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Sample records for mycobacterium leprae infection

  1. Cytokine responses to Mycobacterium leprae unique proteins differentiate between Mycobacterium leprae infected and naive armadillos.

    PubMed

    Pena, Maria; Geluk, Annemieke; Van Der Ploeg-Van Schip, Jolien J; Franken, Kees L M C; Sharma, Rahul; Truman, Richard

    2011-12-01

    New diagnostic tools for early detection of leprosy are necessary to help reduce its transmission and severity. M. leprae unique proteins have been used to assess differences in human T-cell responses in leprosy patients, household contacts and endemic controls. In this study, we examined the response of M. leprae-infected armadillos to a variety of M. leprae recombinant antigen candidates currently being examined for diagnostic efficacy in humans. Among recently M. leprae infected armadillos, IFN-gamma expression was enhanced after stimulation of PBMC with all M. leprae recombinant proteins except for ML2283 (mean: 2.65 Relative Quantification (RQ)). The group mean stimulation index for M. leprae proteins ML0009, ML1601, ML2478 and ML2531 averaged 35.2 RQ and was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that measured among the non-infected, naive group (mean 6.2 RQ). Although ML0840 tended to enhance IFN-gamma levels, the mean IFN-gamma transcript levels of the currently experimentally inoculated group (20.1 RQ) was not significantly different statistically (P = 0.10) from the mean of the naive group (7.5 RQ). Also no statistically significant differences were observed in IFN-gamma transcript levels between the resistant and currently experimentally inoculated group (P > 0.05) or between the resistant and the naive group (P > 0.05) after stimulation of PBMCs with all M. leprae recombinant proteins. Only low levels of TNF-alpha were observed across all groups after in vitro stimulation with all the antigens examined. These data suggest that armadillos can be used effectively to help identify M. leprae specific proteins that may be applied for monitoring T-cell responses in M. leprae infected hosts as their disease progresses as well as for the early diagnosis of leprosy.

  2. Clofazimine modulates the expression of lipid metabolism proteins in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Degang, Yang; Akama, Takeshi; Hara, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Ishido, Yuko; Gidoh, Masaichi; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) lives and replicates within macrophages in a foamy, lipid-laden phagosome. The lipids provide essential nutrition for the mycobacteria, and M. leprae infection modulates expression of important host proteins related to lipid metabolism. Thus, M. leprae infection increases the expression of adipophilin/adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) and decreases hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), facilitating the accumulation and maintenance of lipid-rich environments suitable for the intracellular survival of M. leprae. HSL levels are not detectable in skin smear specimens taken from leprosy patients, but re-appear shortly after multidrug therapy (MDT). This study examined the effect of MDT components on host lipid metabolism in vitro, and the outcome of rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine treatment on ADRP and HSL expression in THP-1 cells. Clofazimine attenuated the mRNA and protein levels of ADRP in M. leprae-infected cells, while those of HSL were increased. Rifampicin and dapsone did not show any significant effects on ADRP and HSL expression levels. A transient increase of interferon (IFN)-β and IFN-γ mRNA was also observed in cells infected with M. leprae and treated with clofazimine. Lipid droplets accumulated by M. leprae-infection were significantly decreased 48 h after clofazimine treatment. Such effects were not evident in cells without M. leprae infection. In clinical samples, ADRP expression was decreased and HSL expression was increased after treatment. These results suggest that clofazimine modulates lipid metabolism in M. leprae-infected macrophages by modulating the expression of ADRP and HSL. It also induces IFN production in M. leprae-infected cells. The resultant decrease in lipid accumulation, increase in lipolysis, and activation of innate immunity may be some of the key actions of clofazimine.

  3. A Negative Feedback Loop Between Autophagy and Immune Responses in Mycobacterium leprae Infection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuelong; Zhang, Li; Lu, Jie; Shui, Tiejun; Chen, Jia; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Joanna; Liu, Yeqiang; Yang, Degang

    2017-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Mycobacterium leprae is the causative agent of leprosy and primarily infects macrophages, leading to irreversible nerve damage and deformities. So far, the underlying reasons allowing M. leprae to persist and propagate in macrophages, despite the presence of cellular immunity, are still a mystery. Here, we investigated the role of autophagy, a cellular process that degrades cytosolic materials and intracellular pathogens, in M. leprae infection. We found that live M. leprae infection of macrophages resulted in significantly elevated autophagy level. However, macrophages with high autophagy levels preferentially expressed lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor-α, and preferentially primed anti-inflammatory T cells responses, characterized by high IL-10 and low interferon-γ, granzyme B, and perforin responses. These anti-inflammatory T cells could suppress further induction of autophagy, leading to improved survival of intracellular M. leprae in infected macrophages. Therefore, these data demonstrated that although autophagy had a role in eliminating intracellular pathogens, the induction of autophagy resulted in anti-inflammatory immune responses, which suppressed autophagy in a negative feedback loop and allowed the persistence of M. leprae.

  4. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae) with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Arthur da Silva; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Ferreira, Jéssica da Silva; Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Macedo, Rafael Enrique; Oliveira, José Henrique; Teixeira, Raquel Lima de Figueiredo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Suffys, Philip Noel; Oliveira, Pedro L; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  5. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae) with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Arthur da Silva; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Ferreira, Jéssica da Silva; Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Macedo, Rafael Enrique; Oliveira, José Henrique; Teixeira, Raquel Lima de Figueiredo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Suffys, Philip Noel; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy. PMID:27203082

  6. Suppression of ADCC by immune complexes formed in vitro in Mycobacterium leprae-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Vaishnavi, C; Ganguly, N K; Kaur, S; Kumar, B

    1993-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was assessed in mice infected experimentally with Mycobacterium leprae and injected simultaneously with in vitro-formed immune complexes (IC). Significant decrease in the ADCC function was observed in animals given IC at zero day (0dIC) and 3 months (3mIC) post inoculation with M. leprae, when ADCC activity was assessed at 3, 6 and 9 months period. From the data obtained we believe that ADCC is suppressed by IC formed in vitro.

  7. Lack of protection afforded by ribonucleic acid preparations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; Youmans, A Y; Youmans, G P

    1977-01-01

    Mycobacterial ribonucleic acid preparations from H37Ra, an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide their usual marked protection against M. tuberculosis challenge; however, they provided no protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge. Suspensions of intact H37Ra were not effective against M. leprae. Suspensions of BCG gave their usual distinct protection against M. leprae challenge. PMID:404242

  8. Pathological investigation of armadillos infected with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N; Kawatsu, K; Tsutsumi, S; Gidoh, M; Nakagawa, H; Kashiwabara, Y; Matsuki, G; Endo, H

    1997-11-01

    An infection experiment with M. leprae was carried out using 20 nine-banded armadillos. As a result, the development of leprous lesions and a marked multiplication of AFB were confirmed in a high rate of 13 out of 15 cases (86.8%) in the inoculated groups. These changes were found to be progressing at post mortem of one case even with the shortest life period for 7.5 months and were very serious in one case with the longest life period for 33 months, suggesting the continuation of symptoms, though it is an expression neglecting the individual difference in susceptibility to leprosy. Among infected viscera with AFB, the most conspicuous lesions were found in the liver and spleen. The developed lesions were found in the lung, stomach and kidney which had been never seen in HD in human cases, and so, which may characterize armadillos' leprosy. The change in the peripheral nerve was not so severe when compared with that in HD in human cases. This difference will remain as a future pathological problem to be solved.

  9. Molecular assays for determining Mycobacterium leprae viability in tissues of experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, Grace L; Ray, Nashone A; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Gillis, Thomas P; Krahenbuhl, James L; Williams, Diana L; Adams, Linda B

    2013-01-01

    The inability of Mycobacterium leprae to grow on axenic media has necessitated specialized techniques in order to determine viability of this organism. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and sensitive molecular assay for determining M. leprae viability directly from infected tissues. Two M. leprae-specific quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays based on the expression levels of esxA, encoding the ESAT-6 protein, and hsp18, encoding the heat shock 18 kDa protein, were developed and tested using infected footpad (FP) tissues of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised (athymic nu/nu) mice. In addition, the ability of these assays to detect the effects of anti-leprosy drug treatment on M. leprae viability was determined using rifampin and rifapentine, each at 10 mg/kg for 1, 5, or 20 daily doses, in the athymic nu/nu FP model. Molecular enumeration (RLEP PCR) and viability determinations (qRT-PCR) were performed via Taqman methodology on DNA and RNA, respectively, purified from ethanol-fixed FP tissue and compared with conventional enumeration (microscopic counting of acid fast bacilli) and viability assays (radiorespirometry, viability staining) which utilized bacilli freshly harvested from the contralateral FP. Both molecular and conventional assays demonstrated growth and high viability of M. leprae in nu/nu FPs over a 4 month infection period. In contrast, viability was markedly decreased by 8 weeks in immunocompetent mice. Rifapentine significantly reduced bacterial viability after 5 treatments, whereas rifampin required up to 20 treatments for the same efficacy. Neither drug was effective after a single treatment. In addition, host gene expression was monitored with the same RNA preparations. hsp18 and esxA qRT-PCR are sensitive molecular indicators, reliably detecting viability of M. leprae in tissues without the need for bacterial isolation or immediate processing, making these assays applicable for in vivo drug screening and

  10. PATTERNS OF MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE INFECTION IN WILD NINE-BANDED ARMADILLOS (DASYPUS NOVEMCINCTUS) IN MISSISSIPPI, USA.

    PubMed

    Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; Loughry, W J; Anderson, Corey Devin; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    The nine-banded armadillo ( Dasypus novemcinctus ) is the only known nonhuman reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae , the causative agent of Hansen's disease or leprosy. We conducted a 6-yr study on a wild population of armadillos in western Mississippi that was exposed to M. leprae to evaluate the importance of demographic and spatial risk factors on individual antibody status. We found that spatially derived covariates were not predictive of antibody status. Furthermore, analyses revealed no evidence of clustering by antibody-positive individuals. Lactating females and adult males had higher odds of being antibody positive than did nonlactating females. No juveniles or yearlings were antibody positive. Results of these analyses support the hypothesis that M. leprae infection patterns are spatially homogeneous within this armadillo population. Further research related to movement patterns, contact among individuals, antibody status, and environmental factors could help address hypotheses related to the role of environmental transmission on M. leprae infection and the mechanisms underlying the differential infection patterns among demographic groups.

  11. Essential role of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in the maintenance of lipid storage in Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Kazunari; Degang, Yang; Kawashima, Akira; Akama, Takeshi; Yoshihara, Aya; Ishido, Yuko; Makino, Masahiko; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), the causative agent of leprosy, parasitizes within the foamy or enlarged phagosome of macrophages where rich lipids accumulate. Although the mechanisms for lipid accumulation in the phagosome have been clarified, it is still unclear how such large amounts of lipids escape degradation. To further explore underlying mechanisms involved in lipid catabolism in M. leprae-infected host cells, we examined the expression of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a key enzyme in fatty acid mobilization and lipolysis, in human macrophage THP-1 cells. We found that infection by live M. leprae significantly suppressed HSL expression levels. This suppression was not observed with dead M. leprae or latex beads. Macrophage activation by peptidoglycan (PGN), the ligand for toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), increased HSL expression; however, live M. leprae suppressed this increase. HSL expression was abolished in the slit-skin smear specimens from patients with lepromatous and borderline leprosy. In addition, the recovery of HSL expression was observed in patients who experienced a lepra reaction, which is a cell-mediated, delayed-type hypersensitivity immune response, or in patients who were successfully treated with multi-drug therapy. These results suggest that M. leprae suppresses lipid degradation through inhibition of HSL expression, and that the monitoring of HSL mRNA levels in slit-skin smear specimens may be a useful indicator of patient prognosis.

  12. Nitazoxanide is active against Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Mai Ann; Na, Hana; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Gillis, Thomas P.; Lahiri, Ramanuj

    2017-01-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is an anti-parasitic drug that also has activity against bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data using both radiorespirometry and live-dead staining in vitro demonstrate that NTZ similarly has bactericidal against M. leprae. Further, gavage of M. leprae-infected mice with NTZ at 25mg/kg provided anti-mycobacterial activity equivalent to rifampicin (RIF) at 10 mg/kg. This suggests that NTZ could be considered for leprosy treatment. PMID:28850614

  13. Nasal PCR assay for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae pra gene to study subclinical infection in a community.

    PubMed

    Arunagiri, Kamalanathan; Sangeetha, Gopalakrishnan; Sugashini, Padmavathy Krishnan; Balaraman, Sekar; Showkath Ali, M K

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Identification of Mycobacterium leprae is difficult in part due to the inability of the leprosy bacillus to grow in vitro. A number of diagnostic methods for leprosy diagnosis have been proposed. Both serological tests and molecular probes have shown certain potential for detection and identification of Mycobacterium leprae in patients. In this study, we have investigated whether Mycobacterium leprae DNA from the nasal secretion of healthy household contacts and the non contacts could be detected through PCR amplification as a method to study the sub clinical infection in a community. A total of 200 samples, 100 each from contacts and non contacts representing all age groups and sex were included in this study. The M. leprae specific primer (proline-rich region) of pra gene was selected and PCR was performed using extracted DNA from the sample. A total of 13 samples were found to be positive for nasal PCR for pra gene among the male and female contacts out of which 7% were males and 6% were females. Even though several diagnostic tools are available to detect the cases of leprosy, they lack the specificity and sensitivity. PCR technology has demonstrated the improved diagnostic accuracy for epidemiological studies and requires minimal time. Although nasal PCR studies have been reported from many countries it is not usually recommended due to the high percentage of negative results in the contact.

  14. Prevalence and incidence density of Mycobacterium leprae and Trypanosoma cruzi infections within a population of wild nine-banded armadillos.

    PubMed

    Paige, Christopher F; Scholl, Daniel T; Truman, Richard W

    2002-11-01

    A total of 415 wild 9-banded armadillos from the East Atchafalaya River Levee (Point Coupee, LA) were collected over 4 years to estimate the incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium leprae and Trypanosoma cruzi and to discern any relationship between the 2 agents. M. leprae infections were maintained at a high steady prevalence rate year to year averaging 19%. T. cruzi antibody prevalence remained relatively low, averaging 3.9%, and varied markedly between years. Prevalence rates were independent, with only 3 armadillos coinfected with both agents. M. leprae incidence density ranged from 0.47 to 3.5 cases per 1,000 animal-days, depending on case definition, confirming active intense transmission of M. leprae among armadillos. No incident T. cruzi cases were found. These infections seem to occur independently and may be used in comparisons to understand better factors that may influence transmission of these agents.

  15. Insight toward Early Diagnosis of Leprosy through Analysis of the Developing Antibody Responses of Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Armadillos ▿

    PubMed Central

    Duthie, Malcolm S.; Truman, Richard W.; Goto, Wakako; O'Donnell, Joanne; Hay, Marah N.; Spencer, John S.; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is a debilitating chronic disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. A World Health Organization-directed control strategy based upon the identification and treatment of patients has resulted in a marked reduction in the number of registered worldwide leprosy cases over the last 20 years. Despite these efforts, the number of new leprosy cases detected each year now remains relatively stable, and M. leprae infection continues to pose a health problem. It is suggested that earlier diagnosis is required to strengthen control programs. In this study, we have examined the development of antigen-specific immunoglobulin responses within armadillos experimentally infected with M. leprae to identify those responses that develop most rapidly and robustly following infection. Antibody responses to the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I and several protein antigens previously demonstrated to have diagnostic potential were assessed. Our results identify several antigens that can provide early diagnosis of M. leprae infection but also indicate considerable variability in the development of antigen-specific antibodies. Our data suggest that a combination of antigens is likely required to provide accurate and early leprosy diagnosis. PMID:21177914

  16. Insight toward early diagnosis of leprosy through analysis of the developing antibody responses of Mycobacterium leprae-infected armadillos.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Truman, Richard W; Goto, Wakako; O'Donnell, Joanne; Hay, Marah N; Spencer, John S; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G

    2011-02-01

    Leprosy is a debilitating chronic disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. A World Health Organization-directed control strategy based upon the identification and treatment of patients has resulted in a marked reduction in the number of registered worldwide leprosy cases over the last 20 years. Despite these efforts, the number of new leprosy cases detected each year now remains relatively stable, and M. leprae infection continues to pose a health problem. It is suggested that earlier diagnosis is required to strengthen control programs. In this study, we have examined the development of antigen-specific immunoglobulin responses within armadillos experimentally infected with M. leprae to identify those responses that develop most rapidly and robustly following infection. Antibody responses to the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I and several protein antigens previously demonstrated to have diagnostic potential were assessed. Our results identify several antigens that can provide early diagnosis of M. leprae infection but also indicate considerable variability in the development of antigen-specific antibodies. Our data suggest that a combination of antigens is likely required to provide accurate and early leprosy diagnosis.

  17. Propionibacterium, Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium and Lepra bacilli.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, L; Kim, K S

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented which suggests that certain key markers of lepra bacilli reside collectively in Proprionibacterium acnes, Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Mycobacterium leprae. The unrestricted replication of Mycobacterium leprae depends most probably upon the presence of an immune-deficiency-inducing viral agent or possibly on the combined effects of the organisms considered.

  18. Involvement of 9-O-Acetyl GD3 ganglioside in Mycobacterium leprae infection of Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Resende, Victor Túlio; Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Lemes, Robertha Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Isis Cristina; Alves, Lucinéia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Lara, Flávio Alves

    2010-10-29

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to demyelization and loss of axonal conductance. Schwann cells (SCs) are the main cell population infected by ML in the nerves, and infection triggers changes in the SC phenotype from a myelinated to a nonmyelinated state. In the present study, we show that expression of 9-O-acetyl GD3, a ganglioside involved in cellular anti-apoptotic signaling and nerve regeneration, increases in SCs following infection with ML. Observation by confocal microscopy together with coimmunoprecipitation suggested that this ganglioside participates in ML attachment and internalization by SC. Immunoblockage of 9-O-acetyl GD3 in vitro significantly reduced adhesion of ML to SC surfaces. Finally, we show that activation of the MAPK (ERK 1/2) pathway and SC proliferation, two known effects of ML on SCs that result in demyelization, are significantly reduced when the 9-O-acetyl GD3 ganglioside is immunoblocked. Taken together, these data suggest the involvement of 9-O-acetyl GD3 in ML infection on SCs.

  19. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  20. An epidemiological study on Mycobacterium leprae infection and prevalence of leprosy in endemic villages by molecular biological technique.

    PubMed

    Izumi, S; Budiawan, T; Saeki, K; Matsuoka, M; Kawatsu, K

    1999-01-01

    One of the most important unsolved questions in epidemiology of leprosy is the highly uneven geographic distribution of the disease. There are many hyperendemic "pockets" in endemic countries. Little is known about the reasons why leprosy is hyperendemic in these areas. We conducted, therefore, a series of epidemiological studies on Mycobacterium leprae infection and prevalence of leprosy in North Maluku district, Maluku Province, Indonesia where leprosy is highly endemic. It was found that considerable number of general inhabitants are seropositive to various mycobacterial antigens and 27% of the villagers were carrying leprosy bacilli on their surface of nasal cavity. These results suggested the importance of M. leprae in the residential environment in infection of the leprosy bacillus and the resulting transmission of the disease. Based on these observations, we conclude that new preventive measures are essential for global elimination of leprosy in addition to early diagnosis and multidrug therapy (MDT).

  1. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3115648

  2. Immunophenotypic analysis of histiocytes involved in AIDS-associated Mycobacterium scrofulaceum infection: similarities with lepromatous lepra.

    PubMed

    Delabie, J; De Wolf-Peeters, C; Bobbaers, H; Bilbe, G; Desmet, V J

    1991-08-01

    The present study reports a rare case of systemic M. scrofulaceum infection in an AIDS patient and analyses the inflammatory infiltrate in a lymph node by immunohistochemistry. Special emphasis is put on the histiocytes. The diffuse infiltrate consists mainly of large histiocytes that contain numerous bacilli. These cells display the phenotype of mature histiocytes and in addition coexpress the antigens recognized by RFD7 and RFD9, both markers of different subsets of histiocytes which have been reported to be co-expressed by the infected histiocytes in the infiltrate of lepromatous lepra. Interdigitating reticulum cells are rare as well as T cells which are mainly of the suppressor/cytotoxic type. These findings are similar to those reported for lepromatous lepra and might indicate common deficiencies in T cell-macrophage interactions in both conditions. Superimposed on the diffuse infiltrate of large histiocytes we observed 'monocytic granulomas', the presence of which might be related to a reactional state comparable to erythema nodosum leprosum, a reactional state of lepromatous lepra.

  3. Antigen-specific secretion of IFNγ and CXCL10 in whole blood assay detects Mycobacterium leprae infection but does not discriminate asymptomatic infection from symptomatic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Freitas, Aline Araújo; Pontes, Maria Araci Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Osório Maroccolo; Costa, Maurício Barcelos; Castilho, Mirian Lane Oliveira Rodrigues; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2017-04-01

    To advance toward a whole blood assay (WBA)-based test capable of facilitating the diagnosis of paucibacillary (PB) leprosy, we evaluated a prototype in-tube WBA using combinations of Mycobacterium leprae antigens. Blood was collected from newly diagnosed untreated PB (n=38), multibacillary (MB) (n=30), healthy household contacts (HHC) of MB (n=27), and endemic controls (n=61) residing in Goiânia and Fortaleza, Brazil. Blood was incubated with M. leprae cell sonicate, recombinant proteins (46f+LID-1; ML0276+LID-1), or controls (phosphate-buffered saline, phytohemagglutinin, M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative). Antigen-specific IFNγ production was observed in 71-84% and 55% of PB and HHC, respectively. Antigen-specific CXCL10 levels were similarly assessed to determine if, unlike IFNγ, CXCL10 could differentiate PB from HHC with repeated exposure/asymptomatic M. leprae infection. The CXCL10 levels induced in response to M. leprae antigens could not, however, differentiate PB from HHC. Despite these limitations, the WBAs reported here still represent important tools for assessing M. leprae infection rates and evaluating the impact of control measures.

  4. Presence of Human T-Cell Responses to the Mycobacterium leprae 45-Kilodalton Antigen Reflects Infection with or Exposure to M. leprae

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Anne; Mondragon-Gonzalez, Rafael; Vega-Lopez, Francisco; Wieles, Brigitte; de Pena, Josefina; Rodriguez, Obdulia; Suarez y de la Torre, Raul; de Vries, Rene R. P.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of the 45-kDa serine-rich Mycobacterium leprae antigen to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production was measured in leprosy patients, household contacts, and healthy controls from areas of endemicity in Mexico. Almost all the tuberculoid leprosy patients gave strong PBMC proliferation responses to the M. leprae 45-kDa antigen (92.8%; n = 14). Responses were lower in lepromatous leprosy patients (60.6%; n = 34), but some responses to the 45-kDa antigen were detected in patients unresponsive to M. leprae sonicate. The proportion of positive responses to the M. leprae 45-kDa antigen was much higher in leprosy contacts (88%; n = 17) than in controls from areas of endemicity (10%; n = 20). None of 15 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis gave a positive proliferation response to the 45-kDa antigen. The 45-kDa antigen induced IFN-γ secretion similar to that induced by the native Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30/31-kDa antigen in tuberculoid leprosy patients and higher responses than those induced by the other recombinant antigens (M. leprae 10- and 65-kDa antigens, thioredoxin, and thioredoxin reductase); in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis it induced lower IFN-γ secretion than the other recombinant antigens. These results suggest that the M. leprae 45-kDa antigen is a potent T-cell antigen which is M. leprae specific in these Mexican donors. This antigen may therefore have diagnostic potential as a new skin test reagent or as an antigen in a simple whole-blood cytokine test. PMID:11329466

  5. Mycobacterium leprae in Mice: Minimal Infectious Dose, Relationship Between Staining Quality and Infectivity, and Effect of Cortisone

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Charles C.; McRae, Dorothy H.

    1965-01-01

    Shepard, Charles C. (Communicable Disease Center, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Ga.), and Dorothy H. McRae. Mycobacterium leprae in mice: minimal infectious dose, relationship between staining quality and infectivity, and effect of cortisone. J. Bacteriol. 89:365–372. 1965.—The minimal infectious dose of Mycobacterium leprae in mouse foot pads was found to be on the order of 10 solidly staining bacilli. In a titration experiment, the actual number found was 3.4 to 34 solid bacilli, and the order of magnitude was confirmed by experience with inocula containing varying numbers of solidly staining leprosy bacilli from mouse passage and from clinical sources. The acid-fast staining quality of leprosy bacilli was related in a useful way to the subsequent rate at which bacillary growth appeared. When the proportion of solidly staining bacilli was high, the calculated generation time was shortest, and the lower the proportion, the longer the generation times. The results were in accord with the hypothesis that all viable bacilli are solid, and that when they die, most of them become nonsolid. Varying proportions of the dead bacilli, perhaps up to 10%, remain solid, at least temporarily. The growth curve of M. leprae in mice was followed in several experiments with total counts of acid-fast bacteria and determination of the ratio of solid bacilli. What had been called a maximal stationary phase was seen to consist of sequential phases of conversion of solid to nonsolid bacilli (death), reappearance of solid bacilli (growth), and conversion of solid to nonsolid bacilli (death). When cortisone was administered, leprosy bacilli grew somewhat more slowly during the logarithmic phase, but attained a higher level, especially of solidly staining bacilli. PMID:14255702

  6. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  7. Advances in Proteomics of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Parkash, O; Singh, B P

    2012-04-01

    Although Mycobacterium leprae was the first bacterial pathogen identified causing human disease, it remains one of the few that is non-cultivable. Understanding the biology of M. leprae is one of the primary challenges in current leprosy research. Genomics has been extremely valuable, nonetheless, functional proteins are ultimately responsible for controlling most aspects of cellular functions, which in turn could facilitate parasitizing the host. Furthermore, bacterial proteins provide targets for most of the vaccines and immunodiagnostic tools. Better understanding of the proteomics of M. leprae could also help in developing new drugs against M. leprae. During the past nearly 15 years, there have been several developments towards the identification of M. leprae proteins employing contemporary proteomics tools. In this review, we discuss the knowledge gained on the biology and pathogenesis of M. leprae from current proteomic studies.

  8. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae infection in wild nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) using the rapid ML Flow test.

    PubMed

    Deps, Patrícia Duarte; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Mycobaterium leprae infection was investigated in armadillos from the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. The ML Flow test was performed on 37 nine-banded armadillos and positive results were found in 11 (29.7%). The ML Flow test may be used to identify possible sources of Mycobaterium leprae among wild armadillos.

  9. Enumeration of Mycobacterium leprae Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Andrews, P. Kyle; Robbins, Naoko Y.; Adams, Linda B.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Gillis, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is not cultivable in axenic media, and direct microscopic enumeration of the bacilli is complex, labor intensive, and suffers from limited sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a real-time PCR assay for quantifying M. leprae DNA in biological samples. Primers were identified to amplify a shared region of the multicopy repeat sequence (RLEP) specific to M. leprae and tested for sensitivity and specificity in the TaqMan format. The assay was specific for M. leprae and able to detect 10 fg of purified M. leprae DNA, or approximately 300 bacteria in infected tissues. We used the RLEP TaqMan PCR to assess the short and long-term growth results of M. leprae in foot pad tissues obtained from conventional mice, a gene knock-out mouse strain, athymic nude mice, as well as from reticuloendothelial tissues of M. leprae–infected nine-banded armadillos. We found excellent correlative results between estimates from RLEP TaqMan PCR and direct microscopic counting (combined r = 0.98). The RLEP TaqMan PCR permitted rapid analysis of batch samples with high reproducibility and is especially valuable for detection of low numbers of bacilli. Molecular enumeration is a rapid, objective and highly reproducible means to estimate the numbers of M. leprae in tissues, and application of the technique can facilitate work with this agent in many laboratories. PMID:18982056

  10. Mycobacterium leprae intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation in infected macrophages: a potential target for new drugs for leprosy treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Katherine A; Oliveira, Viviane C G; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Amaral, Julio J; Antunes, Luis Caetano M; Melo, Rossana C N; Acosta, Chyntia C D; Moura, Danielle F; Olmo, Roberta; Han, Jun; Rosa, Patricia S; Almeida, Patrícia E; Finlay, B Brett; Borchers, Christoph H; Sarno, Euzenir N; Bozza, Patricia T; Atella, Georgia C; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that Mycobacterium leprae (ML) is able to induce lipid droplet formation in infected macrophages. We herein confirm that cholesterol (Cho) is one of the host lipid molecules that accumulate in ML-infected macrophages and investigate the effects of ML on cellular Cho metabolism responsible for its accumulation. The expression levels of LDL receptors (LDL-R, CD36, SRA-1, SR-B1, and LRP-1) and enzymes involved in Cho biosynthesis were investigated by qRT-PCR and/or Western blot and shown to be higher in lepromatous leprosy (LL) tissues when compared to borderline tuberculoid (BT) lesions. Moreover, higher levels of the active form of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptional factors, key regulators of the biosynthesis and uptake of cellular Cho, were found in LL skin biopsies. Functional in vitro assays confirmed the higher capacity of ML-infected macrophages to synthesize Cho and sequester exogenous LDL-Cho. Notably, Cho colocalized to ML-containing phagosomes, and Cho metabolism impairment, through either de novo synthesis inhibition by statins or depletion of exogenous Cho, decreased intracellular bacterial survival. These findings highlight the importance of metabolic integration between the host and bacteria to leprosy pathophysiology, opening new avenues for novel therapeutic strategies to leprosy. PMID:24552180

  11. Protection against Mycobacterium leprae infection by the ID83/GLA-SE and ID93/GLA-SE vaccines developed for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Coler, Rhea N; Laurance, John D; Sampaio, Lucas H; Oliveira, Regiane M; Sousa, Ana Lucia M; Stefani, Mariane M A; Maeda, Yumi; Matsuoka, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko; Reed, Steven G

    2014-09-01

    Despite the dramatic reduction in the number of leprosy cases worldwide in the 1990s, transmission of the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, is still occurring, and new cases continue to appear. New strategies are required in the pursuit of leprosy elimination. The cross-application of vaccines in development for tuberculosis may lead to tools applicable to elimination of leprosy. In this report, we demonstrate that the chimeric fusion proteins ID83 and ID93, developed as antigens for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates, elicited gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses from both TB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy patients and from healthy household contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients (HHC) but not from nonexposed healthy controls. Immunization of mice with either protein formulated with a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand (TLR4L)-containing adjuvant (glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in a stable emulsion [GLA-SE]) stimulated antigen-specific IFN-γ secretion from pluripotent Th1 cells. When immunized mice were experimentally infected with M. leprae, both cellular infiltration into the local lymph node and bacterial growth at the site were reduced relative to those of unimmunized mice. Thus, the use of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis candidate vaccines ID83/GLA-SE and ID93/GLA-SE may confer cross-protection against M. leprae infection. Our data suggest these vaccines could potentially be used as an additional control measure for leprosy.

  12. Protection against Mycobacterium leprae Infection by the ID83/GLA-SE and ID93/GLA-SE Vaccines Developed for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Coler, Rhea N.; Laurance, John D.; Sampaio, Lucas H.; Oliveira, Regiane M.; Sousa, Ana Lucia M.; Stefani, Mariane M. A.; Maeda, Yumi; Matsuoka, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic reduction in the number of leprosy cases worldwide in the 1990s, transmission of the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, is still occurring, and new cases continue to appear. New strategies are required in the pursuit of leprosy elimination. The cross-application of vaccines in development for tuberculosis may lead to tools applicable to elimination of leprosy. In this report, we demonstrate that the chimeric fusion proteins ID83 and ID93, developed as antigens for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates, elicited gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses from both TB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy patients and from healthy household contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients (HHC) but not from nonexposed healthy controls. Immunization of mice with either protein formulated with a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand (TLR4L)-containing adjuvant (glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in a stable emulsion [GLA-SE]) stimulated antigen-specific IFN-γ secretion from pluripotent Th1 cells. When immunized mice were experimentally infected with M. leprae, both cellular infiltration into the local lymph node and bacterial growth at the site were reduced relative to those of unimmunized mice. Thus, the use of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis candidate vaccines ID83/GLA-SE and ID93/GLA-SE may confer cross-protection against M. leprae infection. Our data suggest these vaccines could potentially be used as an additional control measure for leprosy. PMID:25024362

  13. Oral mucosa as a source of Mycobacterium leprae infection and transmission, and implications of bacterial DNA detection and the immunological status.

    PubMed

    Martinez, T S; Figueira, M M N R; Costa, A V; Gonçalves, M A; Goulart, L R; Goulart, I M B

    2011-11-01

    Leprosy is an important health problem in Brazil despite extensive use of multidrug therapy. The nasal mucosa is the preferential site of entry and exit of Mycobacterium leprae, and although lesions have been found in the oral mucosa, its potential involvement in the transmission of leprosy bacilli has never been investigated. We investigated the presence of the M. leprae DNA in buccal swabs of leprosy patients (334) and household contacts (1288) through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and correlated this with clinical and laboratorial evaluations. The overall positivity for patients and contacts was 18.26% and 6.83%, respectively. Subclinical infection among contacts was considered when PCR and anti-PGL-1 ELISA presented positive results. This study provides evidence that the oral mucosa may be a secondary site of M. leprae transmission and infection, and contacts with bacillary DNA may be actively involved in transmission. We have also shown that bacilli DNA is more frequently found in the oral mucosa of PB patients. Our findings have great epidemiological relevance and indicate an additional strategy for leprosy control programmes and dental clinics.

  14. Mycobacterium species related to M. leprae and M. lepromatosis from cows with bovine nodular thelitis.

    PubMed

    Pin, Didier; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Garreau, Virginie; Breysse, Franck; Dumitrescu, Oana; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Lina, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    Bovine nodular thelitis is a granulomatous dermatitis associated with infection with acid-fast bacteria. To identify the mycobacterium responsible for this infection, we conducted phylogenetic investigations based on partial sequencing of 6 genes. These bacteria were identified as an undescribed Mycobacterium species that was phylogenetically related to M. leprae and M. lepromatosis.

  15. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  16. An ultrastructural study of neuromuscular spindles in normal mice: with reference to mice and man infected with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R P

    1975-09-01

    Mycobacterium leprae have been found within muscle spindles in mice, using electron microscopy, and in man, using light microscopy. Their mode of entry clearly is important. It may be via capsular cells, capillaries or nerves. For this reason muscle spindles from normal mice were studied by electron microscopy with special reference to the capsule and the relationship of it with capillaries and nerves, as well as details of the intrafusal fibres and capsular space. A fenestrated capillary was found between the capsular cell layers and outside the capsule in one spindle and in another spindle both a fenestrated and a continuous type of a capillary were found between the capsular cells; this may be of interest for pharmacological studies. However, the muscle spindles of the mouse were in the main similar to muscle spindles studied by other workers in man and other mammals.

  17. Co-infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae in human archaeological samples: a possible explanation for the historical decline of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Helen D.; Marcsik, Antónia; Matheson, Carney; Vernon, Kim; Nuorala, Emilia; Molto, Joseph E.; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Spigelman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe during the first millennium but thereafter leprosy declined. It is not known why this occurred, but one suggestion is that cross-immunity protected tuberculosis patients from leprosy. To investigate any relationship between the two diseases, selected archaeological samples, dating from the Roman period to the thirteenth century, were examined for both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA, using PCR. The work was carried out and verified in geographically separate and independent laboratories. Several specimens with palaeopathological signs of leprosy were found to contain DNA from both pathogens, indicating that these diseases coexisted in the past. We suggest that the immunological changes found in multi-bacillary leprosy, in association with the socio-economic impact on those suffering from the disease, led to increased mortality from tuberculosis and therefore to the historical decline in leprosy. PMID:15734693

  18. Rapid Quantitative Serological Test for Detection of Infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the Causative Agent of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Balagon, Marivic F.; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M.; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections. PMID:24478496

  19. Rapid quantitative serological test for detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Balagon, Marivic F; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G

    2014-02-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections.

  20. Multidrug Resistant Mycobacterium leprae from Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Shinji; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakata, Noboru; Kai, Masanori; Maeda, Yumi; Hashimoto, Ken; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kashiwabara, Yoshiko

    2001-01-01

    Sequences of the folP1, rpoB, and gyrA genes were analyzed for 88 isolates of Mycobacterium leprae from leprosy patients in Japan, Haiti, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Thirteen isolates (14.8%) showed representative mutations in more than two genes, suggesting the emergence of multidrug-resistant M. leprae. PMID:11709358

  1. Mycobacterium leprae upregulates IRGM expression in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yang, Degang; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Linglin; Cha, Zhanshan; Han, Song; Shi, Weiwei; Ding, Ru; Ma, Lan; Xiao, Hong; Shi, Chao; Jing, Zhichun; Song, Ningjing

    2014-08-01

    Leprosy is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium leprae, which evokes a strong inflammatory response and leads to nerve damage. Immunity-related GTPase family M protein (IRGM) plays critical roles in controlling inflammation. The objective of the study was to investigate whether IRGM is involved in the infection of M. leprae. Levels of IRGM were assessed in M. leprae-infected CD4(+) T cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Data revealed that both protein and mRNA levels of IRGM were increased in monocytes after M. leprae infection. Interestingly, monocyte-derived macrophages showed more prominent IRGM expression with M. leprae infection, whereas the bacteria did not affect IRGM in CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we assessed levels of IRGM in CD4(+) T cells and monocytes from 78 leprosy patients and 40 healthy controls, and observed upregulated protein level of IRGM in the monocytes from leprosy patients. Also, IRGM expression was inversely correlated with the severity of the disease. These findings suggested a close involvement of IRGM in M. leprae infection and indicated a potential mechanism of defending M. leprae infection.

  2. An ultrastructural study of neuromuscular spindles in normal mice: with reference to mice and man infected with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, R P

    1975-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae have been found within muscle spindles in mice, using electron microscopy, and in man, using light microscopy. Their mode of entry clearly is important. It may be via capsular cells, capillaries or nerves. For this reason muscle spindles from normal mice were studied by electron microscopy with special reference to the capsule and the relationship of it with capillaries and nerves, as well as details of the intrafusal fibres and capsular space. A fenestrated capillary was found between the capsular cell layers and outside the capsule in one spindle and in another spindle both a fenestrated and a continuous type of a capillary were found between the capsular cells; this may be of interest for pharmacological studies. However, the muscle spindles of the mouse were in the main similar to muscle spindles studied by other workers in man and other mammals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Figs. 8-11 PMID:126981

  3. Effect of purification steps on the immunogenicity of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C. C.; Draper, P.; Rees, R. J.; Lowe, C.

    1980-01-01

    In studies aimed at the development of an antileprosy vaccine for use in man, Mycobacterium leprae suspensions were prepared from livers of experimentally infected armadillos. The 2 methods of purification in chief use, carried out after irradiation of the tissue with 2.5 megarads of gamma irradiation from 60Co, involved treatment with 0.1N NaOH for 2 h at room temperature, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion for 24h at 37 degrees, and separation in a 2-phase liquid polymer (dextran:polyethylene glycol) system. All vaccines were autoclaved and injected intradermally in mice. Earlier studies have shown that heat inactivation does not interfere with the immunogenicity of M. leprae. Immunogenicity was measured by foot-pad enlargement (FPE) after challenge with heat-killed M. leprae suspensions or by protection against infectious foot-pad challenge. The results indicated that the irradiation and 2-phase separation did not decrease immunogenicity but the NaOH treatment and enzyme digestion did. PMID:7000133

  4. VNTR typing of Mycobacterium leprae in South Indian leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vidyagouri; Newton, Hema; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Reddy, Venkateshwar; Jain, Suman; Joseph, Abraham; Gillis, Tom; Nath, Indira; Norman, Gift; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    To study the suitability, stability and diversity of short tandem repeat (STR) genomic markers to elicit strain variation in the Mycobacterium leprae isolates within leprosy patients from Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu states in South India. Slit skin smear (SSS) samples were collected from lesions and various body sites of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. The SSSs from each patient were pooled, except in the case of five patients. Total DNA was extracted from SSS samples. M. leprae STRs were amplified from the DNA either by multiplex PCR (MP) or single PCR methods. The number of repeats for each STR locus (the STR allele) was obtained either by fragment length analysis (FLA) or by DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Multiplex PCR minimised the use of DNA and reagents, and together with FLA, was time and cost effective for STR strain typing. After examination of the isolates of South Indian origin at 13 STR loci, it was determined that the alleles for (AC)8b, (GGT)5, 6-3a (rpoT), 21-3, 27-5, and 23-3 were conserved in two study populations. In a family from Andhra Pradesh, the M. leprae STR patterns in two patients were identical in 16 of 18 loci which indicate a common source of infection. Fourteen of 15 STR loci showed no intra-patient variation in the five patients tested in Tamil Nadu. Altogether, these studies indicate the suitability of STR strain typing for assessing short-range transmission chains.

  5. A lipopeptide facilitate induction of Mycobacterium leprae killing in host cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Fukutomi, Yasuo; Mukai, Tetsu; Kai, Masanori; Makino, Masahiko

    2011-11-01

    Little is known of the direct microbicidal activity of T cells in leprosy, so a lipopeptide consisting of the N-terminal 13 amino acids lipopeptide (LipoK) of a 33-kD lipoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae, was synthesized. LipoK activated M. leprae infected human dendritic cells (DCs) to induce the production of IL-12. These activated DCs stimulated autologous CD4+ or CD8+ T cells towards type 1 immune response by inducing interferon-gamma secretion. T cell proliferation was also evident from the CFSE labeling of target CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The direct microbicidal activity of T cells in the control of M. leprae multiplication is not well understood. The present study showed significant production of granulysin, granzyme B and perforin from these activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when stimulated with LipoK activated, M. leprae infected DCs. Assessment of the viability of M. leprae in DCs indicated LipoK mediated T cell-dependent killing of M. leprae. Remarkably, granulysin as well as granzyme B could directly kill M. leprae in vitro. Our results provide evidence that LipoK could facilitate M. leprae killing through the production of effector molecules granulysin and granzyme B in T cells.

  6. The armadillo as an animal model and reservoir host for Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Pena, Maria; Sharma, Rahul; Truman, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Apart from humans, armadillos are the only known natural hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. They are well developed as hosts for in vivo propagation of M leprae and are advancing as models for studying the pathogenesis of leprosy and translational research. Armadillos are immunologically intact. They exhibit the full Ridley-Jopling spectrum of histopathologic responses to M leprae and uniquely manifest extensive neurological involvement that closely recapitulates human leprosy. In addition, free-ranging armadillos in some regions are known to harbor a naturally occurring infection with M leprae, and zoonotic transmission between armadillos and humans has been implicated in a large number of new case presentations. We review the role of the armadillo as a model for leprosy and reservoir for human infection.

  7. Localization of Mycobacterium leprae to Endothelial Cells of Epineurial and Perineurial Blood Vessels and Lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Scollard, David M.; McCormick, Gregory; Allen, Joe L.

    1999-01-01

    Infection of peripheral nerve by Mycobacterium leprae, the histopathological hallmark of leprosy, is a major factor in this disease, but the route and mechanisms by which bacilli localize to peripheral nerve are unknown. Experimentally infected armadillos have recently been recognized as a model of lepromatous neuritis; the major site of early accumulation of M. leprae is epineurial. To determine the epineurial cells involved, 1-cm segments of 44 nerves from armadillos were screened for acid-fast bacilli and thin sections were examined ultrastructurally. Of 596 blocks containing nerve, 36% contained acid-fast bacilli. Overall, M. leprae were found in endothelial cells in 40% of epineurial blood vessels and 75% of lymphatics, and in 25% of vessels intraneurally. Comparison of epineurial and endoneurial findings suggested that colonization of epineurial vessels preceded endoneurial infection. Such colonization of epineurial nutrient vessels may greatly increase the risk of endoneurial M. leprae bacteremia, and also enhance the risk of ischemia following even mild increases in inflammation or mechanical stress. These findings also raise the possibility that early, specific mechanisms in the localization of M. leprae to peripheral nerve may involve adhesion events between M. leprae (or M. leprae-parasitized macrophages) and the endothelial cells of the vasa nervorum. PMID:10329613

  8. Lichen scrofulosorum caused by Mycobacterium leprae: first report.

    PubMed

    Fiallo, Paolo; Cabiddu, Francesco; Clapasson, Andrea; Parodi, Aurora

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculides are skin lesions caused by the hematogeneous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacilli are rapidly destroyed in the skin and are thus neither visible histologically nor identifiable by culture. Diagnosis depends on previous knowledge of systemic and/or cutaneous tuberculosis. Lichen scrofulosorum (LS), the most uncommon variant of tuberculid, is usually associated with M. tuberculosis infection of lymph nodes or bone but was also reported in association with other mycobacterioses. We report a case of LS in a patient with M. leprae infection. In 2008, a 51-year-old woman from the Philippines was diagnosed with tuberculoid leprosy and treated. In 2010 the leprosy was considered to have been cured, and treatment was stopped. In 2011 the patient presented with lesions on the trunk and legs. Biopsy specimens were obtained for histopathologic examination and DNA detection for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histopathology in the biopsy from the trunk revealed the dermis to be diffusely occupied by granulomas with perineural and periadnexal disposition. Granulomas were composed of epithelioid cells and lymphocytes. Fite-Faraco staining revealed a few solid acid-fast bacilli within nerve fascicles. Reinfection or the re-reactivation of multibacillary borderline tuberculoid leprosy was diagnosed. Histopathology in the biopsy taken from the leg showed superficial, well-formed granulomas in the vicinity of hair follicles and sweat ducts. No acid-fast bacilli were seen. Analysis by PCR revealed M. leprae DNA in specimens from both the leg and trunk. The clinical features of the papular eruption and the histopathologic findings and concomitant mycobacterial infection with M. leprae led to a diagnosis of LS. Treatment was commenced with dapsone 100 mg/day, clofazimine 50 mg/day and 300 mg/month, and rifampicin 600 mg/day. The lichenoid eruption on the legs disappeared at one month of therapy, whereas the other skin lesions resolved in one year

  9. Identification of mimotopes of Mycobacterium leprae as potential diagnostic reagents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An early diagnostic test for detecting infection in leprosy is fundamental for reducing patients’ sequelae. The currently used lepromin is not adequate for disease diagnosis and, so far, no antigen to be used in intradermoreaction has proved to be sensitive and specific for that purpose. Aiming at identifying new reagents to be used in skin tests, candidate antigens were investigated. Methods Random peptide phage display libraries were screened by using antibodies from leprosy patients in order to identify peptides as diagnostic reagents. Results Seven different phage clones were identified using purified antibodies pooled from sera of leprosy patients. When the clones were tested with serum samples by ELISA, three of them, 5A, 6A and 1B, allowed detecting a larger number of leprosy patients when compared to controls. The corresponding peptides expressed by selected phage clones were chemically synthesized. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the use of peptides in skin tests. The intradermal challenge with peptides in animals previously sensitized with Mycobacterium leprae induced a delayed-type hypersensitivity with peptide 5A (2/5) and peptide 1B (1/5). In positive controls, there was a 3/5 reactivity for lepromin and a 4/5 reactivity of the sensitized animals with soluble extract of M. leprae. Conclusions The preliminary data suggest that may be possible to develop reagents with diagnostic potential based on peptide mimotopes selected by phage display using polyclonal human antibodies. PMID:23351151

  10. The formation of lipid droplets favors intracellular Mycobacterium leprae survival in SW-10, non-myelinating Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song-Hyo; An, Sung-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae (M.leprae), which is the leading cause of all non-traumatic peripheral neuropathies worldwide. Although both myelinating and non-myelinating Schwann cells are infected by M.leprae in patients with lepromatous leprosy, M.leprae preferentially invades the non-myelinating Schwann cells. However, the effect of M.leprae infection on non-myelinating Schwann cells has not been elucidated. Lipid droplets (LDs) are found in M.leprae-infected Schwann cells in the nerve biopsies of lepromatous leprosy patients. M.leprae-induced LD formation favors intracellular M.leprae survival in primary Schwann cells and in a myelinating Schwann cell line referred to as ST88-14. In the current study, we initially characterized SW-10 cells and investigated the effects of LDs on M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells, which are non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells express S100, a marker for cells from the neural crest, and NGFR p75, a marker for immature or non-myelinating Schwann cells. SW-10 cells, however, do not express myelin basic protein (MBP), a marker for myelinating Schwann cells, and myelin protein zero (MPZ), a marker for precursor, immature, or myelinating Schwann cells, all of which suggests that SW-10 cells are non-myelinating Schwann cells. In addition, SW-10 cells have phagocytic activity and can be infected with M. leprae. Infection with M. leprae induces the formation of LDs. Furthermore, inhibiting the formation of M. leprae-induced LD enhances the maturation of phagosomes containing live M.leprae and decreases the ATP content in the M. leprae found in SW-10 cells. These facts suggest that LD formation by M. leprae favors intracellular M. leprae survival in SW-10 cells, which leads to the logical conclusion that M.leprae-infected SW-10 cells can be a new model for investigating the interaction of M.leprae with non-myelinating Schwann cells. PMID:28636650

  11. Genome-wide comparison of medieval and modern Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Singh, Pushpendra; Mendum, Thomas A; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Jäger, Günter; Bos, Kirsten I; Herbig, Alexander; Economou, Christos; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Nebel, Almut; Boldsen, Jesper L; Kjellström, Anna; Wu, Huihai; Stewart, Graham R; Taylor, G Michael; Bauer, Peter; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tucker, Katie; Roffey, Simon; Sow, Samba O; Cole, Stewart T; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes

    2013-07-12

    Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.

  12. Spatial and temporal epidemiology of Mycobacterium leprae infection among leprosy patients and household contacts of an endemic region in Southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nicchio, Mariana V C; Araujo, Sergio; Martins, Lorraine C; Pinheiro, Andressa V; Pereira, Daniela C; Borges, Angélica; Antunes, Douglas E; Barreto, Josafá G; Goulart, Isabela Maria B

    2016-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that remains a public health problem in low- and middle-income countries. Household contacts of leprosy patients (HHCs) have increased risk of developing disease and are important links in the chain of transmission of Mycobacterium leprae. Based on epidemiological and operational factors, the global elimination strategy depends on the geographic stratification of endemic areas to intensify control activities. The purpose of the study was to integrate epidemiological indicators and serology into the spatial and temporal analysis of M. leprae infection, in order to understanding of the dynamics of transmission, essential information for the control of leprosy. Using location-based technologies and epidemiological data obtained from leprosy cases (N=371) and HHCs (N=53), during a 11year period (2004-2014), we explored the spatial and temporal distribution of diagnosed cases: stratified according their disease manifestation; and of subclinical infection among HHCs: determined by serology (anti-PGL-I ELISA and anti-NDO-LID rapid lateral-flow test); in order to assess the distribution pattern of the disease and the areas of greatest risk of illness, in a highly endemic municipality (Ituiutaba, MG) in the southeast region of Brazil. Seropositivity among HHCs was: 17% (9/53) for anti-PGL-I ELISA; and 42% for the NDO-LID rapid lateral-flow test. Forty-nine percent of the contacts were seropositive to at least one of the immunological tests. We observed substantial spatial heterogeneity of cases throughout the urban perimeter. Even so, four main clusters of patients and three main clusters of subclinical infection were identified. Spatio-temporal epidemiology associated to serological assessment can identify high-risk areas imbedded within the overall epidemic municipality, to prioritize active search of new cases as well support prevention strategies in these locations of greater disease burden and transmission. Such techniques should

  13. Mycobacterium leprae phenolglycolipid-1 expressed by engineered M. bovis BCG modulates early interaction with human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, Guillaume; Astarie-Dequeker, Catherine; Demangel, Caroline; Malaga, Wladimir; Constant, Patricia; Ray, Aurélie; Honoré, Nadine; Bello, Nana Fatimath; Perez, Esther; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2010-10-21

    The species-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) is suspected to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of leprosy, a chronic disease of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Based on studies using the purified compound, PGL-1 was proposed to mediate the tropism of M. leprae for the nervous system and to modulate host immune responses. However, deciphering the biological function of this glycolipid has been hampered by the inability to grow M. leprae in vitro and to genetically engineer this bacterium. Here, we identified the M. leprae genes required for the biosynthesis of the species-specific saccharidic domain of PGL-1 and reprogrammed seven enzymatic steps in M. bovis BCG to make it synthesize and display PGL-1 in the context of an M. leprae-like cell envelope. This recombinant strain provides us with a unique tool to address the key questions of the contribution of PGL-1 in the infection process and to study the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that PGL-1 production endowed recombinant BCG with an increased capacity to exploit complement receptor 3 (CR3) for efficient invasion of human macrophages and evasion of inflammatory responses. PGL-1 production also promoted bacterial uptake by human dendritic cells and dampened their infection-induced maturation. Our results therefore suggest that M. leprae produces PGL-1 for immune-silent invasion of host phagocytic cells.

  14. A potential role for complement in immune evasion by Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Callegaro-Filho, Donato; Shrestha, Niraj; Burdick, Anne E; Haslett, Patrick A J

    2010-11-01

    Lepromatous leprosy is a model of immune evasion wherein pathogen-specific IL-10-secreting T cells and concomitant failure of Th-1 immunity permit uncontrolled proliferation of the intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). The mechanism of this immune escape is unknown. Here, the authors report that phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1), a major and distinguishing feature of the M. leprae cell wall, is expressed in the cell membrane of M. leprae-infected human dendritic cells, where it can activate complement in human serum. The authors demonstrate that PGL-1 and the C3 component of complement colocalize in lipid rafts in the dendritic cell membrane, and enter the immune synapse upon co-culture of M. leprae-infected DCs and T cells. Hence, activated C3 is strategically located to costimulate naïve T cells via the complement regulatory protein, CD46, a process known to stimulate the differentiation of IL-10-secreting regulatory T cells. These observations suggest a potential novel mechanism of immune evasion, wherein M. leprae may subvert host natural immunity to provoke an adaptive response that favors bacillary survival.

  15. Mycobacterium leprae Phenolglycolipid-1 Expressed by Engineered M. bovis BCG Modulates Early Interaction with Human Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tabouret, Guillaume; Astarie-Dequeker, Catherine; Demangel, Caroline; Malaga, Wladimir; Constant, Patricia; Ray, Aurélie; Honoré, Nadine; Bello, Nana Fatimath; Perez, Esther; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The species-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) is suspected to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of leprosy, a chronic disease of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Based on studies using the purified compound, PGL-1 was proposed to mediate the tropism of M. leprae for the nervous system and to modulate host immune responses. However, deciphering the biological function of this glycolipid has been hampered by the inability to grow M. leprae in vitro and to genetically engineer this bacterium. Here, we identified the M. leprae genes required for the biosynthesis of the species-specific saccharidic domain of PGL-1 and reprogrammed seven enzymatic steps in M. bovis BCG to make it synthesize and display PGL-1 in the context of an M. leprae-like cell envelope. This recombinant strain provides us with a unique tool to address the key questions of the contribution of PGL-1 in the infection process and to study the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that PGL-1 production endowed recombinant BCG with an increased capacity to exploit complement receptor 3 (CR3) for efficient invasion of human macrophages and evasion of inflammatory responses. PGL-1 production also promoted bacterial uptake by human dendritic cells and dampened their infection-induced maturation. Our results therefore suggest that M. leprae produces PGL-1 for immune-silent invasion of host phagocytic cells. PMID:20975946

  16. Susceptibility of thymectomized and irradiated mice to challenge with several organisms and the effect of dapsone on infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Levy, L; Ng, H; Evans, M J; Krahenbuhl, J L

    1975-05-01

    B6C3F1 mice that had been thymectomized at 8 to 12 weeks of age, subjected to 950 R of whole-body X irradiation, and transfused with syngeneic bone marrow were challenged in a footpad with Mycobacterium leprae or M. marinum, or intravenously or intraperitioneally with Listeria monocytogenes. Also, mice inoculated with M. leprae in a hind footpad were administered dapsone in the mouse chow. The thymectomized-irradiated (T + R) mice did not survive as well as non-thymectomized mice when housed in the vivarium with no special precautions, but survived sufficiently well to permit the completion of some long-term experiments. M. leprae multiplied to a higher "ceiling" and survived longer in the T + R mice than in the non-thymectomized controls. But a ceiling to multiplication of M. leprae was imposed, and finally the organisms were killed. The histopathological appearance of the footpad tissues, studied by electron microscopy, was consistent with the measurements of bacterial numbers and viability. Swelling of the footpad after local inoculation with M. marinum was greater in T + R mice than in non-thymectomized controls. Similarly, the number of L. monocytogenes following intravenous challenge was greater in the spleens of T + R than of non-thymectomized mice, and the survival of the T + R mice was impaired after intraperitoneal challenge with L.monocytogenes, compared to the survival of non-thymectomized mice. None of these differences was striking, suggesting that these T + R mice had retained or regained some immune competence. The effects of dapsone treatment of T + R mice inoculated with M. leprae were much the same as those of treatment of non-thymectomized mice. Because these T + R mice were not greatly immunosuppressed, they would not have provided a model of human lepromatous leprosy suitable for chemotherapeutic studies.

  17. Molecular basis of rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Honore, N; Cole, S T

    1993-01-01

    Rifampin is currently the most potent drug used in leprosy control programs. We show that the rifampin resistance which emerged in nine patients with lepromatous leprosy, who had received rifampin monotherapy, stemmed from mutations in the rpoB gene, which encodes the beta subunit of RNA polymerase of Mycobacterium leprae. In eight cases missense mutations were found to affect a serine residue, Ser-425, while in the remaining mutant a small insertion was found close to this site. These findings will be of use for the development of a rapid screening procedure, involving the polymerase chain reaction, for monitoring the emergence of rifampin-resistant M. leprae strains. Images PMID:8460911

  18. A Macrophage Response to Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid Initiates Nerve Damage in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Cressida A; Cambier, C J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Zailaa, Joseph; Bloom, Barry R; Moody, D Branch; Smale, Stephen T; Sagasti, Alvaro; Modlin, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2017-08-24

    Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy and is unique among mycobacterial diseases in producing peripheral neuropathy. This debilitating morbidity is attributed to axon demyelination resulting from direct interaction of the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) with myelinating glia and their subsequent infection. Here, we use transparent zebrafish larvae to visualize the earliest events of M. leprae-induced nerve damage. We find that demyelination and axonal damage are not directly initiated by M. leprae but by infected macrophages that patrol axons; demyelination occurs in areas of intimate contact. PGL-1 confers this neurotoxic response on macrophages: macrophages infected with M. marinum-expressing PGL-1 also damage axons. PGL-1 induces nitric oxide synthase in infected macrophages, and the resultant increase in reactive nitrogen species damages axons by injuring their mitochondria and inducing demyelination. Our findings implicate the response of innate macrophages to M. leprae PGL-1 in initiating nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mode of transmission and histology of M. leprae infection in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott-Lancaster, R. D.; McDougall, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    Athymic (nude) mice were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium leprae via the alimentary and respiratory tracts and through the skin. Animals were allowed to inhale aerosols of M. leprae or had bacilli instilled into the nostrils or directly into the lungs. Others were fed M. leprae by gastric tube or had bacilli placed on the tongue. Attempts were also made to transmit M. leprae from infected footpads by Aedes aegyptii mosquitoes. The most successful infections resulted from nasal instillations and from bacilli inoculated onto the tongue surface: in these cases heavy systemic infections occurred. M. leprae was also shown to survive passage through the alimentary tract and bacilli recovered from the faeces were capable of causing infection in recipient nude mice. The possible epidemiological significance of these findings for the transmission of leprosy in man is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2206990

  20. Mycobacterium leprae virulence-associated peptides are indicators of exposure to M. leprae in Brazil, Ethiopia and Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bobosha, Kidist; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J; Bekele, Yonas; Martins, Marcia V S B; Lund, Ole; Franken, Kees L M C; Khadge, Saraswoti; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Hussien, Jemal; Thapa, Pratibha; Kunwar, Chhatra B; Hagge, Deanna A; Aseffa, Abraham; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pereira, Geraldo M B; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2012-12-01

    Silent transmission of Mycobacterium leprae, as evidenced by stable leprosy incidence rates in various countries, remains a health challenge despite the implementation of multidrug therapy worldwide. Therefore, the development of tools for the early diagnosis of M. leprae infection should be emphasised in leprosy research. As part of the continuing effort to identify antigens that have diagnostic potential, unique M. leprae peptides derived from predicted virulence-associated proteins (group IV.A) were identified using advanced genome pattern programs and bioinformatics. Based on human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-binding motifs, we selected 21 peptides that were predicted to be promiscuous HLA-class I T-cell epitopes and eight peptides that were predicted to be HLA-class II restricted T-cell epitopes for field-testing in Brazil, Ethiopia and Nepal. High levels of interferon (IFN)-γ were induced when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from tuberculoid/borderline tuberculoid leprosy patients located in Brazil and Ethiopia were stimulated with the ML2055 p35 peptide. PBMCs that were isolated from healthy endemic controls living in areas with high leprosy prevalence (EChigh) in Ethiopia also responded to the ML2055 p35 peptide. The Brazilian EChigh group recognised the ML1358 p20 and ML1358 p24 peptides. None of the peptides were recognised by PBMCs from healthy controls living in non-endemic region. In Nepal, mixtures of these peptides induced the production of IFN-γ by the PBMCs of leprosy patients and EChigh. Therefore, the M. leprae virulence-associated peptides identified in this study may be useful for identifying exposure to M. leprae in population with differing HLA polymorphisms.

  1. Long-term survival and virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in amoebal cysts.

    PubMed

    Wheat, William H; Casali, Amy L; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L; McDonnell, Gerald E; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J; Jackson, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  2. Long-term Survival and Virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in Amoebal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William H.; Casali, Amy L.; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S.; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L.; McDonnell, Gerald E.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  3. Expression and characterization of recombinant interferon gamma (IFN-γ) from the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) and its effect on Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Peña, M. T.; Adams, J. E.; Adams, L. B; Gillis, T. P.; Williams, D. L.; Spencer, J. S.; Krahenbuhl, J. L; Truman, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    Armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) manifest the full histopathological spectrum of leprosy, and are hosts of choice for in vivo propagation of Mycobacterium leprae. Though potentially useful as a model of leprosy pathogenesis, few armadillo specific reagents exist. We have identified a region of high homology to the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) of other mammals within the recently published armadillo whole genomic sequence. cDNA was made from ConA-stimulated armadillo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), amplified, and cloned into a pET expression vector for transformation and over-expression in E. coli. The recombinant protein (rDnIFN-γ) was characterized by western blot and its biological function confirmed with biosassays including intracellular killing of Toxoplasma gondii and induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase activity. In using rIFN-γ to activate macrophages from mice, humans or armadillos, similar to humans, rIFN-γ-activated armadillo MΦ did not produce nitrite and or inhibit the viability of M. leprae in vitro. Conversely, murine rIFN-γ-activated mouse MΦ produced high levels of nitrite and killed intracellular M. leprae in vitro. These data indicate that the response of armadillo MΦto rDnIFN-γ is similar to that which occurs in humans, and demonstrates a potentially important value of the armadillo as a model in leprosy research. PMID:18558493

  4. Expression and characterization of recombinant interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) from the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) and its effect on Mycobacterium leprae-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peña, M T; Adams, J E; Adams, L B; Gillis, T P; Williams, D L; Spencer, J S; Krahenbuhl, J L; Truman, R W

    2008-08-01

    Armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) manifest the full histopathological spectrum of leprosy, and are hosts of choice for in vivo propagation of Mycobacterium leprae. Though potentially useful as a model of leprosy pathogenesis, few armadillo-specific reagents exist. We have identified a region of high homology to the interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) of other mammals within the recently published armadillo whole genomic sequence. cDNA was made from ConA-stimulated armadillo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), amplified, and cloned into a pET expression vector for transformation and over-expression in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein (rDnIFN-gamma) was characterized by western blot and its biological function confirmed with bioassays including intracellular killing of Toxoplasma gondii and induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase activity. In using rIFN-gamma to activate macrophages from mice, humans or armadillos, similar to humans, rIFN-gamma-activated armadillo MPhi did not produce nitrite and or inhibit the viability of M. leprae in vitro. Conversely, murine rIFN-gamma-activated mouse MPhi produced high levels of nitrite and killed intracellular M. leprae in vitro. These data indicate that the response of armadillo MPhi to rDnIFN-gamma is similar to that which occurs in humans, and demonstrates a potentially important value of the armadillo as a model in leprosy research.

  5. Lymphocyte response of leprosy patients to human-derived and purified armadillo-derived Mycobacterium leprae, BCG and PPD.

    PubMed Central

    Smelt, A H; Liew, F Y; Rees, R J

    1978-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test was applied to compare in vitro lymphocyte responses of tuberculoid (high resistant) and lepromatous (low resistant) leprosy patients to purified Mycobacterium leprae derived from experimentally infected armadillos and crude M. leprae derived from man, as well as to bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and purified protein derivative (PPD). It was found that the purification procedure using enzymic digestion did not affect the immunogenicity of armadillo-derived M. leprae as compared with the crude human-derived preparation, although 2.5-5-fold higher doses of the purified organisms were required to elicitate equivalent lymphocyte responses. The result indicated the suitability of purified armadillo-derived M. leprae as the standard antigen for lymphocytes transformation tests in leprosy. The cross-reactivity studies show a close relationship between PPD and BCG, but not between M. leprae and PPD or BCG. PMID:367652

  6. Implications of high level pseudogene transcription in Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Diana L; Slayden, Richard A; Amin, Amol; Martinez, Alejandra N; Pittman, Tana L; Mira, Alex; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Morrison, Norman E; Moraes, Milton; Gillis, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    Background The Mycobacterium leprae genome has less than 50% coding capacity and 1,133 pseudogenes. Preliminary evidence suggests that some pseudogenes are expressed. Therefore, defining pseudogene transcriptional and translational potentials of this genome should increase our understanding of their impact on M. leprae physiology. Results Gene expression analysis identified transcripts from 49% of all M. leprae genes including 57% of all ORFs and 43% of all pseudogenes in the genome. Transcribed pseudogenes were randomly distributed throughout the chromosome. Factors resulting in pseudogene transcription included: 1) co-orientation of transcribed pseudogenes with transcribed ORFs within or exclusive of operon-like structures; 2) the paucity of intrinsic stem-loop transcriptional terminators between transcribed ORFs and downstream pseudogenes; and 3) predicted pseudogene promoters. Mechanisms for translational "silencing" of pseudogene transcripts included the lack of both translational start codons and strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences. Transcribed pseudogenes also contained multiple "in-frame" stop codons and high Ka/Ks ratios, compared to that of homologs in M. tuberculosis and ORFs in M. leprae. A pseudogene transcript containing an active promoter, strong SD site, a start codon, but containing two in frame stop codons yielded a protein product when expressed in E. coli. Conclusion Approximately half of M. leprae's transcriptome consists of inactive gene products consuming energy and resources without potential benefit to M. leprae. Presently it is unclear what additional detrimental affect(s) this large number of inactive mRNAs has on the functional capability of this organism. Translation of these pseudogenes may play an important role in overall energy consumption and resultant pathophysiological characteristics of M. leprae. However, this study also demonstrated that multiple translational "silencing" mechanisms are present, reducing additional energy and

  7. rBCG30-Induced Immunity and Cross-Protection against Mycobacterium leprae Challenge Are Enhanced by Boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-Kilodalton Antigen 85B

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Thomas P.; Tullius, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy. PMID:25001602

  8. rBCG30-induced immunity and cross-protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge are enhanced by boosting with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30-kilodalton antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Thomas P; Tullius, Michael V; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2014-09-01

    Leprosy remains a major global health problem and typically occurs in regions in which tuberculosis is endemic. Vaccines are needed that protect against both infections and do so better than the suboptimal Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine. Here, we evaluated rBCG30, a vaccine previously demonstrated to induce protection superior to that of BCG against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis challenge in animal models, for efficacy against Mycobacterium leprae challenge in a murine model of leprosy. rBCG30 overexpresses the M. tuberculosis 30-kDa major secretory protein antigen 85B, which is 85% homologous with the M. leprae homolog (r30ML). Mice were sham immunized or immunized intradermally with BCG or rBCG30 and challenged 2.5 months later by injection of viable M. leprae into each hind footpad. After 7 months, vaccine efficacy was assessed by enumerating the M. leprae bacteria per footpad. Both BCG and rBCG30 induced significant protection against M. leprae challenge. In the one experiment in which a comparison between BCG and rBCG30 was feasible, rBCG30 induced significantly greater protection than did BCG. Immunization of mice with purified M. tuberculosis or M. leprae antigen 85B also induced protection against M. leprae challenge but less so than BCG or rBCG30. Notably, boosting rBCG30 with M. tuberculosis antigen 85B significantly enhanced r30ML-specific immune responses, substantially more so than boosting BCG, and significantly augmented protection against M. leprae challenge. Thus, rBCG30, a vaccine that induces improved protection against M. tuberculosis, induces cross-protection against M. leprae that is comparable or potentially superior to that induced by BCG, and boosting rBCG30 with antigen 85B further enhances immune responses and protective efficacy.

  9. [The Mycobacterium leprae genome: from sequence analysis to therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Honore, N

    2002-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, was analyzed by rapid sequencing of cosmids and plasmids prepared from DNA isolated from one patient's strain. Results showed that the bacillus possesses a single circular chromosome that differs from other known mycobacterium chromosomes with regard to size (3.2 Mb) and G + C content (57.8%). Computer analysis demonstrated that only half of the sequence contains protein-coding genes. The other half contains pseudogenes and non-coding sequences. These findings indicate that M. leprae has undergone a major reductive evolution leaving a minimal set of functional genes for survival. Study of the coding region of the sequence provides evidence accounting for the particular pathogenic properties of M. leprae which is an obligate intracellular parasite. Disappearance of numerous enzymatic pathways in comparison with M. tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen comparable to M. leprae, could explain the differences observed between the two organisms. Genomic analysis of the leprosy bacillus also provided insight into the molecular basis for resistance to various antibiotics and allowed identification of several potential targets for new drug treatments.

  10. Immunogenicity of Mycobacterium leprae unique antigens in leprosy endemic populations in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Bobosha, Kidist; Van Der Ploeg-Van Schip, Jolien J; Zewdie, Martha; Sapkota, Bishwa Raj; Hagge, Deanna A; Franken, Kees L M C; Inbiale, Wondmagegn; Aseffa, Abraham; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Geluk, Annemieke

    2011-12-01

    Ongoing transmission of leprosy is evident from the stable disease incidence in high burden areas. Tools for early detection of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection, particularly in sub-clinically infected individuals, are urgently required to reduce transmission. Following the sequencing of the M. leprae genome, many M. leprae-unique candidate proteins have been identified, several of which have been tested for induction of M. leprae specific T cell responses in different leprosy endemic areas. In this study, 21 M. leprae-unique proteins and 10 peptide pools covering the complete sequence of five M. leprae-unique proteins (ML0576, ML1989, ML1990, ML2283, and ML2567) were evaluated in 160 individuals in Nepal and Ethiopia. These included: tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid (TT/BT), borderline borderline and borderline lepromatous (BB/BL) leprosy patients; healthy household contacts (HHC); tuberculosis (TB) patients and endemic controls (EC). Immunogenicity of the proteins was determined by IFN-gamma secretion via stimulation of PBMC in 6 days lymphocyte stimulation tests (LST) or in whole blood assays (WBA). In LST, BB/BL patients (40%) responded to ML0573 and ML1601 whereas ML1604 was most immunogenic in TT/BT (35%) and HHC (36%). Additionally, significant numbers of EC displayed IFN-gamma production in response to ML0573 (54%), ML1601 (50%) and ML1604 (54%). TB patients on the other hand, hardly responded to any of the proteins except for ML1989. Comparison of IFN-gamma responses to ML0121, ML0141 and ML0188 for TT/BT patients showed specific increase in diluted 6 days WBA compared to the undiluted 24 hours WBA, whereas EC showed a reduced response in the diluted WBA, which may indicate detection of disease-specific responses in the 6 days WBA. In summary, identification of multiple M. leprae proteins inducing M. leprae-specific T cell responses in groups at high risk of developing leprosy may contribute to improve early detection for M. leprae

  11. Comparative sequence analysis of Mycobacterium leprae and the new leprosy-causing Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Sizer, Kurt C; Thompson, Erika J; Kabanja, Juma; Li, Jun; Hu, Peter; Gómez-Valero, Laura; Silva, Francisco J

    2009-10-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a newly discovered leprosy-causing organism. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene and a few other gene segments revealed significant divergence from Mycobacterium leprae, a well-known cause of leprosy, that justifies the status of M. lepromatosis as a new species. In this study we analyzed the sequences of 20 genes and pseudogenes (22,814 nucleotides). Overall, the level of matching of these sequences with M. leprae sequences was 90.9%, which substantiated the species-level difference; the levels of matching for the 16S rRNA genes and 14 protein-encoding genes were 98.0% and 93.1%, respectively, but the level of matching for five pseudogenes was only 79.1%. Five conserved protein-encoding genes were selected to construct phylogenetic trees and to calculate the numbers of synonymous substitutions (dS values) and nonsynonymous substitutions (dN values) in the two species. Robust phylogenetic trees constructed using concatenated alignment of these genes placed M. lepromatosis and M. leprae in a tight cluster with long terminal branches, implying that the divergence occurred long ago. The dS and dN values were also much higher than those for other closest pairs of mycobacteria. The dS values were 14 to 28% of the dS values for M. leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a more divergent pair of species. These results thus indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged approximately 10 million years ago. The M. lepromatosis pseudogenes analyzed that were also pseudogenes in M. leprae showed nearly neutral evolution, and their relative ages were similar to those of M. leprae pseudogenes, suggesting that they were pseudogenes before divergence. Taken together, the results described above indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged from a common ancestor after the massive gene inactivation event described previously for M. leprae.

  12. Non‐exponential growth of Mycobacterium leprae Thai‐53 strain cultured in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Ken‐ichiro; Saito, Mitsumasa; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Shin‐ichi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, attempts were made to culture this bacterium in media supplemented with a variety of biological materials to determine why cultivation of Mycobacterium leprae in vitro has not this far been successful. A slight increase in the number of cells in medium supplemented with human blood plasma and an extract of nude mouse tissue as observed after more than 3 months of cultivation at 30 °C. To ascertain whether this increase was real growth, the growth was analyzed by droplet digital PCR, which showed a slow increase in the copy number of cell‐associated DNA and the release of a large amount of DNA into the culture medium from bacterial cells during cultivation. These results were supported by electron microscopic examination of M. leprae in infected mouse tissues, which showed that most of the replicated bacteria had degenerated and only a few cells survived. Based on these results, it was postulated that many of the replicated cells degenerate during M. leprae growth and that only a few cells remain to participate in the next growth stage. This means that, unlike other cultivable bacteria, the growth of M. leprae is not exponential and the number of cells therefore increase extremely slowly. Thus, accurate judging of the success of M. leprae cultivation requires observation of growth over a long period of time and careful measurement of the increase in number of viable cells. PMID:27925336

  13. Non-exponential growth of Mycobacterium leprae Thai-53 strain cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amako, Kazunobu; Iida, Ken-Ichiro; Saito, Mitsumasa; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Shin-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, attempts were made to culture this bacterium in media supplemented with a variety of biological materials to determine why cultivation of Mycobacterium leprae in vitro has not this far been successful. A slight increase in the number of cells in medium supplemented with human blood plasma and an extract of nude mouse tissue as observed after more than 3 months of cultivation at 30 °C. To ascertain whether this increase was real growth, the growth was analyzed by droplet digital PCR, which showed a slow increase in the copy number of cell-associated DNA and the release of a large amount of DNA into the culture medium from bacterial cells during cultivation. These results were supported by electron microscopic examination of M. leprae in infected mouse tissues, which showed that most of the replicated bacteria had degenerated and only a few cells survived. Based on these results, it was postulated that many of the replicated cells degenerate during M. leprae growth and that only a few cells remain to participate in the next growth stage. This means that, unlike other cultivable bacteria, the growth of M. leprae is not exponential and the number of cells therefore increase extremely slowly. Thus, accurate judging of the success of M. leprae cultivation requires observation of growth over a long period of time and careful measurement of the increase in number of viable cells. © 2016 The Authors. Microbiology and Immunology published by The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. STING-Dependent 2'-5' Oligoadenylate Synthetase-Like Production Is Required for Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae Survival.

    PubMed

    de Toledo-Pinto, Thiago Gomes; Ferreira, Anna Beatriz Robottom; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Batista-Silva, Leonardo Ribeiro; Silva, Bruno Jorge de Andrade; Lemes, Robertha Mariana Rodrigues; Martinez, Alejandra Nóbrega; Sandoval, Felipe Galvan; Alvarado-Arnez, Lucia Elena; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Shannon, Edward Joseph; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Antunes, Sérgio Luís Gomes; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lara, Flávio Alves; Williams, Diana Lynn; Ozório Moraes, Milton

    2016-07-15

    Cytosolic detection of nucleic acids elicits a type I interferon (IFN) response and plays a critical role in host defense against intracellular pathogens. Herein, a global gene expression profile of Mycobacterium leprae-infected primary human Schwann cells identified the genes differentially expressed in the type I IFN pathway. Among them, the gene encoding 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like (OASL) underwent the greatest upregulation and was also shown to be upregulated in M. leprae-infected human macrophage cell lineages, primary monocytes, and skin lesion specimens from patients with a disseminated form of leprosy. OASL knock down was associated with decreased viability of M. leprae that was concomitant with upregulation of either antimicrobial peptide expression or autophagy levels. Downregulation of MCP-1/CCL2 release was also observed during OASL knock down. M. leprae-mediated OASL expression was dependent on cytosolic DNA sensing mediated by stimulator of IFN genes signaling. The addition of M. leprae DNA enhanced nonpathogenic Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin intracellular survival, downregulated antimicrobial peptide expression, and increased MCP-1/CCL2 secretion. Thus, our data uncover a promycobacterial role for OASL during M. leprae infection that directs the host immune response toward a niche that permits survival of the pathogen.

  15. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line: new frontiers in the cellular immunology of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Lyrio, Eloah C D; Campos-Souza, Ivy C; Corrêa, Luiz C D; Lechuga, Guilherme C; Verícimo, Maurício; Castro, Helena C; Bourguignon, Saulo C; Côrte-Real, Suzana; Ratcliffe, Norman; Declercq, Wim; Santos, Dilvani O

    2015-07-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae affecting the skin and peripheral nerves. Despite M. leprae invasion of the skin and keratinocytes importance in innate immunity, the interaction of these cells in vitro during M. leprae infection is poorly understood. Conventional and fluorescence optical microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, flow cytometry and ELISA were used to study the in vitro interaction of M. leprae with the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. Keratinocytes uptake of M. leprae is described, and modulation of the surface expression of CD80 and CD209, cathelicidin expression and TNF-α and IL-1β production of human keratinocytes are compared with dendritic cells and macrophages during M. leprae interaction. This study demonstrated that M. leprae interaction with human keratinocytes enhanced expression of cathelicidin and greatly increased TNF-α production. The highest spontaneous expression of cathelicidin was by dendritic cells which are less susceptible to M. leprae infection. In contrast, keratinocytes displayed low spontaneous cathelicidin expression and were more susceptible to M. leprae infection than dendritic cells. The results show, for the first time, an active role for keratinocytes during infection by irradiated whole cells of M. leprae and the effect of vitamin D on this process. They also suggest that therapies which target cathelicidin modulation may provide novel approaches for treatment of leprosy.

  16. Geographically specific infections and arthritis, including rheumatic syndromes associated with certain fungi and parasites, Brucella species and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    McGill, P E

    2003-04-01

    This overview is designed to introduce the reader to the broad spectrum of rheumatic syndromes associated with certain fungal and parasitic diseases, brucellosis and leprosy. Musculoskeletal disorders caused by fungi are uncommon and difficult to diagnose, particularly in the early stages. Deep fungal infections involve-in order of frequency-bone, soft tissues and joints. Rare but well-defined rheumatic syndromes occur in a variety of parasitic diseases. Brucellosis remains a major challenge to both human public health and clinical acumen in many countries today. The arthritis of leprosy deserves wider recognition and study as it contributes to disability and may hold clues to the mechanism of inflammation in other rheumatic disorders. All of the above may afflict residents in endemic areas and occasionally appear far from the source of origin in travellers or migrants, and usually cause diagnostic confusion.

  17. Detection and strain typing of ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a medieval leprosy hospital.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W G; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T; Stewart, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period.

  18. Detection and Strain Typing of Ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a Medieval Leprosy Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period. PMID:23638071

  19. Reverse Transcription-PCR Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kurabachew, Mekonnen; Wondimu, Assefa; Ryon, Judith J.

    1998-01-01

    A reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay targeting the 16S rRNA of Mycobacterium leprae was developed to detect the organism in clinical specimens. A 171-bp fragment was amplified when M. leprae RNA was used as a template but not when a panel of RNAs from 28 potentially cross-reacting mycobacterial species, seven genera related to Mycobacterium, and three organisms normally found among skin or nose flora were tested. As few as 10 organisms isolated from infected tissue could be detected, confirming the sensitivity of the assay. When the test was applied to clinical specimens, M. leprae was detected in 82% of skin biopsy specimens obtained from untreated leprosy patients, while skin biopsy specimens from healthy volunteers and patients with other dermatological disorders were negative. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR was higher than that of slit skin smear staining for acid-fast bacilli or acid-fast staining of fixed biopsy specimens since 53% of acid-fast bacillus-negative biopsy specimens were RT-PCR positive. Because 16S rRNA is rapidly degraded upon cell death, the assay may detect only viable organisms and may prove to be useful in assessing the efficacy of chemotherapy. PMID:9574704

  20. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Maria Angela M.; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L. S. A.; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M. R.; Lery, Leticia M. S.; Silva, Carlos Adriano M.; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R.; Atella, Georgia C.; Wheat, William H.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Crick, Dean C.; Belisle, John T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-14C]cholesterol or [26-14C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. IMPORTANCE Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in

  1. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production.

    PubMed

    Marques, Maria Angela M; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L S A; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M R; Lery, Leticia M S; Silva, Carlos Adriano M; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R; Atella, Georgia C; Wheat, William H; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C; Belisle, John T; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-(14)C]cholesterol or [26-(14)C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in understanding the

  2. Cohort study of the seasonal effect on nasal carriage and the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in an endemic area in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lavania, M; Turankar, R P; Karri, S; Chaitanya, V S; Sengupta, U; Jadhav, R S

    2013-10-01

    Leprosy continues to be a significant health problem in certain pockets in developing countries. Better understanding of the transmission and source of the infection would help to decipher the transmission link, leading to control of the spread of the disease. The nose is considered to be a portal of entry, suggesting an aerial route for transmission through droplet infection. The evidence suggests that many individuals from endemic countries carry Mycobacterium leprae in their nasal cavities without having obvious symptoms of leprosy. The objective of the present study was to assess the presence of M. leprae on the nasal mucosa in the general population from a leprosy-endemic pocket. M. leprae detection was carried out using PCR targeting RLEP. Four hundred subjects from an area highly endemic for leprosy were included in the study and followed up during three different seasons--winter, summer, and monsoon--for evidence of nasal exposure to M. leprae. PCR positivity for M. leprae was observed in 29%, 21% and 31% of the samples collected in winter, summer and the monsoon season, respectively. Twenty-six individuals from the cohort showed amplification for M. leprae for all seasons. Our results are consistent with reports in the literature showing widespread exposure to M. leprae in the endemic community. The results also suggest possible association of the environmental conditions (climate) with the transmission pattern and levels of exposure to M. leprae. However, the present study indicated that the population from highly endemic pockets will have exposure to M. leprae irrespective of season.

  3. Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-25

    including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae , Staphylococcusaureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, enterococ----ci, Neissr•~n...97 SAD "Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H" Final Comprehensive Report J. Kenneth McClatchy, Ph.D...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED "TREATMENT OF MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE - Final Comprehensive Report INFECTED MICE WITH WALTER REED COMPOUND H"li G

  4. Species-Specific Identification of Mycobacterium leprae by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of the hsp65 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Nalin; Goh, Khye Seng; Berchel, Mylene

    1999-01-01

    PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene present in all mycobacteria was used in the present investigation to characterize Mycobacterium leprae. Bacilli were extracted and purified from different organs from experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice (Swiss mice of nu/nu origin). A total of 15 samples were assayed in duplicate, and the results were compared with those obtained for a total of 147 cultivable mycobacteria representing 34 species. Irrespective of its origin or viability, M. leprae strains from all the samples were uniformly characterized by two fragments of 315 and 135 bp upon BstEII digestion and two fragments of 265 and 130 bp upon HaeIII digestion. PRA is a relatively simple method and permits the conclusive identification of M. leprae to the species level. PMID:10325367

  5. Dynamics of Mycobacterium leprae transmission in environmental context: deciphering the role of environment as a potential reservoir.

    PubMed

    Turankar, Ravindra P; Lavania, Mallika; Singh, Mradula; Siva Sai, Krovvidi S R; Jadhav, Rupendra S

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Various modes of transmission have been suggested for this disease. Transmission and risk of the infection is perhaps related to presence of the infectious cases and is controlled by environmental factors. Evidence suggests that humidity may favor survival of M. leprae in the environment. Several reports show that non-human sources like 'naturally' infected armadillos or monkeys could act as reservoir for M. leprae. Inanimate objects or fomites like articles used by infectious patients may theoretically spread infection. However, it is only through detailed knowledge of the biodiversity and ecology that the importance of this mode of transmission can be fully assessed. Our study focuses here to decipher the role of environment in the transmission of the disease. Two hundred and seven soil samples were collected from a village in endemic area where active cases also resided at the time of sample collection. Slit skin smears were collected from 13 multibacillary (MB) leprosy patients and 12 household contacts of the patients suspected to be hidden cases. DNA and RNA of M. leprae were extracted and amplified using M. leprae specific primers. Seventy-one soil samples showed presence of M. leprae DNA whereas 16S rRNA could be detected in twenty-eight of these samples. Samples, both from the environment and the patients, exhibited the same genotype when tested by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing. Genotype of M. leprae found in the soil and the patients residing in the same area could help in understanding the transmission link in leprosy.

  6. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae. V. Evidence for cross-reactivity between host antigens and Mycobacterium leprae

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.P.; Jones, A.G.; Wade, S.; Krahenbuhl, J.L.; Gillis, T.P.; Watson, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured by immunization of mice at the base of the tail with Ag and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. C57BL/10J and B10.BR mice were identified as low responder mice and the congenic strains B10.M, B10.Q, and B10.AKM as high responders whereas F1 (high x low) hybrid mice were found to be low responders. The cellular basis of low responsiveness did not appear to result from a defect in Ag-presenting cells or the activation of suppressor T cells by M. leprae. The influence of the environment in which T cells developed on responsiveness to M. leprae was analyzed in chimeric mice prepared by irradiating F1(C57BL/10J x B10.M) mice and reconstituting with bone marrow from C57BL/10J, B10.M, or F1 donors. Six weeks later, chimeric mice were immunized with M. leprae, lymph node cells were subsequently prepared, and H-2 phenotyped and challenged in culture with M. leprae Ag. T cell proliferative responses were found to be low in all cases, similar to those observed using lymph node cells from F1 hybrid mice. These results suggested that high responder B10.M lymphocytes developing in the irradiated F1 mice became tolerized to antigenic determinants found on M. leprae. This implied cross-reactive epitopes existed between some mouse strains and M. leprae. Low responsiveness to M. leprae in low responder and F1 hybrid mice may result from tolerance to H-2-encoded Ag that show cross-reactivity with M. leprae.

  7. Genetic control of murine T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae. V. Evidence for cross-reactivity between host antigens and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Harris, D P; Jones, A G; Wade, S; Krahenbuhl, J L; Gillis, T P; Watson, J D

    1988-09-01

    T cell proliferative responses to Mycobacterium leprae were measured by immunization of mice at the base of the tail with Ag and challenging lymphocytes from draining lymph nodes in culture with M. leprae. C57BL/10J and B10.BR mice were identified as low responder mice and the congenic strains B10.M, B10.Q, and B10.AKM as high responders whereas F1 (high x low) hybrid mice were found to be low responders. The cellular basis of low responsiveness did not appear to result from a defect in Ag-presenting cells or the activation of suppressor T cells by M. leprae. The influence of the environment in which T cells developed on responsiveness to M. leprae was analyzed in chimeric mice prepared by irradiating F1(C57BL/10J x B10.M) mice and reconstituting with bone marrow from C57BL/10J, B10.M, or F1 donors. Six weeks later, chimeric mice were immunized with M. leprae, lymph node cells were subsequently prepared, and H-2 phenotyped and challenged in culture with M. leprae Ag. T cell proliferative responses were found to be low in all cases, similar to those observed using lymph node cells from F1 hybrid mice. These results suggested that high responder B10.M lymphocytes developing in the irradiated F1 mice became tolerized to antigenic determinants found on M. leprae. This implied cross-reactive epitopes existed between some mouse strains and M. leprae. Low responsiveness to M. leprae in low responder and F1 hybrid mice may result from tolerance to H-2-encoded Ag that show cross-reactivity with M. leprae.

  8. Molecular Determination of Mycobacterium leprae Viability by Use of Real-Time PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alejandra N.; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Pittman, Tana L.; Scollard, David; Truman, Richard; Moraes, Milton O.; Williams, Diana L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the etiological agent of leprosy, is noncultivable on axenic media. Therefore, the viability of M. leprae for clinical or experimental applications is often unknown. To provide new tools for M. leprae viability determination, two quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays were developed and characterized. M. leprae sodA mRNA and 16S rRNA were used as RNA targets, and M. leprae repetitive element (RLEP) DNA was used to determine relative bacterial numbers in the same purified bacterial preparations or from crude biological specimens. Results demonstrated that both assays were good predictors of M. leprae viability during short-term experiments (48 h) involving rifampin (rifampicin) treatment in axenic medium, within rifampin-treated murine macrophages (MΦ), or within immune-activated MΦ. Moreover, these results strongly correlated those of other M. leprae viability assays, including radiorespirometry-based and Live/Dead BacLight viability assays. The 16S rRNA/RLEP assay consistently identified the presence of M. leprae in eight multibacillary leprosy patient biopsy specimens prior to multidrug therapy (MDT) and demonstrated a decline in viability during the course of MDT. In contrast, the sodA/RLEP assay was able to detect the presence of M. leprae in only 25% of pretreatment biopsy specimens. In conclusion, new tools for M. leprae viability determination were developed. The 16S rRNA/RLEP RT-PCR M. leprae viability assay should be useful both for short-term experimental purposes and for predicting M. leprae viability in biopsy specimens to monitor treatment efficacy, whereas the sodA/RLEP RT-PCR M. leprae viability assay should be limited to short-term experimental research purposes. PMID:19439537

  9. A major T cell antigen of Mycobacterium leprae is a 10-kD heat-shock cognate protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Several mycobacterial antigens, identified by monoclonal antibodies and patient sera, have been found to be homologous to stress or heat-shock proteins (hsp) defined in Escherichia coli and yeast. A major antigen recognized by most Mycobacterium leprae-reactive human T cell lines and cell wall-reactive T cell clones is a 10-kD protein that has now been cloned and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of this protein is 44% homologous to the hsp 10 (GroES) of E. coli. The purified native and recombinant 10-kD protein was found to be a stronger stimulator of peripheral blood T cell proliferation than other native and recombinant M. leprae proteins tested. The degree of reactivity paralleled the response to intact M. leprae throughout the spectrum of leprosy. Limiting-dilution analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient contact and a tuberculoid patient indicated that approximately one third of M. leprae-reactive T cell precursors responded to the 10- kD antigen. T cell lines derived from lepromin skin tests were strongly responsive to the 10-kD protein. T cell clones reactive to both the purified native and recombinant 10-kD antigens recognized M. leprae- specific epitopes as well as epitopes crossreactive with the cognate antigen of M. tuberculosis. Further, the purified hsp 10 elicited strong delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in guinea pigs sensitized to M. leprae. The strong T cell responses against the M. leprae 10-kD protein suggest a role for this heat-shock cognate protein in the protective/resistant responses to infection. PMID:1730920

  10. S100A12 Is Part of the Antimicrobial Network against Mycobacterium leprae in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Realegeno, Susan; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Dang, Angeline Tilly; Lu, Jing; Teles, Rosane; Liu, Philip T.; Schenk, Mirjam; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Modlin, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Triggering antimicrobial mechanisms in macrophages infected with intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria, is critical to host defense against the infection. To uncover the unique and shared antimicrobial networks induced by the innate and adaptive immune systems, gene expression profiles generated by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) from human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) activated with TLR2/1 ligand (TLR2/1L) or IFN-γ were analyzed. Weighed gene correlation network analysis identified modules of genes strongly correlated with TLR2/1L or IFN-γ that were linked by the “defense response” gene ontology term. The common TLR2/1L and IFN-γ inducible human macrophage host defense network contained 16 antimicrobial response genes, including S100A12, which was one of the most highly induced genes by TLR2/1L. There is limited information on the role of S100A12 in infectious disease, leading us to test the hypothesis that S100A12 contributes to host defense against mycobacterial infection in humans. We show that S100A12 is sufficient to directly kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. We also demonstrate that S100A12 is required for TLR2/1L and IFN-γ induced antimicrobial activity against M. leprae in infected macrophages. At the site of disease in leprosy, we found that S100A12 was more strongly expressed in skin lesions from tuberculoid leprosy (T-lep), the self-limiting form of the disease, compared to lepromatous leprosy (L-lep), the progressive form of the disease. These data suggest that S100A12 is part of an innate and adaptive inducible antimicrobial network that contributes to host defense against mycobacteria in infected macrophages. PMID:27355424

  11. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acid mixture, (/sup 14/C)leucine, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and carrier-free /sup 32/P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli.

  12. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  13. Expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, tryptophan aspartate-containing coat protein, leprae lipoarabinomannan, and phenolic glycolipid-1 on the failure of the phagolysosome process in macrophages of leprosy patients as a viability marker of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Prakoeswa, Cita Rosita Sigit; Wahyuni, Ratna; Iswahyudi; Adriaty, Dinar; Yusuf, Irawan; Sutjipto; Agusni, Indropo; Izumi, Shinzo

    2016-06-01

    Phagolysosome process in macrophage of leprosy patients' is important in the early phase of eliminating Mycobacterium leprae invasion. This study was to clarify the involvement of Rab5, Rab7, and trytophan aspartate-containing coat protein (TACO) from host macrophage and leprae lipoarabinomannan (Lep-LAM) and phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) from M. leprae cell wall as the reflection of phagolysosome process in relation to 16 subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) M. leprae as a marker of viability of M. leprae. Using a cross sectional design study, skin biopsies were obtained from 47 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy at Dr Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia. RNA isolation and complementary DNA synthesis were performed. Samples were divided into two groups: 16S rRNA M. leprae-positive and 16S rRNA M. leprae-negative. The expressions of Rab5, Rab7, TACO, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 were assessed with an immunohistochemistry technique. Using Mann-Whitney U analysis, a significant difference in the expression profile of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 was found (p<.05), but there was no significant difference of TACO between the two groups (p>.05). Spearman analysis revealed that there was a significant correlation between the score of Rab5, Rab7, Lep-LAM, and PGL-1 and the score of 16S rRNA M. leprae (p<.05). In M. leprae infection, Rab5, Rab7, and Lep-LAM play important roles in the failure of phagolysosome process via a membrane trafficking pathway, while PGL-1 plays a role via blocking lysosomal activities. These inventions might be used for the development of an early diagnostic device in the future. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristic mutations found in the ML0411 gene of Mycobacterium leprae isolated in Northeast Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kai, M; Nakata, N; Matsuoka, M; Sekizuka, T; Kuroda, M; Makino, M

    2013-10-01

    Genome analysis of Mycobacterium leprae strain Kyoto-2 in this study revealed characteristic nucleotide substitutions in gene ML0411, compared to the reference genome M. leprae strain TN. The ML0411 gene of Kyoto-2 had six SNPs compared to that of TN. All SNPs in ML0411 were non-synonymous mutations that result in amino acid replacements. In addition, a seventh SNP was found 41 bp upstream of the start codon in the regulatory region. The seven SNP sites in the ML0411 region were investigated by sequencing in 36 M. leprae isolates from the Leprosy Research Center in Japan. The SNP pattern in 14 of the 36 isolates showed similarity to that of Kyoto-2. Determination of the standard SNP types within the 36 stocked isolates revealed that almost all of the Japanese strains belonged to SNP type III, with nucleotide substitutions at position 14676, 164275, and 2935685 of the M. leprae TN genome. The geographical distribution pattern of east Asian M. leprae isolates by discrimination of ML0411 SNPs was investigated and interestingly turned out to be similar to that of tandem repeat numbers of GACATC in the rpoT gene (3 copies or 4 copies), which has been established as a tool for M. leprae genotyping. All seven Korean M. leprae isolates examined in this study, as well as those derived from Honshu Island of Japan, showed 4 copies of the 6-base tandem repeat plus the ML0411 SNPs observed in M. leprae Kyoto-2. They are termed Northeast Asian (NA) strain of M. leprae. On the other hand, many of isolates derived from the Okinawa Islands of Japan and from the Philippines showed 3 copies of the 6-base tandem repeat in addition to the M. leprae TN ML0411 type of SNPs. These results demonstrate the existence of M. leprae strains in Northeast Asian region having characteristic SNP patterns.

  15. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with human airway epithelial cells: adherence, entry, survival, and identification of potential adhesins by surface proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos A M; Danelishvili, Lia; McNamara, Michael; Berredo-Pinho, Márcia; Bildfell, Robert; Biet, Franck; Rodrigues, Luciana S; Oliveira, Albanita V; Bermudez, Luiz E; Pessolani, Maria C V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the in vitro interaction between Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, and human alveolar and nasal epithelial cells, demonstrating that M. leprae can enter both cell types and that both are capable of sustaining bacterial survival. Moreover, delivery of M. leprae to the nasal septum of mice resulted in macrophage and epithelial cell infection in the lung tissue, sustaining the idea that the airways constitute an important M. leprae entry route into the human body. Since critical aspects in understanding the mechanisms of infection are the identification and characterization of the adhesins involved in pathogen-host cell interaction, the nude mouse-derived M. leprae cell surface-exposed proteome was studied to uncover potentially relevant adhesin candidates. A total of 279 cell surface-exposed proteins were identified based on selective biotinylation, streptavidin-affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry; 11 of those proteins have been previously described as potential adhesins. In vitro assays with the recombinant forms of the histone-like protein (Hlp) and the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA), considered to be major mycobacterial adhesins, confirmed their capacity to promote bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. Taking our data together, they suggest that the airway epithelium may act as a reservoir and/or portal of entry for M. leprae in humans. Moreover, our report sheds light on the potentially critical adhesins involved in M. leprae-epithelial cell interaction that may be useful in designing more effective tools for leprosy control.

  16. Interaction of Mycobacterium leprae with Human Airway Epithelial Cells: Adherence, Entry, Survival, and Identification of Potential Adhesins by Surface Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos A. M.; Danelishvili, Lia; McNamara, Michael; Berredo-Pinho, Márcia; Bildfell, Robert; Biet, Franck; Rodrigues, Luciana S.; Oliveira, Albanita V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the in vitro interaction between Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, and human alveolar and nasal epithelial cells, demonstrating that M. leprae can enter both cell types and that both are capable of sustaining bacterial survival. Moreover, delivery of M. leprae to the nasal septum of mice resulted in macrophage and epithelial cell infection in the lung tissue, sustaining the idea that the airways constitute an important M. leprae entry route into the human body. Since critical aspects in understanding the mechanisms of infection are the identification and characterization of the adhesins involved in pathogen-host cell interaction, the nude mouse-derived M. leprae cell surface-exposed proteome was studied to uncover potentially relevant adhesin candidates. A total of 279 cell surface-exposed proteins were identified based on selective biotinylation, streptavidin-affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry; 11 of those proteins have been previously described as potential adhesins. In vitro assays with the recombinant forms of the histone-like protein (Hlp) and the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA), considered to be major mycobacterial adhesins, confirmed their capacity to promote bacterial attachment to epithelial cells. Taking our data together, they suggest that the airway epithelium may act as a reservoir and/or portal of entry for M. leprae in humans. Moreover, our report sheds light on the potentially critical adhesins involved in M. leprae-epithelial cell interaction that may be useful in designing more effective tools for leprosy control. PMID:23670556

  17. Sensitization or tolerance to Mycobacterium leprae antigen by route of injection.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; Walker, L L; Van Landingham, R M; Ye, S Z

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of heat-killed Mycobacterium leprae in a dose of 10(7) organisms were highly immunogenic when injected intradermally (i.d.). The same dose of bacteria did not sensitize when given intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intravenously (i.v.), and did so only minimally at best when given subcutaneously. The i.d. route was the most immunogenic for sheep erythrocytes also. M. leprae injected i.p. or i.v. stimulated immune tolerance to M. leprae challenge i.d. In older mice (greater than or equal to 8 weeks), the i.v. injections gave more complete tolerance. Mice that had been rendered tolerant by i.v. injections maintained their tolerance for at least 168 days. Prior UV irradiation of intact mice prevented sensitization by the i.d. route. In normal mice, living M. bovis BCG given i.d. produced good sensitization to M. leprae. Mice that had been made tolerant by i.v. injection of M. leprae could be partially sensitized to M. leprae by i.d. immunization with BCG; mixtures of living BCG and heat-killed M. leprae were no more effective than BCG alone. These findings appear to have relevance to the pathogenesis of lepromatous leprosy and its immunoprophylaxis. PMID:6754621

  18. Studies on the antigenic specificity of Mycobacterium leprae. I. Isoelectric and chromatofocusing separation.

    PubMed

    Ibegbu, C; Mandock, O; Kale, V; Navalkar, R G

    1987-04-01

    Cell sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae and other mycobacteria were subjected to isoelectric focusing and chromatofocusing to evaluate their protein antigens and to determine if the patterns were significantly different. Isoelectric focusing showed that the proteins of all mycobacteria focused within the pH range of 3.5 to 5.5, except those of M. leprae which extended beyond 5.5 to 6.5. These studies have indicated for the first time that the protein antigens of mycobacteria are acidic in nature. Comparison between the proteins of untreated and autoclaved M. leprae showed distinct differences between the two preparations, in respect of loss of some antigens in the autoclaved M. leprae sonicate. This indicates that the bands that were not visible in the autoclaved M. leprae were those of heat-labile proteins. It is possible, however, that the absent bands could have been of a low order of intensity and hence were not discernible. On the other hand, the proteins could have coagulated due to the heat treatment, thus causing confirmational changes or ionic interactions with membrane components, due to their acidic nature. It is possible that the proteins in the autoclaved M. leprae are the ones that possess immunogenic properties since the protective ability of heat-killed M. leprae has already been established. Chromatofocusing studies have confirmed the isoelectric focusing data in respect of the number of antigens and their respective protein content, besides permitting the availability of the various fractions for further biological characterization.

  19. Sensitization or tolerance to Mycobacterium leprae antigen by route of injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, C.C.; Walker, L.L.; Van Landingham, R.M.; Ye, S.Z.

    1982-11-01

    Aqueous suspensions of heat-killed Mycobacterium leprae in a dose of 10(7) organisms were highly immunogenic when injected intradermally (i.d.). The same dose of bacteria did not sensitize when given intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intravenously (i.v.), and did so only minimally at best when given subcutaneously. The i.d. route was the most immunogenic for sheep erythrocytes also. M. leprae injected i.p. or i.v. stimulated immune tolerance to M. leprae challenge i.d. In older mice (greater than or equal to 8 weeks), the i.v. injections gave more complete tolerance. Mice that had been rendered tolerant by i.v. injections maintained their tolerance for at least 168 days. Prior UV irradiation of intact mice prevented sensitization by the i.d. route. In normal mice, living M. bovis BCG given i.d. produced good sensitization to M. leprae. Mice that had been made tolerant by i.v. injection of M. leprae could be partially sensitized to M. leprae by i.d. immunization with BCG; mixtures of living BCG and heat-killed M. leprae were no more effective than BCG alone. These findings appear to have relevance to the pathogenesis of lepromatous leprosy and its immunoprophylaxis.

  20. Profiling of Intracellular Metabolites: An Approach to Understanding the Characteristic Physiology of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Kai, Masanori; Maeda, Yumi; Makino, Masahiko

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is the causative agent of leprosy and also known to possess unique features such as inability to proliferate in vitro. Among the cellular components of M. leprae, various glycolipids present on the cell envelope are well characterized and some of them are identified to be pathogenic factors responsible for intracellular survival in host cells, while other intracellular metabolites, assumed to be associated with basic physiological feature, remain largely unknown. In the present study, to elucidate the comprehensive profile of intracellular metabolites, we performed the capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) analysis on M. leprae and compared to that of M. bovis BCG. Interestingly, comparison of these two profiles showed that, in M. leprae, amino acids and their derivatives are significantly accumulated, but most of intermediates related to central carbon metabolism markedly decreased, implying that M. leprae possess unique metabolic features. The present study is the first report demonstrating the unique profiles of M. leprae metabolites and these insights might contribute to understanding undefined metabolism of M. leprae as well as pathogenic characteristics related to the manifestation of the disease.

  1. Limited susceptibility of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to leprosy after experimental administration of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Gerald P; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C; Abalos, Rodolfo M; Tan, Esterlina V; Fajardo, Tranquilino T; Villahermosa, Laarni G; Cellona, Roland V; Balagon, Maria V; White, Valerie A; Saunderson, Paul R; Walsh, Douglas S

    2012-08-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis-importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1-19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration.

  2. Limited Susceptibility of Cynomolgus Monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) to Leprosy after Experimental Administration of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Gerald P.; Dela Cruz, Eduardo C.; Abalos, Rodolfo M.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Fajardo, Tranquilino T.; Villahermosa, Laarni G.; Cellona, Roland V.; Balagon, Maria V.; White, Valerie A.; Saunderson, Paul R.; Walsh, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for human tuberculosis, but susceptibility to M. leprae is unknown. A cynomolgus model of leprosy could increase understanding of pathogenesis—importantly, neuritis and nerve-damaging reactions. We administered viable Mycobacterium leprae to 24 cynomolgus monkeys by three routes, with a median follow-up period of 6 years (range = 1–19 years) involving biopsies, nasal smears, antiphenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) antibody serology, and lepromin skin testing. Most developed evanescent papules at intradermal M. leprae inoculation sites that, on biopsy, showed a robust cellular immune response akin to a lepromin skin test reaction; many produced PGL-1 antibodies. At necropsy, four monkeys, without cutaneous or gross neurological signs of leprosy but with elevated PGL-1 antibodies, including three with nasal smears (+) for acid fast bacilli (AFB), showed histological features, including AFB, suggestive of leprosy at several sites. Overall, however, cynomolgus monkeys seem minimally susceptible to leprosy after experimental M. leprae administration. PMID:22855766

  3. Detailed Structural and Quantitative Analysis Reveals the Spatial Organization of the Cell Walls of in Vivo Grown Mycobacterium leprae and in Vitro Grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bhamidi, Suresh; Scherman, Michael S.; Jones, Victoria; Crick, Dean C.; Belisle, John T.; Brennan, Patrick J.; McNeil, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of mycobacteria consists of an outer membrane, analogous to that of Gram-negative bacteria, attached to the peptidoglycan (PG) via a connecting polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG). Although the primary structure of these components is fairly well deciphered, issues such as the coverage of the PG layer by covalently attached mycolates in the outer membrane and the spatial details of the mycolic acid attachment to the arabinan have remained unknown. It is also not understood how these components work together to lead to the classical acid-fast staining of mycobacteria. Because the majority of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria in established experimental animal infections are acid-fast negative, clearly cell wall changes are occurring. To address both the spatial properties of mycobacterial cell walls and to begin to study the differences between bacteria grown in animals and cultures, the cell walls of Mycobacterium leprae grown in armadillos was characterized and compared with that of M. tuberculosis grown in culture. Most fundamentally, it was determined that the cell wall of M. leprae contained significantly more mycolic acids attached to PG than that of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis (mycolate:PG ratios of 21:10 versus 16:10, respectively). In keeping with this difference, more arabinogalactan (AG) molecules, linking the mycolic acids to PG, were found. Differences in the structures of the AG were also found; the AG of M. leprae is smaller than that of M. tuberculosis, although the same basic structural motifs are retained. PMID:21555513

  4. Detailed structural and quantitative analysis reveals the spatial organization of the cell walls of in vivo grown Mycobacterium leprae and in vitro grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bhamidi, Suresh; Scherman, Michael S; Jones, Victoria; Crick, Dean C; Belisle, John T; Brennan, Patrick J; McNeil, Michael R

    2011-07-01

    The cell wall of mycobacteria consists of an outer membrane, analogous to that of gram-negative bacteria, attached to the peptidoglycan (PG) via a connecting polysaccharide arabinogalactan (AG). Although the primary structure of these components is fairly well deciphered, issues such as the coverage of the PG layer by covalently attached mycolates in the outer membrane and the spatial details of the mycolic acid attachment to the arabinan have remained unknown. It is also not understood how these components work together to lead to the classical acid-fast staining of mycobacteria. Because the majority of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria in established experimental animal infections are acid-fast negative, clearly cell wall changes are occurring. To address both the spatial properties of mycobacterial cell walls and to begin to study the differences between bacteria grown in animals and cultures, the cell walls of Mycobacterium leprae grown in armadillos was characterized and compared with that of M. tuberculosis grown in culture. Most fundamentally, it was determined that the cell wall of M. leprae contained significantly more mycolic acids attached to PG than that of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis (mycolate:PG ratios of 21:10 versus 16:10, respectively). In keeping with this difference, more arabinogalactan (AG) molecules, linking the mycolic acids to PG, were found. Differences in the structures of the AG were also found; the AG of M. leprae is smaller than that of M. tuberculosis, although the same basic structural motifs are retained.

  5. Semi-automated protocol for purification of Mycobacterium leprae from tissues using the gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Diana L.; Adams, Linda B.; Lahiri, Ramanuj

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, etiologic agent of leprosy, is propagated in athymic nude mouse footpads (FPs). The current purification protocol is tedious and physically demanding. A simpler, semi-automated protocol was developed using gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator. The gentleMACS protocol provided a very effective means for purification of highly viable M. leprae from tissue. PMID:25019518

  6. Semi-automated protocol for purification of Mycobacterium leprae from tissues using the gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator.

    PubMed

    Williams, Diana L; Adams, Linda B; Lahiri, Ramanuj

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, etiologic agent of leprosy, is propagated in athymic nude mouse footpads (FPs). The current purification protocol is tedious and physically demanding. A simpler, semi-automated protocol was developed using gentleMACS™ Octo Dissociator. The gentleMACS protocol provided a very effective means for purification of highly viable M. leprae from tissue.

  7. Gene expression profile and immunological evaluation of unique hypothetical unknown proteins of Mycobacterium leprae by using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Prithiviraj, Kalyani; Groathouse, Nathan; Brennan, Patrick J; Spencer, John S

    2013-02-01

    The cell-mediated immunity (CMI)-based in vitro gamma interferon release assay (IGRA) of Mycobacterium leprae-specific antigens has potential as a promising diagnostic means to detect those individuals in the early stages of M. leprae infection. Diagnosis of leprosy is a major obstacle toward ultimate disease control and has been compromised in the past by the lack of specific markers. Comparative bioinformatic analysis among mycobacterial genomes identified potential M. leprae-specific proteins called "hypothetical unknowns." Due to massive gene decay and the prevalence of pseudogenes, it is unclear whether any of these proteins are expressed or are immunologically relevant. In this study, we performed cDNA-based quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the expression status of 131 putative open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical unknowns. Twenty-six of the M. leprae-specific antigen candidates showed significant levels of gene expression compared to that of ESAT-6 (ML0049), which is an important T cell antigen of low abundance in M. leprae. Fifteen of 26 selected antigen candidates were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. The seroreactivity to these proteins of pooled sera from lepromatous leprosy patients and cavitary tuberculosis patients revealed that 9 of 15 recombinant hypothetical unknowns elicited M. leprae-specific immune responses. These nine proteins may be good diagnostic reagents to improve both the sensitivity and specificity of detection of individuals with asymptomatic leprosy.

  8. Genome-wide re-sequencing of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium leprae Airaku-3.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Benjak, A; Carat, S; Kai, M; Busso, P; Avanzi, C; Paniz-Mondolfi, A; Peter, C; Harshman, K; Rougemont, J; Matsuoka, M; Cole, S T

    2014-10-01

    Genotyping and molecular characterization of drug resistance mechanisms in Mycobacterium leprae enables disease transmission and drug resistance trends to be monitored. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analysis of Airaku-3, a multidrug-resistant strain with an unknown mechanism of resistance to rifampicin. We identified 12 unique non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) including two in the transporter-encoding ctpC and ctpI genes. In addition, two SNPs were found that improve the resolution of SNP-based genotyping, particularly for Venezuelan and South East Asian strains of M. leprae.

  9. Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination: a model for early nerve degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rambukkana, Anura

    2004-08-01

    The molecular events that occur at the early phase of many demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases are unknown. A recent demonstration of rapid demyelination and axonal injury induced by Mycobacterium leprae provides a model for elucidating the molecular events of early nerve degeneration which might be common to neurodegenerative diseases of both infectious origin and unknown etiology. The identification of the M. leprae-targeted Schwann cell receptor, dystroglycan, and its associated molecules in myelination, demyelination and axonal functions suggests a role for these molecules in early nerve degeneration.

  10. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae strains from a region of high endemic leprosy prevalence in India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Jadhav, Rupendra; Turankar, Ravindra P; Singh, Itu; Nigam, Astha; Sengupta, U

    2015-12-01

    Leprosy is still a major health problem in India which has the highest number of cases. Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been proposed as tools of strain typing for tracking the transmission of leprosy. However, empirical data for a defined population from scale and duration were lacking for studying the transmission chain of leprosy. Seventy slit skin scrapings were collected from Purulia (West Bengal), Miraj (Maharashtra), Shahdara (Delhi), and Naini (UP) hospitals of The Leprosy Mission (TLM). SNP subtyping and MLVA on 10 VNTR loci were applied for the strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae. Along with the strain typing conventional epidemiological investigation was also performed to trace the transmission chain. In addition, phylogenetic analysis was done on variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) data sets using sequence type analysis and recombinational tests (START) software. START software performs analyses to aid in the investigation of bacterial population structure using multilocus sequence data. These analyses include data summary, lineage assignment, and tests for recombination and selection. Diversity was observed in the cross-sectional survey of isolates obtained from 70 patients. Similarity in fingerprinting profiles observed in specimens of cases from the same family or neighborhood locations indicated a possible common source of infection. The data suggest that these VNTRs including subtyping of SNPs can be used to study the sources and transmission chain in leprosy, which could be very important in monitoring of the disease dynamics in high endemic foci. The present study strongly indicates that multi-case families might constitute epidemic foci and the main source of M. leprae in villages, causing the predominant strain or cluster infection leading to the spread of leprosy in the community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Presence of viable Mycobacterium leprae in environmental specimens around houses of leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Turankar, R P; Lavania, M; Singh, M; Sengupta, U; Siva Sai, Ksr; Jadhav, R S

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic systemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, one of the first organisms to be established as the cause for disease in humans. Because of high prevalence pockets of leprosy in the endemic regions, it is necessary to identify the possible sources of M. leprae in the environment and its mode of transmission. Slit skin smears (SSSs) from lesions were collected in 70% ethanol from 50 leprosy cases staying in the leprosy resettlement village and hospital from a high endemic area. One hundred and sixty soil samples were collected from different areas around the leprosy hospital and from the resettlement village of cured leprosy patients where active cases also resided at the time of sample collection. M. leprae specific gene region (RLEP 129 bp) and 16S rRNA targets were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection for the presence and viability of M. leprae. An rpoT region was also amplified to determine presence of numbers of 6 bp tandem repeats. All the SSS samples collected from patients showed three copies of rpoT region (6 bp tandem repeat, an ancient Indian type). Fifty-two soil samples showed presence of M. leprae DNA whereas M. leprae specific 16S rRNA gene was amplified in sixteen of these samples. PCR amplification and fragment length analysis showed 91 bp, i.e., three copies of the rpoT 6 bp tandem repeats from soil samples and similar three copies observed in patient samples. Presence of viable M. leprae in the soil having same rpoT genotype of M. leprae noted in patients suggests that it could be the same strain of M. leprae. M. leprae found in the soil could be the one that is excreted out by the patient. Significance of its viability in the environment and its pathogenicity with respect to transmission needs to be further explored. Findings of this study might provide possible insights for further exploration into understanding transmission patterns in leprosy and also will throw light on identifying

  12. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H

    2012-03-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life was identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth.

  13. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  14. Mycobacterium riyadhense infections.

    PubMed

    Saad, Mustafa M; Alshukairi, Abeer N; Qutub, Mohammed O; Elkhizzi, Noura A; Hilluru, Haris M; Omrani, Ali S

    2015-05-01

    Mycobacterium riyadhense is a newly described slowly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacterium species. We describe 2 new cases of Mycobacterium riyadhense infections presenting with extra-pulmonary involvement, and reviewed all previously reported cases in the literature. We also describe the spectrum of the disease and explore treatment options based on the experience with the current and previously reported cases.

  15. Molecular basis of the defective heat stress response in Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Williams, Diana L; Pittman, Tana L; Deshotel, Mike; Oby-Robinson, Sandra; Smith, Issar; Husson, Robert

    2007-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, a major human pathogen, grows poorly at 37 degrees C. The basis for its inability to survive at elevated temperatures was investigated. We determined that M. leprae lacks a protective heat shock response as a result of the lack of transcriptional induction of the alternative sigma factor genes sigE and sigB and the major heat shock operons, HSP70 and HSP60, even though heat shock promoters and regulatory circuits for these genes appear to be intact. M. leprae sigE was found to be capable of complementing the defective heat shock response of mycobacterial sigE knockout mutants only in the presence of a functional mycobacterial sigH, which orchestrates the mycobacterial heat shock response. Since the sigH of M. leprae is a pseudogene, these data support the conclusion that a key aspect of the defective heat shock response in M. leprae is the absence of a functional sigH. In addition, 68% of the genes induced during heat shock in M. tuberculosis were shown to be either absent from the M. leprae genome or were present as pseudogenes. Among these is the hsp/acr2 gene, whose product is essential for M. tuberculosis survival during heat shock. Taken together, these results suggest that the reduced ability of M. leprae to survive at elevated temperatures results from the lack of a functional transcriptional response to heat shock and the absence of a full repertoire of heat stress response genes, including sigH.

  16. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  17. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  18. Structure-activity relationships of selected phenazines against Mycobacterium leprae in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Franzblau, S G; O'Sullivan, J F

    1988-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships of phenazines against Mycobacterium leprae were investigated by using an in vitro radiorespirometric assay. In general, activity in ascending order was observed in compounds containing no chlorine atoms, a monochlorinated phenazine nucleus, and chlorines in the para positions of both the anilino and phenyl rings. The most active compounds contained a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine substitution at the imino nitrogen. Most of these chlorinated phenazines were considerably more active in vitro than clofazimine (B663). PMID:3056241

  19. Comparison of four DNA extraction methods for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Fuentes, Jenny Laura; Díaz, Alexis; Entenza, Anayma Elena; Frión, Yahima; Suárez, Odelaisy; Torres, Pedro; de Armas, Yaxsier; Acosta, Lucrecia

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of leprosy has been a challenge due to the low sensibility of the conventional methods and the impossibility of culturing the causative organism. In this study, four methods for Mycobacterium leprae nucleic-acid extraction from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained slides (ZNS slides) were compared: Phenol/chloroform, Chelex 100 resin, and two commercial kits (Wizard Genomic DNA Purification Kit and QIAamp DNA Mini Kit). DNA was extracted from four groups of slides: a high-codification-slide group (bacteriological index [BI]⩾4), a low-codification-slide group (BI=1), a negative-slide group (BI=0), and a negative-control-slide group (BI=0). Quality DNA was evidenced by the amplification of specific repetitive element present in M. leprae genomic DNA (RLEP) using a nested polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report comparing four different extraction methods for obtaining M. leprae DNA from ZNS slides in Cuban patients, and applied in molecular diagnosis. Good-quality DNA and positive amplification were detected in the high-codification-slide group with the four methods, while from the low-codification-slide group only the QIAGEN and phenol-chloroform methods obtained amplification of M. leprae. In the negative-slide group, only the QIAGEN method was able to obtain DNA with sufficient quality for positive amplification of the RLEP region. No amplification was observed in the negative-control-slide group by any method. Patients with ZNS negative slides can still transmit the infection, and molecular methods can help identify and treat them, interrupting the chain of transmission and preventing the onset of disabilities. The ZNS slides can be sent easily to reference laboratories for later molecular analysis that can be useful not only to improve the diagnosis, but also for the application of other molecular techniques. Copyright © 2015 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification, sequencing, and expression of Mycobacterium leprae superoxide dismutase, a major antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraj, H S; Lamb, F I; Davis, E O; Jenner, P J; Jeyakumar, L H; Colston, M J

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding a major 28-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has now been sequenced and identified as the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the basis of the high degree of homology with known SOD sequences. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 67% homology with a human manganese-utilizing SOD and 55% homology with the Escherichia coli manganese-utilizing enzyme. The gene is not expressed from its own promoter in E. coli but is expressed from its own promoter in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The amino acid sequences of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against the 28-kilodalton antigen have been determined. Images PMID:1692812

  1. Mycobacterium leprae RecA is structurally analogous but functionally distinct from Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA protein.

    PubMed

    Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Singh, Pawan; Harsha, Sri; Muniyappa, K

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, yet causes a very different illness. Detailed genomic comparison between these two species of mycobacteria reveals that the decaying M. leprae genome contains less than half of the M. tuberculosis functional genes. The reduction of genome size and accumulation of pseudogenes in the M. leprae genome is thought to result from multiple recombination events between related repetitive sequences, which provided the impetus to investigate the recombination-like activities of RecA protein. In this study, we have cloned, over-expressed and purified M. leprae RecA and compared its activities with that of M. tuberculosis RecA. Both proteins, despite being 91% identical at the amino acid level, exhibit strikingly different binding profiles for single-stranded DNA with varying GC contents, in the ability to catalyze the formation of D-loops and to promote DNA strand exchange. The kinetics and the extent of single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and coprotease activities were nearly equivalent between these two recombinases. However, the degree of inhibition exerted by a range of ATP:ADP ratios was greater on strand exchange promoted by M. leprae RecA compared to its M. tuberculosis counterpart. Taken together, our results provide insights into the mechanistic aspects of homologous recombination and coprotease activity promoted by M. lepare RecA, and further suggests that it differs from the M. tuberculosis counterpart. These results are consistent with an emerging concept of DNA-sequence influenced structural differences in RecA nucleoprotein filaments and how these differences reflect on the multiple activities associated with RecA protein.

  2. Inhibition of the multiplication of Mycobacterium leprae by vaccination with a recombinant M. bovis BCG strain that secretes major membrane protein II in mice.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Tamura, T; Matsuoka, M; Makino, M

    2009-10-01

    The ability of a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain that secretes major membrane protein II (MMP-II) of Mycobacterium leprae (BCG-SM) to confer protection against leprosy was evaluated by use of a mouse footpad model. C57BL/6J mice intradermally inoculated with BCG-SM produced splenic T cells which secreted significant amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in response to either the recombinant MMP-II, the M. leprae-derived membrane fraction, or the BCG-derived cytosolic fraction in vitro more efficiently than those from the mice infected with the vector control BCG strain (BCG-pMV, a BCG strain containing pMV-261). A higher percentage of CD8(+) T cells obtained from BCG-SM-inoculated mice than those obtained from BCG-pMV-inoculated mice produced intracellular IFN-gamma on restimulation with the M. leprae antigens. BCG-SM inhibited the multiplication of M. leprae in the footpads of C57BL/6J mice more efficiently than BCG-pMV. These results indicate that a BCG strain that secretes MMP-II could be a better vaccine candidate for leprosy.

  3. Viability of Mycobacterium leprae in the environment and its role in leprosy dissemination.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Partha Sarathi; Naaz, Farah; Katara, Dheeraj; Misba, Lama; Kumar, Dilip; Dwivedi, Deepak Kumar; Tiwari, Amit Kumar; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Bansal, Avi Kumar; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Katoch, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a public health concern in certain countries, including India. Although the prevalence of the disease has fallen drastically over time, new cases continue to occur at nearly the same rate in many regions. Several endemic pockets have been observed in India and elsewhere. The precise dynamics of leprosy transmission are still not clearly understood. Both live bacilli as well as M. leprae DNA have been detected in the soil and water of endemic areas; they possibly play an important role in disease transmission. To study the occurrence of viable M. leprae in environmental samples collected from areas of residence of patients with active leprosy. The study was conducted on 169 newly diagnosed leprosy patients in Ghatampur, Uttar Pradesh, India. Soil and water samples were collected from their areas of residence using a standardized protocol. An equal number of soil and water samples were also collected from non-patient areas of the same or adjoining villages. The environmental samples collected from the patients surroundings were subjected to 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis after obtaining informed consent. About a quarter of the environmental samples collected from patient areas, (25.4% of soil samples and 24.2% of water samples) were found to be positive for specific 16S ribosomal RNA genes of M. leprae. Environmental samples collected from non-patient areas were all found negative for M. leprae 16S ribosomal RNA genes. The major limitation of the study was that the sample size was small. The study demonstrated the presence of viable strains of M. leprae in skin smear samples of paucibacillary patients and multibacillary patients, as well as in the environmental samples obtained from around their houses. This could play an important role in the continued transmission of leprosy.

  4. Mycobacterium leprae is identified in the oral mucosa from paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Morgado de Abreu, M A M; Roselino, A M; Enokihara, M; Nonogaki, S; Prestes-Carneiro, L E; Weckx, L L M; Alchorne, M M A

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, the nasal mucosa is considered as the principal route of transmission for the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. The objective of this study was to identify M. leprae in the oral mucosa of 50 untreated leprosy patients, including 21 paucibacillary (PB) and 29 multibacillary (MB) patients, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), with antibodies against bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and phenolic glycolipid antigen-1 (PGL-1), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with MntH-specific primers for M. leprae, and to compare the results. The material was represented by 163 paraffin blocks containing biopsy samples obtained from clinically normal sites (including the tongue, buccal mucosa and soft palate) and visible lesions anywhere in the oral mucosa. All patients and 158 available samples were included for IHC study. Among the 161 available samples for PCR, 110 had viable DNA. There was viable DNA in at least one area of the oral mucosa for 47 patients. M. leprae was detected in 70% and 78% of patients using IHC and PCR, respectively, and in 94% of the patients by at least one of the two diagnostic methods. There were no differences in detection of M. leprae between MB and PB patients. Similar results were obtained using anti-BCG and anti-PGL-1 antibodies, and immunoreactivity occurred predominantly on free-living bacteria on the epithelial surface, with a predilection for the tongue. Conversely, there was no area of predilection according to the PCR results. M. leprae is present in the oral mucosa at a high frequency, implicating this site as a potential means of leprosy transmission.

  5. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-03-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae's genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae's pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3' (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10(-7)). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5' (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts.

  6. Optimized protocols for Mycobacterium leprae strain management: frozen stock preservation and maintenance in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Trombone, Ana Paula Fávaro; Pedrini, Sílvia Cristina Barbosa; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Belone, Andréa de Faria Fernandes; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vicenzi; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco

    2014-03-23

    Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is an important infectious disease that is still endemic in many countries around the world, including Brazil. There are currently no known methods for growing M. leprae in vitro, presenting a major obstacle in the study of this pathogen in the laboratory. Therefore, the maintenance and growth of M. leprae strains are preferably performed in athymic nude mice (NU-Foxn1(nu)). The laboratory conditions for using mice are readily available, easy to perform, and allow standardization and development of protocols for achieving reproducible results. In the present report, we describe a simple protocol for purification of bacilli from nude mouse footpads using trypsin, which yields a suspension with minimum cell debris and with high bacterial viability index, as determined by fluorescent microscopy. A modification to the standard method for bacillary counting by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and light microscopy is also demonstrated. Additionally, we describe a protocol for freezing and thawing bacillary stocks as an alternative protocol for maintenance and storage of M. leprae strains.

  7. Protective role of Mycobacterium leprae small heat-shock protein in heterologous hosts, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis, grown under stress.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Jayapal Jeya; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the in vivo role of a small heat-shock protein (sHsp18) from Mycobacterium leprae in the survival of heterologous recombinant hosts carrying the gene encoding this protein under different environmental conditions that are normally encountered by M. leprae during its infection of the human host. Using an Escherichia coli system where shsp18 expression is controlled by its native promoter, we show that expression of shsp18 is induced under low oxygen tension, nutrient depletion and oxidative stress, all of which reflect the natural internal environment of the granulomas where the pathogen resides for long periods. We demonstrate the in vivo chaperone activity of sHsp18 through its ability to confer survival advantage to recombinant E. coli at heat-shock temperatures. Additional evidence for the protective role of sHsp18 was obtained when Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring a copy of shsp18 was found to multiply better in human macrophages. Furthermore, the autokinase activity of sHsp18 protein demonstrated for what is believed to be the first time in this study implies that some of the functions of sHsp18 might be controlled by the phosphorylation state of this protein. Results from this study suggest that shsp18 might be one of the factors that facilitate the survival and persistence of M. leprae under stress and autophosphorylation of sHsp18 protein could be a mechanism used by this protein to sense changes in the external environment.

  8. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  9. ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE AND ITS ENVIRONMENT IN A VESICULAR LEPROUS LESION.

    PubMed

    Imaeda, T; Convit, J

    1962-01-01

    Imaeda, Tamotsu (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela) and Jacinto Convit. Electron microscope study of Mycobacterium leprae and its environment in a vesicular leprous lesion. J. Bacteriol. 83:43-52. 1962.-Biopsied specimens of a borderline leprosy lesion were observed with the electron microscope. In this lesion, the majority of Mycobacterium leprae were laden with cytoplasmic components. The bacilli were separated from the cytoplasm of host cells by an enclosing membrane, thus differing from the environment of well-developed lepra cells in lepromatous lesions. The cell wall is composed of a moderately dense layer. A diffuse layer is discernible outside the cell wall, separated from it by a low density space. It is suggested that the cell wall is further coated by a low density layer, although the nature of the outermost diffuse layer has not yet been determined. The plasma membrane consists of a double layer, i.e., dense inner and outer layers separated by a low density space. The outer layer is closely adjacent to the cell wall. In the region where the outer layer of the plasma membrane enters the cytoplasm and is transformed into a complex membranous structure, the inner layer encloses this membranous configuration. Together they form the intracytoplasmic membrane system. In the bacterial cytoplasm, moderately dense, presumably polyphosphate bodies are apparent. As neither these bodies nor the intracytoplasmic membrane system are visible in the degenerating bacilli, it seems probable that these two components represent indicators of the state of bacillary activity.

  10. Quinolone resistance-associated amino acid substitutions affect enzymatic activity of Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Quinolones are important antimicrobials for treatment of leprosy, a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Although it is well known that mutations in DNA gyrase are responsible for quinolone resistance, the effect of those mutations on the enzymatic activity is yet to be studied in depth. Hence, we conducted in vitro assays to observe supercoiling reactions of wild type and mutated M. leprae DNA gyrases. DNA gyrase with amino acid substitution Ala91Val possessed the highest activity among the mutants. DNA gyrase with Gly89Cys showed the lowest level of activity despite being found in clinical strains, but it supercoiled DNA like the wild type does if applied at a sufficient concentration. In addition, patterns of time-dependent conversion from relaxed circular DNA into supercoiled DNA by DNA gyrases with clinically unreported Asp95Gly and Asp95Asn were observed to be distinct from those by the other DNA gyrases.

  11. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone-mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans.

  12. Use of the polymerase chain reaction to detect Mycobacterium leprae in urine.

    PubMed

    Caleffi, K R; Hirata, R D C; Hirata, M H; Caleffi, E R; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R F

    2012-02-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been applied to detect M. leprae in different clinical samples and urine seems to be attractive for this purpose. PCR was used to improve the sensitivity for diagnosing leprosy by amplifying a 151-bp PCR fragment of the M. leprae pra gene (PCR-Pra) in urine samples. Seventy-three leprosy patients (39 males and 34 females, 14 to 78 years old) were selected for leprosy diagnosis at a reference laboratory in Maringá, PR, Brazil. Of these, 36 were under anti-leprosy multidrug therapy with dapsone and rifampicin for tuberculoid (TT) and dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine for borderline (BB) and lepromatous (LL) forms. The control group contained 50 healthy individuals without any clinical history of leprosy. DNA isolated from leprosy patients' urine samples was successfully amplified by PCR-Pra in 46.6% (34/73) of the cases. The positivity of PCR-Pra for patients with the TT form was 75% for both patients under treatment and non-treated patients (P = 0.1306). In patients with the LL form, PCR-Pra positivity was 52 and 30% for patients under treatment and non-treated patients, respectively (P = 0.2386). PCR-Pra showed a statistically significant difference in detecting M. leprae between the TT and LL forms of leprosy in patients under treatment (P = 0.0033). Although the current study showed that the proposed PCR-Pra has some limitations in the detection of M. leprae, this method has the potential to be a useful tool for leprosy diagnosis mainly in TT leprosy where the AFB slit-skin smear is always negative.

  13. Thalidomide modulates Mycobacterium leprae-induced NF-κB pathway and lower cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Maristela de Oliveira; Fulco, Tatiana de Oliveira; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Pereira, Renata de Meirelles Santos; Redner, Paulo; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2011-11-16

    It is widely accepted that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) plays a critical role in the development of tissue and nerve damage in leprosy and during the reactional episodes of acute inflammation. Thalidomide (N-α-phthalimidoglutarimide), a drug used to treat leprosy reaction, modulates immune response, inhibits inflammation and NF-κB activity. Here we investigated whether thalidomide inhibits NF-κB activation induced by Mycobacterium leprae, p38 and ERK1/2 MAPK activation. EMSA and supershift assays were performed to investigate NF-κB activation in response to M. leprae and its modulation following in vitro treatment with thalidomide. Luciferase assay was assayed in transfected THP-1 cells to determine NF-κB transcriptional activity. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate p65 accumulation in the nucleus. Immunoblotting was used to investigate p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Following activation of PBMC and monocytes with M. leprae, the formation and nuclear localization of NF-κB complexes composed mainly of p65/p50 and p50/p50 dimers was observed. Induction of NF-κB activation and DNA binding activity was inhibited by thalidomide. The drug also reduced M. leprae-induced TNF-α production and inhibited p38 and ERK1/2 activation. Definition of the activation mechanisms in cells stimulated with M. leprae can lead to the development of new therapy applications to modulate NF-κB activation and to control the inflammatory manifestations due to enhanced TNF-α response as observed in leprosy and in leprosy reactions.

  14. DC-159a Shows Inhibitory Activity against DNA Gyrases of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones are a class of antibacterial agents used for leprosy treatment. Some new fluoroquinolones have been attracting interest due to their remarkable potency that is reportedly better than that of ofloxacin, the fluoroquinolone currently recommended for treatment of leprosy. For example, DC-159a, a recently developed 8-methoxy fluoroquinolone, has been found to be highly potent against various bacterial species. Nonetheless, the efficacy of DC-159a against Mycobacterium leprae is yet to be examined. Methodology/Principal Findings To gather data that can support highly effective fluoroquinolones as candidates for new remedies for leprosy treatment, we conducted in vitro assays to assess and compare the inhibitory activities of DC-159a and two fluoroquinolones that are already known to be more effective against M. leprae than ofloxacin. The fluoroquinolone-inhibited DNA supercoiling assay using recombinant DNA gyrases of wild type and ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae revealed that inhibitory activities of DC-159a and sitafloxacin were at most 9.8- and 11.9-fold higher than moxifloxacin. Also the fluoroquinolone–mediated cleavage assay showed that potencies of those drugs were at most 13.5- and 9.8-fold higher than moxifloxacin. In addition, these two drugs retained their inhibitory activities even against DNA gyrases of ofloxacin-resistant M. leprae. Conclusions/Significance The results indicated that DC-159a and sitafloxacin are more effective against wild type and mutant M. leprae DNA gyrases than moxifloxacin, suggesting that these antibacterial drugs can be good candidates that may supersede current fluoroquinolone remedies. DC-159a in particular is very promising because it is classified in a subgroup of fluoroquinolones that is known to be less likely to cause adverse effects. Our results implied that DC-159a is well worth further investigation to ascertain its in vivo effectiveness and clinical safety for humans. PMID:27681932

  15. Presence of Mycobacterium leprae genotype 4 in environmental waters in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Holanda, Maísa Viana de; Marques, Livia Erika Carlos; Macedo, Maria Luisa Bezerra de; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Sabadia, José Antonio Beltrão; Kerr, Ligia Regina Franco Sansigolo; Almeida, Rosa Lívia Freitas; Frota, Cristiane Cunha

    2017-01-01

    This study quantified Mycobacterium leprae bacilli in environmental water samples from five municipalities in the State of Ceará by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and compared the identified genotypes with those obtained from leprosy patient biopsies. We collected five replicas from each of the 30 selected reservoirs and skin lesion biopsies from 25 new leprosy cases treated at a reference center in Fortaleza, Ceará from 2010 to 2013. The 16S rRNA gene region of M. leprae was amplified by qPCR and a standard curve was created with the pIDTBlue 16SrRNAMlep plasmid. The Juazeiro do Norte water samples and the biopsies were genotyped (single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] 1 to 4) and the SNP 4 genotypes were subtyped. Of the 149 water samples analyzed, 54.4% were positive for the M. leprae DNA. The M. leprae bacilli copy number ranged from 1.42 × 10 -1 to 1.44 × 10 + 2 . Most biopsies showed SNP type 4 (64%), while all samples from Juazeiro do Norte were SNP type 4, with subtype 4-N appearing at the highest frequency. We suggest that environmental waters containing M. leprae bacilli play an important role in disease transmission, justifying PGL-1 seropositivity in individuals living in areas where there is no reported case, and in leprosy cases individuals who report no previous contact with other case. Therefore, further investigation is needed to clarify disease transmission in this region and to explore the role of the environment. We also suggest that in this area surveillance for leprosy cases should be intensified.

  16. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-11-30

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish).

  17. Lipid synthesis in mycobacteria: characterization of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein genes from Mycobacterium leprae and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, E; De Smet, K A; Stoker, N G; Ratledge, C; Wheeler, P R; Dale, J W

    1994-01-01

    The causative agents of leprosy and tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, have a lipid-rich cell envelope which contributes to virulence and antibiotic resistance. Acyl coenzyme A carboxylase, which catalyzes the first committed step of lipid biosynthesis, consists in mycobacteria of two subunits, one of which is biotinylated. Genes from M. leprae and M. tuberculosis encoding a biotinylated protein have been cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the derived protein sequences demonstrated the presence of biotin-binding sites and putative ATP-bicarbonate interactions sites, consistent with the proteins having a biotin carboxylase function as well as their being biotin carrier proteins. Images PMID:7909542

  18. Structure-activity relationships of tetramethylpiperidine-substituted phenazines against Mycobacterium leprae in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Franzblau, S G; White, K E; O'Sullivan, J F

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study of structure-activity relationships of selected phenazines against Mycobacterium leprae in vitro, compounds containing a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine substitution at the imino nitrogen were most active. Therefore, the effect of substitution at the para positions of the phenyl and anilino groups in tetramethylpiperidine-substituted phenazines was assessed. As determined by radiorespirometry, activity in ascending order was observed in compounds substituted with hydrogens or fluorines, ethoxy groups, methyl groups, chlorines, and bromines and correlated with partition coefficients in octanol-water. PMID:2692516

  19. Molecular Drug Susceptibility Testing and Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae Strains from South America▿

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Busso, Philippe; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Aranzazu, Nacarid; Monot, Marc; Honore, Nadine; de Faria Fernandes Belone, Andrea; Virmond, Marcos; Villarreal-Olaya, Maria Esther; Rivas, Carlos; Cole, Stewart T.

    2011-01-01

    Possible drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae strains from Venezuela and three other South American countries was surveyed by molecular methods. None of the 230 strains from new leprosy cases exhibited drug resistance-associated mutations. However, two of the three strains from relapsed cases contained dapsone resistance mutations, and one strain also harbored a rifampin resistance mutation. Single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of these strains revealed five subtypes: 3I (73.8%), 4P (11.6%), 1D (6.9%), 4N (6%), and 4O (1.7%). PMID:21444694

  20. Cloning, expression and characterisation of an HtrA-like serine protease produced in vivo by Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Tempone, Antonio Jorge; Amaral, Julio Jablonski; Klitzke, Clécio F; Silveira, Erika K Xavier da; Portaro, Fernanda Calheta Vieira; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2009-12-01

    Members of the high temperature requirement A (HtrA) family of chaperone proteases have been shown to play a role in bacterial pathogenesis. In a recent report, we demonstrated that the gene ML0176, which codes for a predicted HtrA-like protease, a gene conserved in other species of mycobacteria, is transcribed by Mycobacterium leprae in human leprosy lesions. In the present study, the recombinant ML0176 protein was produced and its enzymatic properties investigated. M. lepraerecombinant ML0176 was able to hydrolyse a variety of synthetic and natural peptides. Similar to other HtrA proteins, this enzyme displayed maximum proteolytic activity at temperatures above 40 degrees C and was completely inactivated by aprotinin, a protease inhibitor with high selectivity for serine proteases. Finally, analysis of M. leprae ML0176 specificity suggested a broader cleavage preference than that of previously described HtrAs homologues. In summary, we have identified an HtrA-like protease in M. lepraethat may constitute a potential new target for the development of novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategies against mycobacterial infections.

  1. Performance of PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for detection of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Jong-Pill; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Tae Ue; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae is a significant problem in countries where leprosy is endemic. A sensitive, specific, and high-throughput reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the detection of genotypic resistance to rifampicin (RIF) was designed and evaluated. It has been shown that resistance to RIF in M. leprae involves mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the -subunit of the RNA polymerase. The PCR-REBA simultaneously detects both 6 wild-type regions and 5 different mutations (507 AGC, 513 GTG, 516 TAT, 531 ATG, and 531 TTC) including the most prevalent mutations at positions 507 and 531. Thirty-one clinical isolates provided by Korea Institute of Hansen-s Disease were analyzed by PCR-REBA with RIF resistance of rpoB gene. As a result, missense mutations at codons 507 AGC and 531 ATG with 2-nucleotide substitutions were found in one sample, and a missense mutation at codon 516 TAT and ΔWT6 (deletion of 530-534) was found in another sample. These cases were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. This rapid, simple, and highly sensitive assay provides a practical alternative to sequencing for genotypic evaluation of RIF resistance in M. leprae.

  2. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in saliva and the evaluation of oral sensitivity in patients with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Fernanda Borowsky da; Souza, Victor Costa de; Almeida, Tatiana Amaral Pires de; Nascimento, Valdinete Alves do; Vásquez, Felicien Gonçalves; Cunha, Maria da Graça Souza; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sensitivity disorders in the oral cavity related to the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in the saliva of treatment-naïve patients with leprosy in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 subjects with leprosy. The subjects were interviewed to evaluate the sensitivity of the oral cavity. For the detection of M. leprae, saliva and slit-skin smear samples were collected. The samples were analysed using a bacteriological index (BI) protocol and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicated that 15 of the 45 (33.3%) subjects with leprosy showed decreased oral sensitivity, which confirmed the importance of the oral cavity sensitivity evaluation. There was not a direct relationship between the presence of M. leprae in saliva and changes in oral sensitivity. Positive saliva qPCR results from six (31.6%) of 19 paucibacillary (PB) patients suggested the possibility of a new site for sample collection. Positive results using these diagnostic techniques (BI, slit-skin smear and saliva qPCR) increased to 55.5%, thus opening the possibility of combining these different techniques to increase the rate of positive diagnoses, especially in PB patients.

  3. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in saliva and the evaluation of oral sensitivity in patients with leprosy

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Fernanda Borowsky; de Souza, Victor Costa; de Almeida, Tatiana Amaral Pires; do Nascimento, Valdinete Alves; Vásquez, Felicien Gonçalves; Cunha, Maria da Graça Souza; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sensitivity disorders in the oral cavity related to the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in the saliva of treatment-naïve patients with leprosy in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 subjects with leprosy. The subjects were interviewed to evaluate the sensitivity of the oral cavity. For the detection of M. leprae, saliva and slit-skin smear samples were collected. The samples were analysed using a bacteriological index (BI) protocol and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicated that 15 of the 45 (33.3%) subjects with leprosy showed decreased oral sensitivity, which confirmed the importance of the oral cavity sensitivity evaluation. There was not a direct relationship between the presence of M. leprae in saliva and changes in oral sensitivity. Positive saliva qPCR results from six (31.6%) of 19 paucibacillary (PB) patients suggested the possibility of a new site for sample collection. Positive results using these diagnostic techniques (BI, slit-skin smear and saliva qPCR) increased to 55.5%, thus opening the possibility of combining these different techniques to increase the rate of positive diagnoses, especially in PB patients. PMID:23903971

  4. Bactericidal Activities of HMR 3647, Moxifloxacin, and Rifapentine against Mycobacterium leprae in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Consigny, Sophie; Bentoucha, Abdelhalim; Bonnafous, Pascale; Grosset, Jacques; Ji, Baohong

    2000-01-01

    Bactericidal activities of HMR 3647 (HMR), moxifloxacin (MXFX), and rifapentine (RPT) against Mycobacterium leprae, measured by the proportional bactericidal technique in the mouse footpad system, were compared with those of the established antileprosy drugs clarithromycin (CLARI), ofloxacin (OFLO), and rifampin (RMP). Administered in five daily doses of 100 mg/kg of body weight, HMR appeared slightly more bactericidal than CLARI. In a single dose, MXFX at 150 mg/kg was more active than the same dose of OFLO and displayed exactly the same level of activity as RMP at 10 mg/kg; the combination MXFX-minocycline (MINO) (MM) was more bactericidal than the combination OFLO-MINO (OM); RPT at 10 mg/kg was more bactericidal than the same dose of RMP and even more active than the combination RMP-OFLO-MINO (ROM); the combination RPT-MXFX-MINO (PMM) killed 99.9% of viable M. leprae and was slightly more bactericidal than RPT alone, indicating that the combination PMM showed an additive effect against M. leprae. PMID:10991891

  5. Pathogen-specific epitopes as epidemiological tools for defining the magnitude of Mycobacterium leprae transmission in areas endemic for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marcia V S B; Guimarães, Marjorie M da S; Spencer, John S; Hacker, Mariana A V B; Costa, Luciana S; Carvalho, Fernanda M; Geluk, Annemieke; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J; Pontes, Maria A A; Gonçalves, Heitor S; de Morais, Janvier P; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Pessolani, Maria C V; Brennan, Patrick J; Pereira, Geraldo M B

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, comparative genomic analysis has allowed the identification of Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes with potential application for the diagnosis of leprosy. In a previous study, 58 synthetic peptides derived from these sequences were tested for their ability to induce production of IFN-γ in PBMC from endemic controls (EC) with unknown exposure to M. leprae, household contacts of leprosy patients and patients, indicating the potential of these synthetic peptides for the diagnosis of sub- or preclinical forms of leprosy. In the present study, the patterns of IFN-γ release of the individuals exposed or non-exposed to M. leprae were compared using an Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and the most promising M. leprae peptides for the identification of exposed people were selected. This subset of M. leprae-specific peptides allowed the differentiation of groups of individuals from sites hyperendemic for leprosy versus those from areas with lower level detection rates. A progressive reduction in the IFN-γ levels in response to the peptides was seen when contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients were compared to other less exposed groups, suggesting a down modulation of IFN-γ production with an increase in bacillary load or exposure to M. leprae. The data generated indicate that an IFN-γ assay based on these peptides applied individually or as a pool can be used as a new tool for predicting the magnitude of M. leprae transmission in a given population.

  6. Expression and purification of an active form of the Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrase and its inhibition by quinolones.

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2007-05-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, is noncultivable in vitro; therefore, evaluation of antibiotic activity against M. leprae relies mainly upon the mouse footpad system, which requires at least 12 months before the results become available. We have developed an in vitro assay for studying the activities of quinolones against the DNA gyrase of M. leprae. We overexpressed in Escherichia coli the M. leprae GyrA and GyrB subunits separately as His-tagged proteins by using a pET plasmid carrying the gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97.5-kDa GyrA and 74.5-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and were reconstituted as an enzyme with DNA supercoiling activity. Based on the drug concentrations that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% or that induced DNA cleavage by 25%, the 13 quinolones tested clustered into three groups. Analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrates that the most active quinolones against M. leprae DNA gyrase share the following structural features: a substituted carbon at position 8, a cyclopropyl substituent at N-1, a fluorine at C-6, and a substituent ring at C-7. We conclude that the assays based on DNA supercoiling inhibition and drug-induced DNA cleavage on purified M. leprae DNA gyrase are rapid, efficient, and safe methods for the screening of quinolone derivatives with potential in vivo activities against M. leprae.

  7. Expression and Purification of an Active Form of the Mycobacterium leprae DNA Gyrase and Its Inhibition by Quinolones▿

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, is noncultivable in vitro; therefore, evaluation of antibiotic activity against M. leprae relies mainly upon the mouse footpad system, which requires at least 12 months before the results become available. We have developed an in vitro assay for studying the activities of quinolones against the DNA gyrase of M. leprae. We overexpressed in Escherichia coli the M. leprae GyrA and GyrB subunits separately as His-tagged proteins by using a pET plasmid carrying the gyrA and gyrB genes. The soluble 97.5-kDa GyrA and 74.5-kDa GyrB subunits were purified by nickel chelate chromatography and were reconstituted as an enzyme with DNA supercoiling activity. Based on the drug concentrations that inhibited DNA supercoiling by 50% or that induced DNA cleavage by 25%, the 13 quinolones tested clustered into three groups. Analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrates that the most active quinolones against M. leprae DNA gyrase share the following structural features: a substituted carbon at position 8, a cyclopropyl substituent at N-1, a fluorine at C-6, and a substituent ring at C-7. We conclude that the assays based on DNA supercoiling inhibition and drug-induced DNA cleavage on purified M. leprae DNA gyrase are rapid, efficient, and safe methods for the screening of quinolone derivatives with potential in vivo activities against M. leprae. PMID:17325221

  8. Amino acid substitutions at position 95 in GyrA can add fluoroquinolone resistance to Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Amino acid substitutions at position 89 or 91 in GyrA of fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycobacterium leprae clinical isolates have been reported. In contrast, those at position 94 in M. tuberculosis, equivalent to position 95 in M. leprae, have been identified most frequently. To verify the possible contribution of amino acid substitutions at position 95 in M. leprae to fluoroquinolone resistance, we conducted an in vitro assay using wild-type and mutant recombinant DNA gyrases. Fluoroquinolone-mediated supercoiling activity inhibition assay and DNA cleavage assay revealed the potent contribution of an amino acid substitution of Asp to Gly or Asn at position 95 to fluoroquinolone resistance. These results suggested the possible future emergence of quinolone-resistant M. leprae isolates with these amino acid substitutions and the usefulness of detecting these mutations for the rapid identification of fluoroquinolone resistance in leprosy.

  9. Induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity in human volunteers immunized with a candidate leprosy vaccine consisting of killed Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Gill, H. K.; Mustafa, A. S.; Godal, T.

    1986-01-01

    A killed armadillo-derived Mycobacterium leprae vaccine was examined for its ability to induce a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive human volunteers living in a leprosy non-endemic country. Four groups of individuals aged between 23 and 28 years were given 1.5 × 107, 5 × 107, 1.5 × 108 and 5 × 108 M. leprae intradermally. A marked increase in reactivity to the M. leprae-derived skin test antigen (MLSA) was observed in the vaccinated groups receiving the three highest doses of vaccine while there was very little change observed in their PPD reactivity. No unacceptable side-effects attributable to the vaccine were observed. The killed armadillo-derived M. leprae vaccine thus appears to be able to induce a DTH response in man at doses which do not cause unacceptable side-effects. PMID:3524883

  10. An integrated map of the genome of the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and comparison with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, W J; Poulet, S; Eiglmeier, K; Pascopella, L; Balasubramanian, V; Heym, B; Bergh, S; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R; Cole, S T

    1996-01-01

    An integrated map of the genome of the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was constructed by using a twin-pronged approach. Pulsed-field gel electrophoretic analysis enabled cleavage sites for Asn I and Dra I to be positioned on the 4.4-Mb circular chromosome, while, in parallel, clones from two cosmid libraries were ordered into contigs by means of fingerprinting and hybridization mapping. The resultant contig map was readily correlated with the physical map of the genome via the landmarked restriction sites. Over 165 genes and markers were localized on the integrated map, thus enabling comparisons with the leprosy bacillus, Mycobacterium leprae, to be undertaken. Mycobacterial genomes appear to have evolved as mosaic structures since extended segments with conserved gene order and organization are interspersed with different flanking regions. Repetitive sequences and insertion elements are highly abundant in M. tuberculosis, but the distribution of IS6110 is apparently nonrandom. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8610181

  11. Carbohydrate-dependent binding of langerin to SodC, a cell wall glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C; Modlin, Robert L; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells.

  12. A study on PCR for detecting infection with M. leprae.

    PubMed

    Qinxue, W; Xinyu, L; Wei, H; Tao, L; Yaoping, Y; Jinping, Z; Xiuling, C; Ganyun, Y

    1999-12-01

    So far, it has not been established a satisfactory method for early diagnosis and studying on epidemiology for leprosy, we want to develop a molecular biological method for solving this point. Based on the M. leprae gene coding groEL, 65 kD and 16S rRNA, three polymerase chain reactions were developed by using Plikaytis', Woods' and Pattyn's procedures. It was optimized that the experimental parameters for each PCR, and a comparative study on practivity among three PCRs was also conducted for practical purpose. For detecting infection with M. leprae, all of PCRs established by us were highly sensitive and specific, but for practical purpose, the Woods' PCR optimized by us ought to be chosen firstly.

  13. Are all the DNA gyrase mutations found in Mycobacterium leprae clinical strains involved in resistance to fluoroquinolones?

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2008-02-01

    Mycobacterium leprae DNA gyrases carrying various mutations, previously described in clinical strains, were investigated for quinolone susceptibility by inhibition of supercoiling and DNA cleavage promotion. We demonstrated that the gyrA mutations leading to G89C or A91V confer fluoroquinolone resistance whereas the gyrB mutation leading to D205N does not.

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA in nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) from the Andean region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, N; Beltrán, J C; Ortiz-Bernal, A; Vissa, V

    2009-12-01

    To use DNA detection methodologies to test for M. leprae in nine-banded armadillos inhabiting forested regions located around the cities and towns where leprosy patients have been identified. Ear lobe biopsies of 22 nine-banded armadillos were studied during a 2 year period. The biopsies were processed for DNA extraction and amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR) of a fragment of the high copy DNA locus of M. leprae known as R-LEP. Nine of the 22 (40.9%) armadillos evaluated showed positive signals for M. leprae. Sequencing confirmed that PCR products were identical to the corresponding region of M. leprae DNA. In Colombia, South America, the consumption of and contact with the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) are common, ignoring the fact that this animal can host and be a possible zoonotic reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy. This is the first study demonstrating that M. leprae is present in nine-banded armadillos in a region of Colombia using specific DNA detection. The possibility of leprosy transmission due to contact and consumption of armadillo meat or use of blood for therapeutic purposes should be further investigated.

  15. Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen (1841-1912)--the 100th anniversary of the death of the discoverer of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Pawlikowski, Jakub; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grażyna

    2013-01-01

    The year 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of the death of Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen (1841-1912), a Norwegian physician known for his identification of Mycobacterium leprae as the causative agent of leprosy. In the second half of the 19th century, the medical community believed leprosy had a noninfectious etiology, and it was not until Hansen uncovered the relationship between M leprae and the clinical manifestations of this disease did that belief begin to change. Strengthening of the late 19th and early 20th century beliefs of the infectious etiology of leprosy made it possible to develop an effective treatment for this still terrible disease.

  16. Extraction and detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from ZNCF-stained skin smear slides for better identification of negative skin smears.

    PubMed

    Kamble, R R; Shinde, V S; Madhale, S P; Kamble, A A; Ravikumar, B P; Jadhav, R S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Identification of Mycobacterium leprae, which causes leprosy, is done by Ziehl Neelsen Carbol Fuchsin (ZNCF) stained slit skin smear microscopy that aids in the diagnosis and quantification of approximate bacterial load carried by the patient. We attempted M. leprae DNA extraction from 46 stained slit skin smear negative slides, using Proteinase K and SDS lysis, followed by ethanol precipitation. M. leprae specific primers (16SrRNA) were used for PCR-based amplification of DNA. We could detect M. leprae DNA in 15 (32.6%) samples. The method can be useful in the diagnosis of apparently slit skin smear negative leprosy cases.

  17. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sergio; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Truman, Richard W; Goulart, Isabela Maria B; Vissa, Varalakshmi; Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suffys, Philip; Fontes, Amanda B; Rosa, Patricia S; Scollard, David M; Williams, Diana L

    2017-06-01

    Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM) analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens. The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR), rifampin (rpoB DRDR) and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR) was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB) and 55 paucibacillary (PB) cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA) were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7%) and PB (35/55; 63.3%) patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues or archival Fite's stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172), formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues (n = 36) or archival Fite's stained slides (n = 3) were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST analysis. The HRM-based assay was also able to

  18. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  19. Drug and Multidrug Resistance among Mycobacterium leprae Isolates from Brazilian Relapsed Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; Cunha, Maria das Graças; Diniz, Lucia Martins; Salgado, Claudio; Aires, Maria Araci P.; Nery, José Augusto; Gallo, Eugênia Novisck; Miranda, Alice; Magnanini, Monica M. F.; Matsuoka, Masanori; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-01-01

    Skin biopsy samples from 145 relapse leprosy cases and from five different regions in Brazil were submitted for sequence analysis of part of the genes associated with Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes were observed in M. leprae from 4 out of 92 cases with positive amplification (4.3%) and included a case with a mutation in rpoB only, another sample with SNPs in both folP1 and rpoB, and two cases showing mutations in folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, suggesting the existence of multidrug resistance (MDR). The nature of the mutations was as reported in earlier studies, being CCC to CGC in codon 55 in folP (Pro to Arg), while in the case of rpoB, all mutations occurred at codon 531, with two being a transition of TCG to ATG (Ser to Met), one TCG to TTC (Ser to Phe), and one TCG to TTG (Ser to Leu). The two cases with mutations in gyrA changed from GCA to GTA (Ala to Val) in codon 91. The median time from cure to relapse diagnosis was 9.45 years but was significantly shorter in patients with mutations (3.26 years; P = 0.0038). More than 70% of the relapses were multibacillary, including three of the mutation-carrying cases; one MDR relapse patient was paucibacillary. PMID:22495562

  20. The pseudogenes of Mycobacterium leprae reveal the functional relevance of gene order within operons

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Enrique M.; Mah, Nancy; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Almost 50 years following the discovery of the prokaryotic operon, the functional relevance of gene order within operons remains unclear. In this work, we take advantage of the eroded genome of Mycobacterium leprae to add evidence supporting the notion that functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of its operons. M. leprae’s genome includes 1133 pseudogenes and 1614 protein-coding genes and can be compared with the close genome of M. tuberculosis. Assuming M. leprae’s pseudogenes to represent dispensable genes, we have studied the position of these pseudogenes in the operons of M. leprae and of their orthologs in M. tuberculosis. We observed that both tend to be located in the 3′ (downstream) half of the operon (P-values of 0.03 and 0.18, respectively). Analysis of pseudogenes in all available prokaryotic genomes confirms this trend (P-value of 7.1 × 10−7). In a complementary analysis, we found a significant tendency for essential genes to be located at the 5′ (upstream) half of the operon (P-value of 0.006). Our work provides an indication that, in prokarya, functionally less important genes have a tendency to be located at the end of operons, while more relevant genes tend to be located toward operon starts. PMID:21051341

  1. Mycobacterium leprae-induced Insulin-like Growth Factor I attenuates antimicrobial mechanisms, promoting bacterial survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Batista-Silva, L. R.; Rodrigues, Luciana Silva; Vivarini, Aislan de Carvalho; Costa, Fabrício da Mota Ramalho; Mattos, Katherine Antunes de; Costa, Maria Renata Sales Nogueira; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Toledo-Pinto, T. G.; Dias, André Alves; Moura, Danielle Fonseca; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML), the etiologic agent of leprosy, can subvert macrophage antimicrobial activity by mechanisms that remain only partially understood. In the present study, the participation of hormone insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in this phenomenum was investigated. Macrophages from the dermal lesions of the disseminated multibacillary lepromatous form (LL) of leprosy expressed higher levels of IGF-I than those from the self-limited paucibacillary tuberculoid form (BT). Higher levels of IGF-I secretion by ML-infected macrophages were confirmed in ex vivo and in vitro studies. Of note, the dampening of IGF-I signaling reverted the capacity of ML-infected human and murine macrophages to produce antimicrobial molecules and promoted bacterial killing. Moreover, IGF-I was shown to inhibit the JAK/STAT1-dependent signaling pathways triggered by both mycobacteria and IFN-γ most probably through its capacity to induce the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3). Finally, these in vitro findings were corroborated by in vivo observations in which higher SOCS3 expression and lower phosphorylation of STAT1 levels were found in LL versus BT dermal lesions. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IGF-I contributes to the maintenance of a functional program in infected macrophages that suits ML persistence in the host, reinforcing a key role for IGF-I in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:27282338

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms typing of Mycobacterium leprae reveals focal transmission of leprosy in high endemic regions of India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, M; Jadhav, R S; Turankar, R P; Chaitanya, V S; Singh, M; Sengupta, U

    2013-11-01

    Earlier studies indicate that genotyping of Mycobaterium leprae based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is useful for analysis of the global spread of leprosy. In the present study, we investigated the diversity of M. leprae at eight SNP loci using 180 clinical isolates obtained from patients with leprosy residing mainly in Delhi and Purulia (West Bengal) regions. It was observed that the frequency of SNP type 1 and subtype D was most predominant in the Indian population. Further, the SNP type 2 subtype E was noted only from East Delhi region and SNP type 2 subtype G was noted only from the nearby areas of Hoogly district of West Bengal. These results indicate the occurrence of focal transmission of M. leprae infection and demonstrate that analysis by SNP typing has great potential to help researchers in understanding the transmission of M. leprae infection in the community.

  3. ML1419c peptide immunization induces Mycobacterium leprae-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL in vivo with potential to kill live mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Geluk, Annemieke; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Dijkman, Karin; Wilson, Louis; Kim, Hee Jin; Franken, Kees L M C; Spencer, John S; Pessolani, Maria C V; Pereira, Geraldo M B; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2011-08-01

    MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells play an important role in protective immunity against mycobacteria. Previously, we showed that p113-121, derived from Mycobacterium leprae protein ML1419c, induced significant IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T cells in 90% of paucibacillary leprosy patients and in 80% of multibacillary patients' contacts, demonstrating induction of M. leprae-specific CD8(+) T cell immunity. In this work, we studied the in vivo role and functional profile of ML1419c p113-121-induced T cells in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Immunization with 9mer or 30mer covering the p113-121 sequence combined with TLR9 agonist CpG induced HLA-A*0201-restricted, M. leprae-specific CD8(+) T cells as visualized by p113-121/HLA-A*0201 tetramers. Most CD8(+) T cells produced IFN-γ, but distinct IFN-γ(+)/TNF-α(+) populations were detected simultaneously with significant secretion of CXCL10/IFN-γ-induced protein 10, CXCL9/MIG, and VEGF. Strikingly, peptide immunization also induced high ML1419c-specific IgG levels, strongly suggesting that peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells provide help to B cells in vivo, as CD4(+) T cells were undetectable. An additional important characteristic of p113-121-specific CD8(+) T cells was their capacity for in vivo killing of p113-121-labeled, HLA-A*0201(+) splenocytes. The cytotoxic function of p113-121/HLA-A*0201-specific CD8(+) T cells extended into direct killing of splenocytes infected with live Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing ML1419c: both 9mer and 30mer induced CD8(+) T cells that reduced the number of ML1419c-expressing mycobacteria by 95%, whereas no reduction occurred using wild-type M. smegmatis. These data, combined with previous observations in Brazilian cohorts, show that ML1419c p113-121 induces potent CD8(+) T cells that provide protective immunity against M. leprae and B cell help for induction of specific IgG, suggesting its potential use in diagnostics and as a subunit (vaccine) for M. leprae infection.

  4. Mycobacterium leprae in six-banded (Euphractus sexcinctus) and nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Frota, Cristiane Cunha; Lima, Luana Nepomuceno Costa; Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; Suffys, Philip Noel; Rolim, Benedito Neilson; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Maurício Lima; Kendall, Carl; Kerr, Ligia Regina Sansigolo

    2012-12-01

    Human beings are the main reservoir of the causative agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae. In the Americas, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) also act as a reservoir for the bacillus. In the state of Ceará (CE), which is located in Northeast Brazil and is an endemic area of leprosy, there are several species of armadillos, including D. novemcinctus and Euphractus sexcinctus (six-banded armadillo). Contact between humans and armadillos occur mainly through hunting, cleaning, preparing, cooking and eating. This study identified M. leprae DNA in the two main species of armadillos found in Northeast Brazil. A total of 29 wild armadillos (27 D. novemcinctus and 2 E. sexcinctus) were captured in different environments of CE countryside. Samples from the ear, nose, liver and spleen from each of these animals were tested by a nested M. leprae-specific repetitive element polymerase chain reaction assay. The samples that tested positive were confirmed by DNA sequencing. M. leprae was detected in 21% (6/29) of the animals, including five D. novemcinctus and one E. sexcinctus. This is the first Brazilian study to identify the presence of a biomarker of M. leprae in wild armadillos (D. novemcinctus and E. sexcinctus) in a leprosy hyperendemic area where there is continuous contact between humans and armadillos.

  5. A S52P mutation in the 'α-crystallin domain' of Mycobacterium leprae HSP18 reduces its oligomeric size and chaperone function.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sandip K; Rehna, Elengikal A A; Panda, Alok K; Shiburaj, Sugathan; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu; Biswas, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae HSP18 is a small heat shock protein (sHSP). It is a major immunodominant antigen of M. leprae pathogen. Previously, we have reported the existence of two M. leprae HSP18 variants in various leprotic patients. One of the variants has serine at position 52, whereas the other one has proline at the same position. We have also reported that HSP18 having proline at position 52 (HSP18P(52)) is a nonameric protein and exhibits chaperone function. However, the structural and functional characterization of wild-type HSP18 having serine at position 52 (HSP18S(52)) is yet to be explored. Furthermore, the implications of the S52P mutation on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are not well understood. Therefore, we cloned and purified these two HSP18 variants. We found that HSP18S(52) is also a molecular chaperone and an oligomeric protein. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and far-UV CD measurements revealed that the S52P mutation altered the tertiary and secondary structure of HSP18. This point mutation also reduced the oligomeric assembly and decreased the surface hydrophobicity of HSP18, as revealed by HPLC and 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid binding studies, respectively. Mutant protein was less stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and was more susceptible towards tryptic cleavage than wild-type HSP18. HSP18P(52) had lower chaperone function and was less effective in protecting thermal killing of Escherichia coli than HSP18S(52). Taken together, our data suggest that serine 52 is important for the larger oligomerization and chaperone function of HSP18. Because both variants differ in stability and function, they may have different roles in the survival of M. leprae in infected hosts.

  6. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Braga, André Flores; Moretto, Daniela Ferraz; Gigliotti, Patrícia; Peruchi, Mariela; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Iyer, Anand; Das, Pranab Kumar; de Souza, Vânia Nieto Brito

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs) using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL)-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL) leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. leprae was lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy. PMID:26222022

  7. Activation and cytokine profile of monocyte derived dendritic cells in leprosy: in vitro stimulation by sonicated Mycobacterium leprae induces decreased level of IL-12p70 in lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Braga, André Flores; Moretto, Daniela Ferraz; Gigliotti, Patrícia; Peruchi, Mariela; Vilani-Moreno, Fátima Regina; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira; Iyer, Anand; Das, Pranab Kumar; Souza, Vânia Nieto Brito de

    2015-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the connection of innate and adaptive immunity of hosts to mycobacterial infection. Studies on the interaction of monocyte-derived DCs (MO-DCs) using Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients are rare. The present study demonstrated that the differentiation of MOs to DCs was similar in all forms of leprosy compared to normal healthy individuals. In vitro stimulation of immature MO-DCs with sonicated M. leprae induced variable degrees of DC maturation as determined by the increased expression of HLA-DR, CD40, CD80 and CD86, but not CD83, in all studied groups. The production of different cytokines by the MO-DCs appeared similar in all of the studied groups under similar conditions. However, the production of interleukin (IL)-12p70 by MO-DCs from lepromatous (LL) leprosy patients after in vitro stimulation with M. leprae was lower than tuberculoid leprosy patients and healthy individuals, even after CD40 ligation with CD40 ligand-transfected cells. The present cumulative findings suggest that the MO-DCs of LL patients are generally a weak producer of IL-12p70 despite the moderate activating properties ofM. leprae. These results may explain the poor M. leprae-specific cell-mediated immunity in the LL type of leprosy.

  8. Cloning of mce1 locus of Mycobacterium leprae in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 SMR5 and evaluation of expression of mce1 genes in M. smegmatis and M. leprae.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Lini, Nirmala; Shabaana, Abdul Khader; Nagavardhini, Avuthu; Dharmalingam, Kuppamuthu

    2005-08-01

    Plasmid pSET152 is a broad host range mobilizable vector which integrates into streptomyces chromosome utilizing att site and int function of slashed circleC31. Transformation of this plasmid into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155 SMR5 gave stable transformants carrying the pSET152 as an integrated copy. Integration occurred at the cross over sequence 5'TTG disrupting the gatA gene (Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase subunitA), which is non-essential under conditions used. Recombinant pSET152 plasmids carrying mce1 locus of Mycobacterium leprae were used to construct M. smegmatis transformants carrying the mce1 locus in their chromosome. RT-PCR analysis revealed specific transcripts of M. leprae mce in M. smegmatis. The transcribed mRNA carried intergenic regions between genes of mce1 locus indicating that mce1 locus is an operon. Examination of M. leprae specific mRNA from lepromatous leprosy patient's biopsy showed that mce locus is transcribed as an operon in the pathogen also.

  9. Identification of functional candidates amongst hypothetical proteins of Mycobacterium leprae Br4923, a causative agent of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is an intracellular obligate parasite that causes leprosy in humans, and it leads to the destruction of peripheral nerves and skin deformation. Here, we report an extensive analysis of the hypothetical proteins (HPs) from M. leprae strain Br4923, assigning their functions to better understand the mechanism of pathogenesis and to search for potential therapeutic interventions. The genome of M. leprae encodes 1604 proteins, of which the functions of 632 are not known (HPs). In this paper, we predicted the probable functions of 312 HPs. First, we classified all HPs into families and subfamilies on the basis of sequence similarity, followed by domain assignment, which provides many clues for their possible function. However, the functions of 320 proteins were not predicted because of low sequence similarity with proteins of known function. Annotated HPs were categorized into enzymes, binding proteins, transporters, and proteins involved in cellular processes. We found several novel proteins whose functions were unknown for M. leprae. These proteins have a requisite association with bacterial virulence and pathogenicity. Finally, our sequence-based analysis will be helpful for further validation and the search for potential drug targets while developing effective drugs to cure leprosy.

  10. Excavating the surface-associated and secretory proteome of Mycobacterium leprae for identifying vaccines and diagnostic markers relevant immunodominant epitopes.

    PubMed

    Rana, Aarti; Thakur, Shweta; Bhardwaj, Nupur; Kumar, Devender; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    For centuries, Mycobacterium leprae, etiological agent of leprosy, has been afflicting mankind regardless of extensive use of live-attenuated vaccines and antibiotics. Surface-associated and secretory proteins (SASPs) are attractive targets against bacteria. We have integrated biological knowledge with computational approaches and present a proteome-wide identification of SASPs. We also performed computational assignment of immunodominant epitopes as coordinates of prospective antigenic candidates in most important class of SASPs, the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Exploiting the known protein sequence and structural characteristics shared by the SASPs from bacteria, 17 lipoproteins, 11 secretory and 19 novel OMPs (including 4 essential proteins) were identified in M. leprae As OMPs represent the most exposed antigens on the cell surface, their immunoinformatics analysis showed that the identified 19 OMPs harbor T-cell MHC class I epitopes and class II epitopes against HLA-DR alleles (54), while 15 OMPs present potential T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DQ alleles (6) and 7 OMPs possess T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DP alleles (5) of humans. Additionally, 11 M. leprae OMPs were found to have B-cell epitopes and these may be considered as prime candidates for the development of new immunotherapeutics against M. leprae.

  11. C-reactive protein and apoB containing lipoproteins are associated with Mycobacterium leprae in lesions of human leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, M J; Ridley, D S; De Beer, F C; Pepys, M B

    1984-01-01

    Skin biopsies from patients with leprosy across the spectrum from tuberculoid (TT) to lepromatous (LL), including histoid lepromas and erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions, were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of C-reactive protein (CRP) and the apolipoprotein, apoB. Mycobacterium leprae bacillary material comprising cell walls, cytoplasmic and soluble components was present with increasing abundance towards the lepromatous end of the spectrum and always stained positively with anti-CRP. M. leprae from armadillos did not stain with anti-human CRP indicating that the staining of M. leprae in human tissues was not due to a cross-reaction between anti-CRP and the organism itself. When CRP was present in large amounts apoB was also demonstrated in the same distribution. CRP was detected on bacilli and their degradation products within the cytoplasm of macrophages even in the absence of a raised serum CRP level in some ENL patients and also in two cases of advanced resolving lepromas. These findings demonstrate remarkable persistence of CRP in association with M. leprae in vivo, and raise intriguing questions about the possible role of CRP in relation to the handling of leprosy bacilli. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6378453

  12. Various genotypes of Mycobacterium leprae from Mexico reveal distinct geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Gonzalez, Alberto Vargas; Estrada, Iris; Carreño-Martinez, Cristina; Fafutis-Morris, Mary

    2009-09-01

    To classify Mycobacterium leprae isolates from multiple areas in Mexico based on variable number of tandem repeats of 6 base within the rpoT gene and three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and to analyse their geographic distribution in the context of the origin of leprosy in Mexico. Analysis for rpoT genotyping of 64 samples collected in the west and southwestern areas revealed that 46 isolates were of the 4 copy type and 18 isolates were of the 3 copy type. All samples from the eastern coastal area (n = 24) and from the Yucatan peninsula (n = 12) were of the 3 copy type. Six isolates from the west and southwestern area were SNP-type 1, 13 isolates were SNP-type 2 and 45 isolates were SNP-type 3. Nineteen of 24 isolates from the eastern coastal area were SNP-type 3 and one was SNP-type 4. Seven isolates from the Yucatan peninsula were SNP-type 3 and one was SNP-type 4. The difference of the proportion of each genotype between the western areas and the eastern areas indicated the expansion of leprosy through different paths in Mexico.

  13. Autolytic Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 fragments may act as biological markers for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina Angélica; Portaro, Fernanda; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Klitzke, Clécio Fernando; Vicente, Elisabete José; Faria, Marcella; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto; Fernandes, Beatriz Lieblich

    2011-10-01

    Investigating the proteolytic activity of the recombinant Mycobacterium leprae Heat Shock Protein of 65 kDa (rHsp65), chaperonin 2 (cpn2), we observed that it displays high instability. The fragmentation process starts at the C-terminus followed by progressive degradation of the N-terminus, which leads to a stable fragment comprising the middle region of the molecule. Urea was able to prevent autolysis, probably due to its denaturing action, while EDTA increased degradation levels indicating the need for metal ions. Peptides originated from autolysis were purified and analyzed by mass spectrometry, generating a continuous map. Since the bacteria and mammalian Hsp60 are known to be targets of the immune response and have been implicated in autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammation, the in vivo effect of rHsp65 peptides was evaluated in the spontaneous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) model developed by the (NZB/NZW)F(1) mouse hybrids, and their individual anti-rHsp65 IgG2a/IgG1 antibody titer ratio was determined. The results showed orientation toward a T(H)1 responsiveness, and the treatment with the rHsp65 peptides diminished the environmental variance of the survival time of treated animals. These results outline the fact that environmental factors may also act through the modified stability expression of Heat Shock Proteins intervening during autoimmune processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predominance of three copies of tandem repeats in rpoT gene of Mycobacterium leprae from Northern India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Katoch, Kiran; Singh, Haribhan; Das, Ram; Gupta, Anuj Kumar; Sharma, Rahul; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Sachan, Pawan; Sachan, Shailendra; Katoch, Vishwa Mohan

    2007-09-01

    This study has been carried out to get understanding of the origin among the strains of Mycobacterium leprae in patients from Northern India by using number of tandem repeats in rpoT gene as marker. Biopsies were collected from hundred leprosy cases (paucibacillary (PB) as well as multibacillary (MB)) across the spectrum from patients attending clinic at JALMA or diagnosed in Field Unit at Ghatampur (Kanpur). These biopsies were homogenized and DNA was extracted by a physiochemical procedure. rpoT region was amplified by using the primers and conditions earlier published. Among 100 strains from Northern Indian patients, 89% exhibited the presence of three copies of the 6bp tandem repeat in the rpoT gene, while 11% contained four copies. These profiles along with other genotyping data may help in studying the historical spread of leprosy by strains of M. leprae disseminated by various human races that migrated to Northern India from other places of Asian continent.

  15. A comparison of the effectiveness of two freeze-dried BCG vaccines against Mycobacterium leprae in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Charles C.

    1968-01-01

    It has previously been shown that BCG vaccination affords mice protection against Mycobacterium leprae and most of this work was carried out using fresh liquid preparations of a strain originating from S. R. Rosenthal some years ago. In the present study, the effectiveness of the Japanese and Glaxo freeze-dried BCG vaccines was tested since such preparations would make it possible to administer vaccine of standard viability anywhere in the world, including leprosy-endemic areas. The Japanese and Glaxo vaccines, and the usual fresh liquid preparations, were administered in equivalent amounts to mice, which were then challenged with Myco. leprae. All the vaccines provided distinct protection. It was not possible, however, to say which vaccine was most effective because their optimal activities were not manifested at comparable times. PMID:4876379

  16. Presence of Mycobacterium leprae DNA and PGL-1 antigen in household contacts of leprosy patients from a hyperendemic area in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pinho, J D; Rivas, P M S; Mendes, M B P; Soares, R E P; Costa, G C; Nascimento, F R F; Paiva, M F L; Aquino, D M C; Figueireido, I A; Santos, A M; Pereira, S R F

    2015-11-19

    Leprosy is a highly infectious disease endemic to underdeveloped countries. In Maranhão State, Northeastern Brazil, the hyperendemic rate of 56.11 cases/100,000 inhabitants increased the necessity of better understanding the epidemiological profile of this population, particularly regarding efficient methods for evaluating individuals residing with diagnosed patients to understand disease transmission and the risk of infection. In this study, we examined the percentage of contacts with positive indices for Mycobacterium leprae DNA and phenol-glycolipid-1 antigen (PGL-1). PGL-1 was analyzed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the ML-Flow test, and polymerase chain reaction of oral and nasal secretions of 808 leprosy contacts from Maranhão. PGL-1 was detected in 14.0% of patients and differed by operational classification of the index case (P < 0.05). Seropositive results of ML-Flow were 15.0% and identified individuals with and without Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine scars. Molecular diagnosis detected M. leprae DNA in 5.6% of oral samples and 4.6% of nasal tissues, and 87% of subjects resided with high bacillary load patients. This study reinforces the efficacy of combining molecular and serological techniques to identify potential bacillus carriers in the asymptomatic stage of infection, such as in household contacts, highlighting the importance of these meth-ods for monitoring hyperendemic populations.

  17. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E.; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations. PMID:26360617

  18. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations.

  19. qPCR detection of Mycobacterium leprae in biopsies and slit skin smear of different leprosy clinical forms.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Michelle de Campos Soriani; Ramuno, Natália Mortari; Fachin, Luciana Raquel Vincenzi; Tassa, Mônica; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Belone, Andrea de Faria Fernandes; Diório, Suzana Madeira; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro

    Leprosy, whose etiological agent is Mycobacterium leprae, is a chronic infectious disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. The diagnosis of leprosy is based on clinical evaluation, whereas histopathological analysis and bacilloscopy are complementary diagnostic tools. Quantitative PCR (qPCR), a current useful tool for diagnosis of infectious diseases, has been used to detect several pathogens including Mycobacterium leprae. The validation of this technique in a robust set of samples comprising the different clinical forms of leprosy is still necessary. Thus, in this study samples from 126 skin biopsies (collected from patients on all clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy) and 25 slit skin smear of leprosy patients were comparatively analyzed by qPCR (performed with primers for the RLEP region of M. leprae DNA) and routine bacilloscopy performed in histological sections or in slit skin smear. Considering clinical diagnostic as the gold standard, 84.9% of the leprosy patients were qPCR positive in skin biopsies, resulting in 84.92% sensitivity, with 84.92 and 61.22% positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values, respectively. Concerning bacilloscopy of histological sections (BI/H), the sensitivity was 80.15% and the PPV and NPV were 80.15 and 44.44%, respectively. The concordance between qPCR and BI/H was 87.30%. Regarding the slit skin smear, 84% of the samples tested positive in the qPCR. Additionally, qPCR showed 100% specificity, since all samples from different mycobacteria, from healthy individuals, and from other granulomatous diseases presented negative results. In conclusion, the qPCR technique for detection of M. leprae using RLEP primers proved to be specific and sensitive, and qPCR can be used as a complementary test to diagnose leprosy irrespective of the clinical form of disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Lsr2 Peptides of Mycobacterium leprae Show Hierarchical Responses in Lymphoproliferative Assays, with Selective Recognition by Patients with Anergic Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Chaduvula, Mehervani; Murtaza, A.; Misra, Namita; Narayan, N. P. Shankar; Ramesh, V.; Prasad, H. K.; Rani, Rajni; Chinnadurai, R. K.

    2012-01-01

    Lsr2 protein of Mycobacterium leprae was shown earlier to elicit B and T cell responses in leprosy patients (20, 28). Lymphoproliferation to M. leprae and Lsr2 antigens was observed in >70% of tuberculoid (T) patients and in 16 and 34% of lepromatous (L) patients, respectively. We focused on the M. leprae nonresponders in the lepromatous group using 22 synthetic Lsr2 peptides (end-to-end peptides A to F and overlapping peptides p1 to p16) in in vitro T cell responses. A total of 125 leprosy and 13 tuberculosis patients and 19 healthy controls from the area of endemicity (here, healthy controls, or HC) were investigated. The highest responses were observed (67 to 100%) in HC for all peptides except p1 to p3, and the lowest was observed in tuberculosis patients. Significant differences in lymphoproliferation were observed in T, L, and HC groups (analysis of variance [ANOVA], P = 0.000 to 0.015) for all end-to-end peptides except B and for p5 and p7 to p10. Hierarchical recognition between lepromatous and tuberculoid leprosy was noted for p8 (P < 0.05) and between the HC and L groups for p7 to p10, p15, and p16 (P < 0.005 to P < 0.02). Significant lymphoproliferation was observed to peptides A to F and p1 to p9, p11, p12, p15, p16 (P = 0.000 to 0.001) with 40% responding to peptides C and p16 in L patients. Lepromatous patients also showed significantly higher levels of a gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response to peptide C than to other peptides (P < 0.05). Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II bias for peptide recognition was not observed. These studies indicate that Lsr2 has multiple T cell epitopes that induce in vitro T cell responses in the highly infective lepromatous leprosy patients. PMID:22144494

  1. Analysis of antibody responses to Mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid I, lipoarabinomannan, and recombinant proteins to define disease subtype-specific antigenic profiles in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John S; Kim, Hee Jin; Wheat, William H; Chatterjee, Delphi; Balagon, Marivic V; Cellona, Roland V; Tan, Esterlina V; Gelber, Robert; Saunderson, Paul; Duthie, Malcolm S; Reece, Stephen T; Burman, William; Belknap, Robert; Mac Kenzie, William R; Geluk, Annemieke; Oskam, Linda; Dockrell, Hazel M; Brennan, Patrick J

    2011-02-01

    A simple serodiagnostic test based on the Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I(PGL-I), for individuals with leprosy is nearly universally positive in leprosy patients with high bacillary loads but cannot be used as a stand-alone diagnostic test for the entire spectrum of the disease process. For patients with early infection with no detectable acid-fast bacilli in lesions or with low or no antibody titer to PGL-I, as in those at the tuberculoid end of the disease spectrum, this diagnostic approach has limited usefulness. To identify additional M. leprae antigens that might enhance the serological detection of these individuals, we have examined the reactivity patterns of patient sera to PGL-I, lipoarabinomannan (LAM), and six recombinant M. leprae proteins (ML1877, ML0841, ML2028, ML2038, ML0380, and ML0050) by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Overall, the responses to ML2028 (Ag85B) and ML2038 (bacterioferritin) were consistently high in both multibacillary and paucibacillary groups and weak or absent in endemic controls, while responses to other antigens showed considerable variability, from strongly positive to completely negative. This analysis has given a clearer understanding of some of the differences in the antibody responses between individuals at opposite ends of the disease spectrum, as well as illustrating the heterogeneity of antibody responses toward protein, carbohydrate, and glycolipid antigens within a clinical group. Correlating these response patterns with a particular disease state could allow for a more critical assessment of the form of disease within the leprosy spectrum and could lead to better patient management.

  2. Comparative assessment of the leprosy antibody absorption test, Mycobacterium leprae extract enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gelatin particle agglutination test for serodiagnosis of lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Gutiérrez, A; Amezcua, M E; Pastén, S; Pallares, F; Cázares, J V; Pulido, R M; Flores, O; Castro, E; Rodríguez, O

    1993-01-01

    A comparative assessment of three serological methods for leprosy diagnosis (the fluorescent leprosy antibody absorption [FLA-ABS] test, the Mycobacterium leprae soluble-extract enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], and the M. leprae particle agglutination [MLPA] test) was carried out. The objective was to identify their performance in clinical and epidemiological diagnosis of leprosy. The study group included 45 lepromatous leprosy patients under treatment. Specificity was > 95% for all three assays, and sensitivity was 95, 58, and 74% for the FLA-ABS test, the MLPA test, and the ELISA, respectively. The only cross-reactivity for M. tuberculosis-infected patients was with the soluble-extract ELISA. Although the FLA-ABS test displayed the highest specificity and sensitivity values, it can only be used in well-developed laboratories, and the patient's clinical and epidemiological background must be considered when results are interpreted because the test remains positive after therapeutic success and could be positive for some household contacts. The MLPA test is easier to perform and interpret, and it is adequate for small laboratories and epidemiological studies intended to detect active untreated or irregularly treated leprosy cases. Therefore, the FLA-ABS and MLPA tests are complementary, and both should be used for serodiagnosis of leprosy. PMID:8501238

  3. Immunological changes observed in indeterminate and lepromatous leprosy patients and Mitsuda-negative contacts after the inoculation of a mixture of Mycobacterium leprae and BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Convit, J; Aranzazu, N; Pinardi, M; Ulrich, M

    1979-01-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the possibility of eliciting favourable immunological changes in small groups of Mitsuda-negative patients with indeterminate leprosy, lepromatous patients who were bacteriologically negative after prolonged treatment with sulphones, and in Mitsuda-negative contacts by means of stimulation with a mixture of autoclaved tissues from Mycobacterium leprae-infected armadillos and living BCG. A radical change was observed in the specific immunological activity of the indeterminate group, all of whom initially had occasional bacilli in cutaneous nerves in biopsies taken from hypopigmented spots, and in the persistently Mitsuda-negative contacts. The 48 hr and 30 day reactions to lepromin, the 48 hr reaction to supernatant antigen from lepromin, the test for bacillary clearence and in vitro lymphocyte transformation (LTT) to M. leprae from human and armadillo lesions all became positive. Of the lepromatous patients studied, only one became positive to all the criteria mentioned above. In the others, the 48 hr reaction to supernatant antigen, the LTT to antigen from a humn source, and the clearance test remained negative, while the Fernandez and Mitsuda reactions became positive. These results are discussed in terms of the possible use of this stimulation procedure in the prevention and immunotherapy of leprosy. PMID:383331

  4. Mycobacterium leprae Activates Toll-Like Receptor-4 Signaling and Expression on Macrophages Depending on Previous Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Polycarpou, Anastasia; Holland, Martin J; Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Eddaoudi, Ayad; Walker, Stephen L; Willcocks, Sam; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)-1 and TLR2 have been shown to be receptors for Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), yet it is unclear whether M. leprae can signal through alternative TLRs. Other mycobacterial species possess ligands for TLR4 and genetic association studies in human populations suggest that people with TLR4 polymorphisms may be protected against leprosy. Using human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells co-transfected with TLR4, we demonstrate that M. leprae activates TLR4. We used human macrophages to show that M. leprae stimulation of cytokine production is diminished if pre-treated with TLR4 neutralizing antibody. TLR4 protein expression was up-regulated on macrophages derived from non-bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccinated healthy volunteers after incubation with M. leprae, whereas it was down-regulated in macrophages derived from BCG-vaccinated donors. Finally, pre-treatment of macrophages derived from BCG-naive donors with BCG reversed the effect of M. leprae on TLR4 expression. This may be a newly described phenomenon by which BCG vaccination stimulates "non-specific" protection to the human immune system.

  5. qPCR-High resolution melt analysis for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium leprae directly from clinical specimens of leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Truman, Richard W.; Goulart, Isabela Maria B.; Vissa, Varalakshmi; Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Suffys, Philip; Fontes, Amanda B.; Rosa, Patricia S.; Scollard, David M.; Williams, Diana L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Real-Time PCR-High Resolution Melting (qPCR-HRM) analysis has been recently described for rapid drug susceptibility testing (DST) of Mycobacterium leprae. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the validity, reliability, and accuracy of this assay for M. leprae DST in clinical specimens. Methodology/Principal findings The specificity and sensitivity for determining the presence and susceptibility of M. leprae to dapsone based on the folP1 drug resistance determining region (DRDR), rifampin (rpoB DRDR) and ofloxacin (gyrA DRDR) was evaluated using 211 clinical specimens from leprosy patients, including 156 multibacillary (MB) and 55 paucibacillary (PB) cases. When comparing the results of qPCR-HRM DST and PCR/direct DNA sequencing, 100% concordance was obtained. The effects of in-house phenol/chloroform extraction versus column-based DNA purification protocols, and that of storage and fixation protocols of specimens for qPCR-HRM DST, were also evaluated. qPCR-HRM results for all DRDR gene assays (folP1, rpoB, and gyrA) were obtained from both MB (154/156; 98.7%) and PB (35/55; 63.3%) patients. All PCR negative specimens were from patients with low numbers of bacilli enumerated by an M. leprae-specific qPCR. We observed that frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues or archival Fite’s stained slides were suitable for HRM analysis. Among 20 mycobacterial and other skin bacterial species tested, only M. lepromatosis, highly related to M. leprae, generated amplicons in the qPCR-HRM DST assay for folP1 and rpoB DRDR targets. Both DNA purification protocols tested were efficient in recovering DNA suitable for HRM analysis. However, 3% of clinical specimens purified using the phenol/chloroform DNA purification protocol gave false drug resistant data. DNA obtained from freshly frozen (n = 172), formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues (n = 36) or archival Fite’s stained slides (n = 3) were suitable for qPCR-HRM DST

  6. Genotypic Variation and Stability of Four Variable-Number Tandem Repeats and Their Suitability for Discriminating Strains of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard; Fontes, Amanda B.; de Miranda, Antonio B.; Suffys, Philip; Gillis, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    It has not been possible to distinguish different strains of Mycobacterium leprae according to their genetic sequence. However, the genome contains several variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR), which have been used effectively in strain typing of other bacteria. To determine their suitability for differentiating M. leprae, we developed PCR systems to amplify 5 different VNTR loci and examined a battery of 12 M. leprae strains derived from patients in different regions of the United States, Brazil, Mexico, and the Philippines, as well as from wild armadillos and a sooty mangabey monkey. We found diversity at four VNTR (D = 0.74), but one system (C16G8) failed to yield reproducible results. Alleles for the GAA VNTR varied in length from 10 to 16 copies, those for AT17 varied in length from 10 to 15 copies, those for GTA varied in length from 9 to 12 copies, and those for TA18 varied in length from 13 to 20 copies. Relatively little variation was seen with interspecies transfer of bacilli or during short-term passage of strains in nude mice or armadillos. The TA18 locus was more polymorphic than other VNTR, and genotypic variation was more common after long-term expansion in armadillos. Most strain genotypes remained fairly stable in passage, but strain Thai-53 showed remarkable variability. Statistical cluster analysis segregated strains and passage samples appropriately but did not reveal any particular genotype associable with different regions or hosts of origin. VNTR polymorphisms can be used effectively to discriminate M. leprae strains. Inclusion of additional loci and other elements will likely lead to a robust typing system that can be used in community-based epidemiological studies and select clinical applications. PMID:15184434

  7. Mycobacterium leprae DNA in peripheral blood may indicate a bacilli migration route and high-risk for leprosy onset.

    PubMed

    Reis, E M; Araujo, S; Lobato, J; Neves, A F; Costa, A V; Gonçalves, M A; Goulart, L R; Goulart, I M B

    2014-05-01

    Leprosy epidemiological studies have been restricted to Mycobacterium leprae DNA detection in nasal and oral mucosa samples with scarce literature on peripheral blood. We present the largest study applying quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for the detection of M. leprae DNA in peripheral blood samples of 200 untreated leprosy patients and 826 household contacts, with results associated with clinical and laboratory parameters. To detect M. leprae DNA a TaqMan qPCR assay targeting the M. leprae ML0024 genomic region was performed. The ML0024 qPCR in blood samples detected the presence of bacillus DNA in 22.0% (44/200) of the leprosy patients: 23.2% (16/69) in paucibacillary (PB), and 21.4% (28/131) in multibacillary (MB) patients. Overall positivity among contacts was 1.2% (10/826), with similar percentages regardless of whether the index case was PB or MB. After a follow-up period of 7 years, 26 contacts have developed leprosy. Comparing the results of healthy contacts with those that become ill, ML0024 qPCR positivity at the time of diagnosis of their index case represented an impressive 14.78-fold greater risk for leprosy onset (95% CI 3.6-60.8; p <0.0001). In brief, contacts with positive PCR in blood at diagnosis of index cases are at higher risk of later leprosy onset and this marker might be combined with other prognostic markers for management of contacts, which requires further studies.

  8. Interaction of ATP with a small heat shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae: effect on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-03-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of "HSP18-ATP" interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts.

  9. Computational Modelling of Dapsone Interaction With Dihydropteroate Synthase in Mycobacterium leprae; Insights Into Molecular Basis of Dapsone Resistance in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Chaitanya V, Sundeep; Das, Madhusmita; Bhat, Pritesh; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2015-10-01

    The molecular basis for determination of resistance to anti-leprosy drugs is the presence of point mutations within the genes of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) that encode active drug targets. The downstream structural and functional implications of these point mutations on drug targets were scarcely studied. In this study, we utilized computational tools to develop native and mutant protein models for 5 point mutations at codon positions 53 and 55 in 6-hydroxymethyl-7, 8-dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) of M. leprae, an active target for dapsone encoded by folp1 gene, that confer resistance to dapsone. Molecular docking was performed to identify variations in dapsone interaction with mutant DHPS in terms of hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and energy changes. Schrodinger Suite 2014-3 was used to build homology models and in performing molecular docking. An increase in volume of the binding cavities of mutant structures was noted when compared to native form indicating a weakening in interaction (60.7 Å(3) in native vs. 233.6 Å(3) in Thr53Ala, 659.9 Å(3) in Thr53Ile, 400 Å(3) for Thr53Val, 385 Å(3) for Pro55Arg, and 210 Å(3) for Pro55Leu). This was also reflected by changes in hydrogen bonds and decrease in hydrophobic interactions in the mutant models. The total binding energy (ΔG) decreased significantly in mutant forms when compared to the native form (-51.92 Kcal/mol for native vs. -35.64, -35.24, -46.47, -47.69, and -41.36 Kcal/mol for mutations Thr53Ala, Thr53Ile, Thr53Val, Pro55Arg, and Pro55Leu, respectively. In brief, this analysis provided structural and mechanistic insights to the degree of dapsone resistance contributed by each of these DHPS mutants in leprosy.

  10. [Infections due to Mycobacterium simiae].

    PubMed

    García-Martos, Pedro; García-Agudo, Lidia; González-Moya, Enrique; Galán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium simiae is a slow-growing photochromogenic environmental mycobacterium, first described in 1965. Rarely associated with human infections, possibly due to its limited pathogenicity, it mainly produces lung infection in immunocompetent elderly patients with underlying lung disease, and in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed young patients with AIDS. A microbiological culture is needed to confirm the clinical suspicion, and genetic sequencing techniques are essential to correctly identify the species. Treating M. simiae infections is complicated, owing to the multiple resistance to tuberculous drugs and the lack of correlation between in vitro susceptibility data and in vivo response. Proper treatment is yet to be defined, but must include clarithromycin combined with other antimicrobials such as moxifloxacin and cotrimoxazole. It is possible that M. simiae infections are undiagnosed.

  11. Widespread nasal carriage of Mycobacterium leprae among a healthy population in a hyperendemic region of northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luana Nepomuceno Gondim Costa; Frota, Cristiane Cunha; Mota, Rosa Maria Salani; Almeida, Rosa Livia Freitas; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Kendall, Carl; Kerr, Ligia

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the presence of Mycobacterium leprae DNA in nasal secretions of leprosy cases and nonleprosy individuals in Fortaleza, Brazil. It included 185 cases identified by physicians at the Dona Libânia National Reference Centre for Sanitary Dermatology (CDERM). A control group (Co) (n = 136) was identified among individuals from CDERM not diagnosed as leprosy cases. To augment the spatial analysis of M. leprae specific repetitive element (RLEP) positive prevalence, an external group (EG) (n = 121), a convenience sample of healthy students, were included. Polymerase chain reaction for the RLEP sequence was conducted for all participants. Prevalence of RLEP positivity for cases and Co were 69.2% and 66.9%, respectively, significantly higher than for EG (28.1%), and reported elsewhere. Male sex, belonging to a lower socioeconomic status (D/E), history of a previous contact with a case and being older, were associated with being a leprosy case. Our geographical analysis demonstrated that the bacillus is widespread among the healthy population, with clusters of RLEP positive multibacillary cases concentrated in distinct areas of the city. Our results suggest that in endemic areas, as in Fortaleza, surveillance for both nonhousehold leprosy contacts and members of the general population living in cluster areas should be implemented. PMID:26560980

  12. Drug resistance patterns in Mycobacterium leprae isolates from relapsed leprosy patients attending The Leprosy Mission (TLM) Hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Lavania, Mallika; Jadhav, Rupendra S; Chaitanya, Vedithi Sundeep; Turankar, Ravindra; Selvasekhar, Abraham; Das, Loretta; Darlong, Famkima; Hambroom, Ujjwal K; Kumar, Sandip; Sengupta, Utpal

    2014-09-01

    Implementation of multidrug therapy (MDT) in leprosy control programmes has significantly reduced the global prevalence of the disease in the last two decades. After many years of use of MDT, it is expected that drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae may emerge. This is a major concern, especially during the stage of elimination. In the present study, slit-skin smears were collected from 140 leprosy relapse cases from different Leprosy Mission hospitals across India. DNA extracted from 111 (79%) of these samples was analysed for the genes associated with drug resistance in M. leprae. More than 90% of the patients relapsed as multibacillary (MB) cases. In our study, four (3.6%) of the DNA samples analysed showed mutations associated with rifampicin resistance. We also observed that mutations associated with resistance to dapsone and ofloxacin were observed in 9 (8.1%) of the DNA samples each; two samples had both dapsone and ofloxacin resistance. Further surveillance and appropriate interventions are needed to ensure the continued success of chemotherapy for leprosy.

  13. Evaluation and Monitoring of Mycobacterium leprae Transmission in Household Contacts of Patients with Hansen's Disease in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Beltran-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy in Colombia is in a stage of post elimination-since 1997, prevalence of the disease is less than 1/10000. However, the incidence of leprosy has remained stable, with 400-500 new cases reported annually, with MB leprosy representing 70% of these case and 10% having grade 2 disability. Thus, leprosy transmission is still occurring, and household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy patients are a population at high risk of contracting and suffering from the effects of the disease during their lifetime. We performed a cross-sectional study with the aim of evaluating leprosy transmission within Family Groups (FGs) from four Colombian departments: Antioquia, Bolívar, Córdoba and Sucre. This study included 159 FGs formed by 543 HHCs; 45 FGs were monitored twice, first in 2003 and again in 2012. Migration, forced displacement by violence, loss of contact with the health center and the lack of an agreement to participate in the second monitoring were the primary reasons not all FGs were tested a second time. In each HHC, a clinical examination was performed, epidemiological data recorded, the bacillary index determined, DNA was isolated for M. leprae detection by nested PCR and IgM anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) titers were inspected. Further, DNA from M. leprae isolates were typed and compared among FGs. Twenty-two (4.1%) of the 543 HHCs had IgM anti-PGL-I positive antibody titers, indicating infection. Nasal swabs (NS) taken from 113 HHCs were tested by RLEP PCR; 18 (16%) were positive for M. leprae DNA and two new leprosy cases were detected among the HHCs. Of the confirmed HHCs with leprosy, it was possible to genotype the bacterial strains from both the index case and their HHCs. We found that the genotype of these two strains agreed at 9 markers, showing the individuals to be infected by the same strain, indicating familiar transmission. HHCs of leprosy patients not only are a high-risk population for M. leprae infection, they can act as M. leprae carriers and

  14. Evaluation and Monitoring of Mycobacterium leprae Transmission in Household Contacts of Patients with Hansen's Disease in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Beltran-Alzate, Juan Camilo

    2017-01-01

    Leprosy in Colombia is in a stage of post elimination—since 1997, prevalence of the disease is less than 1/10000. However, the incidence of leprosy has remained stable, with 400–500 new cases reported annually, with MB leprosy representing 70% of these case and 10% having grade 2 disability. Thus, leprosy transmission is still occurring, and household contacts (HHCs) of leprosy patients are a population at high risk of contracting and suffering from the effects of the disease during their lifetime. We performed a cross-sectional study with the aim of evaluating leprosy transmission within Family Groups (FGs) from four Colombian departments: Antioquia, Bolívar, Córdoba and Sucre. This study included 159 FGs formed by 543 HHCs; 45 FGs were monitored twice, first in 2003 and again in 2012. Migration, forced displacement by violence, loss of contact with the health center and the lack of an agreement to participate in the second monitoring were the primary reasons not all FGs were tested a second time. In each HHC, a clinical examination was performed, epidemiological data recorded, the bacillary index determined, DNA was isolated for M. leprae detection by nested PCR and IgM anti-phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) titers were inspected. Further, DNA from M. leprae isolates were typed and compared among FGs. Twenty-two (4.1%) of the 543 HHCs had IgM anti-PGL-I positive antibody titers, indicating infection. Nasal swabs (NS) taken from 113 HHCs were tested by RLEP PCR; 18 (16%) were positive for M. leprae DNA and two new leprosy cases were detected among the HHCs. Of the confirmed HHCs with leprosy, it was possible to genotype the bacterial strains from both the index case and their HHCs. We found that the genotype of these two strains agreed at 9 markers, showing the individuals to be infected by the same strain, indicating familiar transmission. HHCs of leprosy patients not only are a high-risk population for M. leprae infection, they can act as M. leprae carriers

  15. An enlarged, adaptable active site in CYP164 family P450 enzymes, the sole P450 in Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christopher R J; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Burton, Nicholas M; Lamb, David C; Kelly, Steven L; Brady, R Leo

    2012-01-01

    CYP164 family P450 enzymes are found in only a subset of mycobacteria and include CYP164A1, which is the sole P450 found in Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy. This has previously led to interest in this enzyme as a potential drug target. Here we describe the first crystal structure of a CYP164 enzyme, CYP164A2 from Mycobacterium smegmatis. CYP164A2 has a distinctive, enlarged hydrophobic active site that extends above the porphyrin ring toward the access channels. Unusually, we find that CYP164A2 can simultaneously bind two econazole molecules in different regions of the enlarged active site and is accompanied by the rearrangement and ordering of the BC loop. The primary location is through a classic interaction of the azole group with the porphyrin iron. The second econazole molecule is bound to a unique site and is linked to a tetracoordinated metal ion complexed to one of the heme carboxylates and to the side chains of His 105 and His 364. All of these features are preserved in the closely homologous M. leprae CYP164A1. The computational docking of azole compounds to a homology model of CYP164A1 suggests that these compounds will form effective inhibitors and is supported by the correlation of parallel docking with experimental binding studies of CYP164A2. The binding of econazole to CYP164A2 occurs primarily through the high-spin "open" conformation of the enzyme (K(d) [dissociation constant] of 0.1 μM), with binding to the low-spin "closed" form being significantly hindered (K(d) of 338 μM). These studies support previous suggestions that azole derivatives may provide an effective strategy to improve the treatment of leprosy.

  16. Interaction of ATP with a Small Heat Shock Protein from Mycobacterium leprae: Effect on Its Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Sandip Kumar; Chakraborty, Ayon; Panda, Alok Kumar; Sinha Ray, Sougata; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Biswas, Ashis

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is an important phosphate metabolite abundantly found in Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. This pathogen does not derive ATP from its host but has its own mechanism for the generation of ATP. Interestingly, this molecule as well as several antigenic proteins act as bio-markers for the detection of leprosy. One such bio-marker is the 18 kDa antigen. This 18 kDa antigen is a small heat shock protein (HSP18) whose molecular chaperone function is believed to help in the growth and survival of the pathogen. But, no evidences of interaction of ATP with HSP18 and its effect on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18 are available in the literature. Here, we report for the first time evidences of “HSP18-ATP” interaction and its consequences on the structure and chaperone function of HSP18. TNP-ATP binding experiment and surface plasmon resonance measurement showed that HSP18 interacts with ATP with a sub-micromolar binding affinity. Comparative sequence alignment between M. leprae HSP18 and αB-crystallin identified the sequence 49KADSLDIDIE58 of HSP18 as the Walker-B ATP binding motif. Molecular docking studies revealed that β4-β8 groove/strands as an ATP interactive region in M. leprae HSP18. ATP perturbs the tertiary structure of HSP18 mildly and makes it less susceptible towards tryptic cleavage. ATP triggers exposure of additional hydrophobic patches at the surface of HSP18 and induces more stability against chemical and thermal denaturation. In vitro aggregation and thermal inactivation assays clearly revealed that ATP enhances the chaperone function of HSP18. Our studies also revealed that the alteration in the chaperone function of HSP18 is reversible and is independent of ATP hydrolysis. As the availability and binding of ATP to HSP18 regulates its chaperone function, this functional inflection may play an important role in the survival of M. leprae in hosts. PMID:25811190

  17. Comparative modeling of UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-glycyl-D-glutamate-2, 6-diaminopimelate ligase from Mycobacterium leprae and analysis of its binding features through molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Anusuya; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The increasing drug and multi-drug resistance of M. leprae enforce the importance of finding new drug targets. Mycobacterium has unusually impermeable cell wall that contributes to considerable resistance to many drugs. Peptidoglycan is an important component of the cell wall of M. leprae. UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-glycyl-D-glutamate-2, 6-diaminopimelate ligase (MurE) plays a crucial role in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis and hence it could be considered as a potential drug target for leprosy. Structure of this enzyme for M. leprae has not yet been elucidated. We modeled the three-dimensional structure of MurE from M. leprae using comparative modeling methods based on the X-ray crystal structure of MurE from E. coli and validated. The 3D-structure of M. leprae MurE enzyme was docked with its substrates meso-diaminopimelic acid (A2pm) and UDP-N-acetyl muramoyl-glycyl-D- glutamate (UMGG) and its product UDP-N-acetyl muramoyl-glycyl-D-glu-meso-A(2)pm (UTP) and also with ATP. The docked complexes reveal the amino acids responsible for binding the substrates. Superposition of these complex structures suggests that carboxylic acid group of UMGG is positioned in proximity to γ-phosphate of the ATP to facilitate the formation of acylphosphate intermediate. The orientation of an amino group of A(2)pm facilitates the nucleophilic attack to form the product. Overall, the proposed model together with its binding features gained from docking studies could help to design a truly selective ligand inhibitor specific to MurE for the treatment of leprosy.

  18. Lsr2 of Mycobacterium leprae and Its Synthetic Peptides Elicit Restitution of T Cell Responses in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum and Reversal Reactions in Patients with Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Chaman; Prasad, H. K.; Rani, Rajni; Murtaza, A.; Misra, Namita; Shanker Narayan, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Lsr2 protein of Mycobacterium leprae and its synthetic peptides have been shown to elicit lymphoproliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with lepromatous leprosy (M. Chaduvula, A. Murtaza, N. Misra, N. P. Narayan, V. Ramesh, H. K. Prasad, R. Rani, R. K. Chinnadurai, I. Nath, Infect. Immun. 80:742–752, 2012). PBMCs from 16 patients with lepromatous leprosy who were undergoing erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (type 2) and 5 patients with reversal reactions (RR) (type 1) were stimulated with M. leprae, recombinant Lsr2, and six end-to-end synthetic peptides (A through F) spanning the Lsr2 sequence. During the reaction all patients with ENL showed lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, >2) in response to peptides A and F, with other peptides eliciting responses in 75 to 88% of the subjects. In PBMC cultures, both lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ release for peptide E were significantly higher than for peptides B and C and recombinant Lsr2 (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Five patients with RR also showed enhanced lymphoproliferative responses and IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2, M. leprae, and peptide E. Six months postreaction, 14 patients with ENL continued to exhibit responses to Lsr2 and its peptides, with the highest responses being elicited by peptide E. However, 5 subjects showed no lymphoproliferation and had reduced IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2 peptides (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test) but responded to recombinant Lsr2. Six patients with ENL had HLA-A*68.01, which the STFPEITHI program showed to have high peptide-binding scores of 20 to 21 for peptides E, B, and C. Eleven patients had HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DRB1*1502, which had high binding scores for peptides C and E. Thus, Lsr2 and its peptides are recognized in leprosy reactions during and well after the subsidence of clinical signs. PMID:23446220

  19. Paleopathological Evidence and Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from Archaeological Skeletal Remains of Nabe-kaburi (Head-Covered with Iron Pots) Burials in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, Kazunari; Luo, Yuqian; Ishido, Yuko; Mori, Shuichi; Hirata, Kazuaki; Ishii, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    The Nabe-kaburi is a unique burial method, the purpose of which is shrouded in mystery. The burials were performed during the 15th to 18th centuries in eastern Japan, and involved covering the heads of the deceased with iron pots or mortars. The identification of leprosy-specific osteological lesions among some of the excavated remains has led to the suggestion that Nabe-kaburi burials were a reflection of the social stigma against certain infectious diseases, such as leprosy, tuberculosis or syphilis. However, molecular evidence for the presence of disease has been lacking. The goal of this study was to detect Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) DNA in archaeological human skeletal remains from Nabe-kaburi burials. The paleopathological data from three Nabe-kaburi burials were re-evaluated before small samples were taken from affected and control areas. DNA was extracted and used as a template to target the M. leprae-specific DNA using a combination of whole genome amplification, PCR analysis and DNA sequencing. M. leprae DNA fragments were detected in the two sets of skeletal remains that had also shown paleopathological evidence of leprosy. These findings provide definitive evidence that some of the Nabe-kaburi burials were performed for people affected by leprosy. Demonstration of the presence of M. leprae DNA, combined with archeological and anthropological examinations, will aid in solving the mystery of why Nabe-kaburi burials were performed in medieval Japan. PMID:24516638

  20. Paleopathological evidence and detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA from archaeological skeletal remains of Nabe-kaburi (head-covered with iron pots) burials in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Saso, Aiko; Hoshino, Keigo; Sakurai, Junya; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Luo, Yuqian; Ishido, Yuko; Mori, Shuichi; Hirata, Kazuaki; Ishii, Norihisa

    2014-01-01

    The Nabe-kaburi is a unique burial method, the purpose of which is shrouded in mystery. The burials were performed during the 15(th) to 18(th) centuries in eastern Japan, and involved covering the heads of the deceased with iron pots or mortars. The identification of leprosy-specific osteological lesions among some of the excavated remains has led to the suggestion that Nabe-kaburi burials were a reflection of the social stigma against certain infectious diseases, such as leprosy, tuberculosis or syphilis. However, molecular evidence for the presence of disease has been lacking. The goal of this study was to detect Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) DNA in archaeological human skeletal remains from Nabe-kaburi burials. The paleopathological data from three Nabe-kaburi burials were re-evaluated before small samples were taken from affected and control areas. DNA was extracted and used as a template to target the M. leprae-specific DNA using a combination of whole genome amplification, PCR analysis and DNA sequencing. M. leprae DNA fragments were detected in the two sets of skeletal remains that had also shown paleopathological evidence of leprosy. These findings provide definitive evidence that some of the Nabe-kaburi burials were performed for people affected by leprosy. Demonstration of the presence of M. leprae DNA, combined with archeological and anthropological examinations, will aid in solving the mystery of why Nabe-kaburi burials were performed in medieval Japan.

  1. SNP genotypes of Mycobacterium leprae isolates in Thailand and their combination with rpoT and TTC genotyping for analysis of leprosy distribution and transmission.

    PubMed

    Phetsuksiri, Benjawan; Srisungngam, Sopa; Rudeeaneksin, Janisara; Bunchoo, Supranee; Lukebua, Atchariya; Wongtrungkapun, Ruch; Paitoon, Soontara; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Based on the discovery of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Mycobacterium leprae, it has been previously reported that there are four major SNP types associated with different geographic regions around the world. Another typing system for global differentiation of M. leprae is the analysis of the variable number of short tandem repeats within the rpoT gene. To expand the analysis of geographic distribution of M. leprae, classified by SNP and rpoT gene polymorphisms, we studied 85 clinical isolates from Thai patients and compared the findings with those reported from Asian isolates. SNP genotyping by PCR amplification and sequencing revealed that all strains like those in Myanmar were SNP type 1 and 3, with the former being predominant, while in Japan, Korea, and Indonesia, the SNP type 3 was found to be more frequent. The pattern of M. leprae distribution in Thailand and Myanmar is quite similar, except that SNP type 2 was not found in Thailand. In addition, the 3-copy hexamer genotype in the rpoT gene is shared among the isolates from these two neighboring countries. On the basis of these two markers, we postulate that M. leprae in leprosy patients from Myanmar and Thailand has a common historical origin. Further differentiation among Thai isolates was possible by assessing copy numbers of the TTC sequence, a more polymorphic microsatellite locus.

  2. Characterization of Ofloxacin Interaction with Mutated (A91V) Quinolone Resistance Determining Region of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium Leprae through Computational Simulation.

    PubMed

    Nisha, J; Shanthi, V

    2017-08-18

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causal agent of leprosy is non-cultivable in vitro. Thus, the assessment of antibiotic activity against Mycobacterium leprae depends primarily upon the time-consuming mouse footpad system. The GyrA protein of Mycobacterium leprae is the target of the antimycobacterial drug, Ofloxacin. In recent times, the GyrA mutation (A91V) has been found to be resistant to Ofloxacin. This phenomenon has necessitated the development of new, long-acting antimycobacterial compounds. The underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not completely known. Currently, experimentally crystallized GyrA-DNA-OFLX models are not available for highlighting the binding and mechanism of Ofloxacin resistance. Hence, we employed computational approaches to characterize the Ofloxacin interaction with both the native and mutant forms of GyrA complexed with DNA. Binding energy measurements obtained from molecular docking studies highlights hydrogen bond-mediated efficient binding of Ofloxacin to Asp47 in the native GyrA-DNA complex in comparison with that of the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. Further, molecular dynamics studies highlighted the stable binding of Ofloxacin with native GyrA-DNA complex than with the mutant GyrA-DNA complex. This mechanism provided a plausible reason for the reported, reduced effect of Ofloxacin to control leprosy in individuals with the A91V mutation. Our report is the first of its kind wherein the basis for the Ofloxacin drug resistance mechanism has been explored with the help of ternary Mycobacterium leprae complex, GyrA-DNA-OFLX. These structural insights will provide useful information for designing new drugs to target the Ofloxacin-resistant DNA gyrase.

  3. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Araujo, Marcelo Ivens de; Albuquerque, Edson Cláudio Araripe de; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Moura, Maria Manuela da Fonseca; Rezende, Denise Silva; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Lara, Flávio Alves; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Brennan, Patrick J; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-12-01

    We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N)-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23), Pernambuco (n = 41), Rio de Janeiro (n = 22) and Rondônia (RO) (n = 78). All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1%) yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping.

  4. Identification and comparison of Mycobacterium leprae genotypes in two geographical regions of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Meléndez, Esperanza; Torres, Fernando; Sakamuri, Rama Murthy; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate and establish genomic strain typing markers suitable for the identification of transmission patterns of leprosy in different regions of Colombia. Patients from Agua de Dios, Barranquilla and Cartagena cities and neighbouring towns were enrolled during 2006-2007. Slit skin smears or biopsies were obtained from newly detected untreated patients, and those undergoing multidrug therapy. DNA was extracted from the clinical samples and tested using 15 different short tandem repeat and three SNP polymorphic markers. Differences or similarities between strain types from the northeast (n = 20) and central regions of Colombia (n = 18) were noted. The alleles at two loci, 27-5 and 12-5 were different in the M. leprae in the two regions. The other microsatellite loci may be useful for further intra-population differentiation. There was strong association of 27-5 and 12-5 alleles with the SNP types. The 4-5 combination of alleles was associated with SNP type 3, while the 5-4 combination was mostly associated with SNP type 1, 2 or 4. The SNP type 4 m. leprae isolates were seen in patients in the northeast, but not in the central part.

  5. A Quantitative Approach to Analyzing Genome Reductive Evolution Using Protein–Protein Interaction Networks: A Case Study of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Akinola, Richard O.; Mazandu, Gaston K.; Mulder, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    The advance in high-throughput sequencing technologies has yielded complete genome sequences of several organisms, including complete bacterial genomes. The growing number of these available sequenced genomes has enabled analyses of their dynamics, as well as the molecular and evolutionary processes which these organisms are under. Comparative genomics of different bacterial genomes have highlighted their genome size and gene content in association with lifestyles and adaptation to various environments and have contributed to enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms of their evolution. Protein–protein functional interactions mediate many essential processes for maintaining the stability of the biological systems under changing environmental conditions. Thus, these interactions play crucial roles in the evolutionary processes of different organisms, especially for obligate intracellular bacteria, proven to generally have reduced genome sizes compared to their nearest free-living relatives. In this study, we used the approach based on the Renormalization Group (RG) analysis technique and the Maximum-Excluded-Mass-Burning (MEMB) model to investigate the evolutionary process of genome reduction in relation to the organization of functional networks of two organisms. Using a Mycobacterium leprae (MLP) network in comparison with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) network as a case study, we show that reductive evolution in MLP was as a result of removal of important proteins from neighbors of corresponding orthologous MTB proteins. While each orthologous MTB protein had an increase in number of interacting partners in most instances, the corresponding MLP protein had lost some of them. This work provides a quantitative model for mapping reductive evolution and protein–protein functional interaction network organization in terms of roles played by different proteins in the network structure. PMID:27066064

  6. Application of Mycobacterium Leprae-specific cellular and serological tests for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from confounding dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Aline Araújo; Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Costa, Maurício Barcelos; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Osório Maroccolo; Castilho, Mirian Lane Oliveira; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Pontes, Maria Araci Andrade; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific serological and cell-mediated-immunity/CMI test were evaluated for the differential diagnosis of multibacillary/MB, and paucibacillary/PB leprosy from other dermatoses. Whole-blood assay/WBA/IFNγ stimulated with LID-1 antigen and ELISA tests for IgG to LID-1 and IgM to PGL-I were performed. WBA/LID-1/IFNγ production was observed in 72% PB, 11% MB leprosy, 38% dermatoses, 40% healthy endemic controls/EC. The receiver operating curve/ROC for WBA/LID-1 in PB versus other dermatoses showed 72.5% sensitivity, 61.5% specificity and an area-under-the-curve/AUC=0.75; 74% positive predictive value/PPV, 59% negative predictive value/NPV. Anti PGL-I serology was positive in 67% MB, 8% PB leprosy, 6% of other dermatoses; its sensitivity for MB=66%, specificity=93%, AUC=0.89; PPV=91%, NPV=72%. Anti-LID-1 serology was positive in 87% MB, 7% PB leprosy, all other participants were seronegative; 87.5% sensitivity for MB, 100% specificity, AUC=0.97; PPV=100%, NPV=88%. In highly endemic areas anti-LID-1/PGL-I serology and WBA/LID-1-represent useful tools for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from other confounding dermatoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. False positive reaction of the immunohistochemistry technique using anti-BCG polyclonal antibodies to identify Mycobacterium leprae in wild nine-banded armadillos.

    PubMed

    Deps, Patrícia D; Michalany, Nilceo S; Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2004-09-01

    The authors studied 66 wild nine-banded armadillos from Brazil. The ear samples were collected and Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco stains were performed, as well as immunostaining using polyclonal BCG antibody, to avaluate the presence of the Mycobacterium leprae. The AFB were not detected by the Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco staining, neither immunoexpression of the BCG marker. However, many normal structures from the ears of the nine-banded armadillos, such as condrocytes, condroblasts, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, and Gram positive bacteria cocci, showed false positive reaction by the BCG marker. The authors discuss the use of the immunohistochemical studies with the polyclonal BCG antibody to identify M. leprae antigens in wild armadillos.

  8. Mycobacterium leprae in Colombia described by SNP7614 in gyrA, two minisatellites and geography

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Li, Wei; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    New cases of leprosy are still being detected in Colombia after the country declared achievement of the WHO defined ‘elimination’ status. To study the ecology of leprosy in endemic regions, a combination of geographic and molecular tools were applied for a group of 201 multibacillary patients including six multi-case families from eleven departments. The location (latitude and longitude) of patient residences were mapped. Slit skin smears and/or skin biopsies were collected and DNA was extracted. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis following a multiplex PCR-was developed for rapid and inexpensive strain typing of M. leprae based on copy numbers of two VNTR minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5. A SNP (C/T) in gyrA (SNP7614) was mapped by introducing a novel PCR-RFLP into an ongoing drug resistance surveillance effort. Multiple genotypes were detected combining the three molecular markers. The two frequent genotypes in Colombia were SNP7614(C)/27-5(5)/12-5(4) [C54] predominantly distributed in the Atlantic departments and SNP7614 (T)/27-5(4)/12-5(5) [T45] associated with the Andean departments. A novel genotype SNP7614 (C)/27-5(6)/12-5(4) [C64] was detected in cities along the Magdalena river which separates the Andean from Atlantic departments; a subset was further characterized showing association with a rare allele of minisatellite 23-3 and the SNP type 1 of M. leprae. The genotypes within intra-family cases were conserved. Overall, this is the first large scale study that utilized simple and rapid assay formats for identification of major strain types and their distribution in Colombia. It provides the framework for further strain type discrimination and geographic information systems as tools for tracing transmission of leprosy. PMID:23291420

  9. A Mycobacterium leprae Hsp65 Mutant as a Candidate for Mitigating Lupus Aggravation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marengo, Eliana B.; de Moraes, Luciana V.; Melo, Robson L.; Balan, Andrea; Fernandes, Beatriz L.; Tambourgi, Denise V.; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Hsp60 is an abundant and highly conserved family of intracellular molecules. Increased levels of this family of proteins have been observed in the extracellular compartment in chronic inflammation. Administration of M. leprae Hsp65 [WT] in [NZBxNZW]F1 mice accelerates the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus [SLE] progression whereas the point mutated K409A Hsp65 protein delays the disease. Here, the biological effects of M. leprae Hsp65 Leader pep and K409A pep synthetic peptides, which cover residues 352–371, are presented. Peptides had immunomodulatory effects similar to that observed with their respective proteins on survival and the combined administration of K409A+Leader pep or K409A pep+WT showed that the mutant forms were able to inhibit the deleterious effect of WT on mortality, indicating the neutralizing potential of the mutant molecules in SLE progression. Molecular modeling showed that replacing Lysine by Alanine affects the electrostatic potential of the 352–371 region. The number of interactions observed for WT is much higher than for Hsp65 K409A and mouse Hsp60. The immunomodulatory effects of the point-mutated protein and peptide occurred regardless of the catalytic activity. These findings may be related to the lack of effect on survival when F1 mice were inoculated with Hsp60 or K409A pep. Our findings indicate the use of point-mutated Hsp65 molecules, such as the K409A protein and its corresponding peptide, that may minimize or delay the onset of SLE, representing a new approach to the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21961033

  10. Interleukin-10-dependent down-regulation of interferon-gamma response to Leishmania by Mycobacterium leprae antigens during the clinical course of a coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo-Coutinho, R.B.G.; Matos, D.C.S.; Nery, J.A.C.; Valete-Rosalino, C.M.; Mendonça, S.C.F.

    2012-01-01

    We have described a case of a patient with an intriguing association of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with lepromatous leprosy, two opposite polar forms of these spectral diseases. In the present follow-up study, we investigated the effect of the addition of Mycobacterium leprae antigens on interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production in Leishmania antigen-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from this patient. For this purpose, PBMC cultures were stimulated with crude L. braziliensis and/or M. leprae whole-cell antigen extracts or with concanavalin A. In some experiments, neutralizing anti-human interleukin (IL)-10 antibodies were added to the cultures. IFN-γ and IL-10 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. During active leprosy, M. leprae antigens induced 72.3% suppression of the IFN-γ response to L. braziliensis antigen, and this suppression was abolished by IL-10 neutralization. Interestingly, the suppressive effect of M. leprae antigen was lost after the cure of leprosy and the disappearance of this effect was accompanied by exacerbation of mucosal leishmaniasis. Considered together, these results provide evidence that the concomitant lepromatous leprosy induced an IL-10-mediated regulatory response that controlled the immunopathology of mucosal leishmaniasis, demonstrating that, in the context of this coinfection, the specific immune response to one pathogen can influence the immune response to the other pathogen and the clinical course of the disease caused by it. Our findings may contribute to a better understanding of the Leishmania/M. leprae coinfection and of the immunopathogenesis of mucosal leishmaniasis. PMID:22570089

  11. Type 2 lepra reaction with HIV1 co-infection: a case report with interesting management implications.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, S; Amin, S S; Qaisar, S

    2011-01-01

    A patient co-infected with leprosy and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-type 1 who developed type 2 lepra reaction in the absence of antiretroviral therapy is presented. The reaction responded only after initiating anti retroviral therapy (ART) despite normal CD4+ counts. The present report suggests that type 2 reactions in leprosy and HIV co-infected patients may not always be the typical manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and stresses the importance of considering concomitant HIV infection in refractory lepra reactions. Extensive research is required into the manifestations of HIV in leprosy patients.

  12. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  13. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae from Brazilian leprosy patients suggests the occurrence of reinfection or of bacterial population shift during disease relapse

    PubMed Central

    Cunha dos Santos, Alexandre Araujo; Pignataro, Patrícia; Nery, José Augusto; de Miranda, Antônio Basílio; Soares, Diego Fonseca; Brum Fontes, Amanda Nogueira; Miranda, Alice; Ferreira, Helen; Boéchat, Neio; Novisck Gallo, Maria Eugênia; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; De Oliveira, Maria Leide W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present in skin biopsy samples that were collected during the first and the second disease occurrences from eight leprosy patients, seven of whom were diagnosed as suffering from disease relapse. Sequence analysis of part of the M. leprae rpoB, folP1, gyrB and gyrA genes did not show genetic change that supported the presence of drug-resistant bacilli. However, we observed a synonymous nucleotide change at position 297 of gyrA among five of these patients, one presenting C to T (CgyrAT) and four presenting T to C (TgyrAC) at this position. Additional genotyping by analysis of the four short tandem repeats GAA, GTA9, AT17 and TA18 showed that the gyrA single nucleotide polymorphism change was accompanied by a change in short tandem repeat genotype. Our data suggest that leprosy relapse in these patients, living in an area endemic for leprosy, could be caused by M. leprae with a genotype different from the one that caused initial disease. PMID:21596907

  14. Identification and Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in a Region of High Leprosy Prevalence in China: a 3-Year Molecular Epidemiological Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Xiaoman; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jian; Kimura, Miyako; Black, William C.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Li, Huanying; Vissa, Varalakshmi D.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as a means of strain typing for tracking the transmission of leprosy. However, empirical data for a defined population are lacking. To this end, a study was initiated to assess the diversity and distribution of prevalent Mycobacterium leprae strains in Qiubei County, Yunnan Province, People's Republic of China, where the annual detection rate of leprosy is 10-fold higher than the national average rate. Sixty-eight newly diagnosed leprosy patients were included in the study. MLVA at eight M. leprae loci was applied using DNA extracts from skin biopsies. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 24, providing adequate strain discrimination. MLVA strain typing identified several clusters of patients whose M. leprae specimens shared similar VNTR profiles. Two of these clusters were comprised of patients who resided predominantly in the north and northwest parts of Qiubei County. Furthermore, it was found that multicase families are common in this county: 23 of the 68 patients were from 11 families. Intrafamilial VNTR profiles closely matched within six families, although they were different between the families. Moreover, VNTR patterns related to those found in some multicase families were also detected in patients in the same or adjacent townships, indicating the utility of VNTR strain typing to identify and detect short-range transmission events. Social contact through village markets is proposed as a means of transmission. PMID:17428944

  15. Bactericidal activity of single dose of clarithromycin plus minocycline, with or without ofloxacin, against Mycobacterium leprae in patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, B; Jamet, P; Perani, E G; Sow, S; Lienhardt, C; Petinon, C; Grosset, J H

    1996-01-01

    Fifty patients with newly diagnosed lepromatous leprosy were allocated randomly to one of five groups and treated with either a month-long standard regimen of multidrug therapy (MDT) for multibacillary leprosy, a single dose of 600 mg of rifampin, a month-long regimen with the dapsone (DDS) and clofazimine (CLO) components of the standard MDT, or a single dose of 2,000 mg of clarithromycin (CLARI) plus 200 mg of minocycline (MINO), with or without the addition of 800 mg of ofloxacin (OFLO). At the end of 1 month, clinical improvement accompanied by significant decreases of morphological indexes in skin smears was observed in about half of the patients of each group. A significant bactericidal effect was demonstrated in the great majority of patients in all five groups by inoculating the footpads of mice with organisms recovered from biopsy samples obtained before and after treatment. Rifampin proved to be a bactericidal drug against Mycobacterium leprae more potent than any combination of the other drugs. A single dose of CLARI-MINO, with or without OFLO, displayed a degree of bactericidal activity similar to that of a regimen daily of doses of DDS-CLO for 1 month, suggesting that it may be possible to replace the DDS and CLO components of the MDT with a monthly dose of CLARI-MINO, with or without OFLO. However, gastrointestinal adverse events were quite frequent among patients treated with CLARI-MINO, with or without OFLO, and may be attributed to the higher dosage of CLARI or MINO or to the combination of CLARI-MINO plus OFLO. In future trials, therefore, we propose to reduce the dosages of the drugs to 1,000 mg of CLARI, 100 mg of MINO, and 400 mg of OFLO. PMID:8878595

  16. CD163 favors Mycobacterium leprae survival and persistence by promoting anti-inflammatory pathways in lepromatous macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moura, Danielle F; de Mattos, Katherine A; Amadeu, Thaís P; Andrade, Priscila R; Sales, Jorgenilce S; Schmitz, Verônica; Nery, José Augusto C; Pinheiro, Roberta O; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2012-11-01

    Lepromatous macrophages possess a regulatory phenotype that contributes to the immunosuppression observed in leprosy. CD163, a scavenger receptor that recognizes hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes, is expressed at higher levels in lepromatous cells, although its functional role in leprosy is not yet established. We herein demonstrate that human lepromatous lesions are microenvironments rich in IDO⁺CD163⁺. Cells isolated from these lesions were CD68⁺IDO⁺CD163⁺ while higher levels of sCD163 in lepromatous sera positively correlated with IL-10 levels and IDO activity. Different Myco-bacterium leprae (ML) concentrations in healthy monocytes likewise revealed a positive correlation between increased concentrations of the mycobacteria and IDO, CD209, and CD163 expression. The regulatory phenotype in ML-stimulated monocytes was accompanied by increased TNF, IL-10, and TGF-β levels whereas IL-10 blockade reduced ML-induced CD163 expression. The CD163 blockade reduced ML uptake in human monocytes. ML uptake was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with the cDNA for CD163 than in untransfected cells. Simultaneously, increased CD163 expression in lepromatous cells seemed to be dependent on ML uptake, and contributed to augmented iron storage in lepromatous macrophages. Altogether, these results suggest that ML-induced CD163 expression modulates the host cell phenotype to create a favorable environment for myco-bacterial entry and survival. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mycobacterium marinum infection on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This bacterial infection is caused by Mycobacterium marinum . Marinum is a relative of the organism which causes tuberculosis. This lesion is often referred to as a swimming pool granuloma. Atypical mycobacterial ...

  18. [Rapid detection of mutations related to Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance by using Hp-rPCR (hairpin primer- real time PCR) method].

    PubMed

    Kai, Masanori

    2014-03-01

    Rapid and simple detection method of drug resistance bacteria is required. In the present study, Hp-rPCR (hairpin primer-real time PCR) was applied to Mycobacterium leprae genes to detect mutations. Target sites of the method were as follows: first base and second base on 53rd codon and second base on 55th codon infolP1 gene for dapsone resistance, first base on 441st codon and 451st codon and second base on 456th and 458th codon in rpoB gene for rifampicin resistance, and first base on 89th codon and second base on 91st codon in gyrA gene for quinolone resistance which were common mutation sites in clinical reports. The total number of the target sites was 9. Mycobacterium leprae, Thai-53, Zensho-2 and Zensho-4 were used as reference bacteria in the present study and clear, reliable results were obtained. Double-blind study was conducted using 15 samples. The number of target sites was calculated as 135 in total by 9 sites in 15 samples. There was only one misreading in the blind samples and the sensitivity was more than 99%.

  19. The pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an old enemy of the human race, with evidence of infection observed as early as 5000 years ago. Although more host-restricted than Mycobacterium bovis, which can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, M. tuberculosis can infect, and cause morbidity and mortality in, several veterinary species as well. As M. tuberculosis is one of the earliest described bacterial pathogens, the literature describing this organism is vast and overwhelming. This review strives to distill what is currently known about this bacterium and the disease it causes for the veterinary pathologist.

  20. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China--Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Youhua; Wen, Yan; You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China.

  1. Characterization of Mycobacterium leprae Genotypes in China—Identification of a New Polymorphism C251T in the 16S rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    You, Yuangang; Xing, Yan; Li, Huanying; Weng, Xiaoman; Wu, Nan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to be prevalent in some mountainous regions of China, and genotypes of leprosy strains endemic to the country are not known. Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a new species that was discovered in Mexico in 2008, and it remains unclear whether this species exists in China. Here, we conducted PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis to classify genotypes of 85 DNA samples collected from patients from 18 different provinces. All 171 DNA samples from skin biopsies of leprosy patients were tested for the presence of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene using nested PCR, followed by DNA sequencing. The new species M. lepromatosis was not found among the 171 specimens from leprosy patients in 22 provinces in China. However, we found three SNP genotypes among 85 leprosy patients. A mutation at C251T in the 16S rRNA gene was found in 76% of the strains. We also found that the strains that showed the 16S rRNA C251T mutation belonged to SNP type 3, whereas strains without the point mutation belonged to SNP type 1. The SNP type 3 leprosy strains were observed in patients from both the inner and coastal regions of China, but the SNP type 1 strains were focused only in the coastal region. This indicated that the SNP type 3 leprosy strains were more prevalent than the SNP type 1 strains in China. In addition, the 16S rRNA gene sequence mutation at C251T also indicated a difference in the geographical distribution of the strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a new polymorphism in 16S rRNA gene in M. leprae in China. Our findings shed light on the prevalent genotypes and provide insight about leprosy transmission that are important for leprosy control in China. PMID:26196543

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M; Tweet, Marysia S; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding.

  3. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding. PMID:27703994

  4. Mycobacterium marinum infection from sea monkeys

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Jaclyn; Webster, Duncan; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Chiu, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection acquired from Artemia nyos (sea monkeys) is presented. The infection was unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapies. A biopsy of a lesion revealed granulomatous inflammation with cultures that subsequently grew M marinum. A three-month course of clarithromycin provided complete resolution. PMID:24294280

  5. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  6. Human-armadillo interaction in Ceará, Brazil: Potential for transmission of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ligia; Kendall, Carl; Sousa, Cesar Augusto Barros de; Frota, Cristiane Cunha; Graham, Jove; Rodrigues, Laura; Fernandes, Rafael Lima; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2015-12-01

    Several factors suggest that armadillos present an important risk for human leprosy infection. This study uses semi-structured interviews to better illustrate how human interaction with armadillos may increase the risk of leprosy transmission. The participants were all residents of the state of Ceará, in northeastern Brazil, all acknowledged contact with armadillos either through hunting, through cooking, or through consumption of its meat. This study raises important issues about contact between human beings and armadillos. The interviews provide evidence of numerous situations in which leprosy transmission via the armadillo is possible. At a minimum, people who hunt armadillos need to be made aware of the risk of infection.

  7. Confirmation of a false-positive result associated with a competition inhibition assay used for detecting antibodies to a protein epitope of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Vadiee, A R; Gillis, T P; Shannon, E J

    1990-01-01

    A competitive antibody-binding assay (CABA) was developed to detect antibodies in infected armadillos and leprosy patients which compete with an M. leprae-specific 125I monoclonal antibody IIIE9 for the species-specific M. leprae-IIIE9 epitope on the 65-kD protein. The results suggest armadillos and leprosy patients produce antibodies that inhibit the binding of 125I-IIIE9 monoclonal antibody to the IIIE9 epitope on crude, native 65-kD protein preparations. When purified, recombinant 65-kD protein was substituted for crude antigen, there was no evidence in the CABA of antibody to the IIIE9 epitope. False-positive results, possibly induced by steric hindrance, are likely to be associated with CABA which incorporate crude cell wall extracts as solid-phase antigen. Images Fig. 4 PMID:1690616

  8. Nasal infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D-Q; Righini, C; Darouassi, Y; Schmerber, S

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing non-tuberculous atypical mycobacterium, is commonly found in soil and water. This organism generally causes skin, bone, and soft tissue infections following local trauma or surgical procedures, and in immunodeficient patients. The case reported here is, to our knowledge, the first published report of M. fortuitum nasal infection. The authors report the case of a 3-year-old girl with intranasal tumour-like swelling associated with cervical lymph nodes due to M. fortuitum infection. A combination of radical surgical debridement and prolonged therapy with several antimicrobial agents was required to completely eradicate the infection. This case report indicates that non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections should be considered after failure of conventional antibiotic therapy or when classical microbiological tests fail to identify the pathogen responsible for sinonasal and cervical infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycobacterium caprae infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Wolfgang M; Indra, Alexandra; Koksalan, Orhan K; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Richter, Elvira

    2014-12-01

    Mycobacterium caprae, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, causes tuberculosis (TB) in man and animals. Some features distinguish M. caprae from its epidemiological twin, Mycobacterium bovis: M. caprae is evolutionarily older, accounts for a smaller burden of zoonotic TB and is not globally distributed, but primarily restricted to European countries. M. caprae occurs only in a low proportion of human TB cases and this proportion may even decrease, if progress toward eradication of animal TB in Europe continues. So why bother, if M. caprae is not an enigma for diagnostic TB tests and if resistance against first-line drugs is a rarity with M. caprae? This 'European' pathogen of zoonotic TB asks interesting questions regarding the definition of a species. The latter, seemingly only an academic question, particularly requires and challenges the collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

  10. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  11. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  12. Mycobacterium fortuitum cutaneous infection from amateur tattoo.

    PubMed

    Suvanasuthi, Saroj; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2012-06-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after receiving an amateur tattoo is reported. A few days after tattooing, an otherwise healthy 25-year-old Thai male presented with multiple discrete erythematous papules confined to the tattoo area. He was initially treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamine without improvement. Skin biopsy was carried out, and the histopathology showed mixed cell granuloma with a foreign body reaction (tattoo color pigments). The acid-fast bacilli stain was positive. The tissue culture grew M. fortuitum two weeks later. He was treated with clarithromycin 1,000 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1,000 mg/day for 10 months with complete response. From the clinical aspect, tattoo-associated rapidly growing mycobacterium infection might be difficult to differentiate from the pigment-based skin reactions. Skin biopsy for histopathology and tissue culture for Mycobacterium probably will be needed in arriving at the diagnosis.

  13. Resistance of M. leprae to Quinolones: A Question of Relativity?

    PubMed Central

    Veziris, Nicolas; Chauffour, Aurélie; Escolano, Sylvie; Henquet, Sarah; Matsuoka, Masanori; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistant leprosy, defined as resistance to rifampin, dapsone and fluoroquinolones (FQ), has been described in Mycobacterium leprae. However, the in vivo impact of fluoroquinolone resistance, mainly mediated by mutations in DNA gyrase (GyrA2GyrB2), has not been precisely assessed. Our objective was to measure the impact of a DNA gyrase mutation whose implication in fluoroquinolone resistance has been previously demonstrated through biochemical studies, on the in vivo activity of 3 fluoroquinolones: ofloxacin, moxifloxacin and garenoxacin. Methodology/Principal Findings We used the proportional bactericidal method. 210 four-week-old immunodeficient female Nude mice (NMRI-Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu) were inoculated in the left hind footpad with 0.03 ml of bacterial suspension containing 5×103, 5×102, 5×101, and 5×100 M. leprae AFB organisms of strain Hoshizuka-4 which is a multidrug resistant strain harboring a GyrA A91V substitution. An additional subgroup of 10 mice was inoculated with 5×10−1 bacilli in the untreated control group. The day after inoculation, subgroups of mice were treated with a single dose of ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, garenoxacin or clarithromycin at 150 mg/kg dosing. 12 months later mice were sacrificed and M. leprae bacilli were numbered in the footpad. The results from the untreated control group indicated that the infective inoculum contained 23% of viable M. leprae. The results from the moxifloxacin and garenoxacin groups indicated that a single dose of these drugs reduced the percentage of viable M. leprae by 90%, similarly to the reduction observed after a single dose of the positive control drug clarithromycin. Conversely, ofloxacin was less active than clarithromycin. Conclusion/Significance DNA gyrase mutation is not always synonymous of lack of in vivo fluoroquinolone activity in M. leprae. As for M. tuberculosis, in vivo studies allow to measure residual antibiotic activity in case of target mutations in M. leprae. PMID:24244784

  14. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  15. Mycobacterium chelonei infection of a corneal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, G. W.; Stacey, A. R.; Marsh, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We present a case of Mycobacterium chelonei infection in a corneal graft. The chronic ulceration and stromal infiltration followed a well defined course and eventually responded to topical amikacin, though a further graft was required. Previous cases of keratitis due to the M. fortuitum complex are reviewed. Images PMID:3311141

  16. Impact of amino acid substitutions in B subunit of DNA gyrase in Mycobacterium leprae on fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Ofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (FQ) used for the treatment of leprosy. FQs are known to interact with both A and B subunits of DNA gyrase and inhibit supercoiling activity of this enzyme. Mutations conferring FQ resistance have been reported to be found only in the gene encoding A subunit of this enzyme (gyrA) of M. leprae, although there are many reports on the FQ resistance-associated mutation in gyrB in other bacteria, including M. tuberculosis, a bacterial species in the same genus as M. leprae. To reveal the possible contribution of mutations in gyrB to FQ resistance in M. leprae, we examined the inhibitory activity of FQs against recombinant DNA gyrases with amino acid substitutions at position 464, 502 and 504, equivalent to position 461, 499 and 501 in M. tuberculosis, which are reported to contribute to reduced sensitivity to FQ. The FQ-inhibited supercoiling assay and FQ-induced cleavage assay demonstrated the important roles of these amino acid substitutions in reduced sensitivity to FQ with marked influence by amino acid substitution, especially at position 502. Additionally, effectiveness of sitafloxacin, a FQ, to mutant DNA gyrases was revealed by low inhibitory concentration of this FQ. Data obtained in this study suggested the possible emergence of FQ-resistant M. leprae with mutations in gyrB and the necessity of analyzing both gyrA and gyrB for an FQ susceptibility test. In addition, potential use of sitafloxacin for the treatment of problematic cases of leprosy by FQ resistant M. leprae was suggested.

  17. Impact of Amino Acid Substitutions in B Subunit of DNA Gyrase in Mycobacterium leprae on Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Mukai, Tetsu; Matsuoka, Masanori; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Background Ofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone (FQ) used for the treatment of leprosy. FQs are known to interact with both A and B subunits of DNA gyrase and inhibit supercoiling activity of this enzyme. Mutations conferring FQ resistance have been reported to be found only in the gene encoding A subunit of this enzyme (gyrA) of M. leprae, although there are many reports on the FQ resistance-associated mutation in gyrB in other bacteria, including M. tuberculosis, a bacterial species in the same genus as M. leprae. Methodology/Principal Findings To reveal the possible contribution of mutations in gyrB to FQ resistance in M. leprae, we examined the inhibitory activity of FQs against recombinant DNA gyrases with amino acid substitutions at position 464, 502 and 504, equivalent to position 461, 499 and 501 in M. tuberculosis, which are reported to contribute to reduced sensitivity to FQ. The FQ-inhibited supercoiling assay and FQ-induced cleavage assay demonstrated the important roles of these amino acid substitutions in reduced sensitivity to FQ with marked influence by amino acid substitution, especially at position 502. Additionally, effectiveness of sitafloxacin, a FQ, to mutant DNA gyrases was revealed by low inhibitory concentration of this FQ. Significance Data obtained in this study suggested the possible emergence of FQ-resistant M. leprae with mutations in gyrB and the necessity of analyzing both gyrA and gyrB for an FQ susceptibility test. In addition, potential use of sitafloxacin for the treatment of problematic cases of leprosy by FQ resistant M. leprae was suggested. PMID:23071850

  18. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Midani, S; Rathore, M H

    1999-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is one of the rapidly growing mycobacteria found in soil, dust, and water. It can be isolated as a normal colonizing organism, but as a pathogen this organism causes mainly skin and soft tissue infection preceded by trauma. A wide variety of infections can occur in individuals with predisposing conditions. Central nervous system infection with M fortuitum is rare, and meningitis occurs after surgery or trauma. We believe that ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection with this organism has not been reported in the literature. Practitioners should be aware of this rare entity and should suspect it in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis with sterile culture, and after trauma, surgery, or manipulation of the VP shunt hardware. Mycobacterium fortuitum is resistant to most first-line and second-line antituberculous drugs, and treatment should include surgical debridement in addition to prolonged antimicrobial therapy.

  19. SDS-PAGE analysis of M. leprae protein antigens reacting with antibodies from sera from lepromatous patients and infected armadillos.

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, A K; Maire, M A; Lambert, P H

    1982-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to characterize M. leprae bacilli derived from infected armadillos. First, the proteins of the mycobacterial extracts were fractionated by SDS-PAGE. Subsequently, the proteins in the gel were electrophoretically transferred on a strip of nitrocellulose paper by the technique of 'electrophoretic blotting'. The separated bacterial protein bands, thus immobilized on the nitrocellulose paper were made to react immunologically with sera from the lepromatous patients, infected armadillo sera and other experimental mycobacterial antisera. It was observed that a majority of M. leprae proteins contained antigenic determinants also present on proteins of BCG. In addition, only two specific antigen bands of 33KD and 12KD were conspicuously detected by the patients' sera and the infected armadillo sera. These substances were further identified as polysaccharides or glycoproteins since they could only be stained by Schiff's reagent or alcian blue. Only 12KD glycoprotein band reacted with concanavalin A, whereas wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) did not show any reaction with them. These 33KD and 12KD glycoprotein antigens were found to lose their antigenicity after pepsin treatment and can be considered as glycoproteins. Further, radiolabelling experiments showed that 12KD antigen underwent radioiodination under usual conditions, but 33KD glycoprotein failed to be similarly radiolabelled. It is suggested that these protein antigens have M. leprae specific determinants on a cross-reacting component. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6184189

  20. [The importance of the protein antigens of Mycobacterium leprae. Their potential use for the development of a vaccine against leprosy].

    PubMed

    Vega-López, F; Macotela-Ruiz, E

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe M. leprae antigenic structures that are considered relevant for the development of a vaccine. Other biological elements presently utilized in vaccination and immune therapy against leprosy are also reviewed, and the possibility of having in the future an effective vaccine obtained at low cost through molecular biology recombinant techniques. This review also describes some epidemiological and control aspects of leprosy within the general framework of the importance of this disease.

  1. Efficacy of a cell-mediated reaction to the purified protein derivative of tuberculin in the disposal of Mycobacterium leprae from human skin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, G; Sheftel, G; Job, C K; Mathur, N K; Nath, I; Cohn, Z A

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a delayed-type cell-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen on the Mycobacterium leprae load in the skin of leprosy patients. Twelve patients with the lepromatous form of leprosy have been injected intradermally with 5 units of the purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD). Ten individuals responded with areas of induration ranging from 12 to 21 mm in diameter, and two were unresponsive (less than 10 mm). Twenty-one days thereafter, the injected and control sites were biopsied, and the histology, number of acid-fast bacilli, nature and phenotype of the emigrant cells, and ultrastructural characteristics of the lesions were evaluated. Eight of the 10 responding patients showed reductions in the number of acid-fast bacilli by factors ranging from 5 to 10,000. Two responders and both nonresponders exhibited no discernible decline in the number of organisms. The reduction in bacillary load was correlated with an intense mononuclear cell infiltrate, the maintenance of a high CD4+ T-cell/CD8+ T-cell ratio, the formation of granulomata, and the extensive destruction of previously parasitized macrophages. Images PMID:2969108

  2. Mycobacterium chimaera left ventricular assist device infections.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Leora B; Louie, Eddie; Hill, Fred; Levine, Jamie; Phillips, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    A global outbreak of invasive Mycobacterium chimaera infections after cardiac surgery has recently been linked to bioaerosols from contaminated heater-cooler units. The majority of cases have occurred after valvular surgery or aortic graft surgery and nearly half have resulted in death. To date, infections in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have not been characterized in the literature. We report two cases of device-associated M. chimaera infection in patients with continuous-flow LVADs and describe challenges related to diagnosis and management in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fatal pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Lessing, M P; Walker, M M

    1993-01-01

    Environmental (atypical, opportunist, other) mycobacteria were first isolated nearly a century ago. The classification of these "other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis" organisms was initially chaotic until Runyon proposed a scheme of four groups in 1959. Mycobacterium fortuitum is a member of group IV: Rapid growers. These ubiquitous terrestrial and aquatic forms contaminate water supplies, reagents, and clinical samples. They may colonise the respiratory systems of patients whose local defence mechanisms have been impaired or those with congenital and acquired immune defects. They can also cause disease in immunocompetent individuals. There have been fewer than 20 published cases of pulmonary infection caused by M fortuitum. A further case is reported of fatal pulmonary infection in an elderly patient with long standing chronic obstructive airways disease (COAD). He had left upper zone shadowing on chest radiography and lung abscesses at post mortem examination yielded only M fortuitum. PMID:8463423

  4. Dominant recognition of a cross-reactive B-cell epitope in Mycobacterium leprae 10 K antigen by immunoglobulin G1 antibodies across the disease spectrum in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, R; Dockrell, H M; Chiang, T J

    1999-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibodies in patients with leprosy show a direct correlation with bacterial load (ρ=0·748; P < 0002) suggesting that IgG1 B-cell responses may be surrogate markers of disease progression. To investigate if this upregulation was a general feature of IgG1 responses to all M. leprae (ML) antigens, we analysed responses to several recombinant purified ML heat-shock proteins (HSP). Three recombinant HSPs (ML10 K, ML 18 K and ML 65 K) were tested for their ability to induce various IgG subclasses in patients with either the lepromatous (LL/BL, n = 26) or tuberculoid form (BT/TT, n = 39) of the disease as well as in healthy households (HC, n = 14) and endemic controls (EC = 19). Our major findings were: (1) selective augmentation of IgG1 antibody responses to ML10 K; (2) recognition of a restricted number of epitopes across the disease spectrum and healthy controls by IgG1 antibodies; (3) dominant recognition of cross-reactive epitopes which were common to both ML and MT 10 K. This response was not related to contamination with endotoxin. Epitope mapping using 15-mer overlapping peptides spanning the ML 10 000 MW revealed an immunodominant IgG1 binding peptide (aa41–55) in patients as well as healthy controls. This peptide is a shared epitope with M. tuberculosis 10 K suggesting that postswitched IgG1 B cells recognizing this epitope rather than naive B cells are being expanded. PMID:10233750

  5. Serological detection of leprosy employing Mycobacterium leprae derived serine-rich 45 kDa, ESAT-6, CFP-10 and PGL-I: a compilation of data from studies in Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om

    2011-12-01

    This article is a compilation of our findings recorded in the recent past where we have investigated the serological performance of Mycobacterium leprae antigens like-serine-rich 45 kDa protein (45 kD), early secretary antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10) and phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) for detection (employing antibody detecting ELISA) of leprosy patients, particularly those belonging to the paucibacillary (PB) group. All of these antigens were capable of detecting, by themselves the majority (82-100%) of multibacillary (MB) patients. However, with respect to PB patients, only 18-47% (i.e. less than half) of the cases could be detected. Based on the results of serological assays for each of the four antigens separately a combinatorial approach was performed for these antigens, which increased the sensitivity for detection of PB patients to 73%, giving 36% improvement over conventional PGL-I based ELISA. Thus, the multi-antigenic serological approach is worthwhile for its establishment for detection of leprosy patients. Since ESAT-6 and CFP-10 are secreted proteins by nature, antibodies against them are worth exploring for detection of early infections and for monitoring of treatment efficiency. Nevertheless, efforts towards identification of more new antigens with serological potential are still desirable in order to further improve the detection rate of leprosy.

  6. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M; Silva, Ita de Oliveira; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C

    2015-11-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts.

  7. Validation of qPCR Methods for the Detection of Mycobacterium in New World Animal Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Housman, Genevieve; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Boere, Vanner; Grativol, Adriana D.; Pereira, Luiz Cezar M.; Silva, Ita de Oliveira e; Ruiz-Miranda, Carlos R.; Truman, Richard; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, MTBC) continue to impact modern human populations. Therefore, methods able to survey mycobacterial infection in potential animal hosts are necessary for proper evaluation of human exposure threats. Here we tested for mycobacterial-specific single- and multi-copy loci using qPCR. In a trial study in which armadillos were artificially infected with M. leprae, these techniques were specific and sensitive to pathogen detection, while more traditional ELISAs were only specific. These assays were then employed in a case study to detect M. leprae as well as MTBC in wild marmosets. All marmosets were negative for M. leprae DNA, but 14 were positive for the mycobacterial rpoB gene assay. Targeted capture and sequencing of rpoB and other MTBC genes validated the presence of mycobacterial DNA in these samples and revealed that qPCR is useful for identifying mycobacterial-infected animal hosts. PMID:26571269

  8. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection interference with Mycobacterium bovis diagnostics: natural infection cases and a pilot experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum and at least 1 unidentified species of soil mycobacteria were isolated from lymph nodes from 4 of 5 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that had been culled because of positive test results using the Bovigam assay. The buffalo were part of a group of 16 free-ranging buffalo captured in the far north of the Kruger National Park (South Africa) assumed to be free of bovine tuberculosis. No Mycobacterium bovis was isolated. To investigate the possible cause of the apparent false-positive diagnosis, the Mycobacterium isolates were inoculated into 4 experimental cattle and their immune responses monitored over a 13-week period, using the gamma interferon assay. The immune reactivity was predominantly directed toward avian tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and lasted for approximately 8 weeks. During that period 3 of 4 cattle yielded positive test results on 1 or 2 occasions. The immune responsiveness was boosted when the inoculations were repeated after 15 weeks, which led to 2 subsequent positive reactions in the experimental animal that did not react previously. Including an additional stimulatory antigen, sensitin prepared from M. fortuitum in the gamma interferon assay, showed that it was able to elicit a detectable gamma interferon response in all 4 experimentally inoculated cattle when applied in parallel with bovine and avian tuberculin PPD for the stimulation of blood samples. The implications of occasional cross-reactive responses in natural cases of infection with environmental mycobacteria in the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo and cattle in South Africa are discussed.

  9. Bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Satti, Luqman; Abbasi, Shahid; Sattar, Abdul; Ikram, Aamer; Manzar, Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Malik Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection vary greatly by location and death is very rare except in disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. We present what we believe is the first case of bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in an HIV negative patient. Bone marrow examination revealed presence of numerous acid fast bacilli which were confirmed as Mycobacterium fortuitum on culture and by molecular analysis. Patient was managed successfully with amikacin and ciprofloxacin.

  10. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yee Man Tracy; Pillinger, Toby; Luqmani, Asad; Cooper, Nichola

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal condition that can be primary or secondary. Secondary HLH can occur in association with infections, most commonly viral infections, but has also been reported in association with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Prompt identification of the underlying cause of HLH is important as it guides treatment decisions. Early initiation of appropriate treatment (eg, anti-TB treatment) reduces morbidity and mortality. We present a case of HLH associated with TB infection. Initial TB investigations were negative and standard combination chemoimmunotherapy for HLH resulted in a limited clinical response. On apparent relapse of HLH, further investigation revealed TB with changes on CT chest, granuloma on bone marrow and eventual positive TB culture on bronchoalveolar lavage. Subsequent treatment with quadruple anti-TB treatment resulted in rapid clinical response and disease remission. We advocate continued monitoring for TB infection in patients with HLH, and prophylaxis or full treatment for those at high risk. PMID:25870214

  11. Drosophila melanogaster model for Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chun-Taek; Moon, Cheol; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Jang, Jichan

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a human pathogen that is responsible for a broad spectrum of tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunodeficient patients. This pathogen is one of the most resistant organisms to chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a genetically tractable model host for M. abscessus. In this context, we infected D. melanogaster with M. abscessus. This M. abscessus infection results in dissemination in the fly body, followed by death, which is accompanied by severe indirect flight muscle and brain damage. Our data show that M. abscessus can grow and replicate in D. melanogaster w(1118) and that it elicited a humoral immune response, especially of the Toll antimicrobial peptide pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that mycobacteria induce the production of antimicrobial peptides in D. melanogaster.

  12. Study of idiotypes expressed by monoclonal antibodies to the 35 kD and 12 kD antigens of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Praputpittaya, K; Ivanyi, J

    1987-01-01

    Rabbit antisera were raised against four monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) binding with the 35 kD protein and four MoAb binding with the 12 kD protein antigen of Mycobacterium leprae. Antisera showed idiotype (Id) specificity following cross-absorption with normal mouse globulin. One Id on a single MoAb and another Id shared between three MoAb were identified for each group. Functional studies were carried out with the Rb04 anti [anti-35 kD] specificity. The expression of this Id and paratope in antigen immunized mice was associated with Igh alleles. Inoculation of mice with anti-Id Rb04 induced an 'Ab3' serum response of corresponding Id specificity only when the anti-Id was given in emulsion with incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Conversely, prior injection of soluble anti-Id inhibited the subsequent Ab3 response to Rb04/IFA. Moreover, the suppressive effect of soluble anti-Id was abrogated by prior injection of 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. These results indicate that regulatory mechanisms similar to those involved in antigenic stimulation may explain the stimulatory or suppressive potency of anti-Id antibodies. Finally, the Ab3 responses to the two tested anti-Ids did not contain any antigen binding activity. PMID:3322615

  13. Recognition of phenolic glycolipid-I (Mycobacterium leprae) and sulfolipid-I (M. tuberculosis) by serum from Mexican patients with leprosy or tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Luna-Herrera, J; Arce-Paredes, P

    1999-12-01

    Differential diagnosis of leprosy and tuberculosis in regions where both illnesses are endemic is a prerequisite for proper identification and treatment. To evaluate the recognition of phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) of Mycobacterium leprae and sulfolipid-I (SL-I) of M. tuberculosis by serum from patients with leprosy (LL) or pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Purified PGL-I and SL-I were used as antigens in an ELISA test set up to assess recognition of these lipids by serum from 43 LL patients, 44 PTB patients and 38 healthy individuals. Leprosy patients gave higher IgM than IgG responses to PGL-I and had comparable IgM and IgG responses to SL-I. A similar situation was observed with PTB serum. Some healthy individuals were found to contain significant levels of antibodies to both lipids. There is no specific recognition of either of the two lipid antigens tested by serum from both leprosy and tuberculosis patients; this rules out the possibility of using PGL-I and SL-I as tools for the differential diagnosis of these two mycobacterial diseases.

  14. [15 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium scrofulaceum infection].

    PubMed

    Emori, Mikiko; Kajiki, Akira; Ikedo, Yukari; Ochiai, Sanae; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Harada, Yasuko; Kitahara, Yoshinari

    2007-03-01

    We described clinical features of pulmonary Mycobacterium scofulaceum disease. We described 15 cases of pulmonary Mycobacterium scrofulaceum infection admitted to National Hospital Organization Omuta National Hospital from 1989 to 2003 and reviewed the clinical feature, the findings of chest radiograph, and clinical course. Sex ratio was 8 male cases and 7 female cases, and the average age was 65.9 years old. Smoking history was found in 8 patients and occupational history of the dust inhalation was found in 7 patients with pulmonary M. scrofulaceum infection. There were 11 cases of tuberculosis-like form and 4 cases of nodular-bronchiectasis form according to the NTM Research society classification based on the findings of chest radiography. Improvement of the findings of chest radiography was seen in 4 patients by therapy, while no change or aggravation in 11 patients. Five patients died and among them, 3 died due to aggravation of pulmonary M. scrofulaceum infection. Cases showing tuberculosis-like form were dominant, and most of them showed extensive lesions when they were diagnosed, and these facts were considered to be major factors of difficulty in the treatment of this infection. The facts that 7 cases had occupational exposure to the dust, obstructive pulmonary disease in 3 cases, and 6 cases showed sputum culture positive for other nontuberculous mycobacteriosis, suggest that local resistance of lung might be attenuated, and this could be one of factors of onset and development of this infection. Only 4 cases showed improvement, while 5 cases died (primary disease death in 3 cases) and it was thought that the prognosis of the disease was in general poor.

  15. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks.

  16. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Male, 83 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Nephrology. Rare disease. Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection.

  17. Real-time PCR and high-resolution melt analysis for rapid detection of Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance mutations and strain types.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Matsuoka, Masanori; Kai, Masanori; Thapa, Pratibha; Khadge, Saraswoti; Hagge, Deanna A; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2012-03-01

    Drug resistance surveillance and strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae are necessary to investigate ongoing transmission of leprosy in regions of endemicity. To enable wider implementation of these molecular analyses, novel real-time PCR-high-resolution melt (RT-PCR-HRM) assays without allele-specific primers or probes and post-PCR sample handling were developed. For the detection of mutations within drug resistance-determining regions (DRDRs) of folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, targets for dapsone, rifampin, and fluoroquinolones, real-time PCR-HRM assays were developed. Wild-type and drug-resistant mouse footpad-derived strains that included three folP1, two rpoB, and one gyrA mutation types in a reference panel were tested. RT-PCR-HRM correctly distinguished the wild type from the mutant strains. In addition, RT-PCR-HRM analyses aided in recognizing samples with mixed or minor alleles and also a mislabeled sample. When tested in 121 sequence-characterized clinical strains, HRM identified all the folP1 mutants representing two mutation types, including one not within the reference panel. The false positives (<5%) could be attributed to low DNA concentration or PCR inhibition. A second set of RT-PCR-HRM assays for identification of three previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that have been used for strain typing were developed and validated in 22 reference and 25 clinical strains. Real-time PCR-HRM is a sensitive, simple, rapid, and high-throughput tool for routine screening known DRDR mutants in new and relapsed cases, SNP typing, and detection of minor mutant alleles in the wild-type background at lower costs than current methods and with the potential for quality control in leprosy investigations.

  18. Tuberculosis and leprosy infections in the Marshallese population of Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Victor Manuel; Orloff, Mohammed S; Kaminaga, Joseph; Cardenas, Irma Carrillo; Brown, Joeline; Hainline-Williams, Sandra; Duthie, Malcolm S; Gonzalez-Puche, Angela C; Mukasa, Leonard; Patil, Naveen; Mcelfish, Pearl Ann; Bates, Joseph H

    2016-03-01

    The cross-immunity between tuberculosis and leprosy is unknown. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the occurrence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. leprae infection in Marshallese adult volunteers in Springdale, Arkansas, U.S.A., a population that experiences high rates of leprosy and tuberculosis. We used immunodiagnostic testing for tuberculosis and leprosy infection and found significant prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (19.0%), and asymptomatic Mycobacterium leprae infection (22.2%). We found a negative association between presence of antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae and a positive interferon-γ release assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, prevalence odds ratio = 0.1 (95% CI = 0.0, 0.9). Although these findings require confirmation on a larger scale, they are supportive of the existence of cross-immunity.

  19. Chronic Helminth Infection Does Not Exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Marc P.; Killoran, Kristin E.; Rajnik, Michael; Wilson, Samuel; Yim, Kevin C.; Torrero, Marina N.; Morris, Christopher P.; Nikonenko, Boris; Blanco, Jorge C. G.; Hemming, Val G.; Mitre, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. Methodology/Principal Findings Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections. PMID:23285308

  20. Role of cholesterol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Miner, Maurine D; Chang, Jennifer C; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) acquisition and utilization of nutrients within the host cell is poorly understood, although it has been hypothesized that host lipids probably play an important role in MTB survival. Cholesterol has recently been identified as an important lipid for mycobacterial infection. The mce4 transport system is required for cholesterol import into bacterial cells, and deletion of mce4 locus resulted in severe attenuation in a chronic mouse model of infection. However, it has remained unclear what additional bacterial functions were required for utilization of this sterol. We have found that the igr locus, which was previously found essential for intracellular growth and virulence of MTB, is required for cholesterol metabolism: igr-deficient bacteria cannot grow using cholesterol as a primary carbon source. The growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as the delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout the course of infection, and that degradation of this sterol is crucial for bacterial persistence.

  1. Mycobacterium salmoniphilum infection in burbot Lota lota.

    PubMed

    Zerihun, Mulualem Adam; Berg, Vidar; Lyche, Jan L; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Poppe, Trygve T

    2011-05-24

    Burbot Lota lota sampled from lakes Mjosa and Losna in southeastern Norway between 2005 and 2008 were found to be infected with Mycobacterium salmoniphilum at a culture-positive prevalence of 18.6 and 3.3%, respectively. The condition factor (CF) of mycobacteria-affected fish sampled from Mjøsa in 2008 was lower than the average CF of total sampled fish the same year. Externally visible pathological changes included skin ulceration, petechiae, exopthalmia and cataract. Internally, the infections were associated with capsulated, centrally necrotic granulomas, containing large numbers of acid-fast bacilli, found mainly in the mesenteries, spleen, heart and swim bladder. Mycobacterial isolates recovered on Middlebrook 7H10 agar were confirmed as M. salmoniphilum by phenotypical investigation and by partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB and Hsp65genes as well as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) locus. This study adds burbot to the list of fish species susceptible to piscine mycobacteriosis and describes M. salmoniphilum infection in a non-salmonid fish for the first time.

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hod, T; Kushnir, R; Paitan, Y; Korzets, Z

    2008-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum group species is an atypical rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. It has been increasingly recognized as a potential pathogen mostly encountered in skin and soft tissue infections. Rarely, however, it has been associated with catheter-related infections, either central venous lines or peritoneal dialysis catheters. In this report we describe 2 patients maintained on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who developed Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis and a catheter tunnel abscess, respectively. Molecular biology identification of the isolates was performed in both cases. The literature is reviewed regarding all similar cases.

  3. [Case of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Eri; Sekine, Akimasa; Sato, Tomohide; Baba, Tomohisa; Shinohara, Takeshi; Endo, Takahiro; Sogo, Yoko; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Komatsu, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    A 39-year-old man with dyspnea was revealed to have severe pneumothorax and received partial resection of the left upper lobe after unsuccessful drainage. Necrotizing epitheloid granuloma was found in the resected lung and Mycobacterium fortuitum was detected from the lesion. Chemotherapy with levofloxacin and clarithromycin was started one year after surgery because of the newly found nodular shadow near the lesion. The case experienced pyothorax due to pulmonary tuberculosis three years before and Mycobacterium avium pleuritis one year before this episode. Three-time mycobacterial pleural infection in three years seems to be uncommon. Furthermore this is the first report of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

  4. The distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in naturally infected badgers.

    PubMed

    Corner, Leigh A L; O'Meara, D; Costello, E; Lesellier, S; Gormley, E

    2012-11-01

    Populations of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) are a significant reservoir of infection for cattle in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In this study the distribution of infection, histological lesions and gross lesions was determined in a sample of 132 culled badgers from naturally-infected wild populations. Badgers were culled when an epidemiological investigation following a tuberculosis breakdown in a cattle herd implicated badgers as the probable source of infection. The definition of tuberculosis infection was based on the isolation of M. bovis from tissues or clinical samples. An accurate diagnosis of infection was achieved by culturing a wide range of lymph nodes (LN) and organ tissues (mean 32.1) and clinical samples (faeces and urine) from each badger. Infection was detected in 57/132 badgers (43.2%). Histological lesions consistent with tuberculosis were seen in 39/57 (68.4%) culture-positive and 7/75 (9.3%) culture-negative animals. Gross lesions were seen in only 30/57 (52.6%) infected badgers, leaving a high proportion (47.4%) of infected animals with latent infection (no grossly visible lesions). The most frequently infected tissues were the lungs and axillary LN, followed by the deep cervical LN, parotid LN and tracheobronchial LN. The data support the hypotheses that in badgers there are only two significant routes of infection, namely, the lower respiratory tract and bite wounds, and that badgers are very susceptible to infection but resistant to the development and progression of the disease. At all levels of disease severity, infection was found in widely dispersed anatomical locations suggesting that there is early dissemination of infection in the period preceding the development of active immunity.

  5. Cytokines and Chemokines in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gonzalez, Racquel; Prince, Oliver; Cooper, Andrea; Khader, Shabaana A

    2016-10-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are critical for initiating and coordinating the organized and sequential recruitment and activation of cells into Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Correct mononuclear cellular recruitment and localization are essential to ensure control of bacterial growth without the development of diffuse and damaging granulocytic inflammation. An important block to our understanding of TB pathogenesis lies in dissecting the critical aspects of the cytokine/chemokine interplay in light of the conditional role these molecules play throughout infection and disease development. Much of the data highlighted in this review appears at first glance to be contradictory, but it is the balance between the cytokines and chemokines that is critical, and the "goldilocks" (not too much and not too little) phenomenon is paramount in any discussion of the role of these molecules in TB. Determination of how the key chemokines/cytokines and their receptors are balanced and how the loss of that balance can promote disease is vital to understanding TB pathogenesis and to identifying novel therapies for effective eradication of this disease.

  6. [Buruli ulcer or Mycobacterium ulcerans infection].

    PubMed

    Abgueguen, P; Pichard, E; Aubry, J

    2010-02-01

    Buruli ulcer is a severe necrotizing cutaneous infection due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. The disease is currently expanding, especially in West Africa, and the WHO is supporting a vast research program to better understand the modes of transmission, to develop diagnostic methods, and to define specific treatment protocols. The disease transmission could be linked to environment and especially water striders. After M. ulcerans inoculation, cutaneous lesions appear, as broad painless ulcers, and thus ignored by patients. The production of mycolactone, a toxin, only virulence factor known at this time, is responsible for the cytotoxic effect on skin tissues. Complications may occur, especially super infections and more rarely bone involvement responsible for osteomyelitis. The prognosis is usually functional with sometimes severe sequels, and skin and tendinous retraction as well as amputation are frequent. The diagnosis is usually made on PCR but this is difficult in developing countries, direct examination is not very reliable, and culture is long and difficult. The disease often remains ignored and undiagnosed, leading to evolved clinical presentations and sequels. The treatment is not defined yet. It is often surgical exeresis with skin graft, not always efficient. Antibiotic combination protocols are under evaluation.

  7. The Biology of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Giovanni; Sali, Michela; Fadda, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a major threat to mankind and during the last thirty years we have seen a recrudescence of the disease even in countries where TB was thought to be conquered. It is common opinion that more effective control tools such as new diagnostics, a new vaccine and new drugs are urgently needed to control the global pandemic, though the so far insufficient understanding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mechanism of pathogenesis is a major obstacle for the development of these control tools. In this review, we will summarize the recent advancement in the understanding of Mtb biology and on the pathogenesis of Mtb infection with emphasis on latent infection, with the change in paradigm of the last few years where the dichotomy between latent and active disease has been reconsidered in favor of a dynamic equilibrium between the host and the bacilli, encompassing a continuous spectrum of conditions that has been named TB spectrum. Implications for the diagnosis and control of disease in certain population will also be discussed. PMID:24363885

  8. Mycobacterium caprae Infection in Livestock and Wildlife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Álvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Javed, M. Tariq; Sáez-Llorente, José L.; Liébana, Ernesto; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas; Tuberculosis, Monitoring of Animal

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae is a pathogen that can infect animals and humans. To better understand the epidemiology of M. caprae, we spoligotyped 791 animal isolates. Results suggest infection is widespread in Spain, affecting 6 domestic and wild animal species. The epidemiology is driven by infections in caprids, although the organism has emerged in cattle. PMID:21392452

  9. Deep brain stimulator infection by a novel rapid growing mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Donna C; Harrington, Amanda T; Slavin, Konstantin; Gomez, Christy; Jarrett, Olamide D

    2017-09-20

    Devise-related infections after deep brain stimulator implantation are not uncommon. However, infections due to mycobacteria have not been reported in the medical literature. We describe the first reported case of DBS infection due to a novel rapidly growing mycobacteria, most closely resembling Mycobacterium goodii, by rpoB gene sequencing.

  10. Human Infections Due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Erba, Maria Luigia; Levrè, Egle; Lombardi, Natalia; Mantella, Antonia; Mecocci, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of human disease due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum are reported. In the first, the mycobacterium was responsible for chronic pulmonary disease in an elderly woman; in the second, it gave rise to cervical lymphadenitis in a child; and in the third, it caused a liver abscess in a young AIDS patient. PMID:11826009

  11. Leprosy reactions: The predictive value of Mycobacterium leprae-specific serology evaluated in a Brazilian cohort of leprosy patients (U-MDT/CT-BR).

    PubMed

    Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; de Oliveira, Regiane Morillas; Aderaldo, Lúcio Cartaxo; Pontes, Araci de Andrade; Cruz, Rossilene; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2017-02-01

    Leprosy reactions, reversal reactions/RR and erythema nodosum leprosum/ENL, can cause irreversible nerve damage, handicaps and deformities. The study of Mycobacterium leprae-specific serologic responses at diagnosis in the cohort of patients enrolled at the Clinical Trial for Uniform Multidrug Therapy Regimen for Leprosy Patients in Brazil/U-MDT/CT-BR is suitable to evaluate its prognostic value for the development of reactions. IgM and IgG antibody responses to PGL-I, LID-1, ND-O-LID were evaluated by ELISA in 452 reaction-free leprosy patients at diagnosis, enrolled and monitored for the development of leprosy reactions during a total person-time of 780,930 person-days, i.e. 2139.5 person-years, with a maximum of 6.66 years follow-up time. Among these patients, 36% (160/452) developed reactions during follow-up: 26% (119/452) RR and 10% (41/452) had ENL. At baseline higher anti-PGL-I, anti-LID-1 and anti-ND-O-LID seropositivity rates were seen in patients who developed ENL and RR compared to reaction-free patients (p<0.0001). Seroreactivity in reactional and reaction-free patients was stratified by bacilloscopic index/BI categories. Among BI negative patients, higher anti-PGL-I levels were seen in RR compared to reaction-free patients (p = 0.014). In patients with 0

  12. Leprosy reactions: The predictive value of Mycobacterium leprae-specific serology evaluated in a Brazilian cohort of leprosy patients (U-MDT/CT-BR)

    PubMed Central

    Hungria, Emerith Mayra; de Oliveira, Regiane Morillas; Aderaldo, Lúcio Cartaxo; Pontes, Araci de Andrade; Cruz, Rossilene; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2017-01-01

    Background Leprosy reactions, reversal reactions/RR and erythema nodosum leprosum/ENL, can cause irreversible nerve damage, handicaps and deformities. The study of Mycobacterium leprae-specific serologic responses at diagnosis in the cohort of patients enrolled at the Clinical Trial for Uniform Multidrug Therapy Regimen for Leprosy Patients in Brazil/U-MDT/CT-BR is suitable to evaluate its prognostic value for the development of reactions. Methodology IgM and IgG antibody responses to PGL-I, LID-1, ND-O-LID were evaluated by ELISA in 452 reaction-free leprosy patients at diagnosis, enrolled and monitored for the development of leprosy reactions during a total person-time of 780,930 person-days, i.e. 2139.5 person-years, with a maximum of 6.66 years follow-up time. Principal findings Among these patients, 36% (160/452) developed reactions during follow-up: 26% (119/452) RR and 10% (41/452) had ENL. At baseline higher anti-PGL-I, anti-LID-1 and anti-ND-O-LID seropositivity rates were seen in patients who developed ENL and RR compared to reaction-free patients (p<0.0001). Seroreactivity in reactional and reaction-free patients was stratified by bacilloscopic index/BI categories. Among BI negative patients, higher anti-PGL-I levels were seen in RR compared to reaction-free patients (p = 0.014). In patients with 0

  13. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  14. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  15. Mycobacterium microti infection in two meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Palgrave, C J; Benato, L; Eatwell, K; Laurenson, I F; Smith, N H

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. microti is generally considered a pathogen of small rodents, although sporadic infections in a range of other mammals, including domestic animals and man, have been reported. While many human infections have been associated with immunosuppression, an increasing number of cases are being reported in immunocompetent patients. Two cases of M. microti infection in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are reported. These are the first cases of mycobacterial disease to be described in meerkats outside Africa.

  16. [Pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium malmoense. Difficulties in diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Huet, D; Godbert, B; Hermann, J; Zordan, J-M; Chabot, F; Andréjak, C

    2017-03-01

    Pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium malmoense can be difficult to diagnose. These difficulties can be responsible for a delay in the implementation of optimal treatment. Moreover, the treatment is not standardized. We report the case of a 56-year-old patient who developed a Mycobacterium malmoense pulmonary infection whose diagnosis was delayed due to initial suspicion of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Once the diagnosis was confirmed, the patient was treated empirically with rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin for 12 months after culture conversion, giving a total of 15 months. The clinical and radiological outcomes were favorable. This clinical case highlights the difficulties of diagnosing pulmonary atypical mycobacterial infection according to the American Thoracic Society criteria, particularly Mycobacterium malmoense, a non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) quite uncommon in France. Currently, there are new diagnostic techniques such as GenoType Mycobacteria Direct(®). The second issue is the poorly standardized treatment of this NTM and many others, that are based on the recommendations of the British Thoracic Society. A national register has been set up by the MycoMed network, based essentially on the work of microbiologists but this register is unfortunately not exhaustive. A more systematic reporting strategy could allow cohort studies and therefore provide us with data on the most efficient drugs in the treatment of the rarest NTM infections. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mycobacterium goodii Infections Associated with Surgical Implants at Colorado Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gershman, Ken; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew J.; Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2004-01-01

    From February to October 2003, Mycobacterium goodii wound infections were identified among three patients who received surgical implants at a Colorado hospital. This report summarizes the investigation of the first reported nosocomial outbreak of M. goodii. Increased awareness is needed about the potential for nontuberculous mycobacteria to cause postoperative wound infections. PMID:15504281

  18. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  19. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum: a rare offending organism.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Gilbert; Wiedeman, Jean; Boggan, James E

    2014-12-01

    Postsurgical infection is one of the greatest potential morbidities of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. The majority of infections can be linked to contamination with skin flora at the time of surgery, a phenomenon that has been well described. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria. The authors report a case of postoperative ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum and review the available neurosurgical literature and treatment strategies.

  20. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2011-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment. PMID:21487459

  1. [Molecular mechanism of the acquisition of new-quinolone resistance in Mycobacterium leprae and M. tuberculosis and rapid differentiation methods for resistant bacilli].

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun; Suzuki, Haruka; Matsuoka, Masanori; Matsuba, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2011-02-01

    Drugs included in new-quinolone are used for the treatment of leprosy with single lesion. These drugs are also known to be effective drugs for the treatment of multi-drug resistant M. tuberculosis. Recent emergence of new-quinolone resistant M. leprae and M. tuberculosis enforced the urgent elucidation of the mode of emergence of new-quinolone resistant strains. In this review, new-quinolone drugs, their mode of action and mechanism of acquisition of resistance by M. leprae and M. tuberculosis were explained. And rapid differentiation methods for resistant bacilli were also introduced.

  2. Lipid droplet formation in leprosy: Toll-like receptor-regulated organelles involved in eicosanoid formation and Mycobacterium leprae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Katherine A; D'Avila, Heloisa; Rodrigues, Luciana S; Oliveira, Viviane G C; Sarno, Euzenir N; Atella, Georgia C; Pereira, Geraldo M; Bozza, Patricia T; Pessolani, Maria Cristina V

    2010-03-01

    A hallmark of LL is the accumulation of Virchow's foamy macrophages. However, the origin and nature of these lipids, as well as their function and contribution to leprosy disease, remain unclear. We herein show that macrophages present in LL dermal lesions are highly positive for ADRP, suggesting that their foamy aspect is at least in part derived from LD (also known as lipid bodies) accumulation induced during ML infection. Indeed, the capacity of ML to induce LD formation was confirmed in vivo via an experimental model of mouse pleurisy and in in vitro studies with human peripheral monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, infected cells were shown to propagate LD induction to uninfected, neighboring cells by generating a paracrine signal, for which TLR2 and TLR6 were demonstrated to be essential. However, TLR2 and TLR6 deletions affected LD formation in bacterium-bearing cells only partially, suggesting the involvement of alternative receptors of the innate immune response besides TLR2/6 for ML recognition by macrophages. Finally, a direct correlation between LD formation and PGE(2) production was observed, indicating that ML-induced LDs constitute intracellular sites for eicosanoid synthesis and that foamy cells may be critical regulators in subverting the immune response in leprosy.

  3. T cell reactivity against antigen 85 but not against the 18- and 65-kD heat shock proteins in the early stages of acquired immunity against Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Launois, P; Niang N'Diaye, M; Sarthou, J L; Drowart, A; Van Vooren, J P; Cartel, J L; Huygen, K

    1994-01-01

    T cell proliferation and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 household contacts were tested against the 18- and 65-kD heat shock proteins from Mycobacterium leprae (ML18 and ML65 respectively) and antigen 85 from Myco. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (Ag 85) during a 12-months follow-up study. Among the eight contacts that became positive, eight showed positive reactivity against Ag 85, 5/8 against ML65 and 4/8 against ML18 at the end of the study. Of the 16 contacts who were lepromin-positive either at first or second testing, all responded to Ag 85, 11 to ML 65, but only eight reacted to ML18 antigen. Contacts who were lepromin-positive at first testing developed responses to ML18 only at second testing. In contrast, among the four contacts that remained lepromin-negative during the follow up, three proliferated to Ag 85 either at first or second testing, but only one produced IFN-gamma against Ag 85 at the end of the study. These results demonstrated that T cell reactivity and particularly IFN-gamma secretion against Ag 85, but not against ML18 and ML65, might be a predominant mechanism in the early stages of acquired protective immunity against Myco. leprae. PMID:8149672

  4. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Mycobacterium marinum: ubiquitous agent of waterborne granulomatous skin infections.

    PubMed

    Petrini, B

    2006-10-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a waterborne mycobacterium that commonly infects fish and amphibians worldwide. Infection in humans occurs occasionally, in most cases as a granulomatous infection localized in the skin, typically following minor trauma on the hands. For this reason, infection is especially common among aquarium keepers. Such local infection may-though infrequently-spread to tendon sheaths or joints. Disseminated disease, which is rare, can occur in immunosuppressed patients. In order to obtain a definitive diagnosis, culture and histopathological examination of biopsies from skin or other tissues are recommended. Infections sometimes heal spontaneously, but drug treatment is usually necessary for several months in order to cure the infection. Doxycycline or clarithromycin is used most commonly, although in severe cases, a combination of rifampicin and ethambutol is recommended.

  6. Acid mucopolysaccharide metabolism in leprosy. 2. Subcellular localization of hyaluronic acid and beta-glucuronidase in leprous infiltrates suggestive of a host-Mycobacterium leprae metabolic relationship.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, E; Skinsnes, O K

    1974-01-01

    Electron- and light microscopic analyses were conducted on leprosy skin biopsies relative to the origin of hyaluronic acid, which has previously been observed to be distributed inversely in ratio to the degree of cell- mediated immunity. The present study investigated the subcellular localization of hyaluronic acid and its degrading enzyme in various types of leprosy. Hyaluronic acid in some lepromatous leprosy cases was shown to be accumulated in the limiting membranes of the phagosomes of lepra cells and Myco-bacteria leprae have beta-glucuronidase which plays a role in the degradation of hyaluronic acid. Contrariwise, in tuberculoid leprosy, beta-glucuronidase was detected in the lysosomes of epithelioid cells and giant cells. This result suggests that the origin of hyaluronic acid is in histiocytes and at the same time it might suggest that M. leprae is in competition with enzymes of epithelioid cells for hyaluronic acid, whereas reduced or absent beta-glucuronidase in lepra cells enable bacilli to utilize the AMPS as a nutrient.

  7. [Sporotrichoid cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Cameselle, D; Hernández, J; Francès, A; Montenegro, T; Cañas, F; Borrego, L

    2007-04-01

    We report a case of primary cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum after the bite of an aquarium fish in a severely immunodepressed AIDS patient. Clinical features consisted in nodular and ulcerative lesions that followed a sporotrichoid pattern. Histological study of nodular lesions showed a granulomatous dermatitis with numerous acid-fast bacilli. The mycobacterium was identified 3 months later by genetic hybridization from a cultive in solid medium. Combined therapy with isoniazid, rifampin, clarithromycin, ethambutol, amikacin and ciprofloxacin resulted in complete resolution of the lesions. Infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum is a rare mycobacteriosis that usually affects immunodepressed patients. The most common clinical manifestations are cutaneous lesions but the development of sporotrichoid nodular lymphangitis is exceptional.

  8. Sporotrichoid atypical cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Tigges, Frauke; Bauer, Andrea; Hochauf, Kristina; Meurer, Michael

    2009-03-01

    A case of a sporotrichoid cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium marinum is reported. A 53- year-old male patient presented with red, partly purulent nodular lesions on the back of his left hand, forearm, and upper medial arm that had developed consecutively during the past 4 weeks. A mycobacterial infection with M. marinum was confirmed by molecular methods in a lesional skin biopsy. The patient was treated systemically with rifampicin (750 mg/day) and clarithromycine (1,000 mg/day), and topically with sulmycin (gentamicin sulfate). After 12 weeks of treatment the nodules regressed, leaving behind erythematous patches. M. marinum is a waterborne mycobacterium that commonly infects fish and amphibians worldwide. Transmissions to humans occur occasionally, in most cases as a granulomatous infection localized to the skin, typically following minor trauma to the hands. For this reason, infections are especially common among aquarium keepers.

  9. Type II lepra reaction: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S; D'Cruz, S; Mohan, H; Singh, R; Ram, J; Sachdev, A

    2006-01-27

    Ulcers with maculo-papular rash are an unusual presenting feature of leprosy. They occur as result of neuropathy, type-2 lepra reaction or Lucio's phenomenon. The hall mark of type-2 reaction is erythema nodosum. Very rarely it manifests as ulcerative skin lesions. We describe one such unusual case of a young male who presented with multiple ulcers and maculo-papular rash over the legs, chest and abdomen. In addition to this, he had fever, heart murmur, pulmonary infiltrates, neuropathy, and deranged liver function. A clinical differential diagnosis of infective endocarditis and systemic nectrozing vasculitis was made. Skin biopsy showed dense inflammation with lepra bacilli consistent with type-2 lepra reaction.

  10. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  11. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in animals in France.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy; Boschiroli, Maria Laura

    2015-03-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002-2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated.

  12. Mycobacterium abscessus ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Montero, Jose A; Alrabaa, Sally F; Wills, Todd S

    2016-04-01

    A 30-year-old man with history of neonatal hydrocephalus requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement presented with Mycobacterium abscessus shunt infection despite no shunt manipulation over 10 years prior to presentation. Cure was not achieved until complete removal of all CNS shunt foreign body was performed despite initial adequate antimicrobial therapy.

  13. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  14. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  15. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in Animals in France

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002–2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M.; Dragoo, Gwen A.; Saiers, Rhonda L.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Daley, Charles L.; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun

    2017-01-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted. PMID:28221115

  17. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Ribes, Julie A.; Lohr, Kristine M.; Evans, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  18. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Ribes, Julie A; Lohr, Kristine M; Evans, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois.

  19. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  20. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  1. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-01-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3–5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively. PMID:15932504

  2. Analysis of Antigens of Mycobacterium leprae by Interaction to Sera IgG, IgM, and IgA Response to Improve Diagnosis of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Avnish; Parkash, Om; Girdhar, Bhawneshwar K.

    2014-01-01

    Till 2010, several countries have declared less than one leprosy patient among population of 10,000 and themselves feeling as eliminated from leprosy cases. However, new leprosy cases are still appearing from all these countries. In this situation one has to be confident to diagnose leprosy. This review paper highlighted already explored antigens for diagnosis purposes and finally suggested better combinations of protein antigens of M. leprae versus immunoglobulin as detector antibody to be useful for leprosy diagnosis. PMID:25101267

  3. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories.

    PubMed

    Reibel, Florence; Chauffour, Aurélie; Brossier, Florence; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients. Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71). Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31) or from French overseas territories (n = 36) where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4) was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33), followed by type 3 (n = 17), type 4 (n = 11) and type 2 (n = 6). SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients' countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka) and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion) not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements. The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a) concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories, metropolitan France) or (b) more likely random in regions where diverse

  4. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Pezzone, Natalia; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Fernández, Analia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Zumárraga, Martín; Gioffré, Andrea; Magni, Carolina; Beldomenico, Pablo M; Marini, M Rocío; Canal, Ana M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the first case of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection with typical granulomatous lesions of mycobacteriosis in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). The individual was a captive-bred young female, part of the control group of an experimental study on stress. Multiple granulomatous lesions were detected in a mesenteric lymph node of this young female. Mycobacterial infection was confirmed by bacteriologic culture and molecular identification methods. Clinical lesions were characterized by histopathology.

  5. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  6. Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Mycobacterium avium-Infected Macrophages Comparing with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongjun; Fu, Xin; He, Shiyi; Ning, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) belongs to the intracellular parasitic bacteria. To better understand how MA survives within macrophages and the different pathogenic mechanisms of MA and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), tandem mass tag (TMT) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis have been used to determine the proteins which are differentially expressed in MA-infected and MTB-infected macrophages. 369 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in MA-infected cells but not in MTB-infected cells. By using certain bioinformatics methods, we found the 369 proteins were involved in molecular function, biological process, and cellular component including binding, catalytic activity, metabolic process, cellular process, and cell part. In addition, some identified proteins were involved in multiple signaling pathways. These results suggest that MA probably survive within macrophages by affecting the expression of some crucial proteins. PMID:28573139

  7. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shivani S; Tavana, M Lance; Boger, M Sean; Win, Soe Soe; Rimawi, Bassam H

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  8. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shivani S.; Tavana, M. Lance; Boger, M. Sean; Win, Soe Soe; Rimawi, Bassam H.

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery. PMID:25506004

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphism-based molecular typing of M. leprae from multicase families of leprosy patients and their surroundings to understand the transmission of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Turankar, R P; Lavania, M; Chaitanya, V S; Sengupta, U; Darlong, J; Darlong, F; Siva Sai, K S R; Jadhav, R S

    2014-03-01

    The exact mode of transmission of leprosy is not clearly understood; however, many studies have demonstrated active transmission of leprosy around a source case. Families of five active leprosy cases and their household contacts were chosen from a high endemic area in Purulia. Fifty-two soil samples were also collected from different areas of their houses. DNA was extracted from slit-skin smears (SSS) and soil samples and the Mycobacterium leprae-specific RLEP (129 bp) region was amplified using PCR. Molecular typing of M. leprae was performed for all RLEP PCR-positive samples by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and confirmation by DNA sequencing. SSS of these five patients and six out of the total 28 contacts were PCR positive for RLEP whereas 17 soil samples out of 52 showed the presence of M. leprae DNA. SNP typing of M. leprae from all RLEP PCR-positive subjects (patients and smear-positive contacts) and 10 soil samples showed the SNP type 1 genotype. M. leprae DNA from the five leprosy patients and the six contacts was further subtyped and the D subtype was noted in all patients and contacts, except for one contact where the C subtype was identified. Typing followed by subtyping of M. leprae clearly revealed that either the contacts were infected by the patients or both patients and contacts had the same source of infection. It also revealed that the type of M. leprae in the soil in the inhabited areas where patients resided was also of the same type as that found in patients.

  10. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin.

  11. Outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus infection after soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Toy, Brian R; Frank, Paul Jarrod

    2003-09-01

    Illicit soft-tissue augmentation performed in New York City resulted in an outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in 2002. To report two cases of women who developed tender, subcutaneous nodules of the face and buttocks after illicit soft-tissue augmentation with a hyaluronic acid derivative. Two case reports are presented, and the literature is reviewed. Empiric treatment with clarithromycin (for M. abscessus infection) and prednisone (for foreign body reaction) resulted in clearance of lesions. Contaminated or impure material used for soft-tissue augmentation can result in a clustered outbreak of infection or foreign body reaction.

  12. Mycobacterium fortuitum infections associated with laparoscopic gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Callen, Erin C; Kessler, Tiffany L

    2011-03-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing atypical mycobacteria, is commonly found in soil and water. This organism is most often known to cause skin, bone, and soft tissue infections associated with local trauma, surgical procedures, and in patients with immunodeficiency. Nosocomial infections associated with a variety of contaminated devices and equipment have also been widely documented. This report presents the first cases of M. fortuitum infection following laparoscopic gastric banding procedures. Both patients had complicated clinical courses necessitating removal of their banding devices and long-term antibiotic therapy.

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke R; Iking-Konert, Christof; Stahl, Rolf A K; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2016-10-31

    Opportunistic infections are a major concern in renal and transplant medicine. We present the case of a renal transplant recipient with a generalised Mycobacterium haemophilum infection after an increase in immunosuppressive therapy and treatment with a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor. Infection involved skin and soft tissue, joints and bones, as well as the renal transplant with an interstitial nephritis. Rapid diagnosis using PCR and DNA sequencing allowed early appropriate treatment. Triple antibiotic therapy and reduction in immunosuppression resulted in a slow but sustained recovery. Immunosuppression causes severe opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors are very effective and well tolerated but have an increased susceptibility to infections with mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections represent a significant clinical risk to transplant recipients because of their aggressive clinical course and the need for complex toxic antibiotic treatments. In these patients, M. haemophilum is a cause of skin infections.

  14. DDT inhibits the functional activation of murine macrophages and decreases resistance to infection by Mycobacterium microti.

    PubMed

    Nuñez G, María Andrea; Estrada, Iris; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S

    2002-06-05

    DDT is still widely used in several parts of the world to control malaria, typhoid and dengue vectors, even though its use was banned in many countries based on toxicity data in wild life species. DDT has been shown to have immunotoxic effects in mice and to increase susceptibility to intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium leprae. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this effect. Activated macrophages play an important defensive role against intracellular pathogens, therefore our objective was to evaluate the effect of in vitro exposure to technical grade DDT (a mixture of three forms: 1,1,1-thricloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT) (85%), o,p'-DDT (15%) and o,o'-DDT (trace amounts)), p,p'-DDT, 1,1-dicloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane on the functional activation of J774A.1 macrophages and their capability to limit growth of intracellular pathogens, using Mycobacterium microti as a model. We evaluated cytotoxicity and the effect on cell proliferation of 2.5, 5.0 and 10 microg/ml of DDT compounds. Functional macrophage activity (NO(*) and O(2)(-) production, and mRNA expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and iNO synthase) and the ability of treated cells to limit infection by M. microti in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages were evaluated in cells exposed to 2.5 microg/ml of DDT compounds. Doses of 5 and 10 microg/ml induced direct cytotoxic effects precluding meaningful analysis of the above parameters, whereas 2.5 microg/ml of all DDT compounds inhibited macrophage activity and reduced their ability to limit the intracellular growth of M. microti without inducing cytotoxicity. Technical grade DDT and p,p'-DDE were the more potent compounds. Therefore, exposure to DDT compounds could represent an important risk for infection development by those intracellular pathogens against which NO(*) and/or O(2)(-) production represent the main immune protective mechanism.

  15. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  16. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  17. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect.

  18. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; David, Marion; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-09-22

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it.

  19. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. Case presentation An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Conclusion Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it. PMID:21939536

  20. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jeffrey S; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-10-30

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation.

  1. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Jeffrey S.; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-01-01

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation. PMID:26515292

  2. Treatment of the Mycobacterium chelonae Infection after Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    For recent years, use of autologous fat injection has increased significantly in facial contouring surgery. Along with such increase in use, complications like atypical mycoplasma infection have been also on the increasing trend. The authors report two cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection that occurred after autologous fat injection. Patients were treated as infection that resistant to common antibiotics and results were negative to routine culture and Gram staining. Acid-fast bacillus stain, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and mycobacterial cultures were conducted for diagnosis under suspicion of atypical mycoplasma infection. Then, combination antibiotics therapy, surgical treatment, and steroid injection were performed for treatment. Both patients were diagnosed with Mycobacterium chelonae in PCR test. They were positive to mycobacterial cultures. Combination antibiotics therapy was repeated to improvement of symptom. However, they could not be free from side effects such as deformation in facial contour, scar and pigmentation even after full recovery. When chronic wound infections after autologous fat injection, we must suspect atypical or mycobacterial infection and conduct examinations for a early diagnosis and proper antibiotic therapy that is effective to the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:25606492

  3. [The fate of 20 sea breams. Mycobacterium marinum infection].

    PubMed

    Schefzyk, M; Richter, E; Röhrbein, J H; Schaefer, T; Wedi, B; Raap, U

    2012-09-01

    Cutaneous infections with Mycobacterium marinum are rare. They also are known as swimming pool or fish tank granulomas. Often the history of contact with contaminated water associated with microtrauma of the upper extremities leads to the correct diagnosis. Since chlorination of swimming pools has become standard, cases of swimming pool granuloma have become rare. Contact with fish tanks now is the most common route of infection. Positive culture of skin biopsy leads to the correct diagnosis. Moxifloxacin in combination with other antibiotics is often effective.

  4. Innate and Adaptive Cellular Immune Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Barber, Daniel L

    2015-07-17

    Host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection requires the coordinated efforts of innate and adaptive immune cells. Diverse pulmonary myeloid cell populations respond to Mtb with unique contributions to both host-protective and potentially detrimental inflammation. Although multiple cell types of the adaptive immune system respond to Mtb infection, CD4 T cells are the principal antigen-specific cells responsible for containment of Mtb infection, but they can also be major contributors to disease during Mtb infection in several different settings. Here, we will discuss the role of different myeloid populations as well as the dual nature of CD4 T cells in Mtb infection with a primary focus on data generated using in vivo cellular immunological studies in experimental animal models and in humans when available. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Differences in T-cell responses between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Sutherland, Jayne S; de Jong, Bouke C; Kampmann, Beate; Jafali, James; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Antonio, Martin; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2014-05-01

    In The Gambia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) are major causes of tuberculosis (TB). Maf is more likely to cause TB in immune suppressed individuals, implying differences in virulence. Despite this, few studies have assessed the underlying immunity to the two pathogens in human. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses from 19 Maf- and 29 Mtb-infected HIV-negative patients before and after TB chemotherapy following overnight stimulation of whole blood with TB-specific antigens. Before treatment, percentages of early secreted antigenic target-6(ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10(CFP-10) and purified protein derivative-specific single-TNF-α-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher while single-IL-2-producing T cells were significantly lower in Maf- compared with Mtb-infected patients. Purified protein derivative-specific polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells frequencies were significantly higher before than after treatment, but there was no difference between the groups at both time points. Furthermore, the proportion of CD3(+) CD11b(+) T cells was similar in both groups pretreatment, but was significantly lower with higher TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ production in Mtb- compared with that of Maf-infected patients posttreatment. Our data provide evidence of differences in T-cell responses to two mycobacterial strains with differing virulence, providing some insight into TB pathogenesis with different Mtb strains that could be prospectively explored as biomarkers for TB protection or susceptibility.

  6. Insight into the evolution and origin of leprosy bacilli from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pushpendra; Benjak, Andrej; Schuenemann, Verena J; Herbig, Alexander; Avanzi, Charlotte; Busso, Philippe; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Cole, Stewart T

    2015-04-07

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is an uncultured human pathogen associated with diffuse lepromatous leprosy and a reactional state known as Lucio's phenomenon. By using deep sequencing with and without DNA enrichment, we obtained the near-complete genome sequence of M. lepromatosis present in a skin biopsy from a Mexican patient, and compared it with that of Mycobacterium leprae, which has undergone extensive reductive evolution. The genomes display extensive synteny and are similar in size (∼3.27 Mb). Protein-coding genes share 93% nucleotide sequence identity, whereas pseudogenes are only 82% identical. The events that led to pseudogenization of 50% of the genome likely occurred before divergence from their most recent common ancestor (MRCA), and both M. lepromatosis and M. leprae have since accumulated new pseudogenes or acquired specific deletions. Functional comparisons suggest that M. lepromatosis has lost several enzymes required for amino acid synthesis whereas M. leprae has a defective heme pathway. M. lepromatosis has retained all functions required to infect the Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system and therefore may also be neuropathogenic. A phylogeographic survey of 227 leprosy biopsies by differential PCR revealed that 221 contained M. leprae whereas only six, all from Mexico, harbored M. lepromatosis. Phylogenetic comparisons indicate that M. lepromatosis is closer than M. leprae to the MRCA, and a Bayesian dating analysis suggests that they diverged from their MRCA approximately 13.9 Mya. Thus, despite their ancient separation, the two leprosy bacilli are remarkably conserved and still cause similar pathologic conditions.

  7. Insight into the evolution and origin of leprosy bacilli from the genome sequence of Mycobacterium lepromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Benjak, Andrej; Schuenemann, Verena J.; Herbig, Alexander; Avanzi, Charlotte; Busso, Philippe; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is an uncultured human pathogen associated with diffuse lepromatous leprosy and a reactional state known as Lucio's phenomenon. By using deep sequencing with and without DNA enrichment, we obtained the near-complete genome sequence of M. lepromatosis present in a skin biopsy from a Mexican patient, and compared it with that of Mycobacterium leprae, which has undergone extensive reductive evolution. The genomes display extensive synteny and are similar in size (∼3.27 Mb). Protein-coding genes share 93% nucleotide sequence identity, whereas pseudogenes are only 82% identical. The events that led to pseudogenization of 50% of the genome likely occurred before divergence from their most recent common ancestor (MRCA), and both M. lepromatosis and M. leprae have since accumulated new pseudogenes or acquired specific deletions. Functional comparisons suggest that M. lepromatosis has lost several enzymes required for amino acid synthesis whereas M. leprae has a defective heme pathway. M. lepromatosis has retained all functions required to infect the Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system and therefore may also be neuropathogenic. A phylogeographic survey of 227 leprosy biopsies by differential PCR revealed that 221 contained M. leprae whereas only six, all from Mexico, harbored M. lepromatosis. Phylogenetic comparisons indicate that M. lepromatosis is closer than M. leprae to the MRCA, and a Bayesian dating analysis suggests that they diverged from their MRCA approximately 13.9 Mya. Thus, despite their ancient separation, the two leprosy bacilli are remarkably conserved and still cause similar pathologic conditions. PMID:25831531

  8. CD8 T cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis can persist and replicate in macrophages in vivo, usually in organized cellular structures called granulomas. There is substantial evidence for the importance of CD4 T cells in control of tuberculosis, but the evidence for a requirement for CD8 T cells in this infection has not been proven in humans. However, animal model data support a non-redundant role for CD8 T cells in control of M. tuberculosis infection. In humans, infection with this pathogen leads to generation of specific CD8 T cell responses. These responses include classical (MHC Class I restricted) and non-classical CD8 T cells. Here, we discuss the potential roles of CD8 T cells in defense against tuberculosis, and our current understanding of the wide range of CD8 T cell types seen in M. tuberculosis infection.

  9. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  10. [Lepra: an uncommon cause of infectious neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Turpín-Fenoll, L; Martín-Estefanía, C; Berenguer, L; Lucas-Costa, A; Bañuls-Roca, J; Alcaraz-Mateos, E

    2009-05-01

    Lepra is an uncommon disease within our setting. However, it was considered the most frequent cause of polyneuropathy only 50 years ago. We present the case of a 37 year-old woman who consulted due to paresthesias in both hands and feet, livedo reticularis and complaints of frequent hand lesions. Examination of the skin detected nodular lesions and the neurophysiological study confirmed distal symmetric sensitive polyneuropathy with axonal predominance. The skin biopsy also showed histocytic infiltrate and mycobacterium lepra type intracytoplasmatic bacilli. This led to the diagnosis of Multibacillary lepromatous leprosy. Multiple treatment was begun, according to the World Health Organization recommendations, with good evolution. In spite of the attempts to eradicate lepra, its incidence continues to be elevated, especially in endemic areas, among which the south of Spain is included. It is generally associated to overcrowding and low social-economic level. This is the last endemic case in the Valencian Community. The possibility of lepra should be considered among the possible causes of sensitive polyneuropathy, above all in patients in endemic areas.

  11. Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Mycobacterium haemophilum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Lesla E. S.; van Soolingen, Dick; Prins, Jan M.; Kuijper, Eduard J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Mycobacterium haemophilum is a slowly growing acid-fast bacillus (AFB) belonging to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) frequently found in environmental habitats, which can colonize and occasionally infect humans and animals. Several findings suggest that water reservoirs are a likely source of M. haemophilum infections. M. haemophilum causes mainly ulcerating skin infections and arthritis in persons who are severely immunocompromised. Disseminated and pulmonary infections occasionally occur. The second at-risk group is otherwise healthy children, who typically develop cervical and perihilar lymphadenitis. A full diagnostic regimen for the optimal detection of M. haemophilum includes acid-fast staining, culturing at two temperatures with iron-supplemented media, and molecular detection. The most preferable molecular assay is a real-time PCR targeting an M. haemophilum-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS), but another approach is the application of a generic PCR for a mycobacterium-specific fragment with subsequent sequencing to identify M. haemophilum. No standard treatment guidelines are available, but published literature agrees that immunocompromised patients should be treated with multiple antibiotics, tailored to the disease presentation and underlying degree of immune suppression. The outcome of M. haemophilum cervicofacial lymphadenitis in immunocompetent patients favors surgical intervention rather than antibiotic treatment. PMID:21976605

  12. Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Pawar, Santosh; Myers, Amy; Pegu, Amarenda; Fuhrman, Carl; Reinhart, Todd A.; Capuano, Saverio V.; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the early events of infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cynomolgus macaque is a useful model of tuberculosis, with strong similarities to human tuberculosis. In this study, eight cynomolgus macaques were infected bronchoscopically with low-dose M. tuberculosis; clinical, immunologic, microbiologic, and pathologic events were assessed 3 to 6 weeks postinfection. Gross pathological abnormalities were observed as early as 3 weeks, including Ghon complex formation by 5 weeks postinfection. Caseous granulomas were observed in the lung as early as 4 weeks postinfection. Only caseous granulomas were observed in the lungs at these early time points, reflecting a rigorous initial response. T-cell activation (CD29 and CD69) and chemokine receptor (CXCR3 and CCR5) expression appeared localized to different anatomic sites. Activation markers were increased on cells from airways and only at modest levels on cells in peripheral blood. The priming of mycobacterium-specific T cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon occurred slowly, with responses seen only after 4 weeks of infection. These responses were observed from T lymphocytes in blood, airways, and hilar lymph node, with responses predominantly localized to the site of infection. From these studies, we conclude that immune responses to M. tuberculosis are relatively slow in the local and peripheral compartments and that necrosis occurs surprisingly quickly during granuloma formation. PMID:16790751

  13. Infection by Mycobacterium bovis in a dog from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Vivianne Cambuí Figueiredo; Figueiredo, Salomão Cambuí de; Rosales, Cesar Alejandro Rodriguez; Porto, Camila Dias; Sequeira, Julio Lopes; Neto, José Soares Ferreira; Paes, Antônio Carlos; Salgado, Vanessa Riesz

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease caused by bacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC). This disease rarely affects dogs. Canine infections are usually caused by M. tuberculosis. Mycobacterium bovis infections are rare in dogs and associated with consumption of raw milk or contaminated products. Here, we report a Boxer dog who had a M. bovis infection and was admitted to a Brazilian veterinary hospital with a presumptive diagnosis of chronic ehrlichiosis. Despite receiving treatment for chronic ehrlichiosis, it progressed to death. TB was diagnosed during post-mortem examinations using histopathological analysis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed acid-fast bacilli in the kidneys, liver, mesentery, and a mass adhered to the liver. Further, PCR-restriction analysis was performed to identify mycobacteria in the samples. A restriction profile compatible with MtbC was found in the lungs. In addition, PCR-based MtbC typing deletions at different loci of chromosome 9 enabled the identification of M. bovis in the lungs. Therefore, it is very essential to perform differential diagnosis of TB in dogs with non-specific clinical signs and who do not respond to treatment, particularly those who had been in contact with TB-infected cattle or owners. Further, we highlight the use of molecular methods for the identification of bacilli, improving the diagnosis and aiding epidemiological studies.

  14. Successive Intramuscular Boosting with IFN-Alpha Protects Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Vaccinated Mice against M. lepraemurium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, G. G.; Rangel-Moreno, J.; Islas-Trujillo, S.; Rojas-Espinosa, Ó.

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy caused by Mycobacterium leprae primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves. As a human infectious disease, it is still a significant health and economic burden on developing countries. Although multidrug therapy is reducing the number of active cases to approximately 0.5 million, the number of cases per year is not declining. Therefore, alternative host-directed strategies should be addressed to improve treatment efficacy and outcome. In this work, using murine leprosy as a model, a very similar granulomatous skin lesion to human leprosy, we have found that successive IFN-alpha boosting protects BCG-vaccinated mice against M. lepraemurium infection. No difference in the seric isotype and all IgG subclasses measured, neither in the TH1 nor in the TH2 type cytokine production, was seen. However, an enhanced iNOS/NO production in BCG-vaccinated/i.m. IFN-alpha boosted mice was observed. The data provided in this study suggest a promising use for IFN-alpha boosting as a new prophylactic alternative to be explored in human leprosy by targeting host innate cell response. PMID:26484351

  15. Successive Intramuscular Boosting with IFN-Alpha Protects Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Vaccinated Mice against M. lepraemurium Infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, G G; Rangel-Moreno, J; Islas-Trujillo, S; Rojas-Espinosa, Ó

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy caused by Mycobacterium leprae primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves. As a human infectious disease, it is still a significant health and economic burden on developing countries. Although multidrug therapy is reducing the number of active cases to approximately 0.5 million, the number of cases per year is not declining. Therefore, alternative host-directed strategies should be addressed to improve treatment efficacy and outcome. In this work, using murine leprosy as a model, a very similar granulomatous skin lesion to human leprosy, we have found that successive IFN-alpha boosting protects BCG-vaccinated mice against M. lepraemurium infection. No difference in the seric isotype and all IgG subclasses measured, neither in the TH1 nor in the TH2 type cytokine production, was seen. However, an enhanced iNOS/NO production in BCG-vaccinated/i.m. IFN-alpha boosted mice was observed. The data provided in this study suggest a promising use for IFN-alpha boosting as a new prophylactic alternative to be explored in human leprosy by targeting host innate cell response.

  16. Ocular manifestation of disseminated Mycobacterium simiae infection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, U; Arnold, P; Guscetti, F; Pfyffer, G E; Spiess, B

    2003-03-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial disease was diagnosed in an eight-year-old domestic shorthaired cat, with involvement of the skin, lungs, lymph nodes and one eye. Mycobacterium simiae was cultured from skin biopsies on solid agar and in liquid media. This organism is known to cause pulmonary, cutaneous or disseminated infection in human patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome but has never been encountered as a pathogen in companion animals. Combination treatment with rifampicin, enrofloxacin and clarithromycin resulted in complete clinical remission within six months, with no side effects. No recurrence was observed in a 22-month follow-up period.

  17. An elucidation of neutrophil functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  18. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection. PMID:24312131

  19. Immunoinformatics study on highly expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi, Le Thuy; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Calero, Romel; Camacho, Frank; Reyes, Fatima; Hossain, Md Murad; Gonzalez, Gustavo Sierra; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-09-01

    The most important targets for vaccine development are the proteins that are highly expressed by the microorganisms during infection in-vivo. A number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins are also reported to be expressed in-vivo at different phases of infection. In the present study, we analyzed multiple published databases of gene expression profiles of Mtb in-vivo at different phases of infection in animals and humans and selected 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. We predicted T- and B-cell epitopes from the selected proteins using HLAPred for T-cell epitope prediction and BCEPred combined with ABCPred for B-cell epitope prediction. For each selected proteins, regions containing both T- and B-cell epitopes were identified which might be considered as important candidates for vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  20. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M; Stowell, Britni L; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Behar, Samuel M

    2016-03-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  2. Chronic Mycobacterium marinum Infection Acts as a Tumor Promoter in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accumulating body of research indicates there is an increased cancer risk associated with chronic infections. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of species, including M tuberculosis, which mount chronic infections and have been implicated in higher cancer risk. Several ...

  3. Chronic Mycobacterium marinum Infection Acts as a Tumor Promoter in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accumulating body of research indicates there is an increased cancer risk associated with chronic infections. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of species, including M tuberculosis, which mount chronic infections and have been implicated in higher cancer risk. Several ...

  4. Extrapulmonary infections caused by a dominant strain of Mycobacterium massiliense (Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies bolletii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Liu, Y-C; Chen, M-L; Hung, C-C; Tsai, Y-T; Sheng, W-H; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R; Chen, Y-C; Chang, S-C

    2013-10-01

    A single strain of Mycobacterium massiliense (BRA 100), a subspecies of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex, has been responsible for an epidemic of post-surgical infections in Brazil. Outside Brazil, this is the first report to describe a single emerging strain of M. massiliense (TPE 101) associated with extrapulmonary infections. This phenomenon may be underestimated because sophisticated molecular typing of M. abscessus is not routinely performed. Our molecular epidemiology study was triggered by an outbreak investigation. Nine case isolates were grown from the surgical sites of nine mostly paediatric patients receiving operations from 2010 to 2011. All available non-duplicated isolates of M. abscessus during this period were obtained for comparison. Mycobacteria were characterized by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), repetitive sequence PCR (rep-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of 58 isolates of M. abscessus overall, 56 were clinical isolates. MLSA identified 36 of the isolates as M. massiliense. All case isolates were indistinguishable by PFGE and named the TPE 101 pulsotype. Of the stored strains of M. abscessus, TPE 101 strains were over-represented among the control surgical wound (7/7, 100%) and subcutaneous tissue isolates (4/5, 80%) but rare among the respiratory isolates (1/16, 6%) and absent from external skin, ocular and environmental samples. In conclusion, a unique strain of M. massiliense has emerged as a distinctive pathogen causing soft tissue infections in Taiwan. Further study to identify whether this is due to an occult common source or to specific virulence factors dictating tissue tropism is warranted.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium genavense infection in a FIV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    Hughes, M S; Ball, N W; Love, D N; Canfield, P J; Wigney, D I; Dawson, D; Davis, P E; Malik, R

    1999-03-01

    An 8-year-old FIV-positive Australian cat was presented with coughing, periocular alopecia, pyrexia and inappetence. Skin scrapings demonstrated Demodex cati mites. Antibiotics were administered and it was treated successfully for periocular demodectic mange, but the cat continued to exhibit respiratory signs and lose weight. Further investigation revealed an ascarid infection and active chronic inflammation of undetected cause affecting the lower airways. Repetitive treatment with pyrantel failed to eradicate the ascarid infection. The cat became cachectic and developed moist ulcerative dermatitis of the neck, severe non-regenerative anaemia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia. Necropsy and histopathology revealed mycobacteriosis affecting skin, lungs, spleen, lymph nodes, liver and kidney. Attempted culture of frozen tissues at a mycobacteria reference laboratory was unsuccessful. Paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue was retrieved and examined using PCR to amplify part of the 16S rRNA gene. A diagnosis of disseminated Mycobacterium genavense infection was made based on the presence of acid fast bacteria in many tissues and partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene. Although M genavense has been identified previously as a cause of disseminated disease in AIDS patients, this is the first report of infection in a cat. It was suspected that the demodecosis, recurrent ascarid infections and disseminated M genavense infection resulted from an immune deficiency syndrome consequent to longstanding FIV infection.

  7. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection arising in a new tattoo.

    PubMed

    Philips, Rebecca C; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey A; Martin, Julie E; Wilkerson, Michael G

    2014-06-15

    We report an uncommon case of a cutaneous infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum arising in a new tattoo. A 29-year-old man presented with a several month history of a non-pruritic papular eruption within a tattoo; the papules developed 1-to-2 weeks after the tattoo procedure. He denied similar symptoms with previous tattoos. He had been treated unsuccessfully with cephalexin. Histopathologic examination revealed perifollicular chronic and granulomatous inflammation, consistent with chronic folliculitis. Acid-fast bacilli culture identified Mycobacterium fortuitum complex. The patient was treated with a 2-month course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (160mg/800mg twice daily) and ciprofloxacin (250 mg twice daily), with clinical improvement at follow up after three weeks of the antibiotic regimen. Rapidly growing mycobacteria have emerged as a cause of tattoo-associated cutaneous infection in recent years. Diagnosis and treatment can be difficult without clinical suspicion. M. fortuitum and other rapidly growing mycobacteria should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tattoo-associated dermatologic complications.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement. PMID:27141534

  9. Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum infection following open fracture: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K; Ho, S T

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of dual nontuberculous mycobacterial infections complicating an open distal radius and ulna fracture after polytrauma in a 35-year-old man. There was persistent wound discharge after definitive fixation of this fracture, but microbiological cultures did not yield any organism. The patient underwent multiple debridement, and subsequent tissue grew Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Despite appropriate chemotherapy and surgical debridement the infection persisted until radical bone excision and tissue debridement were done. This case indicates that nontuberculous mycobacterial infections should be considered when conventional microbiological assays fail to identify the infecting agent in suspected osteomyelitis following open fracture. A combination of radical debridement, including removal of infected bone, and prolonged antimicrobial therapy are required to eradicate the infection completely.

  10. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  11. Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiac Surgery: First Canadian Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Raphael; Noly, Pierre-Emmanuel; Perrault, Louis P; Pellerin, Michel; Demers, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Recently reported in Europe and United States, disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infection is a novel clinical entity linked to point contamination of Stockert 3T heater-cooler units used for cardiopulmonary bypass. We present here the first two cases in Canada. Both patients presented with nonspecific extracardiac symptoms 1 year after undergoing minimally invasive mitral surgical repair. Before the right diagnosis was established, the patients were initially treated with prednisone for suspected sarcoidosis. One patient is currently improving, and the other needed mitral valve repair despite aggressive treatment. Because of the nonspecific mode and timing of presentation, a high index of suspicion is necessary for the diagnosis of M. chimaera infection. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pathology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, J A; Foote, A K; Sutcliffe, R L; Pearce, G P

    2009-01-01

    Pathological lesions associated with Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis; bTB) in free-living meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa are described. The pathology of bTB in meerkats was determined through detailed post-mortem examinations of 57 animals (52 meerkats showing clinical signs of bTB, and five not showing signs of disease). Lymph nodes and tissue lesions thought to be associated with bTB were cultured for mycobacteria. All 52 bTB-infected meerkats showed gross or microscopical granulomatous lesions, but M. bovis was cultured from only 42% (22/52) of these animals. The majority (96%, 50/52) of diseased meerkats had lesions in multiple sites, the pattern of which suggested haematogenous spread of M. bovis infection in this species. The histological characteristics of the tuberculous lesions, together with the gross pathology and the wide range of body systems affected, indicate that infection in meerkats is acquired principally via the respiratory and oral routes, whereas excretion is most likely via the respiratory tract and suppurating skin wounds. Urine and faeces appear to be unlikely sources of infection. The findings of this study provide information on the transmission, pathogenesis and epidemiology of bTB in meerkats that is likely to be relevant to the understanding of M. bovis infection in other social mammal species such as the European badger (Meles meles).

  13. A rabbit model for study of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mokresh, A H; Czuprynski, C J; Butler, D G

    1989-01-01

    Of 21 newborn rabbits inoculated orally with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis ATCC 19698, 13 (62%) became infected, as determined by histopathology and culture. Of the 21 inoculated rabbits, 14 (67%) experienced episodes of intermittent diarrhea, sometimes as early as 5 months after inoculation. Feces varied in consistency from soft-semisolid to watery. The organism was isolated from the sacculus rotundus, vermiform appendix of the cecum, ileum, mesenteric lymph node, and feces of 9 of 21 (43%) M. paratuberculosis-inoculated rabbits 8 to 10 months after inoculation. One infected rabbit gradually became severely emaciated; advanced paratuberculosis was confirmed by culture and histopathology. Of 21 rabbits, 9 (43%) developed multifocal, well-demarcated granulomatous enteritis in the sacculus rotundus and the vermiform appendix of the cecum. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection when the organisms were administered daily for 5 or 10 days in cow milk or broth. There was no discernible effect of pregnancy, parturition, or lactation on the severity of intestinal lesions, clinical signs, or the number of rabbits infected. Complement fixation and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests failed to detect infection. The results of this study suggest that newborn rabbits inoculated orally with M. paratuberculosis constitute a useful animal model for the study of paratuberculosis infection. Images PMID:2807547

  14. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  15. Immune profiling of leprosy and tuberculosis patients to 15-mer peptides of Mycobacterium leprae and M. tuberculosis GroES in a BCG vaccinated area: implications for development of vaccine and diagnostic reagents

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rabia; Shahid, Firdaus; Zafar, Shahid; Dojki, Maqboola; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (ML) GroES has been shown to induce strong T cell responses in tuberculoid as well as in exposed healthy contacts of leprosy patients, and therefore this antigen has been the focus of study as a potential vaccine candidate. Paradoxically, we have shown that ML GroES also induces extremely high titres of IgG1 antibody in leprosy patients across the disease spectrum, a response associated with disease progression. IgG1 antibodies in leprosy also show a negative association with interferon-γ, a critical T cell cytokine responsible for macrophage activation and intracellular killing of mycobacteria. We therefore queried if antibody and T cell responses were being evoked by different epitopes in ML GroES proteins. To address the issue of epitope recognition in mycobacterial diseases, we have analysed 16 peptides (15-mer peptides) spanning the entire ML and M. tuberculosis GroES protein in leprosy (n = 19) and tuberculosis (n = 9) patients and healthy endemic controls (n = 8). Our analysis demonstrates clearly that the dominant peptides evokingT cell and IgG subclass antibodies were different. The target of both T and B cell responses were cross-reactive epitopes in all groups. Differences in disease and healthy states related to the strength (mean intensity) of the T cell and antibody response. IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies were associated with disseminated disease and IgG 2 and IgG4 with disease limitation. Such comprehensive immune profiling of antigen-specific responses is critical to understanding the disease pathogenesis and also if these reagents are to be exploited for either diagnostic or vaccine purposes. PMID:15056384

  16. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection. PMID:28133458

  17. SIV Infection Facilitates Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Xian, Qiao-Yang; Rao, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Xin; Bao, Rong; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jin-Biao; Tang, Zhi-Jiao; Guo, De-Yin; Qin, Chuan; Li, Jie-Liang; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common opportunistic infection and the leading cause of death for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Thus, it is necessary to understand the pathogenetic interactions between M.tb and HIV infection. In this study, we examined M.tb and/or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Chinese rhesus macaques. While there was little evidence that M.tb enhanced SIV infection of macaques, SIV could facilitate M.tb infection as demonstrated by X-rays, pathological and microbiological findings. Chest X-rays showed that co-infected animals had disseminated lesions in both left and right lungs, while M.tb mono-infected animals displayed the lesions only in right lungs. Necropsy of co-infected animals revealed a disseminated M.tb infection not only in the lungs but also in the extrapulmonary organs including spleen, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart. The bacterial counts in the lungs, the bronchial lymph nodes, and the extrapulmonary organs of co-infected animals were significantly higher than those of M.tb mono-infected animals. The mechanistic studies demonstrated that two of three co-infected animals had lower levels of M.tb specific IFN-γ and IL-22 in PBMCs than M.tb mono-infected animals. These findings suggest that Chinese rhesus macaque is a suitable and alternative non-human primate model for SIV/M.tb coinfection studies. The impairment of the specific anti-TB immunity is likely to be a contributor of SIV-mediated enhancement M.tb infection.

  18. Paramecium caudatum enhances transmission and infectivity of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Mutoji, K. Nadine; Ennis, Don G.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio) are common and widespread in research colonies. Mycobacteria within free living amoebae have been shown to be transmission vectors for mycobacteriosis. Paramecium caudatum are commonly used as a first food for zebrafish, and we investigated this ciliate’s potential to serve as a vector of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae. The ability of live P. caudatum to transmit these mycobacteria to larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish was evaluated. Infections were defined by histologic observation of granulomas containing acid-fast bacteria in extraintestinal locations. In both experiments, fish fed paramecia containing mycobacteria became infected at a higher incidence than controls. Larvae (exposed at 4 days post hatch) fed paramecia with M. marinum exhibited an incidence of 30% (24/80) and juveniles (exposed at 21 days post hatch) showed 31% incidence (14/45). Adult fish fed a gelatin food matrix containing mycobacteria within paramecia or mycobacteria alone for 2 wk resulted in infections when examined 8 wk after exposure as follows: M. marinum OSU 214 47% (21/45), M. marinum CH 47% (9/19), M. chelonae 38% (5/13). In contrast, fish feed mycobacteria alone in this diet did not become infected, except for 2 fish (5%) in the M. marinum OSU 214 low dose group. These results demonstrate that Paramecium caudatum can act as a vector for mycobacteria. This provides a useful animal model for evaluation of natural mycobacterial infections and demonstrates the possibility of mycobacterial transmission in zebrafish facilities via contaminated paramecia cultures. PMID:24192000

  19. Role of PGL-I of M. leprae in TNF-alpha production by in vitro whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, S; Ranjit, C; Sapkota, B R; Macdonald, M

    2008-03-01

    Phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) is known to be a major antigen of Mycobacterium leprae. We have studied the influence of PGL-I on the production of Tumour Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-alpha) using the in vitro whole blood assay. Armadillo-derived M. leprae (ADML) are thought to be depleted of PGL-I during the purification process. M. leprae obtained from mouse foot pad material (MFPML) has been subjected to a less rigorous purification process; their PGL-I coating is therefore believed to be more intact than that of ADML. PGL-I or ADML alone induced the secretion of minimal levels of TNF-alpha in whole blood assay; when added in combination, higher levels of this cytokine were observed. The highest TNF-alpha response was seen following stimulation with MFPML. MFP material not infected with ML did not elicit any response. The difference in TNF-alpha response shown by ADML and MFPML was postulated to be largely due to the presence of higher levels of PGL-I in MFPML. This increase in TNF-alpha production suggests that PGL-I may play a significant role in the induction of TNF-alpha during natural infection.

  20. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  1. Modeling Innate Immune Response to Early Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Rafael V.; Kleijn, Jetty; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of complex patterns in biology, mathematical and computational models are emerging as important tools. In addition to experimental approaches, these modeling tools have recently been applied to address open questions regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, including the immune response to mycobacterial infection and tuberculous granuloma formation. We present an approach in which a computational model represents the interaction of the Mycobacterium infection with the innate immune system in zebrafish at a high level of abstraction. We use the Petri Net formalism to model the interaction between the key host elements involved in granuloma formation and infection dissemination. We define a qualitative model for the understanding and description of causal relations in this dynamic process. Complex processes involving cell-cell or cell-bacteria communication can be modeled at smaller scales and incorporated hierarchically into this main model; these are to be included in later elaborations. With the infection mechanism being defined on a higher level, lower-level processes influencing the host-pathogen interaction can be identified, modeled, and tested both quantitatively and qualitatively. This systems biology framework incorporates modeling to generate and test hypotheses, to perform virtual experiments, and to make experimentally verifiable predictions. Thereby it supports the unraveling of the mechanisms of tuberculosis infection. PMID:23365620

  2. Mycobacterium microti Infection (Vole Tuberculosis) in Wild Rodent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Rachel; Begon, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Ergon, Torbjørn; Graham, Isla M.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Hart, C. A.; Koedam, Marianne; Kremer, Kristin; Lambin, Xavier; Roholl, Paul; Soolingen, Dick van

    2002-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti (vole tuberculosis) infections in small wild mammals were first described more than 60 years ago in several populations in Great Britain. Few studies of vole tuberculosis have been undertaken since then, and little is known about the relationship between M. microti isolates originating from different populations or at different times or of the prevalence of this infection in wild rodent populations, despite human cases of M. microti infections being increasingly reported. In this study, field voles (Microtus agrestis), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were found to be infected, with up to 8% having external tuberculous signs, in wild populations in Northumberland and Cheshire, England. Spoligotyping applied directly to the clinical material simultaneously detected and typed M. microti bacteria in skin lesions, lymph glands, and internal abcesses. IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of cultured bacteria was used to compare these isolates with previously isolated strains from both animals and humans. This demonstrated that although the current rodent isolates were distinct from those isolated from voles in the 1930s in Great Britain, they had a high degree of similarity to these strains and were distinct from the M. microti isolates from humans, a pig, and a ferret from The Netherlands. Thus, M. microti infection seems to be widespread in wild rodent populations, but more studies are needed to understand how M. microti might be transmitted from animals to humans and to determine better the zoonotic risk posed. PMID:12202566

  3. Computed Tomography Findings of Pulmonary Mycobacterium simiae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baghizadeh, Ayeh; Farnia, Poopak

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary infections can be quite similar to tuberculosis, both clinically and radiologically. However, the treatment protocol is not similar. Mycobacterium simiae is a rare cause of NTM pulmonary infection. Herein, we aimed to evaluate and compare the computed tomography (CT) scan findings of M. simiae infection in lungs. For this reason, thirty-four patients (n = 34) with M. simiae lung infection were retrospectively evaluated. Diagnosis was confirmed by American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines and CT scans were reviewed in both lung and mediastinal windows. The average age of patients was 63 ± 14.54 years and 52.9% were male. The majority of patients had cough (91.2%) and sputum production (76.5%). Clinically, 41.2% of patients had previous history of TB (14/34), 38.2% had cardiac diseases (13/34), and 35.3% had diabetes mellitus (12/34). The most common CT findings in our study were nodular lesions (100%) and bronchiectasis (85.29%). Regarding the severity, grade I bronchiectasis was the most prevalent. Other prominent findings were tree-in-bud sign (88.2%), consolidation (52.94%), and lobar fibrosis and volume loss (67.6%). There was no significant zonal distribution of findings. In conclusion, nodular lesions and bronchiectasis are the most frequent features in CT scan of M. simiae pulmonary infection. PMID:28127232

  4. Control of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in agricultural species.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D J; Benedictus, G

    2001-04-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which continues to spread in agricultural species. Control of paratuberculosis is challenging and should not be underestimated. Due to the long incubation period of the infection, disease is largely subclinical in domesticated livestock. Hence, direct effects on animal productivity and welfare are often masked and may appear insufficient to justify large investments in control programmes by individual farmers, livestock industries or governments. Furthermore, in some countries the main effects of the disease are indirect, resulting from the impact of market discrimination against herds and flocks known to be infected, or from the control measures enforced to reduce transmission. In such circumstances, producers may be unwilling to co-operate with surveillance that may detect infection in herds or flocks. As control programmes are rarely successful in eliminating the infection from a herd or flock in the short term without an aggressive and costly programme, financial and community support assists producers to deal with the challenge. Successful prevention and control depends on animal health authorities and livestock industries acquiring a good understanding of the nature and epidemiology of infection, and of the application of tools for diagnosis and control. Building support for control programmes under the leadership of the affected livestock industries is critical, as programmes are unlikely to be successful without ongoing political will, supported by funding for research, surveillance and control.

  5. In situ cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected by aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in most animal species, including cattle and is a serious zoonotic pathogen. In humans, M. bovis infection can result in disease clinically indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of most tuberculosis in humans. Reg...

  6. Virulence of two strains of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle following aerosol infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Over the past two decades, highly virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged and spread rapidly in humans, suggesting a selective advantage based upon virulence. A similar scenario has not been described for Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle (i.e., Bovine Tuberculos...

  7. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) are necessary in the early stages of induction of CD4 and CD8 cytotoxic T cells by Mycobacterium leprae heat shock protein (hsp) 65 kD

    PubMed Central

    Del, M; Sasiain, C; De La Barrera, S; Fink, S; Finiasz, M; Alemán, M; Fariña, M H; Pizzariello, G; Valdez, R

    1998-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells (CTL) may play an important role in host defence against mycobacterial infections. CD4 CTL are preferentially induced by mycobacteria, but both CD4 and CD8 CTL may be necessary components of a protective immune response. The 65-kD mycobacterium heat shock protein (hsp65) is a poor inducer of CTL in multibacillary leprosy (MB) patients. In this study we evaluate the possible role of cytokines in modulating the cytotoxic activity of CTL from leprosy patients and normal individuals (N) against autologous macrophages presenting Mycobacterium leprae hsp65. Our results show that hsp65-specific CTL were generated from both CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In N, individual cytokines as well as the combination of them were able to modify the hsp65-induced cytotoxic activity. The effect of cytokines on leprosy patients' lymphocytes was different in MB and paucibacillary (PB) patients. Thus, IL-6, IL-2, IFN-γ or TNF-α did not modify the generation of hsp65-CTL from either MB (with or without an erythema nodosum episode (ENL)) or PB. In all the patients the simultaneous addition of two cytokines was required in order to increase CTL generation. In MB, IL-6 plus IFN-γ or IL-2 increased both CD4 and CD8 CTL, while TNF-α plus IFN-γ up-regulated only CD4 CTL. In PB, CD8 CTL were prominent with IL-6 plus IFN-γ, while the increase was significant in CD4 CTL with IL-6 plus IL-2. Down-regulation of CTL was observed by addition of IL-4, IL-10, anti-IFN-γ or anti-TNF-α in N controls. Our data demonstrate that IFN-γ and TNF-α must be present for at least the first 60 h of the induction stage in order to generate full hsp65 CTL. Hence, IFN-γ and TNF-α would be key factors in the generation of hsp65 CTL. PMID:9822276

  8. Red squirrels in the British Isles are infected with leprosy bacilli.

    PubMed

    Avanzi, Charlotte; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Benjak, Andrej; Stevenson, Karen; Simpson, Victor R; Busso, Philippe; McLuckie, Joyce; Loiseau, Chloé; Lawton, Colin; Schoening, Janne; Shaw, Darren J; Piton, Jérémie; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Velarde-Felix, Jesùs S; McDermott, Fergal; Gordon, Stephen V; Cole, Stewart T; Meredith, Anna L

    2016-11-11

    Leprosy, caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae or the recently discovered Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was once endemic in humans in the British Isles. Red squirrels in Great Britain (Sciurus vulgaris) have increasingly been observed with leprosy-like lesions on the head and limbs. Using genomics, histopathology, and serology, we found M. lepromatosis in squirrels from England, Ireland, and Scotland, and M. leprae in squirrels from Brownsea Island, England. Infection was detected in overtly diseased and seemingly healthy animals. Phylogenetic comparisons of British and Irish M. lepromatosis with two Mexican strains from humans show that they diverged from a common ancestor around 27,000 years ago, whereas the M. leprae strain is closest to one that circulated in Medieval England. Red squirrels are thus a reservoir for leprosy in the British Isles. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Genetics-directed drug discovery for combating Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yuan; Xiong, Le; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the pathogen of tuberculosis (TB), is one of the most infectious bacteria in the world. The traditional strategy to combat TB involves targeting the pathogen directly; however, the rapid evolution of drug resistance lessens the efficiency of this anti-TB method. Therefore, in recent years, some researchers have turned to an alternative anti-TB strategy, which hinders Mtb infection through targeting host genes. In this work, using a theoretical genetic analysis, we identified 170 Mtb infection-associated genes from human genetic variations related to Mtb infection. Then, the agents targeting these genes were identified to have high potential as anti-TB drugs. In particular, the agents that can target multiple Mtb infection-associated genes are more druggable than the single-target counterparts. These potential anti-TB agents were further screened by gene expression data derived from connectivity map. As a result, some agents were revealed to have high interest for experimental evaluation. This study not only has important implications for anti-TB drug discovery, but also provides inspirations for streamlining the pipeline of modern drug discovery.

  10. Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Interferon-Gamma Release Assays.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Behr, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    The identification of individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is useful for both fundamental understanding of the pathogenesis of disease and for clinical and public health interventions (i.e., to prevent progression to disease). Basic research suggests there is a pathogenetic continuum from exposure to infection to disease, and individuals may advance or reverse positions within the spectrum, depending on changes in the host immunity. Unfortunately, there is no diagnostic test that resolves the various stages within the spectrum of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Two main immune-based approaches are currently used for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). TST can use either the conventional purified protein derivative or more specific antigens. Extensive research suggests that both TST and IGRA represent indirect markers of M. tuberculosis exposure and indicates a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. The imperfect concordance between these two tests suggests that neither test is perfect, presumably due to both technical and biological reasons. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB. Both IGRA and TST have low sensitivity in a variety of immunocompromised populations. Cohort studies have shown that both TST and IGRA have low predictive value for progression from infection to active TB. For fundamental applications, basic research is necessary to identify those at highest risk of disease with a positive TST and/or IGRA. For clinical applications, the identification of such biomarkers can help prioritize efforts to interrupt progression to disease through preventive therapy.

  11. Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection distal to the arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Van Ende, Charlotte; Wilmes, Dunja; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Labriola, Laura; Cuvelier, René; Van Ingelgem, Grégory; Jadoul, Michel

    2016-10-01

    A few single cases of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infection have been reported in haemodialysis patients. We report three additional cases that share peculiar clinical characteristics, pointing to diagnostic clues. All three cases presented as erythematous nodules developing distally to a proximal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). This presentation was identical to that of two published cases. A survey of all Belgian haemodialysis units during the period 2007-11 yields an estimated incidence of ∼0.9/10 000 patient-years. Although the source of M. chelonae remains unclear, this specific clinical presentation should be added to the listing of potential complications of an AVF and should be recognized, as it is fully treatable if diagnosed by culture and tissue biopsy.

  12. Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection distal to the arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Van Ende, Charlotte; Wilmes, Dunja; Lecouvet, Frédéric E.; Labriola, Laura; Cuvelier, René; Van Ingelgem, Grégory; Jadoul, Michel

    2016-01-01

    A few single cases of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infection have been reported in haemodialysis patients. We report three additional cases that share peculiar clinical characteristics, pointing to diagnostic clues. All three cases presented as erythematous nodules developing distally to a proximal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). This presentation was identical to that of two published cases. A survey of all Belgian haemodialysis units during the period 2007–11 yields an estimated incidence of ∼0.9/10 000 patient-years. Although the source of M. chelonae remains unclear, this specific clinical presentation should be added to the listing of potential complications of an AVF and should be recognized, as it is fully treatable if diagnosed by culture and tissue biopsy. PMID:27679721

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Domesticated Korean Wild Boar ( Sus scrofa coreanus).

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Goo; Ouh, In-Ohk; Kim, Munki; Lee, Jienny; Kim, Young-Hoan; Do, Jae-Cheul; Kwak, Dongmi

    2017-06-01

    Tuberculosis, a chronic progressive disease, has been reported in bovine, swine, and primate species. Here, we report the first case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a Korean wild boar ( Sus scrofa coreanus). The owners this domesticated boar brought it to the Gyeongbuk Veterinary Service Laboratory in Korea after it was found dead and severely emaciated. Demarcated yellowish white nodules were found around the larynx and retropharyngeal lymph node during necropsy. The lungs had diffuse fibrinous pleuritis, severe congestion, and scattered nodules. More nodules were found in the spleen. Tuberculosis is characterized by massive macrophage infiltration and central caseous necrosis; both characteristics were found in the lungs. Histopathologic examination revealed that the alveolar lumen had marked fibrosis and exudates. Examination of the fluid revealed extensive macrophage permeation. To confirm a Mycobacterium infection, PCR was performed using two primer sets specific to the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium; Mycobacterium was detected in the lungs and spleen. To identify the species of Mycobacterium, immunohistochemical evaluation was performed using antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis . The results revealed immunoreactivity against M. tuberculosis but not against M. bovis . The consumption of undercooked or raw meat from game animals may expose humans and other animals to sylvatic infection. Consequently, Koreans who ingest wild boar may be at risk of a tuberculosis infection. To reduce the risk of foodborne infection and maintain public health, continuous monitoring and control strategies are required.

  14. Mycobacterium heckeshornense lung infection that was diagnosed as Mycobacterium xenopi disease by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH).

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Kazumi, Yuko; Maeda, Shinji; Yoshimori, Kozo; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Kudoh, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    The DNA sequencing analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, rpoB and hsp65 were conducted to characterize six strains that had been identified as Mycobacterium xenopi by DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) for past ten years in our hospital. The results revealed Mycobacterium heckeshornense infection in one of the six cases. A 47-year-old man, who had been treated for pneumonia, had pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The sputa from the patient were culture positive for mycobacterium in three times. And it was diagnosed as M. xenopiby DDH method. Chest X-ray showed fibrocavitary lesion in right upper lobe was successfully treated with clarithromycin for four weeks.

  15. Strain specific transcriptional response in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a significant health problem worldwide with a third of the world population infected and nearly nine million new cases claiming 1.1 million deaths every year. The outcome following infection by Mtb is determined by a complex and dynamic host-pathogen interaction in which the phenotype of the pathogen and the immune status of the host play a role. However, the molecular mechanism by which Mtb strains induce different responses during intracellular infection of the host macrophage is not fully understood. To explore the early molecular events triggered upon Mtb infection of macrophages, we studied the transcriptional responses of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) to infection with two clinical Mtb strains, CDC1551 and HN878. These strains have previously been shown to differ in their virulence/immunogenicity in the mouse and rabbit models of pulmonary TB. Results In spite of similar intracellular growth rates, we observed that compared to HN878, infection by CDC1551 of BMM was associated with an increased global transcriptome, up-regulation of a specific early (6 hours) immune response network and significantly elevated nitric oxide production. In contrast, at 24 hours post-infection of BMM by HN878, more host genes involved in lipid metabolism, including cholesterol metabolism and prostaglandin synthesis were up-regulated, compared to infection with CDC1551. In association with the differences in the macrophage responses to infection with the 2 Mtb strains, intracellular CDC1551 expressed higher levels of stress response genes than did HN878. Conclusions In association with the early and more robust macrophage activation, intracellular CDC1551 cells were exposed to a higher level of stress leading to increased up-regulation of the bacterial stress response genes. In contrast, sub-optimal activation of macrophages and induction of a dysregulated host cell

  16. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  17. Macrophage polarization drives granuloma outcome during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Marino, Simeone; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Mattila, Joshua T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), induces formation of granulomas, structures in which immune cells and bacteria colocalize. Macrophages are among the most abundant cell types in granulomas and have been shown to serve as both critical bactericidal cells and targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation throughout the course of infection. Very little is known about how these processes are regulated, what controls macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity, or why some granulomas control bacteria and others permit bacterial dissemination. We take a computational-biology approach to investigate mechanisms that drive macrophage polarization, function, and bacterial control in granulomas. We define a "macrophage polarization ratio" as a metric to understand how cytokine signaling translates into polarization of single macrophages in a granuloma, which in turn modulates cellular functions, including antimicrobial activity and cytokine production. Ultimately, we extend this macrophage ratio to the tissue scale and define a "granuloma polarization ratio" describing mean polarization measures for entire granulomas. Here we coupled experimental data from nonhuman primate TB granulomas to our computational model, and we predict two novel and testable hypotheses regarding macrophage profiles in TB outcomes. First, the temporal dynamics of granuloma polarization ratios are predictive of granuloma outcome. Second, stable necrotic granulomas with low CFU counts and limited inflammation are characterized by short NF-κB signal activation intervals. These results suggest that the dynamics of NF-κB signaling is a viable therapeutic target to promote M1 polarization early during infection and to improve outcome.

  18. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  19. Mycobacterium marinum infections in humans and tracing of its possible environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Slany, Michal; Jezek, Petr; Fiserova, Vera; Bodnarova, Monika; Stork, Jiri; Havelkova, Marta; Kalat, Frantisek; Pavlik, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    The low frequency of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, nonspecific symptoms for individual mycobacteria, and the lack of specific identification methods could alter correct diagnosis. This study presents a combined microbiology and molecular-based approach for Mycobacterium marinum detection in four aquarists with cutaneous mycobacterial infection. Simultaneously, ecology screening for M. marinum presence in the aquarists' fish tanks was performed. A total of 38 mycobacterial isolates originated from four human patients (n = 20), aquarium animals (n = 8), and an aquarium environment (n = 10). Isolate identification was carried out using 16S rRNA sequence analysis. A microbiology-based approach, followed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis, was successfully used for detection of M. marinum in all four patients. Animal and environmental samples were simultaneously examined, and a total of seven mycobacterial species were isolated: Mycobacterium chelonae , Mycobacterium fortuitum , Mycobacterium gordonae , Mycobacterium kansasii , Mycobacterium mantenii , Mycobacterium marinum , and Mycobacterium peregrinum . The presence of M. marinum was proven in the aquarium environments of two patients. Although M. marinum is described as being present in water, it was detected only in fish.

  20. Osteomyelitis Infection of Mycobacterium marinum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hao H.; Fadul, Nada; Ashraf, Muhammad S.; Siraj, Dawd S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that grows optimally at temperatures around 30°C. It is a nontuberculous Mycobacterium found in nonchlorinated water with worldwide prevalence. It is the most common atypical Mycobacterium that causes opportunistic infection in humans. M. marinum can cause superficial infections and localized invasive infections in humans, with the hands being the sites most frequently affected. It can cause skin lesions, which are either single, papulonodular lesions, confined to an extremity, or may resemble cutaneous sporotrichosis. This infection can also cause deeper infections including tenosynovitis, bursitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Disseminated infections and visceral involvements have been reported in immunocompromised patients. We here report a case of severe deep soft tissue infection with necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis of the left upper extremity (LUE) caused by M. marinum in an immunocompromised patient. PMID:25664190

  1. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject. PMID:22481952

  2. Evolution of lymphocyte populations in armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) inoculated with M. leprae.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Infante, F; Quesada-Pascual, F; Estrada-Parra, S; Santos-Argumedo, L

    1996-06-01

    In human leprosy patients there are changes in the percentages of T and B lymphocytes in peripheral blood, and there is a correlation with the clinical characteristics or manifestations of the disease. These phenomena still require clarification regarding the triggering mechanism involved that may lead to one or the other clinical entities. Much has yet to be learned about the intricacies of whether the changes in subpopulations of T and B lymphocytes are a causative factor or an effect attributable to the microorganism itself. The armadillo is an excellent animal model to study how Mycobacterium leprae spread, turning into an established infection. The application of modifications in percentages of the subpopulations of B and T lymphocytes in armadillos may well lead to extrapolation of the results obtained in this animal model in an attempt to be able to manipulate the course of the disease in humans. The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in the percentages of rosette-forming and sIgM+ mononuclear cells during a full year in groups of armadillos: five randomly chosen animals formed the control group and 11 armadillos were inoculated with M. leprae obtained from a human leproma at the onset of the 12-month period of the study. Of the 11 randomly selected armadillos that were inoculated, only five developed an active and disseminated infection. The percentage of rosette-forming cells did not show statistically significant variations during the first 6 months of the study. However, at months 8 and 12 a significant increment in this parameter was observed (p < 0.05) in the animals with active infection. In regard to the variations in the numbers of sIgM+ cells, significant changes occurred in the armadillos with active infection at month 2. However, results returned to normal and no changes were seen at later times. No significant changes occurred in the group of animals inoculated but not developing active infection compared with the other groups. The

  3. Prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in prisoners

    PubMed Central

    de Navarro, Pedro Daibert; de Almeida, Isabela Neves; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Ceccato, Maria das Graças; Maciel, Mônica Maria Delgado; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the prevalence of and the factors associated with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in prisoners in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methods: This was a cross-sectional cohort study conducted in two prisons in Minas Gerais. Tuberculin skin tests were performed in the individuals who agreed to participate in the study. Results: A total of 1,120 individuals were selected for inclusion in this study. The prevalence of LTBI was 25.2%. In the multivariate analysis, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients within prisons (adjusted OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.05-2.18) and use of inhaled drugs (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13). Respiratory symptoms were identified in 131 (11.7%) of the participants. Serological testing for HIV was performed in 940 (83.9%) of the participants, and the result was positive in 5 (0.5%). Two cases of active tuberculosis were identified during the study period. Conclusions: Within the prisons under study, the prevalence of LTBI was high. In addition, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients and with the use of inhaled drugs. Our findings demonstrate that it is necessary to improve the conditions in prisons, as well as to introduce strategies, such as chest X-ray screening, in order to detect tuberculosis cases and, consequently, reduce M. tuberculosis infection within the prison system. PMID:27812634

  4. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  5. Infections caused by Mycobacterium abscessus: epidemiology, diagnostic tools and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mougari, Faiza; Guglielmetti, Lorenzo; Raskine, Laurent; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Veziris, Nicolas; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging mycobacteria that is responsible for lung diseases and healthcare-associated extrapulmonary infections. Recent findings support its taxonomic status as a single species comprising 3 subspecies designated abscessus, bolletii and massiliense. We performed a review of English-language publications investigating all three of these subspecies. Areas covered: Worldwide, human infections are often attributable to environmental contamination, although the isolation of M. abscessus in this reservoir is very rare. Basic research has demonstrated an association between virulence and cell wall components and cording, and genome analysis has identified gene transfer from other bacteria. The bacteriological diagnosis of M. abscessus is based on innovative tools combining molecular biology and mass spectrometry. Genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility testing are required to predict the success of macrolide (clarithromycin or azithromycin)-based therapeutic regimens. Genotyping methods are helpful to assess relapse and cross-transmission and to search for a common source. Treatment is not standardised, and outcomes are often unsatisfactory. Expert commentary: M. abscessus is still an open field in terms of clinical and bacteriological research. Further knowledge of its ecology and transmission routes, as well as host-pathogen interactions, is required. Because the number of human cases is increasing, it is also necessary to identify more active treatments and perform clinical trials to assess standard effective regimens.

  6. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  7. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis During Infection: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah K.; Abomoelak, Bassam; Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is considered one of the biggest infectious disease killers worldwide. A significant amount of attention has been directed toward revealing genes involved in the virulence and pathogenesis of this air-born pathogen. With the advances in technologies for transcriptional profiling, several groups, including ours, took advantage of DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional units differentially regulated by M. tuberculosis within a host. The main idea behind this approach is that pathogens tend to regulate their gene expression levels depending on the host microenvironment, and preferentially express those needed for survival. Identifying this class of genes will improve our understanding of pathogenesis. In our case, we identified an in vivo expressed genomic island that was preferentially active in murine lungs during early infection, as well as groups of genes active during chronic tuberculosis. Other studies have identified additional gene groups that are active during macrophage infection and even in human lungs. Despite all of these findings, one of the lingering questions remaining was whether in vivo expressed transcripts are relevant to the virulence, pathogenesis, and persistence of the organism. The work of our group and others addressed this question by examining the contribution of in vivo expressed genes using a strategy based on gene deletions followed by animal infections. Overall, the analysis of most of the in vivo expressed genes supported a role of these genes in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Further, these data suggest that in vivo transcriptional profiling is a valid approach to identify genes required for bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:21738523

  8. Mycobacterium bovis infection in humans and cats in same household, Texas, USA, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis infection of cats is exceedingly rare in non-endemic regions for bovine tuberculosis. This case study describes the diagnosis and clinical management of pulmonary M. bovis infection in two indoor-housed cats and their association with at least one M. bovis-infected human in Texas...

  9. Association between cattle herd Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection and infection of a hare population.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Monti, Gustavo; Sevilla, Iker; Manning, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Paratuberculosis has long been considered a disease of domestic and wild ruminants only. The known host range of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was recently extended to include non-ruminant wildlife species believed to be exposed to spillover of MAP from infected domestic cattle herds. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between cattle herd MAP infection pressure level and the infection level of a hare population in two dairy farms of southern Chile. Fifty hares from a herd A and 42 hares from herd B were captured and sampled for MAP culture. The results showed a statistically significant association between the cattle herds' infection prevalence and the hare infection prevalence.

  10. Mycobacterium avium infections of Acanthamoeba strains: host strain variability, grazing-acquired infections, and altered dynamics of inactivation with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Horn, Matthias; Xi, Chuanwu; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2010-10-01

    Stable Mycobacterium avium infections of several Acanthamoeba strains were characterized by increased infection resistance of recent environmental isolates and reduced infectivity in the presence of other bacteria. Exposure of M. avium in coculture with Acanthamoeba castellanii to monochloramine yielded inactivation kinetics markedly similar to those observed for A. castellanii alone.

  11. Outbreak of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with tattoo ink.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Byron S; Bedard, Brenden; Younge, Mary; Tuttle, Deborah; Ammerman, Eric; Ricci, John; Doniger, Andrew S; Escuyer, Vincent E; Mitchell, Kara; Noble-Wang, Judith A; O'Connell, Heather A; Lanier, William A; Katz, Linda M; Betts, Robert F; Mercurio, Mary Gail; Scott, Glynis A; Lewis, Matthew A; Goldgeier, Mark H

    2012-09-13

    In January 2012, on the basis of an initial report from a dermatologist, we began to investigate an outbreak of tattoo-associated Mycobacterium chelonae skin and soft-tissue infections in Rochester, New York. The main goals were to identify the extent, cause, and form of transmission of the outbreak and to prevent further cases of infection. We analyzed data from structured interviews with the patients, histopathological testing of skin-biopsy specimens, acid-fast bacilli smears, and microbial cultures and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We also performed DNA sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), cultures of the ink and ingredients used in the preparation and packaging of the ink, assessment of source water and faucets at tattoo parlors, and investigation of the ink manufacturer. Between October and December 2011, a persistent, raised, erythematous rash in the tattoo area developed in 19 persons (13 men and 6 women) within 3 weeks after they received a tattoo from a single artist who used premixed gray ink; the highest occurrence of tattooing and rash onset was in November (accounting for 15 and 12 patients, respectively). The average age of the patients was 35 years (range, 18 to 48). Skin-biopsy specimens, obtained from 17 patients, showed abnormalities in all 17, with M. chelonae isolated from 14 and confirmed by means of DNA sequencing. PFGE analysis showed indistinguishable patterns in 11 clinical isolates and one of three unopened bottles of premixed ink. Eighteen of the 19 patients were treated with appropriate antibiotics, and their condition improved. The premixed ink was the common source of infection in this outbreak. These findings led to a recall by the manufacturer.

  12. [A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yosuke; Kurosawa, Takayuki; Hosaka, Kiminori

    2014-09-01

    A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion is very rare. We report a case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis. A 44-year-old man presented to a clinic with a productive cough, sputum, and loss of appetite for several months. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion, centrilobular nodules and infiltrative shadows with cavities in the bilateral lung fields. The direct smear examination showed positive acid-fast bacilli (Gaffky 5). He was referred to our hospital for suspected recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. We started anti-tuberculosis drugs because pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleurisy was first suspected from the findings of high ADA level (78.6 IU/l) of the effusion and positive result of interferon-gamma release assay (QuantiFERON TB-2G). But Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex was not identified by the polymerase chain reaction method and the culture of the sputum was negative. At a later date, Mycobacterium kansasii was detected by sputum culture. The patient was diagnosed as pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs including RFP resulted in a good clinical response. This case was a rare case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis.

  13. [Application of recombinant 38000 protein antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in screening Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    He, Xiu-yun; Zhuang, Yu-hui; Zhang, Xiao-gang

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the potential of recombinant 38000 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (38000 protein) as a tuberculosis-specific tuberculin for screening M. tuberculosis infection. A total of 1342 subjects (706 men and 636 women, age 18-60 years) from several communities in Kazuo County and Xidaziying Town, Chaoyang, Liaoning Province, and Hongdong County, Linfen, Shanxi Province were enrolled from September 2004 to February 2005. The skin tests were performed with double-blinded and the intradermal injections were administered on both forearms with 0.1 ml solution of PPD and 38000 protein at the right side and the left side, respectively. The vertical and transverse diameters of induration or erythema were measured following 24 h for 38000 protein and 48 h for PPD, respectively. The diameters of the the skin test reactions were defined as the means of the vertical and transverse diameters, and positive skin reactions were identified when the diameter was greater than or equal to 5 mm. The comparison of the positive rate was performed via chi(2) test and the consistency of positive skin test reactions between 38000 protein and TB-PPD was analyzed through calculating Kappa coefficients. The positive rate was 55.1% (740/1342) and 28.6% (384/1342) for PPD and 38000 protein, respectively; the difference being significant (chi(2) = 190.6, P < 0.01). The consistency of positive skin test reactions between 38000 protein and PPD was low due to a negative Kappa coefficient. The positive rates induced by PPD and 38000 protein tended to increase with age except for the 33-37 year group. For a given age group, the positive rate of PPD was much higher than that of 38000 protein. The subjects without BCG scar had a lower positive rate for 38000 protein (24.3%, 137/566) than those with BCG scar (31.9%, 247/776) (chi(2) = 4.7, P < 0.05). The subjects with tuberculosis contact history had a higher positive rate for 38000 protein (74.4%, 32/43) than those without tuberculosis contact

  14. Isolated Mycobacterium kansasii wound infection and Osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Tarek; Almahmoud, Mohamed Faher; Raslan, Khulood

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a slow growing acid-fast non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. It most commonly causes pulmonary disease with tuberculosis-like manifestations. Mycobacterium kansasii-induced skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are very uncommon, especially in the absence of obvious risk factors. In this report, we present a rare case of M. kansasii-associated SSTI complicated by tendonitis and osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering non-tuberculosis mycobacteria while investigating chronic, relapsing, non-healing SSTIs and osteomyelitis. Proper pharmacotherapy, along with surgical debridement, is the optimal management to avoid relapse and the production of resistant species. PMID:28031850

  15. Lepra: various etiologies from miasma to bacteriology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Suchodolska, Elżbieta; Virmond, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mycobacterium leprae. There have been various beliefs in its etiology with two main concepts emerging: anticontagion and contagion. From ancient times through the early Middle Ages, the miasmatic theory of leprosy was the main anticontagion view. The development of histopathologic and cytologic studies in the second half of the 19th century provided a starting point to explain the etiology of leprosy bacteriologically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin-Gook; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Jong-Sung; Jeong, Tae-Yeob; Ryu, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Moon, Jeong-Seop; Kang, Yun-Kyung; Shim, Myung-Shup; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2008-02-07

    Chronic diarrhea is one of the most frequent gastro-intestinal manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Protozoa and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that can easily infect these patients. Among the NTM, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently observed pathogen in HIV-infected patients. However, NTMs other than MAC have not been reported as a gastrointestinal pathogen as yet. We present a case of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient in whom Mycobacterium ulcerans and cryptosporidium co-infection is evidenced from colonic tissue.

  17. Low dose chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Elias, D; Akuffo, H; Thors, C; Pawlowski, A; Britton, S

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of mycobacterial diseases is high and the efficacy of Bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) is low in most areas of the world where chronic worm infections are common. However, if and how concurrent worm infections could affect immunity to mycobacterial infections has not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether infection of mice with Schistosoma mansoni could affect the ability of the animals to control Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection and the immune response to mycobacterial antigens. BALB/c mice subclinically infected with S. mansoni were challenged with M. bovis BCG via the intravenous route. The ability of the animals to contain the replication of M. bovis BCG in their organs, lung pathology as well as the in vitro mycobacterial and worm antigen induced immune responses were evaluated. The results showed that S. mansoni coinfected mice had significantly higher levels of BCG bacilli in their organs and sustained greater lung pathology compared to Schistosoma uninfected controls. Moreover, Schistosoma infected mice show depressed mycobacterial antigen specific Th1 type responses. This is an indication that chronic worm infection could affect resistance/susceptibility to mycobacterial infections by impairing mycobacteria antigen specific Th1 type responses. This finding is potentially important in the control of TB in helminth endemic parts of the world. PMID:15730384

  18. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of the scalp after a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Smith, Blaine D; Liras, Ioannis N; De Cicco, Ignacio A; Aisenberg, Gabriel Marcelo

    2016-10-19

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium found in the soil and water of most regions of the world, and it can cause disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. We present a 52-year-old man who developed a scalp abscess under a free flap for cranium coverage after a motor vehicle accident. Culture of material drained from the abscess grew M. fortuitum.

  19. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing infection of a biventricular pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhning L; Bridge, Bronwyn; Wang, Jeffrey; Jovin, Ion S

    2012-12-01

    Increased utilization of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) has seen a corresponding rise in related infections. Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely the cause. Treatment involves susceptibilities, antimicrobials, and device removal. This study presents a patient who underwent a biventricular implantable cardioverter defibrillator upgrade with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum located at the pocket site and a lead infection.

  20. Central nervous system infection due to Mycobacterium haemophilum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buppajarntham, Aubonphan; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rutjanawech, Sasinuj; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is an environmental organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who had central nervous system infection due to M. haemophilum. The diagnosis required brain tissue procurement and molecular identification method while the treatment outcome was unfavourable.

  1. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  2. Induction of B Cell Responses Upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  3. Induction of B Cell Responses upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal models are useful for studying host responses to infection and aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The current study was designed to compare the effects of different methods of experimental infection: Oral (Mycobacterium avium subsp. parauberculosis (MAP) strain K-10; Or...

  4. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression using experimental data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of the infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN- gamma, ELI...

  5. Tattoo-associated Mycobacterium haemophilum Skin Infection in Immunocompetent Adult, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Perti, Tara R.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    After a laboratory-confirmed case of Mycobacterium haemophilum skin infection in a recently tattooed immunocompetent adult was reported, we investigated to identify the infection source and additional cases. We found 1 laboratory-confirmed and 1 suspected case among immunocompetent adults who had been tattooed at the same parlor. PMID:21888807

  6. Multiple samples improve the sensitivity for detection of mixed Mycobacterium infections.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Yang, Chongguang; Li, Xia; Luo, Tao; Li, Fabin; Gao, Qian

    2013-09-01

    By using VNTR genotyping, mixed infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were detected in 11.2% of cases in a prospective study in Heilongjiang China, a setting with a high prevalence (87.5%) of Beijing family strains. If only one sputum sample had been collected, the study would have underestimated the fraction of mixed infections by 50%.

  7. Prevalence of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in prisoners.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pedro Daibert de; Almeida, Isabela Neves de; Kritski, Afrânio Lineu; Ceccato, Maria das Graças; Maciel, Mônica Maria Delgado; Carvalho, Wânia da Silva; Miranda, Silvana Spindola de

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of and the factors associated with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in prisoners in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort study conducted in two prisons in Minas Gerais. Tuberculin skin tests were performed in the individuals who agreed to participate in the study. A total of 1,120 individuals were selected for inclusion in this study. The prevalence of LTBI was 25.2%. In the multivariate analysis, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients within prisons (adjusted OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 1.05-2.18) and use of inhaled drugs (adjusted OR = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13). Respiratory symptoms were identified in 131 (11.7%) of the participants. Serological testing for HIV was performed in 940 (83.9%) of the participants, and the result was positive in 5 (0.5%). Two cases of active tuberculosis were identified during the study period. Within the prisons under study, the prevalence of LTBI was high. In addition, LTBI was associated with self-reported contact with active tuberculosis patients and with the use of inhaled drugs. Our findings demonstrate that it is necessary to improve the conditions in prisons, as well as to introduce strategies, such as chest X-ray screening, in order to detect tuberculosis cases and, consequently, reduce M. tuberculosis infection within the prison system. Determinar a prevalência e os fatores associados à infecção latente por Mycobacterium tuberculosis (ILTB) em pessoas privadas de liberdade no Estado de Minas Gerais. Estudo de coorte transversal realizado em duas penitenciárias em Minas Gerais. Foi realizada a prova tuberculínica nos indivíduos que aceitaram participar do estudo. Foram selecionados 1.120 indivíduos para a pesquisa. A prevalência da ILTB foi de 25,2%. Na análise multivariada, a ILTB esteve associada com relato de contato com caso de tuberculose ativa dentro da penitenciária (OR ajustada = 1,51; IC95%: 1

  8. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and drug susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    The global control of tuberculosis remains a challenge from the standpoint of diagnosis, detection of drug resistance, and treatment. This is an area of special concern to the health of women and children, particularly in regions of the world with high infant mortality rates and where women have limited access to health care. Because treatment can only be initiated when infection is detected, and is guided by the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, there recently has been a marked increase in the development and testing of novel assays designed to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, with or without simultaneous detection of resistance to isoniazid and/or rifampin. Both nonmolecular and molecular assays have been developed. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the use of rapid tests to detect M tuberculosis and drug resistance. Review of the most recent World Health Organization Global Tuberculosis Report, as well as selected publications in the primary research literature, meta-analyses, and review articles. To a large extent, nonmolecular methods are refinements or modifications of conventional methods, with the primary goal of providing more rapid test results. In contrast, molecular methods use novel technologies to detect the presence of M tuberculosis complex and genes conferring drug resistance. Evaluations of molecular assays have generally shown that these assays are of variable sensitivity for detecting the presence of M tuberculosis complex, and in particular are insensitive when used with smear-negative specimens. As a group, molecular assays have been shown to be of high sensitivity for detecting resistance to rifampin, but of variable sensitivity for detecting resistance to isoniazid.

  9. Efficacy of Microencapsulated Rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Staas, Jay K.; Winchester, Gary A.; Barrow, Esther L. W.; Barrow, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Rifampin is a first-line drug useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. By using biocompatible polymeric excipients of lactide and glycolide copolymers, two microsphere formulations were developed for targeted and sustained delivery of rifampin, with minimal dosing. A small-microsphere formulation, with demonstrated ability to inhibit intracellularly replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, was tested along with a large-microsphere formulation in an infected mouse model. Results revealed that by using a single treatment of the large-microsphere formulation, it was possible to achieve a significant reduction in M. tuberculosis H37Rv CFUs in the lungs of mice by 26 days postinfection. A combination of small (given as two injections on day 0 and day 7) and large (given as one injection at day 0) rifampin-loaded microsphere formulations resulted in significant reductions in CFUs in the lungs by 26 days, achieving a 1.23 log10 reduction in CFUs. By comparison, oral treatment with 5, 10, or 20 mg of rifampin/kg of body weight, administered every day, resulted in a reduction of 0.42, 1.7, or 1.8 log10 units, respectively. Thus the microsphere formulations, administered in one or two doses, were able to achieve results in mice similar to those obtained with a daily drug regimen within the range of the highest clinically tolerated dosage in humans. These results demonstrate that microsphere formulations of antimycobacterial drugs such as rifampin can be used for therapy of tuberculosis with minimal dosing. PMID:10223927

  10. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amresh Kumar; Marak, Rungmei S. K.; Maurya, Anand Kumar; Das, Manaswini; Nag, Vijaya Lakshmi; Dhole, Tapan N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar) for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites. PMID:25789180

  11. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, P. P.; Retnakumar, R. J.; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation. PMID:26876331

  12. Downregulation of vimentin in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis is mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, P P; Retnakumar, R J; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists primarily in macrophages after infection and manipulates the host defence pathways in its favour. 2D gel electrophoresis results showed that vimentin, an intermediate filament protein, is downregulated in macrophages infected with live Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared to macrophages infected with heat- killed H37Rv. The downregulation was confirmed by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, the expression of vimentin in avirulent strain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra- infected macrophages was similar to the expression in heat-killed H37Rv- infected macrophages. Increased expression of vimentin in H2O2- treated live H37Rv-infected macrophages and decreased expression of vimentin both in NAC and DPI- treated heat-killed H37Rv-infected macrophages showed that vimentin expression is positively regulated by ROS. Ectopic expression of ESAT-6 in macrophages decreased both the level of ROS and the expression of vimentin which implies that Mycobacterium tuberculosis-mediated downregulation of vimentin is at least in part due to the downregulation of ROS by the pathogen. Interestingly, the incubation of macrophages with anti-vimentin antibody increased the ROS production and decreased the survival of H37Rv. In addition, we also showed that the pattern of phosphorylation of vimentin in macrophages by PKA/PKC is different from monocytes, emphasizing a role for vimentin phosphorylation in macrophage differentiation.

  13. [Advances in the research of an animal model of wound due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Jia, Chiyu

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis ranks as the second deadly infectious disease worldwide. The incidence of tuberculosis is high in China. Refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection ranks high in misdiagnosis, and it is accompanied by a protracted course, and its pathogenic mechanism is still not so clear. In order to study its pathogenic mechanism, it is necessary to reproduce an appropriate animal model. Up to now the study of the refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is just beginning, and there is still no unimpeachable model for study. This review describes two models which may reproduce a wound similar to the wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, so that they could be used to study the pathogenesis and characteristics of a tuberculosis wound in an animal.

  14. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  15. Pulmonary Mycobacterium marinum infection: 'fish tank granuloma' of the lung.

    PubMed

    Velu, Prasad Palani; Fernandes, Susan E; Laurenson, Ian F; Noble, Donald D

    2016-11-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with a six-month history of lethargy, weight loss and dry cough. He had a background of mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Chest radiograph showed new right upper lobe cavitary opacification. Sputum cultures were acid-fast bacilli smear positive and yielded Mycobacterium marinum - a non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) often found in aquatic environments and rarely associated with respiratory disease. The suspected source was silent aspiration of contaminated water, likely due to his initiating the siphon of his fish-tank by mouth. He completed a one-year course of rifampicin, ethambutol and clarithromycin, with negative repeat sputum mycobacteria cultures and radiological improvement. This case report demonstrates a successful approach to investigation and further management of Mycobacterium marinum pulmonary disease - a rare condition, particularly in immunocompetent individuals, with limited treatment guidelines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. A case of postoperative breast infection by Mycobacterium fortuitum associated with the hospital water supply.

    PubMed

    Jaubert, Julien; Mougari, Faiza; Picot, Sandrine; Boukerrou, Malik; Barau, Georges; Ali Ahmed, Sitty-Amina; Raskine, Laurent; Camuset, Guillaume; Michault, Alain; Simac, Catherine; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    This report describes the first known laboratory-confirmed case of Mycobacterium fortuitum breast infection related to the hospital water supply. The source of the M fortuitum infection was identified by repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based polymerase chain reaction genotyping. In addition, we discuss appropriate infection control measures to minimize patient exposure to waterborne pathogens, in particular, in the context of nontuberculous mycobacteria, which is difficult to eradicate from the water supply network.

  17. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium infections in a tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) herd.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Graham C; Ziccardi, Michael H; Gonzales, Ben J; Woods, Leslie M; Fischer, Jon K; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2006-10-01

    Between 2 August and 22 September 2000, 37 hunter-killed tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) were evaluated at the Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California, USA, for evidence of paratuberculosis. Elk were examined post-mortem, and tissue and fecal samples were submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. Acid-fast isolates were identified by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that discriminates among members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Histopathologic evaluations were completed, and animals were tested for antibodies using a Johne's enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel immunodiffusion. In addition, 104 fecal samples from tule elk remaining in the herd were collected from the ground and submitted for radiometric mycobacterial culture. No gross lesions were detected in any of the hunter-killed animals. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was cultured once from ileocecal tissue of one adult elk and was determined to be a strain (A18) found commonly in infected cattle. One or more isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) were isolated from tissues of five additional adult elk. Gastrointestinal tract and lymph node tissues from 17 of the 37 elk (46%) examined had histopathologic lesions commonly seen with mycobacterial infection; however, acid-fast bacteria were not observed. All MAC infections were detected from adult elk (P = 0.023). In adult elk, a statistically significant association was found between MAA infection and ELISA sample-to-positive ratio (S/P) > or = 0.25 (P=0.021); four of five MAA culture-positive elk tested positive by ELISA. Sensitivity and specificity of ELISA S/P > or = 0.25 for detection of MAA in adult elk were 50% and 93%, respectively. No significant associations were found between MAC infection and sex or histopathologic lesions. Bacteriologic culture confirmed infection with MAP and MAA in this asymptomatic tule elk herd. The Johne's ELISA was useful in signaling

  18. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  19. Heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 confers host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2013-07-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (M) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1(-/-)) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1(+/+)) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1(-/-) mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1(-/-) versus Hmox1(+/+) SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected M, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type M in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in M, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Free-Roaming Wild Asian Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Umashankar, Kunigal Srinivasa; Nandini, Poojappa; Giridhar, Papanna; Byregowda, Somenahalli Munivenkatappa; Shrinivasa, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a wild Asian elephant at Rajiv Gandhi National Park, India, revealed nodular lesions, granulomas with central caseation, and acid-fast bacilli in the lungs. PCR and nucleotide sequencing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study indicates that wild elephants can harbor M. tuberculosis that can become fatal. PMID:28221114

  1. Mycobacterium conceptionense Bloodstream Infection in a Patient with Advanced Gastric Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yaita, Kenichiro; Matsunaga, Mototsugu; Tashiro, Naotaka; Sakai, Yoshiro; Masunaga, Kenji; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Oshima, Koichi; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Takaki, Akiko; Mitarai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-24

    A 65-year-old Japanese male farmer with advanced gastric adenocarcinoma and multiple hepatic metastases was admitted to our hospital. Blood culture results were positive on day 5, and Gram-positive rods were detected. According to the results of Ziehl-Neelsen staining and a cultured colony of this bacterium, we suspected a mycobacterial infection. Suspecting a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM), we started multidrug therapy with levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and ethambutol, and the patient recovered from the bloodstream infection. Further gene examination (16S rRNA, hsp65, and sodA) revealed an isolate of Mycobacterium conceptionense. M. conceptionense was first identified as an RGM in 2006. Among previous case reports of M. conceptionense infections, bone and soft tissue infections in hosts with a disorder of the normal structure (e.g., surgical sites) were dominant. We report the characteristics of M. conceptionense infection in this first Japanese case report and a review of the literature.

  2. Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in endemically infected dairy herds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is thought to be the primary source of infection for dairy cattle. The exact link between fecal shedding of MAP by individual cows and environmental contamination levels at the herd level was explored with a cross-se...

  3. Anatomical distribution of Mycobacterium bovis genotypes in experimentally infected white-tailed deer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in white-tailed deer (WTD). Natural infection of WTD with M. bovis is most closely mimicked by instilling inoculum into palatine tonsilar crypts. One hundred fifty days after intratonsilar inoculation, M. bovis was cultured from 30 tissues originati...

  4. Cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum Infection: Successfully Treated with Amikacin and Ofloxacin Combination.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sunil; Arora, Shilpa; Gupta, Vikas; Kumar, Shiv

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by atypical mycobacteria are uncommon and the diagnosis can be missed unless there is strong clinical suspicion supported by laboratory confirmation. We report a case of chronic discharging sinus caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum in a young healthy immunocompetent individual. The patient recovered completely following amikacin and ofloxacin therapy.

  5. Transcriptional profiling of ileocecal valve of Holstein dairy cows infected with mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advan...

  6. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the infection process to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is tantamount to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for the control of this disease in the field. The current study compared the effectiveness of oral and intraperitoneal methods of experimental in...

  7. Rapid Accumulation of Eosinophils in Lung Lesions in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasco, Todd M.; Turner, Oliver C.; Cassone, Lynne; Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophils were positively identified in bronchoalveolar lavage populations and in the lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs. It is possible that the rapid influx of these cells, and their subsequent degranulation during acute pulmonary tuberculosis, may play a key role in the susceptibility of this animal model. PMID:14742563

  8. Population analysis of Fecal Microbiota from Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is a gram-positive, acid-fast bacillus that is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic infection of ruminant animals characterized by inflammation of the digestive tract leading to nutrient malabsorption and eventually ...

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in latently infected lungs by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo; Kaplan, Gilla

    2014-01-01

    Detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge in the diagnosis of asymptomatic, subclinical tuberculosis. We report the development of an immunofluorescence technique to visualize and enumerate M. tuberculosis in latently infected rabbit lungs where no acid-fast–stained organisms were seen and no cultivable bacilli were obtained by the agar-plating method. PMID:25161200

  10. Osteopontin Expression in Periparturient Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Periods of immunosuppression, typically seen at parturition, may contribute to the transition from the subclinical, or asymptomatic, to the clinical stage of inf...

  11. Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment and Control

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Paul D.; Wilson, Douglas; Colijn, Caroline; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Warren, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Numerous studies have reported that individuals can simultaneously harbor multiple distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To date, there has been limited discussion of the consequences for the individual or the epidemiological importance of mixed infections. Here, we review studies that documented mixed infections, highlight challenges associated with the detection of mixed infections, and discuss possible implications of mixed infections for the diagnosis and treatment of patients and for the community impact of tuberculosis control strategies. We conclude by highlighting questions that should be resolved in order to improve our understanding of the importance of mixed-strain M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:23034327

  12. Cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum and kansasii in an IgA-deficient man

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has steadily increased over the past decades, especially in immunocompromised patients. Case presentation We present a patient with IgA-deficiency and mixed cutaneous infection by two slowly growing mycobacteria, Mycobacterium (M.) haemophilum and M. kansasii. Conclusions Cutaneous M. haemophilum infections most often result from HIV or transplantation-associated immunosuppression. Rarely, M. haemophilum may also infect healthy patients or iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients without transplantation. M. kansasii is one of the most frequent NTM and large awareness exists about its involvement in human diseases. Mycobacterial diagnosis of cutaneous infections should be considered in long-lasting skin lesions. PMID:21269422

  13. One Episode of Self-Resolving Plasmodium yoelii Infection Transiently Exacerbates Chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Jannike; Eggers, Lars; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas; Schneider, Bianca E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and tuberculosis (Tb) are two of the main causes of death from infectious diseases globally. The pathogenic agents, Plasmodium parasites and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are co-endemic in many regions in the world, however, compared to other co-infections like HIV/Tb or helminth/Tb, malaria/Tb has been given less attention both in clinical and immunological studies. Due to the lack of sufficient human data, the impact of malaria on Tb and vice versa is difficult to estimate but co-infections are likely to occur very frequently. Due to its immunomodulatory properties malaria might be an underestimated risk factor for latent or active Tb patients particularly in high-endemic malaria settings were people experience reinfections very frequently. In the present study, we used the non-lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii to investigate, how one episode of self-resolving malaria impact on a chronic M. tuberculosis infection. P. yoelii co-infection resulted in exacerbation of Tb disease as demonstrated by increased pathology and cellular infiltration of the lungs which coincided with elevated levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. T cell responses were not impaired in co-infected mice but enhanced and likely contributed to increased cytokine production. We found a slight but statistically significant increase in M. tuberculosis burden in co-infected animals and increased lung CFU was positively correlated with elevated levels of TNFα but not IL-10. Infection with P. yoelii induced the recruitment of a CD11c+ population into lungs and spleens of M. tuberculosis infected mice. CD11c+ cells isolated from P. yoelii infected spleens promoted survival and growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro. 170 days after P. yoelii infection changes in immunopathology and cellular immune responses were no longer apparent while M. tuberculosis numbers were still slightly higher in lungs, but not in spleens of co-infected mice. In conclusion, one episode of P. yoelii co-infection

  14. Aquarium-borne Mycobacterium marinum skin infection. Report of 15 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; De Vito, Daniela; Vestita, Michelangelo; Delvecchio, Susanna; Ranieri, Luigi Davide; Santantonio, Marilina; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a non-tuberculous photochromogenic mycobacterium, commonly responsible for fish and amphibious infections world-wide. Contagion in humans typically follows minor hand trauma from aquarium keeping and manifests as a granulomatous infection of the skin. Dissemination is rare and almost exclusive to immunosuppressed hosts. 15 cases of M. marinum fish tank related infection are hereby reported. The site of infection was the upper limbs in all cases. 3 patients presented a single papulo-verrucous lesion, while the remaining 12 showed a sporotrichoid clinical pattern. Diagnosis was reached by history and clinical examination and further supported by one or more of the following criteria: histology, culture, acid fast bacilli identification from histologic specimen and PCR. 2 to 3 months minocycline treatment showed efficacy in 13 individuals, another case was treated with rifampicin-isoniazid association, yet another showed spontaneous regression over a 3 month period.

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid bioabsorbable screw: Case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Horng Lii; Chen, Darren B; Seeto, Bradley G; Macdessi, Samuel J

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of pretibial sinus and abscess after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid tricalcium phosphate bioabsorbable screw for tibial fixation. Mycobacterium fortuitum was identified as the pathogen after specific mycobacterial cultures were obtained from operative specimens. M. fortuitum is a known but rare cause of periprosthetic infection. Diagnosis is often delayed as routine microbiological cultures do not utilise specific culture requirements for mycobacterial growth. There have been several reports in the literature of sterile abscesses associated with bioabsorbable screws. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection associated with a bioabsorbable implant. This case illustrates that post-operative Mycobacterium infection can occur as a complication of ACL reconstruction with bioabsorbable screw fixation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-operative periprosthetic infection.

  16. Mycobacterium xenopi infection in an immunosuppressed patient with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Majoor, C; Schreurs, A; Weers-Pothoff, G

    2004-01-01

    A 48 year old patient with active Crohn's disease presented with bilateral nodules over his lungs resembling malignant metastasis. Bronchoscopic and pathological examination of the airways and sputum did not show any malignancy. After 6 weeks Mycobacterium xenopi was cultured from his bronchial washings while all other cultures remained negative. Treatment was started with rifampicin, ethambutol, and clarithromycin and, after 9 months of treatment, there was an almost complete resolution of his chest radiograph. PMID:15223876

  17. Mycobacterium marinum Hand Infection in a “Sushi Chef”

    PubMed Central

    Cennimo, David J.; Agag, Richard; Fleegler, Earl; Lardizabal, Alfred; Klein, Kenneth M.; Wenokor, Cornelia; Swaminathan, Shobha

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We present the case of a sushi chef with pain and swelling of his index finger and wrist for a year, unresponsive to antibiotics. Methods: Biopsy showed a xanthogranulomatous reaction and positive culture results for Mycobacterium marinum. Results: He was treated with minocycline, clarithromycin, and ethambutol. In addition, he underwent radical synovectomy of the lesion. Conclusion: The combined medical and surgical approach resulted in a positive outcome. PMID:19915656

  18. Cell death paradigms in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Parandhaman, Dinesh Kumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Cell death or senescence is a fundamental event that helps maintain cellular homeostasis, shapes the growth of organism, and provides protective immunity against invading pathogens. Decreased or increased cell death is detrimental both in infectious and non-infectious diseases. Cell death is executed both by regulated enzymic reactions and non-enzymic sudden collapse. In this brief review we have tried to summarize various cell death modalities and their impact on the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24634891

  19. Cell death paradigms in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Parandhaman, Dinesh Kumar; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2014-01-01

    Cell death or senescence is a fundamental event that helps maintain cellular homeostasis, shapes the growth of organism, and provides protective immunity against invading pathogens. Decreased or increased cell death is detrimental both in infectious and non-infectious diseases. Cell death is executed both by regulated enzymic reactions and non-enzymic sudden collapse. In this brief review we have tried to summarize various cell death modalities and their impact on the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  20. Pacemaker pocket infection due to Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yoo, David K; Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed M

    2017-01-10

    A woman aged 74 years with an implanted dual-chamber pacemaker presented with pacemaker site infection after failing empiric antimicrobial therapy. The pathogen was later identified as Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing mycobacteria species. The pacemaker was subsequently removed and the patient was treated with oral ciprofloxacin and doxycycline with clinical improvement. In this article, we describe a rare case of pacemaker site infection by M. goodii. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Paradoxical Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child.

    PubMed

    Kalk, Emma; Technau, Karl; Hendson, Willy; Coovadia, Ashraf

    2013-02-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome occurs in a subset of HIV-infected individuals as the immune system recovers secondary to antiretroviral therapy. An exaggerated and uncontrolled inflammatory response to antigens of viable or nonviable organisms is characteristic, with clinical deterioration despite improvement in laboratory indicators. We describe a fatal case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected child and review the literature.

  2. History, biology and chemistry of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer disease).

    PubMed

    Chany, Anne-Caroline; Tresse, Cédric; Casarotto, Virginie; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans infections (Buruli ulcer disease) have a long history that can be traced back 150 years. The successive discoveries of the mycobacteria in 1948 and of mycolactone A/B in 1999, the toxin responsible for this dramatic necrotic skin disease, resulted in a paradigm shift concerning the disease itself and in a broader sense, delineated an entirely new role for bioactive polyketides as virulence factors. The fascinating history, biology and chemistry of M. ulcerans infections are discussed in this review.

  3. Mycobacterium senegalense tissue infection in a child after fish tank exposure

    PubMed Central

    Talavlikar, Rachel; Carson, Julie; Meatherill, Bonnie; Desai, Shalini; Sharma, Meenu; Shandro, Cary; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Kuhn, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The present report describes the first known case of an otherwise healthy child who developed a soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium senegalense – a pathogen usually found in east Africa that is responsible for infecting various animals. The patient presented with nonhealing wounds after sustaining facial lacerations from the shattered glass of a fish tank. The patient responded well to scar revision and antibiotics, with no subsequent relapse. PMID:22942887

  4. Tuberculosis in swine co-infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Mycobacterium bovis in a cluster from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Barandiaran, S; Pérez, A M; Gioffré, A K; Martínez Vivot, M; Cataldi, A A; Zumárraga, M J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY In Argentina little is known about the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) infection in swine. We characterized the epidemiological dynamics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in a swine population of Argentina using molecular tools and spatial analysis techniques. Isolates (n = 196) obtained from TB-like lesions (n = 200) were characterized by polymerase chain reaction. The isolates were positive to either M. bovis (IS6110) (n = 160) or M. avium (IS1245) (n = 16) while the remaining 20 (10.2%) isolates were positive to both M. bovis and M. avium. The detection of both bacteria together suggests co-infection at the animal level. In addition, MAC-positive isolates (n = 36) were classified as M. avium subsp. avium (MAA) (n = 30) and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) (n = 6), which resulted in five genotypes when they were typed using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit, variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR). One significant (P = 0.017) spatial clustering of genotypes was detected, in which the proportion of MAH isolates was larger than expected under the null hypothesis of even distribution of genotypes. These results show that in Argentina the proportion of TB cases in pigs caused by M. avium is larger than that reported in earlier studies. The proportion of M. bovis-MAC co-infections was also higher than in previous reports. These results provide valuable information on the epidemiology of MAC infection in swine in Argentina.

  5. Control of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium intracellulare infections with respect to distinct granuloma formations in livers of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tânia Regina Marques da; Petersen, Antonio Luis de Oliveira Almeida; Santos, Theo de Araújo; Almeida, Taís Fontoura da; Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues da; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2010-08-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium that can cause a range of diseases in humans. Complications from M. fortuitum infection have been associated with numerous surgical procedures. A protective immune response against pathogenic mycobacterial infections is dependent on the granuloma formation. Within the granuloma, the macrophage effector response can inhibit bacterial replication and mediate the intracellular killing of bacteria. The granulomatous responses of BALB/c mice to rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria were assessed in vivo and the bacterial loads in spleens and livers from M. fortuitum and Mycobacterium intracellulare-infected mice, as well as the number and size of granulomas in liver sections, were quantified. Bacterial loads were found to be approximately two times lower in M. fortuitum-infected mice than in M. intracellulare-infected mice and M. fortuitum-infected mice presented fewer granulomas compared to M. intracellulare-infected mice. These granulomas were characterized by the presence of Mac-1+ and CD4+ cells. Additionally, IFN-γmRNA expression was higher in the livers of M. fortuitum-infected mice than in those of M. intracellulare-infected mice. These data clearly show that mice are more capable of controlling an infection with M. fortuitum than M. intracellulare. This capacity is likely related to distinct granuloma formations in mice infected with M. fortuitum but not with M. intracellulare.

  6. [Breast implant infection by Mycobacterium fortuitum in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Lizaso, Diego; García, Mercedes; Aguirre, Ana; Esposto, Amadeo

    2011-10-01

    In recent decades there has been an increase in the number of breast implants for reconstruction and cosmetic purposes. Infection is a severe complication mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. Mycobacteria are an infrequent cause of infection in this type of surgery. We describe a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in a patient with lupus, subjected to a prosthetic replacement. These patients are more prone to unusual opportunistic infections. Treatment always requires both removal of prosthetic material and antibiotic therapy.

  7. Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum infection in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; George, A; Papanicolaou, G A; Lacouture, M E; Tan, B H; Jakubowski, A A; Kaltsas, A

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a photochromogenic mycobacterium that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. In the general population, exposure to aquaria is the most common cause of M. marinum infection. Known as "swimmer's granuloma" or "fish tank granuloma," M. marinum is an occupational hazard for aquarium cleaners and fishermen. There are several reports in the literature of M. marinum infection in immunocompromised hosts, including those with solid organ transplants, but none in patients who have received stem cell transplants (SCTs). To our knowledge, this is a first report of disseminated M. marinum infection in an SCT recipient who continued to develop new skin lesions even after months of targeted therapy. The implications are that elderly patients who receive T-cell-depleted SCTs may be at prolonged risk for pathogens dependent on cellular immunity, and the presentation of illness with such pathogens may be more severe and widely disseminated than might otherwise be expected.

  8. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking organizing pneumonia associated with Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Minami, Daisuke; Irie, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old man diagnosed with invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lungs. Chest computed tomography showed subpleural ground-glass opacity and small nodules with cavitation. A culture of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid resulted in the detection of Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient's lung consolidation rapidly progressed; however, repeated bronchoscopy showed no atypical cells, thus suggesting a diagnosis of organizing pneumonia associated with M. fortuitum infection. However, the surgical biopsy specimen was diagnostic for adenocarcinoma, with no mycobacterial infection. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma should not be excluded in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical features of organizing pneumonia and nontuberculous mycobacterium infection, even if a transbronchial biopsy confirms the absence of malignancy.

  9. Mycobacterium marinum infection following contact with reptiles: vivarium granuloma.

    PubMed

    Bouricha, Mehdi; Castan, Bernard; Duchene-Parisi, Elisabeth; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-04-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with a 1.5-cm nodule on the first dorsal metacarpal ray. The patient denied having contact with fish tanks or fish, but recalled handling many reptiles without gloves in the vivarium where he worked. A culture of a skin biopsy specimen yielded Mycobacterium marinum. The clinical outcome was favourable after a 2-week course of intramuscular gentamicin (180 mg daily) combined with a 6-week course of oral clarithromycin (500 mg twice a day). Doctors should be aware that vivariums, in addition to fish tanks, can be sources of M. marinum exposure.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Shin, N S; Kwon, S W; Han, D H; Bai, G H; Yoon, J; Cheon, D S; Son, Y S; Ahn, K; Chae, C; Lee, Y S

    1995-10-01

    A respiratory disorder was noted in a 5-year-old female orangutan kept in the Yongin Farmland. Radiographically, multiple radiodense foci ranging from 2 to 6 mm diameter were seen throughout the lung lobes. Grossly, the thoracic cavity revealed a firm texture and grayish-pink discoloration of the left apical lung lobe. Histopathologically, multifocal areas of granulomatous pneumonia present the right and left apical lung lobes. Both primers from IS1081 and IS6110 targeting 196 bp and 245 bp respectively were used in polymerase chain reaction, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from liver and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction.

  11. Disseminated Mycobacterium genavense infection in a chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Huynh, M; Pingret, J-L; Nicolier, A

    2014-07-01

    A 1-year-old neutered male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) was presented with emaciation and a 1-month history of progressive weight loss. The animal was bright and responsive on clinical examination, but had poor body condition. Serum biochemical analysis revealed elevated alanine amino transferase and alkaline phosphatase. Ultrasound examination was unremarkable. Thoracic radiography showed changes consistent with bullous emphysema and severe pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, but the chinchilla died 6 weeks later. Necropsy examination revealed granulomatous lesions in the lungs and liver. Numerous acid-fast bacilli were present in the cytoplasm of macrophages. Sequencing of genetic material isolated from fixed tissue classified the pathogen as Mycobacterium genavense.

  12. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum infection with extensive cutaneous eruption and bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Streit, Markus; Böhlen, Lorenz M; Hunziker, Thomas; Zimmerli, Stefan; Tscharner, Gion G; Nievergelt, Helga; Bodmer, Thomas; Braathen, Lasse R

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum can cause fish tank granuloma (or swimming pool or aquarium granuloma) in immunocompetent patients. Dissemination of Mycobacterium marinum-infection is a rare condition which occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients and can be life-threatening. We report the case of an 87-year-old woman who was treated with oral corticosteroids for polymyalgia rheumatica for many years and developed erythema nodosum-like lesions on the right forearm and arthritis of the right wrist. By increasing the steroid dosage and adding methotrexate only short-term remission was achieved. Seven months later painful erythematous nodules occurred on all extremities which became necrotic, ulcerative and suppurative. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed acid-fast bacilli and Mycobacterium marinum was cultured from skin biopsies, blood, and urine. The critically ill patient was treated with clarithromycin and ethambutol resulting in a dramatic improvement of the general condition. After four months, doxycycline had to be added because of new skin lesions. This case illustrates the impact of Mycobacterium marinum infection in immunocompromised patients.

  14. Heterogeneity in the risk of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badger (Meles meles) cubs.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, A J; Chambers, M A; Carter, S P; Wilson, G J; Smith, G C; McDonald, R A; Delahay, R J

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of certain infected individuals within socially structured populations can have a disproportionately large effect on the spatio-temporal distribution of infection. Endemic infection with Mycobacterium bovis in European badgers (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland is an important source of bovine tuberculosis in cattle. Here we quantify the risk of infection in badger cubs in a high-density wild badger population, in relation to the infection status of resident adults. Over a 24-year period, we observed variation in the risk of cub infection, with those born into groups with resident infectious breeding females being over four times as likely to be detected excreting M. bovis than cubs from groups where there was no evidence of infection in adults. We discuss how our findings relate to the persistence of infection at both social group and population level, and the potential implications for disease control strategies.

  15. Aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causes rapid loss of diversity in gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Winglee, Kathryn; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley; Gupta, Shashank; Guo, Haidan; Fraser, Claire; Bishai, William

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an important human pathogen, and yet diagnosis remains challenging. Little research has focused on the impact of M. tuberculosis on the gut microbiota, despite the significant immunological and homeostatic functions of the gastrointestinal tract. To determine the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the gut microbiota, we followed mice from M. tuberculosis aerosol infection until death, using 16S rRNA sequencing. We saw a rapid change in the gut microbiota in response to infection, with all mice showing a loss and then recovery of microbial community diversity, and found that pre-infection samples clustered separately from post-infection samples, using ecological beta-diversity measures. The effect on the fecal microbiota was observed as rapidly as six days following lung infection. Analysis of additional mice infected by a different M. tuberculosis strain corroborated these results, together demonstrating that the mouse gut microbiota significantly changes with M. tuberculosis infection.

  16. An outbreak of Mycobacterium genavense infection in a flock of captive diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata).

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Fukuta, Mayumi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    Two diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) in a flock of 23 birds housed in an aviary in a zoo in central Japan were found dead as a result of mycobacteriosis. Fecal samples of the remaining doves were positive for mycobacterial infection, and thus they were euthanatized. Clinical signs and gross pathology, including weight loss and sudden death and slight enlargement of the liver and intestine, were observed in a small number of birds (3/23). Disseminated histiocytic infiltration of either aggregates or sheets of epithelioid cells containing acid-fast bacilli, in the absence of caseous necrosis, were observed in different organs of the infected doves, especially lungs (23/23), intestines (9/23), livers (7/23), and hearts (6/23). Mycobacterium sp. was isolated from the livers of three birds (3/23). DNA extracted from frozen liver and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (5/23) were used for amplification of the gene encoding mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65). The causative Mycobacterium species was identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mycobacterium genavense infection was confirmed in three of the diamond doves. Moreover, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed 100% identity across the three samples tested, and 99.77% nucleotide homology of the isolate sequence to M. genavense. The main route of M. genavense infection in the diamond doves was most likely airborne, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk of airborne transmission between humans and birds.

  17. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection following total knee arthroplasty: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ian; Wilson, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Although Mycobacterium fortuitum is ubiquitous in our environment, infection of total knee arthroplasties with this organism is uncommon. This particular mycobacterium belongs to a group of organisms known as rapidly growing mycobacteria that distinguishes itself from the more typical Mycobacterium tuberculosis by their lower virulence and lack of human-to-human transmission. Another distinguishing feature is their resistance to almost all traditional anti-tuberculous medications and many antibiotics. Because such infections are encountered so infrequently, delays in reaching a microbiological diagnosis are not unusual. This inevitably compromises patient care. At present, there is no universally accepted treatment protocol. Management tends to be individualized, but cure may be possible with a prolonged course of appropriate anti-microbial therapy, removal of the implant, biopsy to confirm eradication of the organism, and finally, reimplantation of a new prosthesis. This paper presents the successful treatment of such an infection. Use of the combination of meropenem and moxifloxacin has not been previously reported in this setting. This case suggests that their in vivo activity is clinically effective against M. fortuitum peri-prosthetic infections when combined with surgical therapy.

  18. Molecular, epidemiological and infectivity characterisation of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain prevalent in Madrid.

    PubMed

    Martín, A; Chaves, F; Iñigo, J; Alonso, M; Sola, C; Rastogi, N; Ruiz Serrano, M J; Palenque, E; Bouza, E; García de Viedma, D

    2007-12-01

    The most prevalent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Madrid, Spain (strain 5) was recovered from 45 cases between 1997 and 2004 and showed a highly homogeneous genetic composition. This strain was not exclusive to Spain, and its spoligotyping signature (ST20) was found in entries from different countries in the SITVIT1 database. Patients infected with strain 5 were more frequently positive for human immunodeficiency virus and autochthonous, and had been in prison more frequently, but strain 5 did not show increased infectivity in an in-vitro model of infection.

  19. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  20. Effects of dexamethasone and transient malnutrition on rabbits infected with aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551.

    PubMed

    Kesavan, Anup K; Mendez, Susana E; Hatem, Christine L; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Aird, Katherine; Pitt, M Louise M; Dannenberg, Arthur M; Manabe, Yukari C

    2005-10-01

    Malnutrition is common in the developing world, where tuberculosis is often endemic. Rabbits infected with aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis that subsequently became inadvertently and transiently malnourished had compromised cell-mediated immunity comparable to that of the rabbits immunosuppressed with dexamethasone. They had significant leukopenia and reduced delayed-type hypersensitivity responses. Malnutrition dampened cell-mediated immunity and would interfere with diagnostic tests that rely on intact CD4 T-cell responses.

  1. A pseudoepidemic of Mycobacterium chelonae infection caused by contamination of a fibreoptic bronchoscope suction channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, H C; Liaw, Y S; Yang, P C; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T

    1995-08-01

    An unusual increase in the frequency of isolation of Mycobacterium chelonae subspecies chelonae from specimens of bronchial washings was found between September and December 1992 in National Taiwan University Hospital. During this period, a total of 123 patients underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy with an Olympus P20. Seventy six patients had bronchial washing for bacteriological study and cytological examination. Acid-fast bacilli were found in 21 patients, in 18 of whom Mycobacterium chelonae were isolated from bronchial washing cultures. Eight patients were treated as mycobacterial infected, because of the presence of unexplained pulmonary lesion, positive acid-fast stain and culture for Mycobacterium chelonae. Diagnosis of lung cancer was delayed in one patient because of the initial negative cytological study and positive bacterial culture. The fibreoptic bronchoscope was disinfected by automated washing machine (EW-20, Olympus) using 2.3% glutaraldehyde according to a standard protocol. From a survey to search for possible sources of contamination, they were identified at the suction channel of four different bronchoscopes. This episode proved to be a pseudoepidemic. The contamination was controlled by extensive suction and rinsing of the channel with 70% alcohol immediately after disinfection by the automated bronchoscope disinfection machine. This study shows that, despite using the disinfection machine, the suction channel could still be contaminated with Mycobacterium chelonae. This may cause diagnostic confusion and unnecessary antimycobacterial treatment.

  2. Spatiotemporal and Ecological Patterns of Mycobacterium microti Infection in Wild Boar (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Chiari, M; Ferrari, N; Giardiello, D; Avisani, D; Pacciarini, M L; Alborali, L; Zanoni, M; Boniotti, M B

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium microti has recently been described as the causative agent of tuberculosis-like lesions in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a reservoir specie of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in some European Mediterranean ecosystem. Through a five-year survey on tuberculosis in free-living wild boars, the epidemiological trend of M. microti infections and the host and population risk factors linked with its occurrence were described. Retropharyngeal and mandibular lymph nodes of 3041 hunted wild boars from six different districts were macroscopically inspected. The sex and age of each animal were registered, as well as the animal abundance in each district. Lesions compatible with tuberculosis (190) were collected and analysed using a gyrB PCR-RFLP assay. M. microti was identified directly in 99 tissue samples (Prev = 3.26%; 95% CI: 2.67-3.97%), while neither Mycobacterium bovis, nor other members of the MTBC were detected. The probability of being M. microti positive showed spatio-temporal variability, with 26% of increase of risk of being infected for each year. Moreover, a positive effect of wild boar abundance and age on the prevalence was detected. The generalized increase in the European wild boar population, coupled with its sensitivity to M. microti infection, poses a future concern for the identification and management of MTBC members in wild boar.

  3. Mixed infection of an atypical Mycobacterium and Aspergillus following a cryopreserved fat graft to a face.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Kee; Kim, Han Joon; Hwang, Kun

    2013-09-01

    We report a chronic infection of a patient who received a cryopreserved fat graft on her face. A 22-year-old female patient presented with multiple abscesses of her face. Four months previously, she received a second fat graft with the fat harvested at a previous surgery which was cryopreserved for 2 months. On examination, she had tender erythematous nodules on both cheeks. A computed tomography of her neck showed multiple peripheral enhancing nodular lesions. In an open pus fungus culture, Aspergillus fumigatus growth was observed. On the Mycobacterium Other Than Tuberculosis identification PCR, Mycobacterium fortuitum was found. She was treated with levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and minocycline for 11 months, and finally the symptoms subsided. To avoid infection after the fat graft, cryopreserved fat should not be used as a possible grafting material. In cases of persistent infection, or in cases of waxes and gains after drainage of pus and short-term antibiotics therapy, atypical Mycobacterium or Aspergillus should be suspected and a PCR for them should be carried out.

  4. Evaluation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis SO2 vaccine using a natural tuberculosis infection model in goats.

    PubMed

    Bezos, J; Casal, C; Álvarez, J; Roy, A; Romero, B; Rodríguez-Bertos, A; Bárcena, C; Díez, A; Juste, R; Gortázar, C; Puentes, E; Aguiló, N; Martín, C; de Juan, L; Domínguez, L

    2017-05-01

    The development of new vaccines against animal tuberculosis (TB) is a priority for improving the control and eradication of this disease, particularly in those species not subjected to compulsory eradication programmes. In this study, the protection conferred by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis SO2 experimental vaccine was evaluated using a natural infection model in goats. Twenty-six goats were distributed in three groups: (1) 10 goats served as a control group; (2) six goats were subcutaneously vaccinated with BCG; and (3) 10 goats were subcutaneously vaccinated with SO2. Four months after vaccination, all groups were merged with goats infected with Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium caprae, and tested over a 40 week period using a tuberculin intradermal test and an interferon-γ assay for mycobacterial reactivity. The severity of lesions was determined at post-mortem examination and the bacterial load in tissues were evaluated by culture. The two vaccinated groups had significantly lower lesion and bacterial culture scores than the control group (P<0.05); at the end of the study, the SO2 vaccinated goats had the lowest lesion and culture scores. These results suggest that the SO2 vaccine provides some protection against TB infection acquired from natural exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization and management of asymptomatic Mycobacterium infections at the Zebrafish International Resource Center.

    PubMed

    Murray, Katrina N; Bauer, Justin; Tallen, Ari; Matthews, Jennifer L; Westerfield, Monte; Varga, Zoltan M

    2011-09-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) supplies wildtype, mutant, and transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) to the international research community. In 2005, the ZIRC halted shipment of adult Tübingen (TU) zebrafish, a popular wildtype line, after diagnosis of asymptomatic Mycobacterium chelonae infections in a high proportion of the TU stock. Mycobacterium presents a zoonotic risk to fish handlers. In addition, the presence of underlying chronic disease in a model organism is unacceptable. The TU stock was depopulated and replaced by a new import of TU with the intent of reducing disease prevalence. In the current study, we sampled the new population of TU and fish of the AB, Tupfel long-fin (TL), TAB5 and TAB14 (2 AB × TU hybrid lines), and wildtype-in-Kalkutta (WIK) lines for histologic evaluation and acid-fast staining and compared the prevalence of subclinical mycobacteriosis between these lines. Although prevalence in the new TU stock was lower than that of the original TU stock, asymptomatic infections with Mycobacterium remained high (10%) in the new TU stock held in 20-gal tanks. The prevalence was similar (10%) in the TAB5 line compared with other wildtype lines held in similar conditions. Prevalence of infections in TU can be minimized by husbandry adjustments, including tank size, population density, and cleaning method. Application of these findings has allowed us to decrease mycobacteriosis in TU zebrafish and resume shipment of TU adults to the research community.

  6. Characterization and Management of Asymptomatic Mycobacterium Infections at the Zebrafish International Resource Center

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katrina N; Bauer, Justin; Tallen, Ari; Matthews, Jennifer L; Westerfield, Monte; Varga, Zoltan M

    2011-01-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) supplies wildtype, mutant, and transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) to the international research community. In 2005, the ZIRC halted shipment of adult Tübingen (TU) zebrafish, a popular wildtype line, after diagnosis of asymptomatic Mycobacterium chelonae infections in a high proportion of the TU stock. Mycobacterium presents a zoonotic risk to fish handlers. In addition, the presence of underlying chronic disease in a model organism is unacceptable. The TU stock was depopulated and replaced by a new import of TU with the intent of reducing disease prevalence. In the current study, we sampled the new population of TU and fish of the AB, Tupfel long-fin (TL), TAB5 and TAB14 (2 AB × TU hybrid lines), and wildtype-in-Kalkutta (WIK) lines for histologic evaluation and acid-fast staining and compared the prevalence of subclinical mycobacteriosis between these lines. Although prevalence in the new TU stock was lower than that of the original TU stock, asymptomatic infections with Mycobacterium remained high (10%) in the new TU stock held in 20-gal tanks. The prevalence was similar (10%) in the TAB5 line compared with other wildtype lines held in similar conditions. Prevalence of infections in TU can be minimized by husbandry adjustments, including tank size, population density, and cleaning method. Application of these findings has allowed us to decrease mycobacteriosis in TU zebrafish and resume shipment of TU adults to the research community. PMID:22330714

  7. Early Immune Markers Associated with Experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Methods of experimental infection included: Control (n...

  8. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  9. Skin, subcutaneous tissue, and allograft infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Raees F; Bappa, Adamu; Ahmad, Mustafa; AlShaebi, Fuad

    2014-11-01

    Different types of skin disorders are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients. The development of nodular skin lesions in these patients would usually raise a suspicion of Kaposi's sarcoma. We report a patient, who presented with nodular skin lesions one year post transplant, but the biopsy revealed a rare diagnosis - Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum) infection of the skin, subcutaneous, and renal allograft. He was treated successfully with an initial two-week course of intravenous cefoxitin, followed by a six-month course of ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and co-trimoxazole. There are a few reported cases of M. fortuitum infection in renal transplant recipients in the literature - notably urinary tract infection, allograft infection, and psoas abscess, but to the best of our knowledge this is the first case demonstrating extensive infection involving the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and renal allograft. Physicians vested with the care of renal transplant patients should be aware of this rare infection in these patients.

  10. Palaeogenomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: epidemic bursts with a degrading genome.

    PubMed

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Genome-scale analysis suggests that the last common ancestor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium leprae diverged 36 million years ago, and members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex differentiated 40,000 years ago. Analysis of palaeomicrobiological data from a 17,000-year-old sample from a bison and a 9000-year-old sample from a human being suggested that M tuberculosis preceded Mycobacterium bovis and related species. Whole-genome comparisons show that members of the M tuberculosis complex form a unique bacterial species with distinct ecotypes that are transmissible from any infected mammalian species to several others. Genomic deletions identified several M tuberculosis lineages that could be placed on a phylogeographical map, suggesting adaptation to local host populations. The degrees of transmissibility and virulence vary between M tuberculosis clones, with increased virulence mainly linked to gene loss in regulatory pathways. Such data suggest that most M tuberculosis clones have a restricted spreading capacity between the host population, allowing unpredictable bursts of highly transmissible, virulent, and successful clones, such as the east Asian (Beijing) clone. Advances in genomics have helped the development of molecular techniques for accurate identification of species and clones in the M tuberculosis complex, which is essential for tracing the source of infections.

  11. Mycobacterium branderi infection: Case report and literature review of an unusual and difficult-to-treat non-tuberculous mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Shannon L; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Hernandez, Cristina; Kabbani, Dima; Doucette, Karen; Cervera, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    A 67-year-old man with significant smoking history presented with fever, unintentional weight loss, night sweats, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Multiple respiratory specimens grew Mycobacterium branderi. Computed tomography scanning of the chest revealed a cavitary right upper lung lesion. Bronchoscopy and thoracoscopic biopsy were negative for malignancy but showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation, which was culture negative. Due to clinical and radiologic progression despite therapy with clarithromycin, ethambutol and moxifloxacin, the lesion was surgically resected and the patient's symptoms resolved. Mycobacteria were seen in histopathology but did not grow from resected tissue. The patient received an additional 6 months of medical therapy and remains asymptomatic 1 month after completing antimicrobials. Cases of M. branderi causing human infection are very rarely reported. This is a novel case of multi-drug resistant M. branderi pulmonary infection in an apparently immunocompetent patient, progressive despite medical therapy and requiring surgical resection for definitive management. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrocardiographic changes in lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Zawar, P B; Chawhan, R N; Swami, R M

    1983-04-01

    The electrocardiographic (E.C.G.) changes were evaluated in 54 patients of lepra reaction. Abnormalities of the E.C.G. observed were in the form of prolongation of QTc in 24 (44.44%), ST-T changes in a (16.66%), bundle branch block and ventricular extrasystoles in 2 each (3.70%). The mean QTc interval in 64 normal adults was 0.41 second (S.D. +/- 0.03, range 0.36 to 0.44 second). It was 0.44 second (S.D. +/- 0.05, range 0.38 to 0.52 second) in patients of lepra reaction. The difference in the QTc values in the two groups was statistically significant (P less than 0.01). The E.C.G. abnormalities in patients of lepra reaction appears to be due to myocardial involvement.

  13. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  14. Mycobacterium kansasii Infection in a Patient Receiving Biologic Therapy-Not All Reactive Interferon Gamma Release Assays Are Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Nasir; Saba, Raya; Maddika, Srikanth; Weinstein, Mitchell

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii, a nontuberculous mycobacterium, can lead to lung disease similar to tuberculosis. Immunotherapeutic biologic agents predispose to infections with mycobacteria, including M kansasii. T-cell-mediated interferon gamma release assays like QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test (QFT) are widely used by clinicians for the diagnosis of infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis; however, QFT may also show positive result with certain nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of M kansasii pulmonary infection, with a positive QFT, in an immunocompromised patient receiving prednisone, leflunomide and tocilizumab, a humanized anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody. This case highlights the risk of mycobacterial infections with the use of various biologic agents and the need for caution when interpreting the results of interferon gamma release assays.

  15. Association of Mycobacterium infections in patients with Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease with venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Alinejad Dizaj, Maryam; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Tabarsi, Payam; Ahari, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Ahmad; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Emami, Habib; Mortaz, Esmaeil

    2016-10-01

    An association between a hypercoagulable state and Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) has been established in a few studies; resultant thrombosis is considered rare. In a case-control study, the prevalence of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T, A1298C mutations were investigated in mycobacterium-infected patients. The study comprised 30 patients with mycobacterial infections (invasive, disseminated and/or recurrent infections with Bacille Calmette-Guerin or non-tuberculosis mycobacteria and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis with positive results for acid-fast bacilli and tuberculin skin tests) and 30 normal healthy controls. Forty female (66.7%) and 20 male subjects (33.3%) aged from 3 to 70 years were recruited into this study. Genotyping of targeted genes was performed by RT-PCR and cytokine TNF-α concentrations were quantified using a commercially available ELISA kit. Significant associations between mycobacterial infection and TNF-α production after stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with LPS alone and with IFN-γ plus LPS were identified. Moreover, genotyping analysis in the studied population revealed a significant association between MTHFR c.677C>T (OR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.35-7.92; P < 0.05), MTHFR c.1298A>C (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.10-4.93; P < 0.05) and mycobacterial infection in affected patients, indicating susceptibility to venous thromboembolism according to previous studies. Additionally, mycobacterium-infected patients had a significantly greater prevalence of MTHFR C677T and A1298C mutations than controls.

  16. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  17. Mycobacterium marinum cutaneous infections acquired from occupations and hobbies.

    PubMed

    Kullavanijaya, P; Sirimachan, S; Bhuddhavudhikrai, P

    1993-07-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTB) infections are not commonly diagnosed in Thailand. The dissertation of reported cases among 10 published reports of 44 cases within 20 years revealed only six cases of cutaneous infections in which M. marinum was not included. The proven cases of M. marinum infection were studied at the Institute of Dermatology, Bangkok from 1981 to 1990. The clinical data, histopathology, tuberculin test, chest x-ray, and treatments were recorded. M. marinum skin infection accounted for 18 cases (81.8% of NTB skin infection), 10 men and 8 women. A history of preceding trauma occurred in 11 cases (61.1%), most of which were negligible wounds or minor abrasions. Twelve cases (66.7%) were in contact with organisms in their occupations and hobbies associated with fish and water exposure. Eighteen cases of M. marinum cutaneous infection acquired from occupations and hobbies were reported. The term "M. marinum cutaneous infection" or "M. marinum granuloma" instead of swimming pool granuloma or fish tank granuloma was proposed. According to this study, cotrimoxazole was the most appropriate drug for the treatment of M. marinum cutaneous infection.

  18. Direct molecular detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suspected to be the specific infection in a case of recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Lukšić, Boris; Kljajić, Zlatko; Roje, Zeljka; Forempoher, Gea; Grgić, Duška; Janković-Katalinić, Vera; Goić-Barišić, Ivana

    2013-12-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old man with recurrent tonsillitis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For a period of 5 months, the patient had tonsillitis seven times and was treated with several oral or parenteral antibiotics. On one of these occasions, tonsillitis was complicated with a peritonsillar abscess that was treated by incision. According to relevant bibliographic data, this is the first case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confirmed by direct molecular microbiology methods from the tonsillar tissue of a young immunocompetent male reported in Europe. In a case of recurrent tonsillitis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection should be considered as a possible cause.

  19. Identification of Cutaneous Mycobacterium massiliense Infections Associated with Repeated Surgical Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ah Young; Kim, Yeon Sook; Kook, Yoon Hoh; Kim, Shin Ok; Back, Seung Ju; Seo, Young Joon; Lee, Jeung Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense, an emerging pathogen that is increasingly reported as a causative agent in infections occurring during medical procedures, is difficult to be identified using conventional methods. Here we report the case of a cutaneous M. massiliense infection that was associated with repeated surgical procedures and that was identified via a comparative sequence analysis of rpoB and hsp65. The patient showed a substantial response to treatment with a combination of antimicrobial therapies consisting of clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin for 6 months. PMID:20548899

  20. Mycobacterium bovis infection in a wild sow (Sus scrofa): the first case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Myung; Jang, Young-Boo; Jang, Yunho; Yu, So Yoon; Kim, Jiro; Moon, Oun Kyung; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Min Kwon; Jeong, Tae Nam

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium (M.) bovis causes tuberculosis and has a broad host range, including humans, livestock, and wild animals. M. bovis infection of wild boar has been reported in several European countries. We report here the first case of M. bovis infection in a domesticated wild sow in Korea. Granulomatous and necrotizing lesions with small numbers of acid-fast bacilli were observed in nodules of the lung of wild sow. Furthermore, the M. bovis isolate from the wild sow had spoligotype SB0140 and a novel MIRU-VNTR allelic profile, which is not found in cattle and deer in Korea. PMID:26726026

  1. Fatal Pulmonary Infection Due to Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ardito, Fausta; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; La Sorda, Marilena; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Ricciotti, Gabriella; Fadda, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of fatal pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus in a young patient with cystic fibrosis, who underwent bipulmonary transplantation after a 1-year history of severe lung disease. Fifteen days after surgery he developed septic fever with progressive deterioration in lung function. M. abscessus, initially isolated from a pleural fluid specimen, was then recovered from repeated blood samples, suggesting a disseminated nature of the mycobacterial disease. Drug susceptibility testing assay, performed on two sequential isolates of the microorganism, showed a pattern of multidrug resistance. Despite aggressive therapy with several antimycobacterial drugs, including clarithromycin, the infection persisted, and the patient died. PMID:11158161

  2. γδ T Cells Cross-Link Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meraviglia, Serena; El Daker, Sary; Dieli, Francesco; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Protective immunity against mycobacter