvant pEGFP-RANTES (pRANTES) could enhance the efficacy of the multi-epitopes DNA vaccine associating with humoral and cellular (Th1, CD8(+) T cell) immune responses. Above all, the DNA vaccine and the genetic adjuvant revealed in this study might be new candidates for further vaccine development against T. gondii infection.

  9. Zirconia based nucleic acid sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Maumita; Sumana, Gajjala; Nagarajan, R.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconium oxide (ZrO2) film (particle size˜35 nm), electrochemically deposited onto gold(Au) surface, has been used to immobilize 21-mer oligonucleotide probe (ssDNA) specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by utilizing affinity between oxygen atom of phosphoric group and zirconium to fabricate DNA biosensor. This DNA-ZrO2/Au bioelectrode, characterized using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques, can be used for early and rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis with detection limit of 0.065 ng/μL within 60s.

  10. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  11. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection. PMID:27363904

  12. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  13. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  14. Identification and pathogenicity analysis of a novel non-tuberculous mycobacterium clinical isolate with nine-antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z-Y; Sun, Z-Q; Wang, Z-L; Hu, H-R; Wen, Z-L; Song, Y-Z; Zhao, J-W; Wang, H-H; Guo, X-K; Zhang, S-L

    2013-01-01

    With mycobacteriosis increasing, the study of non-tuberculous mycobacteria is imperative for clinical therapy and management. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are naturally resistant to most anti-tuberculosis drugs. Accordingly, it is important to decipher the biology of the novel non-tuberculous mycobacteria through complete genomic analysis of novel pathogenic mycobacteria. We describe Mycobacterium sinense JDM601, a novel, slow-growing mycobacterium of the Mycobacterium terrae complex resistant to nine antibiotics, by clinical presentation, cultural and biochemical characteristics, minimal inhibitory concentrations, and genome-sequencing analysis. JDM601 is closest to Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum according to mycolic acid composition, but closest to Mycobacterium algericum sp. nov according to 16S rDNA. JDM601 is resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, euteropas, protionamide, capromycin, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and levofloxacin but not ethambutol. The clinical information, mycolic acid composition, and virulence genes indicate that JDM601 is an opportunistic pathogen.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, Iñaki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention. PMID:25988174

  16. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Johnson, R. Christian; Phillips, Richard; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Portaels, Françoise; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is an important health problem in several west African countries. It is prevalent in scattered foci around the world, predominantly in riverine areas with a humid, hot climate. We review the epidemiology, bacteriology, transmission, immunology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of infections. M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. The mode of transmission is unknown. Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, particularly on the limbs. Spontaneous healing may occur. Many patients in endemic areas present late with advanced, severe lesions. BCG vaccination yields a limited, relatively short-lived, immune protection. Recommended treatment consists of surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting if necessary. Many patients have functional limitations after healing. Better understanding of disease transmission and pathogenesis is needed for improved control and prevention of Buruli ulcer. PMID:16283056

  17. Outer Membrane Vesicles from the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the Commensal ECOR12 Enter Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Elicit Differential Effects on DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Fábrega, María-José; Toloza, Lorena; Baldomà, Laura; Badia, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal microbiota and the human host are complex. The gut mucosal surface is covered by a mucin layer that prevents bacteria from accessing the epithelial cells. Thus, the crosstalk between microbiota and the host mainly rely on secreted factors that can go through the mucus layer and reach the epithelium. In this context, vesicles released by commensal strains are seen as key players in signaling processes in the intestinal mucosa. Studies with Gram-negative pathogens showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are internalized into the host cell by endocytosis, but the entry mechanism for microbiota-derived vesicles is unknown. Escherichia coli strains are found as part of normal human gut microbiota. In this work, we elucidate the pathway that mediate internalization of OMVs from the probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the commensal ECOR12 strains in several human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Time course measurement of fluorescence and microscopy analysis performed with rhodamine B-R18-labeled OMVs in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors showed that OMVs from these strains enter epithelial cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Vesicles use the same endocytosis pathway in polarized epithelial monolayers. Internalized OMVs are sorted to lysosomal compartments as shown by their colocalization with clathrin and specific markers of endosomes and lysosomes. OMVs from both strains did not affect cell viability, but reduce proliferation of HT-29 cells. Labeling of 8-oxo-dG adducts in DNA revealed that neither OMVs from EcN nor from ECOR12 promoted oxidative DNA damage. In contrast, flow cytometry analysis of phosphorylated γH2AX evidenced that OMVs from the probiotic EcN significantly produced more double strand breaks in DNA than ECOR12 OMVs. The EcN genotoxic effects have been attributed to the synthesis of colibactin. However, it is not known how colibactin is exported and delivered into host cells. Whether colibactin is secreted

  18. Outer Membrane Vesicles from the Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and the Commensal ECOR12 Enter Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Clathrin-Dependent Endocytosis and Elicit Differential Effects on DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, María-Alexandra; Giménez, Rosa; Fábrega, María-José; Toloza, Lorena; Badia, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal microbiota and the human host are complex. The gut mucosal surface is covered by a mucin layer that prevents bacteria from accessing the epithelial cells. Thus, the crosstalk between microbiota and the host mainly rely on secreted factors that can go through the mucus layer and reach the epithelium. In this context, vesicles released by commensal strains are seen as key players in signaling processes in the intestinal mucosa. Studies with Gram-negative pathogens showed that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are internalized into the host cell by endocytosis, but the entry mechanism for microbiota-derived vesicles is unknown. Escherichia coli strains are found as part of normal human gut microbiota. In this work, we elucidate the pathway that mediate internalization of OMVs from the probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and the commensal ECOR12 strains in several human intestinal epithelial cell lines. Time course measurement of fluorescence and microscopy analysis performed with rhodamine B-R18-labeled OMVs in the presence of endocytosis inhibitors showed that OMVs from these strains enter epithelial cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Vesicles use the same endocytosis pathway in polarized epithelial monolayers. Internalized OMVs are sorted to lysosomal compartments as shown by their colocalization with clathrin and specific markers of endosomes and lysosomes. OMVs from both strains did not affect cell viability, but reduce proliferation of HT-29 cells. Labeling of 8-oxo-dG adducts in DNA revealed that neither OMVs from EcN nor from ECOR12 promoted oxidative DNA damage. In contrast, flow cytometry analysis of phosphorylated γH2AX evidenced that OMVs from the probiotic EcN significantly produced more double strand breaks in DNA than ECOR12 OMVs. The EcN genotoxic effects have been attributed to the synthesis of colibactin. However, it is not known how colibactin is exported and delivered into host cells. Whether colibactin is secreted

  19. Cyclophilin A as a potential genetic adjuvant to improve HIV-1 Gag DNA vaccine immunogenicity by eliciting broad and long-term Gag-specific cellular immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jue; Zhang, Qicheng; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Shuhui; Li, Dan; Liu, Chang; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that host Cyclophilin A (CyPA) can promote dendritic cell maturation and the subsequent innate immune response when incorporated into an HIV-1 Gag protein to circumvent the resistance of dendritic cells to HIV-1 infection. This led us to hypothesize that CyPA may improve HIV-1 Gag-specific vaccine immunogenicity via binding with Gag antigen. The adjuvant effect of CyPA was evaluated using a DNA vaccine with single or dual expression cassettes. Mouse studies indicated that CyPA specifically and markedly promoted HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity but not an HIV-1 Env-specific cellular response. The Gag/CyPA dual expression cassettes stimulated a greater Gag-specific cellular immune response, than Gag immunization alone. Furthermore, CyPA induced a broad Gag-specific T cell response and strong cellular immunity that lasted up to 5 months. In addition, CyPA skewed to cellular rather than humoral immunity. To investigate the mechanisms of the adjuvant effect, site-directed mutagenesis in CyPA, including active site residues H54Q and F60A resulted in mutants that were co-expressed with Gag in dual cassettes. The immune response to this vaccine was analyzed in vivo. Interestingly, the wild type CyPA markedly increased Gag cellular immunity, but the H54Q and F60A mutants drastically reduced CyPA adjuvant activation. Therefore, we suggest that the adjuvant effect of CyPA was based on Gag-CyPA-specific interactions. Herein, we report that Cyclophilin A can augment HIV-1 Gag-specific cellular immunity as a genetic adjuvant in multiplex DNA immunization strategies, and that activity of this adjuvant is specific, broad, long-term, and based on Gag-CyPA interaction. PMID:26305669

  20. Internalization of Mycobacterium shottsii and Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii by Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tuhina; Fine-Coulson, Kari; Karls, Russell; Gauthier, David; Quinn, Frederick

    2013-08-01

    Amoebae serve as environmental hosts to a variety of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium marinum. Mycobacterium shottsii and Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii are waterborne species isolated from the spleens and dermal lesions of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from the Chesapeake Bay. The optimal growth temperature for these fish isolates is 25 °C. In the present study, amoebae were examined as a potential environmental reservoir for these fish pathogens. Several studies demonstrated that M. avium bacilli replicate within the trophozoite stage and reside in large numbers within the cytosol of the cyst of the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Results from the present study showed that M. shottsii, M. pseudoshottsii, and M. marinum bacilli were internalized by A. polyphaga trophozoites within 6 h but that intracellular viability decreased by 2 to 3 logs over 10 days. While an average of 25 M. marinum bacilli were identified by electron microscopy in the cytosol of the cyst, <5 M. pseudoshottsii and no M. shottsii bacilli were observed in this location. All Mycobacterium species examined remained viable but did not replicate after encystment and subsequent 48 h incubation in 4% HCl. This concentration of HCl will kill mycobacteria but will not enter amoebal cysts. Bacterial viability studies within stages of the amoeba life cycle indicate fewer M. shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii bacilli within the trophozoite and cyst stages relative to M. marinum. PMID:23899000

  1. [Infections due to Mycobacterium marinum: a review].

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Klapper, B-M; Mayser, P; Paasch, U; Handrick, W

    2011-04-01

    Mycobacterium marinum belongs to the non-tuberculous or "atypical" mycobacteria. The reservoirs for these ubiquitous and slowly growing bacteria are both fresh water and salt water. In particular, aquaria should be considered as important source of hobby-related infections especially of fingers, hands and forearms. Affected are both immunosuppressed patients and persons with an intact immune system. Distinctive are erythematous plaques and nodules with tendency for hyperkeratosis, crusting, and superficial ulcerations, sometimes as sporotrichoid lymphocutaneous infection. The histology shows non-caseation granulomas containing epithelioid cells and Langhans giant cells. Using the Ziehl Neelsen staining, typical acid-fast rods are not always detectable. The molecular biological detection of mycobacterial DNA using polymerase chain reaction represents the standard method of diagnosis. Cryotherapy is frequently used as first treatment. For the often long-term tuberculostatic therapy, rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin are the most used agents.

  2. [Construction of fusion gene vaccine of WT1 multi-epitope fused with stimulating epitope of mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 and its expression and immunogenicity].

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei-Wei; Qiao, Zhen-Hua; Yang, Lin-Hua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Tang, Yan-Hong; Bian, Si-Cheng

    2011-04-01

    This study was purposed to construct a fusion DNA vaccine containing WT1 multi-epitope and stimulating epitope of mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 and to detect its expression and immunogenicity. On the basis of published data, a multi-epitope gene (Multi-WT1) containing three HLA *0201-restricted CTL epitopes: one HLA*2402-restricted CTL epitope, two Th epitopes and one universal Th Pan-DR epitope (PADRE) was constructed. DNA-coding sequence was modified by Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to optimize proteasome-mediated epitope processing through the introduction of different amino acid spacer sequences. The synthetic nucleotide sequence was then inserted into an eukaryotic vector to construct the plasmid pcDNA3.1-WT1.For enhancing CTL activity, HSP70 fragment including stimulatory domain P407-426 was amplified by PCR from mycobacterial HSP70 gene and cloned into pcDNA3.1(+). Then Multi-WT1 was fused to the N-terminal of pcDNA3.1-mHSP70(407-426) to make the multi-epitope fusion gene vaccine pcDNA3.1-WT1-mHSP70(407-426). HEK-293T cells were transfected with this vaccine and the expressed product was identified by RT-PCR. Enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) was used to evaluate the immunological responses elicited by vaccine. The results showed that the most of WT1 epitopes could be correctly cleaved which was confirmed by software Net Chop 3.1 and PAPROCIanalysis. RT-PCR showed correct expression of target gene in HEK293T cells and ELISPOT showed specific T-cell responses. It is concluded that the eukaryotic expression vector PcDNA3.1-WT1-mHSP70(407-426) fusion gene has been successfully constructed and the immunity response is also elicited, which is a good candidate for further research of DNA vaccine.

  3. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  4. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants.

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Segura, Erika; Acero, Gonzalo; Palma, José P; Espitia, Clara; Manoutcharian, Karen; López-Marín, Luz M

    2005-04-15

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed.

  5. Detection of Mycobacterium gilvum first time from the bathing water of leprosy patient from Purulia, West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Turankar, Ravindra; Singh, Itu; Nigam, Astha; Sengupta, Utpal

    2014-12-01

    In this present study for the first time the authors are reporting the isolation of Mycobacterium gilvum from the accumulated water in the drain connected to the bathing place of leprosy patients residing in an endemic region. The identification and characterization of this isolate was carried out by various conventional and molecular tests, including 16S rDNA sequencing. These findings might shed further light and association with amoeba in the leprosy endemic area of this rare Mycobacterium species. PMID:26786629

  6. Vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium leprae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N B; Lowe, A C; Rees, R J; Colston, M J

    1989-01-01

    Intradermal immunization with killed Mycobacterium leprae renders mice immune to infection with viable M. leprae. This protection is long lasting and systemic in that immunization in the left flank results in protection in both the left and right footpads. Immunization with Mycobacterium vaccae was ineffective in protecting mice against M. leprae infection, while Mycobacterium bovis BCG provided partial protection. Mycobacterium habana TMC 5135 (now known as Mycobacterium simiae) was found to be as effective as M. leprae in protecting mice against footpad infection. PMID:2643581

  7. Safety and Immunogenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis {Delta}lysA {Delta}panCD Vaccine in Domestic Cats Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)+ and FIV- cats (n = 4/group) received 2 x 10**6 cfu Mycobacterium tuberculosis Delta-lysA Delta-panCD intramuscularly. Vaccination elicited antibody responses; albeit, at lower levels in FIV+ cats as compared to FIV- cats. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses ...

  8. An efficient alternative marker for specific identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianing; Wang, Yiwei; Li, Dairong; Liu, Jiawen; Zhang, Xuemei; He, Yujuan; Wang, Hong; Cao, Ju; Yin, Yibing; Xu, Wenchun

    2014-08-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria to the species level is important to provide epidemiological information and to guide the appropriate treatment, especially identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) which is the leading pathogen causing tuberculosis. The genetic marker named as Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific sequence 90 (mtss90) was screened by a bioinformatics software and verified by a series of experiments. To test its specificity, 266 strains of microorganisms and human cells were used for the mtss90 conventional PCR method. Moreover, the efficiency of mtss90 was evaluated by comparing 16S rDNA (Mycobacterium genus-specific), IS6110 (specific identification of MTB complex), mtp40 (MTB-specific) and PNB/TCH method (traditional bacteriology testing) in Mycobacterium strains. All MTB isolates were mtss90 positive. No amplification was observed from any other tested strains with M. microti as an exception. Compared with the traditional PNB/TCH method, the coincidence rate was 99.1 % (233/235). All of the mtss90 positive strains were IS6110 and 16S rDNA positive, indicating a 100 % coincidence rate (216/216) between mtss90 and these two genetic markers. Additionally, mtss90 had a better specificity than mtp40 in the identification of MTB. Lastly, a real-time PCR diagnostic assay was developed for the rapid identification of MTB. In conclusion, mtss90 may be an efficient alternative marker for species-specific identification of MTB and could be used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis combined with other genetic markers.

  9. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Sheep Isolate 397 Reveals Striking Differences Among a Genetically Homogeneous Subspecies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is remarkably homogeneous among the bovine, human and wildlife isolates. However previous work in our labs using genomic DNA hybridizations with the bovine K-10 DNA microarray has revealed substantial differences in sheep isolates. A dr...

  10. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  11. Outbreak of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections after permanent makeup of the eyebrows.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, Stefano; Morisod, Benoit; Edney, Timothy; Odman, Micaela; Genné, Daniel; Malinverni, Raffaele; Hammann, Catherine; Musumeci, Enrico; Voide, Cathy; Greub, Gilbert; Masserey, Eric; Bille, Jacques; Cavassini, Matthias; Jaton, Katia

    2011-02-15

    We report a Mycobacterium haemophilum outbreak after permanent make-up of the eyebrows performed by the same freelance artist. Twelve patients presented an eyebrow lesion and cervical lymphadenitis. All were treated with antibiotics. Surgery was required in 10 cases. M. haemophilum DNA was identified in the make-up ink.

  12. Outbreak of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections after permanent makeup of the eyebrows.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, Stefano; Morisod, Benoit; Edney, Timothy; Odman, Micaela; Genné, Daniel; Malinverni, Raffaele; Hammann, Catherine; Musumeci, Enrico; Voide, Cathy; Greub, Gilbert; Masserey, Eric; Bille, Jacques; Cavassini, Matthias; Jaton, Katia

    2011-02-15

    We report a Mycobacterium haemophilum outbreak after permanent make-up of the eyebrows performed by the same freelance artist. Twelve patients presented an eyebrow lesion and cervical lymphadenitis. All were treated with antibiotics. Surgery was required in 10 cases. M. haemophilum DNA was identified in the make-up ink. PMID:21258102

  13. Rapid and accurate identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and common non-tuberculous mycobacteria by multiplex real-time PCR targeting different housekeeping genes.

    PubMed

    Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Rezaei Yazdi, Hadi; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of mycobacteria isolates from primary culture is important due to timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy. Conventional methods for identification of Mycobacterium species based on biochemical tests needs several weeks and may remain inconclusive. In this study, a novel multiplex real-time PCR was developed for rapid identification of Mycobacterium genus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and the most common non-tuberculosis mycobacteria species including M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and the M. gordonae in three reaction tubes but under same PCR condition. Genetic targets for primer designing included the 16S rDNA gene, the dnaJ gene, the gyrB gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Multiplex real-time PCR was setup with reference Mycobacterium strains and was subsequently tested with 66 clinical isolates. Results of multiplex real-time PCR were analyzed with melting curves and melting temperature (T (m)) of Mycobacterium genus, MTC, and each of non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species were determined. Multiplex real-time PCR results were compared with amplification and sequencing of 16S-23S rDNA ITS for identification of Mycobacterium species. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primers were each 100 % for MTC, M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, M. avium complex, M. kansasii, and M. gordonae. Sensitivity and specificity of designed primer for genus Mycobacterium was 96 and 100 %, respectively. According to the obtained results, we conclude that this multiplex real-time PCR with melting curve analysis and these novel primers can be used for rapid and accurate identification of genus Mycobacterium, MTC, and the most common non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium species.

  14. Proposal that Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium bolletii be united and reclassified as Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov., designation of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus subsp. nov. and emended description of Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Leao, Sylvia Cardoso; Tortoli, Enrico; Euzéby, Jean Paul; Garcia, Maria Jesus

    2011-09-01

    The names 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus' and 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense', proposed by Leao et al. (2009, J Clin Microbiol 47, 2691-2698), cannot be validly published. The purpose of this report is to provide a description in accordance with the Rules of the Bacteriological Code (1990 Revision). Moreover, the proposal of the name 'Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense' is contrary to Rule 38 and the correct name of this taxon, at the rank of subspecies, is Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov. A description of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus subsp. nov. and an emended description of Mycobacterium abscessus are also given. PMID:21037035

  15. Mycobacterium bovis Infection, Lyon, France

    PubMed Central

    Pichat, Catherine; Carret, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    In a 5-year retrospective study, we used spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units to type 13 strains of Mycobacterium bovis isolated from human sources. Despite the relatively high incidence of human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis (2%), these tools showed no clonal evolution and no relationships between the isolates. PMID:17073096

  16. Ectoine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Naomi; Wishkautzan, Marina; Meijler, Michael; Wang, Ying; Speer, Alexander; Niederweis, Michael; Gur, Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a commonly used mycobacterial model system. Here, we show that M. smegmatis protects itself against elevated salinity by synthesizing ectoine and hydroxyectoine and characterize the phenotype of a nonproducing mutant. This is the first analysis of M. smegmatis halotolerance and of the molecular mechanism that supports it.

  17. Oral vaccination with heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis activates the complement system to protect against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; de la Fuente, José; Garrido, Joseba M; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar.

  18. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  19. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  20. Insights into redox sensing metalloproteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chim, Nicholas; Johnson, Parker M; Goulding, Celia W

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for evading assault by the human host. This review focuses on M. tuberculosis regulatory metalloproteins that are sensitive to exogenous stresses attributed to changes in the levels of gaseous molecules (i.e., molecular oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide) to elicit an intracellular response. In particular, we highlight recent developments on the subfamily of Whi proteins, redox sensing WhiB-like proteins that contain iron-sulfur clusters, sigma factors and their cognate anti-sigma factors of which some are zinc-regulated, and the dormancy survival regulon DosS/DosT-DosR heme sensory system. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that these systems contribute to a highly complex and interrelated regulatory network that controls M. tuberculosis biology. This review concludes with a discussion of strategies that M. tuberculosis has developed to maintain redox homeostasis, including mechanisms to regulate endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide levels.

  1. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  2. Support from Phylogenomic Networks and Subspecies Signatures for Separation of Mycobacterium massiliense from Mycobacterium bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Joon Liang; Choo, Siew Woh

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies classification has important clinical implications. We used phylogenomic network and amino acid analyses to provide evidence for the separation of Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense into two distinct subspecies which can potentially be differentiated rapidly by their protein signatures. PMID:26157149

  3. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  4. Combination of multiplex PCR with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography for rapid detection of Mycobacterium genus and simultaneous identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Shen, Xiao-Bing; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Duan, Yan-Yu; Liu, Zhi-Ling; Wu, Xiao-Wei; Zhu, Dao-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    A new assay with the combination of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis was developed for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus and identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Targeting at genus-specific 16S rRNA sequence of Mycobacterium and specific insertion elements IS6110 and IS1081 of MTC, the assay was validated with 84 strains covering 23 mycobacteria species and 30 strains of non-mycobacteria species. No cross reactivity was observed. Clinical application was carried out on 198 specimens (155 human sputum and 43 bovine tissue samples) and compared with culture. The multiplex assay detected all culture-positive (36 in number) and 35.2% (57/162) culture-negative specimens. The molecular assay was fast that could be completed within 1 h on purified DNA, with the limit of detection as 0.8-1.6 pg per reaction on DNA template. This work provided a useful laboratory tool for rapid identification of Mycobacterium and differentiation of MTC and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

  5. Quantitative PCR assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and application to environmental samples and fishes from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Reece, K S; Xiao, J; Rhodes, M W; Kator, H I; Latour, R J; Bonzek, C F; Hoenig, J M; Vogelbein, W K

    2010-09-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass. PMID:20656856

  6. Quantitative PCR assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and application to environmental samples and fishes from the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Reece, K S; Xiao, J; Rhodes, M W; Kator, H I; Latour, R J; Bonzek, C F; Hoenig, J M; Vogelbein, W K

    2010-09-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass.

  7. Genome-wide comparison of medieval and modern Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Singh, Pushpendra; Mendum, Thomas A; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Jäger, Günter; Bos, Kirsten I; Herbig, Alexander; Economou, Christos; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Nebel, Almut; Boldsen, Jesper L; Kjellström, Anna; Wu, Huihai; Stewart, Graham R; Taylor, G Michael; Bauer, Peter; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tucker, Katie; Roffey, Simon; Sow, Samba O; Cole, Stewart T; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes

    2013-07-12

    Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.

  8. Binding of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare to human leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, A; Wright, S D

    1990-01-01

    We examined nonopsonic binding of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare (MAI) by human leukocytes. Macrophages (M phi) avidly bound fluorescently labeled MAI in the absence of serum proteins. Binding appeared to be mediated by a lineage-specific, proteinaceous receptor on M phi, since (i) binding of labeled bacteria could be competitively inhibited by unlabeled MAI, (ii) treatment of M phi with trypsin ablated the ability of M phi to bind MAI, and (iii) the capacity to bind MAI was observed on monocytes, M phi, and stimulated polymorphonuclear cells but not on lymphocytes or unstimulated polymorphonuclear cells. The receptor for MAI appeared mobile in the plane of the membrane, since spreading of M phi on a carpet of immobilized, unlabeled MAI down modulated binding of labeled MAI added in suspension. The receptor required neither calcium nor magnesium for activity and appeared different from other known receptors for intracellular pathogens. Images PMID:2387629

  9. Global Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Analysis: Insights into Tuberculosis Evolution, Phylogenetic Accuracy of Other DNA Fingerprinting Systems, and Recommendations for a Minimal Standard SNP Set†

    PubMed Central

    Filliol, Ingrid; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Cavatore, Magali; Qi, Weihong; Hazbón, Manzour Hernando; Bobadilla del Valle, Miriam; Fyfe, Janet; García-García, Lourdes; Rastogi, Nalin; Sola, Christophe; Zozio, Thierry; Guerrero, Marta Inírida; León, Clara Inés; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Sam; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Durmaz, Riza; Joloba, Moses L.; Rendón, Adrian; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce de León, Alfredo; Cave, M. Donald; Fleischmann, Robert; Whittam, Thomas S.; Alland, David

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed a global collection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains using 212 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. SNP nucleotide diversity was high (average across all SNPs, 0.19), and 96% of the SNP locus pairs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. Cluster analyses identified six deeply branching, phylogenetically distinct SNP cluster groups (SCGs) and five subgroups. The SCGs were strongly associated with the geographical origin of the M. tuberculosis samples and the birthplace of the human hosts. The most ancestral cluster (SCG-1) predominated in patients from the Indian subcontinent, while SCG-1 and another ancestral cluster (SCG-2) predominated in patients from East Asia, suggesting that M. tuberculosis first arose in the Indian subcontinent and spread worldwide through East Asia. Restricted SCG diversity and the prevalence of less ancestral SCGs in indigenous populations in Uganda and Mexico suggested a more recent introduction of M. tuberculosis into these regions. The East African Indian and Beijing spoligotypes were concordant with SCG-1 and SCG-2, respectively; X and Central Asian spoligotypes were also associated with one SCG or subgroup combination. Other clades had less consistent associations with SCGs. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) analysis provided less robust phylogenetic information, and only 6 of the 12 MIRU microsatellite loci were highly differentiated between SCGs as measured by GST. Finally, an algorithm was devised to identify two minimal sets of either 45 or 6 SNPs that could be used in future investigations to enable global collaborations for studies on evolution, strain differentiation, and biological differences of M. tuberculosis. PMID:16385065

  10. Mycobacterium bovis infection in a horse with granulomatous enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Sarradell, Javier E; Alvarez, Julio; Biscia, Mariana; Zumarraga, Martin; Wunschmann, Arno; Armien, Anibal G; Perez, Andres M

    2015-03-01

    A 2-year-old dappled Percheron horse had a wasting condition that did not respond to antibiotic treatments and ultimately resulted in death. Thickening of the wall of the large colon and enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes were observed at postmortem examination, along with the presence of pinpoint whitish foci in the liver. Microscopic examination of affected tissues revealed diffuse chronic granulomatous enterocolitis, granulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis, and multifocal granulomatous hepatitis. The DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded intestinal and lymph node samples was analyzed using both a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and PCR-restriction endonuclease analysis and demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium bovis.

  11. Co-infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae in human archaeological samples: a possible explanation for the historical decline of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Helen D.; Marcsik, Antónia; Matheson, Carney; Vernon, Kim; Nuorala, Emilia; Molto, Joseph E.; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Spigelman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe during the first millennium but thereafter leprosy declined. It is not known why this occurred, but one suggestion is that cross-immunity protected tuberculosis patients from leprosy. To investigate any relationship between the two diseases, selected archaeological samples, dating from the Roman period to the thirteenth century, were examined for both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA, using PCR. The work was carried out and verified in geographically separate and independent laboratories. Several specimens with palaeopathological signs of leprosy were found to contain DNA from both pathogens, indicating that these diseases coexisted in the past. We suggest that the immunological changes found in multi-bacillary leprosy, in association with the socio-economic impact on those suffering from the disease, led to increased mortality from tuberculosis and therefore to the historical decline in leprosy. PMID:15734693

  12. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  13. Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Lepra bacilli.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, L; Kim, K S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that certain key markers of lepra bacilli reside collectively in Proprionibacterium acnes, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Mycobacterium leprae. The unrestricted replication of Mycobacterium leprae depends most probably upon the presence of an immune-deficiency-inducing viral agent or possibly on the combined effects of the organisms considered.

  14. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my.

  15. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  16. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  17. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions.

  18. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  19. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  20. Expanding the mycobacterial diversity of metalworking fluids (MWFs): evidence showing MWF colonization by Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Renuka; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2012-02-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with hypersensitivity pneumonitis in machinists. Only two species of NTM, namely Mycobacterium immunogenum and Mycobacterium chelonae, have been reported thus far to have the ability to colonize contaminated metalworking fluids (MWFs). Here, we report, for the first time, the presence and characterization (phenotypic and genotypic) of a third species, Mycobacterium abscessus, colonizing these harsh alkaline machining fluids. Two Mycobacterium morphotypes, smooth (S) and rough (R), were isolated (two isolates each) from an in-use industrial MWFs. Biocide susceptibility analysis using triclosan as a model yielded the same minimal inhibitory concentration for the two morphotypes. PCR-restriction analysis-based speciation of the morphotypes confirmed their identity as M. abscessus. Genotyping based on partial DNA sequences corresponding to the variable regions of the hsp65 gene and 16S-23S rRNA operon internal transcribed spacer region and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR analysis showed that both morphotypes belong to a single genotype. In addition, we isolated and confirmed two novel mycobacterial genotypes, one each of M. immunogenum and M. chelonae from additional in-use MWF screening. Taken together, this study expands the known mycobacterial species- and strain-diversity colonizing MWF. Furthermore, the study emphasizes the need for including M. abscessus species in the existing mycobacterial screening of contaminated MWF. PMID:22092754

  1. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  2. Amplicon DNA Melting Analysis for the Simultaneous Detection of Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex. Potential Use in Rapid Differential Diagnosis between Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Focal Complications of Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuan-Jimenez, Rocio; Colmenero, Juan D.; Bermúdez, Pilar; Alonso, Antonio; Morata, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Some sites of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and focal complications of brucellosis are very difficult to differentiate clinically, radiologically, and even histopathologically. Conventional microbiological methods for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated brucellosis not only lack adequate sensitivity, they are also time consuming, which could lead to an unfavourable prognosis. The aim of this work was to develop a multiplex real-time PCR assay based on SYBR Green I to simultaneously detect Brucella spp and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and evaluate the efficacy of the technique with different candidate genes. The IS711, bcsp31 and omp2a genes were used for the identification of Brucella spp and the IS6110, senX3-regX3 and cfp31 genes were targeted for the detection of the M. tuberculosis complex. As a result of the different combinations of primers, nine different reactions were evaluated. A test was defined as positive only when the gene combinations were capable of co-amplifying both pathogens in a single reaction tube and showed distinguishable melting temperatures for each microorganism. According to the melting analysis, only three combinations of amplicons (senX3-regX3+bcsp31, senX3-regX3+IS711 and IS6110+IS711) were visible. Detection limits of senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 were of 2 and 3 genome equivalents for M. tuberculosis complex and Brucella while for IS6110+IS711 they were of 200 and 300 genome equivalents, respectively. The three assays correctly identified all the samples, showing negative results for the control patients. The presence of multicopy elements and GC content were the components most influencing the efficiency of the test; this should be taken into account when designing a multiplex-based SYBR Green I assay. In conclusion, multiplex real time PCR assays based on the targets senX3-regX3+bcsp31 and senX3-regX3+IS711 using SYBR Green I are highly sensitive and reproducible. This may therefore be a

  3. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  4. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an urban area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcio Roberto; Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Alencar, Andrea Padilha; de Oliveira, Vania Maria; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Sales, Mariana Lázaro; Issa, Marina de Azevedo; Soares, Paulo Martins; Pereira, Omara Tereza Vianello; dos Santos, Eduardo Calazans; Mendes, Rejane Silva; Ferreira, Ângela Maria de Jesus; Mota, Pedro Moacyr Pinto Coelho; Suffys, Philip Noel; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2013-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, mycobacteria specimens from 189 tuberculosis (TB) patients living in an urban area in Brazil were characterised from 2008-2010 using phenotypic and molecular speciation methods (pncA gene and oxyR pseudogene analysis). Of these samples, 174 isolates simultaneously grew on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Stonebrink (SB)-containing media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas 12 had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis based on the DNA analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples (paraffin blocks). One patient produced two sputum isolates, the first of which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, and the second of which only grew on SB media and presented phenotypic profiles of Mycobacterium bovis. One patient provided a bronchial lavage isolate, which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, but had molecular profiles of M. bovis from paraffin block DNA analysis, and one sample had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis identified from two distinct paraffin blocks. Moreover, we found a low prevalence (1.6%) of M. bovis among these isolates, which suggests that local health service procedures likely underestimate its real frequency and that it deserves more attention from public health officials. PMID:23778657

  5. Real-time quantitative PCR detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies in meat products.

    PubMed

    Klanicova, B; Slana, I; Vondruskova, H; Kaevska, M; Pavlik, I

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work was to examine various purchased meat products and to find out if any traces of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis could be detected in these samples. Analysis of the meat products (raw, cooked, and fermented) was performed using a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for the detection of specific insertion sequences: duplex qPCR for the detection of IS900 specific for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and triplex qPCR for the detection of IS901 specific for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and IS 1245 specific for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Of the 77 analyzed meat samples, 17 (22%) were found to contain M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA, 4 (5%) samples contained Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium DNA, and in 12 (16%) samples M. avium subsp. hominissuis DNA was detected. The concentration of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. hominissuis DNA in some meat products exceeded 10(4) genomes per g. Culture examination of these mycobacterial subspecies was negative. By analyzing a range of meat products, we have provided evidence to support the hypothesis that M. avium is present in everyday commodities sold to the general public.

  6. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  7. Methylation of GPLs in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Patterson, John H.; Taig, Ellen; Sargeant, Tobias; McConville, Malcolm J.; Billman-Jacobe, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Several species of mycobacteria express abundant glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) on the surfaces of their cells. The GPLs are glycolipids that contain modified sugars including acetylated 6-deoxy-talose and methylated rhamnose. Four methyltransferases have been implicated in the synthesis of the GPLs of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium. A rhamnosyl 3-O-methytransferase and a fatty acid methyltransferase of M. smegmatis have been previously characterized. In this paper, we characterize the methyltransferases that are responsible for modifying the hydroxyl groups at positions 2 and 4 of rhamnose and propose the biosynthetic sequence of GPL trimethylrhamnose formation. The analysis of M. avium genes through the creation of specific mutants is technically difficult; therefore, an alternative approach to determine the function of putative methyltransferases of M. avium was undertaken. Complementation of M. smegmatis methyltransferase mutants with M. avium genes revealed that MtfC and MtfB of the latter species have 4-O-methyltransferase activity and that MtfD is a 3-O-methyltransferase which can modify rhamnose of GPLs in M. smegmatis. PMID:15466031

  8. Novel genetic polymorphisms that further delineate the phylogeny of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Huard, Richard C; Fabre, Michel; de Haas, Petra; Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio Oliveira; van Soolingen, Dick; Cousins, Debby; Ho, John L

    2006-06-01

    In a previous report, we described a PCR protocol for the differentiation of the various species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) on the basis of genomic deletions (R. C. Huard, L. C. de Oliveira Lazzarini, W. R. Butler, D. van Soolingen, and J. L. Ho, J. Clin. Microbiol. 41:1637-1650, 2003). That report also provided a broad cross-comparison of several previously identified, phylogenetically relevant, long-sequence and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (LSPs and SNPs, respectively). In the present companion report, we expand upon the previous work (i) by continuing the evaluation of known MTC phylogenetic markers in a larger collection of tubercle bacilli (n = 125), (ii) by evaluating additional recently reported MTC species-specific and interspecific polymorphisms, and (iii) by describing the identification and distribution of a number of novel LSPs and SNPs. Notably, new genomic deletions were found in various Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, new species-specific SNPs were identified for "Mycobacterium canettii," Mycobacterium microti, and Mycobacterium pinnipedii, and, for the first time, intraspecific single-nucleotide DNA differences were discovered for the dassie bacillus, the oryx bacillus, and the two Mycobacterium africanum subtype I variants. Surprisingly, coincident polymorphisms linked one M. africanum subtype I genotype with the dassie bacillus and M. microti with M. pinnipedii, thereby suggesting closer evolutionary ties within each pair of species than had been previously thought. Overall, the presented data add to the genetic definitions of several MTC organisms as well as fine-tune current models for the evolutionary history of the MTC. PMID:16740934

  9. Distinguishing Between Social Reinforcement and Social Elicitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Kathleen

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the distinction between species-typical (elicitation) and operant reinforcement interpretations of infant/adult social interaction; considers procedural and analytic components of Poulson's 1983 paper (v36 p471-89); and clarifies differences in Poulson's interpretation and the author's interpretation of the vocal conditioning studies of…

  10. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  11. A Kinetic Study of In Vitro Lysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Valente, WJ; Pienaar, E; Fast, A; Fluitt, A; Whitney, SE; Fenton, RJ; Barletta, RG; Chacon, O; Viljoen, HJ

    2011-01-01

    The traditional diagnostic tests for tuberculosis consist of an acid fast stain and a culture test from a sputum sample. With the emergence of drug resistant strains of tuberculosis, nucleic acid amplification has become the diagnostic test of choice. The nucleic acid amplification test consists of four steps: sputum sample collection, lysis of bacilli to release DNA, DNA amplification by PCR and detection of PCR products. The DNA extraction step has been largely overlooked and this study describes a systematic approach to measure the kinetics of cell lysis in a Tris-EDTA buffer. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a saphorytic, fast-growing mycobacterium that is often used as a surrogate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in laboratory studies. M. smegmatis cells have been transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes. Transformed cells are lysed in a temperature-controlled cuvette that is equipped with optical input/output. The fluorescence signal increases when the GFP is released from lysed cells, and the extent of lysis of the loaded cells can be followed in real time. The experimental results are complemented by two theoretical models. The first model is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the lysis process and the accompanying probability density function as described by the Fokker-Planck equation. The second model follows a chemical reaction engineering approach: the cell wall is modeled as layers, where each layer is made up of ‘blocks’. Blocks can only be removed if they are exposed to the lysis solution and the model describes the rate of block exposure and removal. Both models are consistent with the experimental results. The main findings are: (1) the activation energy for M. smegmatis lysis by Tris-EDTA buffer is 22.1kcal/mole, (2) cells lyse on the average after 14–17% loss in cell wall thickness locally, (3) with the help of the models, the initial distribution in cell wall thickness of the population can be resolved, (4) near complete lysis of

  12. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y.; Alawami, Hussain M.; Alburki, Abdussalam M.; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not. The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group. In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  13. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D.; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M.; Silva, Ita de Oliveira e; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R.; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts. PMID:26571269

  14. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Silva, Ita de Oliveira; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C

    2015-11-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts. PMID:26571269

  15. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Silva, Ita de Oliveira; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C

    2015-11-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts.

  16. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, "Mycobacterium virginiense" sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wengenack, Nancy L; Eke, Uzoamaka A; Benwill, Jeana L; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species ("M. virginiense" sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  17. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  18. Detection of Rifampin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Double Gradient-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Scarpellini, Paolo; Braglia, Sergio; Carrera, Paola; Cedri, Maura; Cichero, Paola; Colombo, Alessia; Crucianelli, Rosella; Gori, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio; Lazzarin, Adriano

    1999-01-01

    We applied double gradient-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DG-DGGE) for the rapid detection of rifampin (RMP) resistance from rpoB PCR products of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and clinical samples. The results of this method were fully concordant with those of DNA sequencing and susceptibility testing analyses. DG-DGGE is a valid alternative to the other methods of detecting mutations for predicting RMP resistance. PMID:10508043

  19. Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterium genavense Disseminated Infection by the Microseq 500: A Case Report in A Two Year Old HIV-Negative Child.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Marco; Ruggeri, Maurizio; Buoro, Sabrina; Locatelli, Anna; Ortalli, Gaia; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Farina, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    This paper evaluates the capability of MicroSeq 500 instrument to improve the diagnosis of Mycobacterium genavense The strain was isolated from a two year old child admitted to our hospital for hepatosplenomegaly and massive abdominal lymphadenopathies. DNA was extracted from a lymph node and examined by amplifying 500 bp at the 5' end of 16S rRNA gene using MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification PCR kit. Sequencing reactions were performed with MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA Bacterial Identification Sequencing kit (Applied Biosystems, USA). Afterwards, sequences were analyzed by GenBank database and identified as Mycobacterium genavense, a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. The use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for the identification of bacteria allows the recognition of new clinically relevant agents, eliminating the culture result waiting times. PMID:27650624

  20. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  1. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi. PMID:26542221

  2. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  3. A new agent of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in children: Mycobacterium heidelbergense sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, W H; Butler, W R; Kirschner, P; Plikaytis, B B; Coyle, M B; Amthor, B; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J; Salfinger, M; Crawford, J T; Böttger, E C; Bremer, H J

    1997-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lymphadenitis presents an increasing clinical problem in immunocompetent young children. A slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacterium was recovered twice (isolates 2553/91 and 2554/91) from the lymphatic tissue of a child with recurrent cervical lymphadenitis. It could be differentiated biochemically from described Mycobacterium species, although it most closely resembled Mycobacterium malmoense by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography of mycolic acids. A striking characteristic of the isolate was its high degree of susceptibility to antituberculous drugs in vitro, including isoniazid. Direct determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed a unique sequence and positioned the strain phylogenetically on a branch separate from M. malmoense within a group of slowly growing mycobacteria that show a high degree of similarity to M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level. Despite 99.6% sequence identity with M. simiae at the 16S rRNA gene level, DNA-DNA hybridization studies (hydroxyapatite method) demonstrated DNA relatedness of less than 40%. We conclude that this organism is a new species for which we propose the name M. heidelbergense. A culture of the type strain, strain 2554/91, has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as strain ATCC 51253. PMID:9399520

  4. Rapid and sensitive identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, C V; Damato, J J; McClatchy, J K; Brennan, P J

    1985-01-01

    The fatty acid constituents of 14 species of Mycobacterium (14 isolates) and one isolate each of Corynebacterium xerosis, Nocardia asteroides, and Streptomyces albus were examined with the purpose of distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from other acid-fast bacilli. Combined thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of methyl mycolates and gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of shorter-chain fatty acid esters provided an unequivocal identification of M. tuberculosis in a matter of 2 to 3 days. The methodology included rapid and simplified procedures for methanolysis and extraction of bacterial lipids with equally facilitated GLC and TLC analyses. These studies were performed with 0.5 to 1.0 mg of dry bacterial cells (approximately 2.5 X 10(7) CFU). When applied to 100 unknown cultures, the methodology with combined TLC-GLC correctly identified all 49 of the M. tuberculosis-Mycobacterium bovis cultures and a variety of other mycobacterium taxa. It was also interesting to note that 28 of 39 (72%) of the nontuberculous mycobacteria were correctly identified. An additional five species were tentatively identified as belonging to either of two species (Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium terrae), but in all cases, the two species belonged to the same Runyon group. All six nonmycobacterial species were differentiated from the mycobacteria studied. Images PMID:3932458

  5. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  6. Genomic signal analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Banica, Dorina; Tuduce, Rodica

    2007-02-01

    As previously shown the conversion of nucleotide sequences into digital signals offers the possibility to apply signal processing methods for the analysis of genomic data. Genomic Signal Analysis (GSA) has been used to analyze large scale features of DNA sequences, at the scale of whole chromosomes, including both coding and non-coding regions. The striking regularities of genomic signals reveal restrictions in the way nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides are distributed along nucleotide sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be less of a "plain text", corresponding to certain semantic and grammar rules, but more of a "poem", satisfying additional symmetry restrictions that evoke the "rhythm" and "rhyme". Recurrent patterns in nucleotide sequences are reflected in simple mathematical regularities observed in genomic signals. GSA has also been used to track pathogen variability, especially concerning their resistance to drugs. Previous work has been dedicated to the study of HIV-1, Clade F and Avian Flu. The present paper applies GSA methodology to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) rpoB gene variability, relevant to its resistance to antibiotics. Isolates from 50 Romanian patients have been studied both by rapid LightCycler PCR and by sequencing of a segment of 190-250 nucleotides covering the region of interest. The variability is caused by SNPs occurring at specific sites along the gene strand, as well as by inclusions. Because of the mentioned symmetry restrictions, the GS variations tend to compensate. An important result is that MT can act as a vector for HIV virus, which is able to retrotranscribe its specific genes both into human and MT genomes.

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-06-25

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced.

  8. Essays on probability elicitation scoring rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmino, Paulo Renato A.; dos Santos Neto, Ademir B.

    2012-10-01

    In probability elicitation exercises it has been usual to considerer scoring rules (SRs) to measure the performance of experts when inferring about a given unknown, Θ, for which the true value, θ*, is (or will shortly be) known to the experimenter. Mathematically, SRs quantify the discrepancy between f(θ) (the distribution reflecting the expert's uncertainty about Θ) and d(θ), a zero-one indicator function of the observation θ*. Thus, a remarkable characteristic of SRs is to contrast expert's beliefs with the observation θ*. The present work aims at extending SRs concepts and formulas for the cases where Θ is aleatory, highlighting advantages of goodness-of-fit and entropy-like measures. Conceptually, it is argued that besides of evaluating the personal performance of the expert, SRs may also play a role when comparing the elicitation processes adopted to obtain f(θ). Mathematically, it is proposed to replace d(θ) by g(θ), the distribution that model the randomness of Θ, and do also considerer goodness-of-fit and entropylike metrics, leading to SRs that measure the adherence of f(θ) to g(θ). The implications of this alternative perspective are discussed and illustrated by means of case studies based on the simulation of controlled experiments. The usefulness of the proposed approach for evaluating the performance of experts and elicitation processes is investigated.

  9. Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to facilitate their pathogenesis. In particular, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, has evolved multiple pathways to respond to Cu. Here, we summarize what is currently known about Cu homeostasis in Mtb and discuss potential sources of Cu encountered by this and other pathogens in a mammalian host. PMID:25614981

  10. A 35-kilodalton protein is a major target of the human immune response to Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Triccas, J A; Roche, P W; Winter, N; Feng, C G; Butlin, C R; Britton, W J

    1996-01-01

    The control of leprosy will be facilitated by the identification of major Mycobacterium leprae-specific antigens which mirror the immune response to the organism across the leprosy spectrum. We have investigated the host response to a 35-kDa protein of M. leprae. Recombinant 35-kDa protein purified from Mycobacterium smegmatis resembled the native antigen in the formation of multimeric complexes and binding by monoclonal antibodies and sera from leprosy patients. These properties were not shared by two forms of 35-kDa protein purified from Escherichia coli. The M. smegmatis-derived 35-kDa protein stimulated a gamma interferon-secreting T-cell proliferative response in the majority of paucibacillary leprosy patients and healthy contacts of leprosy patients tested. Cellular responses to the protein in patients with multibacillary leprosy were weak or absent, consistent with hyporesponsiveness to M. leprae characteristic of this form of the disease. Almost all leprosy patients and contacts recognized the 35-kDa protein by either a T-cell proliferative or an immunoglobulin G antibody response, whereas few tuberculosis patients recognized the antigen. This specificity was confirmed in guinea pigs, with the 35-kDa protein eliciting strong delayed-type hypersensitivity in M. leprae-sensitized animals but not in those sensitized with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Therefore, the M. leprae 35-kDa protein appears to be a major and relatively specific target of the human immune response to M. leprae and is a potential component of a diagnostic test to detect exposure to leprosy or a vaccine to combat the disease. PMID:8945562

  11. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70–0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area. PMID:26561038

  12. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70-0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area. PMID:26561038

  13. Widespread Environmental Contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Revealed by a Molecular Detection Protocol.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nuno; Santos, Catarina; Valente, Teresa; Gortázar, Christian; Almeida, Virgílio; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) has been considered crucial for bovine tuberculosis persistence in multi-host-pathogen systems. However, MTC contamination has been difficult to detect due to methodological issues. In an attempt to overcome this limitation we developed an improved protocol for the detection of MTC DNA. MTC DNA concentration was estimated by the Most Probable Number (MPN) method. Making use of this protocol we showed that MTC contamination is widespread in different types of environmental samples from the Iberian Peninsula, which supports indirect transmission as a contributing mechanism for the maintenance of bovine tuberculosis in this multi-host-pathogen system. The proportion of MTC DNA positive samples was higher in the bovine tuberculosis-infected than in presumed negative area (0.32 and 0.18, respectively). Detection varied with the type of environmental sample and was more frequent in sediment from dams and less frequent in water also from dams (0.22 and 0.05, respectively). The proportion of MTC-positive samples was significantly higher in spring (p<0.001), but MTC DNA concentration per sample was higher in autumn and lower in summer. The average MTC DNA concentration in positive samples was 0.82 MPN/g (CI95 0.70-0.98 MPN/g). We were further able to amplify a DNA sequence specific of Mycobacterium bovis/caprae in 4 environmental samples from the bTB-infected area.

  14. An unusual presentation of Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis infection in a captive tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus).

    PubMed

    Del-Pozo, J; Girling, S; McLuckie, J; Abbondati, E; Stevenson, K

    2013-07-01

    This report describes an unusual presentation of paratuberculosis in a captive, 4-year-old female tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus). The gross and histological presentation was consistent with clinical paratuberculosis as previously reported for other ruminants, with poor body condition, subcutaneous oedema, granulomatous ileitis (multibacillary), mesenteric lymphadenitis and hepatitis. However, this animal also presented with unusual lung lesions, with necrosis and mineralization similar to that reported for Mycobacterium bovis in other wild and domestic ruminants. The presence of DNA of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in intestine and lung tissue (IS900, Hsp65) and PCR tests for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and other members of the M. avium complex were negative.

  15. Transcriptional Profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Replicating in Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhengyu; Laal, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection is initiated by the few bacilli inhaled into the alveolus. Studies in lungs of aerosol-infected mice provided evidence for extensive replication of M. tb in non-migrating, non-antigen-presenting cells in the alveoli during the first 2–3 weeks post-infection. Alveoli are lined by type II and type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) which outnumber alveolar macrophages by several hundred-fold. M. tb DNA and viable M. tb have been demonstrated in AEC and other non-macrophage cells of the kidney, liver, and spleen in autopsied tissues from latently-infected subjects from TB-endemic regions indicating systemic bacterial dissemination during primary infection. M. tb have also been demonstrated to replicate rapidly in A549 cells (type II AEC line) and acquire increased invasiveness for endothelial cells. Together, these results suggest that AEC could provide an important niche for bacterial expansion and development of a phenotype that promotes dissemination during primary infection. In the current studies, we have compared the transcriptional profile of M. tb replicating intracellularly in A549 cells to that of M. tb replicating in laboratory broth, by microarray analysis. Genes significantly upregulated during intracellular residence were consistent with an active, replicative, metabolic, and aerobic state, as were genes for tryptophan synthesis and for increased virulence (ESAT-6, and ESAT-6-like genes, esxH, esxJ, esxK, esxP, and esxW). In contrast, significant downregulation of the DevR (DosR) regulon and several hypoxia-induced genes was observed. Stress response genes were either not differentially expressed or were downregulated with the exception of the heat shock response and those induced by low pH. The intra-type II AEC M. tb transcriptome strongly suggests that AEC could provide a safe haven in which M. tb can expand dramatically and disseminate from the lung prior to the elicitation of adaptive immune responses

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Giuseppe; Torrents, Eduard; Luquin, Marina; Comas, Iñaki; Julián, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  18. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, T.; Blagodatskikh, K.; Varlamov, D.; Sochivko, D.; Larionova, E.; Andreevskaya, S.; Andrievskaya, I.; Chernousova, L.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae. The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  19. First Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium gordonae Clinical Isolate.

    PubMed

    Ustinova, V; Smirnova, T; Blagodatskikh, K; Varlamov, D; Sochivko, D; Larionova, E; Andreevskaya, S; Andrievskaya, I; Chernousova, L

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of the clinically relevant species Mycobacterium gordonae The clinical isolate Mycobacterium gordonae 14-8773 was obtained from the sputum of a patient with mycobacteriosis. PMID:27365356

  20. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection.

  1. The Elicitation of Vocal Responses from Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champley, Elizabeth Hyne; Andrews, Moya L.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the construction of tasks used to elicit vocal responses from preschool children with and without communication disorders. Procedures to elicit valid and reliable responses are proposed, and a sample assessment protocol is presented. (Author/DB)

  2. MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS PNEUMONIA IN AN ATLANTIC BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS)

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Leigh Ann; Stamper, M. Andrew; Whitaker, Brent R.; Hadfield, Catherine A.; Simons, Brian; Mankowski, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus pneumonia was diagnosed antemortem in a 23-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Clinical signs included lethargy, hyporexia, coughing, and bloody respiratory discharge. Diagnostic findings included neutrophilic leukocytosis, anemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and repeated forceful exhaled breath (sputum) cytology, with acute inflammatory cells and acid-fast positive beaded rods. The bacteria were initially identified free in the sputum sample and subsequently were seen within neutrophils. A culture was positive for a rapidly growing, white, colony-forming organism confirmed as M. abscessus by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Clinical signs initially resolved with multidrug therapy. Concurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection complicated clinical management and contributed to terminal decline. The dolphin was euthanized 5 mo after initial diagnosis. Necropsy results demonstrated acid-fast positive bacteria in lung tissue and supported the diagnosis of M. abscessus pneumonia. Acid-fast stains and mycobacteria cultures should be considered when evaluating ill dolphins. PMID:23272373

  3. The efficacy of the heat killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Doig, C; Seagar, A L; Watt, B; Forbes, K J

    2002-01-01

    There is concern that current procedures for the heat inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may not be adequate. This raises serious safety issues for laboratory staff performing molecular investigations such as IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing. This paper confirms that the protocol of van Embden et al, as performed routinely in this laboratory, is safe and effective for the heat inactivation of M tuberculosis. This procedure involves complete immersion of a tube containing a suspension of one loopfull of growth in a water bath at 80°C for 20 minutes. Seventy four isolates were included in this investigation. Despite prolonged incubation for 20 weeks, none of the heat killed M tuberculosis suspensions produced visible colonies or gave a positive growth signal from liquid culture. This method did not affect the integrity of the DNA for subsequent molecular investigations. PMID:12354807

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus pneumonia in an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Clayton, Leigh Ann; Stamper, M Andrew; Whitaker, Brent R; Hadfield, Catherine A; Simons, Brian; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2012-12-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus pneumonia was diagnosed antemortem in a 23-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Clinical signs included lethargy, hyporexia, coughing, and bloody respiratory discharge. Diagnostic findings included neutrophilic leukocytosis, anemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and repeated forceful exhaled breath (sputum) cytology, with acute inflammatory cells and acid-fast positive beaded rods. The bacteria were initially identified free in the sputum sample and subsequently were seen within neutrophils. A culture was positive for a rapidly growing, white, colony-forming organism confirmed as M. abscessus by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Clinical signs initially resolved with multidrug therapy. Concurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection complicated clinical management and contributed to terminal decline. The dolphin was euthanized 5 mo after initial diagnosis. Necropsy results demonstrated acid-fast positive bacteria in lung tissue and supported the diagnosis of M. abscessus pneumonia. Acid-fast stains and mycobacteria cultures should be considered when evaluating ill dolphins. PMID:23272373

  5. The efficacy of the heat killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Doig, C; Seagar, A L; Watt, B; Forbes, K J

    2002-10-01

    There is concern that current procedures for the heat inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may not be adequate. This raises serious safety issues for laboratory staff performing molecular investigations such as IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing. This paper confirms that the protocol of van Embden et al, as performed routinely in this laboratory, is safe and effective for the heat inactivation of M tuberculosis. This procedure involves complete immersion of a tube containing a suspension of one loopfull of growth in a water bath at 80 degrees C for 20 minutes. Seventy four isolates were included in this investigation. Despite prolonged incubation for 20 weeks, none of the heat killed M tuberculosis suspensions produced visible colonies or gave a positive growth signal from liquid culture. This method did not affect the integrity of the DNA for subsequent molecular investigations.

  6. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  7. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  8. Cripto-1 vaccination elicits protective immunity against metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, M A; Witt, K; Galvez-Cancino, F; Sette, A; Lundqvist, A; Lladser, A; Kiessling, R

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a fatal disease that responds poorly to classical treatments but can be targeted by T cell-based immunotherapy. Cancer vaccines have the potential to generate long-lasting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses able to eradicate established and disseminated tumors. Vaccination against antigens expressed by tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential represents a highly attractive strategy to efficiently target deadly metastatic disease. Cripto-1 is frequently over-expressed in human carcinomas and melanomas, but is expressed only at low levels on normal differentiated tissues. Cripto-1 is particularly upregulated in cancer-initiating cells and is involved in cellular processes such as cell migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells able to initiate metastatic disease. Here, we explored the potential of Cripto-1 vaccination to target metastatic melanoma in a preclinical model. Cripto-1 was overexpressed in highly metastatic B16F10 cells as compared to poorly metastatic B16F1 cells. Moreover, B16F10 cells grown in sphere conditions to enrich for cancer stem cells (CSC) progressively upregulated cripto1 expression. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with a DNA vaccine encoding mouse Cripto-1 elicited a readily detectable/strong cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response specific for a H-2 Kb-restricted epitope identified based on its ability to bind H-2(b) molecules. Remarkably, Cripto-1 vaccination elicited a protective response against lung metastasis and subcutaneous challenges with highly metastatic B16F10 melanoma cells. Our data indicate that vaccination against Cripto-1 represents a novel strategy to be tested in the clinic. PMID:27467944

  9. Eliciting promises from children reduces cheating.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gail D; Fu, Genyue; Lin, Jianyan; Qian, Miao K; Lee, Kang

    2015-11-01

    Widespread cheating can undermine rules that are necessary for maintaining social order. Preventing cheating can be a challenge, especially with regard to children, who as a result of their limited executive function skills may have particular difficulty with resisting temptation to cheat. We examined one approach designed to help children resist this temptation: eliciting a verbal commitment to not cheat. We tested 4- to 7-year-olds (total N = 330) and found that starting at 5 years of age, a verbal commitment to not cheat led to a substantial reduction in cheating. The results suggest that verbal commitments can be used to help children overcome temptations and comply with rules.

  10. An outbreak of Mycobacterium genavense infection in a flock of captive diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata).

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Fukuta, Mayumi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    Two diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) in a flock of 23 birds housed in an aviary in a zoo in central Japan were found dead as a result of mycobacteriosis. Fecal samples of the remaining doves were positive for mycobacterial infection, and thus they were euthanatized. Clinical signs and gross pathology, including weight loss and sudden death and slight enlargement of the liver and intestine, were observed in a small number of birds (3/23). Disseminated histiocytic infiltration of either aggregates or sheets of epithelioid cells containing acid-fast bacilli, in the absence of caseous necrosis, were observed in different organs of the infected doves, especially lungs (23/23), intestines (9/23), livers (7/23), and hearts (6/23). Mycobacterium sp. was isolated from the livers of three birds (3/23). DNA extracted from frozen liver and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (5/23) were used for amplification of the gene encoding mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65). The causative Mycobacterium species was identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mycobacterium genavense infection was confirmed in three of the diamond doves. Moreover, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed 100% identity across the three samples tested, and 99.77% nucleotide homology of the isolate sequence to M. genavense. The main route of M. genavense infection in the diamond doves was most likely airborne, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk of airborne transmission between humans and birds. PMID:25518432

  11. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

  12. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  13. Molecular analysis of Mycobacterium isolates from extrapulmonary specimens obtained from patients in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; García-Corral, Nora; Carrero-Dominguez, David; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Gurrola-Morales, Teodoro; Portillo-Gómez, Leopoldo; Rossau, Rudi; Mijs, Wouter

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the molecular epidemiology in Mexico of Mycobacterium species infecting extrapulmonary sites in humans. This study used molecular methods to determine the Mycobacterium species present in tissues and body fluids in specimens obtained from patients in Mexico with extrapulmonary disease. Methods Bacterial or tissue specimens from patients with clinical or histological diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis were studied. DNA extracts from 30 bacterial cultures grown in Löwenstein Jensen medium and 42 paraffin-embedded tissues were prepared. Bacteria were cultured from urine, cerebrospinal fluid, pericardial fluid, gastric aspirate, or synovial fluid samples. Tissues samples were from lymph nodes, skin, brain, vagina, and peritoneum. The DNA extracts were analyzed by PCR and by line probe assay (INNO-LiPA MYCOBACTERIA v2. Innogenetics NV, Gent, Belgium) in order to identify the Mycobacterium species present. DNA samples positive for M. tuberculosis complex were further analyzed by PCR and line probe assay (INNO-LiPA Rif.TB, Innogenetics NV, Gent, Belgium) to detect mutations in the rpoB gene associated with rifampicin resistance. Results Of the 72 DNA extracts, 26 (36.1%) and 23 (31.9%) tested positive for Mycobacterium species by PCR or line probe assay, respectively. In tissues, M. tuberculosis complex and M. genus were found in lymph nodes, and M. genus was found in brain and vagina specimens. In body fluids, M. tuberculosis complex was found in synovial fluid. M. gordonae, M. smegmatis, M. kansasii, M. genus, M. fortuitum/M. peregrinum complex and M. tuberculosis complex were found in urine. M. chelonae/M. abscessus was found in pericardial fluid and M. kansasii was found in gastric aspirate. Two of M. tuberculosis complex isolates were also PCR and LiPA positive for the rpoB gene. These two isolates were from lymph nodes and were sensitive to rifampicin. Conclusion 1) We describe the Mycobacterium species diversity

  14. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  15. Reward positivity elicited by predictive cues.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Krigolson, Olav E; Lee, Seung

    2011-03-30

    A recent theory holds that a component of the human event-related brain potential called the reward positivity reflects a reward prediction error signal. We investigated this idea in gambling-like task in which, on each trial, a visual stimulus predicted a subsequent rewarding or nonrewarding outcome with 80% probability. Consistent with earlier results, we found that the reward positivity was larger to unexpected than to expected outcomes. In addition, we found that the predictive cues also elicited a reward positivity, as proposed by the theory. These results indicate that the reward positivity reflects the initial assessment of whether a trial will end in success or failure and the reappraisal of that information once the outcome actually occurs.

  16. Assessing pragmatic skills in elicited production.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Peter

    2004-02-01

    In developing a test of pragmatic skills for children ages 4 to 9 years, we focused on a number of functional language skills that are important for children's success in early schooling and for the development of fluent reading and writing. They included (1) wh-question asking, (2) communicative role taking, (3) linking events in a cohesive narrative, and (4) articulating the mental states of the characters in a story. All of the proposed items provide specific referential support and pragmatic motivation for the forms and content to be produced by the child. The pictured materials and elicitation prompts constrain the range of appropriate utterances, so the children's productions are more easily scored than an open-ended spontaneous speech sample. All tasks described show a clear developmental trend, a clear separation between the performance of typically developing and language-impaired children, and no performance differences between African American English- and Mainstream American English-speaking children.

  17. Hindlimb unloading elicits anhedonia and sympathovagal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Julia A; Grippo, Angela J; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2008-10-01

    The hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat model elicits cardiovascular deconditioning and simulates the physiological adaptations to microgravity or prolonged bed rest in humans. Although psychological deficits have been documented following bed rest and spaceflight in humans, few studies have explored the psychological effects of cardiovascular deconditioning in animal models. Given the bidirectional link established between cardiac autonomic imbalance and psychological depression in both humans and in animal models, we hypothesized that hindlimb unloading would elicit an alteration in sympathovagal tone and behavioral indexes of psychological depression. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats confined to 14 days of HU displayed anhedonia (a core feature of human depression) compared with casted control (CC) animals evidenced by reduced sucrose preference (CC: 81 +/- 2.9% baseline vs. HU: 58 +/- 4.5% baseline) and reduced (rightward shift) operant responding for rewarding electrical brain stimulation (CC: 4.4 +/- 0.3 muA vs. 7.3 +/- 1.0 muA). Cardiac autonomic blockade revealed elevated sympathetic [CC: -54 +/- 14.1 change in (Delta) beats/min vs. HU: -118 +/- 7.6 Delta beats/min] and reduced parasympathetic (CC: 45 +/- 11.8 Delta beats/min vs. HU: 8 +/- 7.3 Delta beats/min) cardiac tone in HU rats. Heart rate variability was reduced (CC: 10 +/- 1.4 ms vs. HU: 7 +/- 0.7 ms), and spectral analysis of blood pressure indicated loss of total, low-, and high-frequency power, consistent with attenuated baroreflex function. These data indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning results in sympathovagal imbalance and behavioral signs consistent with psychological depression. These findings further elucidate the pathophysiological link between cardiovascular diseases and affective disorders.

  18. Evaluation of the association between fecal excretion of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and detection in colostrum and on teat skin surfaces of dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective—To evaluate the association between fecal excretion of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) by dairy cows in the periparturient period and detection of MAP DNA in colostrum specimens and on teat skin surfaces. Design—Cross-sectional study. Animals—112 Holstein cows. Procedures—...

  19. Gene structure and regulation of alkane monooxygenases in propane-utilizing Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 and Pseudonocardia sp. TY-7.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Kawashima, Yui; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2006-09-01

    Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 and Pseudonocardia sp. TY-7 were isolated from soil samples as propane-utilizing bacteria and were found to be able to utilize various gaseous and liquid n-alkanes as carbon and energy sources. One gene cluster, M-prmABCD, and two gene clusters, P-prm1ABCD and P-prm2ABCD, were cloned from the genomes of Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 and Pseudonocardia sp. TY-7, respectively. These gene clusters are homologous to the gene cluster encoding the multicomponent propane monooxygenase (prmABCD) of Gordonia sp. TY-5. The expression of prm gene clusters in Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 and Pseudonocardia sp. TY-7 was shown to be induced by gaseous n-alkanes (C2-C4) except methane, suggesting that the products of these genes are involved in gaseous n-alkane oxidation. Homologous genes for an alkane hydroxylase system (alk system) involved in liquid n-alkane oxidation were also cloned from the genomic DNA of Mycobacterium sp. TY-6. The alk gene cluster was transcribed in response to liquid n-alkanes (C11-C15). These results indicate that Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 has two distinct gene clusters for multicomponent monooxygenases involved in alkane oxidation. Whole-cell reactions revealed that propane is oxidized to 1-propanol through terminal oxidation in Mycobacterium sp. TY-6 and that propane is oxidized to 1-propanol and 2-propanol through both terminal and subterminal oxidations in Pseudonocardia sp. TY-7. This study reveals the diversity of propane metabolism present in microorganisms. PMID:17046531

  20. Photodynamic inactivation of the models Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce-Micah, R.; Gamm, U.; Hüttenberger, D.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacterial strains presents an attractive potential alternative to antibiotic therapies. Success is dependent on the effective accumulation in bacterial cells of photochemical substances called photosensitizers, which are usually porphyrins or their derivatives. The kinetics of porphyrin synthesis after treatment with the precursor ALA and the accumulation of the Chlorin e6 and the following illumination were studied. The goal was to estimate effectivity of the destructive power of these PS in vitro in respect of the physiological states of Mycobacteria. So the present results examine the cell destruction by PDI using ALA-induced Porphyrins and Chlorin e6 accumulated in Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis, which serve as models for the important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium bovis. We could show that both Mycobacterium after ALA and Chlorin e6 application were killed by illumination with light of about 662 nm. A reduction of about 97% could be reached by using a lightdose of 70 mW/cm2.

  1. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  2. Diterpene production in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Prach, Lisa; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.; Alber, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes are a structurally diverse class of molecules common in plants, although they are very rarely found in bacteria. We report the identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of three diterpenes proposed to promote phagolysosome maturation arrest. MS analysis reveals that these diterpenes are novel compounds not previously identified in other organisms. The diterpene with highest abundance in Mtb has a mass fragmentation pattern identical to edaxadiene, which is produced in vitro from geranylgeranyl diphosphate by the enzymes Rv3377c and Rv3378c [Mann FM et al. (2009) J Am Chem Soc 131, 17526–17527]. A second diterpene found in Mtb has a similar mass spectrum, and is always observed in the same proportion relative to edaxadiene, indicating that it is a side product of the Rv3378c reaction in vivo. We name this second diterpene olefin edaxadiene B. The least abundant of the three diterpenes in Mtb extracts is tuberculosinol, a dephosphorylated side-product of the edaxadiene pathway intermediate produced by Rv3377c [Nakano C et al. (2009) Chembiochem 10, 2060–2071; Nakano C et al. (2005) Chem Commun (Camb) 8, 1016–1018]. A frameshift in Rv3377c in Mtb completely eliminates diterpene production, whereas expression of Rv3377c and Rv3378c in the nonpathogenic M. smegmatis is sufficient to produce edaxadiene and edaxadiene B. These studies define the pathway of edaxadiene and edaxadiene B biosynthesis in vivo. Rv3377c and Rv3378c are unique to Mtb and M. bovis, making them candidates for selective therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:20670276

  3. Mycobacterium abscessus multispacer sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus group includes antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic mycobacteria that are responsible for sporadic cases and outbreaks of cutaneous, pulmonary and disseminated infections. However, because of their close genetic relationships, accurate discrimination between the various strains of these mycobacteria remains difficult. In this report, we describe the development of a multispacer sequence typing (MST) analysis for the simultaneous identification and typing of M. abscessus mycobacteria. We also compared MST with the reference multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) typing method. Results Based on the M. abscessus CIP104536T genome, eight intergenic spacers were selected, PCR amplified and sequenced in 21 M. abscessus isolates and analysed in 48 available M. abscessus genomes. MST and MLSA grouped 37 M. abscessus organisms into 12 and nine types, respectively; four formerly “M. bolletii” organisms and M. abscessus M139 into three and four types, respectively; and 27 formerly “M. massiliense” organisms grouped into nine and five types, respectively. The Hunter-Gaston index was off 0.912 for MST and of 0.903 for MLSA. The MST-derived tree was similar to that based on MLSA and rpoB gene sequencing and yielded three main clusters comprising each the type strain of the respective M. abscessus sub-species. Two isolates exhibited discordant MLSA- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position, one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position and one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and MLSA-derived position. MST spacer n°2 sequencing alone allowed for the accurate identification of the different isolates at the sub-species level. Conclusions MST is a new sequencing-based approach for both identifying and genotyping M. abscessus mycobacteria that clearly differentiates formerly “M. massiliense” organisms from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii organisms. PMID:23294800

  4. Xylaria hypoxylon Lectin as Adjuvant Elicited Tfh Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Zuo, Y; Guo, Q; Wang, H; Liu, Q; Liu, Q; Xia, G; Kang, Y

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) caused by FMD virus (FMDV) is a major health and economic problem in the farming industry. Vaccination of livestock against this highly infectious viral disease is crucial, and inactivated FMD vaccine has been effective at controlling infection. However, accumulated data show that the inactivated vaccine generates weak immune responses and that the oil formulation results in undesirable side effects. Mushroom lectins have recently been shown to display adjuvant effects when incorporated into DNA vaccines. In this study, to enhance the cellular immune response of FMDV antigen (146S), C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 146S combined with Xylaria hypoxylon lectin (XHL). The oil formulation (146S/Oil) was served as control group. Strong humoral immune responses were elicited in mice immunized with 146S/XHL as shown by high 146S antigen-specific IgG levels, and also in 146S/Oil group. Interestingly, XHL in conjunction with inactivated FMD vaccine activated strong Th1 and Tc1 cell responses, especially Tfh cell responses, in immunized mice. XHL stimulated dendritic cell maturation by upregulating expression of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) molecules and co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 in immunized mice. No XHL-specific IgG or inflammatory factors were detected indicating the safety of XHL as an adjuvant. Taken together, these results suggest the effectiveness of XHL at inducing cellular immune responses and therefore confirm its suitability as an adjuvant for inactivated FMD vaccine.

  5. The Mycobacterium phlei Genome: Expectations and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium phlei, a nontuberculosis mycobacterial species, was first described in 1898–1899. We present the complete genome sequence for the M. phlei CCUG21000T type strain and the draft genomes for four additional strains. The genome size for all fiveis 5.3 Mb with 69.4% Guanine-Cytosine content. This is ≈0.35 Mbp smaller than the previously reported M. phlei RIVM draft genome. The size difference is attributed partly to large bacteriophage sequence fragments in the M. phlei RIVM genome. Comparative analysis revealed the following: 1) A CRISPR system similar to Type 1E (cas3) in M. phlei RIVM; 2) genes involved in polyamine metabolism and transport (potAD, potF) that are absent in other mycobacteria, and 3) strain-specific variations in the number of σ-factor genes. Moreover, M. phlei has as many as 82 mce (mammalian cell entry) homologs and many of the horizontally acquired genes in M. phlei are present in other environmental bacteria including mycobacteria that share similar habitat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 693 Mycobacterium core genes present in all complete mycobacterial genomes suggested that its closest neighbor is Mycobacterium smegmatis JS623 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae NBB3, while it is more distant to M. smegmatis mc2 155. PMID:26941228

  6. Radioimmunoassay of tuberculoprotein derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Wu, N

    1980-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay was developed for constituent of the purified-protein derivative obtained from cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crossreacting immunoreactive material was detected in cultures of other mycobacterial species, but no immunoreactivity was present in cultures of various fungal and bacterial species. The development of specific radioimmunoassays for tuberculoproteins offers a new research and diagnostic approach. Images PMID:6933481

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense

    PubMed Central

    Raiol, Tainá; Ribeiro, Guilherme Menegói; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense is a rapidly growing bacterium associated with opportunistic infections. The genome of a representative isolate (strain GO 06) recovered from wound samples from patients who underwent arthroscopic or laparoscopic surgery was sequenced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first announcement of the complete genome sequence of an M. massiliense strain. PMID:22965084

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  9. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  10. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  11. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding. PMID:27703994

  12. [Fatal nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease caused by Mycobacterium kyorinense: a case report with five years of follow-up].

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yumi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Kojima, Kaoru; Fujie, Toshihide; Inase, Naohiko

    2014-04-01

    An 85-year-old man with dementia first visited our hospital 5 years ago, complaining of hemoptysis. He was hospitalized 2 years later owing to fever, cough, and dyspnea. A chest computed tomography scan showed infiltration with a cavity in the left upper lobe. He was diagnosed with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung infection on the basis of the presence of acid-fast bacilli in the sputum and repeated bronchoalveolar lavage specimens; however, we were unable to identify the isolate by DNA-DNA hybridization. Although his general condition had slightly improved after treatment initiation, intermittent chemotherapy owing to the adverse effects of the drugs and dementia led to rapid disease progression and death. After his death, the isolated mycobacterium was identified as Mycobacterium kyorinense by sequence analysis of the hsp 65 and rpoB genes.

  13. The rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L P; Crawford, J T; Shinnick, T M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides and used as a hybridization probe to isolate plasmid clones carrying the entire rpoB gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a virulent, rifampin-susceptible strain. Sequence analysis of a 5,084-bp SacI genomic DNA fragment revealed a 3,534-bp open reading frame encoding an 1,178-amino-acid protein with 57% identity with the Escherichia coli beta subunit. This SacI fragment also carried a portion of the rpoC gene located 43 bp downstream from the 3' end of the rpoB open reading frame; this organization is similar to that of the rpoBC operon of E. coli. The M. tuberculosis rpoB gene was cloned into the shuttle plasmid pMV261 and electroporated into the LR223 strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is highly resistant to rifampin (MIC > 200 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were relatively rifampin susceptible (MIC = 50 micrograms/ml). Using PCR mutagenesis techniques, we introduced a specific rpoB point mutation (associated with clinical strains of rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis) into the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene and expressed this altered gene in the LR222 strain of M. smegmatis, which is susceptible to rifampin (MIC = 25 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were rifampin resistant (MIC = 200 micrograms/ml). The mutagenesis and expression strategy of the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene that we have employed in this study will allow us to determine the rpoB mutations that are responsible for rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:8031050

  14. Decreased capacity of recombinant 45/47-kDa molecules (Apa) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to stimulate T lymphocyte responses related to changes in their mannosylation pattern.

    PubMed

    Horn, C; Namane, A; Pescher, P; Rivière, M; Romain, F; Puzo, G; Bârzu, O; Marchal, G

    1999-11-01

    The Apa molecules secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, or BCG have been identified as major immunodominant antigens. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated similar mannosylation, a complete pattern from 1 up to 9 hexose residues/mole of protein, of the native species from the 3 reference strains. The recombinant antigen expressed in M. smegmatis revealed a different mannosylation pattern: species containing 7 to 9 sugar residues/mole of protein were in the highest proportion, whereas species bearing a low number of sugar residues were almost absent. The 45/47-kDa recombinant antigen expressed in E. coli was devoid of sugar residues. The proteins purified from M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, or BCG have a high capacity to elicit in vivo potent delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions and to stimulate in vitro sensitized T lymphocytes of guinea pigs immunized with living BCG. The recombinant Apa expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis was 4-fold less potent in vivo in the DTH assay and 10-fold less active in vitro to stimulate sensitized T lymphocytes than the native proteins. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was nearly unable to elicit DTH reactions in vivo or to stimulate T lymphocytes in vitro. Thus the observed biological effects were related to the extent of glycosylation of the antigen.

  15. Expert elicitation of population-level effects of disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C.; Schick, Robert S; Krauss, Scott; Popper, Arthur N.; Hawkins, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty.

  16. Web-based tool for expert elicitation of the variogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Phuong N.; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Gosling, John Paul

    2013-02-01

    The variogram is the keystone of geostatistics. Estimation of the variogram is deficient and difficult when there are no or too few observations available due to budget constraints or physical and temporal obstacles. In such cases, expert knowledge can be an important source of information. Expert knowledge can also fulfil the increasing demand for an a priori variogram in Bayesian geostatistics and spatial sampling optimization. Formal expert elicitation provides a sound scientific basis to reliably and consistently extract knowledge from experts. In this study, we aimed at applying existing statistical expert elicitation techniques to extract the variogram of a regionalized variable that is assumed to have either a multivariate normal or lognormal spatial probability distribution from expert knowledge. To achieve this, we developed an elicitation protocol and implemented it as a web-based tool to facilitate the elicitation of beliefs from multiple experts. Our protocol has two main rounds: elicitation of the marginal probability distribution and elicitation of the variogram. The web-based tool has three main components: a web interface for expert elicitation and feedback; a component for statistical computation and mathematical pooling of multiple experts' knowledge; and a database management component. Results from a test case study show that the protocol is adequate and that the online elicitation tool functions satisfactorily. The web-based tool is free to use and supports scientists to conveniently elicit the variogram of spatial random variables from experts. The source code is available from the journal FTP site under the GNU General Public License.

  17. Expert Elicitation of Population-Level Effects of Disturbance.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C; Schick, Robert S; Kraus, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty. PMID:26610972

  18. The Development of a Novel Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli Shuttle Vector System Using pMyong2, a Linear Plasmid from Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungki; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system, equipped with the pAL5000 replicon, is widely used for heterologous gene expression and gene delivery in mycobacteria. Despite its extensive use, this system has certain limitations, which has led to the development of alternative mycobacterial vector systems. The present study describes the molecular structure and expression profiles of a novel 18-kb linear plasmid, pMyong2, from Mycobacterium yongonense. Sixteen open reading frames and a putative origin of replication were identified, and the compatibility of the pMyong2 and pAL5000 vector systems was demonstrated. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rSmeg), the pMyong2 vector system showed a copy number that was approximately 37 times greater than that of pAL5000. Furthermore, pMyong2 increased the mRNA and protein expression of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) over pAL5000 levels by approximately 10-fold and 50-fold, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of the pMyong2 vector system in heterologous gene expression in mycobacteria. Successful delivery of the EGFP gene into mammalian cells via rSmeg carrying the pMyong2 vector system was also observed, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for DNA delivery. In conclusion, the pMyong2 vector system could be effectively used not only for the in vivo delivery of recombinant protein and DNA but also for mycobacterial genetic studies as an alternative or a complement to the pAL5000 vector system. PMID:25822634

  19. The development of a novel Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system using pMyong2, a linear plasmid from Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungki; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system, equipped with the pAL5000 replicon, is widely used for heterologous gene expression and gene delivery in mycobacteria. Despite its extensive use, this system has certain limitations, which has led to the development of alternative mycobacterial vector systems. The present study describes the molecular structure and expression profiles of a novel 18-kb linear plasmid, pMyong2, from Mycobacterium yongonense. Sixteen open reading frames and a putative origin of replication were identified, and the compatibility of the pMyong2 and pAL5000 vector systems was demonstrated. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rSmeg), the pMyong2 vector system showed a copy number that was approximately 37 times greater than that of pAL5000. Furthermore, pMyong2 increased the mRNA and protein expression of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) over pAL5000 levels by approximately 10-fold and 50-fold, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of the pMyong2 vector system in heterologous gene expression in mycobacteria. Successful delivery of the EGFP gene into mammalian cells via rSmeg carrying the pMyong2 vector system was also observed, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for DNA delivery. In conclusion, the pMyong2 vector system could be effectively used not only for the in vivo delivery of recombinant protein and DNA but also for mycobacterial genetic studies as an alternative or a complement to the pAL5000 vector system.

  20. Protection by novel vaccine candidates, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔmosR and ΔechA7, against challenge with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Sarah A.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects over two billion people, claiming around 1.5 million lives annually. The only vaccine approved for clinical use against this disease is the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Unfortunately, BCG has limited efficacy against the adult, pulmonary form of tuberculosis. This vaccine was developed from M. bovis with antigen expression and host specificity that differ from M. tuberculosis. To address these problems, we have designed two novel, live attenuated vaccine (LAV) candidates on an M. tuberculosis background: ΔmosR and ΔechA7. These targeted genes are important to M. tuberculosis pathogenicity during infection. To examine the efficacy of these strains, C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated subcutaneously with either LAV, BCG, or PBS. Both LAV strains persisted up to 16 weeks in the spleens or lungs of vaccinated mice, while eliciting minimal pathology prior to challenge. Following challenge with a selected, high virulence M. tuberculosis Beijing strain, protection was notably greater for both groups of LAV vaccinated animals as compared to BCG at both 30 and 60 days post-challenge. Additionally, vaccination with either ΔmosR or ΔechA7 elicited an immune response similar to BCG. Although these strains require further development to meet safety standards, this first evidence of protection by these two new, live attenuated vaccine candidates shows promise. PMID:26363381

  1. Genotyping of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains reveals historic genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A.; Brown, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) has previously been studied by analysis of sequence diversity in extant strains, but not addressed by direct examination of strain genotypes in archaeological remains. Here, we use ancient DNA sequencing to type 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms and two large sequence polymorphisms in the MTBC strains present in 10 archaeological samples from skeletons from Britain and Europe dating to the second–nineteenth centuries AD. The results enable us to assign the strains to groupings and lineages recognized in the extant MTBC. We show that at least during the eighteenth–nineteenth centuries AD, strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to different genetic groups were present in Britain at the same time, possibly even at a single location, and we present evidence for a mixed infection in at least one individual. Our study shows that ancient DNA typing applied to multiple samples can provide sufficiently detailed information to contribute to both archaeological and evolutionary knowledge of the history of tuberculosis. PMID:24573854

  2. Genotype of a historic strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Abigail S.; Kennedy, Sandra L.; Müller, Romy; Stephens, Richard H.; Holst, Malin; Caffell, Anwen C.; Roberts, Charlotte A.; Brown, Terence A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of ancient DNA in paleopathological studies of tuberculosis has largely been restricted to confirmation of disease identifications made by skeletal analysis; few attempts at obtaining genotype data from archaeological samples have been made because of the need to perform different PCRs for each genetic locus being studied in an ancient DNA extract. We used a next generation sequencing approach involving hybridization capture directed at specific polymorphic regions of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to identify a detailed genotype for a historic strain of M. tuberculosis from an individual buried in the 19th century St. George’s Crypt, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. We obtained 664,500 sequencing by oligonucleotide ligation and detection (SOLiD) reads that mapped to the targeted regions of the M. tuberculosis genome; the coverage included 218 of 247 SNPs, 10 of 11 insertion/deletion regions, and the repeat elements IS1081 and IS6110. The accuracy of the SOLiD data was checked by conventional PCRs directed at 11 SNPs and two insertion/deletions. The data placed the historic strain of M. tuberculosis in a group that is uncommon today, but it is known to have been present in North America in the early 20th century. Our results show the use of hybridization capture followed by next generation sequencing as a means of obtaining detailed genotypes of ancient varieties of M. tuberculosis, potentially enabling meaningful comparisons between strains from different geographic locations and different periods in the past. PMID:23091009

  3. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture.

  4. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture. PMID:26412530

  5. Mycobacterium minnesotense sp. nov., a photochromogenic bacterium isolated from sphagnum peat bogs.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Fordice, Daniel; Welch, Jacqueline B; Dahl, John L

    2013-01-01

    Several intermediate-growing, photochromogenic bacteria were isolated from sphagnum peat bogs in northern Minnesota, USA. Acid-fast staining and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed these environmental isolates in the genus Mycobacterium, and colony morphologies and PCR restriction analysis patterns of the isolates were similar. Partial sequences of hsp65 and dnaJ1 from these isolates showed that Mycobacterium arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T) was the closest mycobacterial relative, and common biochemical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibilities existed between the isolates and M. arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T). However, compared to nonchromogenic M. arupense ATCC BAA-1242(T), the environmental isolates were photochromogenic, had a different mycolic acid profile and had reduced cell-surface hydrophobicity in liquid culture. The data reported here support the conclusion that the isolates are representatives of a novel mycobacterial species, for which the name Mycobacterium minnesotense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DL49(T) (=DSM 45633(T) = JCM 17932(T) = NCCB 100399(T)).

  6. Two New Mycobacterium Strains and Their Role in Toluene Degradation in a Contaminated Stream

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Stephen T.-L.; Hemond, Harold F.; Polz, Martin F.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Dejesus, Indhira; Krumholz, Lee R.

    1998-01-01

    Two toluene-degrading strains, T103 and T104, were isolated from rock surface biomass in a freshwater stream contaminated with toluene. The strains exhibit different capacities for degradation of toluene and other aromatic compounds and have characteristics of the genus Mycobacterium. Both are aerobic, rod-shaped, gram-positive, nonmotile, and acid-alcohol fast and produce yellow pigments. They have mainly straight-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids with 10 to 20 carbon atoms and large amounts of tuberculostearic acid that are typical of mycobacteria. Fatty acid analyses indicate that T103 and T104 are different mycobacterial strains that are related at the subspecies level. Their identical 16S rDNA sequences are most similar to Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium komossense, and they constitute a new species of fast-growing mycobacteria. Ecological studies reveal that toluene contamination has enriched for toluene-degrading bacteria in the epilithic microbial community. Strains T103 and T104 play only a small role in toluene degradation in the stream, although they are present in the habitat and can degrade toluene. Other microorganisms are consequently implicated in the biodegradation. PMID:9572941

  7. Genetic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains Used for Producing Purified Protein Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Semret, Makeda; Bakker, Douwe; Smart, Nonie; Olsen, Ingrid; Haslov, Kaare; Behr, Marcel A.

    2006-01-01

    For over a century, purified protein derivatives (PPD) have been used to detect mycobacterial infections in humans and livestock. Among these, reagents to detect infections by Mycobacterium avium complex organisms have been produced, but the utility of these reagents has not been clearly established due in part to limited biologic and immunologic standardization. Because there is little information about the strains used to produce these reagents (avian PPD, intracellulare PPD, scrofulaceum PPD, and Johnin), we have performed genetic characterizations of strains used to produce these products. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and the hsp65 gene provided results concordant with species designations provided for M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum organisms. For M. avium strains, comparative genomic hybridization was performed on a whole-genome DNA microarray, revealing one novel 7.9-kilobase genomic deletion in certain Johnin-producing strains, in addition to genomic variability inherent to the particular M. avium subspecies. Our findings indicate that considerable genomic differences exist between organisms used for reagents and the infecting organism being studied. These results serve as a baseline for potency studies of different preparations and should aid in comparative studies of newly discovered antigens for the diagnosis of infection and disease by M. avium complex organisms. PMID:16960109

  8. Basic emotions elicited by odors and pictures.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Olgun, Selda; Joraschky, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The sense of olfaction is often reported to have a special relationship with emotional processing. Memories triggered by olfactory cues often have a very emotional load. On the other hand, basic negative or positive emotional states should be sufficient to cover the most significant functions of the olfactory system including ingestion, hazard avoidance, and social communication. Thus, we investigated whether different basic emotions can be evoked in healthy people through the sense of olfaction. We asked 119 participants which odor evokes one of the six basic emotions (happiness, disgust, anger, anxiety, sadness, and surprise); another 97 participants were asked about pictures evoking those emotions. The results showed that almost every participant could name an olfactory elicitor for happiness or disgust. Olfactory elicitors of anxiety were reported less frequently, but they were still reported by three-quarters of the participants. However, for sadness and anger only about half of the participants reported an olfactory elicitor, whereas significantly more named a visual cue. Olfactory emotion elicitors were mainly related to the classes of culture, plants, and food, and visual emotion elicitors were largely related to humans. This data supports the hypothesis that in the vast majority of people, few differentiated emotions can be elicited through the olfactory channel. These emotions are happiness, disgust, and anxiety.

  9. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  10. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  11. Live attenuated Salmonella vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with antigen delivery via the type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rodríguez, María Dolores; Arteaga-Cortés, Lourdes T; Kader, Rebin; Curtiss, Roy; Clark-Curtiss, Josephine E

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health threat, and there is dire need to develop a vaccine that is safe and efficacious and confers long-lasting protection. In this study, we constructed recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV) strains with plasmids expressing fusion proteins consisting of the 80 amino-terminal amino acids of the type 3 secretion system effector SopE of Salmonella and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens early secreted antigenic target 6-kDa (ESAT-6) protein and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10). We demonstrated that the SopE-mycobacterial antigen fusion proteins were translocated into the cytoplasm of INT-407 cells in cell culture assays. Oral immunization of mice with RASV strains synthesizing SopE-ESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion proteins resulted in significant protection of the mice against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv that was similar to the protection afforded by immunization with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) administered subcutaneously. In addition, oral immunization with the RASV strains specifying these mycobacterial antigens elicited production of significant antibody titers to ESAT-6 and production of ESAT-6- or CFP-10-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-secreting splenocytes. PMID:22144486

  12. A Defined Tuberculosis Vaccine Candidate Boosts BCG and Protects Against Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C.; Ordway, Diane J.; Windish, Hillarie Plessner; Pine, Samuel O.; Kahn, Maria; Phan, Tony; Orme, Ian M.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) childhood vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious global health problem. A successful vaccine against TB that replaces or boosts BCG will include antigens that induce or recall appropriate T cell responses. Four Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens, including members of the virulence factor families PE/PPE and EsX, or antigens associated with latency were produced as a single recombinant fusion protein. When administered with the adjuvant GLA-SE, a stable oil-in-water nanoemulsion, the fusion protein ID93 was immunogenic in mice, guinea pigs, and cynomolgus monkeys. In mice, ID93/GLA-SE combination induced polyfunctional CD4 TH1-cell responses characterized by antigen-specific IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-2, as well as a reduction in the number of bacteria in the lungs of animals subsequently infected with virulent or multidrug resistant Mtb strains. Furthermore, boosting BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs with ID93/GLA-SE resulted in reduced pathology and fewer bacilli, and prevented the death of animals challenged with virulent Mtb. Finally, ID93 elicited polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in BCG-vaccinated or Mtb-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study establishes that the protein subunit vaccine ID93/GLA-SE protects against TB and MDR-TB in animals, and is a candidate for boosting the protective efficacy of the childhood BCG vaccine. PMID:20944089

  13. Intralymphatic immunization enhances DNA vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Kevin J.; Erdmann, Iris; Basch, Veronique; Sierro, Sophie; Kramps, Thomas A.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Oehen, Stefan; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2001-03-01

    Although DNA vaccines have been shown to elicit potent immune responses in animal models, initial clinical trials in humans have been disappointing, highlighting a need to optimize their immunogenicity. Naked DNA vaccines are usually administered either i.m. or intradermally. The current study shows that immunization with naked DNA by direct injection into a peripheral lymph node enhances immunogenicity by 100- to 1,000-fold, inducing strong and biologically relevant CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Because injection directly into a lymph node is a rapid and easy procedure in humans, these results have important clinical implications for DNA vaccination.

  14. Use of Mycobacterium smegmatis deficient in ADP-ribosyltransferase as surrogate for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in drug testing and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Priyanka; Miryala, Sandeep; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Rifampicin (Rif) is a first line drug used for tuberculosis treatment. However, the emergence of drug resistant strains has necessitated synthesis and testing of newer analogs of Rif. Mycobacterium smegmatis is often used as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. However, the presence of an ADP ribosyltransferase (Arr) in M. smegmatis inactivates Rif, rendering it impractical for screening of Rif analogs or other compounds when used in conjunction with them (Rif/Rif analogs). Rifampicin is also used in studying the role of various DNA repair enzymes by analyzing mutations in RpoB (a subunit of RNA polymerase) causing Rif resistance. These analyses use high concentrations of Rif when M. smegmatis is used as model. Here, we have generated M. smegmatis strains by deleting arr (Δarr). The M. smegmatis Δarr strains show minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Rif which is similar to that for M. tuberculosis. The MICs for isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were essentially unaltered for M. smegmatis Δarr. The growth profiles and mutation spectrum of Δarr and, Δarr combined with ΔudgB (udgB encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises uracil) strains were similar to their counterparts wild-type for arr. However, the mutation spectrum of ΔfpgΔarr strain differed somewhat from that of the Δfpg strain (fpg encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises 8-oxo-G). Our studies suggest M. smegmatis Δarr strain as an ideal model system in drug testing and mutation spectrum determination in DNA repair studies.

  15. Discrimination of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense from Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus in clinical isolates by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Nakanaga, Kazue; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fukano, Hanako; Sakakibara, Yumi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Wada, Shinpei; Ishii, Norihisa; Makino, Masahiko; Kuroda, Makoto; Hoshino, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing mycobacterium M. abscessus sensu lato is the causative agent of emerging pulmonary and skin diseases and of infections following cosmetic surgery and postsurgical procedures. M. abscessus sensu lato can be divided into at least three subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. Clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria were previously identified as M. abscessus by DNA-DNA hybridization. More than 30% of these 117 clinical isolates were differentiated as M. abscessus subsp. massiliense using combinations of multilocus genotyping analyses. A much more cost-effective technique to distinguish M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, a multiplex PCR assay, was developed using the whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense JCM15300 as a reference. Several primer sets were designed for single PCR to discriminate between the strains based on amplicons of different sizes. Two of these single-PCR target sites were chosen for development of the multiplex PCR assay. Multiplex PCR was successful in distinguishing clinical isolates of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense from samples previously identified as M. abscessus. This approach, which spans whole-genome sequencing and clinical diagnosis, will facilitate the acquisition of more-precise information about bacterial genomes, aid in the choice of more relevant therapies, and promote the advancement of novel discrimination and differential diagnostic assays. PMID:24197885

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium peregrinum Strain CSUR P2098

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium peregrinum is a nonpigmented rapid growing nontuberculosis species belonging to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The draft genome of M. peregrinum type I CSUR P2098 comprises 7,109,836 bp exhibiting a 66.23% G+C content, 6,894 protein-coding genes, and 100 predicted RNA genes. Its genome analysis suggests this species differs from Mycobacterium senegalense. PMID:26543113

  17. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated protein HU with structure-based inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dixit, Karuna; Ganesan, Varsha; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Dey, Debayan; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoid-associated protein HU plays an important role in maintenance of chromosomal architecture and in global regulation of DNA transactions in bacteria. Although HU is essential for growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there have been no reported attempts to perturb HU function with small molecules. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HU from Mtb. We identify a core region within the HU-DNA interface that can be targeted using stilbene derivatives. These small molecules specifically inhibit HU-DNA binding, disrupt nucleoid architecture and reduce Mtb growth. The stilbene inhibitors induce gene expression changes in Mtb that resemble those induced by HU deficiency. Our results indicate that HU is a potential target for the development of therapies against tuberculosis.

  18. Molecular beacon sequence analysis for detecting drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Piatek, A S; Tyagi, S; Pol, A C; Telenti, A; Miller, L P; Kramer, F R; Alland, D

    1998-04-01

    We developed a new approach to DNA sequence analysis that uses fluorogenic reporter molecules--molecular beacons--and demonstrated their ability to discriminate alleles in real-time PCR assays of genomic DNA. A set of overlapping molecular beacons was used to analyze an 81-bp region of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis rpoB gene for mutations that confer resistance to the antibiotic rifampin. In a blinded study of 52 rifampin-resistant and 23 rifampin-susceptible clinical isolates, this method correctly detected mutations in all of the resistant strains and in none of the susceptible strains. The assay was carried out entirely in sealed PCR tubes and was simple to perform and interpret. This approach can be used to analyze any DNA sequence of moderate length with single base pair accuracy.

  19. Metabolite analysis of Mycobacterium species under aerobic and hypoxic conditions reveals common metabolic traits.

    PubMed

    Drapal, Margit; Wheeler, Paul R; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    A metabolite profiling approach has been implemented to elucidate metabolic adaptation at set culture conditions in five Mycobacterium species (two fast- and three slow-growing) with the potential to act as model organisms for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Analysis has been performed over designated growth phases and under representative environments (nutrient and oxygen depletion) experienced by Mtb during infection. The procedure was useful in determining a range of metabolites (60-120 compounds) covering nucleotides, amino acids, organic acids, saccharides, fatty acids, glycerols, -esters, -phosphates and isoprenoids. Among these classes of compounds, key biomarker metabolites, which can act as indicators of pathway/process activity, were identified. In numerous cases, common metabolite traits were observed for all five species across the experimental conditions (e.g. uracil indicating DNA repair). Amino acid content, especially glutamic acid, highlighted the different properties between the fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria studied (e.g. nitrogen assimilation). The greatest similarities in metabolite composition between fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were apparent under hypoxic conditions. A comparison to previously reported transcriptomic data revealed a strong correlation between changes in transcription and metabolite content. Collectively, these data validate the changes in the transcription at the metabolite level, suggesting transcription exists as one of the predominant modes of cellular regulation in Mycobacterium. Sectors with restricted correlation between metabolites and transcription (e.g. hypoxic cultivation) warrant further study to elucidate and exploit post-transcriptional modes of regulation. The strong correlation between the laboratory conditions used and data derived from in vivo conditions, indicate that the approach applied is a valuable addition to our understanding of cell regulation in these Mycobacterium species.

  20. Non Mycobacterial Virulence Genes in the Genome of the Emerging Pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Schenowitz, Chantal; Dossat, Carole; Barbe, Valérie; Rottman, Martin; Macheras, Edouard; Heym, Beate; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Daffé, Mamadou; Brosch, Roland; Risler, Jean-Loup; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) causing a pseudotuberculous lung disease to which patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are particularly susceptible. We report here its complete genome sequence. The genome of M. abscessus (CIP 104536T) consists of a 5,067,172-bp circular chromosome including 4920 predicted coding sequences (CDS), an 81-kb full-length prophage and 5 IS elements, and a 23-kb mercury resistance plasmid almost identical to pMM23 from Mycobacterium marinum. The chromosome encodes many virulence proteins and virulence protein families absent or present in only small numbers in the model RGM species Mycobacterium smegmatis. Many of these proteins are encoded by genes belonging to a “mycobacterial” gene pool (e.g. PE and PPE proteins, MCE and YrbE proteins, lipoprotein LpqH precursors). However, many others (e.g. phospholipase C, MgtC, MsrA, ABC Fe(3+) transporter) appear to have been horizontally acquired from distantly related environmental bacteria with a high G+C content, mostly actinobacteria (e.g. Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp.) and pseudomonads. We also identified several metabolic regions acquired from actinobacteria and pseudomonads (relating to phenazine biosynthesis, homogentisate catabolism, phenylacetic acid degradation, DNA degradation) not present in the M. smegmatis genome. Many of the “non mycobacterial” factors detected in M. abscessus are also present in two of the pathogens most frequently isolated from CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia. This study elucidates the genetic basis of the unique pathogenicity of M. abscessus among RGM, and raises the question of similar mechanisms of pathogenicity shared by unrelated organisms in CF patients. PMID:19543527

  1. Misidentification of Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent patient presenting with a unilateral neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Kanzara, Todd; Hall, Andy; Namnyak, Simon; Owa, Tony

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old African man with a blameless medical history presented with an enlarging neck swelling of 6 months duration. He was systemically well with normal heamatobiochemistry. MRI of the neck demonstrated abnormal signalling in the subcutaneous fat overlying the posterior spinal muscles in the midline and the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scanty growth of Rhodococcus equi was reported from a turbid fine needle aspirate of the neck on two separate occasions. The swelling progressed despite numerous antibiotic combinations which necessitated surgical debridement. Analysis of debrided tissue using 16S rDNA surprisingly identified Mycobacterium fortuitum, not R equi, thereby resolving our diagnostic conundrum. PMID:24744071

  2. Introducing Forum Theatre to Elicit and Advocate Children's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Eliciting and advocating the voice of the child remains at the heart of international political agenda and also remains a central role for educational psychologists (EPs). Previous research indicates that EPs tend to use language-based methods for eliciting and advocating views of children. However, these approaches are often limited. Taking a…

  3. Freeze or Flee? Negative Stimuli Elicit Selective Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Zachary; Verges, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Humans preferentially attend to negative stimuli. A consequence of this automatic vigilance for negative valence is that negative words elicit slower responses than neutral or positive words on a host of cognitive tasks. Some researchers have speculated that negative stimuli elicit a general suppression of motor activity, akin to the freezing…

  4. Science Teachers' Elicitation Practices: Insights for Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating teachers' instructional decisions during instruction, it is clear that the nature of their elicitation is crucial for student learning. When instructional decisions are informed by information about students' conceptual understanding, significant learning is possible. This article examined the elicitation practices of two high school…

  5. Elicited Emotions and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Rivka; Klein, Pnina S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of eliciting positive and negative emotions on various cognitive functions of four- to five-year-old preschool children were examined. Emotions were elicited through presentations of "happy" and "sad" video clips, before the children performed the cognitive tasks. Behavioural (facial expressions) and physiological (heart…

  6. Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterial Infections and Quantitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Load by Two Real-Time Calibrated PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Broccolo, Francesco; Scarpellini, Paolo; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Zingale, Anna; Brambilla, Anna M.; Cichero, Paola; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lusso, Paolo; Malnati, Mauro S.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitive and specific techniques to detect and identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly in clinical specimens are important for the diagnosis and management of patients with tuberculosis (TB). We developed two real-time PCR assays, based on the IS6110 multicopy element and on the senX3-regX3 intergenic region, which provide a rapid method for the diagnosis of mycobacterial infections. The sensitivity and specificity of both assays were established by using purified DNA from 71 clinical isolates and 121 clinical samples collected from 83 patients, 20 of whom were affected by TB. Both assays are accurate, sensitive, and specific, showing a complementary pattern of Mycobacterium recognition: broader for the IS6110-based assay and restricted to the M. tuberculosis complex for the senX3-regX3-based assay. Moreover, the addition of a synthetic DNA calibrator prior to DNA extraction allowed us to measure the efficiency of DNA recovery and to control for the presence of PCR inhibitors. The mycobacterial burden of the clinical samples, as assessed by direct microscopy, correlates with the M. tuberculosis DNA load measured by the senX3-regX3-based assay. In addition, reduced levels of M. tuberculosis DNA load are present in those patients subjected to successful therapy, suggesting a potential use of this assay for monitoring treatment efficacy. Therefore, these assays represent a fully controlled high-throughput system for the evaluation of mycobacterial burden in clinical specimens. PMID:14532183

  7. Influence of polymerase brand on microarray-based spoligotyping in low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Spoligotyping is a widely used typing method for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Protocols and platforms can be adapted for direct use on patient samples. Serial dilutions of genomic DNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain DSM45071 were spoligotyped by array hybridization using 32 different commercial PCR polymerase preparations. In samples with very low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA, commercially available PCR polymerases differed in their performance, and some yielded no, or false, identification. Direct spoligotyping from samples with very low concentrations of mycobacterial DNA thus requires careful selection of polymerase and strict standardization.

  8. Severe Leprosy Reactions Due to Mycobacterium lepromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Jessurun, Jose

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by the well known Mycobacterium leprae and the newly discovered Mycobacterium lepromatosis. We describe here 2 cases of leprosy with unusual clinical presentation caused by M. lepromatosis. The patients, a 32-year-old man and a 50-year-old woman, both of Mexican origin, manifested high fever, lymphadenopathy, and florid skin lesions in the form of erythema nodosum and Lucio’s phenomenon as the first clinical presentation. Heavy infiltration of acid-fast bacilli was identified in the tissues that led to the diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy or diffuse leprosy. The patients were treated with multi-drug regimen and responded appropriately. From the lymph node tissue, we showed the bacillus to be M. lepromatosis, not M. leprae as presumed previously, by using differential polymerase chain reactions and analysis of gene sequences. These cases add to the growing studies on this organism, expand its endemic regions in Mexico, and provide more clinical insight. PMID:23111393

  9. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following hair transplant.

    PubMed

    Eustace, K; Jolliffe, V; Sahota, A; Gholam, K

    2016-10-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of scalp nodules. He had undergone hair transplantation 2 months previously. Incision and drainage of one of the nodules yielded gelatinous material, which was sent for microscopy and culture, including low-temperature culture. After 2 weeks of incubation, culture of the nodule yielded acid- and alcohol-fast bacilli, which were identified as Mycobacterium abscessus, a rapidly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterium, which has been reported to cause cutaneous, soft tissue and respiratory infections following trauma, surgery or injection with nonsterile needles. A high index of suspicion is therefore needed in patients who present with cutaneous infections after cosmetic dermatological procedures, including hair transplantation. PMID:27663154

  10. Polymorphisms of 20 regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Bigi, María M; Blanco, Federico Carlos; Araújo, Flabio R; Thacker, Tyler C; Zumárraga, Martín J; Cataldi, Angel A; Soria, Marcelo A; Bigi, Fabiana

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans and animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and other members of the MTC evolved. The genome of M. bovis is over >99.95% identical to that of M. tuberculosis but with seven deletions ranging in size from 1 to 12.7 kb. In addition, 1200 single nucleotide mutations in coding regions distinguish M. bovis from M. tuberculosis. In the present study, we assessed 75 M. tuberculosis genomes and 23 M. bovis genomes to identify non-synonymous mutations in 202 coding sequences of regulatory genes between both species. We identified species-specific variants in 20 regulatory proteins and confirmed differential expression of hypoxia-related genes between M. bovis and M. tuberculosis.

  11. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  13. Assessment of Mycobacterial, Propionibacterial, and Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA in Tissues of Greek Patients with Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gazouli, M.; Ikonomopoulos, J.; Trigidou, R.; Foteinou, M.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.

    2002-01-01

    The causes of sarcoidosis are unknown. In this study, we report the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Propionibacterium granulosum DNA in a significant proportion of Greek patients with sarcoidosis. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA was not detected in sarcoid tissues from Greek patients. Our findings are discussed. PMID:12149380

  14. Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Epidemiologically and Clinically Significant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Vyazovaya, Anna; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav; Otten, Tatiana; Millet, Julie; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Shen, A-Dong; Rastogi, Nalin; Vishnevsky, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strains are rapidly disseminating, frequently hypervirulent, and multidrug resistant. Here, we describe a method for their rapid detection by real-time PCR that targets the specific IS6110 insertion in the dnaA-dnaN genome region. The method was evaluated with a geographically and genetically diverse collection representing areas in East Asia and the former Soviet Union in which the Beijing genotype is endemic and epidemic (i.e., major foci of its global propagation) and with clinical specimens. PMID:24523461

  15. Real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of epidemiologically and clinically significant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype isolates.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Vyazovaya, Anna; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav; Otten, Tatiana; Millet, Julie; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Shen, A-Dong; Rastogi, Nalin; Vishnevsky, Boris; Narvskaya, Olga

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strains are rapidly disseminating, frequently hypervirulent, and multidrug resistant. Here, we describe a method for their rapid detection by real-time PCR that targets the specific IS6110 insertion in the dnaA-dnaN genome region. The method was evaluated with a geographically and genetically diverse collection representing areas in East Asia and the former Soviet Union in which the Beijing genotype is endemic and epidemic (i.e., major foci of its global propagation) and with clinical specimens.

  16. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. Factors that influence mycobactin dependence.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, R S; Collins, M T

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis does not produce any detectable mycobactin, an iron-binding compound that is synthesized by most Mycobacterium spp. and necessary for the growth of all mycobacteria. This study examined the influence of various culture conditions on mycobactin dependence in M. paratuberculosis. Using a radiometric growth assay, we found the minimal concentration of mycobactin J necessary for growth of M. paratuberculosis to be 0.006 microM, whereas 1.2 microM (1 microgram/ml) was required for optimal growth. In media without mycobactin at iron concentrations less than or equal to 100 microM, growth of M. paratuberculosis occurred at pH 5.0, but not pH 6.8. Iron concentrations greater than 100 microM did not significantly increase growth at pH 5.0, but at pH 6.8 the growth rate increased with increasing amounts of iron reaching a rate equal to control cultures containing mycobactin. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis appeared to lose mycobactin dependence when subcultured; however, this was subsequently shown to be a result of mycobactin carried over from primary medium. Removal of this contaminating cell-wall-associated mycobactin reestablished mycobactin dependence. We conclude that mycobactin dependence must be carefully determined because it is a key test used in identification of M. paratuberculosis and may be easily influenced by media pH, iron concentration, and mycobactin carryover from primary media. PMID:1582168

  17. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  18. Microaerophilic Conditions Promote Growth of Mycobacterium genavense

    PubMed Central

    Realini, L.; De Ridder, K.; Palomino, J.-C.; Hirschel, B.; Portaels, F.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies show that microaerophilic conditions promote the growth of Mycobacterium genavense in semisolid medium. The growth of M. genavense at 2.5 or 5% oxygen was superior to that obtained at 21% oxygen in BACTEC primary cultures (Middlebrook 7H12, pH 6.0, without additives). By using nondecontaminated specimens, it was possible to detect growth with very small inocula (25 bacilli/ml) of 12 different M. genavense strains (from nude mice) within 6 weeks of incubation under low oxygen tension; conversely, with 21% oxygen, no growth of 8 of 12 (66.7%) M. genavense strains was detected (growth index, <10). The same beneficial effect of 2.5 or 5% oxygen was observed in primary cultures of a decontaminated clinical specimen. Low oxygen tension (2.5 or 5%) is recommended for the primary isolation of M. genavense. Microaerophilic cultivation of other atypical mycobacteria, especially slow-growing (e.g., Mycobacterium avium) and difficult-to-grow (e.g., Mycobacterium ulcerans) species, is discussed. PMID:9705393

  19. Cloning, expression, and immunological evaluation of two putative secreted serine protease antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Skeiky, Y A; Lodes, M J; Guderian, J A; Mohamath, R; Bement, T; Alderson, M R; Reed, S G

    1999-08-01

    Culture filtrate proteins (CFP) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been shown to contain immunogenic components that elicit at least partial protective immunity against Mycobacterium infection. To clone genes encoding some of the immunogenic proteins, we made a high-titer rabbit anti-CFP serum and used it to screen an M. tuberculosis genomic expression library in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we describe the molecular cloning of two new protein components of CFP and identified them as members of the serine protease gene family. Their open reading frames contain N-terminal hydrophobic secretory signals consistent with their detection in CFP. The predicted molecular masses of the mature, fully processed forms of both antigens are approximately 32 kDa, in agreement with their observed sizes on immunoblots of CFP probed with polyclonal rabbit antisera made to the recombinant proteins. Thus, these proteins have been designated MTB32A and MTB32B. Interestingly, and despite 66% amino acid sequence homology between the two proteins, polyclonal rabbit antisera made to each of the recombinant proteins were found to be specific for the respective immunizing antigens. The recombinant proteins were also evaluated in in vitro assays with donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals of diverse ethnic backgrounds. MTB32A but not MTB32B stimulated PBMC from healthy PPD-positive donors but not from PPD-negative donors to proliferate and secrete gamma interferon. MTB32A is encoded by a single-copy gene which is present in both virulent and avirulent strains of the M. tuberculosis complex and the BCG strain of Mycobacterium bovis but absent in the environmental mycobacterial species tested. In addition, nucleotide sequence comparison of mtb32a of the avirulent H37Ra strain and the virulent Erdman strain, as well as with the corresponding sequences (identified in the databases) of strain H37Rv and the clinical

  20. Genomic analysis of Mycobacterium abscessus strain M139, which has an ambiguous subspecies taxonomic position.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Yun Fong; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Yan Ling; Tan, Joon Liang; Ongi, Chia Su; Ng, Kee Peng; Choo, Siew Woh

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a ubiquitous, rapidly growing species of nontuberculous mycobacteria that colonizes organic surfaces and is frequently associated with opportunistic infections in humans. We report here the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus strain M139, which shows genomic features reported to be characteristic of both Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense. PMID:23045507

  1. [Mycobacterium avium complex in water buffaloes slaughtered for consumption].

    PubMed

    Freitas, J; Panetta, J C; Curcio, M; Ueki, S Y

    2001-06-01

    Two mycobacterium strains isolated from lung tissue a apical lymph nodes of slaughtered water buffaloes were biochemically analyzed and identified as Mycobacterium avium complex strains. Association between these microorganisms and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the potential risk posed by eating infected animals and their products, was discussed.

  2. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  3. Vaccination with an Attenuated Ferritin Mutant Protects Mice against Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Pandey, Ruchi; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rodriguez, G. Marcela

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis the causative agent of tuberculosis affects millions of people worldwide. New tools for treatment and prevention of tuberculosis are urgently needed. We previously showed that a ferritin (bfrB) mutant of M. tuberculosis has altered iron homeostasis and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and to microbicidal effectors produced by activated macrophages. Most importantly, M. tuberculosis lacking BfrB is strongly attenuated in mice, especially, during the chronic phase of infection. In this study, we examined whether immunization with a bfrB mutant could confer protection against subsequent infection with virulent M. tuberculosis in a mouse model. The results show that the protection elicited by immunization with the bfrB mutant is comparable to BCG vaccination with respect to reduction of bacterial burden. However, significant distinctions in the disease pathology and host genome-wide lung transcriptome suggest improved containment of Mtb infection in animals vaccinated with the bfrB mutant, compared to BCG. We found that downmodulation of inflammatory response and enhanced fibrosis, compared to BCG vaccination, is associated with the protective response elicited by the bfrB mutant. PMID:26339659

  4. Partial characterization of a major autolysin from Mycobacterium phlei.

    PubMed

    Li, Z S; Beveridge, T J; Betts, J; Clarke, A J

    1999-01-01

    Autolytic enzyme profiles of fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were examined using SDS-PAGE zymography with incorporated mycobacterial peptidoglycan sacculi as substrate. Each species tested (Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium kansasii) appeared to produce a different set of enzymes on the basis of differing number and molecular masses. A major autolysin from M. phlei was purified to apparent homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, preparative gel electrophoresis and Mono Q FPLC. This enzyme had an estimated molecular mass of 38 kDa, an isoelectric point of 5.5 and a pH optimum of pH 7.5. Digestion of purified peptidoglycan by the enzyme resulted in the appearance of reducing sugars, suggesting that the 38 kDa autolysin is a beta-glycosidase. Partial internal amino acid sequence of the autolysin was determined and should facilitate identification, cloning and overexpression of the encoding gene. PMID:10206696

  5. First isolation of Mycobacterium spp. in Mullus spp. in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Sevim, P; Ozer, S; Rad, F

    2015-01-01

    Ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. poses health risks both to fish and humans. In this study, the presence of ichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. was investigated in red mullet (Mullus barbatus barbatus) and surmullet (Mullus surmuletus), widely caught species in the Mediterranean and the Aegean Sea. A total of 208 fish samples, provided from fishermen of Mersin province (Turkey) were studied. Using conventional methods, Mycobacterium spp. was isolated and identified at the genus level by PCR and at the species level by PCR-RFLP. Thirteen Mycobacterium spp. were detected in 13 (6.25%) fish samples. Four mycobacteria were identified as M. genavense, three as M. fortuitum, three as M. scrofulaceum, one as M. marinum, one as M. vaccae and one as M. aurum. No signs of mycobacteriosis were observed in fish samples. Findings of this study can contribute to future studies of onichthyozoonotic Mycobacterium spp. in seafood. PMID:27175166

  6. Update on Medicinal Plants with Potency on Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ofosuhene, Mark; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease has been a serious threat for people living in rural remote areas. Due to poverty or availability of traditional medicine these populations rely on herbal remedies. Currently, data on the anti-Mycobacterium ulcerans activity of plants, so far considered community-based knowledge, have been scientifically confirmed, concomitantly with some medicinal plants used to treat infectious diseases in general. Products derived from plants usually responsible for the biological properties may potentially control Mycobacterium ulcerans disease; numerous studies have aimed to describe the chemical composition of these plant antimicrobials. Thus, the present work provides the first compilation of medicinal plants that demonstrated inhibitory potential on Mycobacterium ulcerans. This work shows that the natural products represent potential alternatives to standard therapies for use as curative medicine for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. PMID:26779539

  7. Gene Transfer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Shuttle Phasmids to Enlightenment.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William R

    2014-04-01

    Infectious diseases have plagued humankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems. Yet vaccines have eradicated smallpox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents. These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases, followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. The discovery of DNA as genetic material and the understanding of how this information translates into specific phenotypes have changed the paradigm for developing new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents. The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e., genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance. The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts. Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host. The construction of shuttle phasmids-chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages-was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis. This review will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis research.

  8. Characterization of Mycobacterium Abscessus Subtypes in Shanghai of China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liulin; Li, Bing; Chu, Haiqing; Huang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Lan; Sun, Xiwen; Xiao, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemic characteristics of Mycobacterium abscessus in Shanghai. Fifty-five strains from 55 M. abscessus pulmonary disease patients were isolated. Drug sensitivity was measured by a broth microdilution method. Subtypes of M. abscessus were identified by DNA sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mining spanning tree (MST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyze sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes (CC). Clinical manifestations were assessed by CT imaging. We identified 42 A isolates, 11 M, and 2 B-subtypes. A and M were highly sensitive to tigecycline and amikacin (97.6–100%). The A-type easily developed drug resistance against clarithromycin. Both types were highly resistance to sulfonamides, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem, and tobramycin. MLST analysis identified 41 STs including 32 new STs. The MST algorithm distributed 55 isolates into 12 separate CC. The PFGE analysis exhibited 53 distinct restriction patterns and the M-type was closely clustered according to their ST and CC numbers. CT imaging showed that tree-in-bud and patch shadow were commonly observed in M-type, whereas pulmonary cavities were often found in A-type infection patients (P < 0.001). ST1 in A and ST23 in M-type were the main epidemic strains in Shanghai. The M-type appeared to be prone to epidemic nosocomial transmission. PMID:26817866

  9. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from central India

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Prabha; Chauhan, D.S.; Sharma, Pragya; Panwalkar, Nikita; Chourey, Manju; Patidar, Mohan Lal; Yadav, Priyanka; Chandrasekaran, V.; Ohri, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a paucity of data available on genetic biodiversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from central India. The present study was carried out on isolates of M. tuberculosis cultured from diagnostic clinical samples of patients from Bhopal, central India, using spoligotyping as a method of molecular typing. Methods: DNA was extracted from 340 isolates of M. tuberculosis from culture, confirmed as M. tuberculosis by molecular and biochemical methods and subjected to spoligotyping. The results were compared with the international SITVIT2 database. Results: Sixty five different spoligo international type (SIT) patterns were observed. A total of 239 (70.3%) isolates could be clustered into 25 SITs. The Central Asian (CAS) and East African Indian (EAI) families were found to be the two major circulating families in this region. SIT26/CAS1_DEL was identified as the most predominant type, followed by SIT11/EAI3_IND and SIT288/CAS2. Forty (11.8%) unique (non-clustered) and 61 (17.9%) orphan isolates were identified in the study. There was no significant association of clustering with clinical and demographic characteristics of patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Well established SITs were found to be predominant in our study. SIT26/CAS1_DEL was the most predominant type. However, the occurrence of a substantial number of orphan isolates may indicate the presence of active spatial and temporal evolutionary dynamics within the isolates of M. tuberculosis. PMID:27377505

  10. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  11. Gene Transfer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Shuttle Phasmids to Enlightenment

    PubMed Central

    JACOBS, WILLIAM R.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have plagued humankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems. Yet vaccines have eradicated smallpox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents. These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases, followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. The discovery of DNA as genetic material and the understanding of how this information translates into specific phenotypes have changed the paradigm for developing new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents. The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e., genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance. The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts. Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host. The construction of shuttle phasmids—chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages—was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis. This review will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis research. “I had to know my enemy in order to prevail against him.”Nelson Mandela PMID:26105819

  12. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  13. Genetic markers, genotyping methods & next generation sequencing in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Srinidhi; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2015-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology (ME) is one of the main areas in tuberculosis research which is widely used to study the transmission epidemics and outbreaks of tubercle bacilli. It exploits the presence of various polymorphisms in the genome of the bacteria that can be widely used as genetic markers. Many DNA typing methods apply these genetic markers to differentiate various strains and to study the evolutionary relationships between them. The three widely used genotyping tools to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spacer oligotyping (Spoligotyping), and mycobacterial interspersed repeat units - variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). A new prospect towards ME was introduced with the development of whole genome sequencing (WGS) and the next generation sequencing (NGS) methods, where the entire genome is sequenced that not only helps in pointing out minute differences between the various sequences but also saves time and the cost. NGS is also found to be useful in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), comparative genomics and also various aspects about transmission dynamics. These techniques enable the identification of mycobacterial strains and also facilitate the study of their phylogenetic and evolutionary traits. PMID:26205019

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis- induced neutrophil extracellular traps activate human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Braian, Clara; Hogea, Valentin; Stendahl, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), containing DNA and several biologically active cytosolic and granular proteins. These NETs may assist in the innate immune defense against different pathogens. We investigated whether the NET-forming neutrophils mediate an activating signal to macrophages during the early multicellular inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation. Mtb-induced NETs were found to be reactive oxygen species dependent and phagocytosis dependent. A neutrophil elastase inhibitor also delayed NET formation. However, NET formation occurred independently of Mtb-induced apoptosis. We observed close interactions between macrophages and Mtb-activated neutrophils, where macrophages bound and phagocytosed NETs. Significant secretion of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-10 were detected from macrophages cocultured with NETs from Mtb-activated but not phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. NETs binding heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) or recombinant Hsp72 were able to trigger cytokine release from macrophages. Only Mtb-induced NETs contained Hsp72, suggesting that these NETs can transfer this danger signal to adjacent macrophages. We propose that Hsp72 sequestered in NETs plays an important role in the interaction between neutrophils and macrophages during the early innate immune phase of an Mtb infection. The immunomodulatory role of NETs and proteins derived from them may influence not only chronic inflammation during tuberculosis but also immune regulation and autoimmunity.

  15. Proteomic analysis of ofloxacin-mono resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Lata, Manju; Sharma, Divakar; Deo, Nirmala; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar; Bisht, Deepa; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-09-01

    Drug resistance particularly, multi drug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major problem in the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Ofloxacin (OFX) has been used as second-line drug against MDR-TB. The principal target of the OFX is DNA gyrase encoded by gyrA and gyrB genes. Many explanations have been proposed for drug resistance to OFX but still some mechanisms are unknown. As proteins manifest most of the biological processes, these are attractive targets for developing drugs and diagnostics/therapeutics. We examined the OFX resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates by proteomic approach (2DE-MALDI-TOF-MS) and bioinformatic tools under OFX induced conditions. Our study showed fourteen proteins (Rv0685, Rv0363c, Rv2744c, Rv3803c, Rv2534c, Rv2140c, Rv1475c, Rv0440, Rv2245, Rv1436, Rv3551, Rv0148, Rv2882c and Rv0733) with increased intensities in OFX resistant and OFX induced as compared to susceptible isolates. Bioinformatic analysis of hypothetical proteins (Rv2744c, Rv2140c, Rv3551 and Rv0148) revealed the presence of conserved motifs and domains. Molecular docking showed proper interaction of OFX with residues of conserved motifs. These proteins might be involved in the OFX modulation/neutralization and act as novel resistance mechanisms as well as potential for diagnostics and drug targets against OFX resistance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  16. Alternative activation modifies macrophage resistance to Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Aranday-Cortés, Elihú; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of macrophage alternative activation in the intracellular pathogen natural disease resistance phenotype of the host. Macrophage monolayers from resistant (R) (3) or susceptible (S) (3) cattle donors were treated with 10 ng/ml of bovine recombinant IL-4 (rbIL-4), and infected with virulent and avirulent Mycobacterium bovis (MOI 10:1). Bactericidal assays were performed to assess the bacterial phagocytic index and intracellular survival. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and used to analyze the relative changes in gene expression of IL-10, IL-12, IL-18 IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, MCP-2, IL-6, MIP-1, MIP-3, iNOS, ARGII and SLAM by real time PCR. Cell supernatants were collected and nitric oxide and arginase production was assessed. Apoptosis induction was measured by TUNEL. IL-4 treatment increased the phagocytic index in both R and S macrophages; however intracellular survival was augmented mainly in S macrophages. Alternative activation decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide production and DNA fragmentation mainly in R macrophages. On the other hand, arginase production was not different between R and S macrophages. Alternative activation modifies the macrophage response against M. bovis. IL-4 treatment minimized the functional differences that exist between R and S macrophages.

  17. Otitis media and otomastoiditis caused by Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii).

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Cheng, Aristine; Liu, Chia-Ying; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Liang, Sheng-Kai; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-11-01

    We describe two patients with otologic infections caused by Mycobacterium massiliense (M. abscessus subsp. bolletti) which were identified using erm(41) PCR, 23S rRNA, and rpoB gene sequence analysis. They were middle-aged adults with underlying otologic diseases and were treated successfully with clarithromycin-based combination regimens for 3 and 9 months, respectively. PMID:22933592

  18. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi

    2015-01-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26259792

  19. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-10-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:26259792

  20. CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2012-10-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

  1. Spoonerisms as Sequencer Conflicts: Evidence from Artifically Elicited Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baars, Bernard J.; Motley, Michael T.

    1976-01-01

    Presents evidence that spoonerisms result from a conflict in word sequencing that carries through to phoneme sequencing, and in the process illustrates the use of some techniques for the experimental elicitation of spoonerisms. (Author/RK)

  2. Csor Is a Novel Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Copper-Sensing Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Ramesh, A.; Ma, Z.; Ward, S.K.; Zhang, L.; George, G.N.; Talaat, A.M.; Sacchettini, J.C.; Giedroc, D.P.; /Texas A-M /Wisconsin U., Madison /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-07-10

    Copper is an essential element that becomes highly cytotoxic when concentrations exceed the capacity of cells to sequester the ion. Here, we identify a new copper-specific repressor (CsoR) of a copper-sensitive operon (cso) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is representative of a large, previously uncharacterized family of proteins (DUF156). Electronic and X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal that CsoR binds a single-monomer mole equivalent of Cu(I) to form a trigonally coordinated (S(2)N) Cu(I) complex. The 2.6-A crystal structure of copper-loaded CsoR shows a homodimeric antiparallel four-helix bundle architecture that represents a novel DNA-binding fold. The Cu(I) is coordinated by Cys36, Cys65' and His61' in a subunit bridging site. Cu(I) binding negatively regulates the binding of CsoR to a DNA fragment encompassing the operator-promoter region of the Mtb cso operon; this results in derepression of the operon in Mtb and the heterologous host Mycobacterium smegmatis. Substitution of Cys36 or His61 with alanine abolishes Cu(I)- and CsoR-dependent regulation in vivo and in vitro. Potential roles of CsoR in Mtb pathogenesis are discussed.

  3. Deglycosylation of HIV-1 AE Gp140 enhances the capacity to elicit neutralizing antibodies against the heterologous HIV-1 clade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congyou; Wan, Yanmin; Shi, Jijing; Zhou, Mingzhe; Meng, Zhefeng; Yuan, Songhua; Qiu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Xuemei; Liu, Chaoqi; Xu, Jianqing

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether deglycosylation of an HIV-1 AE recombinant-derived gp140 could enhance the induction of neutralizing antibodies. N-to-Q mutations were introduced in the V1/V2 (m157/161) or V4 (m382/388) loops by using overlapping PCR. BALB/c mice were inoculated with different DNA vaccines at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 7. The Elispot assay was used to quantify Env-specific T-cell immunity, and the TZM-bl cell-based in vitro neutralizing assay with primary isolates was used to assess humoral immune responses. Our data showed that two mutant DNA vaccines, designated m157/161 and m382/388, mounted total T-cell responses that were at levels similar those of the unmutated vaccine. Although the levels of binding antibodies elicited by the two mutants were significantly lower than the levels elicited by the unmutated vaccine, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies were observed only in the sera that received the mutant DNA vaccines. These data demonstrate that deglycosylation of HIV-1 Env could enhance the capacity to elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20455767

  4. Differential Specificity and Immunogenicity of Adenovirus Type 5 Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by Natural Infection or Immunization▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Gall, Jason G. D.; Nason, Martha; King, C. Richter; Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; McElrath, M. Juliana; Morgan, Cecilia A.; Churchyard, Gavin; Baden, Lindsey R.; Duerr, Ann C.; Keefer, Michael C.; Graham, Barney S.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent clinical trial of a T-cell-based AIDS vaccine delivered with recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vectors showed no efficacy in lowering viral load and was associated with increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Preexisting immunity to Ad5 in humans could therefore affect both immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy. We hypothesized that vaccine-induced immunity is differentially affected, depending on whether subjects were exposed to Ad5 by natural infection or by vaccination. Serum samples from vaccine trial subjects receiving a DNA/rAd5 AIDS vaccine with or without prior immunity to Ad5 were examined for the specificity of their Ad5 neutralizing antibodies and their effect on HIV-1 immune responses. Here, we report that rAd5 neutralizing antibodies were directed to different components of the virion, depending on whether they were elicited by natural infection or vaccination in HIV vaccine trial subjects. Neutralizing antibodies elicited by natural infection were directed largely to the Ad5 fiber, while exposure to rAd5 through vaccination elicited antibodies primarily to capsid proteins other than fiber. Notably, preexisting immunity to Ad5 fiber from natural infection significantly reduced the CD4 and CD8 cell responses to HIV Gag after DNA/rAd5 vaccination. The specificity of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies therefore differs depending on the route of exposure, and natural Ad5 infection compromises Ad5 vaccine-induced immunity to weak immunogens, such as HIV-1 Gag. These results have implications for future AIDS vaccine trials and the design of next-generation gene-based vaccine vectors. PMID:19846512

  5. Elicitation of natural language representations of uncertainty using computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Travis, C.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation is an important aspect of risk analysis. Knowledge about risks must be accurately elicited from experts for use in risk assessments. Knowledge and perceptions of risks must also be accurately elicited from the public in order to intelligently perform policy analysis and develop and implement programs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing computer technology to effectively and efficiently elicit knowledge from experts and the public. This paper discusses software developed to elicit natural language representations of uncertainty. The software is written in Common Lisp and resides on VAX Computers System and Symbolics Lisp machines. The software has three goals, to determine preferences for using natural language terms for representing uncertainty; likelihood rankings of the terms; and how likelihood estimates are combined to form new terms. The first two goals relate to providing useful results for those interested in risk communication. The third relates to providing cognitive data to further our understanding of people's decision making under uncertainty. The software is used to elicit natural language terms used to express the likelihood of various agents causing cancer in humans and cancer resulting in various maladies, and the likelihood of everyday events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; May, Andrew P; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  7. Human Neoplasms Elicit Multiple Specific Immune Responses in the Autologous Host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Ugur; Tureci, Ozlem; Schmitt, Holger; Cochlovius, Bjorn; Johannes, Thomas; Schmits, Rudolf; Stenner, Frank; Luo, Guorong; Schobert, Ingrid; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    1995-12-01

    Expression of cDNA libraries from human melanoma, renal cancer, astrocytoma, and Hodgkin disease in Escherichia coli and screening for clones reactive with high-titer IgG antibodies in autologous patient serum lead to the discovery of at least four antigens with a restricted expression pattern in each tumor. Besides antigens known to elicit T-cell responses, such as MAGE-1 and tyrosinase, numerous additional antigens that were overexpressed or specifically expressed in tumors of the same type were identified. Sequence analyses suggest that many of these molecules, besides being the target of a specific immune response, might be of relevance for tumor growth. Antibodies to a given antigen were usually confined to patients with the same tumor type. The unexpected frequency of human tumor antigens, which can be readily defined at the molecular level by the serological analysis of autologous tumor cDNA expression cloning, indicates that human neoplasms elicit multiple specific immune responses in the autologous host and provides diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to human cancer.

  8. Thiol reductive stress induces cellulose-anchored biofilm formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Mavi, Parminder Singh; Bhatt, Deepak; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) forms biofilms harbouring antibiotic-tolerant bacilli in vitro, but the factors that induce biofilm formation and the nature of the extracellular material that holds the cells together are poorly understood. Here we show that intracellular thiol reductive stress (TRS) induces formation of Mtb biofilms in vitro, which harbour drug-tolerant but metabolically active bacteria with unchanged levels of ATP/ADP, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH. The development of these biofilms requires DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional analysis suggests that Mtb modulates only ∼7% of its genes for survival in biofilms. In addition to proteins, lipids and DNA, the extracellular material in these biofilms is primarily composed of polysaccharides, with cellulose being a key component. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Mtb biofilm formation, although the clinical relevance of Mtb biofilms in human tuberculosis remains unclear. PMID:27109928

  9. Thiol reductive stress induces cellulose-anchored biofilm formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Mavi, Parminder Singh; Bhatt, Deepak; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-04-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) forms biofilms harbouring antibiotic-tolerant bacilli in vitro, but the factors that induce biofilm formation and the nature of the extracellular material that holds the cells together are poorly understood. Here we show that intracellular thiol reductive stress (TRS) induces formation of Mtb biofilms in vitro, which harbour drug-tolerant but metabolically active bacteria with unchanged levels of ATP/ADP, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH. The development of these biofilms requires DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional analysis suggests that Mtb modulates only similar to 7% of its genes for survival in biofilms. In addition to proteins, lipids and DNA, the extracellularmore » material in these biofilms is primarily composed of polysaccharides, with cellulose being a key component. Lastly, our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Mtb biofilm formation, although the clinical relevance of Mtb biofilms in human tuberculosis remains unclear.« less

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by PCR in fresh cheese from local markets in Hidalgo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Estrada-Chávez, Yessica; Zúñiga-Estrada, Armidá; Lopez-Rincón, Gonzálo; Hernández, David Ulises Miranda; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacterial DNA in samples extracted from fresh cheeses; 95 samples of fresh cheese were obtained from municipal markets in the state of Hidalgo, in central Mexico, and were analyzed in triplicate. The exogenous control for the amplification was the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome b (cyt-b). M. tuberculosis complex DNA was detected by nested-PCR amplification of a fragment of the mpb70 gene in six samples, four of which were obtained from regions with enzootic bovine tuberculosis. These results suggest that cheeses prepared with raw milk contaminated with M. bovis are being sold and consumed by humans, which may cause tuberculosis.

  11. Thiol reductive stress induces cellulose-anchored biofilm formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Mavi, Parminder Singh; Bhatt, Deepak; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) forms biofilms harbouring antibiotic-tolerant bacilli in vitro, but the factors that induce biofilm formation and the nature of the extracellular material that holds the cells together are poorly understood. Here we show that intracellular thiol reductive stress (TRS) induces formation of Mtb biofilms in vitro, which harbour drug-tolerant but metabolically active bacteria with unchanged levels of ATP/ADP, NAD(+)/NADH and NADP(+)/NADPH. The development of these biofilms requires DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional analysis suggests that Mtb modulates only ∼7% of its genes for survival in biofilms. In addition to proteins, lipids and DNA, the extracellular material in these biofilms is primarily composed of polysaccharides, with cellulose being a key component. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Mtb biofilm formation, although the clinical relevance of Mtb biofilms in human tuberculosis remains unclear. PMID:27109928

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by PCR in fresh cheese from local markets in Hidalgo, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Estrada-Chávez, Yessica; Zúñiga-Estrada, Armidá; Lopez-Rincón, Gonzálo; Hernández, David Ulises Miranda; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacterial DNA in samples extracted from fresh cheeses; 95 samples of fresh cheese were obtained from municipal markets in the state of Hidalgo, in central Mexico, and were analyzed in triplicate. The exogenous control for the amplification was the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome b (cyt-b). M. tuberculosis complex DNA was detected by nested-PCR amplification of a fragment of the mpb70 gene in six samples, four of which were obtained from regions with enzootic bovine tuberculosis. These results suggest that cheeses prepared with raw milk contaminated with M. bovis are being sold and consumed by humans, which may cause tuberculosis. PMID:24780344

  13. Validation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex, and Mycobacterium avium Complex Directly from Clinical Samples by Use of the BD Max Open System.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Widen, Raymond

    2016-06-01

    A multiplex real-time PCR was validated on the BD Max open system to detect different Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium spp. directly from clinical samples. The PCR results were compared to those with traditional cultures. The multiplex PCR assay was found to be a specific and sensitive method for the rapid detection of mycobacteria directly from clinical specimens.

  14. Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A minireview

    PubMed Central

    Alnimr, Amani M.

    2015-01-01

    Dormancy models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis play important roles in understanding various aspects of tuberculosis pathogenesis and in the testing of novel therapeutic regimens. By simulating the latent tuberculosis infection, in which the bacteria exist in a non-replicative state, the models demonstrate reduced susceptibility to antimycobacterial agents. This minireview outlines the models available for simulating latent tuberculosis both in vitro and in several animal species. Additionally, this minireview discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these models for investigating the bacterial subpopulations and susceptibilities to sterilization by various antituberculosis drugs. PMID:26413043

  15. Bacteremia with an Unusual Pathogen: Mycobacterium neoaurum

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium neoaurum (M. neoaurum) is an infrequently encountered cause of infection in humans. It is a member of the rapidly growing mycobacteria family. It predominately afflicts those with a compromised immune status and a chronically indwelling vascular access. Isolation of this organism is challenging yet the advent of 16s ribosomal sequencing paved the way for more sensitive detection. No treatment guidelines are available and treatment largely depends on the experience of the treating physician and nature of the isolate. We report a case of M. neoaurum bacteremia in an immune competent host, with a chronically placed peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). PMID:27807489

  16. Urinary mycobacterium avium presenting as sterile pyuria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Samplaski, Mary; Mazzulli, Tony; Lo, Kirk; Grober, Ethan; Jarvi, Keith Allen

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old healthy woman presented with persistent, asymptomatic sterile pyuria detected by her family physician. While she did not have symptoms, the patient recounts that she has had cloudy urine for years. Cultures of the urine for bacteria showed no growth and no fungi were identified. First-morning urine samples were sent for both tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterium species testing. The culture grew genotypically identified Mycobaterium avium complex (MAC). Mantoux skin testing was positive. No urological abnormalities were detected by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the urinary tract.

  17. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  18. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  19. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  20. Mycobacterium marinum osteomyelitis of the first metatarsal.

    PubMed

    López Zabala, Ibon; Poggio Cano, Daniel; García-Elvira, Rubén; Asunción Márquez, Jordi

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium marinum (MM) infections secondary to injuries occurring in the aquatic environment have been widely described in literature, especially in immunosuppressed patients. The most frequent locations are the hands and forearms in patients exposed to water. The infection usually presents as a granuloma affecting superficial structures. However, due to the difficulty of diagnosis and the chronic course of the condition, deeper structures may eventually become affected. Late presentation of deep-seated infections in bones in the foot is exceptional. We report a case of osteomyelitis of the first metatarsal bone caused by MM after accidental puncture injury by a sea urchin requiring surgical treatment in a not immunosuppressed patient. PMID:26662782

  1. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection. PMID:26511731

  2. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Boyle, David S; McNerney, Ruth; Teng Low, Hwee; Leader, Brandon Troy; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C; Meyer, Jessica C; O'Sullivan, Denise M; Brooks, David G; Piepenburg, Olaf; Forrest, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Improved access to effective tests for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) has been designated a public health priority by the World Health Organisation. In high burden TB countries nucleic acid based TB tests have been restricted to centralised laboratories and specialised research settings. Requirements such as a constant electrical supply, air conditioning and skilled, computer literate operators prevent implementation of such tests in many settings. Isothermal DNA amplification technologies permit the use of simpler, less energy intensive detection platforms more suited to low resource settings that allow the accurate diagnosis of a disease within a short timeframe. Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) is a rapid, low temperature isothermal DNA amplification reaction. We report here RPA-based detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) DNA in <20 minutes at 39 °C. Assays for two MTC specific targets were investigated, IS6110 and IS1081. When testing purified MTC genomic DNA, limits of detection of 6.25 fg (IS6110) and 20 fg (IS1081)were consistently achieved. When testing a convenience sample of pulmonary specimens from suspected TB patients, RPA demonstrated superior accuracy to indirect fluorescence microscopy. Compared to culture, sensitivities for the IS1081 RPA and microscopy were 91.4% (95%CI: 85, 97.9) and 86.1% (95%CI: 78.1, 94.1) respectively (n = 71). Specificities were 100% and 88.6% (95% CI: 80.8, 96.1) respectively. For the IS6110 RPA and microscopy sensitivities of 87.5% (95%CI: 81.7, 93.2) and 70.8% (95%CI: 62.9, 78.7) were obtained (n = 90). Specificities were 95.4 (95% CI: 92.3,98.1) and 88% (95% CI: 83.6, 92.4) respectively. The superior specificity of RPA for detecting tuberculosis was due to the reduced ability of fluorescence microscopy to distinguish Mtb complex from other acid fast bacteria. The rapid nature of the RPA assay and its low energy requirement compared to other amplification technologies suggest RPA-based TB assays

  3. Analytical and Clinical Evaluation of the Epistem Genedrive Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shenai, Shubhada; Armstrong, Derek T; Valli, Eloise; Dolinger, David L; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Dietze, Reynaldo; Dalcolmo, Margareth Pretti; Nicol, Mark P; Zemanay, Widaad; Manabe, Yuka; Hadad, David Jamil; Marques-Rodrigues, Patricia; Palaci, Moises; Peres, Renata L; Gaeddert, Mary; Armakovitch, Sandra; Nonyane, Bareng A S; Denkinger, Claudia M; Banada, Padmapriya; Joloba, Moses L; Ellner, Jerrold; Boehme, Catharina; Alland, David; Dorman, Susan E

    2016-04-01

    The Epistem Genedrive assay rapidly detects the Mycobacterium tuberculosis omplex from sputum and is currently available for clinical use. However, the analytical and clinical performance of this test has not been fully evaluated. The analytical limit of detection (LOD) of the Genedrive PCR amplification was tested with genomic DNA; the performance of the complete (sample processing plus amplification) system was tested by spiking M. tuberculosismc(2)6030 cells into distilled water andM. tuberculosis-negative sputum. Specificity was tested using common respiratory pathogens and nontuberculosis mycobacteria. A clinical evaluation enrolled adults with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis, obtained three sputum samples from each participant, and compared the accuracy of the Gene drive to that of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay using M. tuberculosiscultures as the reference standard. The Genedrive assay had an LOD of 1 pg/μl (100 genomic DNA copies/reaction). The LODs of the system were 2.5 × 10(4)CFU/ml and 2.5 × 10(5)CFU/ml for cells spiked into water and sputum, respectively. False-positiverpoBprobe signals were observed in 3/32 (9.4%) of the negative controls and also in few samples containing Mycobacterium abscessus,Mycobacterium gordonae, o rMycobacterium thermoresistibile In the clinical study, among 336 analyzed participants, the overall sensitivities for the tuberculosis case detection of Gene drive, Xpert, and smear microscopy were 45.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 35.2% to 55.8%), 91.8% (95% CI, 84.4% to 96.4%), and 77.3% (95% CI, 67.7% to 85.2%), respectively. The sensitivities of Gene drive and Xpert for the detection of smear-microscopy-negative tuberculosis were 0% (95% CI, 0% to 15.4%) and 68.2% (95% CI, 45.1% to 86.1%), respectively. The Genedrive assay did not meet performance standards recommended by the World Health Organization for a smear microscopy replacement tuberculosis test. Epistem is working on modifications to improve the assay.

  4. Strain Variation in Mycobacterium marinum Fish Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.; Kvitt, H.; Diamant, A.; Zlotkin, A.; Knibb, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular characterization of two Mycobacterium marinum genes, 16S rRNA and hsp65, was carried out with a total of 21 isolates from various species of fish from both marine and freshwater environments of Israel, Europe, and the Far East. The nucleotide sequences of both genes revealed that all M. marinum isolates from fish in Israel belonged to two different strains, one infecting marine (cultured and wild) fish and the other infecting freshwater (cultured) fish. A restriction enzyme map based on the nucleotide sequences of both genes confirmed the divergence of the Israeli marine isolates from the freshwater isolates and differentiated the Israeli isolates from the foreign isolates, with the exception of one of three Greek isolates from marine fish which was identical to the Israeli marine isolates. The second isolate from Greece exhibited a single base alteration in the 16S rRNA sequence, whereas the third isolate was most likely a new Mycobacterium species. Isolates from Denmark and Thailand shared high sequence homology to complete identity with reference strain ATCC 927. Combined analysis of the two gene sequences increased the detection of intraspecific variations and was thus of importance in studying the taxonomy and epidemiology of this aquatic pathogen. Whether the Israeli M. marinum strain infecting marine fish is endemic to the Red Sea and found extremely susceptible hosts in the exotic species imported for aquaculture or rather was accidentally introduced with occasional imports of fingerlings from the Mediterranean Sea could not be determined. PMID:12406715

  5. Mycobacterium spp. in wild game in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Pate, Mateja; Zajc, Urška; Kušar, Darja; Žele, Diana; Vengušt, Gorazd; Pirš, Tina; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    Wildlife species are an important reservoir of mycobacterial infections that may jeopardise efforts to control and eradicate bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Slovenia is officially free of bTB, but no data on the presence of mycobacteria in wild animals has been reported. In this study, samples of liver and lymph nodes were examined from 306 apparently healthy free-range wild animals of 13 species in Slovenia belonging to the families Cervidae, Suidae, Canidae, Mustelidae and Bovidae. Mycobacteria were isolated from 36/306 (11.8%) animals (red deer, roe deer, fallow deer, wild boar and jackal) and identified by PCR, commercial diagnostic kits and sequencing. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria identified in five species were Mycobacterium peregrinum, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. intracellulare, M. confluentis, M. fortuitum, M. terrae, M. avium subsp. avium, M. celatum, M. engbaekii, M. neoaurum, M. nonchromogenicum and M. vaccae.

  6. Targeting the histidine pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Juleane; Nunes, José Eduardo S; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to a single bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of multi-, extensively, and totally drug-resistant strains, complicated by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, and the length of tuberculosis chemotherapy have led to an urgent and continued need for the development of new and more effective antitubercular drugs. Within this context, the L-histidine biosynthetic pathway, which converts 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate to L-histidine in ten enzymatic steps, has been reported as a promising target of antimicrobial agents. This pathway is found in bacteria, archaebacteria, lower eukaryotes, and plants but is absent in mammals, making these enzymes highly attractive targets for the drug design of new antimycobacterial compounds with selective toxicity. Moreover, the biosynthesis of L-histidine has been described as essential for Mtb growth in vitro. Accordingly, a comprehensive overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine pathway enzymes as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents is provided, mainly summarizing the previously reported inhibition data for Mtb or orthologous proteins. PMID:24111909

  7. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  8. Efficacies of selected disinfectants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Best, M; Sattar, S A; Springthorpe, V S; Kennedy, M E

    1990-10-01

    The activities of 10 formulations as mycobactericidal agents in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-contaminated suspensions (suspension test) and stainless steel surfaces (carrier test) were investigated with sputum as the organic load. The quaternary ammonium compound, chlorhexidine gluconate, and an iodophor were ineffective in all tests. Ethanol (70%) was effective against M. tuberculosis only in suspension in the absence of sputum. Povidone-iodine was not as efficacious when the test organism was dried on a surface as it was in suspension, and its activity was further reduced in the presence of sputum. Sodium hypochlorite required a higher concentration of available chlorine to achieve an effective level of disinfection than did sodium dichloroisocyanurate. Phenol (5%) was effective under all test conditions, producing at least a 4-log10 reduction in CFU. The undiluted glutaraldehyde-phenate solution was effective against M. tuberculosis and a second test organism, Mycobacterium smegmatis, even in the presence of dried sputum, whereas the diluted solution (1:16) was only effective against M. smegmatis in the suspension test. A solution of 2% glutaraldehyde was effective against M. tuberculosis. This investigation presents tuberculocidal efficacy data generated by methods simulating actual practices of routine disinfection. PMID:2121783

  9. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  10. Mycobacterium spp. in wild game in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Pate, Mateja; Zajc, Urška; Kušar, Darja; Žele, Diana; Vengušt, Gorazd; Pirš, Tina; Ocepek, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    Wildlife species are an important reservoir of mycobacterial infections that may jeopardise efforts to control and eradicate bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Slovenia is officially free of bTB, but no data on the presence of mycobacteria in wild animals has been reported. In this study, samples of liver and lymph nodes were examined from 306 apparently healthy free-range wild animals of 13 species in Slovenia belonging to the families Cervidae, Suidae, Canidae, Mustelidae and Bovidae. Mycobacteria were isolated from 36/306 (11.8%) animals (red deer, roe deer, fallow deer, wild boar and jackal) and identified by PCR, commercial diagnostic kits and sequencing. Non-tuberculous mycobacteria identified in five species were Mycobacterium peregrinum, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. intracellulare, M. confluentis, M. fortuitum, M. terrae, M. avium subsp. avium, M. celatum, M. engbaekii, M. neoaurum, M. nonchromogenicum and M. vaccae. PMID:26639827

  11. Molecular Basis of the Increase in Invertase Activity Elicited by Gravistimulation of Oat-Shoot Pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Kim, Donghern; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom) increase in invertase activity is elicited by gravistimulation in oatshoot pulvini starting within 3h after treatment. In order to analyze the regulation of invertase gene expression in this system, we examined the effect of gravistimulation on invertase mRNA induction. Total RNA and poly(A)(+)RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oligonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino-acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). A partial-length cDNA (550 base pairs) was obtained and characterized. There was a 52 % deduced amino-acid sequence homology to that of carrot beta-fructosi- dase and a 48 % homology to that of tomato invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obvious transient accumulation of invertase mRNA elicited by gravistimulation of oat pulvini. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1h following gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher (five-fold) than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient enhancement of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. These data indicate that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. Southern blot analysis showed that there were four genomic DNA fragments hybridized to the invertase cDNA. This suggests that an invertase gene family may exist in oat plants.

  12. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L M C; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2015-09-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by "dormant" M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ(+)/TNF(+)) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting.

  13. Synthetic Long Peptide Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Latency Antigen Rv1733c Protects against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Responsible for 9 million new cases of active disease and nearly 2 million deaths each year, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat of overwhelming dimensions. Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine available, fails to confer lifelong protection and to prevent reactivation of latent infection. Although 15 new vaccine candidates are now in clinical trials, an effective vaccine against TB remains elusive, and new strategies for vaccination are vital. BCG vaccination fails to induce immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency antigens. Synthetic long peptides (SLPs) combined with adjuvants have been studied mostly for therapeutic cancer vaccines, yet not for TB, and proved to induce efficient antitumor immunity. This study investigated an SLP derived from Rv1733c, a major M. tuberculosis latency antigen which is highly expressed by “dormant” M. tuberculosis and well recognized by T cells from latently M. tuberculosis-infected individuals. In order to assess its in vivo immunogenicity and protective capacity, Rv1733c SLP in CpG was administered to HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Immunization with Rv1733c SLP elicited gamma interferon-positive/tumor necrosis factor-positive (IFN-γ+/TNF+) and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells and Rv1733c-specific antibodies and led to a significant reduction in the bacterial load in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-challenged mice. This was observed both in a pre- and in a post-M. tuberculosis challenge setting. Moreover, Rv1733c SLP immunization significantly boosted the protective efficacy of BCG, demonstrating the potential of M. tuberculosis latency antigens to improve BCG efficacy. These data suggest a promising role for M. tuberculosis latency antigen Rv1733c-derived SLPs as a novel TB vaccine approach, both in a prophylactic and in a postinfection setting. PMID:26202436

  14. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  15. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available. PMID:27556566

  16. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available.

  17. Gender differences in preschoolers' help-eliciting communication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B

    1999-09-01

    Gender differences in help-eliciting communication and the relationship of such utterances with ability were explored. A sample of 71 preschoolers (38 boys, 33 girls; mean age 4 years 3 months) were videotaped as they solved a difficult puzzle. Spontaneous talk was analyzed for orientation (to whom or to what an utterance referred) and for the frequency of utterances coded as help eliciting. Significant main effects for gender were observed, with more frequent help-eliciting utterances (HEUs) made by the girls than by the boys, particularly HEUs about themselves (self-disclosing). Although the girls' HEUs were not predictive of ability on the puzzle, the boys' were. No gender differences in puzzle-solving ability were observed. Findings are discussed with regard to problem solving and social/linguistic development. PMID:10515069

  18. Novel Monoclonal Antibody and Peptide Binders for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Their Application for Magnetic Separation

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Lorna M.; Stewart, Linda D.; Strain, Sam A. J.; Grant, Irene R.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of novel Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP)-specific monoclonal antibodies and phage-display derived peptide binders, along with their application for the magnetic separation (MS) of MAP cells, is described. Our aim was to achieve even greater MAP capture capability than is possible with peptide-mediated magnetic separation (PMS) using a 50:50 mix of biotinylated-aMp3 and biotinylated-aMptD peptide-coated beads. Gamma-irradiated whole MAP cells and ethanol extracted antigens (EEA) from these cells were used to elicit an immune response and as phage-display biopanning targets. A range of novel binders was obtained and coated onto paramagnetic beads, both individually and in various combinations, for MS evaluation. IS900 PCR was employed after MS to provide quick results. Capture sensitivity was assessed using a range of MAP concentrations after which the most promising beads were tested for their specificity for MAP, by performing MS followed by culture using 10 other Mycobacterium species. Magnetic beads coated with the biotinylated EEA402 peptide demonstrated a greater level of MAP capture than the current PMS method, even when low numbers of MAP (<10 cfu/ml) were present; however these beads also captured a range of other mycobacteria and so lacked capture specificity. Magnetic beads coated with monoclonal antibodies 6G11 and 15D10 (used as a 50:50 mix or as dually coated beads) also demonstrated improved MAP capture relative to the current PMS method, but with little cross-reactivity to other Mycobacterium spp. Therefore, two new MS protocols are suggested, the application of which would be dependent upon the required endpoint. Biotinylated EEA402-coated beads could potentially be used with a MAP-specific PCR to ensure detection specificity, while beads coated with 6G11 and 15D10 monoclonal antibodies could be used with culture or the phage amplification assay. PMID:26815790

  19. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  20. Construction and immunogenicity of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing GP5 and M protein of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Reginaldo G; Dellagostin, Odir A; Barletta, Raúl G; Doster, Allan R; Nelson, Eric; Osorio, Fernando A

    2002-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG was used to express a truncated form of GP5 (lacking the first 30 NH(2)-terminal residues) and M protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The PRRSV proteins were expressed in BCG under control of the mycobacterial hsp60 gene promoter either in the mycobacterial cytoplasm (BCGGP5cyt and BCGMcyt) or as MT19-fusion proteins on the mycobacterial surface (BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf). Mice inoculated with BCGGP5surf and BCGMsurf developed antibodies against the viral proteins at 30 days post-inoculation (dpi) as detected by ELISA and Western blot. By 60 dpi, the animals developed titer of neutralizing antibodies of 8. A PRRSV-specific gamma interferon response was also detected in splenocytes of recombinant BCG-inoculated mice at 60 and 90 dpi. These results indicate that BCG was able to express antigens of PRRSV and elicit an immune response against the viral proteins in mice.

  1. Apoptosis of human monocytes and macrophages by Mycobacterium avium sonicate.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Catanzaro, A; Rao, S P

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular organism which multiplies predominantly within human macrophages. This organism has previously been shown to induce apoptosis in human macrophages. With a view to identifying M. avium components that induce cell death in infected host cells, sonicated extracts of M. avium as well as individual components isolated from the M. avium sonicate were tested in various assays with a human monocytic cell line (THP-1). THP-1 cells incubated with M. avium sonicate showed significantly reduced viability after a 2-day exposure compared to control cells incubated with media alone. This effect was dose dependent, with only 6.6% +/- 5.2% and 48.8% +/- 10.3% of the cells being viable by trypan blue exclusion at 600 and 300 microg/ml, respectively. Control cells, on the other hand, exhibited a viability of 98.8% +/- 1.0%. In addition, an 80% ammonium sulfate fraction of the M. avium sonicate and the previously characterized 68-kDa protein were found to have similar effects on THP-1 cells. In both cases, the reduction in viability was due to apoptosis characterized by chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis, or terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and release of nuclear matrix protein (NMP) into the culture medium. M. avium sonicate-induced apoptosis of THP-1 cells was completely inhibited by the commonly used antioxidants pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), indicating that the generation of free oxygen radicals may be responsible for inducing cell death. M. avium sonicate was found to induce apoptosis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) as well. This effect was not reversed in the presence of PDTC and was not accompanied with DNA fragmentation when determined by agarose gel electrophoresis, as seen in the case of THP-1 cells. However, these MDMs were found to contain fragmented DNA by TUNEL. These findings suggest that the mechanism

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  4. In vitro Anti-mycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden with one –third of the world’s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and annually 1.4 million deaths occur due to the disease. This high incidence of infection and the increased rate of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism further complicated the problem of TB control and have called for an urgent need to develop new anti-TB drugs from plants. In this study, the in vitro activity of root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were evaluated against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Methods Five Ethiopian medicinal plants, root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis used locally for the management of TB. They were investigated for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. 80% methanolic extracts of the plant materials were obtained by maceration. The antimycobacterial activity was determined using 96 wells of microplate with the help of visual Resazurin Microtiter Assay. Results The crude 80% methanolic extracts of the root of C. aurea, seeds of O. basilicum, and leaves of A. abyssinica, C. macrostachyus, and E. camaldulensis had anti-mycobacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 6.25–100 μg/mL. The MIC of 80% methanol extracts in the order mentioned above ranged 25-100 μg/ml and 12.5-75 μg/mL, 25–100 μg/mL and 25–50 μg/mL, 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, 12.5-100 μg/mL and 18.25-50 μg/mL and 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, respectively for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Conclusions The results support the local use of these plants in the treatment of TB and it is suggested that these plants may have therapeutic value in the treatment of TB. However

  5. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  6. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  7. Free-living amoebae, Legionella and Mycobacterium in tap water supplied by a municipal drinking water utility in the USA.

    PubMed

    Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Jamerson, Melissa; Kaneshiro, Edna S

    2010-03-01

    Legionella and Mycobacterium can proliferate within free-living amoebae (FLA) where they are protected from disinfectants at concentrations that can kill bacteria but not protozoa. Despite effective treatment of drinking water, microbes can enter water utility distribution systems (DS) and hence the plumbing within building premises. Additionally, biofilm formation may account for the persistence of microbes in the DS. In the present study a domestic water tap in north-central United States (USA) was sampled in March and September 2007 and analysed for FLA, Legionella and Mycobacterium. Identification of organisms was determined by growth on specific culture media, light and electron microscopy, and amplification of DNA probes specific for each organism. In both the spring and fall samples, amoebae, Legionella and Mycobacterium were detected. However, Acanthamoeba was prominent in the spring sample whereas Vahlkampfia and Naegleria were the amoebae detected in the autumn. Bacterial proliferation in laboratory cultures was noticeably enhanced in the presence of amoebae and biofilms rapidly formed in mixed amoebae and bacteria cultures. It is hypothesized that temperature affected the dynamics of FLA species population structure within the DS and that pathogenic bacteria that proliferate within FLA, which are themselves opportunistic pathogens, pose dual public health risks.

  8. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. Results: IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. Conclusion: The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections. PMID:26719782

  9. Phenotypic and Genomic Analyses of the Mycobacterium avium Complex Reveal Differences in Gastrointestinal Invasion and Genomic Composition

    PubMed Central

    McGarvey, Jeffery A.; Bermudez, Luiz E.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare are closely related organisms and comprise the Mycobacterium avium complex. These organisms share many common characteristics, including the ability to cause life-threatening respiratory infections in people with underlying lung pathology or immunological defects and occasionally in those with no known predisposing conditions. However, the ability to invade the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract and cause disseminated disease in AIDS patients has not been epidemiologically linked to M. intracellulare and appears to be unique to M. avium. We compared the abilities of M. avium and M. intracellulare to tolerate the acidic conditions of the stomach, to resist the membrane-disrupting activity of cationic peptides, and to invade intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. We observed that M. avium and M. intracellulare were both tolerant to the acidic conditions encountered in the stomach and resistant to cationic peptides. However, when strains of M. avium and M. intracellulare were examined for their ability to enter cultured human intestinal cells or mouse intestinal mucosa, we observed that M. avium could invade more efficiently than M. intracellulare. To elucidate the basis of this pathogenic difference and identify genes involved in the invasion of the intestinal mucosa, we performed chromosomal DNA subtractive hybridization using M. avium and M. intracellulare chromosomal DNAs. In all, 21 genes that were present in M. avium but absent in M. intracellulare were identified, including some that may be associated with the ability of M. avium to invade the intestinal mucosa. PMID:11705893

  10. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kouzaki, Yuji; Maeda, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Tamura, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Yuki, Atsushi; Sato, Akinori; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64°C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE) kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE) was up to 1 × 103 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 103 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any clinical situation

  11. Candida-Elicited Murine Th17 Cells Express High CTLA-4 Compared to Th1 Cells and Are Resistant to Costimulation Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Krummey, Scott M.; Floyd, Tamara L.; Liu, Danya; Wagener, Maylene E.; Song, Mingqing; Ford, Mandy L.

    2014-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells may cross-react with allogeneic antigens to mediate graft rejection. While the costimulation properties of Th1 cells are well studied, relatively little is known about the costimulation requirements of microbe elicited Th17 cells. The costimulation blocker CTLA-4 Ig has been ineffective in the treatment of several Th17 driven autoimmune diseases and is associated with severe acute rejection following renal transplantation, leading us to investigate whether Th17 cells play a role in CD28/CTLA-4 blockade resistant alloreactivity. We established an antigen-specific model in which Th1 and Th17 cells were elicited via Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb) and Candida albicans (Candida) immunization, respectively. Candida immunization elicited a higher frequency of Th17 cells and conferred resistance to costimulation blockade following transplantation. Compared to the M.Tb group, Candida elicited Th17 cells contained a higher frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+ producers and a lower frequency of IL-10+ and IL-10+IL-17+ cells. Importantly, Th17 cells differentially regulated the CD28/CTLA-4 pathway, expressing similarly high CD28 but significantly greater amounts of CTLA-4 compared to Th1 cells. Ex vivo blockade experiments demonstrated that Th17 cells are more sensitive to CTLA-4 coinhibition and therefore less susceptible to CTLA-4 Ig. These novel insights into the differential regulation of CTLA-4 coinhibition on CD4+ T cells have implications for the immunomodulation of pathologic T cell responses during transplantation and autoimmunity. PMID:24493820

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain ATCC 35752

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing opportunistic nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) species that causes infections in humans and other hosts. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae type strain ATCC 35752, consisting of 4.89 Mbp, 63.96% G+C content, 4,489 protein-coding genes, 48 tRNAs, and 3 rRNA genes. PMID:26021923

  13. Postoperative infection of laparoscopic surgery wound due to Mycobacterium chelonae.

    PubMed

    Rajini, M; Prasad, S R; Reddy, R R; Bhat, R V; Vimala, K R

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of postoperative wound infection due to Mycobacterium chelonae. A 35-year-old woman presented with multiple erythematous nodules, plaques and discharging sinuses over the abdomen, 45 days after she had undergone laparoscopic ovarian cystectomy. The seropurulent discharge from the wound showed acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl- Neelsen stain and culture yielded Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient responded to clarithromycin and doxycycline. The source of infection was probably contaminated water or disinfectant solution used for sterilization of laparoscopic instruments.

  14. Treatment of Mycobacterium marinum with lymecycline: new therapeutic alternative?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Maria Gertrudes Fernandes Pereira; Neugebauer, Samuel Antônio; Almeida Junior, Hiram Larangeira; Mota, Laís Marques

    2015-01-01

    Skin infections by Mycobacterium marinum are quite rare in our environment and, therefore, little studied. The majority of the lesions appear three weeks after traumas in aquariums, beaches and fish tanks. Lymph node drainage and systematization of the disease are rare and most lesions disappear in about three years. This case aims to show the effectiveness of the treatment used (lymecycline 150 mg/orally/day). This medication may be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of Mycobacterium marinum. PMID:25672310

  15. Proteins differentially expressed in elicited cell suspension culture of Podophyllum hexandrum with enhanced podophyllotoxin content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Podophyllotoxin (PTOX), the precursor for semi-synthesis of cancer therapeutics like etoposide, teniposide and etophos, is primarily obtained from an endangered medicinal herb, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle. PTOX, a lignan is biosynthetically derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. The aim of this study is to investigate changes in the P. hexandrum cell proteome potentially related to PTOX accumulation in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicitation. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by colloidal Coomassie staining and mass spectrometric analysis was used to detect statistically significant changes in cell’s proteome. Result The HPLC analysis showed approximately 7–8 fold change in accumulation of PTOX, in the 12day old cell suspension culture (i.e. after 9days of elicitation) elicited with 100 μM MeJA as compared to the control. Using 2-DE a total of 233 spots was detected, out of which 105 spots were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS. Data were subjected to functional annotation from a biological point of view through KEGG. The phenylpropanoid and monolignol pathway enzymes were identified, amongst these, chalcone synthase, polyphenol oxidase, caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases, caffeic acid-O-methyl transferase etc. are noted as important. The relation of other differentially accumulated proteins with varied effects caused by elicitors on P. hexandrum cells namely stress and defense related protein, transcription and DNA replication and signaling are also discussed. Conclusions Elicitor-induced PTOX accumulation in P. hexandrum cell cultures provides a responsive model system to profile modulations in proteins related to phenylpropanoid/monolignol biosynthesis and other defense responses. Present findings form a baseline for future investigation on a non-sequenced medicinal herb P. hexandrum at molecular level. PMID:22621772

  16. Sequence analysis of the drug‑resistant rpoB gene in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis L‑form among patients with pneumoconiosis complicated by tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Jiang, Shan; Ye, Song; Deng, Yun; Ma, Shuai; Li, Chao-Pin

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mutational characteristics of the drug‑resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis L‑form of the rpoB gene isolated from patients with pneumoconiosis complicated by tuberculosis, in order to reduce the occurrence of the drug resistance of patients and gain a more complete information on the resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis L‑form. A total of 42 clinically isolated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis L‑form were collected, including 31 drug‑resistant strains. The genomic DNA was extracted, then the target genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the hot mutational regions of the rpoB gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. The results revealed that no rpoB gene mutation was present in 11 rifampicin (RFP)‑sensitive strains, while conformational changes were identified in 31 RFP‑resistant strains. The mutation rate was 93.55% (29/31) in the resistant strains, and was frequently concentrated in codons 531 (51.61%; 16/31) and 526 (32.26%; 10/31), mainly occurring by case substitutions, including 27 unit point mutations and two two‑point mutations. The novel mutation identified in codon 516 had not been previously reported. The substitution of highly‑conserved amino acids encoded by the rpoB gene resulted in the molecular mechanism responsible for RFP resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis L‑form. This also demonstrated that the rpoB gene is diversiform.

  17. Evaluation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays targeting Mycobacterium avium, M. intracellulare, and M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis in drinking water biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; King, Dawn; Haugland, Richard; Pfaller, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA), Mycobacterium intracellulare (MI), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) are difficult to culture due to their slow growing nature. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method for the rapid detection of MA, MI, and MAP can be used to provide data supporting drinking water biofilms as potential sources of human exposure. The aim of this study was to characterize two qPCR assays targeting partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of MA and MI and use these assays, along with two previously reported MAP qPCR assays (IS900 and Target 251), to investigate Mycobacterium occurrence in kitchen faucet biofilms. MA and MI qPCR assays demonstrated 100% specificity and sensitivity when evaluated against 18 non-MA complex, 76 MA, and 17 MI isolates. Both assays detected approximately 1,000 cells from a diluted cell stock inoculated on a sampling swab 100% of the time. DNA analysis by qPCR indicated that 35.3, 56.9 and 11.8% of the 51 kitchen faucet biofilm samples collected contained MA, MI, and MAP, respectively. This study introduces novel qPCR assays designed to specifically detect MA and MI in biofilm. Results support the use of qPCR as an alternative to culture for detection and enumeration of MA, MI, and MAP in microbiologically complex samples.

  18. Transcriptomic Characterization of an Infection of Mycobacterium smegmatis by the Cluster A4 Mycobacteriophage Kampy

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The mycobacteriophages, phages that infect the genus Mycobacterium, display profound genetic diversity and widespread geographical distribution, and possess significant medical and ecological importance. However, most of the majority of functions of mycobacteriophage proteins and the identity of most genetic regulatory elements remain unknown. We characterized the gene expression profile of Kampy, a cluster A4 mycobacteriophage, during infection of its host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, using RNA-Seq and mass spectrometry. We show that mycobacteriophage Kampy transcription occurs in roughly two phases, an early phase consisting of genes for metabolism, DNA synthesis, and gene regulation, and a late phase consisting of structural genes and lysis genes. Additionally, we identify the earliest genes transcribed during infection, along with several other possible regulatory units not obvious from inspection of Kampy's genomic structure. The transcriptional profile of Kampy appears similar to that of mycobacteriophage TM4 but unlike that of mycobacteriophage Giles, a result which further expands our understanding of the diversity of mycobacteriophage gene expression programs during infection. PMID:26513661

  19. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  20. Mycobacterium hippocampi sp. nov., a rapidly growing scotochromogenic species isolated from a seahorse with tail rot.

    PubMed

    Balcázar, José Luis; Planas, Miquel; Pintado, José

    2014-09-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-sporulating, acid-fast, and rod-shaped bacterium (BFLP-6(T)), previously isolated from a seahorse (Hippocampus guttulatus) with tail rot, was studied using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Growth occurred at 15-35 °C (optimum 25 °C), at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and at NaCl concentrations between 0 and 6 % (w/v). The G+C content of DNA was 66.7 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C(18:1) ω9c, C(16:0) and C(16:1) ω6c. A mycolic acid pattern of alpha-mycolates and keto-mycolates was detected. Analysis of concatenated sequences (16S rRNA, rpoB, ssrA and tuf genes), and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic features indicated that strain BFLP-6(T) represents a novel species within the genus Mycobacterium, for which the name Mycobacterium hippocampi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BFLP-6(T) (=DSM 45391(T) =LMG 25372(T)).

  1. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection. PMID:24283140

  2. The adenylyl cyclase Rv2212 modifies the proteome and infectivity of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Zaveri, Anisha; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin Eduardo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Allen, Kirk; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    All organisms have the capacity to sense and respond to environmental changes. These signals often involve the use of second messengers such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). This second messenger is widely distributed among organisms and coordinates gene expression related with pathogenesis, virulence, and environmental adaptation. Genomic analysis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has identified 16 adenylyl cyclases (AC) and one phosphodiesterase, which produce and degrade cAMP, respectively. To date, ten AC have been biochemically characterized and only one (Rv0386) has been found to be important during murine infection with M. tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the impact of hsp60-driven Rv2212 gene expression in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) during growth in vitro, and during macrophage and mice infection. We found that hsp60-driven expression of Rv2212 resulted in an increased capacity of replication in murine macrophages but an attenuated phenotype in lungs and spleen when administered intravenously in mice. Furthermore, this strain displayed an altered proteome mainly affecting proteins associated with stress conditions (bfrB, groEL-2, DnaK) that could contribute to the attenuated phenotype observed in mice.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a novel bacteriophage against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Basra, Simone; Anany, Hany; Brovko, Lioubov; Kropinski, Andrew M; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne's disease, has a doubling time of 24 hours, making rapid detection very difficult. Mycobacteriophages can be used in the detection of disease-causing mycobacteria such as MAP. Isolation and sequencing the genomes of lytic MAP bacteriophages are important preliminary steps towards designing phage-based rapid detection assays for this bacterium. A simple optimized protocol was developed to allow reproducible production of confluent growth of MAP on plates within four to six weeks of incubation at 30 °C. This protocol was applied to the screening of environmental and fecal samples for bacteriophages inhibiting the growth of MAP. As a result, a lytic phage, vB_MapS_FF47, was isolated from bovine feces. FF47 contains a double-stranded DNA genome ~48 kb in length with 73 protein coding sequences. It does not carry temperate or known virulence genes. This phage was shown to be most closely related to Mycobacterium phage Muddy, isolated in South Africa, and Gordonia phage GTE2; however, it could not infect any of the tested Gordonia, Rhodococcus, or Nocardia spp. that GTE2 could. The protocols that were developed for growth and phage isolation have potential applications in a high-throughput screening for compounds inhibiting the growth of MAP. This work describes the first time that a phage was isolated against M. paratuberculosis.

  4. Mycobacterium marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus).

    PubMed

    Haridy, M; Tachikawa, Y; Yoshida, S; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tomita, M; Maeda, S; Wada, T; Ibi, K; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2014-01-01

    Four Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus) were presented with emaciation, abdominal distention and ulcerative and nodular cutaneous lesions affecting the brisket, limbs, digits and ventral abdomen. Another three frogs had been found dead in the same tank 1 year previously. Necropsy examination of these seven frogs revealed splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with multiple tan-yellow nodular foci present in the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, ovaries and kidneys. Microscopically, five frogs had necrosis and surrounding granulomatous inflammation in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, intestine and ovaries, with numerous acid-fast bacilli in the areas of necrosis. Two frogs had granulomatous lesions in the lungs, liver, spleen, heart, coelomic membrane, stomach and intestinal wall. These lesions had no or minimal necrosis and few acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium spp. was cultured from three frogs and identified as Mycobacterium marinum by colony growth rate and photochromogenicity and DNA sequencing. This is the first report of M. marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs.

  5. Insight into the evolution and origin of leprosy bacilli from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium lepromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Benjak, Andrej; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Herbig, Alexander; Avanzi, Charlotte; Busso, Philippe; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is an uncultured human pathogen associated with diffuse lepromatous leprosy and a reactional state known as Lucio's phenomenon. By using deep sequencing with and without DNA enrichment, we obtained the near-complete genome sequence of M. lepromatosis present in a skin biopsy from a Mexican patient, and compared it with that of Mycobacterium leprae, which has undergone extensive reductive evolution. The genomes display extensive synteny and are similar in size (∼3.27 Mb). Protein-coding genes share 93% nucleotide sequence identity, whereas pseudogenes are only 82% identical. The events that led to pseudogenization of 50% of the genome likely occurred before divergence from their most recent common ancestor (MRCA), and both M. lepromatosis and M. leprae have since accumulated new pseudogenes or acquired specific deletions. Functional comparisons suggest that M. lepromatosis has lost several enzymes required for amino acid synthesis whereas M. leprae has a defective heme pathway. M. lepromatosis has retained all functions required to infect the Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system and therefore may also be neuropathogenic. A phylogeographic survey of 227 leprosy biopsies by differential PCR revealed that 221 contained M. leprae whereas only six, all from Mexico, harbored M. lepromatosis. Phylogenetic comparisons indicate that M. lepromatosis is closer than M. leprae to the MRCA, and a Bayesian dating analysis suggests that they diverged from their MRCA approximately 13.9 Mya. Thus, despite their ancient separation, the two leprosy bacilli are remarkably conserved and still cause similar pathologic conditions. PMID:25831531

  6. Reduction and mutagenic activation of nitroaromatic compounds by a Mycobacterium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, F; Selby, A L; Newton, R K; Cerniglia, C E

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain Pyr-1 cells, which were grown to the stationary phase in media with and without pyrene, were centrifuged and resuspended in a medium containing 1-nitropyrene. Cells that had been grown with pyrene oxidized up to 20% of the added 1-nitropyrene to 1-nitropyrene-cis-9,10- and 4,5-dihydrodiols. However, cells that had been grown without pyrene reduced up to 70% of the 1-nitropyrene to 1-aminopyrene but did not produce dihydrodiols. The nitroreductase activity was oxygen insensitive, intracellular, and inducible by nitro compounds. Nitroreductase activity was inhibited by p-chlorobenzoic acid, o-iodosobenzoic acid, menadione, dicumarol, and antimycin A. Extracts from cells that had been grown without pyrene activated 1-nitropyrene, 1-amino-7-nitrofluorene, 2,7-dinitro-9-fluorenone, 1,3-dinitropyrene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, and 6-nitrochrysene to DNA-damaging products, as shown in Salmonella typhimurium tester strains by the reversion assay and by induction of the umuC gene. Activation of nitro compounds, as shown by the umu test, was enhanced by NADPH. This study shows that Mycobacterium sp. strain Pyr-1 metabolizes nitroaromatic compounds by both oxidative and reductive pathways. During reduction, it generates products that are mutagenic. PMID:7811065

  7. Production of recombinant proteins in Mycobacterium smegmatis for structural and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Ghader; Baker, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Protein production using recombinant DNA technology has a fundamental impact on our understanding of biology through providing proteins for structural and functional studies. Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been traditionally used as the default expression host to over-express and purify proteins from many different organisms. E. coli does, however, have known shortcomings for obtaining soluble, properly folded proteins suitable for downstream studies. These shortcomings are even more pronounced for the mycobacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, with typically only one third of proteins expressed in E. coli produced as soluble proteins. Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) is a closely related and non-pathogenic species that has been successfully used as an expression host for production of proteins from various mycobacterial species. In this review, we describe the early attempts to produce mycobacterial proteins in alternative expression hosts and then focus on available expression systems in M. smegmatis. The advantages of using M. smegmatis as an expression host, its application in structural biology and some practical aspects of protein production are also discussed. M. smegmatis provides an effective expression platform for enhanced understanding of mycobacterial biology and pathogenesis and for developing novel and better therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:25303009

  8. Bead Array Direct rRNA Capture Assay (rCapA) for Amplification Free Speciation of Mycobacterium Cultures

    PubMed Central

    de Ronde, Hans; González Alonso, Paula; van Soolingen, Dick; Klatser, Paul R.; Anthony, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium cultures, from patients suspected of tuberculosis or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection, need to be identified. It is most critical to identify cultures belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, but also important to recognize clinically irrelevant or important NTM to allow appropriate patient management. Identification of M. tuberculosis can be achieved by a simple and cheap lateral flow assay, but identification of other Mycobacterium spp. generally requires more complex molecular methods. Here we demonstrate that a paramagnetic liquid bead array method can be used to capture mycobacterial rRNA in crude lysates of positive cultures and use a robust reader to identify the species in a direct and sensitive manner. We developed an array composed of paramagnetic beads coupled to oligonucleotides to capture 16 rRNA from eight specific Mycobacterium species and a single secondary biotinilated reporter probe to allow the captured rRNA to be detected. A ninth less specific bead and its associated reporter probe, designed to capture 23S rRNA from mycobacteria and related genera, is included as an internal control to confirm the presence of bacterial rRNA from a GC rich Gram variable genera. Using this rRNA capture assay (rCapA) with the array developed we were already able to confirm the presence of members of the M. tuberculosis complex and to discriminate a range of NTM species. This approach is not based on DNA amplification and therefore does not require precautions to avoid amplicon contamination. Moreover, the new generation of stable and cost effective liquid bead readers provides the necessary multiplexing potential to develop a robust and highly discriminatory assay. PMID:22396779

  9. Optimization of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis RNA polymerase expression and purification.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rajdeep; Rudra, Paulami; Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sengupta, Shreya; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the human pathogen that causes tuberculosis, warrants enormous attention due to the emergence of multi drug resistant and extremely drug resistant strains. RNA polymerase (RNAP), the key enzyme in gene regulation, is an attractive target for anti-TB drugs. Understanding the structure-function relationship of M. tuberculosis RNAP and the mechanism of gene regulation by RNAP in conjunction with different σ factors and transcriptional regulators would provide significant information for anti-tuberculosis drug development targeting RNAP. Studies with M. tuberculosis RNAP remain tedious because of the extremely slow-growing nature of the bacteria and requirement of special laboratory facility. Here, we have developed and optimized recombinant methods to prepare M. tuberculosis RNAP core and RNAP holo enzymes assembled in vivo in Escherichia coli. These methods yield high amounts of transcriptionally active enzymes, free of E. coli RNAP contamination. The recombinant M. tuberculosis RNAP is used to develop a highly sensitive fluorescence based in vitro transcription assay that could be easily adopted in a high-throughput format to screen RNAP inhibitors. These recombinant methods would be useful to set a platform for M. tuberculosis RNAP targeted anti TB drug development, to analyse the structure/function of M. tuberculosis RNAP and to analyse the interactions among promoter DNA, RNAP, σ factors, and transcription regulators of M. tuberculosis in vitro, avoiding the hazard of handling of pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis During Infection: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is considered one of the biggest infectious disease killers worldwide. A significant amount of attention has been directed toward revealing genes involved in the virulence and pathogenesis of this air-born pathogen. With the advances in technologies for transcriptional profiling, several groups, including ours, took advantage of DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional units differentially regulated by M. tuberculosis within a host. The main idea behind this approach is that pathogens tend to regulate their gene expression levels depending on the host microenvironment, and preferentially express those needed for survival. Identifying this class of genes will improve our understanding of pathogenesis. In our case, we identified an in vivo expressed genomic island that was preferentially active in murine lungs during early infection, as well as groups of genes active during chronic tuberculosis. Other studies have identified additional gene groups that are active during macrophage infection and even in human lungs. Despite all of these findings, one of the lingering questions remaining was whether in vivo expressed transcripts are relevant to the virulence, pathogenesis, and persistence of the organism. The work of our group and others addressed this question by examining the contribution of in vivo expressed genes using a strategy based on gene deletions followed by animal infections. Overall, the analysis of most of the in vivo expressed genes supported a role of these genes in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Further, these data suggest that in vivo transcriptional profiling is a valid approach to identify genes required for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:21738523

  11. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, Caitlin S; Granka, Julie M; Alexander, David C; Behr, Marcel A; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L; Jamieson, Frances B; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-04-19

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6(Quebec) genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710-1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate. PMID:21464295

  12. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade

    PubMed Central

    Pepperell, Caitlin S.; Granka, Julie M.; Alexander, David C.; Behr, Marcel A.; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L.; Jamieson, Frances B.; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6Quebec genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710–1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate. PMID:21464295

  13. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium abscessus in a prosthetic knee joint: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Chang-Jen; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is an infrequent cause of prosthetic knee joint infections. Simultaneous infection with different NTM species in a prosthetic knee joint has not been previously reported. A case of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus and M. fortuitum is described in this report. The patient was successfully treated with adequate antibiotics and surgery. The clinical features of sixteen previously reported cases of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by NTM are reviewed.

  14. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks. PMID:26295364

  15. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks. PMID:26295364

  16. Non-human sources of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a successful pathogen responsible for the vast majority of deadly tuberculosis cases in humans. It rests in a dormant form in contaminated people who constitute the reservoir with airborne interhuman transmission during pulmonary tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis is therefore regarded majoritary as a human pathogen. Here, we review the evidence for anthroponotic M. tuberculosis infection in non-human primates, other mammals and psittacines. Some infected animals may be sources for zoonotic tuberculosis caused by M. tuberculosis, with wild life trade and zoos being amplifying factors. Moreover, living animals and cadavers can scatter M. tuberculosis in the environment where it could survive for extended periods of time in soil where amoebae could play a role. Although marginal in the epidemiology of human tuberculosis, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis is not uniquely adapted to humans.

  17. Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: molecular perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, A.; Kalia, A.; Ahmad, N.

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis seriously threaten tuberculosis (TB) control and prevention efforts. Molecular studies of the mechanism of action of antitubercular drugs have elucidated the genetic basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. Drug resistance in M. tuberculosis is attributed primarily to the accumulation of mutations in the drug target genes; these mutations lead either to an altered target (e.g., RNA polymerase and catalase-peroxidase in rifampicin and isoniazid resistance, respectively) or to a change in titration of the drug (e.g., InhA in isoniazid resistance). Development of specific mechanism-based inhibitors and techniques to rapidly detect multidrug resistance will require further studies addressing the drug and drug-target interaction. PMID:9621190

  18. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  19. Pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium malmoense.

    PubMed

    Alberts, W M; Chandler, K W; Solomon, D A; Goldman, A L

    1987-06-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense was isolated from pulmonary material from 4 patients. Two patients had repeatedly positive smears and cultures along with roentgenographic progression of pulmonary disease in the absence of another pathogen. These 2 patients therefore meet the criteria for diagnosis of pulmonary mycobacteriosis. Isolation of the organism may represent colonization in a third patient, and M. malmoense has been isolated from a fourth patient on 2 occasions. It is not yet definite, however, that the pulmonary process is due to mycobacterial disease. Although uncommon, pulmonary disease caused by this organism has been reported from Europe. Only 1 prior case of pulmonary disease caused by M. malmoense, however, has been reported in the United States. PMID:3592410

  20. Hypoxia: a window into Mycobacterium tuberculosis latency.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Tige R; Sherrid, Ashley M; Minch, Kyle J; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Tuberculosis is a massive public health problem on a global scale and the success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is linked to its ability to persist within humans for long periods without causing any overt disease symptoms. Hypoxia is predicted to be a key host-induced stress limiting growth of the pathogen in vivo. However, multiple studies in vitro and in vivo indicate that M. tuberculosis adapts to oxygen limitation by entering into a metabolically altered state, while awaiting the opportunity to reactivate. Molecular signatures of bacteria adapted to hypoxia in vitro are accumulating, although correlations to human disease are only now being established. Similarly, defining the mechanisms that control this adaptation is an active area of research. In this review we discuss the historical precedents linking hypoxia and latency, and the gathering knowledge of M. tuberculosis hypoxic responses. We also examine the role of these responses in tuberculosis latency, and identify promising avenues for future studies.

  1. The zoonotic importance of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Moda, G; Daborn, C J; Grange, J M; Cosivi, O

    1996-04-01

    The zoonotic importance of Mycobacterium bovis has been the subject of renewed interest in the wake of the increasing incidence of tuberculosis in the human population. This paper considers some of the conditions under which transmission of M. bovis from animals to humans occurs and reviews current information on the global distribution of the disease. The paper highlights the particular threat posed by this zoonotic disease in developing countries and lists the veterinary and human public health measures that need to be adopted if the disease is to be contained. The association of tuberculosis with malnutrition and poverty has long been recognized and the need to address these basic issues are as crucial as specific measures against the disease itself.

  2. Case report of fatal Mycobacterium tilburgii infection.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Timur; Bakkaloglu, Oguz K; Ince, Burak; Tufan, Fatih; Kose, Murat; Poda, Mehves; Tascioglu, Didem; Koksalan, O Kaya; Saka, Bulent; Erten, Nilgun; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2015-07-01

    There are few reports concerning Mycobacterium tilburgii infection in humans because this bacterium is non-cultivatable. Herein, using new molecular techniques, we report the case of an immunocompromised patient with fatal disseminated lymphadenitis that was caused by M. tilburgii.26 years old Caucasian HIV negative female patient presented with abdominal pain. Her clinical assessment revealed disseminated lymphadenitis, that was acid fast bacilli positive. Further molecular evaluation showed the causative agent as M. tilburgii. Despite anti mycobacterial therapy and careful management of intervening complications patient died because of an intraabdominal sepsis. This is the first fatal M. tilburgii infection in the literature. This case points the importance of careful management of patient's immune status and intervening infections besides implementation of effective drug treatment.

  3. Reducing human exposure to Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-08-01

    In light of the increasing prevalence of Mycobacterium avium pulmonary disease and the challenges of treating patients with M. avium infection, consideration of measures to reduce exposure is warranted. Because M. avium inhabits water and soil, humans are surrounded by that opportunistic pathogen. Because infection has been linked to the presence of M. avium in household plumbing, increasing hot water temperature, reducing aerosol (mist) exposures in bathrooms and showers, and installing filters that prevent the passage of mycobacteria will likely reduce M. avium exposure. Granular activated carbon (charcoal) filters support the growth of M. avium and should be avoided. When gardening, avoid the inhalation of soil dusts by using a mask or wetting the soil because peat-rich potting soils have high numbers of mycobacteria.

  4. Atypical Mycobacterium furunculosis occurring after pedicures.

    PubMed

    Redbord, Kelley Pagliai; Shearer, David A; Gloster, Hugh; Younger, Bruce; Connelly, Beverly L; Kindel, Susan E; Lucky, Anne W

    2006-03-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex are rapidly-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria found ubiquitously in the environment including, water, soil, dust, and biofilms. M fortuitum has been reported to cause skin and soft-tissue infections in association with nail salon footbath use during pedicures. Four cases of M fortuitum complex furunculosis are reported that occurred after pedicures in the Cincinnati, Ohio/Northern Kentucky area. Dermatologists and clinicians should consider mycobacterial infections from the M fortuitum complex when patients present with nonhealing furuncles on the lower legs and should inquire about recent pedicures. Early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy are critical. Public health measures should be explored to protect against such infections, given the recent popularity of the nail care industry.

  5. Case report of fatal Mycobacterium tilburgii infection.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Timur; Bakkaloglu, Oguz K; Ince, Burak; Tufan, Fatih; Kose, Murat; Poda, Mehves; Tascioglu, Didem; Koksalan, O Kaya; Saka, Bulent; Erten, Nilgun; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2015-07-01

    There are few reports concerning Mycobacterium tilburgii infection in humans because this bacterium is non-cultivatable. Herein, using new molecular techniques, we report the case of an immunocompromised patient with fatal disseminated lymphadenitis that was caused by M. tilburgii.26 years old Caucasian HIV negative female patient presented with abdominal pain. Her clinical assessment revealed disseminated lymphadenitis, that was acid fast bacilli positive. Further molecular evaluation showed the causative agent as M. tilburgii. Despite anti mycobacterial therapy and careful management of intervening complications patient died because of an intraabdominal sepsis. This is the first fatal M. tilburgii infection in the literature. This case points the importance of careful management of patient's immune status and intervening infections besides implementation of effective drug treatment. PMID:25818194

  6. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  7. [Mycobacterium lentiflavum lymphadenitis: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Del Olmo Izuzquiza, Ignacio; Monforte Cirac, María L; Bustillo Alonso, Matilde; Burgués Prades, Pedro; Guerrero Laleona, Carmelo

    2016-10-01

    Lymphadenitis is the most common clinical feature in nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in immunocompetent children. We present two case reports of M. lentiflavum lymphadenitis diagnosed in a tertiary hospital in the last 10 years. Routine tests were performed after persistent adenopathy, and a sample for culture was obtained, being positive for this microorganism. Both patients received oral antibiotics during several weeks. Case 1 needed complete excision after five months of treatment, whilst Case 2 was cured by medical therapy. M. lentiflavum is considered, among the newly described nontuberculous mycobacterial species, an emergent pathogen in our environment. It has its own microbiological and clinical characteristics, different from the rest of nontuberculous mycobacteria. Case reports are limited in the literature since the infection was described for the first time in 1997.

  8. Mycobacterium bovis in coyotes from Michigan.

    PubMed

    Bruning-Fann, C S; Schmitt, S M; Fitzgerald, S D; Payeur, J B; Whipple, D L; Cooley, T M; Carlson, T; Friedrich, P

    1998-07-01

    During a survey for tuberculosis in wild carnivores and omnivores, Mycobacterium bovis was cultured from pooled lymph nodes of three adult female coyotes (Canis latrans) harvested by hunters in Michigan (USA). No gross or histologic lesions suggestive of tuberculosis were seen in these animals. One coyote was taken from Montmorency county and two coyotes from Alcona county located in the north-eastern portion of Michigan's Lower Peninsula where free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been found infected with bovine tuberculosis. It is thought that these coyotes became infected with M. bovis through the consumption of tuberculous deer. Other species included in the survey were the opossum (Didelphis virginiana), raccoon (Procyon lotor), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), bobcat (Felis rufus), and badger (Taxidea taxus).

  9. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  10. The Elicited Language Inventory and the Influence of Contextual Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lauren K.; Weber-Olsen, Marcia

    1980-01-01

    The Elicited Language Inventory (ELI) was administered in standardized fashion and in a modified procedure with contextually supported cues and grammatical morpheme use under the two ELI presentation conditions was compared with use of the same morphemes in spontaneous speech. Results favored modified use of the ELI with contextually cued items…

  11. Clinicians as Communication Partners: Developing a Mediated Discourse Elicitation Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengst, Julie A.; Duff, Melissa C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development and piloting of a mediated discourse elicitation protocol. Grounded in situated theories of communication and informed by mediated discourse analysis, this protocol selectively samples familiar discourse types in a manner designed to preserve interactional aspects of communication. Critically, the mediated…

  12. Eliciting Students' Beliefs about Who Is Good at Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morge, Shelby P.

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights a series of activities designed to elicit students' mathematics-related beliefs, particularly those related to gender. As a result of the activities, females in upper-level classes rated themselves as having less confidence than males, and viewing a movie clip was sufficient for some students to modify their descriptions of…

  13. Modification of commercially available simulators to elicit decision making behavior.

    PubMed

    Salud, Jonathan; Ononye, Chiagozie; Salud, Lawrence; Pugh, Carla

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, simulation training has emerged as an innovative method for decreasing error and teaching complex procedures. Simulation has also been a valuable tool for evaluating investigatory and analytic thinking. By adding a specific, clinically oriented modification to a commercially available simulator, we were able to elicit first-year emergency medicine resident perceptions, actions, and decisions.

  14. Eliciting Design Patterns for E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retalis, Symeon; Georgiakakis, Petros; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    Design pattern creation, especially in the e-learning domain, is a highly complex process that has not been sufficiently studied and formalized. In this paper, we propose a systematic pattern development cycle, whose most important aspects focus on reverse engineering of existing systems in order to elicit features that are cross-validated through…

  15. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  16. Computational Support for Early Elicitation and Classification of Tone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Steven; Lee, Haejoong

    2014-01-01

    Investigating a tone language involves careful transcription of tone on words and phrases. This is challenging when the phonological categories--the tones or melodies--have not been identified. Effects such as coarticulation, sandhi, and phrase-level prosody appear as obstacles to early elicitation and classification of tone. This article presents…

  17. Photo-Elicitation: Reflexivity on Method, Analysis, and Graphic Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Veronica M.; Lahman, Maria K. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this methodological discussion, the authors detail and reflect on the processes of using photo-elicitation interviewing as a way to align with positive qualitative methodologies, to gain access to participant beliefs and values, and to highlight participant voices through their choices of words and visuals. A review of the literature and an…

  18. Engaging Young Children in Research through Photo Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Embracing the new sociology of childhood, this paper describes a participatory research method built on a belief in the competency of young children. The paper begins with a critical review of the photo elicitation literature exploring the varied levels of children's participation. Drawing on the strengths of the previous research, a…

  19. Creating a Framework: Art Therapy Elicits the Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harber, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A case study illustrates how art therapy was used to elicit the narrative of an adolescent male student in transition from incarceration to a transfer school setting. Childhood trauma was addressed in individual sessions and within a literacy group co-led by a reading specialist. The art therapist responded to the client's needs by broadening the…

  20. Stimulus Duration Preference at Electrode Sites Yielding Elicited Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    The latency to display eating or drinking during hypothalamic stimulation was compared with the preferred duration of the same stimulus intensity in a self-stimulation situation. All the animals preferred longer stimulus durations than those required to elicit eating or drinking

  1. The Role of Elicited Verbal Imitation in Toddlers' Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Rosemary; Munro, Natalie; Baker, Elise; McGregor, Karla; Docking, Kimberley; Arciuli, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This study is about the role of elicited verbal imitation in toddler word learning. Forty-eight toddlers were taught eight nonwords linked to referents. During training, they were asked to imitate the nonwords. Naming of the referents was tested at three intervals (one minute later [uncued], five minutes, and 1-7 days later [cued]) and recognition…

  2. A Study of the Affective Responses Elicited by Occupational Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Craig G.

    1976-01-01

    The semantic differential was used to assess the properties of affect elicited by occupational stimuli. Vocationally committed men studying medicine, business, and engineering responded to a semantic differential containing occupational concepts. Results show a semantic space for all three groups composed of three orthogonal dimensions of affect…

  3. Elicited Role-Play of Commands and Requests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strage, Amy; And Others

    Children's ability to understand the implied messages in indirect speech was investigated using a role play elicitation task. Subjects were asked to complete story endings using puppets for several scenerios involving a mother and her four children. In each of the stories the mother gives an indirect directive which is supposed to get the children…

  4. Elicited Production of Relative Clauses in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zukowski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Relative clauses have been implicated alternately as a strength and a weakness in the language of people with Williams Syndrome (WS). To clarify the facts, an elicited production test was administered to 10 people with WS (age 10-16 years), 10 typically developing children (age 4-7 years), and 12 typically developing adults. Nearly every WS…

  5. Using Automatic Speech Recognition Technology with Elicited Oral Response Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Troy L.; Davies, Randall S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of automatic speech recognition (ASR) scored elicited oral response (EOR) tests to assess the speaking ability of English language learners. It also examined the relationship between ASR-scored EOR and other language proficiency measures and the ability of the ASR to rate speakers without bias to gender or native…

  6. Elicitation Support Requirements of Multi-Expertise Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Martens, Rob; Jochems, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Tools to support knowledge elicitation are used more and more in situations where employees or students collaborate using the computer. Studies indicate that differences exist between experts and novices regarding their methods of work and reasoning. However, the commonly preferred approach tends to deal with team members as a single system with…

  7. A Task that Elicits Reasoning: A Dual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelewitz, Dina; Mueller, Mary; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the forms of reasoning elicited as fourth grade students in a suburban district and sixth grade students in an urban district worked on similar tasks involving reasoning with the use of Cuisenaire rods. Analysis of the two data sets shows similarities in the reasoning used by both groups of students on specific tasks, and the…

  8. Teacher Burnout and Self-Efficacy in Eliciting Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Andre; Evers, Will J. G.; Tomic, Welko

    This study examined the relationship between perceived lack of social support, perceived self-efficacy in eliciting support at the workplace, and the three successive burnout symptoms (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) in a sample of 277 Dutch secondary school teachers. The study hypothesized that teachers'…

  9. Preparing Beginning Teachers to Elicit and Interpret Students' Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleep, Laurie; Boerst, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how teacher education assignments can be designed to support beginning teachers in learning to do the work of teaching. We examined beginners' formative assessment practices--in particular, their eliciting and interpreting of students' mathematical thinking--in the context of an elementary mathematics methods assignment,…

  10. An Unconventional Hexacoordinated Flavohemoglobin from Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Pawaria, Sudesh; Lu, Changyuan; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Singh, Chaahat; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Dikshit, Kanak L.

    2012-01-01

    Being an obligate aerobe, Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces a number of energetic challenges when it encounters hypoxia and environmental stress during intracellular infection. Consequently, it has evolved innovative strategies to cope with these unfavorable conditions. Here, we report a novel flavohemoglobin (MtbFHb) from M. tuberculosis that exhibits unique features within its heme and reductase domains distinct from conventional FHbs, including the absence of the characteristic hydrogen bonding interactions within the proximal heme pocket and mutations in the FAD and NADH binding regions of the reductase domain. In contrast to conventional FHbs, it has a hexacoordinate low-spin heme with a proximal histidine ligand lacking imidazolate character and a distal heme pocket with a relatively low electrostatic potential. Additionally, MtbFHb carries a new FAD binding site in its reductase domain similar to that of d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). When overexpressed in Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium smegmatis, MtbFHb remained associated with the cell membrane and exhibited d-lactate:phenazine methosulfate reductase activity and oxidized d-lactate into pyruvate by converting the heme iron from Fe3+ to Fe2+ in a FAD-dependent manner, indicating electron transfer from d-lactate to the heme via FAD cofactor. Under oxidative stress, MtbFHb-expressing cells exhibited growth advantage with reduced levels of lipid peroxidation. Given the fact that d-lactate is a byproduct of lipid peroxidation and that M. tuberculosis lacks the gene encoding d-LDH, we propose that the novel d-lactate metabolizing activity of MtbFHb uniquely equips M. tuberculosis to balance the stress level by protecting the cell membrane from oxidative damage via cycling between the Fe3+/Fe2+ redox states. PMID:22437825

  11. Crystal structure and stability of gyrase–fluoroquinolone cleaved complexes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Benjamin H.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects one-third of the world’s population and in 2013 accounted for 1.5 million deaths. Fluoroquinolone antibacterials, which target DNA gyrase, are critical agents used to halt the progression from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to extensively resistant disease; however, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging and new ways to bypass resistance are required. To better explain known differences in fluoroquinolone action, the crystal structures of the WT Mtb DNA gyrase cleavage core and a fluoroquinolone-sensitized mutant were determined in complex with DNA and five fluoroquinolones. The structures, ranging from 2.4- to 2.6-Å resolution, show that the intrinsically low susceptibility of Mtb to fluoroquinolones correlates with a reduction in contacts to the water shell of an associated magnesium ion, which bridges fluoroquinolone–gyrase interactions. Surprisingly, the structural data revealed few differences in fluoroquinolone–enzyme contacts from drugs that have very different activities against Mtb. By contrast, a stability assay using purified components showed a clear relationship between ternary complex reversibility and inhibitory activities reported with cultured cells. Collectively, our data indicate that the stability of fluoroquinolone/DNA interactions is a major determinant of fluoroquinolone activity and that moieties that have been appended to the C7 position of different quinolone scaffolds do not take advantage of specific contacts that might be made with the enzyme. These concepts point to new approaches for developing quinolone-class compounds that have increased potency against Mtb and the ability to overcome resistance. PMID:26792525

  12. Evaluation of DNA Primase DnaG as a Potential Target for Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kuron, Aneta; Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Brzostek, Anna; Nowosielski, Marcin; Doherty, Aidan; Dziadek, Bozena

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain genes for several DNA-dependent RNA primases, including dnaG, which encodes an essential replication enzyme that has been proposed as a target for antituberculosis compounds. An in silico analysis revealed that mycobacteria also possess archaeo-eukaryotic superfamily primases (AEPs) of unknown function. Using a homologous recombination system, we obtained direct evidence that wild-type dnaG cannot be deleted from the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis without disrupting viability, even in backgrounds in which mycobacterial AEPs are overexpressed. In contrast, single-deletion AEP mutants or mutants defective for all four identified M. smegmatis AEP genes did not exhibit growth defects under standard laboratory conditions. Deletion of native dnaG in M. smegmatis was tolerated only after the integration of an extra intact copy of the M. smegmatis or Mycobacterium tuberculosis dnaG gene, under the control of chemically inducible promoters, into the attB site of the chromosome. M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis DnaG proteins were overproduced and purified, and their primase activities were confirmed using radioactive RNA synthesis assays. The enzymes appeared to be sensitive to known inhibitors (suramin and doxorubicin) of DnaG. Notably, M. smegmatis bacilli appeared to be sensitive to doxorubicin and resistant to suramin. The growth and survival of conditional mutant mycobacterial strains in which DnaG was significantly depleted were only slightly affected under standard laboratory conditions. Thus, although DnaG is essential for mycobacterial viability, only low levels of protein are required for growth. This suggests that very efficient inhibition of enzyme activity would be required for mycobacterial DnaG to be useful as an antibiotic target. PMID:24379196

  13. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  14. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  15. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  16. Further studies of infectious DNA extracted from mycobacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sellers, M I; Tokunaga, T

    1966-02-01

    Results of the previous investigation in which it was found that DNA extracted from D29 mycobacteriophage was infectious for Mycobacterium smegmatis 607, have been extended. DNA extracted from mycobacteriophage D4 and D32 produced plaques when plated on their respective hosts; D28 DNA, extracted in the same manner and tested under similar conditions, failed to show infectivity. Species barriers were not crossed by mycobacteriophage DNA; bacteria resistant to intact phage were not infected with the phage DNA. The efficiency of plating of the DNA is very much lower than that of intact phage; infection of a given host was not accomplished by DNA when titration for plaque formation by the intact phage was less than 10(9) PFU. The base composition of DNA extracted from the four mycobacteriophages and the three propagating hosts was very similar. The bases were paired, adenine with thymine and guanine with cytosine. A relatively higher per cent of guanine-cytosine than of adenine-thymine, was found. The buoyant density of each DNA in CsCl was linearly related to its guanine-cytosine content whereas with the exception of D28 DNA, thermal denaturation temperatures failed to show this relationship. However, the thermal transition profiles were characteristic of double stranded DNA. Additional evidence that D29 DNA forms complexes with basic proteins was obtained. Binding between calf thymus histone and between RNAase and D29 DNA readily occurs with a resultant loss in DNA infectivity. Trypsin and D29 DNA are only weakly reactive.

  17. Human humoral responses to antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: immunodominance of high-molecular-mass antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Laal, S; Samanich, K M; Sonnenberg, M G; Zolla-Pazner, S; Phadtare, J M; Belisle, J T

    1997-01-01

    The selection of antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for most studies of humoral responses in tuberculosis patients has been restricted to molecules that were either immunodominant in immunized animals or amenable to biochemical purification rather than those that were reactive with the human immune system. Delineation of antigens that elicit humoral responses during the natural course of disease progression in humans has been hindered by the presence of cross-reactive antibodies to conserved regions on ubiquitous prokaryotic antigens in sera from healthy individuals and tuberculosis patients. The levels of cross-reactive antibodies in the sera were reduced by preadsorption with Escherichia coli lysates, prior to studying their reactivity against a large panel of M. tuberculosis antigens to which the human immune system may be exposed during natural infection and disease. Thus, reactivity against pools of secreted, cellular, and cell wall-associated antigens of M. tuberculosis was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results suggested that the secreted protein preparation contained antigens most frequently recognized by the humoral responses of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The culture filtrate proteins were subsequently size fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, characterized by reaction with murine monoclonal antibodies to known antigens of M. tuberculosis by an ELISA, and assessed for reactivity with tuberculous and nontuberculous sera. Results show that a secreted antigen of 88 kDa elicits a strong antibody response in a high percentage of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This and other antigens identified on the basis of their reactivity with patient sera may prove useful for developing serodiagnosis for tuberculosis. PMID:9008280

  18. Clonidine inhibits anti-non-Gal IgM xenoantibody elicited in multiple pig-to-primate models

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, John M.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.; Salvaris, Evelyn J.; O’Connell, Philip J.; Nottle, Mark B.; d’Apice, Anthony J. F.; Cowan, Peter J.; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background Survival of vascularized xenografts is dependent on pre-emptive inhibition of the xenoantibody response against galactosyltransferase knockout (GTKO) porcine organs. Our analysis in multiple GTKO pig-to-primate models of xenotransplantation has demonstrated that the anti-non-gal-α-1,3-gal (anti-non-Gal) xenoanti-body response displays limited structural diversity. This allowed our group to identify an experimental compound which selectively inhibited induced anti-non-Gal IgM xenoantibodies. However, because this compound had an unknown safety profile, we extended this line of research to include screening small molecules with known safety profiles allowing rapid advancement to large animal models. Methods The NIH clinical collections of small molecules were screened by ELISA for their ability to inhibit xenoantibody binding to GTKO pig endothelial cells. Serum collected from non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys at day 14 post-injection with GTKO pig endothelial cells was utilized as a source of elicited xenoantibody for initial screening. Virtual small molecule screening based on xenoanti-body structure was used to assess the likelihood that the identified small molecules bound xenoantibody directly. As a proxy for selectivity, ELISAs against tetanus toxoid and the natural antigens laminin, thyroglobulin, and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) were utilized to assess the ability of the identified reagents to inhibit additional antibody responses. The identified inhibitory small molecules were further tested for their ability to inhibit xenoantibody elicited in multiple settings, including rhesus monkeys pre-treated with an anti-non-Gal selective anti-idiotypic antibody, non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys immunized with wild-type fetal pig isletlike cell clusters, and non-immunosuppressed baboons transplanted with GTKO multiple transgenic pig kidneys. Results Four clinically relevant small molecules inhibited anti-non-Gal IgM binding to GTKO pig endothelial

  19. Identification of gene targets against dormant phase Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis J; Brown, James R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects approximately 2 billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. Current TB therapy involves a regimen of four antibiotics taken over a six month period. Patient compliance, cost of drugs and increasing incidence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains have added urgency to the development of novel TB therapies. Eradication of TB is affected by the ability of the bacterium to survive up to decades in a dormant state primarily in hypoxic granulomas in the lung and to cause recurrent infections. Methods The availability of M. tuberculosis genome-wide DNA microarrays has lead to the publication of several gene expression studies under simulated dormancy conditions. However, no single model best replicates the conditions of human pathogenicity. In order to identify novel TB drug targets, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple published datasets from gene expression DNA microarray experiments that modeled infection leading to and including the dormant state, along with data from genome-wide insertional mutagenesis that examined gene essentiality. Results Based on the analysis of these data sets following normalization, several genome wide trends were identified and used to guide the selection of targets for therapeutic development. The trends included the significant up-regulation of genes controlled by devR, down-regulation of protein and ATP synthesis, and the adaptation of two-carbon metabolism to the hypoxic and nutrient limited environment of the granuloma. Promising targets for drug discovery were several regulatory elements (devR/devS, relA, mprAB), enzymes involved in redox balance and respiration, sulfur transport and fixation, pantothenate, isoprene, and NAD biosynthesis. The advantages and liabilities of each target are discussed in the context of enzymology, bacterial pathways, target tractability, and drug development

  20. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis SB24 isolated from Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Philip, Noraini; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis; William, Timothy; John, Daisy Vanitha

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) that causes millions of death every year. We have sequenced the genome of M. tuberculosis isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a patient diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis (TBM). The isolated strain was referred as M. tuberculosis SB24. Genomic DNA of the M. tuberculosis SB24 was extracted and subjected to whole genome sequencing using PacBio platform. The draft genome size of M. tuberculosis SB24 was determined to be 4,452,489 bp with a G + C content of 65.6%. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited in NCBI SRA under the accession number SRP076503. PMID:27556011