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Sample records for mycobacterium smegmatis strain

  1. Ectoine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Naomi; Wishkautzan, Marina; Meijler, Michael; Wang, Ying; Speer, Alexander; Niederweis, Michael; Gur, Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a commonly used mycobacterial model system. Here, we show that M. smegmatis protects itself against elevated salinity by synthesizing ectoine and hydroxyectoine and characterize the phenotype of a nonproducing mutant. This is the first analysis of M. smegmatis halotolerance and of the molecular mechanism that supports it.

  2. Selective targeting of Mycobacterium smegmatis with trehalose-functionalized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Jayawardena, H Surangi N; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Sundhoro, Madanodaya; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-08-01

    Silica and iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 6 to 40 nm were functionalized with trehalose. The trehalose-conjugated nanoparticles showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and minimal interactions with macrophage (RAW 264.7) or A549 cells. In addition, trehalose-conjugated silica nanoparticles selectively interacted with M. smegmatis on M. smegmatis-treated A549 cells, demonstrating high potential of trehalose in developing targeted therapy for treating mycobacterial infection. PMID:26121049

  3. Methylation of GPLs in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarajah, Dharshini; Patterson, John H.; Taig, Ellen; Sargeant, Tobias; McConville, Malcolm J.; Billman-Jacobe, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Several species of mycobacteria express abundant glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) on the surfaces of their cells. The GPLs are glycolipids that contain modified sugars including acetylated 6-deoxy-talose and methylated rhamnose. Four methyltransferases have been implicated in the synthesis of the GPLs of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium. A rhamnosyl 3-O-methytransferase and a fatty acid methyltransferase of M. smegmatis have been previously characterized. In this paper, we characterize the methyltransferases that are responsible for modifying the hydroxyl groups at positions 2 and 4 of rhamnose and propose the biosynthetic sequence of GPL trimethylrhamnose formation. The analysis of M. avium genes through the creation of specific mutants is technically difficult; therefore, an alternative approach to determine the function of putative methyltransferases of M. avium was undertaken. Complementation of M. smegmatis methyltransferase mutants with M. avium genes revealed that MtfC and MtfB of the latter species have 4-O-methyltransferase activity and that MtfD is a 3-O-methyltransferase which can modify rhamnose of GPLs in M. smegmatis. PMID:15466031

  4. Proteogenomic Analysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Potgieter, Matthys G.; Nakedi, Kehilwe C.; Ambler, Jon M.; Nel, Andrew J. M.; Garnett, Shaun; Soares, Nelson C.; Mulder, Nicola; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical evidence is vital for accurate genome annotation. The integration of experimental data collected at the proteome level using high resolution mass spectrometry allows for improvements in genome annotation by providing evidence for novel gene models, while validating or modifying others. Here, we report the results of a proteogenomic analysis of a reference strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis (mc2155), a fast growing model organism for the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis—the causative agent for Tuberculosis. By integrating high throughput LC/MS/MS proteomic data with genomic six frame translation and ab initio gene prediction databases, a total of 2887 ORFs were identified, including 2810 ORFs annotated to a Reference protein, and 63 ORFs not previously annotated to a Reference protein. Further, the translational start site (TSS) was validated for 558 Reference proteome gene models, while upstream translational evidence was identified for 81. In addition, N-terminus derived peptide identifications allowed for downstream TSS modification of a further 24 gene models. We validated the existence of six previously described interrupted coding sequences at the peptide level, and provide evidence for four novel frameshift positions. Analysis of peptide posterior error probability (PEP) scores indicates high-confidence novel peptide identifications and shows that the genome of M. smegmatis mc2155 is not yet fully annotated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003500. PMID:27092112

  5. Impact of the deletion of the six mce operons in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Klepp, Laura I.; Forrellad, Marina A.; Osella, Ana V.; Blanco, Federico C.; Stella, Emma J.; Bianco, María Verónica; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Sassetti, Cristopher; Jackson, Mary; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana; Morbidoni, Héctor R.

    2012-01-01

    The Mycobacterium smegmatis genome contains six operons designated mce (mammalian cell entry). These operons, which encode membrane and exported proteins, are highly conserved in pathogenic and non-pathogenic mycobacteria. Although the function of the Mce protein family has not yet been established in Mycobacterium smegmatis, the requirement of the mce4 operon for cholesterol utilization and uptake by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. In this study, we report the construction of an M. smegmatis knock-out mutant deficient in the expression of all six mce operons. The consequences of these mutations were studied by analyzing physiological parameters and phenotypic traits. Differences in colony morphology, biofilm formation and aggregation in liquid cultures were observed, indicating that mce operons of M. smegmatis are implicated in the maintenance of the surface properties of the cell. Importantly, the mutant strain showed reduced cholesterol uptake when compared to the parental strain. Further cholesterol uptake studies using single mce mutant strains showed that the mutation of operon mce4 was reponsible for the cholesterol uptake failure detected in the sextuple mce mutant. This finding demonstrates that mce4 operon is involved in cholesterol transport in M. smegmatis. PMID:22353253

  6. A Kinetic Study of In Vitro Lysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Valente, WJ; Pienaar, E; Fast, A; Fluitt, A; Whitney, SE; Fenton, RJ; Barletta, RG; Chacon, O; Viljoen, HJ

    2011-01-01

    The traditional diagnostic tests for tuberculosis consist of an acid fast stain and a culture test from a sputum sample. With the emergence of drug resistant strains of tuberculosis, nucleic acid amplification has become the diagnostic test of choice. The nucleic acid amplification test consists of four steps: sputum sample collection, lysis of bacilli to release DNA, DNA amplification by PCR and detection of PCR products. The DNA extraction step has been largely overlooked and this study describes a systematic approach to measure the kinetics of cell lysis in a Tris-EDTA buffer. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a saphorytic, fast-growing mycobacterium that is often used as a surrogate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in laboratory studies. M. smegmatis cells have been transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes. Transformed cells are lysed in a temperature-controlled cuvette that is equipped with optical input/output. The fluorescence signal increases when the GFP is released from lysed cells, and the extent of lysis of the loaded cells can be followed in real time. The experimental results are complemented by two theoretical models. The first model is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the lysis process and the accompanying probability density function as described by the Fokker-Planck equation. The second model follows a chemical reaction engineering approach: the cell wall is modeled as layers, where each layer is made up of ‘blocks’. Blocks can only be removed if they are exposed to the lysis solution and the model describes the rate of block exposure and removal. Both models are consistent with the experimental results. The main findings are: (1) the activation energy for M. smegmatis lysis by Tris-EDTA buffer is 22.1kcal/mole, (2) cells lyse on the average after 14–17% loss in cell wall thickness locally, (3) with the help of the models, the initial distribution in cell wall thickness of the population can be resolved, (4) near complete lysis of

  7. A recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis induces potent bactericidal immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Kari A; Dao, Dee N; Goldberg, Michael F; Hsu, Tsungda; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Ordway, Diane; Sellers, Rani S; Jain, Paras; Chen, Bing; Chen, Mei; Kim, John; Lukose, Regy; Chan, John; Orme, Ian M; Porcelli, Steven A; Jacobs, William R

    2011-01-01

    We report the involvement of an evolutionarily conserved set of mycobacterial genes, the esx-3 region, in evasion of bacterial killing by innate immunity. Whereas high-dose intravenous infections of mice with the rapidly growing mycobacterial species Mycobacterium smegmatis bearing an intact esx-3 locus were rapidly lethal, infection with an M. smegmatis Δesx-3 mutant (here designated as the IKE strain) was controlled and cleared by a MyD88-dependent bactericidal immune response. Introduction of the orthologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis esx-3 genes into the IKE strain resulted in a strain, designated IKEPLUS, that remained susceptible to innate immune killing and was highly attenuated in mice but had a marked ability to stimulate bactericidal immunity against challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. Analysis of these adaptive immune responses indicated that the highly protective bactericidal immunity elicited by IKEPLUS was dependent on CD4+ memory T cells and involved a distinct shift in the pattern of cytokine responses by CD4+ cells. Our results establish a role for the esx-3 locus in promoting mycobacterial virulence and also identify the IKE strain as a potentially powerful candidate vaccine vector for eliciting protective immunity to M. tuberculosis. PMID:21892180

  8. Use of Mycobacterium smegmatis deficient in ADP-ribosyltransferase as surrogate for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in drug testing and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Priyanka; Miryala, Sandeep; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Rifampicin (Rif) is a first line drug used for tuberculosis treatment. However, the emergence of drug resistant strains has necessitated synthesis and testing of newer analogs of Rif. Mycobacterium smegmatis is often used as a surrogate for M. tuberculosis. However, the presence of an ADP ribosyltransferase (Arr) in M. smegmatis inactivates Rif, rendering it impractical for screening of Rif analogs or other compounds when used in conjunction with them (Rif/Rif analogs). Rifampicin is also used in studying the role of various DNA repair enzymes by analyzing mutations in RpoB (a subunit of RNA polymerase) causing Rif resistance. These analyses use high concentrations of Rif when M. smegmatis is used as model. Here, we have generated M. smegmatis strains by deleting arr (Δarr). The M. smegmatis Δarr strains show minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Rif which is similar to that for M. tuberculosis. The MICs for isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ciprofloxacin and streptomycin were essentially unaltered for M. smegmatis Δarr. The growth profiles and mutation spectrum of Δarr and, Δarr combined with ΔudgB (udgB encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises uracil) strains were similar to their counterparts wild-type for arr. However, the mutation spectrum of ΔfpgΔarr strain differed somewhat from that of the Δfpg strain (fpg encodes a DNA repair enzyme that excises 8-oxo-G). Our studies suggest M. smegmatis Δarr strain as an ideal model system in drug testing and mutation spectrum determination in DNA repair studies.

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of the models Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce-Micah, R.; Gamm, U.; Hüttenberger, D.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacterial strains presents an attractive potential alternative to antibiotic therapies. Success is dependent on the effective accumulation in bacterial cells of photochemical substances called photosensitizers, which are usually porphyrins or their derivatives. The kinetics of porphyrin synthesis after treatment with the precursor ALA and the accumulation of the Chlorin e6 and the following illumination were studied. The goal was to estimate effectivity of the destructive power of these PS in vitro in respect of the physiological states of Mycobacteria. So the present results examine the cell destruction by PDI using ALA-induced Porphyrins and Chlorin e6 accumulated in Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis, which serve as models for the important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium bovis. We could show that both Mycobacterium after ALA and Chlorin e6 application were killed by illumination with light of about 662 nm. A reduction of about 97% could be reached by using a lightdose of 70 mW/cm2.

  10. Novel Functions of (p)ppGpp and Cyclic di-GMP in Mycobacterial Physiology Revealed by Phenotype Microarray Analysis of Wild-Type and Isogenic Strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Kasetty, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial second messengers (p)ppGpp and bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulate important functions, such as transcription, virulence, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing. In mycobacteria, they regulate long-term survival during starvation, pathogenicity, and dormancy. Recently, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain lacking (p)ppGpp was shown to be sensitive to multiple classes of antibiotics and defective in biofilm formation. We were interested to find out whether Mycobacterium smegmatis strains lacking the gene for either (p)ppGpp synthesis (ΔrelMsm) or c-di-GMP synthesis (ΔdcpA) would display similar phenotypes. We used phenotype microarray technology to compare the growth of the wild-type and the knockout strains in the presence of several antibiotics. Surprisingly, the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA strains showed enhanced survival in the presence of many antibiotics, but they were defective in biofilm formation. These strains also displayed altered surface properties, like impaired sliding motility, rough colony morphology, and increased aggregation in liquid cultures. Biofilm formation and surface properties are associated with the presence of glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell walls of M. smegmatis. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of various cell wall fractions revealed that the levels of GPLs and polar lipids were reduced in the knockout strains. As a result, the cell walls of the knockout strains were significantly more hydrophobic than those of the wild type and the complemented strains. We hypothesize that reduced levels of GPLs and polar lipids may contribute to the antibiotic resistance shown by the knockout strains. Altogether, our data suggest that (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP may be involved in the metabolism of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in M. smegmatis. PMID:25636840

  11. Novel functions of (p)ppGpp and Cyclic di-GMP in mycobacterial physiology revealed by phenotype microarray analysis of wild-type and isogenic strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Kasetty, Sanjay; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2015-04-01

    The bacterial second messengers (p)ppGpp and bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulate important functions, such as transcription, virulence, biofilm formation, and quorum sensing. In mycobacteria, they regulate long-term survival during starvation, pathogenicity, and dormancy. Recently, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain lacking (p)ppGpp was shown to be sensitive to multiple classes of antibiotics and defective in biofilm formation. We were interested to find out whether Mycobacterium smegmatis strains lacking the gene for either (p)ppGpp synthesis (ΔrelMsm) or c-di-GMP synthesis (ΔdcpA) would display similar phenotypes. We used phenotype microarray technology to compare the growth of the wild-type and the knockout strains in the presence of several antibiotics. Surprisingly, the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA strains showed enhanced survival in the presence of many antibiotics, but they were defective in biofilm formation. These strains also displayed altered surface properties, like impaired sliding motility, rough colony morphology, and increased aggregation in liquid cultures. Biofilm formation and surface properties are associated with the presence of glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell walls of M. smegmatis. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of various cell wall fractions revealed that the levels of GPLs and polar lipids were reduced in the knockout strains. As a result, the cell walls of the knockout strains were significantly more hydrophobic than those of the wild type and the complemented strains. We hypothesize that reduced levels of GPLs and polar lipids may contribute to the antibiotic resistance shown by the knockout strains. Altogether, our data suggest that (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP may be involved in the metabolism of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in M. smegmatis.

  12. Growth inhibition of Mycobacterium smegmatis by mycobacteriophage-derived enzymes.

    PubMed

    Grover, Navdeep; Paskaleva, Elena E; Mehta, Krunal K; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2014-09-01

    We report the ability of mycobacteriophage-derived endolysins to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis. We expressed and purified LysB from mycobacteriophage Bxz2 and compared its activity with that of a previously reported LysB from mycobacteriophage Ms6. The esterase activity of Bxz2 LysB with pNP esters was 10-fold higher than that of the previously reported LysB but its lipolytic activity was significantly lower. The presence of surfactant - Tween 80 or Triton X-100 - significantly increased the activity of LysB. Characterization of LysB-treated M. smegmatis cells and LysB-treated purified cell wall by mass spectroscopy confirmed the hydrolytic activity of the enzyme. Both enzymes were equally effective in inhibiting the growth of M. smegmatis, demonstrating their potential as bacteriostatic agents.

  13. Specific electrochemical phage sensing for Bacillus cereus and Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Yemini, Miri; Levi, Yaron; Yagil, Ezra; Rishpon, Judith

    2007-01-01

    The rapid and reliable detection of pathogenic microorganisms is an important issue for the safety and security of our society. Here we describe the use of a sensitive, inexpensive, amperometric, phage-based biosensor for the detection of extremely low concentrations of Bacillus cereus and Mycobacterium smegmatis as models for Bacillus anthracis (the causative agent of anthrax) and for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (the causative agent of tuberculosis), respectively. The detection procedure developed here enabled the determination of bacteria at a low concentration of 10 viable cells/mL within 8 h. This experimental setup allows the simultaneous analysis of up to eight independent samples, using disposable screen-printed electrodes.

  14. Ribosomal RNA methylation in Mycobacterium smegmatis SN2.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, R; Gopinathan, K P

    1987-12-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from a fast growing nonpathogenic strain of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis SN2, was analyzed for the presence of minor nucleotides. Of the sixteen modified nucleotides detected, the identity of twelve has been established and their molar ratios were determined. These nucleotides include m1A, m2A, m6A, m6(2)A, m7G, m5C, rT, CmpC, CmpG, GmpG, UmpG and UmpU. The distinct features of the mycobacterial rRNA modifications include: (i) relatively substantial level of methylation, a feature distinct from that of the tRNA species which are unique in being under methylated in these bacteria, (ii) N1 methyl adenine representing the bulk of the modified bases, (iii) the lack of ribose methylation on any two successive nucleotides, and (iv) the presence of N6,N6-dimethyl adenosines, which are the target sites of the antibiotic kasugamycin, although the bacterial growth is insensitive to the drug. PMID:3440025

  15. Glycopeptidolipid of Mycobacterium smegmatis J15cs Affects Morphology and Survival in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Maeda, Shinji; Naka, Takashi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Yamamoto, Saburo; Ayata, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis has been widely used as a mycobacterial infection model. Unlike the M. smegmatis mc2155 strain, M. smegmatis J15cs strain has the advantage of surviving for one week in murine macrophages. In our previous report, we clarified that the J15cs strain has deleted apolar glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) in the cell wall, which may affect its morphology and survival in host cells. In this study, the gene causing the GPL deletion in the J15cs strain was identified. The mps1-2 gene (MSMEG_0400-0402) correlated with GPL biosynthesis. The J15cs strain had 18 bps deleted in the mps1 gene compared to that of the mc2155 strain. The mps1-complemented J15cs mutant restored the expression of GPLs. Although the J15cs strain produces a rough and dry colony, the colony morphology of this mps1-complement was smooth like the mc2155 strain. The length in the mps1-complemented J15cs mutant was shortened by the expression of GPLs. In addition, the GPL-restored J15cs mutant did not survive as long as the parent J15cs strain in the murine macrophage cell line J774.1 cells. The results are direct evidence that the deletion of GPLs in the J15cs strain affects bacterial size, morphology, and survival in host cells. PMID:25970481

  16. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  17. Adhesion of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Charged Surfaces and Diagnostics Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, Diane; Dhinojwala, Ali; Moore, Francisco

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) causes more than 1 million deaths annually. Smear microscopy is a primary rapid detection tool in areas where 95 % of PTB cases occur. This technique, in which the sputum of a symptomatic patient is stained and examined using a light microscope for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) shows sensitivity between 20 and 60 %. Insufficient bacterial isolation during sample preparation may be a reason for low sensitivity. We are optimizing a system to capture bacteria on the basis of electrostatic interactions to more thoroughly isolate bacteria from suspension and facilitate more accurate detection. Silica supports coated with positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), captured approximately 4.1 times more Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism for MTB, than was captured on negatively-charged silica substrates. Future experimentation will employ branched polymer systems and seek to justify the use of colloidal stability theories to describe initial capture. Supported by University of Akron, Department of Polymer Science, Department of Biology; LORD Corporation.

  18. The effect of MSMEG_6402 gene disruption on the cell wall structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; He, Lianqi; Zhan, Yaoyao; Zang, Shizhu; Ma, Yufang; Zhao, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Cuili; Xin, Yi

    2011-09-01

    Arabinogalactan (AG) of mycobacterial cell wall consists of arabinan region, galactan region and disaccharide linker. The arabinan is composed of D-arabinofuranose residues, and decaprenyphosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA) is the donor of the D-arabinofuranose residues. DPA is formed from phosphoribose diphosphate (PRPP) in a four-step process catalyzed by transferase, phosphatase and epimerase, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3806c has been identified as PRPP: decaprenyl-phosphate 5-phosphoribosyltransferase, and heteromeric Rv3790/Rv3791 has epimerase activity. Rv3807c is putative phospholipid phosphatase. However, there is no direct biochemical evidence since expression of Rv3807c has been unsuccessful. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_6402 is ortholog of Rv3807c. To investigate the function of MSMEG_6402 on AG biosynthesis, a conditional MSMEG_6402 gene knock out (M. sm-ΔM_6402) strain was constructed through homologous recombination technique. The morphological and compositional changes of cell wall were examined in the M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain. The M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain grew at non-permissive temperature slower than that at permissive temperature, indicating that MSMEG_6402 is non-essential for growth of M. smegmatis. The change of cell shape and detectable bulging on the cell surface of M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain were observed by scanning electron microscopy, and curled as well as deformed cell wall of M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain was revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of sugar composition in the cell wall by HPLC indicated that the ratio of arabinofuran to galactofuran in M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain was changed to 1.7:1 comparing with 2:1 in the wild type. It demonstrates that the lacking MSMEG_6402 interferes the biosynthesis of arabinan. Analyzing 5' P-DPR and DPR from both M. sm-ΔM_6402 strain and wild type M. smegmatis is undergoing in this lab.

  19. Characterisation of a putative AraC transcriptional regulator from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Gupta, Antima; Lack, Nathan A.; Maitra, Arundhati; ten Bokum, Annemieke M.C.; Kendall, Sharon; Sim, Edith; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Summary MSMEG_0307 is annotated as a transcriptional regulator belonging to the AraC protein family and is located adjacent to the arylamine N-acetyltransferase (nat) gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis, in a gene cluster, conserved in most environmental mycobacterial species. In order to elucidate the function of the AraC protein from the nat operon in M. smegmatis, two conserved palindromic DNA motifs were identified using bioinformatics and tested for protein binding using electrophoretic mobility shift assays with a recombinant form of the AraC protein. We identified the formation of a DNA:AraC protein complex with one of the motifs as well as the presence of this motif in 20 loci across the whole genome of M. smegmatis, supporting the existence of an AraC controlled regulon. To characterise the effects of AraC in the regulation of the nat operon genes, as well as to gain further insight into its function, we generated a ΔaraC mutant strain where the araC gene was replaced by a hygromycin resistance marker. The level of expression of the nat and MSMEG_0308 genes was down-regulated in the ΔaraC strain when compared to the wild type strain indicating an activator effect of the AraC protein on the expression of the nat operon genes. PMID:25443504

  20. Functional Analysis of a c-di-AMP-specific Phosphodiesterase MsPDE from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Luo, Yunchao; Zheng, Cao; Yin, Kang; Ali, Maria Kanwal; Li, Xinfeng; He, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic di‑AMP (c-di-AMP) is a second signaling molecule involved in the regulation of bacterial physiological processes and interaction between pathogen and host. However, the regulatory network mediated by c-di-AMP in Mycobacterium remains obscure. In M. smegmatis, a diadenylate cyclase (DAC) was reported recently, but there is still no investigation on c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). Here, we provide a systematic study on signaling mechanism of c-di-AMP PDE in M. smegmatis. Based on our enzymatic analysis, MsPDE (MSMEG_2630), which contained a DHH-DHHA1 domain, displayed a 200-fold higher hydrolytic efficiency (kcat/Km) to c-di-AMP than to c-di-GMP. MsPDE was capable of converting c-di-AMP to pApA and AMP, and hydrolyzing pApA to AMP. Site-directed mutations in DHH and DHHA1 revealed that DHH domain was critical for the phosphodiesterase activity. To explore the regulatory role of c-di-AMP in vivo, we constructed the mspde mutant (Δmspde) and found that deficiency of MsPDE significantly enhanced intracellular C12-C20 fatty acid accumulation. Deficiency of DAC in many bacteria results in cell death. However, we acquired the M. smegmatis strain with DAC gene disrupted (ΔmsdisA) by homologous recombination approach. Deletion of msdisA reduced bacterial C12-C20 fatty acids production but scarcely affected bacterial survival. We also provided evidences that superfluous c-di-AMP in M. smegmatis could lead to abnormal colonial morphology. Collectively, our results indicate that MsPDE is a functional c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also expands the regulatory network mediated by c-di-AMP in M. smegmatis. PMID:26078723

  1. Active efflux of fluoroquinolones in Mycobacterium smegmatis mediated by LfrA, a multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Takiff, H E; Nikaido, H

    1996-01-01

    The lfrA gene cloned from chromosomal DNA of quinolone-resistant Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-552 conferred low-level resistance to fluoroquinolones when present on multicopy plasmids. Sequence analysis suggested that lfrA encodes a membrane efflux pump of the major facilitator family (H. E. Takiff, M. Cimino, M. C. Musso, T. Weisbrod, R. Martinez, M. B. Delgado, L Salazar, B. R. Bloom, and W. R. Jacbos, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:362-366, 1996). In this work, we studied the role of LfrA in the accumulation of fluoroquinolones by M. smegmatis. The steady-state accumulation level of a hydrophilic quinolone, norfloxacin, by M. smegmatis harboring a plasmid carrying the lfrA gene was about 50% of that by the parent strain but was increased to the same level as that of the parent strain by addition of a proton conductor, carbonyl cyanide m-chorophenylhydrazone. Norfloxacin efflux mediated by LfrA was competed for strongly by ciprofloxacin but not by nalidixic acid. Furthermore, we showed that portions of norfloxacin accumulated by starved cells were pumped out upon reenergization of the cells, and the rates of this efflux showed evidence of saturation at higher intracellular concentrations of the drug. These results suggest that the LfrA polypeptide catalyzes the active efflux of several quinolones. PMID:8682782

  2. Phenylpropanoids of Alpinia galanga as efflux pump inhibitors in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc² 155.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somendu K; Pahwa, Sonika; Nandanwar, Hemraj; Jachak, Sanjay M

    2012-10-01

    The first and second line drugs used for the treatment of tuberculosis are now becoming ineffective due to emergence of resistant strains. Efflux pump provokes resistance in mycobacterium and hence could be explored as a new target for the discovery of anti-TB agents. In search of efflux pump inhibitors, MIC and modulation factor of phenylpropanoids isolated from A. galanga rhizome were determined prior to the accumulation and efflux assay. Phenylpropanoid compounds viz. 1'-S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, trans-p-coumaryl diacetate and 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate were found to be potent modulators and decreased the MIC of ethidium bromide by 64 fold at the concentration of 2.5, 6.25 and 5.0 mg/L respectively. 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate enhanced the accumulation and inhibited the efflux of EtBr in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc² 155 cells.

  3. Low expression level of glnA1 accounts for absence of cell wall associated poly-l-glutamate/glutamine in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Deeksha; Kant, Sashi; Garg, Rajni; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Cell wall associated poly-l-glutamine (PLG) layer synthesis is directly linked to glutamine synthetase (GS) encoded by glnA1 in tuberculosis causing mycobacteria. Avirulent Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) despite of having a glnA1 homolog lacks cell wall associated PLG layer. In the present study, we complemented a ΔglnA1 mutant of Mycobacterium bovis (lack PLG in cell wall) with M. smegmatis glnA1 cloned under M. bovis glnA1 promoter. PLG synthesis was restored in the cell wall of complemented strain. The complemented strain also showed increased resistance to physical stresses such as lysozyme, SDS and increased survival in THP-1 macrophages in comparison to the knockout. Further, in β-galactosidase reporter assay M. smegmatis glnA1 promoter showed ten times less activity as compared to M. bovis glnA1 promoter. GACT-8-11 → TGAC mutations in the M. smegmatis glnA1 promoter restored its activity by 60% as compared to the activity of glnA1 promoter of M. bovis. This mutation also showed increased GS expression and produced cell wall associated PLG in M. smegmatis. The results of this study demonstrate that glnA1 promoter of M. smegmatis accounts for low expression level of GS and apparently responsible for absence of cell wall associated PLG layer. PMID:25637529

  4. Low expression level of glnA1 accounts for absence of cell wall associated poly-l-glutamate/glutamine in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Deeksha; Kant, Sashi; Garg, Rajni; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Cell wall associated poly-l-glutamine (PLG) layer synthesis is directly linked to glutamine synthetase (GS) encoded by glnA1 in tuberculosis causing mycobacteria. Avirulent Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) despite of having a glnA1 homolog lacks cell wall associated PLG layer. In the present study, we complemented a ΔglnA1 mutant of Mycobacterium bovis (lack PLG in cell wall) with M. smegmatis glnA1 cloned under M. bovis glnA1 promoter. PLG synthesis was restored in the cell wall of complemented strain. The complemented strain also showed increased resistance to physical stresses such as lysozyme, SDS and increased survival in THP-1 macrophages in comparison to the knockout. Further, in β-galactosidase reporter assay M. smegmatis glnA1 promoter showed ten times less activity as compared to M. bovis glnA1 promoter. GACT-8-11 → TGAC mutations in the M. smegmatis glnA1 promoter restored its activity by 60% as compared to the activity of glnA1 promoter of M. bovis. This mutation also showed increased GS expression and produced cell wall associated PLG in M. smegmatis. The results of this study demonstrate that glnA1 promoter of M. smegmatis accounts for low expression level of GS and apparently responsible for absence of cell wall associated PLG layer.

  5. [Pleuropulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium smegmatis. Case description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Vonmoos, S; Leuenberger, P; Beer, V; de Haller, R

    1986-12-27

    The case is described of a patient with a tracheostomy subsequent to laryngectomy for carcinoma, who developed a pleuro-pulmonary infection due to Mycobacterium smegmatis complicating lipoid pneumonia after prolonged instillation of gomenol oil into the tracheostoma. The adjuvant property of lipids for the development of respiratory infections due to M. smegmatis and other rapid-growing mycobacteria is discussed in the light of the cases described in the literature.

  6. LC-MS based assay to measure intracellular compound levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis: linking compound levels to cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Jyothi; Narayan, Ashwini; Venkatraman, Janani; Chatterji, Monalisa

    2013-08-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a central role in maintaining cellular pool of tetrahydrofolic acid, a cofactor necessary for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. The clinical validation of DHFR as antibacterial target was established by the success of trimethoprim (TMP). DHFR is also an attractive target for identifying anti-tuberculosis molecules however, due to observed weak cellular potency, no DHFR inhibitors have been developed as drugs so far. TMP and its analogs have poor cellular potency on Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. We found a mutant strain of M. smegmatis, mc²155 to be sensitive to TMP whereas wild type strain was not inhibited by TMP. We utilized this system to probe if poor or lack of activity of TMP is a consequence of poor intracellular compound levels. An LC-MS based method was developed for measuring TMP and rifampicin (RIF) in M. smegmatis. Using the assay, equivalent RIF levels were observed in both strains however, TMP was detected only in mc²155 cells, hence proving a positive correlation between potency and compound levels. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time LC-MS method has been used to measure compound levels in mycobacterial cells. We propose it to be a valuable tool to understand the lack of potency or resistance mechanisms in antimycobacterial drug development.

  7. Boosting Effect of 2-Phenylquinoline Efflux Inhibitors in Combination with Macrolides against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Cannalire, Rolando; Santos Costa, Sofia; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel; Sabatini, Stefano

    2015-12-11

    The identification of efflux inhibitors to be used as adjuvants alongside existing drug regimens could have a tremendous value in the treatment of any mycobacterial infection. Here, we investigated the ability of four 2-(4'-propoxyphenyl)quinoline Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux inhibitors (1-4) to reduce the efflux activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium avium strains. All four compounds were able to inhibit efflux pumps in both mycobacterial species; in particular, O-ethylpiperazinyl derivative 2 showed an efflux inhibitory activity comparable to that of verapamil, the most potent mycobacterial efflux inhibitor reported to date, and was able to significantly reduce the MIC values of macrolides against different M. avium strains. The contribution of the M. avium efflux pumps MAV_1406 and MAV_1695 to clarithromycin resistance was proved because they were found to be overexpressed in two M. avium 104 isogenic strains showing high-level clarithromycin resistance. These results indicated a correlation between increased expression of efflux pumps, increased efflux, macrolide resistance, and reduction of resistance by efflux pump inhibitors such as compound 2. Additionally, compound 2 showed synergistic activity with clarithromycin, at a concentration below the cytotoxicity threshold, in an ex vivo experiment against M. avium 104-infected macrophages. In summary, the 2-(4'-propoxyphenyl)quinoline scaffold is suitable to obtain compounds endowed with good efflux pump inhibitory activity against both S. aureus and nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:27623057

  8. Iron transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis: uptake of iron from ferric citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, A.J.M.; Ratledge, C.

    1982-01-01

    In mycobacterial growth medium 40 to 400 ..mu..M citrate was required to solubilize 2 ..mu..M /sup 55/Fe. This solubilized /sup 55/Fe was taken up into both iron-deficient and iron-sufficient washed cell suspensions of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Although the /sup 55/Fe was taken up into the cell, the citrate was not. The uptake system with M. smegmatis was not inhibited by electron transport inhibitors, uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, or thiol reagents and was saturable with iron at approximately 35 ..mu..M. The system was independent of the iron transport systems already known to exist in M. smegmatis: i.e., the two exochelin routes of assimilation as well as the mycobactin-salicylate system. It was not induced by the presence of 400 ..mu..M citrate in the growth medium, nor did the presence of citrate in the medium affect the production of either exochelin or mycobactin.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS17 Promotes the Death of Host Cell and Cytokines Secretion via Erk Kinase Accompanying with Enhanced Survival of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tian; Zhao, Quanju; Li, Wu

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious threat to global public health, largely due to the successful manipulation of the host immunity by its etiological agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The PE_PGRS protein family of M. tuberculosis might be a contributing factor. To investigate the roles of PE_PGRS17, the gene of PE_PGRS 17 was expressed in nonpathogenic fast growing Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the recombinant strain survives better than the control in macrophage cultures, accompanied by more host cell death and a marked higher secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by a recombinant strain compared with control. Blocking the action of Erk kinase by an inhibitor can abolish the above effects. In brief, our data showed that PE_PGRS 17 might facilitate pathogen survival and disserve the host cell via remodeling the macrophages immune niche largely consisting of inflammatory cytokines. This furnishes a novel insight into the immune role of this mycobacterium unique gene family. PMID:23663047

  10. Mycobacterium smegmatis synthesizes in vitro androgens and estrogens from different steroid precursors.

    PubMed

    Dlugovitzky, Diana G; Fontela, María Sol; Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Valdez, Ricardo A; Romano, Marta C

    2015-07-01

    Fast-growing mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium sp. and Mycobacterium smegmatis degrade natural sterols. They are a model to study tuberculosis. Interestingly, M. smegmatis has been found in river effluents derived from paper production, and therefore, it would be important to gain further insight into its capacity to synthesize steroids that are potential endocrine disruptors affecting the development and reproduction of fishes. To our knowledge, the capacity of M. smegmatis to synthesize estrogens and even testosterone has not been previously reported. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the capacity of M. smegmatis to synthesize in vitro testosterone and estrogens from tritiated precursors and to investigate the metabolic pathways involved. Results obtained by thin-layer chromatography showed that (3)H-progesterone was transformed to 17OH-progesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, estrone, and estradiol after 6, 12, or 24 h of incubation. (3)H-androstenedione was transformed into testosterone and estrogens, mainly estrone, and (3)H-testosterone was transformed to estrone and androstenedione. Incubation with (3)H-dehydroepiandrosterone rendered androstenediol, testosterone, and estrogens. This ability to transform less potent sex steroids like androstenedione and estrone into other more active steroids like testosterone and estradiol or vice versa suggests that M. smegmatis can influence the amount of self-synthesized strong androgens and estrogens and can transform those found in the environment. PMID:25994226

  11. Production of recombinant proteins in Mycobacterium smegmatis for structural and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Ghader; Baker, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Protein production using recombinant DNA technology has a fundamental impact on our understanding of biology through providing proteins for structural and functional studies. Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been traditionally used as the default expression host to over-express and purify proteins from many different organisms. E. coli does, however, have known shortcomings for obtaining soluble, properly folded proteins suitable for downstream studies. These shortcomings are even more pronounced for the mycobacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, with typically only one third of proteins expressed in E. coli produced as soluble proteins. Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) is a closely related and non-pathogenic species that has been successfully used as an expression host for production of proteins from various mycobacterial species. In this review, we describe the early attempts to produce mycobacterial proteins in alternative expression hosts and then focus on available expression systems in M. smegmatis. The advantages of using M. smegmatis as an expression host, its application in structural biology and some practical aspects of protein production are also discussed. M. smegmatis provides an effective expression platform for enhanced understanding of mycobacterial biology and pathogenesis and for developing novel and better therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:25303009

  12. A Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant with a defective inositol monophosphate phosphatase gene homolog has altered cell envelope permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Parish, T; Liu, J; Nikaido, H; Stoker, N G

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage infection mutant (strain LIMP7) of Mycobacterium smegmatis was isolated following transposon mutagenesis. The mutant showed an unusual phenotype, in that all phages tested produced larger plaques on this strain compared to the parent strain. Other phenotypic characteristics of the mutant were slower growth, increased clumping in liquid culture, increased resistance to chloramphenicol and erythromycin, and increased sensitivity to isoniazid and several beta-lactam antibiotics. Permeability studies showed decreases in the accumulation of lipophilic molecules (norfloxacin and chenodeoxycholate) and a small increase with hydrophilic molecules (cephaloridine); taken together, these characteristics indicate an altered cell envelope. The DNA adjacent to the transposon in LIMP7 was cloned and was shown to be highly similar to genes encoding bacterial and mammalian inositol monophosphate phosphatases. Inositol is important in mycobacteria as a component of the major thiol mycothiol and also in the cell wall, with phosphatidylinositol anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in the cell envelope. In LIMP7, levels of phosphatidylinositol dimannoside, the precursor of LAM, were less than half of those in the wild-type strain, confirming that the mutation had affected the synthesis of inositol-containing molecules. The impA gene is located within the histidine biosynthesis operon in both M. smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, lying between the hisA and hisF genes. PMID:9401044

  13. The plant alkaloid piperine as a potential inhibitor of ethidium bromide efflux in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Zhang, Jiyu; Guo, Na; Feng, Haihua; Li, Lei; Liang, Junchao; Sun, Kai; Wu, Xiuping; Wang, Xuelin; Liu, Mingyuan; Deng, Xuming; Yu, Lu

    2011-02-01

    Piperine, a major plant alkaloid found in black pepper (Piper nigrum) and long pepper (Piper longum), has shown potential for inhibiting the efflux pump (EP) of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, a modulation assay showed that piperine could decrease the MIC of ethidium bromide (EtBr) twofold at 32 μg ml(-1) and fourfold at 64 μg ml(-1) against Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2) 155 ATCC 700084. A real-time, 96-well plate fluorometric method was employed to evaluate the EP inhibition ability of piperine in M. smegmatis. Reserpine, chlorpromazine, verapamil and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone were used as positive controls. Piperine significantly enhanced accumulation and decreased the efflux of EtBr in M. smegmatis, which suggests that it has the ability to inhibit mycobacterial EPs.

  14. Unmarked gene integration into the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis via precise replacement of the pyrF gene.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, N; Seth, A; Shrader, T E

    1997-01-01

    After integration into the bacterial chromosome an exogenous gene may be stably expressed without continued selection for the recombinant locus. However, chromosomal integration events occur infrequently, requiring the concomitant integration of a drug resistance marker in order to identify colonies of recombinant cells. The generation of a drug-resistant recombinant strain can both reduce the in vivo applicability of the strain and preclude the use of recombinant vectors which use the same drug resistance marker. We have constructed a plasmid, pINT-delta, which allows recombination of exogenous genes onto the Mycobacterium smegmatis chromosome. The exogenous gene completely replaces the pyrF gene and the resultant strain lacks any exogenous drug resistance marker. The methodologies described herein are general and applicable even to those bacteria for which extrachromosomal plasmids are not available. Using pINT-delta we integrated the lacZ gene into the M. smegmatis chromosome via a precise exchange of lacZ and pyrF. The resultant strain was used to demonstrate that the expression of genes integrated at the pyrF locus is repressed twofold by inclusion of uracil in the growth medium. In addition, we used pINT-delta to construct an M. smegmatis strain with a precise deletion of its pyrF locus. This strain, TSm-627, grows normally in rich medium but does not grow in medium lacking uracil. TSm-627 cells allow the pyrF gene to be used as a selectable marker for growth on medium lacking uracil. In TSm-627 cells, the pyrF gene is also useful as a counterselectable marker on complete medium containing 5'-fluoroorotic acid and uracil. Two pyrF-containing plasmids, designed to exploit the new delta pyrF strain, have been constructed and their possible applications to problems in mycobacteriology are discussed. PMID:9169204

  15. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. PMID:25516959

  16. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Plasticity of Metabolic Networks in Mycobacterium smegmatis *

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Tarun; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; McKinney, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a remarkable ability to persist within the human host as a clinically inapparent or chronically active infection. Fatty acids are thought to be an important carbon source used by the bacteria during long term infection. Catabolism of fatty acids requires reprogramming of metabolic networks, and enzymes central to this reprogramming have been targeted for drug discovery. Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, is often used as a model system because of the similarity of basic cellular processes in these two species. Here, we take a quantitative proteomics-based approach to achieve a global view of how the M. smegmatis metabolic network adjusts to utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled proteins identified a total of 3,067 proteins with high confidence. This number corresponds to 44% of the predicted M. smegmatis proteome and includes most of the predicted metabolic enzymes. Compared with glucose-grown cells, 162 proteins showed differential abundance in acetate- or propionate-grown cells. Among these, acetate-grown cells showed a higher abundance of proteins that could constitute a functional glycerate pathway. Gene inactivation experiments confirmed that both the glyoxylate shunt and the glycerate pathway are operational in M. smegmatis. In addition to proteins with annotated functions, we demonstrate carbon source-dependent differential abundance of proteins that have not been functionally characterized. These proteins might play as-yet-unidentified roles in mycobacterial carbon metabolism. This study reveals several novel features of carbon assimilation in M. smegmatis, which suggests significant functional plasticity of metabolic networks in this organism. PMID:24997995

  17. Quantitative mass spectrometry reveals plasticity of metabolic networks in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Tarun; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Chiappe, Diego; Moniatte, Marc; McKinney, John D

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a remarkable ability to persist within the human host as a clinically inapparent or chronically active infection. Fatty acids are thought to be an important carbon source used by the bacteria during long term infection. Catabolism of fatty acids requires reprogramming of metabolic networks, and enzymes central to this reprogramming have been targeted for drug discovery. Mycobacterium smegmatis, a nonpathogenic relative of M. tuberculosis, is often used as a model system because of the similarity of basic cellular processes in these two species. Here, we take a quantitative proteomics-based approach to achieve a global view of how the M. smegmatis metabolic network adjusts to utilization of fatty acids as a carbon source. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled proteins identified a total of 3,067 proteins with high confidence. This number corresponds to 44% of the predicted M. smegmatis proteome and includes most of the predicted metabolic enzymes. Compared with glucose-grown cells, 162 proteins showed differential abundance in acetate- or propionate-grown cells. Among these, acetate-grown cells showed a higher abundance of proteins that could constitute a functional glycerate pathway. Gene inactivation experiments confirmed that both the glyoxylate shunt and the glycerate pathway are operational in M. smegmatis. In addition to proteins with annotated functions, we demonstrate carbon source-dependent differential abundance of proteins that have not been functionally characterized. These proteins might play as-yet-unidentified roles in mycobacterial carbon metabolism. This study reveals several novel features of carbon assimilation in M. smegmatis, which suggests significant functional plasticity of metabolic networks in this organism.

  18. Functional identification of MSMEG_6402 protein from Mycobacterium smegmatis in decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Cai, Lina; Zhao, Xiaojiao; He, Lianqi; Ma, Yufang; Zang, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuili; Li, Xinli; Xin, Yi

    2014-11-01

    The arabinogalactan (AG) of the mycobacterial cell wall consists of an arabinan region, a galactan region and a disaccharide linker. Decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose (DPA) is the donor for arabinofuran residues, which are formed from phosphoribose diphosphate (PRPP) and decaprenyl phosphate (DP). DP is sequentially catalyzed by a three-step process that involves a transferase, a phosphatase and an epimerase. Rv3807c is a putative phospholipid phosphatase that might generate the intermediate product of decaprenyl-phosphoryl-ribose (DPR) in DPA biosynthesis. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_6402 is a homolog gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3807c and was substituted for the functional identification of Rv3807c. Previously, we generated a conditional MSMEG_6402 gene knockout strain (M. sm-ΔM_6402) that exhibited significantly affected cell wall structure. To understand the function of MSMEG_6402 in DPA biosynthesis, this gene was amplified and expressed, and the resulting protein was identified and purified using a His-tagged approach. A MSMEG_6402 enzymatic reaction system with PRPP and DP as substrates was utilized, and the reaction products were separated using thin layer chromatography (TLC). The results revealed a specific lipid-linked sugar band that appeared in the reaction with the addition of MSMEG_6402. Furthermore, ESI-MS detection was utilized in this study, and the results revealed that the enzymatic reaction products involving MSMEG_6402 included DPPR and a sodium ion adduct of DPR. Additionally, the phosphatase activity of MSMEG_6402 was also determined through phosphate group detection using the colorimetric method. Based on our results together with the results of previous studies, including the functional identification and bioinformatics analysis of M. tuberculosis Rv3807c, we propose that MSMEG_6402, as a phosphatase, has an intimate relationship with DPA biosynthesis.

  19. Mutational Analysis of a Role for Salicylic Acid in Iron Metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Adilakshmi, Tadepalli; Ayling, Peter D.; Ratledge, Colin

    2000-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in iron metabolism was examined in two wild-type strains (mc2155 and NCIMB 8548) and three mutant strains (mc21292 [lacking exochelin], SM3 [lacking iron-dependent repressor protein IdeR] and S99 [a salicylate-requiring auxotroph derived in this study]) of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Synthesis of salicylate in SM3 was derepressed even in the presence of iron, as was synthesis of the siderophores exochelin, mycobactin, and carboxymycobactin. S99 was dependent on salicylate for growth and failed to grow with the three ferrisiderophores, suggesting that salicylate fulfills an additional function(s) other than being a precursor of mycobactin and carboxymycobactin. Salicylic acid at 100 μg/ml repressed the formation of a 29-kDa cell envelope protein (putative exochelin receptor protein) in S99 grown both iron deficiently and iron sufficiently. In contrast, synthesis of this protein was affected only under iron-limited conditions in the parent strain, mc2155, and remained unaltered in SM3, suggesting an interaction between the IdeR protein and salicylate. Thus, salicylate may also function as a signal molecule for recognition of cellular iron status. Growth of all strains and mutants with p-aminosalicylate (PAS) at 100 μg/ml increased salicylate accumulation between three- and eightfold under both iron-limited and iron-sufficient growth conditions and decreased mycobactin accumulation by 40 to 80% but increased carboxymycobactin accumulation by 50 to 55%. Thus, although PAS inhibited salicylate conversion to mycobactin, presumptively by blocking salicylate AMP kinase, PAS also interferes with the additional functions of salicylate, as its effect was heightened in S99 when the salicylate concentration was minimal. PMID:10629169

  20. Qualitative and quantitative proteomic analysis of Vitamin C induced changes in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Abhishek; Sarkar, Dhiman

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin C is a critical dietary nutrient in human which has a wide range of regulatory effects on gene expression and physiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that leads to a dormant drug-tolerant phenotype. In the presence of iron, vitamin C shows a high bactericidal activity even in the drug resistant phenotype of M. tuberculosis. The regulatory mechanisms underlying vitamin C induced adaptations are largely unknown due to lack of functional genomics data in this field. In this study, we attempt to characterize the direct effect of vitamin C treatment on the physiology of actively growing Mycobacterium smegmatis. The study chose M. smegmatis as it is a fast-growing bacterium and a non-pathogenic model system which shares many physiological features with the pathogenic M. tuberculosis including dormancy and its regulation. The proteomic adaptation of M. smegmatis on vitamin C treatment demonstrates the important changes in cellular and metabolic process such as reversal of tricarboxylic acid cycle, decrease in ATP synthesis, decrease in iron acquisition and storage, and induction of dormancy regulators WhiB3, PhoP, and Lsr2. PMID:26042100

  1. Large-Scale Production of Coenzyme F420-5,6 by Using Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Isabelle, Dale; Simpson, D. Randall; Daniels, Lacy

    2002-01-01

    Production of coenzyme F420 and its biosynthetic precursor FO was examined with a variety of aerobic actinomycetes to identify an improved source for these materials. Based on fermentation costs, safety, and ease of growth, Mycobacterium smegmatis was the best source for F420-5,6. M. smegmatis produced 1 to 3 μmol of intracellular F420 per liter of culture, which was more than the 0.85 to 1.0 μmol of F420-2 per liter usually obtained with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and ∼10-fold higher than what was previously reported for the best aerobic actinomycetes. An improved chromatography system using rapidly flowing quaternary aminoethyl ion-exchange material and Florisil was used to more quickly and easily purify F420 than with previous methods. PMID:12406775

  2. Rel Is Required for Morphogenesis of Resting Cells in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Chan, Chuu Ling; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recently we showed that upon transfer of growing Mycobacterium smegmatis into saline, the bacilli exited the canonical cell division cycle and formed septated multi-nucleoided cells. Under shock starvation (i.e., in saline without any carbon source), differentiation terminated at this stage with internally remodeled Large Resting Cells (LARCs). Whereas under gentle starvation (i.e., in saline with trace amounts of a carbon source), the septated multi-nucleoided bacilli completed cell division and separated into mono-nucleoided Small Resting Cells (SMRCs). This demonstrated that the non-sporulating mycobacteria are in fact capable of forming morphologically differentiated resting cells when exposed to starvation. Depending on the specific starvation conditions they can form two different resting cell types, LARCs or SMRCs, which share a common cellular differentiation pathway. The mRNA encoding the (p)ppGpp synthetase Rel was found to be transiently upregulated immediately upon starvation under both conditions, suggesting a role for the stringent response factor in both LARC and SMRC development. Here, we disrupted Rel function by generating two types of mutant M. smegmatis strains: a rel nonsense mutant (relE4TAG) in which translation is prematurely terminated at codon 4, and a rel deletion mutant (Δrel) in which the entire coding sequence was deleted. Both mutants showed identical phenotypes: sparse septum formation, less DNA compaction, and failure in formation of both the septated multi-nucleoided LARCs and the small-cell morphotype SMRC under starvation conditions. All phenotypes were rescued through the introduction of a wild-type copy of rel. Therefore, we conclude that loss-of-function mutations in rel block the development of both LARCs and SMRCs by preventing the first morphogenetic step in mycobacterial resting cell development, the formation of septated multi-nucleoided cells. Interestingly, in contrast to Rel’s role in most other bacteria, starvation

  3. Rel Is Required for Morphogenesis of Resting Cells in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Chan, Chuu Ling; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recently we showed that upon transfer of growing Mycobacterium smegmatis into saline, the bacilli exited the canonical cell division cycle and formed septated multi-nucleoided cells. Under shock starvation (i.e., in saline without any carbon source), differentiation terminated at this stage with internally remodeled Large Resting Cells (LARCs). Whereas under gentle starvation (i.e., in saline with trace amounts of a carbon source), the septated multi-nucleoided bacilli completed cell division and separated into mono-nucleoided Small Resting Cells (SMRCs). This demonstrated that the non-sporulating mycobacteria are in fact capable of forming morphologically differentiated resting cells when exposed to starvation. Depending on the specific starvation conditions they can form two different resting cell types, LARCs or SMRCs, which share a common cellular differentiation pathway. The mRNA encoding the (p)ppGpp synthetase Rel was found to be transiently upregulated immediately upon starvation under both conditions, suggesting a role for the stringent response factor in both LARC and SMRC development. Here, we disrupted Rel function by generating two types of mutant M. smegmatis strains: a rel nonsense mutant (relE4TAG) in which translation is prematurely terminated at codon 4, and a rel deletion mutant (Δrel) in which the entire coding sequence was deleted. Both mutants showed identical phenotypes: sparse septum formation, less DNA compaction, and failure in formation of both the septated multi-nucleoided LARCs and the small-cell morphotype SMRC under starvation conditions. All phenotypes were rescued through the introduction of a wild-type copy of rel. Therefore, we conclude that loss-of-function mutations in rel block the development of both LARCs and SMRCs by preventing the first morphogenetic step in mycobacterial resting cell development, the formation of septated multi-nucleoided cells. Interestingly, in contrast to Rel’s role in most other bacteria, starvation

  4. Rel Is Required for Morphogenesis of Resting Cells in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mu-Lu; Chan, Chuu Ling; Dick, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Recently we showed that upon transfer of growing Mycobacterium smegmatis into saline, the bacilli exited the canonical cell division cycle and formed septated multi-nucleoided cells. Under shock starvation (i.e., in saline without any carbon source), differentiation terminated at this stage with internally remodeled Large Resting Cells (LARCs). Whereas under gentle starvation (i.e., in saline with trace amounts of a carbon source), the septated multi-nucleoided bacilli completed cell division and separated into mono-nucleoided Small Resting Cells (SMRCs). This demonstrated that the non-sporulating mycobacteria are in fact capable of forming morphologically differentiated resting cells when exposed to starvation. Depending on the specific starvation conditions they can form two different resting cell types, LARCs or SMRCs, which share a common cellular differentiation pathway. The mRNA encoding the (p)ppGpp synthetase Rel was found to be transiently upregulated immediately upon starvation under both conditions, suggesting a role for the stringent response factor in both LARC and SMRC development. Here, we disrupted Rel function by generating two types of mutant M. smegmatis strains: a rel nonsense mutant (rel (E4TAG)) in which translation is prematurely terminated at codon 4, and a rel deletion mutant (Δrel) in which the entire coding sequence was deleted. Both mutants showed identical phenotypes: sparse septum formation, less DNA compaction, and failure in formation of both the septated multi-nucleoided LARCs and the small-cell morphotype SMRC under starvation conditions. All phenotypes were rescued through the introduction of a wild-type copy of rel. Therefore, we conclude that loss-of-function mutations in rel block the development of both LARCs and SMRCs by preventing the first morphogenetic step in mycobacterial resting cell development, the formation of septated multi-nucleoided cells. Interestingly, in contrast to Rel's role in most other bacteria

  5. MS_RHII-RSD, a dual-function RNase HII-(p)ppGpp synthetase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Murdeshwar, Maya S; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2012-08-01

    In the noninfectious soil saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis, intracellular levels of the stress alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate, together termed (p)ppGpp, are regulated by the enzyme Rel(Msm). This enzyme consists of a single, bifunctional polypeptide chain that is capable of both synthesizing and hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp. The rel(Msm) knockout strain of M. smegmatis (Δrel(Msm)) is expected to show a (p)ppGpp null [(p)ppGpp(0)] phenotype. Contrary to this expectation, the strain is capable of synthesizing (p)ppGpp in vivo. In this study, we identify and functionally characterize the open reading frame (ORF), MSMEG_5849, that encodes a second functional (p)ppGpp synthetase in M. smegmatis. In addition to (p)ppGpp synthesis, the 567-amino-acid-long protein encoded by this gene is capable of hydrolyzing RNA·DNA hybrids and bears similarity to the conventional RNase HII enzymes. We have classified this protein as actRel(Msm) in accordance with the recent nomenclature proposed and have named it MS_RHII-RSD, indicating the two enzymatic activities present [RHII, RNase HII domain, originally identified as domain of unknown function 429 (DUF429), and RSD, RelA_SpoT nucleotidyl transferase domain, the SYNTH domain responsible for (p)ppGpp synthesis activity]. MS_RHII-RSD is expressed and is constitutively active in vivo and behaves like a monofunctional (p)ppGpp synthetase in vitro. The occurrence of the RNase HII and (p)ppGpp synthetase domains together on the same polypeptide chain is suggestive of an in vivo role for this novel protein as a link connecting the essential life processes of DNA replication, repair, and transcription to the highly conserved stress survival pathway, the stringent response.

  6. The crystal structure of FdxA, a 7Fe ferredoxin from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    SciTech Connect

    Ricagno, Stefano; De Rosa, Matteo; Aliverti, Alessandro; Zanetti, Giuliana; Bolognesi, Martino . E-mail: martino.bolognesi@unimi.it

    2007-08-17

    Mycobacterium smegmatis ferredoxin FdxA, which has an orthologue ferredoxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, FdxC, contains both one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] cluster. M. smegmatis FdxA has been shown to be a preferred ferredoxin substrate of FprA [F. Fischer, D. Raimondi, A. Aliverti, G. Zanetti, Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA, a novel bacterial NADPH-ferredoxin reductase, Eur. J. Biochem. 269 (2002) 3005-3013], an adrenodoxin reductase-like flavoprotein of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis FdxC could be the physiological partner of the enzyme in providing reducing power to the cytochromes P450. We report here the crystal structure of FdxA at 1.6 A resolution (R {sub factor} 16.5%, R {sub free} 20.2%). Besides providing an insight on protein architecture for this 106-residue ferredoxin, our crystallographic investigation highlights lability of the [4Fe-4S] center, which is shown to loose a Fe atom during crystal growth. Due to their high similarity (87% sequence identity), the structure here reported can be considered a valuable model for M. tuberculosis FdxC, thus representing a step forward in the study of the complex mycobacterial redox pathways.

  7. Identification of a Desaturase Involved in Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Albel; Varela, Cristian; Bhatt, Kiranmai; Veerapen, Natacha; Lee, Oona Y. C.; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Minnikin, David E.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Teramoto, Kanae; Bhatt, Apoorva

    2016-01-01

    Mycolic acids are unique long chain fatty acids found in the cell walls of mycobacteria including the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The introduction of double bonds in mycolic acids remains poorly understood, however, genes encoding two potential aerobic desaturases have been proposed to be involved in this process. Here we show that one of these genes, desA1, is essential for growth of the saprophytic Mycobacterium smegmatis. Depletion of desA1 in a M. smegmatis conditional mutant led to reduction of mycolic acid biosynthesis and loss of viability. The DesA1-depleted cells exhibited two other phenotypes: using 14[C]-labelling, we detected the accumulation of minor mycolic acid-related species that migrated faster in a silver TLC plate. Spiral Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopic analysis suggested the presence of species with sizes corresponding to what were likely monoenoic derivatives of α-mycolic acids. Additionally, conditional depletion led to the presence of free fatty acyl species of lengths ~C26-C48 in the lysing cells. Cell viability could be rescued in the conditional mutant by Mycobacterium tuberculosis desA1, highlighting the potential of desA1 as a new drug target in pathogenic mycobacteria. PMID:27741286

  8. Mycobacterium smegmatis in Skin Biopsy Specimens from Patients with Suppurative Granulomatous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe; Lu, Di; Zhang, Xia; Li, Haijing; Meng, Shufang; Pan, Yue-Song; Boyd, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin biopsy specimens, including 72 suppurative granulomatous inflammation (SGI) and 47 non-SGI controls, were tested for mycobacteria by using a broad-range PCR and a suspension array identification system. Mycobacterium smegmatis was detected in 13 (18.1%) of the SGI skin biopsy specimens, which was significantly more than 2 (4.3%) in the controls (odds ratio, 5.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.21 to 27.06; P = 0.028). PMID:23303491

  9. Cloning, expression, and transcription analysis of L-arabinose isomerase gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis SMDU.

    PubMed

    Takata, Goro; Poonperm, Wayoon; Rao, Devendar; Souda, Akane; Nishizaki, Tomoe; Morimoto, Kenji; Izumori, Ken

    2007-12-01

    The L-arabinose metabolic gene cluster, araA, araB, araD, araG, araH and araR, encoding L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) and its accessory proteins was cloned from Mycobacterium smegmatis SMDU and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of araA displayed highest identity with that of Bacillus subtilis (52%). These six genes comprised the L-arabinose operon, and its genetic arrangement was similar to that of B. subtilis. The L-AI gene (araA), encoding a 501 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 54,888 Da, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The productivity and overall enzymatic properties of the recombinant L-AI were almost same as the authentic L-AI from M. smegmatis. Although the recombinant L-AI showed high substrate specificity, as did L-AI from other organisms, this enzyme catalyzed not only isomerization of L-arabinose-L-ribulose and D-galactose-D-tagatose but also isomerization of L-altrose-L-psicose and L-erythrulose-L-threose. In combination with L-AI from M. smegmatis, L-threose and L-altrose can be produced from cheap and abundant erythritol and D-fructose respectively, indicating that this enzyme has great potential for biological application in rare sugar production. Transcription analysis using various sugars revealed that this enzyme was significantly induced not only by L-arabinose and D-galactose but also by L-ribose, galactitol, L-ribulose, and L-talitol. This different result of transcription mediated by sugars from that of E. coli suggests that the transcriptional regulation of araA from M. smegmatis against sugar is loose compared with that from E. coli, and that it depends on the hydroxyl configuration at C2, C3 and C4 positions of sugars.

  10. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Profiling of Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2 155 Cultivated in Minimal Media Supplemented with Cholesterol, Androstenedione or Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qun; Ge, Fanglan; Tan, Yunya; Zhang, Guangxiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis strain MC2 155 is an attractive model organism for the study of M. tuberculosis and other mycobacterial pathogens, as it can grow well using cholesterol as a carbon resource. However, its global transcriptomic response remains largely unrevealed. In this study, M. smegmatis MC2 155 cultivated in androstenedione, cholesterol and glycerol supplemented media were collected separately for a RNA-Sequencing study. The results showed that 6004, 6681 and 6348 genes were expressed in androstenedione, cholesterol and glycerol supplemented media, and 5891 genes were expressed in all three conditions, with 237 specially expressed in cholesterol added medium. A total of 1852 and 454 genes were significantly up-regulated by cholesterol compared with the other two supplements. Only occasional changes were observed in basic carbon and nitrogen metabolism, while almost all of the genes involved in cholesterol catabolism and mammalian cell entry (MCE) were up-regulated by cholesterol, but not by androstenedione. Eleven and 16 gene clusters were induced by cholesterol when compared with glycerol or androstenedione, respectively. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the cholesterol responsive transcriptome of M. smegmatis. Our results indicated that cholesterol induced many more genes and increased the expression of the majority of genes involved in cholesterol degradation and MCE in M. smegmatis, while androstenedione did not have the same effect. PMID:27164097

  11. Inactivation of the organic hydroperoxide stress resistance regulator OhrR enhances resistance to oxidative stress and isoniazid in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Saikolappan, Sankaralingam; Das, Kishore; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    The organic hydroperoxide stress resistance regulator (OhrR) is a MarR type of transcriptional regulator that primarily regulates the expression of organic hydroperoxide reductase (Ohr) in bacteria. In mycobacteria, the genes encoding these proteins exist in only a few species, which include the fast-growing organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. To delineate the roles of Ohr and OhrR in defense against oxidative stress in M. smegmatis, strains lacking the expression of these proteins were constructed by deleting the ohrR and ohr genes, independently and together, through homologous recombination. The OhrR mutant strain (MSΔohrR) showed severalfold upregulation of Ohr expression, which could be observed at both the transcript and protein levels. Similar upregulation of Ohr expression was also noticed in an M. smegmatis wild-type strain (MSWt) induced with cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). The elevated Ohr expression in MSΔohrR correlated with heightened resistance to oxidative stress due to CHP and t-BHP and to inhibitory effects due to the antituberculosis drug isoniazid (INH). Further, this mutant strain exhibited significantly enhanced survival in the intracellular compartments of macrophages. In contrast, the strains lacking either Ohr alone (MSΔohr) or both Ohr and OhrR (MSΔohr-ohrR) displayed limited or no resistance to hydroperoxides and INH. Additionally, these strains showed no significant differences in intracellular survival from the wild type. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed that the overexpressed and purified OhrR interacts with the ohr-ohrR intergenic region with a greater affinity and this interaction is contingent upon the redox state of the OhrR. These findings suggest that Ohr-OhrR is an important peroxide stress response system in M. smegmatis. PMID:25313389

  12. Inactivation of the Organic Hydroperoxide Stress Resistance Regulator OhrR Enhances Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Isoniazid in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Saikolappan, Sankaralingam; Das, Kishore

    2014-01-01

    The organic hydroperoxide stress resistance regulator (OhrR) is a MarR type of transcriptional regulator that primarily regulates the expression of organic hydroperoxide reductase (Ohr) in bacteria. In mycobacteria, the genes encoding these proteins exist in only a few species, which include the fast-growing organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. To delineate the roles of Ohr and OhrR in defense against oxidative stress in M. smegmatis, strains lacking the expression of these proteins were constructed by deleting the ohrR and ohr genes, independently and together, through homologous recombination. The OhrR mutant strain (MSΔohrR) showed severalfold upregulation of Ohr expression, which could be observed at both the transcript and protein levels. Similar upregulation of Ohr expression was also noticed in an M. smegmatis wild-type strain (MSWt) induced with cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). The elevated Ohr expression in MSΔohrR correlated with heightened resistance to oxidative stress due to CHP and t-BHP and to inhibitory effects due to the antituberculosis drug isoniazid (INH). Further, this mutant strain exhibited significantly enhanced survival in the intracellular compartments of macrophages. In contrast, the strains lacking either Ohr alone (MSΔohr) or both Ohr and OhrR (MSΔohr-ohrR) displayed limited or no resistance to hydroperoxides and INH. Additionally, these strains showed no significant differences in intracellular survival from the wild type. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed that the overexpressed and purified OhrR interacts with the ohr-ohrR intergenic region with a greater affinity and this interaction is contingent upon the redox state of the OhrR. These findings suggest that Ohr-OhrR is an important peroxide stress response system in M. smegmatis. PMID:25313389

  13. Crystal Structure of a Monomeric Thiolase-Like Protein Type 1 (TLP1) from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Janardan, Neelanjana; Harijan, Rajesh K.; Wierenga, Rikkert K.; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1), has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function. PMID:22844533

  14. Regulation of the ald gene encoding alanine dehydrogenase by AldR in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-A; Baek, Eun-Young; Kim, Si Wouk; Choi, Jong-Soon; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2013-08-01

    The regulatory gene aldR was identified 95 bp upstream of the ald gene encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The AldR protein shows sequence similarity to the regulatory proteins of the Lrp/AsnC family. Using an aldR deletion mutant, we demonstrated that AldR serves as both activator and repressor for the regulation of ald gene expression, depending on the presence or absence of L-alanine. The purified AldR protein exists as a homodimer in the absence of L-alanine, while it adopts the quaternary structure of a homohexamer in the presence of L-alanine. The binding affinity of AldR for the ald control region was shown to be increased significantly by L-alanine. Two AldR binding sites (O1 and O2) with the consensus sequence GA-N₂-ATC-N₂-TC and one putative AldR binding site with the sequence GA-N₂-GTT-N₂-TC were identified upstream of the ald gene. Alanine and cysteine were demonstrated to be the effector molecules directly involved in the induction of ald expression. The cellular level of L-alanine was shown to be increased in M. smegmatis cells grown under hypoxic conditions, and the hypoxic induction of ald expression appears to be mediated by AldR, which senses the intracellular level of alanine.

  15. Three different [NiFe] hydrogenases confer metabolic flexibility in the obligate aerobe Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Hards, Kiel; Collins, Desmond; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is an obligate aerobe that harbours three predicted [NiFe] hydrogenases, Hyd1 (MSMEG_2262–2263), Hyd2 (MSMEG_2720-2719) and Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928). We show here that these three enzymes differ in their phylogeny, regulation and catalytic activity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyd1 groups with hydrogenases that oxidize H2 produced by metabolic processes, and Hyd2 is homologous to a novel group of putative high-affinity hydrogenases. Hyd1 and Hyd2 respond to carbon and oxygen limitation, and, in the case of Hyd1, hydrogen supplementation. Hydrogen consumption measurements confirmed that both enzymes can oxidize hydrogen. In contrast, the phylogenetic analysis and activity measurements of Hyd3 are consistent with the enzyme evolving hydrogen. Hyd3 is controlled by DosR, a regulator that responds to hypoxic conditions. The strict dependence of hydrogen oxidation of Hyd1 and Hyd2 on oxygen suggests that the enzymes are oxygen tolerant and linked to the respiratory chain. This unique combination of hydrogenases allows M. smegmatis to oxidize hydrogen at high (Hyd1) and potentially tropospheric (Hyd2) concentrations, as well as recycle reduced equivalents by evolving hydrogen (Hyd3). The distribution of these hydrogenases throughout numerous soil and marine species of actinomycetes suggests that oxic hydrogen metabolism provides metabolic flexibility in environments with changing nutrient fluxes.

  16. Arthritogenicity of Mycobacterium smegmatis subfractions, related to different oil vehicle and different composition.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, C M

    1976-01-01

    Arthrigenicity of Mycobacterium smegmatis subfractions appeared to be remarkably potentiated in oil vehicles such as squalane or mineral oil, while water-in-oil emulsions containing Arlacel A appeared to decrease or suppress their arthritogenicity. It seems that Arlacel A can exert a suppressive effect on the arthritogenicity of the subfractions. Poly I:C and acetylated wax D potentiated the arthritogenicity of lysozyme-solubilized product, while cord factor was unable to do so. When given together with either cell membrane fraction or cell envelope, the lysozyme-solubilized product produced much more severe disease than that of lysozyme-solubilized product alone. Cell walls lost much of their arthritogenicity when mixed with lysozyme-solubilized product. PMID:1085757

  17. Arthritogenicity of Mycobacterium smegmatis subfractions, related to different oil vehicle and different composition.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, O; Pearson, C M

    1976-01-01

    Arthrigenicity of Mycobacterium smegmatis subfractions appeared to be remarkably potentiated in oil vehicles such as squalane or mineral oil, while water-in-oil emulsions containing Arlacel A appeared to decrease or suppress their arthritogenicity. It seems that Arlacel A can exert a suppressive effect on the arthritogenicity of the subfractions. Poly I:C and acetylated wax D potentiated the arthritogenicity of lysozyme-solubilized product, while cord factor was unable to do so. When given together with either cell membrane fraction or cell envelope, the lysozyme-solubilized product produced much more severe disease than that of lysozyme-solubilized product alone. Cell walls lost much of their arthritogenicity when mixed with lysozyme-solubilized product.

  18. Distinct Responses of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Exposure to Low and High Levels of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojing; Wu, Jun; Han, Jiao; Hu, Yongfei; Mi, Kaixia

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a natural oxidant produced by aerobic organisms and gives rise to oxidative damage, including DNA mutations, protein inactivation and lipid damage. The genus Mycobacterium utilizes redox sensors and H2O2 scavenging enzymes for the detoxification of H2O2. To date, the precise response to oxidative stress has not been fully elucidated. Here, we compared the effects of different levels of H2O2 on transcription in M. smegmatis using RNA-sequencing. A 0.2 mM H2O2 treatment had little effect on the growth and viability of M. smegmatis whereas 7 mM H2O2 was lethal. Analysis of global transcription showed that 0.2 mM H2O2 induced relatively few changes in gene expression, whereas a large proportion of the mycobacterial genome was found to be differentially expressed after treatment with 7 mM H2O2. Genes differentially expressed following treatment with 0.2 mM H2O2 included those coding for proteins involved in glycolysis-gluconeogenesis and fatty acid metabolism pathways, and expression of most genes encoding ribosomal proteins was lower following treatment with 7 mM H2O2. Our analysis shows that M. smegmatis utilizes the sigma factor MSMEG_5214 in response to 0.2 mM H2O2, and the RpoE1 sigma factors MSMEG_0573 and MSMEG_0574 in response to 7 mM H2O2. In addition, different transcriptional regulators responded to different levels of H2O2: MSMEG_1919 was induced by 0.2 mM H2O2, while high-level induction of DevR occurred in response to 7 mM H2O2. We detected the induction of different detoxifying enzymes, including genes encoding KatG, AhpD, TrxB and Trx, at different levels of H2O2 and the detoxifying enzymes were expressed at different levels of H2O2. In conclusion, our study reveals the changes in transcription that are induced in response to different levels of H2O2 in M. smegmatis. PMID:26225431

  19. Transcriptomic Characterization of an Infection of Mycobacterium smegmatis by the Cluster A4 Mycobacteriophage Kampy

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The mycobacteriophages, phages that infect the genus Mycobacterium, display profound genetic diversity and widespread geographical distribution, and possess significant medical and ecological importance. However, most of the majority of functions of mycobacteriophage proteins and the identity of most genetic regulatory elements remain unknown. We characterized the gene expression profile of Kampy, a cluster A4 mycobacteriophage, during infection of its host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, using RNA-Seq and mass spectrometry. We show that mycobacteriophage Kampy transcription occurs in roughly two phases, an early phase consisting of genes for metabolism, DNA synthesis, and gene regulation, and a late phase consisting of structural genes and lysis genes. Additionally, we identify the earliest genes transcribed during infection, along with several other possible regulatory units not obvious from inspection of Kampy's genomic structure. The transcriptional profile of Kampy appears similar to that of mycobacteriophage TM4 but unlike that of mycobacteriophage Giles, a result which further expands our understanding of the diversity of mycobacteriophage gene expression programs during infection. PMID:26513661

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of MutT2, MSMEG_5148 from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Arif, S. M.; Sang, P. B.; Varshney, U.; Vijayan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization of MutT2, MSMEG_5148 from Mycobacterium smegmatis, has been carried out and the crystals have been characterized using X-ray diffraction. Matthews coefficient calculation suggests the possibility of one protein molecule in the asymmetric unit of the orthorhombic unit cell, space group P21212 or P2122. Solution of the structure of the protein by molecular replacement using the known three-dimensional structure of a bacterial Nudix hydrolase is envisaged. PMID:24637753

  1. Characterization of differential pore-forming activities of ESAT-6 proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiuli; Jiang, Guozhong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Qian, Wei; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 (MtbESAT-6) plays essential roles in pathogenesis. MtbESAT-6 exhibits a unique pore-forming activity (PFA) that is not found in its ortholog from non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis (MsESAT-6). Here, we characterized the differential PFAs and found that exchange of I25-H26/T25-A26 between two proteins reciprocally affected their PFAs. MtbESAT-6(IH/TA) had ~ 40% reduction, while MsESAT-6(TA/IH) fully acquired its activity similar to MtbESAT-6. Mutations of A17E, K38T, N67L or R74Q on MtbESAT-6(IH/TA) further reduced the activity, with MtbESAT-6(IH/TA-17) being the lowest. This study suggests I25-H26 as the pH-sensor essential for MsESAT-6 to fully acquire the activity, while multiple residues contributed to MtbESAT-6 PFA.

  2. Initial step in the catabolism of cholesterol by Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155.

    PubMed

    Uhía, I; Galán, B; Morales, V; García, J L

    2011-04-01

    The first step in the catabolism of cholesterol, i.e. the transformation of cholesterol into cholestenone, has been investigated in Mycobacterium smegmatis. In silico analysis identified the MSMEG_1604 gene encoding a putative protein similar to the ChoD cholesterol oxidase of M. tuberculosis H37Rv (Rv3409c) and the MSMEG_5228 gene coding for a protein similar to the NAD(P)-dependent cholesterol dehydrogenase/isomerase of Nocardia sp. The expression of the MSMEG_5228 gene was inducible by cholesterol whereas the expression of MSMEG_1604 gene was constitutive. When both genes were expressed in Escherichia coli only the MSMEG_5228 protein was active on cholesterol. The function of ChoD-like MSMEG_1604 protein remains to be elucidated, but it does not appear to play a critical role in the mineralization of cholesterol as a MSMEG_1604(-) mutant was not affected in the production of cholestenone. However, a MSMEG_5228(-) mutant showed a drastic reduction in the synthesis of cholestenone. The finding that this mutant was still able to grow in cholesterol, allowed us to demonstrate that the cholesterol-inducible MSMEG_5233 gene encodes an additional cholesterol dehydrogenase/isomerase similar to the AcmA dehydrogenase of Sterolibacterium denitrificans. The observation that the double MSMEG_5228-5233(-) mutant was able to grow in cholesterol suggests that in addition to these enzymes other dehydrogenase/isomerases can also catalyse the first reaction of the cholesterol degradation pathway in M. smegmatis, which is not the limiting step of the process. PMID:21208358

  3. R-loop induced stress response by second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis: functional and domain interdependence.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sushma; Petchiappan, Anushya; Singh, Albel; Bhatt, Apoorva; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2016-10-01

    Persistent R-loops lead to replicative stress due to RNA polymerase stalling and DNA damage. RNase H enzymes facilitate the organisms to survive in the hostile condition by removing these R-loops. MS_RHII-RSD was previously identified to be the second (p)ppGpp synthetase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The unique presence of an additional RNase HII domain raises an important question regarding the significance of this bifunctional protein. In this report, we demonstrate its ability to hydrolyze R-loops in Escherichia coli exposed to UV stress. MS_RHII-RSD gene expression was upregulated under UV stress, and this gene deleted strain showed increased R-loop accumulation as compared to the wild type. The domains in isolation are known to be inactive, and the full length protein is required for its function. Domain interdependence studies using active site mutants reveal the necessity of a hexamer form with high alpha helical content. In previous studies, bacterial RNase type HI has been mainly implicated in R-loop hydrolysis, but in this study, the RNase HII domain containing protein showed the activity. The prospective of this differential RNase HII activity is discussed. This is the first report to implicate a (p)ppGpp synthetase protein in R-loop-induced stress response.

  4. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10(-10) per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB) homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase) methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways. PMID:27194804

  5. The Rate and Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a Bacterium Naturally Devoid of the Postreplicative Mismatch Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F.; Doak, Thomas G.; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a bacterium that is naturally devoid of known postreplicative DNA mismatch repair (MMR) homologs, mutS and mutL, providing an opportunity to investigate how the mutation rate and spectrum has evolved in the absence of a highly conserved primary repair pathway. Mutation accumulation experiments of M. smegmatis yielded a base-substitution mutation rate of 5.27 × 10−10 per site per generation, or 0.0036 per genome per generation, which is surprisingly similar to the mutation rate in MMR-functional unicellular organisms. Transitions were found more frequently than transversions, with the A:T→G:C transition rate significantly higher than the G:C→A:T transition rate, opposite to what is observed in most studied bacteria. We also found that the transition-mutation rate of M. smegmatis is significantly lower than that of other naturally MMR-devoid or MMR-knockout organisms. Two possible candidates that could be responsible for maintaining high DNA fidelity in this MMR-deficient organism are the ancestral-like DNA polymerase DnaE1, which contains a highly efficient DNA proofreading histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain, and/or the existence of a uracil-DNA glycosylase B (UdgB) homolog that might protect the GC-rich M. smegmatis genome against DNA damage arising from oxidation or deamination. Our results suggest that M. smegmatis has a noncanonical Dam (DNA adenine methylase) methylation system, with target motifs differing from those previously reported. The mutation features of M. smegmatis provide further evidence that genomes harbor alternative routes for improving replication fidelity, even in the absence of major repair pathways. PMID:27194804

  6. Antibiotic Bactericidal Activity Is Countered by Maintaining pH Homeostasis in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, I. L.; Reichlen, M. J.; Honaker, R. W.; Leistikow, R. L.; Clambey, E. T.; Scobey, M. S.; Hinds, A. B.; Born, S. E.; Covey, C. R.; Schurr, M. J.; Lenaerts, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotics target specific biosynthetic processes essential for bacterial growth. It is intriguing that several commonalities connect the bactericidal activity of seemingly disparate antibiotics, such as the numerous conditions that confer broad-spectrum antibiotic tolerance. Whether antibiotics kill in a manner unique to their specific targets or by a universal mechanism is a critical and contested subject. Herein, we demonstrate that the bactericidal activity of diverse antibiotics against Mycobacterium smegmatis and four evolutionarily divergent bacterial pathogens was blocked by conditions that worked to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis. Single-cell pH analysis demonstrated that antibiotics increased the cytosolic pH of M. smegmatis, while conditions that promoted proton entry into the cytosol prevented intracellular alkalization and antibiotic killing. These findings led to a hypothesis that posits antibiotic lethality occurs when antibiotics obstruct ATP-consuming biosynthetic processes while metabolically driven proton efflux is sustained despite the loss of proton influx via ATP synthase. Consequently, without a concomitant reduction in respiratory proton efflux, cell death occurs due to intracellular alkalization. Our findings indicate the effects of antibiotics on pH homeostasis should be considered a potential mechanism contributing to antibiotic lethality. IMPORTANCE Since the discovery of antibiotics, mortality due to bacterial infection has decreased dramatically. However, infections from difficult to treat bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant pathogens have been on the rise. An understanding of the cascade of events that leads to cell death downstream of specific drug-target interactions is not well understood. We have discovered that killing by several classes of antibiotics was stopped by maintaining pH balance within the bacterial cell, consistent with a shared mechanism of antibiotic killing. Our

  7. Antibiotic Bactericidal Activity Is Countered by Maintaining pH Homeostasis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bartek, I L; Reichlen, M J; Honaker, R W; Leistikow, R L; Clambey, E T; Scobey, M S; Hinds, A B; Born, S E; Covey, C R; Schurr, M J; Lenaerts, A J; Voskuil, M I

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics target specific biosynthetic processes essential for bacterial growth. It is intriguing that several commonalities connect the bactericidal activity of seemingly disparate antibiotics, such as the numerous conditions that confer broad-spectrum antibiotic tolerance. Whether antibiotics kill in a manner unique to their specific targets or by a universal mechanism is a critical and contested subject. Herein, we demonstrate that the bactericidal activity of diverse antibiotics against Mycobacterium smegmatis and four evolutionarily divergent bacterial pathogens was blocked by conditions that worked to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis. Single-cell pH analysis demonstrated that antibiotics increased the cytosolic pH of M. smegmatis, while conditions that promoted proton entry into the cytosol prevented intracellular alkalization and antibiotic killing. These findings led to a hypothesis that posits antibiotic lethality occurs when antibiotics obstruct ATP-consuming biosynthetic processes while metabolically driven proton efflux is sustained despite the loss of proton influx via ATP synthase. Consequently, without a concomitant reduction in respiratory proton efflux, cell death occurs due to intracellular alkalization. Our findings indicate the effects of antibiotics on pH homeostasis should be considered a potential mechanism contributing to antibiotic lethality. IMPORTANCE Since the discovery of antibiotics, mortality due to bacterial infection has decreased dramatically. However, infections from difficult to treat bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant pathogens have been on the rise. An understanding of the cascade of events that leads to cell death downstream of specific drug-target interactions is not well understood. We have discovered that killing by several classes of antibiotics was stopped by maintaining pH balance within the bacterial cell, consistent with a shared mechanism of antibiotic killing. Our findings

  8. Biosynthesis of d-arabinose in Mycobacterium smegmatis: specific labeling from d-glucose.

    PubMed

    Klutts, J Stacey; Hatanaka, Kenichi; Pan, Y T; Elbein, Alan D

    2002-02-15

    d-Arabinose is a major sugar in the cell wall polysaccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacterial species. The reactions involved in the biosynthesis and activation of d-arabinose represent excellent potential sites for drug intervention since d-arabinose is not found in mammalian cells, and the cell wall arabinomannan and/or arabinogalactan appear to be essential for cell survival. Since the pathway involved in conversion of d-glucose to d-arabinose is unknown, we incubated cells of Mycobacterium smegmatis individually with [1-(14)C]glucose, [3,4-(14)C]glucose, and [6-(14)C]glucose and compared the specific activities of the cell wall-bound arabinose. Although the specific activity of the arabinose was about 25% lower with [6-(14)C]glucose than with other labels, there did not appear to be selective loss of either carbon 1 or carbon 6, suggesting that arabinose was not formed by loss of carbon 1 of glucose via the oxidative step of the pentose phosphate pathway, or by loss of carbon 6 in the uronic acid pathway. Similar labeling patterns were observed with ribose isolated from the nucleic acid fraction. Since these results suggested an unusual pathway of pentose formation, labeling studies were also done with [1-(13)C]glucose, [2-(13)C]glucose, and [6-(13)C]glucose and the cell wall arabinose was examined by NMR analysis. This method allows one to determine the relative (13)C content in each carbon of the arabinose. The labeling patterns suggested that the most likely pathway was condensation of carbons 1 and 2 of fructose 6-phosphate produced by the transaldolase reaction with carbons 4, 5, and 6 (i.e., glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate) formed by fructose-1,6 bisphosphate aldolase. Cell-free enzyme extracts of M. smegmatis were incubated with ribose 5-phosphate, xylulose 5-phosphate, and d-arabinose 5-phosphate under a variety of experimental conditions. Although the ribose 5-phosphate and xylulose 5-phosphate were converted to other pentoses and

  9. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and lipopolysaccharide induce different transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the IRG1 gene in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Jeckstadt, Sabine; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a chronic enteritis in ruminants. In addition, MAP is presently the most favored pathogen linked to Crohn's disease. In this study, we were interested in dissecting the molecular mechanisms of macrophage activation or deactivation after infection with MAP. By subtractive hybridization of cDNAs, we identified the immune-responsive gene 1 (IRG1), which was expressed substantially higher in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated than in MAP-infected murine macrophage cell lines. A nuclear run-on transcription assay revealed that the IRG1 gene was activated transcriptionally in LPS-stimulated and MAP-infected macrophages with higher expression in LPS-stimulated cells. Analysis of post-transcriptional regulation demonstrated that IRG1 mRNA stability was increased in LPS-stimulated but not in MAP-infected macrophages. Furthermore, IRG1 gene expression of macrophages infected with the nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis differed from those of LPS-stimulated and MAP-infected macrophages. At 2 h postinfection, M. smegmatis-induced IRG1 gene expression was as low as in MAP-infected, and 8 h postinfection, it increased nearly to the level in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Transient transfection experiments revealed similar IRG1 promoter activities in MAP- and M. smegmatis-infected cells. Northern analysis demonstrated increased IRG1 mRNA stability in M. smegmatis-infected macrophages. IRG1 mRNA stabilization was p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent. Inhibition of protein synthesis revealed that constitutively expressed factors seemed to be responsible for IRG1 mRNA destabilization. Thus, our data demonstrate that transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are responsible for a differential IRG1 gene expression in murine macrophages treated with LPS, MAP, and M. smegmatis.

  10. Mycobacterium smegmatis L-alanine dehydrogenase (Ald) is required for proficient utilization of alanine as a sole nitrogen source and sustained anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhengyu; Cáceres, Nancy E; Sarath, Gautam; Barletta, Raúl G

    2002-09-01

    NAD(H)-dependent L-alanine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.1) (Ald) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-alanine and the reductive amination of pyruvate. To assess the physiological role of Ald in Mycobacterium smegmatis, we cloned the ald gene, identified its promoter, determined the protein expression levels, and analyzed the combined effects of nutrient supplementation, oxygen availability, and growth stage on enzyme activity. High Ald activities were observed in cells grown in the presence of L- or D-alanine regardless of the oxygen availability and growth stage. In exponentially growing cells under aerobic conditions, supplementation with alanine resulted in a 25- to 50-fold increase in the enzyme activity. In the absence of alanine supplementation, 23-fold-higher Ald activities were observed in cells grown exponentially under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, M. smegmatis ald null mutants were constructed by targeted disruption and were shown to lack any detectable Ald activity. In contrast, the glycine dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.10) (Gdh) activity in mutant cells remained at wild-type levels, indicating that another enzyme protein is responsible for the physiologically relevant reductive amination of glyoxylate. The ald mutants grew poorly in minimal medium with L-alanine as the sole nitrogen source, reaching a saturation density 100-fold less than that of the wild-type strain. Likewise, mutants grew to a saturation density 10-fold less than that of the wild-type strain under anaerobic conditions. In summary, the phenotypes displayed by the M. smegmatis ald mutants suggest that Ald plays an important role in both alanine utilization and anaerobic growth.

  11. Voltage-controlled insertion of single α-hemolysin and Mycobacterium smegmatis nanopores into lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Stephan; Bessonov, Andrey; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2011-02-01

    One of the prerequisites for single molecule nanopore translocation experiments is the availability of a single nanopore embedded into a lipid bilayer membrane. Using two alternative experimental setups, microdroplets, and a classical planar lipid bilayer setup, we here show that at near-neutral pH and high salt concentration the incorporation rates of the pore-forming proteins α-hemolysin and porin A from Mycobacterium smegmatis are exponentially enhanced at elevated voltages. This fact can be utilized to establish an experimental procedure by which a voltage-controlled insertion of single pores into lipid membranes can be achieved.

  12. The Growth and Survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis Is Enhanced by Co-Metabolism of Atmospheric H2

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Chris; Villas-Bôas, Silas G.; Robson, Jennifer R.; Berney, Michael; Cook, Gregory M.

    2014-01-01

    The soil bacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis is able to scavenge the trace concentrations of H2 present in the atmosphere, but the physiological function and importance of this activity is not understood. We have shown that atmospheric H2 oxidation in this organism depends on two phylogenetically and kinetically distinct high-affinity hydrogenases, Hyd1 (MSMEG_2262-2263) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2720-2719). In this study, we explored the effect of deleting Hyd2 on cellular physiology by comparing the viability, energetics, transcriptomes, and metabolomes of wild-type vs. Δhyd2 cells. The long-term survival of the Δhyd2 mutant was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type. The mutant additionally grew less efficiently in a range of conditions, most notably during metabolism of short-chain fatty acids; there was a twofold reduction in growth rate and growth yield of the Δhyd2 strain when acetate served as the sole carbon source. Hyd1 compensated for loss of Hyd2 when cells were grown in a high H2 atmosphere. Analysis of cellular parameters showed that Hyd2 was not necessary to generate the membrane potential, maintain intracellular pH homeostasis, or sustain redox balance. However, microarray analysis indicated that Δhyd2 cells were starved for reductant and compensated by rewiring central metabolism; transcripts encoding proteins responsible for oxidative decarboxylation pathways, the urea cycle, and ABC transporter-mediated import were significantly more abundant in the Δhyd2 mutant. Metabolome profiling consistently revealed an increase in intracellular amino acids in the Δhyd2 mutant. We propose that atmospheric H2 oxidation has two major roles in mycobacterial cells: to generate reductant during mixotrophic growth and to sustain the respiratory chain during dormancy. PMID:25058581

  13. Purification, crystallization, and properties of D-ribose isomerase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Izumori, K; Rees, A W; Elbein, A D

    1975-10-25

    D-Ribose isomerase, which catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose to D-ribulose, was purified from extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis grown on D-ribose. The purified enzyme crystalized as hexagonal plates from a 44% solution of ammonium sulfate. The enzyme was homogenous by disc gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugal analysis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was between 145,000 and 174,000 by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. Its sedimentation constant of 8.7 S indicates it is globular. On the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the presence of Mn2+, the enzyme is probably composed of 4 identical subunits of molecular weight about 42,000 to 44,000. The enzyme was specific for sugars having the same configuration as D-ribose at carbon atoms 1 to 3. Thus, the enzyme could also utilize L-lyxose, D-allose, and L-rhamnose as substrates. The Km for D-ribose was 4 mM and for L-lyxose it was 5.3 mM. The enzyme required a divalent cation for activity with optimum activity being shown with Mn2+. the Km for the various cations was as follows: Mn2+, 1 times 10(-7) M, Co2+, 4 times 10(-7) M, and Mg2+, 1.8 times 10(-5) M. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 7.5 to 8.5. Polyols did not inhibit the enzyme to any great extent. The product of the reaction was identified as D-ribulose by thin layer chromatography and by preparation of the O-nitrophenylhydrazone derivative. PMID:240851

  14. A Histidine Aspartate Ionic Lock Gates the Iron Passage in Miniferritins from Mycobacterium smegmatis*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sunanda Margrett; Chandran, Anu V.; Vijayabaskar, Mahalingam S.; Roy, Sourav; Balaram, Hemalatha; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi; Vijayan, Mamannamana; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells) are dodecameric assemblies belonging to the ferritin family that can bind DNA, carry out ferroxidation, and store iron in their shells. The ferritin-like trimeric pore harbors the channel for the entry and exit of iron. By representing the structure of Dps as a network we have identified a charge-driven interface formed by a histidine aspartate cluster at the pore interface unique to Mycobacterium smegmatis Dps protein, MsDps2. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to generate mutants to disrupt the charged interactions. Kinetics of iron uptake/release of the wild type and mutants were compared. Crystal structures were solved at a resolution of 1.8–2.2 Å for the various mutants to compare structural alterations vis à vis the wild type protein. The substitutions at the pore interface resulted in alterations in the side chain conformations leading to an overall weakening of the interface network, especially in cases of substitutions that alter the charge at the pore interface. Contrary to earlier findings where conserved aspartate residues were found crucial for iron release, we propose here that in the case of MsDps2, it is the interplay of negative-positive potentials at the pore that enables proper functioning of the protein. In similar studies in ferritins, negative and positive patches near the iron exit pore were found to be important in iron uptake/release kinetics. The unique ionic cluster in MsDps2 makes it a suitable candidate to act as nano-delivery vehicle, as these gated pores can be manipulated to exhibit conformations allowing for slow or fast rates of iron release. PMID:24573673

  15. Identification of a salvage pathway for D-arabinose in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Wojtkiewicz, B; Szmidzinski, R; Jezierska, A; Cocito, C

    1988-02-15

    Extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which was adapted to growth in synthetic medium containing D-arabinose as sole carbon source, catalyzed the NADPH-mediated reduction of D-arabinose to D-arabitol. When arabinose-adapted bacteria were transferred to glycerol medium, resumption of growth was accompanied by a sharp drop in the specific activity of this enzyme. Moreover, extracts of cells grown in D-arabinose medium contained large amounts of an NAD+-linked pentitol dehydrogenase, as compared to bacteria multiplying in glycerol medium. The specific activity of mycobacterial extracts was ten-fold higher for D-arabitol than for its L-isomer, and eight-fold higher than for xylitol (it was more than forty-fold lower in the case of glycerol-grown cells). The product of the pentitol dehydrogenase reaction was identified as D-xylulose by three different procedures. On the basis of these data, it is suggested that utilization of exogenous D-arabinose in mycobacteria involves two dehydrogenases that catalyze the reactions D-arabinose NADPH----D-arabitol NAD+----D-xylulose, by virtue of which an aldopentose is converted into a ketopentose. The alditol: NADP oxidoreductase was isolated from homogenates of D-arabinose-adapted mycobacteria, and purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The enzymatic activity was restricted to a single band which, under denaturing conditions, comigrated with albumin (approximately 46 kDa). It was insensitive to 2-mercaptoethanol, EDTA and NaF, and was inactivated at 70 degrees C.

  16. Purification, crystallization, and properties of D-ribose isomerase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Izumori, K; Rees, A W; Elbein, A D

    1975-10-25

    D-Ribose isomerase, which catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose to D-ribulose, was purified from extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis grown on D-ribose. The purified enzyme crystalized as hexagonal plates from a 44% solution of ammonium sulfate. The enzyme was homogenous by disc gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugal analysis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was between 145,000 and 174,000 by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. Its sedimentation constant of 8.7 S indicates it is globular. On the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the presence of Mn2+, the enzyme is probably composed of 4 identical subunits of molecular weight about 42,000 to 44,000. The enzyme was specific for sugars having the same configuration as D-ribose at carbon atoms 1 to 3. Thus, the enzyme could also utilize L-lyxose, D-allose, and L-rhamnose as substrates. The Km for D-ribose was 4 mM and for L-lyxose it was 5.3 mM. The enzyme required a divalent cation for activity with optimum activity being shown with Mn2+. the Km for the various cations was as follows: Mn2+, 1 times 10(-7) M, Co2+, 4 times 10(-7) M, and Mg2+, 1.8 times 10(-5) M. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 7.5 to 8.5. Polyols did not inhibit the enzyme to any great extent. The product of the reaction was identified as D-ribulose by thin layer chromatography and by preparation of the O-nitrophenylhydrazone derivative.

  17. Characterization of a dual-active enzyme, DcpA, involved in cyclic diguanosine monophosphate turnover in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indra Mani; Prakash, Sunita; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    We have reported previously that the long-term survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis is facilitated by a dual-active enzyme MSDGC-1 (renamed DcpA), which controls the cellular turnover of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Most mycobacterial species possess at least a single copy of a DcpA orthologue that is highly conserved in terms of sequence similarity and domain architecture. Here, we show that DcpA exists in monomeric and dimeric forms. The dimerization of DcpA is due to non-covalent interactions between two protomers that are arranged in a parallel orientation. The dimer shows both synthesis and hydrolysis activities, whereas the monomer shows only hydrolysis activity. In addition, we have shown that DcpA is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and exhibits heterogeneous cellular localization with a predominance at the cell poles. Finally, we have also shown that DcpA is involved in the change in cell length and colony morphology of M. smegmatis. Taken together, our study provides additional evidence about the role of the bifunctional protein involved in c-di-GMP signalling in M. smegmatis.

  18. Overexpression of inhA, but not kasA, confers resistance to isoniazid and ethionamide in Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Michelle H; Vilchèze, Catherine; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S; Parsons, Linda; Salfinger, Max; Heifets, Leonid; Hazbon, Manzour H; Alland, David; Sacchettini, James C; Jacobs, William R

    2002-10-01

    The inhA and kasA genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have each been proposed to encode the primary target of the antibiotic isoniazid (INH). Previous studies investigating whether overexpressed inhA or kasA could confer resistance to INH yielded disparate results. In this work, multicopy plasmids expressing either inhA or kasA genes were transformed into M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and three different M. tuberculosis strains. The resulting transformants, as well as previously published M. tuberculosis strains with multicopy inhA or kasAB plasmids, were tested for their resistance to INH, ethionamide (ETH) or thiolactomycin (TLM). Mycobacteria containing inhA plasmids uniformly exhibited 20-fold or greater increased resistance to INH and 10-fold or greater increased resistance to ETH. In contrast, the kasA plasmid conferred no increased resistance to INH or ETH in any of the five strains, but it did confer resistance to thiolactomycin, a known KasA inhibitor. INH is known to increase the expression of kasA in INH-susceptible M. tuberculosis strains. Using molecular beacons, quantified inhA and kasA mRNA levels showed that increased inhA mRNA levels corre--lated with INH resistance, whereas kasA mRNA levels did not. In summary, analysis of strains harbouring inhA or kasA plasmids yielded the same conclusion: overexpressed inhA, but not kasA, confers INH and ETH resistance to M. smegmatis, M. bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis. Therefore, InhA is the primary target of action of INH and ETH in all three species. PMID:12406221

  19. MmpL11 Protein Transports Mycolic Acid-containing Lipids to the Mycobacterial Cell Wall and Contributes to Biofilm Formation in Mycobacterium smegmatis*

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Sophia A.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Powers, Katelyn M.; Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that MmpL (mycobacterial membrane protein large) transporters are dedicated to cell wall biosynthesis and transport mycobacterial lipids. How MmpL transporters function and the identities of their substrates have not been fully elucidated. We report the characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis MmpL11. We showed previously that M. smegmatis lacking MmpL11 has reduced membrane permeability that results in resistance to host antimicrobial peptides. We report herein the further characterization of the M. smegmatis mmpL11 mutant and identification of the MmpL11 substrates. We found that biofilm formation by the M. smegmatis mmpL11 mutant was distinct from that by wild-type M. smegmatis. Analysis of cell wall lipids revealed that the mmpL11 mutant failed to export the mycolic acid-containing lipids monomeromycolyl diacylglycerol and mycolate ester wax to the bacterial surface. In addition, analysis of total lipids indicated that the mycolic acid-containing precursor molecule mycolyl phospholipid accumulated in the mmpL11 mutant compared with wild-type mycobacteria. MmpL11 is encoded at a chromosomal locus that is conserved across pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria. Phenotypes of the M. smegmatis mmpL11 mutant are complemented by the expression of M. smegmatis or M. tuberculosis MmpL11, suggesting that MmpL11 plays a conserved role in mycobacterial cell wall biogenesis. PMID:23836904

  20. Short, Synthetic Cationic Peptides Have Antibacterial Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis by Forming Pores in Membrane and Synergizing with Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kajal; Singh, Sameer; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are constantly exposed to a multitude of pathogenic microbes. Infection is inhibited in vivo by the innate and adaptive immune system. Mycobacterium species have emerged that are resistant to most antibiotics. We identified several naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides that were active at low micromolar concentrations against Mycobacterium smegmatis. Human-derived cathelicidin LL-37 is well characterized and studied against M. smegmatis; we compared LL-37 with Chinese cobra-derived cathelicidin NA-CATH and mouse cathelicidin (mCRAMP). Two synthetic 11-residue peptides (ATRA-1A and ATRA-2) containing variations of a repeated motif within NA-CATH were tested for their activity against M. smegmatis along with a short synthetic peptide derivative from the human beta-defensin hBD3 (hBD3-Pep4). We hypothesized that these smaller synthetic peptides may demonstrate antimicrobial effectiveness with shorter length (and at less cost), making them strong potential candidates for development into broad-spectrum antimicrobial compounds or use in combination with antibiotics. These peptides have antimicrobial activity with EC50 ranging from 0.05 to 1.88 μg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. The ATRA-1A short peptide was found to be the most effective antimicrobial peptide (AMP) (EC50 = 0.05 μg/mL). High bactericidal activity correlated with bacterial membrane depolarization and permeabilization activities. The efficacy of the peptides was further analyzed through Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) assays. The MICs were determined by the microdilution method. The peptide mCRAMP showed the best MIC activity at 15.6 μg/mL. Neither of the effective short synthetic peptides demonstrated synergy with the antibiotic rifampicin, although both demonstrated synergy with the cyclic peptide antibiotic polymyxin B. The peptides LL-37 and mCRAMP displayed synergism with rifampicin in MIC assays, whereas antibiotic polymyxin B displayed synergism

  1. Immunotherapeutic efficacy of recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing Ag85B-ESAT6 fusion protein against persistent tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Limei; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Yinlan; Kang, Jian; Hao, Yanfei; Luo, Tailai; Shi, Changhong; Xu, Zhikai

    2014-01-01

    The application of immunotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is considered an effective treatment strategy against persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. In this study, we constructed a novel recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rMS) strain that expresses Ag85B and ESAT6 fusion protein (AE-rMS). Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with AE-rMS generated mainly Th1-type immune responses by strongly stimulating IFN-γ- and IL-2-producing splenocytes and increasing antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. To test the immunotherapeutic efficacy of AE-rMS, a persistent tuberculosis infection (PTBI) model was established via tail-vein injection of C57BL/6 mice with 1×10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of Mtb strain H37Rv in combination with concurrent chemotherapy drugs isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA). PTBI mice immunized with AE-rMS showed high levels of IFN-γ secreted by splenocytes and decreased bacteria loads in lung. Treatment with only the anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drugs RFP and INH (RI), decreased bacteria loads to low levels, with the Th1-type immune response further attenuated. Moreover, AE-rMS, when combined with RI treatment, further reduced the bacteria load as well as the pathological tissue damage in lung. Together, these results demonstrated the essential roles of AE-rMS-induced Th1-type responses, providing an effective treatment strategy by combining AE-rMS and RI for persistent TB.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of a Hybrid Respiratory Supercomplex Consisting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome bcc and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cytochrome aa3*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Jang, Jichan; AB Rahman, Nurlilah Binte; Pethe, Kevin; Berry, Edward A.; Huang, Li-Shar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, energy production pathways have been shown to be viable antitubercular drug targets to combat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and eliminate pathogen in the dormant state. One family of drugs currently under development, the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivatives, is believed to target the pathogen's homolog of the mitochondrial bc1 complex. This complex, denoted cytochrome bcc, is highly divergent from mitochondrial Complex III both in subunit structure and inhibitor sensitivity, making it a good target for drug development. There is no soluble cytochrome c in mycobacteria to transport electrons from the bcc complex to cytochrome oxidase. Instead, the bcc complex exists in a “supercomplex” with a cytochrome aa3-type cytochrome oxidase, presumably allowing direct electron transfer. We describe here purification and initial characterization of the mycobacterial cytochrome bcc-aa3 supercomplex using a strain of M. smegmatis that has been engineered to express the M. tuberculosis cytochrome bcc. The resulting hybrid supercomplex is stable during extraction and purification in the presence of dodecyl maltoside detergent. It is hoped that this purification procedure will potentiate functional studies of the complex as well as crystallographic studies of drug binding and provide structural insight into a third class of the bc complex superfamily. PMID:25861988

  3. Cloning and Characterization of the Genes Encoding a Cytochrome P450 (PipA) Involved in Piperidine and Pyrrolidine Utilization and Its Regulatory Protein (PipR) in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155

    PubMed Central

    Poupin, Pascal; Ducrocq, Véronique; Hallier-Soulier, Sylvie; Truffaut, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 enabled the isolation of a mutant strain (called LGM1) altered in the regulation of piperidine and pyrrolidine utilization. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene inactivated in mutant LGM1 was determined from the wild-type strain. This gene (pipR) encoded a member of the GntR family of bacterial regulatory proteins. An insertion element (IS1096), previously described for M. smegmatis, was detected downstream of the gene pipR. Three additional open reading frames were found downstream of IS1096. The first open reading frame (pipA) appeared to encode a protein identified as a cytochrome P450 enzyme. This gene is the first member of a new family, CYP151. By a gene replacement experiment, it was demonstrated that the cytochrome P450 pipA gene is required for piperidine and pyrrolidine utilization in M. smegmatis mc2155. Genes homologous to pipA were detected by hybridization in several, previously isolated, morpholine-degrading mycobacterial strains. A gene encoding a putative [3Fe-4S] ferredoxin (orf1) and a truncated gene encoding a putative glutamine synthetase (orf2′) were found downstream of pipA. PMID:10348853

  4. Expression, Purification And Crystallization of Native And Selenomethionine Labeled Mycobacterium Tuberculosis FDG1 (Rv0407) Using a Mycobacterium Smegmatis Expression System

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiri, G.; Squire, C.J.; Baker, E.N.; Moreland, N.J.

    2009-06-01

    FGD1 is an F{sub 420}-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that has been shown to be essential for activation of the anti-TB compound PA-824. Initial attempts to produce recombinant FGD1 using Escherichia coli as a host was unsuccessful, but when the alternative host Mycobacterium smegmatis was used, soluble protein yields of 7 mg/L of culture were achieved. Both native and selenomethionine-substituted FGD1 were obtained by culturing M. smegmatis in autoinduction media protocols originally developed for E. coli. Using these media afforded the advantages of decreased handling, as cultures did not require monitoring of optical density and induction, and reduced cost by removing the need for expensive ADC enrichment normally used in mycobacterial cultures. Selenomethionine was efficiently incorporated at levels required for multiwavelength anomalous diffraction experiments used in crystal structure determination. As far as we are aware this is the first protocol for preparation of selenomethionine-substituted protein in mycobacteria. Native and selenomethionine-labeled FGD1 were successfully crystallized by vapor diffusion, with the crystals diffracting to 2.1 AA resolution.

  5. Crystal Structure of PhnF, a GntR-Family Transcriptional Regulator of Phosphate Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Jason N.; Fritz, Georg; Moreland, Nicole J.; Cook, Gregory M.; Lott, J. Shaun; Baker, Edward N.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial uptake of phosphate is usually accomplished via high-affinity transporters that are commonly regulated by two-component systems, which are activated when the concentration of phosphate is low. Mycobacterium smegmatis possesses two such transporters, the widely distributed PstSCAB system and PhnDCE, a transporter that in other bacteria mediates the uptake of alternative phosphorus sources. We previously reported that the transcriptional regulator PhnF controls the production of the Phn system, acting as a repressor under high-phosphate conditions. Here we show that the phnDCE genes are common among environmental mycobacteria, where they are often associated with phnF-like genes. In contrast, pathogenic mycobacteria were not found to encode Phn-like systems but instead were found to possess multiple copies of the pst genes. A detailed biochemical analysis of PhnF binding to its identified binding sites in the phnD-phnF intergenic region of M. smegmatis has allowed us to propose a quantitative model for repressor binding, which shows that a PhnF dimer binds independently to each site. We present the crystal structure of M. smegmatis PhnF at 1.8-Å resolution, showing a homodimer with a helix-turn-helix N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain with a UbiC transcription regulator-associated fold. The C-terminal domain crystallized with a bound sulfate ion instead of the so far unidentified physiological ligand, allowing the identification of residues involved in effector binding. Comparison of the positioning of the DNA binding domains in PhnF with that in homologous proteins suggests that its DNA binding activity is regulated via a conformational change in the linker region, triggering a movement of the N-terminal domains. PMID:25049090

  6. Regulation of Growth, Cell Shape, Cell Division, and Gene Expression by Second Messengers (p)ppGpp and Cyclic Di-GMP in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kuldeepkumar Ramnaresh; Baloni, Priyanka; Indi, Shantinath S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alarmone (p)ppGpp regulates transcription, translation, replication, virulence, lipid synthesis, antibiotic sensitivity, biofilm formation, and other functions in bacteria. Signaling nucleotide cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates biofilm formation, motility, virulence, the cell cycle, and other functions. In Mycobacterium smegmatis, both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP are synthesized and degraded by bifunctional proteins RelMsm and DcpA, encoded by relMsm and dcpA genes, respectively. We have previously shown that the ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA knockout strains are antibiotic resistant and defective in biofilm formation, show altered cell surface properties, and have reduced levels of glycopeptidolipids and polar lipids in their cell wall (K. R. Gupta, S. Kasetty, and D. Chatterji, Appl Environ Microbiol 81:2571–2578, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03999-14). In this work, we have explored the phenotypes that are affected by both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP in mycobacteria. We have shown that both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP are needed to maintain the proper growth rate under stress conditions such as carbon deprivation and cold shock. Scanning electron microscopy showed that low levels of these second messengers result in elongated cells, while high levels reduce the cell length and embed the cells in a biofilm-like matrix. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that the elongated ΔrelMsm and ΔdcpA cells are multinucleate, while transmission electron microscopy showed that the elongated cells are multiseptate. Gene expression analysis also showed that genes belonging to functional categories such as virulence, detoxification, lipid metabolism, and cell-wall-related processes were differentially expressed. Our results suggests that both (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP affect some common phenotypes in M. smegmatis, thus raising a possibility of cross talk between these two second messengers in mycobacteria. IMPORTANCE Our work has expanded the horizon of (p)ppGpp and c-di-GMP signaling in

  7. The Non-Essential Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis Genes hadA and hadC Contribute to the Physiology and Fitness of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Jamet, Stevie; Slama, Nawel; Domingues, Joana; Laval, Françoise; Texier, Pauline; Eynard, Nathalie; Quémard, Annaik; Peixoto, Antonio; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Cam, Kaymeuang

    2015-01-01

    Gram positive mycobacteria with a high GC content, such as the etiological agent of tuberculosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess an outer membrane mainly composed of mycolic acids (MAs), the so-called mycomembrane, which is essential for the cell. About thirty genes are involved in the biosynthesis of MAs, which include the hadA, hadB and hadC genes that encode the dehydratases Fatty Acid Synthase type II (FAS-II) known to function as the heterodimers HadA-HadB and HadB-HadC. The present study shows that M. smegmatis cells remain viable in the absence of either HadA and HadC or both. Inactivation of HadC has a dramatic effect on the physiology and fitness of the mutant strains whereas that of HadA exacerbates the phenotype of a hadC deletion. The hadC mutants exhibit a novel MA profile, display a distinct colony morphology, are less aggregated, are impaired for sliding motility and biofilm development and are more resistant to detergent. Conversely, the hadC mutants are significantly more susceptible to low- and high-temperature and to selective toxic compounds, including several current anti-tubercular drugs. PMID:26701652

  8. Crystal Structure of Reduced MsAcg, a Putative Nitroreductase from Mycobacterium smegmatis and a Close Homologue of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acg

    PubMed Central

    Chauviac, François-Xavier; Bommer, Martin; Yan, Jun; Parkin, Gary; Daviter, Tina; Lowden, Philip; Raven, Emma L.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Keep, Nicholas H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of MsAcg (MSMEG_5246), a Mycobacterium smegmatis homologue of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acg (Rv2032) in its reduced form at 1.6 Å resolution using x-ray crystallography. Rv2032 is one of the most induced genes under the hypoxic model of tuberculosis dormancy. The Acg family turns out to be unusual flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding proteins that have probably arisen by gene duplication and fusion from a classical homodimeric nitroreductase such that the monomeric protein resembles a classical nitroreductase dimer but with one active site deleted and the other active site covered by a unique lid. The FMN cofactor is not reduced by either NADH or NADPH, but the chemically reduced enzyme is capable of reduction of nitro substrates, albeit at no kinetic advantage over free FMN. The reduced enzyme is rapidly oxidized by oxygen but without any evidence for a radical state commonly seen in oxygen-sensitive nitroreductases. The presence of the unique lid domain, the lack of reduction by NAD(P)H, and the slow rate of reaction of the chemically reduced protein raises a possible alternative function of Acg proteins in FMN storage or sequestration from other biochemical pathways as part of the bacteria's adaptation to a dormancy state. PMID:23148223

  9. The Mechanism of Mycobacterium smegmatis PafA Self-Pupylation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuejie; Li, Chandan; Wang, Li; Liu, Yi; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    PafA, the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) ligase, catalyzes the Pup modification of bacterial proteins and targets the substrates for proteasomal degradation. It has been reported that that M. smegmatis PafA can be poly-pupylated. In this study, the mechanism of PafA self-pupylation is explored. We found that K320 is the major target residue for the pupylation of PafA. During the self-pupylation of PafA, the attachment of the first Pup to PafA is catalyzed by the other PafA molecule through an intermolecular reaction, while the formation of the polymeric Pup chain is carried out in an intramolecular manner through the internal ligase activity of the already pupylated PafA. Among the three lysine residues, K7, K31 and K61, in M. smegmatis Pup, K7 and K31 are involved in the formation of the poly-Pup chain in PafA poly-pupylation. Poly-pupylation of PafA can be reversibly regulated by depupylase Dop. The polymeric Pup chain formed through K7/K31 linkage is much more sensitive to Dop than the mono-Pup directly attached to PafA. Moreover, self-pupylation of PafA is involved in the regulation of its stability in vivo in a proteasome-dependent manner, suggesting that PafA self-pupylation functions as a mechanism in the auto-regulation of the Pup-proteasome system. PMID:26953889

  10. A General Strategy for the Discovery of Metabolic Pathways: d-Threitol, l-Threitol, and Erythritol Utilization in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hua; Carter, Michael S; Vetting, Matthew W; Al-Obaidi, Nawar; Patskovsky, Yury; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2015-11-25

    We describe a general integrated bioinformatic and experimental strategy to discover the in vitro enzymatic activities and in vivo functions (metabolic pathways) of uncharacterized enzymes discovered in microbial genome projects using the ligand specificities of the solute binding proteins (SBPs) for ABC transporters. Using differential scanning fluorimetry, we determined that the SBP for an ABC transporter encoded by the genome of Mycobacterium smegmatis is stabilized by d-threitol. Using sequence similarity networks and genome neighborhood networks to guide selection of target proteins for pathway enzymes, we applied both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches to discover novel pathways for catabolism of d-threitol, l-threitol, and erythritol.

  11. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidase from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Colin J. Taylor, Matthew C.; Tattersall, David B.; French, Nigel G.; Carr, Paul D.; Ollis, David L.; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2008-05-01

    Good-quality crystals of selenomethionine-substituted Msmeg-3380 were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique and diffracted to 1.2 Å using synchrotron radiation. Pyridoxine 5′-phosphate oxidases (PNPOxs) are known to catalyse the terminal step in pyridoxal 5′-phosphate biosynthesis in a flavin mononucleotide-dependent manner in humans and Escherichia coli. Recent reports of a putative PNPOx from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv1155, suggest that the cofactor or catalytic mechanism may differ in Mycobacterium species. To investigate this, a putative PNPOx from M. smegmatis, Msmeg-3380, has been cloned. This enzyme has been recombinantly expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. Good-quality crystals of selenomethionine-substituted Msmeg-3380 were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique and diffracted to 1.2 Å using synchrotron radiation.

  12. A role for the class A penicillin-binding protein PonA2 in the survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis under conditions of nonreplication.

    PubMed

    Patru, Maria-Magdalena; Pavelka, Martin S

    2010-06-01

    Class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are large, bifunctional proteins that are responsible for glycan chain assembly and peptide cross-linking of bacterial peptidoglycan. Bacteria in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported to have only two class A PBPs, PonA1 and PonA2, that are encoded in their genomes. We report here that the genomes of Mycobacterium smegmatis and other soil mycobacteria contain an additional gene encoding a third class A penicillin-binding protein, PonA3, which is a paralog of PonA2. Both the PonA2 and PonA3 proteins contain a penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine protein kinase-associated (PASTA) domain that we propose may be involved in sensing the cell cycle and a C-terminal proline-rich region (PRR) that may have a role in protein-protein or protein-carbohydrate interactions. We show here that an M. smegmatis Delta ponA2 mutant has an unusual antibiotic susceptibility profile, exhibits a spherical morphology and an altered cell surface in stationary phase, and is defective for stationary-phase survival and recovery from anaerobic culture. In contrast, a Delta ponA3 mutant has no discernible phenotype under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that PonA2 and PonA3 can bind penicillin and that PonA3 can partially substitute for PonA2 when ponA3 is expressed from a constitutive promoter on a multicopy plasmid. Our studies suggest that PonA2 is involved in adaptation to periods of nonreplication in response to starvation or anaerobiosis and that PonA3 may have a similar role. However, the regulation of PonA3 is likely different, suggesting that its importance could be related to stresses encountered in the environmental niches occupied by M. smegmatis and other soil-dwelling mycobacteria. PMID:20400545

  13. Immunogenicity of a Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Vaccine Expressing the Fusion Protein CMX in Cattle from Goiás State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    ALVES DA SILVA, Duanne; CAVALCANTI, Marcos Antônio Rocha; MUNIZ DE OLIVEIRA, Fábio; TRENTINI, Monalisa Martins; JUNQUEIRA-KIPNIS, Ana Paula; KIPNIS, André

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis vaccine expressing the CMX fusion protein composed of immunodominant epitopes Ag85C, MPT51 and HspX of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which are important mycobacteria virulence factors. A group of Nelore heifers that were 10 to 12 months of age and negative for the tuberculin skin test (TST) were immunized with four doses of the recombinant vaccine mc2-CMX (M. smegmatis-Ag85C-MPT51-HspX) during a period of one year. Before each immunization, blood was collected to obtain sera for antibody analysis. Serological analysis demonstrated that mc2-CMX was able to induce a humoral response with increased levels of specific IgG antibodies against CMX, despite minimum antibody levels being detected for individual Ag85C, MPT51 or HspX recombinant antigens. However, there was no significant increase in specific CD4+ IFN-γ-positive T cells. Lymphadenomegaly was observed in superficial cervical lymph nodes adjacent to the site of vaccination among mc2-CMX-vaccinated bovines, and the histopathological analysis demonstrated follicular hyperplasia without inflammatory infiltrate or granuloma formation. Animals remained negative for the TST until the end of the experiments, showing no cross-reactivity with the recombinant vaccine and tuberculin proteins. We discuss the potential of mc2-CMX to induce an immune response in cattle. PMID:24681608

  14. Transcription analysis of the dnaA gene and oriC region of the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and its regulation by the DnaA protein.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Leiria; Guerrero, Elba; Casart, Yveth; Turcios, Lilia; Bartoli, Fulvia

    2003-03-01

    The regions flanking the Mycobacterium dnaA gene have extensive sequence conservation, and comprise various DnaA boxes. Comparative analysis of the dnaA promoter and oriC region from several mycobacterial species revealed that the localization, spacing and orientation of the DnaA boxes are conserved. Detailed transcriptional analysis in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG shows that the dnaN gene of both species and the dnaA gene of M. bovis BCG are transcribed from two promoters, whereas the dnaA gene of M. smegmatis is transcribed from a single promoter. RT-PCR with total RNA showed that dnaA and dnaN were expressed in both species at all growth stages. Analysis of the promoter activity using dnaA-gfp fusion plasmids and DnaA expression plasmids indicates that the dnaA gene is autoregulated, although the degree of transcriptional autorepression was moderate. Transcription was also detected in the vicinity of oriC of M. bovis BCG, but not of M. smegmatis. These results suggest that a more complex transcriptional mechanism may be involved in the slow-growing mycobacteria, which regulates the expression of dnaA and initiation of chromosomal DNA replication.

  15. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation.

  16. Intranasal Administration of Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis Inducing IL-17A Autoantibody Attenuates Airway Inflammation in a Murine Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wanting; Chen, Ling; Guo, Sheng; Wu, Liangxia; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder, previous studies have shown that IL-17A contributes to the development of asthma, and there is a positive correlation between the level of IL-17A and the severity of disease. Here, we constructed recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing fusion protein Ag85A-IL-17A (rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a) and evaluated whether it could attenuate allergic airway inflammation, and further investigated the underlying mechanism. In this work, the murine model of asthma was established with ovalbumin, and mice were intranasally vaccinated with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a. Autoantibody of IL-17A in sera was detected, and the airway inflammatory cells infiltration, the local cytokines and chemokines production and the histopathological changes of lung tissue were investigated. We found that the administration of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a induced the autoantibody of IL-17A in sera. The vaccination of rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a remarkably reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the secretion of mucus in lung tissue and significantly decreased the numbers of the total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in BALF. Th1 cells count in spleen, Th1 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and T-bet mRNA in lung tissue were significantly increased with rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a administration. Meanwhile, rMS-Ag85a-IL-17a vaccination markedly decreased Th2 cells count, Th2 cytokine and Th17 cytokine levels in BALF and supernatant of splenocytes and mediastinal lymph nodes, and chemokines mRNA expression in lung tissue. These data confirmed that recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis in vivo could induce autoantibody of IL-17A, which attenuated asthmatic airway inflammation. PMID:26974537

  17. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Distribution of CarD, RNAP σ(A), and RNAP β on the Mycobacterium smegmatis Chromosome using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Landick, Robert; Krek, Azra; Glickman, Michael S; Socci, Nicholas D; Stallings, Christina L

    2014-12-01

    CarD is an essential mycobacterial protein that binds the RNA polymerase (RNAP) and affects the transcriptional profile of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6). We predicted that CarD was directly regulating RNAP function but our prior experiments had not determined at what stage of transcription CarD was functioning and at which genes CarD interacted with the RNAP. To begin to address these open questions, we performed Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to survey the distribution of CarD throughout the M. smegmatis chromosome. The distribution of RNAP subunits β and σ(A) were also profiled. We expected that RNAP β would be present throughout transcribed regions and RNAP σ(A) would be predominantly enriched at promoters based on work in Escherichia coli (3), however this had yet to be determined in mycobacteria. The ChIP-seq analyses revealed that CarD was never present on the genome in the absence of RNAP, was primarily associated with promoter regions, and was highly correlated with the distribution of RNAP σ(A). The colocalization of σ(A) and CarD led us to propose that in vivo, CarD associates with RNAP initiation complexes at most promoters and is therefore a global regulator of transcription initiation. Here we describe in detail the data from the ChIP-seq experiments associated with the study published by Srivastava and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science in 2013 (5) as well as discuss the findings from this dataset in relation to both CarD and mycobacterial transcription as a whole. The ChIP-seq data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo (accession no. GSE48164).

  18. Genome-wide mapping of the distribution of CarD, RNAP σA, and RNAP β on the Mycobacterium smegmatis chromosome using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Landick, Robert; Krek, Azra; Glickman, Michael S.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Stallings, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    CarD is an essential mycobacterial protein that binds the RNA polymerase (RNAP) and affects the transcriptional profile of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis [6]. We predicted that CarD was directly regulating RNAP function but our prior experiments had not determined at what stage of transcription CarD was functioning and at which genes CarD interacted with the RNAP. To begin to address these open questions, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to survey the distribution of CarD throughout the M. smegmatis chromosome. The distribution of RNAP subunits β and σA were also profiled. We expected that RNAP β would be present throughout transcribed regions and RNAP σA would be predominantly enriched at promoters based on work in Escherichia coli [3], however this had yet to be determined in mycobacteria. The ChIP-seq analyses revealed that CarD was never present on the genome in the absence of RNAP, was primarily associated with promoter regions, and was highly correlated with the distribution of RNAP σA. The colocalization of σA and CarD led us to propose that in vivo, CarD associates with RNAP initiation complexes at most promoters and is therefore a global regulator of transcription initiation. Here we describe in detail the data from the ChIP-seq experiments associated with the study published by Srivastava and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science in 2013 [5] as well as discuss the findings from this dataset in relation to both CarD and mycobacterial transcription as a whole. The ChIP-seq data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo (accession no. GSE48164). PMID:25089258

  19. Differential regulation of high-affinity phosphate transport systems of Mycobacterium smegmatis: identification of PhnF, a repressor of the phnDCE operon.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Susanne; Cook, Gregory M

    2008-02-01

    The uptake of phosphate into the cell via high-affinity, phosphate-specific transport systems has been studied with several species of mycobacteria. All of these species have been shown to contain several copies of such transport systems, which are synthesized in response to phosphate limitation. However, the mechanisms leading to the expression of the genes encoding these transporters have not been studied. This study reports on the investigation of the regulation of the pstSCAB and the phnDCE operons of Mycobacterium smegmatis. The phn locus contains an additional gene, phnF, encoding a GntR-like transcriptional regulator. Expression analyses of a phnF deletion mutant demonstrated that PhnF acts as a repressor of the phnDCE operon but does not affect the expression of pstSCAB. The deletion of pstS, which is thought to cause the constitutive expression of genes regulated by the two-component system SenX3-RegX3, led to the constitutive expression of the transcriptional fusions pstS-lacZ, phnD-lacZ, and phnF-lacZ, suggesting that phnDCE and phnF are conceivably new members of the SenX3-RegX3 regulon of M. smegmatis. Two presumptive binding sites for PhnF in the intergenic region between phnD and phnF were identified and shown to be required for the repression of phnD and phnF, respectively. We propose a model in which the transcription of pstSCAB is controlled by the two-component SenX3-RegX3 system, while phnDCE and phnF are subject to dual control by SenX3-RegX3 and PhnF. PMID:18083811

  20. Strain Variation in Mycobacterium marinum Fish Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.; Kvitt, H.; Diamant, A.; Zlotkin, A.; Knibb, W. R.

    2002-01-01

    A molecular characterization of two Mycobacterium marinum genes, 16S rRNA and hsp65, was carried out with a total of 21 isolates from various species of fish from both marine and freshwater environments of Israel, Europe, and the Far East. The nucleotide sequences of both genes revealed that all M. marinum isolates from fish in Israel belonged to two different strains, one infecting marine (cultured and wild) fish and the other infecting freshwater (cultured) fish. A restriction enzyme map based on the nucleotide sequences of both genes confirmed the divergence of the Israeli marine isolates from the freshwater isolates and differentiated the Israeli isolates from the foreign isolates, with the exception of one of three Greek isolates from marine fish which was identical to the Israeli marine isolates. The second isolate from Greece exhibited a single base alteration in the 16S rRNA sequence, whereas the third isolate was most likely a new Mycobacterium species. Isolates from Denmark and Thailand shared high sequence homology to complete identity with reference strain ATCC 927. Combined analysis of the two gene sequences increased the detection of intraspecific variations and was thus of importance in studying the taxonomy and epidemiology of this aquatic pathogen. Whether the Israeli M. marinum strain infecting marine fish is endemic to the Red Sea and found extremely susceptible hosts in the exotic species imported for aquaculture or rather was accidentally introduced with occasional imports of fingerlings from the Mediterranean Sea could not be determined. PMID:12406715

  1. Aggregation-based detection of M. smegmatis using D-arabinose-functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-14

    Fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) functionalized with D-arabinose (Ara) showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and caused the bacteria to aggregate. This aggregate formation was used as a means to detect M. smegmatis at the concentration of 10(4) CFU per mL. PMID:26379182

  2. Aggregation-based detection of M. smegmatis using D-arabinose-functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-14

    Fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) functionalized with D-arabinose (Ara) showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and caused the bacteria to aggregate. This aggregate formation was used as a means to detect M. smegmatis at the concentration of 10(4) CFU per mL.

  3. A putative low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding protein (PBP) of Mycobacterium smegmatis exhibits prominent physiological characteristics of DD-carboxypeptidase and beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Kar, Debasish; Murugan, Rajagopal A; Mallick, Sathi; Dutta, Mouparna; Pandey, Satya Deo; Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2015-05-01

    DD-carboxypeptidases (DD-CPases) are low-molecular-mass (LMM) penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that are mainly involved in peptidoglycan remodelling, but little is known about the dd-CPases of mycobacteria. In this study, a putative DD-CPase of Mycobacterium smegmatis, MSMEG_2433 is characterized. The gene for the membrane-bound form of MSMEG_2433 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in its active form, as revealed by its ability to bind to the Bocillin-FL (fluorescent penicillin). Interestingly, in vivo expression of MSMEG_2433 could restore the cell shape oddities of the septuple PBP mutant of E. coli, which was a prominent physiological characteristic of DD-CPases. Moreover, expression of MSMEG_2433 in trans elevated beta-lactam resistance in PBP deletion mutants (ΔdacAdacC) of E. coli, strengthening its physiology as a dd-CPase. To confirm the biochemical reason behind such physiological behaviours, a soluble form of MSMEG_2433 (sMSMEG_2433) was created, expressed and purified. In agreement with the observed physiological phenomena, sMSMEG_2433 exhibited DD-CPase activity against artificial and peptidoglycan-mimetic DD-CPase substrates. To our surprise, enzymic analyses of MSMEG_2433 revealed efficient deacylation for beta-lactam substrates at physiological pH, which is a unique characteristic of beta-lactamases. In addition to the MSMEG_2433 active site that favours dd-CPase activity, in silico analyses also predicted the presence of an omega-loop-like region in MSMEG_2433, which is an important determinant of its beta-lactamase activity. Based on the in vitro, in vivo and in silico studies, we conclude that MSMEG_2433 is a dual enzyme, possessing both DD-CPase and beta-lactamase activities.

  4. Novel pppGpp binding site at the C-terminal region of the Rel enzyme from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Syal, Kirtimaan; Joshi, Himanshu; Chatterji, Dipankar; Jain, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis elicits the stringent response under unfavorable growth conditions, such as those encountered by the pathogen inside the host. The hallmark of this response is production of guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphates, collectively termed (p)ppGpp, which have pleiotropic effects on the bacterial physiology. As the stringent response is connected to survival under stress, it is now being targeted for developing inhibitors against bacterial persistence. The Rel enzyme in mycobacteria has two catalytic domains at its N-terminus that are involved in the synthesis and hydrolysis of (p)ppGpp, respectively. However, the function of the C-terminal region of the protein remained unknown. Here, we have identified a binding site for pppGpp in the C-terminal region of Rel. The binding affinity of pppGpp was quantified by isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding site was determined by crosslinking using the nucleotide analog azido-pppGpp, and examining the crosslink product by mass spectrometry. Additionally, mutations in the Rel protein were created to confirm the site of pppGpp binding by isothermal titration calorimetry. These mutants showed increased pppGpp synthesis and reduced hydrolytic activity. We believe that binding of pppGpp to Rel provides a feedback mechanism that allows the protein to detect and adjust the (p)ppGpp level in the cell. Our work suggests that such sites should also be considered while designing inhibitors to target the stringent response. PMID:26179484

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain BCG-1 (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Shitikov, Egor A.; Malakhova, Maja V.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Ilina, Elena N.; Atrasheuskaya, Alena V.; Ignatyev, Georgy M.; Vinokurova, Nataliya V.; Gorbachyov, Vyacheslav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacille Calmette-Guérin) is a vaccine strain used for protection against tuberculosis. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of M. bovis strain BCG-1 (Russia). Extensive use of this strain necessitates the study of its genome stability by comparative analysis. PMID:27034492

  6. Low Molecular Weight Glucosamine/L-lactide Copolymers as Potential Carriers for the Development of a Sustained Rifampicin Release System: Mycobacterium Smegmatis as a Tuberculosis Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Jorge Alejandro

    Tuberculosis, a highly contagious disease, ranks as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease, and remains a major global health problem. In 2013, 9 million new cases were diagnosed and 1.5 million people died worldwide from tuberculosis. This dissertation aims at developing a new, ultrafine particle-based efficient antibiotic delivery system for the treatment of tuberculosis. The carrier material to make the rifampicin (RIF)-loaded particles is a low molecular weight star-shaped polymer produced from glucosamine (molecular core building unit) and L-lactide (GluN-LLA). Stable particles with a very high 50% drug loading capacity were made via electrohydrodynamic atomization. Prolonged release (>14 days) of RIF from these particles is demonstrated. Drug release data fits the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation, which suggests the occurrence of a modified diffusion-controlled RIF release mechanism, and is also supported by differential scanning calorimetry and drug leaching tests. Cytotoxicity tests on Mycobacterium smegmatis showed that antibiotic-free GluN-LLA and polylactides (PLA) (reference material) particles did not show any significant anti-bacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values obtained for RIF-loaded particles showed 2- to 4-fold improvements in the anti-bacterial activity relative to the free drug. Cytotoxicity tests on macrophages indicated an increment in cell death as particle dose increased, but was not significantly affected by material type or particle size. Confocal microscopy was used to track internalization and localization of particles in the macrophages. GluN-LLA particles led to higher uptakes than the PLA particles. In addition, after phagocytosis, the GluN-LLA particles stayed in the cytoplasm and the particles showed a favorable long term drug release effect in killing intracellular bacteria compared to free RIF. The studies presented and discussed in this dissertation

  7. Biochemical Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis RnhC (MSMEG_4305), a Bifunctional Enzyme Composed of Autonomous N-Terminal Type I RNase H and C-Terminal Acid Phosphatase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jacewicz, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes several DNA repair polymerases that are adept at incorporating ribonucleotides, which raises questions about how ribonucleotides in DNA are sensed and removed. RNase H enzymes, of which M. smegmatis encodes four, are strong candidates for a surveillance role. Here, we interrogate the biochemical activity and nucleic acid substrate specificity of M. smegmatis RnhC, a bifunctional RNase H and acid phosphatase. We report that (i) the RnhC nuclease is stringently specific for RNA:DNA hybrid duplexes; (ii) RnhC does not selectively recognize and cleave DNA-RNA or RNA-DNA junctions in duplex nucleic acid; (iii) RnhC cannot incise an embedded monoribonucleotide or diribonucleotide in duplex DNA; (iv) RnhC can incise tracts of 4 or more ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA, leaving two or more residual ribonucleotides at the cleaved 3′-OH end and at least one or two ribonucleotides on the 5′-PO4 end; (v) the RNase H activity is inherent in an autonomous 140-amino-acid (aa) N-terminal domain of RnhC; and (vi) the C-terminal 211-aa domain of RnhC is an autonomous acid phosphatase. The cleavage specificity of RnhC is clearly distinct from that of Escherichia coli RNase H2, which selectively incises at an RNA-DNA junction. Thus, we classify RnhC as a type I RNase H. The properties of RnhC are consistent with a role in Okazaki fragment RNA primer removal or in surveillance of oligoribonucleotide tracts embedded in DNA but not in excision repair of single misincorporated ribonucleotides. IMPORTANCE RNase H enzymes help cleanse the genome of ribonucleotides that are present either as ribotracts (e.g., RNA primers) or as single ribonucleotides embedded in duplex DNA. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes four RNase H proteins, including RnhC, which is characterized in this study. The nucleic acid substrate and cleavage site specificities of RnhC are consistent with a role in initiating the removal of ribotracts but not in single

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain ATCC 35752

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; DeGroote, Mary Ann; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae is a rapidly growing opportunistic nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) species that causes infections in humans and other hosts. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae type strain ATCC 35752, consisting of 4.89 Mbp, 63.96% G+C content, 4,489 protein-coding genes, 48 tRNAs, and 3 rRNA genes. PMID:26021923

  9. Inactivation of the inhA-encoded fatty acid synthase II (FASII) enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase induces accumulation of the FASI end products and cell lysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Vilchèze, C; Morbidoni, H R; Weisbrod, T R; Iwamoto, H; Kuo, M; Sacchettini, J C; Jacobs, W R

    2000-07-01

    The mechanism of action of isoniazid (INH), a first-line antituberculosis drug, is complex, as mutations in at least five different genes (katG, inhA, ahpC, kasA, and ndh) have been found to correlate with isoniazid resistance. Despite this complexity, a preponderance of evidence implicates inhA, which codes for an enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase of the fatty acid synthase II (FASII), as the primary target of INH. However, INH treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes the accumulation of hexacosanoic acid (C(26:0)), a result unexpected for the blocking of an enoyl-reductase. To test whether inactivation of InhA is identical to INH treatment of mycobacteria, we isolated a temperature-sensitive mutation in the inhA gene of Mycobacterium smegmatis that rendered InhA inactive at 42 degrees C. Thermal inactivation of InhA in M. smegmatis resulted in the inhibition of mycolic acid biosynthesis, a decrease in hexadecanoic acid (C(16:0)) and a concomitant increase of tetracosanoic acid (C(24:0)) in a manner equivalent to that seen in INH-treated cells. Similarly, INH treatment of Mycobacterium bovis BCG caused an inhibition of mycolic acid biosynthesis, a decrease in C(16:0), and a concomitant accumulation of C(26:0). Moreover, the InhA-inactivated cells, like INH-treated cells, underwent a drastic morphological change, leading to cell lysis. These data show that InhA inactivation, alone, is sufficient to induce the accumulation of saturated fatty acids, cell wall alterations, and cell lysis and are consistent with InhA being a primary target of INH. PMID:10869086

  10. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3’-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotide and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologs of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both, in an M. smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5’-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ. PMID:23198659

  11. Genomic analysis of Mycobacterium abscessus strain M139, which has an ambiguous subspecies taxonomic position.

    PubMed

    Ngeow, Yun Fong; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Yan Ling; Tan, Joon Liang; Ongi, Chia Su; Ng, Kee Peng; Choo, Siew Woh

    2012-11-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a ubiquitous, rapidly growing species of nontuberculous mycobacteria that colonizes organic surfaces and is frequently associated with opportunistic infections in humans. We report here the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus strain M139, which shows genomic features reported to be characteristic of both Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense. PMID:23045507

  12. A Novel Loading Method for Doxycycline Liposomes for Intracellular Drug Delivery: Characterization of In Vitro and In Vivo Release Kinetics and Efficacy in a J774A.1 Cell Line Model of Mycobacterium smegmatis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Sarah A.; Talaat, Adel M.; KuKanich, Butch K.; Sullivan, Ruth; Krugner-Higby, Lisa A.; Heath, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline (doxy) is used in treating intracellular and extracellular infections. Liposomal (LE) antibiotics allow low-frequency dosing and extended efficacy compared with standard (STD) formulations. We developed a novel sulfuric acid–loading method for doxycycline liposomes (LE-doxy). We hypothesized that a single s.c. injection of LE-doxy would be detectable in serum for at least 2 weeks at concentrations equal to or better than STD-doxy and would be bactericidal in an in vitro Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of J774A.1 macrophage cells. Liposomes were encapsulated by sulfuric acid gradient loading, and release kinetics were performed in vitro and in vivo. LE-doxy made using 8.25 mg/ml doxycycline loaded for 24 hours achieved 97.77% capture in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 43.87% in sphingomyelin (sphing). Rats were injected s.c. with 50 mg/kg LE-doxy or 5 mg/kg STD-doxy, and serial blood samples were collected. Pharmacokinetics were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. Liver and injection site skin samples were collected at euthanasia (4 weeks postinjection). Minimal histologic tissue reactions occurred after injection of STD (nonliposomal), DPPC, or sphing-doxy. DPPC-doxy had slightly faster in vitro leakage than sphing liposomes, although both were detectable at 264 hours. The mean residence time for DPPC was the highest (111.78 hours), followed by sphing (56.00 hours) and STD (6.86 hours). DPPC and sphing-doxy were detectable at 0.2 μg/ml in serum at 336 hours postadministration. LE-doxy was not toxic to J774A.1 cells in vitro and produced inhibition of viable Mycobacterium smegmatis at 24 and 48 hours. LE-doxy will require further testing in in vivo infection models. PMID:26033620

  13. Identification of proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis missing in attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains.

    PubMed

    Mattow, J; Jungblut, P R; Schaible, U E; Mollenkopf, H J; Lamer, S; Zimny-Arndt, U; Hagens, K; Müller, E C; Kaufmann, S H

    2001-08-01

    A proteome approach, combining high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) with mass spectrometry, was used to compare the cellular protein composition of two virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with two attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), in order to identify unique proteins of these strains. Emphasis was given to the identification of M. tuberculosis specific proteins, because we consider these proteins to represent putative virulence factors and interesting candidates for vaccination and diagnosis of tuberculosis. The genome of M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv comprises nearly 4000 predicted open reading frames. In contrast, the separation of proteins from whole mycobacterial cells by 2-DE resulted in silver-stained patterns comprising about 1800 distinct protein spots. Amongst these, 96 spots were exclusively detected either in the virulent (56 spots) or in the attenuated (40 spots) mycobacterial strains. Fifty-three of these spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry, of which 41 were identified, including 32 M. tuberculosis specific spots. Twelve M. tuberculosis specific spots were identified as proteins, encoded by genes previously reported to be deleted in M. bovis BCG. The remaining 20 spots unique for M. tuberculosis were identified as proteins encoded by genes that are not known to be missing in M. bovis BCG.

  14. Analysis of dibenzothiophene metabolic pathway in Mycobacterium strain G3.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideki; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Nakahara, Tadaatsu; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    The dibenzothiophene (DBT) metabolic pathway in Mycobacterium strain G3, which is classified as a desulfurizing microorganism with the 4S pathway, was analyzed. 2-Hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), which is an end metabolite in the DBT desulfurization reaction, and 2-methoxybiphenyl (MBP) were found in the reaction mixture, and the methoxylation pathway from HBP to MBP was clarified. Although the substrate in the methoxylation reaction was HBP, there was no relationship between expression of the methoxylation activity and that of the desulfurization activity. Then, 4,6-dimethyl DBT, 4,6-diethyl DBT and benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene were metabolized to their methoxy forms via the desulfurization pathway. We established the methoxylation pathway in Mycobacterium G3.

  15. Accurate Detection of Rifampicin-Resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Kim, Hee Jin; Yang, Jeongseong; Kim, Taisun

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 alone, the death rate among the 9.0 million people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) worldwide was around 14%, which is unacceptably high. An empiric treatment of patients infected with TB or drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strain can also result in the spread of MDR-TB. The diagnostic tools which are rapid, reliable, and have simple experimental protocols can significantly help in decreasing the prevalence rate of MDR-TB strain. We report the evaluation of the 9G technology based 9G DNAChips that allow accurate detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF. One hundred and thirteen known cultured samples were used to evaluate the ability of 9G DNAChip in the detection and discrimination of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains. Hybridization of immobilized probes with the PCR products of TB and MDR-TB-RIF strains allow their detection and discrimination. The accuracy of 9G DNAChip was determined by comparing its results with sequencing analysis and drug susceptibility testing. Sequencing analysis showed 100% agreement with the results of 9G DNAChip. The 9G DNAChip showed very high sensitivity (95.4%) and specificity (100%). PMID:26999135

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Mycobacterium immunogenum Type Strain CCUG 47286

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Seguí, Carolina; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruiz, Mikel; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium immunogenum type strain CCUG 47286, a nontuberculous mycobacterium. The whole genome has 5,573,781 bp and covers as many as 5,484 predicted genes. This genome contributes to the task of closing the still-existing gap of genomes of rapidly growing mycobacterial type strains. PMID:27231356

  17. Resistance to cellular autophagy by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Fazlul; Boonhok, Rachasak; Prammananan, Therdsak; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Ponpuak, Marisa

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy represents a key pathway in innate immune defense to restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth inside host macrophages. Induction of autophagy has been shown to promote mycobacterial phagosome acidification and acquisition of lysosomal hydrolases, resulting in the elimination of intracellular M. tuberculosis reference strains such as H37Rv. The notorious Beijing genotype has been previously shown to be hyper-virulent and associated with increased survival in host cells and a high mortality rate in animal models, but the underlying mechanism that renders this family to have such advantages remains unclear. We hypothesize that autophagic control against M. tuberculosis Beijing strains may be altered. Here, we discovered that the Beijing strains can resist autophagic killing by host cells compared with that of the reference strain H37Rv and a strain belonging to the East African Indian genotype. Moreover, we have determined a possible underlying mechanism and found that the greater ability to evade autophagic elimination possessed by the Beijing strains stems from their higher capacity to inhibit autophagolysosome biogenesis upon autophagy induction. In summary, a previously unrecognized ability of the M. tuberculosis Beijing strains to evade host autophagy was identified, which may have important implications for tuberculosis treatment, especially in regions prevalent by the Beijing genotype. PMID:26160686

  18. Export of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis superoxide dismutase is dependent upon both information in the protein and mycobacterial export machinery. A model for studying export of leaderless proteins by pathogenic mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Harth, G; Horwitz, M A

    1999-02-12

    We have investigated the expression and extracellular release of enzymatically active superoxide dismutase, one of the 10 major extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, both in its native host and in the heterologous host Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the M. tuberculosis superoxide dismutase gene, encoding a leaderless polypeptide of Mr approximately 23,000 representing one of the four identical subunits of the enzyme, is expressed constitutively under normal growth conditions and at a 5-fold increased level under conditions of hydrogen peroxide stress. The highly pathogenic mycobacterium M. tuberculosis expresses 93-fold more superoxide dismutase than the nonpathogenic mycobacterium M. smegmatis, and it exports a much higher proportion of expressed enzyme (76 versus 21%); taking both expression and export into consideration, M. tuberculosis exports approximately 350-fold more enzyme than M. smegmatis. In M. smegmatis, recombinant M. tuberculosis superoxide dismutase is expressed at 8.4 times the level of the endogenous enzyme and the proportion exported (66%) approaches that in the homologous host; hence M. smegmatis exports up to 26-fold more of the recombinant than endogenous enzyme. Interestingly, subunits of the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis enzymes readily and stoichiometrically exchange with each other, forming five different complexes of four subunits, both when the enzymes are expressed in the recombinant host and when the purified enzymes are incubated together; however, each subunit retains its characteristic metal ion, iron for M. tuberculosis and manganese for M. smegmatis. Compared with the cell-associated enzyme, the supernatant enzyme of recombinant M. smegmatis is enriched for M. tuberculosis enzyme subunits, consistent with preferential export of the M. tuberculosis enzyme. Recombinant M. tuberculosis superoxide dismutase transcomplements a superoxide dismutase-deficient Escherichia coli, resulting in a reduction of

  19. The Mycobacterium phlei Genome: Expectations and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium phlei, a nontuberculosis mycobacterial species, was first described in 1898–1899. We present the complete genome sequence for the M. phlei CCUG21000T type strain and the draft genomes for four additional strains. The genome size for all fiveis 5.3 Mb with 69.4% Guanine-Cytosine content. This is ≈0.35 Mbp smaller than the previously reported M. phlei RIVM draft genome. The size difference is attributed partly to large bacteriophage sequence fragments in the M. phlei RIVM genome. Comparative analysis revealed the following: 1) A CRISPR system similar to Type 1E (cas3) in M. phlei RIVM; 2) genes involved in polyamine metabolism and transport (potAD, potF) that are absent in other mycobacteria, and 3) strain-specific variations in the number of σ-factor genes. Moreover, M. phlei has as many as 82 mce (mammalian cell entry) homologs and many of the horizontally acquired genes in M. phlei are present in other environmental bacteria including mycobacteria that share similar habitat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 693 Mycobacterium core genes present in all complete mycobacterial genomes suggested that its closest neighbor is Mycobacterium smegmatis JS623 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae NBB3, while it is more distant to M. smegmatis mc2 155. PMID:26941228

  20. Genotyping of ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains reveals historic genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Romy; Roberts, Charlotte A.; Brown, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) has previously been studied by analysis of sequence diversity in extant strains, but not addressed by direct examination of strain genotypes in archaeological remains. Here, we use ancient DNA sequencing to type 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms and two large sequence polymorphisms in the MTBC strains present in 10 archaeological samples from skeletons from Britain and Europe dating to the second–nineteenth centuries AD. The results enable us to assign the strains to groupings and lineages recognized in the extant MTBC. We show that at least during the eighteenth–nineteenth centuries AD, strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to different genetic groups were present in Britain at the same time, possibly even at a single location, and we present evidence for a mixed infection in at least one individual. Our study shows that ancient DNA typing applied to multiple samples can provide sufficiently detailed information to contribute to both archaeological and evolutionary knowledge of the history of tuberculosis. PMID:24573854

  1. Virulence of two strains of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle following aerosol infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Over the past two decades, highly virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged and spread rapidly in humans, suggesting a selective advantage based upon virulence. A similar scenario has not been described for Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle (i.e., Bovine Tuberculos...

  2. Genotype of a historic strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bouwman, Abigail S.; Kennedy, Sandra L.; Müller, Romy; Stephens, Richard H.; Holst, Malin; Caffell, Anwen C.; Roberts, Charlotte A.; Brown, Terence A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of ancient DNA in paleopathological studies of tuberculosis has largely been restricted to confirmation of disease identifications made by skeletal analysis; few attempts at obtaining genotype data from archaeological samples have been made because of the need to perform different PCRs for each genetic locus being studied in an ancient DNA extract. We used a next generation sequencing approach involving hybridization capture directed at specific polymorphic regions of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to identify a detailed genotype for a historic strain of M. tuberculosis from an individual buried in the 19th century St. George’s Crypt, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. We obtained 664,500 sequencing by oligonucleotide ligation and detection (SOLiD) reads that mapped to the targeted regions of the M. tuberculosis genome; the coverage included 218 of 247 SNPs, 10 of 11 insertion/deletion regions, and the repeat elements IS1081 and IS6110. The accuracy of the SOLiD data was checked by conventional PCRs directed at 11 SNPs and two insertion/deletions. The data placed the historic strain of M. tuberculosis in a group that is uncommon today, but it is known to have been present in North America in the early 20th century. Our results show the use of hybridization capture followed by next generation sequencing as a means of obtaining detailed genotypes of ancient varieties of M. tuberculosis, potentially enabling meaningful comparisons between strains from different geographic locations and different periods in the past. PMID:23091009

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a New Zealand Rangipo Strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Sanjay S.; Bower, James E.; Basu, Indira

    2016-01-01

    The Rangipo genotype of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex has been associated with a number of tuberculosis (TB) outbreaks in New Zealand. We report here the draft whole-genome sequence of a representative isolate of this strain. PMID:27389273

  4. Molecular Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains in Northwestern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pourostadi, Mahya; Rashedi, Jalil; Mahdavi Poor, Behroz; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Shirazi, Samaneh; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Years after the development of antituberculosis (TB) drugs, many people continue to suffer from this disease. To control the spread of TB, strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex need to be determined, and sources of infection must be identified. Such steps should help to prevent transmission of the infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to perform molecular genotyping of isolates of the M. tuberculosis complex obtained from patients in northwestern Iran. Methods One hundred ninety-four culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates obtained from patients in northwestern Iran were analyzed using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-exact tandem repeats (MIRU-ETR) method. Results The MIRU-ETR method distinguished 162 different patterns in the 194 isolates, comprising 23 clusters and 139 unique patterns. Its discriminatory power according to the Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index (HGDI) was 0.9978. The largest cluster contained six isolates. Conclusions This research indicated that various strains of M. tuberculosis were responsible for TB and that the majority of cases were due to reactivation. PMID:27800145

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium peregrinum Strain CSUR P2098

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium peregrinum is a nonpigmented rapid growing nontuberculosis species belonging to the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The draft genome of M. peregrinum type I CSUR P2098 comprises 7,109,836 bp exhibiting a 66.23% G+C content, 6,894 protein-coding genes, and 100 predicted RNA genes. Its genome analysis suggests this species differs from Mycobacterium senegalense. PMID:26543113

  6. Nonopsonic binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to complement receptor type 3 is mediated by capsular polysaccharides and is strain dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Cywes, C; Hoppe, H C; Daffé, M; Ehlers, M R

    1997-01-01

    The choice of host cell receptor and the mechanism of binding (opsonic versus nonopsonic) may influence the intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have identified two substrains of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, designated H37Rv-CC and -HH, that differed in their modes of binding to complement receptor type 3 (CR3) expressed in transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-Mac-1) cells: H37Rv-CC bound nonopsonically, whereas H37Rv-HH bound only after opsonization in fresh serum. H37Rv-CC also bound nonopsonically to untransfected CHO cells, whereas H37Rv-HH binding was enhanced by serum and was mediated by the 1D1 antigen, a bacterial adhesin previously identified as a polar phosphatidylinositol mannoside. H37Rv-CC and -HH had identical IS6110 DNA fingerprint patterns. Of five M. tuberculosis clinical isolates examined, four displayed the same binding phenotype as H37Rv-CC, as did the Erdman strain, whereas one isolate, as well as Mycobacterium smegmatis, behaved like H37Rv-HH. Nonopsonic binding of H37Rv-CC to CHO cell-expressed CR3 was apparently to the beta-glucan lectin site, as it was cation independent and inhibited by laminarin (seaweed beta-glucan) and N-acetylglucosamine; laminarin also inhibited the binding of H37Rv-CC to monocyte-derived macrophages. Further, binding of H37Rv-CC to CHO-Mac-1 cells was inhibited by prior agitation of bacteria with glass beads (which strips outer capsular polysaccharides) and by preincubation with amyloglucosidase, as well as by the presence of capsular D-glucan and D-mannan from M. tuberculosis Erdman, but not by Erdman D-arabino-D-mannan, yeast mannan, or capsular components from H37Rv-HH. Analysis of capsular carbohydrates revealed that H37Rv-CC expressed 5-fold more glucose and 2.5-fold more arabinose and mannose than H37Rv-HH. Flow cytometric detection of surface epitopes indicated that H37Rv-CC displayed twofold less surface-exposed phosphatidylinositol mannoside and bound complement C3 less efficiently than H37Rv

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies. PMID:27497873

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies.

  9. Annotated genome sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense strain M154, belonging to the recently created taxon Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Wong, Yan Ling; Tan, Joon Liang; Ong, Chia Sui; Wong, Guat Jah; Ng, Kee Peng; Ngeow, Yun Fong

    2012-09-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense has recently been proposed as a member of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii comb. nov. Strain M154, a clinical isolate from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of a Malaysian patient presenting with lower respiratory tract infection, was subjected to shotgun DNA sequencing with the Illumina sequencing technology to obtain whole-genome sequence data for comparison with other genetically related strains within the M. abscessus species complex. PMID:22887675

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of Fish-Pathogenic Mycobacterium sp. Strain 012931, Isolated from Yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata).

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Nho, Seong Won; Hwang, Seong Don; Hikima, Jun-Ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Aoki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises a large number of well-characterized species, several of which are human and animal pathogens. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931, a fish pathogen responsible for huge losses in aquaculture farms in Japan. The strain was isolated from a marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). PMID:23929466

  11. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. Strain NBB4: a Soluble Methane Monooxygenase (sMMO)-Like Enzyme, Active on C2 to C4 Alkanes and Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kiri E.; Ozsvar, Jazmin

    2014-01-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-155. Cells of mc2-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc2-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc2-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc2-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  12. SmoXYB1C1Z of Mycobacterium sp. strain NBB4: a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO)-like enzyme, active on C2 to C4 alkanes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kiri E; Ozsvar, Jazmin; Coleman, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Monooxygenase (MO) enzymes initiate the aerobic oxidation of alkanes and alkenes in bacteria. A cluster of MO genes (smoXYB1C1Z) of thus-far-unknown function was found previously in the genomes of two Mycobacterium strains (NBB3 and NBB4) which grow on hydrocarbons. The predicted Smo enzymes have only moderate amino acid identity (30 to 60%) to their closest homologs, the soluble methane and butane MOs (sMMO and sBMO), and the smo gene cluster has a different organization from those of sMMO and sBMO. The smoXYB1C1Z genes of NBB4 were cloned into pMycoFos to make pSmo, which was transformed into Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)-155. Cells of mc(2)-155(pSmo) metabolized C2 to C4 alkanes, alkenes, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The activities of mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells were 0.94, 0.57, 0.12, and 0.04 nmol/min/mg of protein with ethene, ethane, propane, and butane as substrates, respectively. The mc(2)-155(pSmo) cells made epoxides from ethene, propene, and 1-butene, confirming that Smo was an oxygenase. Epoxides were not produced from larger alkenes (1-octene and styrene). Vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane were biodegraded by cells expressing Smo, with production of inorganic chloride. This study shows that Smo is a functional oxygenase which is active against small hydrocarbons. M. smegmatis mc(2)-155(pSmo) provides a new model for studying sMMO-like monooxygenases. PMID:25015887

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium acapulcensis Strain CSURP1424

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium acapulcensis is a rapidly growing scotochromogenic acid-fast bacillus. The draft genome of M. acapulcensis CSURP1424 comprises 5,290,974 bp, exhibiting a 66.67% G+C content, 4,870 protein-coding genes, and 71 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27516522

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium interjectum Strain ATCC 51457T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium interjectum is a nontuberculosis species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. interjectum ATCC 51457T comprises 5,927,979 bp, exhibiting 67.91% G+C content, 5,314 protein-coding genes, and 51 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231376

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium houstonense Strain ATCC 49403T

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur, Anthony; Asmar, Shady; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium houstonense is a nontuberculous species rarely responsible for human infection. The draft genome of M. houstonense ATCC 49403T comprises 6,451,020 bp, exhibiting a 66.96% G+C content, 5,881 protein-coding genes, and 65 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27231371

  16. In vitro susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains isolated from seals to antituberculosis drugs.

    PubMed

    Bernardelli, Amelia; Morcillo, Nora; Loureiro, Julio; Quse, Viviana; Davenport, Silvana

    2004-06-01

    Mycobacteria strains belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex were isolated from seals found in the South Atlantic. The animals were received in Mundo Marino installations and treated for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by conventional therapy of intensive care and enriched food supply; however, in all cases treatment failed. Necropsies of all animals revealed extensive lesions compatible with tuberculosis involving lungs, liver, spleen and lymphatic nodes. Classical biochemical methods as well as molecular techniques using the IS6110 probes were performed for mycobacterial identification. Furthermore, the LCx M. tuberculosis assay (Abbott Laboratories) identified all strains as Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex members. The in vitro susceptibility pattern was examined in mycobacterial strains isolated from seven seals and in 3 reference strains--BCG, H37Rv (M. tuberculosis) and AN5 (Mycobacterium bovis)--to 4 medications--isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin and ethambutol. Minimal inhibitory drug concentrations were determined by the Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (BD Argentina) method and a microdilution and colorimetric assay using 3-(4-5 dimethyltiazol-2)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide. All the isolates and the reference strains BCG and AN5 were inhibited by MIC values similar to those of H37Rv with good agreement obtained by both techniques. These findings suggest that a therapeutic regimen aimed to seals diagnosed with tuberculosis play an important role in the prevention of tuberculosis transmission from infected animals to humans that are in routine contact with them.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of the Vaccination Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena

    PubMed Central

    Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Straube, Eberhard; Karrasch, Matthias; Keller, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis BCG S4-Jena, a tuberculosis vaccine strain. The genome of S4-Jena is represented by 48 scaffolds, consisting of 132 scaffolded contigs and amounting to a size of about 4.2 Mb. New genes potentially encoding a phage fragment were identified in the genome. PMID:27103721

  18. Pre-multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain associated with disseminated tuberculosis in a pet dog.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Ana; Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets.

  19. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras.

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Garcia, L; Ferrera, A; Hoffner, S E

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 84 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Seventy-three different IS6110 patterns were found; 63 of these were unique and 10 were shared by two to three strains each. Thus, no ongoing spread of any specific clone of bacteria could be demonstrated. PMID:9276422

  20. Sliding Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Glycopeptidolipid Production in Mycobacterium colombiense Strains

    PubMed Central

    Maya-Hoyos, Milena; Leguizamón, John; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Soto, Carlos Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium colombiense is a novel member of the Mycobacterium avium complex, which produces respiratory and disseminated infections in immunosuppressed patients. Currently, the morphological and genetic bases underlying the phenotypic features of M. colombiense strains remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth morphology show increased biofilm formation on hydrophobic surfaces and sliding on motility plates. Thin-layer chromatography experiments showed that M. colombiense strains displaying smooth colonies produce large amounts of glycolipids with a chromatographic behaviour similar to that of the glycopeptidolipids (GPLs) of M. avium. Conversely, we observed a natural rough variant of M. colombiense (57B strain) lacking pigmentation and exhibiting impaired sliding, biofilm formation, and GPL production. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a gene cluster that is likely involved in GPL biosynthesis in M. colombiense CECT 3035. RT-qPCR experiments showed that motile culture conditions activate the transcription of genes possibly involved in key enzymatic activities of GPL biosynthesis. PMID:26180799

  1. Strain-dependent CNS dissemination in guinea pigs after Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Klinkenberg, Lee G; Bishai, William R; Karakousis, Petros C; Jain, Sanjay K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with CNS disease. We therefore examined CNS dissemination by different laboratory strains (two M. tuberculosis H37Rv, one CDC1551) in a guinea pig aerosol infection model. Although all strains grew exponentially in lungs, with similar bacterial burdens at the time of extrapulmonary dissemination, M. tuberculosis CDC1551 disseminated to the CNS significantly more than the H37Rv strains. No CNS lesions were observed throughout the study, with only a modest cytokine response. These data suggest that M. tuberculosis may have virulence factors that promote CNS dissemination, distinct from those required for pulmonary TB.

  2. Ultrafast Assessment of the Presence of a High-Risk Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain in a Population

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Herranz, Marta; Comas, Iñaki; Ruiz-Serrano, María Jesús; López Roa, Paula; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A persistent 8-year infection by a Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain from a previous outbreak after importation from West Africa obliged us to investigate secondary cases. We developed a multiplex PCR method based on whole-genome sequencing to target strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In 1 week, we analyzed 868 isolates stored over 6 years. Only 2 cases (immigrants from Guinea Conakry) harbored the strain, which ruled out transmission—despite opportunities—and challenged some of the advantages associated with Beijing strains. PMID:26719445

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Revetta, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium previously reported to be the cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis from contaminated metalworking fluid aerosols, is becoming a public health concern. PMID:26744376

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Revetta, Randy P

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium previously reported to be the cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis from contaminated metalworking fluid aerosols, is becoming a public health concern. PMID:26744376

  5. Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains, Alberta, Canada, 1991-2007.

    PubMed

    Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Chui, Linda; Kunimoto, Dennis; Saunders, L Duncan; Menzies, Dick; Long, Richard

    2013-05-01

    Beijing strains are speculated to have a selective advantage over other Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains because of increased transmissibility and virulence. In Alberta, a province of Canada that receives a large number of immigrants, we conducted a population-based study to determine whether Beijing strains were associated with increased transmission leading to disease compared with non-Beijing strains. Beijing strains accounted for 258 (19%) of 1,379 pulmonary tuberculosis cases in 1991-2007; overall, 21% of Beijing cases and 37% of non-Beijing cases were associated with transmission clusters. Beijing index cases had significantly fewer secondary cases within 2 years than did non-Beijing cases, but this difference disappeared after adjustment for demographic characteristics, infectiousness, and M. tuberculosis lineage. In a province that has effective tuberculosis control, transmission of Beijing strains posed no more of a public health threat than did non-Beijing strains.

  6. Two New Mycobacterium Strains and Their Role in Toluene Degradation in a Contaminated Stream

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Stephen T.-L.; Hemond, Harold F.; Polz, Martin F.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Dejesus, Indhira; Krumholz, Lee R.

    1998-01-01

    Two toluene-degrading strains, T103 and T104, were isolated from rock surface biomass in a freshwater stream contaminated with toluene. The strains exhibit different capacities for degradation of toluene and other aromatic compounds and have characteristics of the genus Mycobacterium. Both are aerobic, rod-shaped, gram-positive, nonmotile, and acid-alcohol fast and produce yellow pigments. They have mainly straight-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids with 10 to 20 carbon atoms and large amounts of tuberculostearic acid that are typical of mycobacteria. Fatty acid analyses indicate that T103 and T104 are different mycobacterial strains that are related at the subspecies level. Their identical 16S rDNA sequences are most similar to Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium komossense, and they constitute a new species of fast-growing mycobacteria. Ecological studies reveal that toluene contamination has enriched for toluene-degrading bacteria in the epilithic microbial community. Strains T103 and T104 play only a small role in toluene degradation in the stream, although they are present in the habitat and can degrade toluene. Other microorganisms are consequently implicated in the biodegradation. PMID:9572941

  7. Genetic Analysis of Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains Used for Producing Purified Protein Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Semret, Makeda; Bakker, Douwe; Smart, Nonie; Olsen, Ingrid; Haslov, Kaare; Behr, Marcel A.

    2006-01-01

    For over a century, purified protein derivatives (PPD) have been used to detect mycobacterial infections in humans and livestock. Among these, reagents to detect infections by Mycobacterium avium complex organisms have been produced, but the utility of these reagents has not been clearly established due in part to limited biologic and immunologic standardization. Because there is little information about the strains used to produce these reagents (avian PPD, intracellulare PPD, scrofulaceum PPD, and Johnin), we have performed genetic characterizations of strains used to produce these products. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and the hsp65 gene provided results concordant with species designations provided for M. avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum organisms. For M. avium strains, comparative genomic hybridization was performed on a whole-genome DNA microarray, revealing one novel 7.9-kilobase genomic deletion in certain Johnin-producing strains, in addition to genomic variability inherent to the particular M. avium subspecies. Our findings indicate that considerable genomic differences exist between organisms used for reagents and the infecting organism being studied. These results serve as a baseline for potency studies of different preparations and should aid in comparative studies of newly discovered antigens for the diagnosis of infection and disease by M. avium complex organisms. PMID:16960109

  8. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG.

  9. Four decades of transmission of a multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak strain.

    PubMed

    Eldholm, Vegard; Monteserin, Johana; Rieux, Adrien; Lopez, Beatriz; Sobkowiak, Benjamin; Ritacco, Viviana; Balloux, Francois

    2015-05-11

    The rise of drug-resistant strains is a major challenge to containing the tuberculosis (TB) pandemic. Yet, little is known about the extent of resistance in early years of chemotherapy and when transmission of resistant strains on a larger scale became a major public health issue. Here we reconstruct the timeline of the acquisition of antimicrobial resistance during a major ongoing outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in Argentina. We estimate that the progenitor of the outbreak strain acquired resistance to isoniazid, streptomycin and rifampicin by around 1973, indicating continuous circulation of a multidrug-resistant TB strain for four decades. By around 1979 the strain had acquired additional resistance to three more drugs. Our results indicate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with extensive resistance profiles circulated 15 years before the outbreak was detected, and about one decade before the earliest documented transmission of Mtb strains with such extensive resistance profiles globally.

  10. Four decades of transmission of a multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak strain

    PubMed Central

    Eldholm, Vegard; Monteserin, Johana; Rieux, Adrien; Lopez, Beatriz; Sobkowiak, Benjamin; Ritacco, Viviana; Balloux, Francois

    2015-01-01

    The rise of drug-resistant strains is a major challenge to containing the tuberculosis (TB) pandemic. Yet, little is known about the extent of resistance in early years of chemotherapy and when transmission of resistant strains on a larger scale became a major public health issue. Here we reconstruct the timeline of the acquisition of antimicrobial resistance during a major ongoing outbreak of multidrug-resistant TB in Argentina. We estimate that the progenitor of the outbreak strain acquired resistance to isoniazid, streptomycin and rifampicin by around 1973, indicating continuous circulation of a multidrug-resistant TB strain for four decades. By around 1979 the strain had acquired additional resistance to three more drugs. Our results indicate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with extensive resistance profiles circulated 15 years before the outbreak was detected, and about one decade before the earliest documented transmission of Mtb strains with such extensive resistance profiles globally. PMID:25960343

  11. [Application of the molecular test PCR multiplex for identification of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Zabost, Anna; Brzezińiska, Sylwia; Wasowicz, Marcin; Zwolska, Zofia

    2005-01-01

    In our last paper (18) we described the problem of proper microbiological identification of BCG strains and how important is distinguishing vaccine strain from virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We have suggested the modern algorithm of BCG strains identification including mycolic acids profile by HPLC and 14C PZA resistance methods. These methods allowed us to made fast and accurate microbiological identification of side effects of BCG vaccine in the children. Identification of BCG by HPLC is possible within one working day compared with 3-4 weeks required for conventional methods. However both methods need very expensive instruments like HPLC and/or Bactec-460 Tb radiometric system. Presently we have evaluated molecular test based on the analyzis of the region RD1 encoding a 9.5-kb fragment. This fragment is deleted in all BCG substrains (6) and present in all human and bovine virulent strains. To evaluate this method for the rapid and specific detection of BCG, a large strain collection (32 strains) representating M. bovis BCG (vaccine strains and strains isolated from the children in case of adverse reactions after vaccination) M. bovis and M. tuberculosis from own collection was analyzed. RD1 was present in all 15 M. tuberculosis and M. bovis tested strains and deleted in 17 of 18 BCG strains. The multiplex PCR method was 100% sensitive and specific for the identification of BCG among strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Multiplex PCR can be used as a diagnostic test and has significant advantages over existing methods. PMID:16989158

  12. Immunogenic Mycobacterium africanum strains associated with ongoing transmission in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Florian; Antonio, Martin; Otu, Jacob K; Sallah, Neneh; Secka, Oumie; Faal, Tutty; Owiafe, Patrick; Sutherland, Jayne S; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Ota, Martin O; Kampmann, Beate; Corrah, Tumani; de Jong, Bouke C

    2013-10-01

    In West Africa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains co-circulate with M. africanum, and both pathogens cause pulmonary tuberculosis in humans. Given recent findings that M. tuberculosis T-cell epitopes are hyperconserved, we hypothesized that more immunogenic strains have increased capacity to spread within the human host population. We investigated the relationship between the composition of the mycobacterial population in The Gambia, as measured by spoligotype analysis, and the immunogenicity of these strains as measured by purified protein derivative-induced interferon-γ release in ELISPOT assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We found a positive correlation between strains with superior spreading capacity and their relative immunogenicity. Although our observation is true for M. tuberculosis and M. africanum strains, the association was especially pronounced in 1 M. africanum sublineage, characterized by spoligotype shared international type 181, which is responsible for 20% of all tuberculosis cases in the region and therefore poses a major public health threat in The Gambia.

  13. Spatial relationship between Mycobacterium bovis strains in cattle and badgers in four areas in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Olea-Popelka, F J; Flynn, O; Costello, E; McGrath, G; Collins, J D; O'keeffe, J; Kelton, D F; Berke, O; Martin, S W

    2005-09-30

    We investigated whether strains (restriction fragment length polymorphism, RFLP-types) of Mycobacterium bovis isolated from badgers and from cattle clustered among and within four areas in Ireland. The spatial scan test and nearest-neighbor analysis were used as the spatial cluster-detection techniques. In addition, for each of the major strains, associations between the distance to badger setts and the "centroid" of the cattle farm were assessed in a logistic model. Overall, between September 1997 and May 2000, 316 and 287 M. bovis samples, from badgers and cattle, respectively, were strain-typed. The distribution of strains in badgers, and separately in cattle, differed among areas. Within each of the four large areas, badgers and cattle tended to have similar strains; this is consistent with the sharing of M. bovis strains within an area. In more detailed within-area analyses, some spatial clusters of M. bovis strains were detected, separately, in both cattle and badgers. Almost half of the infected badger setts with a specific strain were located outside of the "detected" clusters. There was no association between the number of infected badgers with a specific M. bovis strain within 2 or 5 km distances to cattle herds, and the risk of the same strain in cattle. We speculate about the dynamic nature of badger movements, as an explanation for the absence of more clusters of most of the strains of M. bovis isolated from badgers, and its impact on trying to study transmission of M. bovis between cattle and badger.

  14. Molecular diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in a slum area of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Joycenea Matsuda; Machado, Silvia Maria Almeida; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Ferreira, Rosa Maria Carvalho; Fonseca, Leila de Souza; Saad, Maria Helena Feres

    2008-12-01

    This retrospective molecular study involving restriction fragment length polymorphism, using insertion sequence 6110 as a marker, was conducted in order to provide an initial insight into the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in the slums of the Complexo de Manguinhos, located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the 67 strains evaluated, 23 (34.3%) were found to belong to clusters (total clusters, 10). Household and social chains of transmission were associated with clustering, in 20% and 60%, respectively. Living in the Conjunto Habitacional Programado 2 slum was associated with clustering. Although not significant, it is relevant that 26% of the clustered strains presented primary resistance. These findings, although possibly underestimating the prevalence due to the failure to analyze all strains, could help improve the local tuberculosis control program.

  15. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  16. The Mechanism for Type I Interferon Induction by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is Bacterial Strain-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-08-01

    Type I interferons (including IFNαβ) are innate cytokines that may contribute to pathogenesis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. To induce IFNβ, Mtb must gain access to the host cytosol and trigger stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling. A recently proposed model suggests that Mtb triggers STING signaling through bacterial DNA binding cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in the cytosol. The aim of this study was to test the generalizability of this model using phylogenetically distinct strains of the Mtb complex (MTBC). We infected bone marrow derived macrophages with strains from MTBC Lineages 2, 4 and 6. We found that the Lineage 6 strain induced less IFNβ, and that the Lineage 2 strain induced more IFNβ, than the Lineage 4 strain. The strains did not differ in their access to the host cytosol and IFNβ induction by each strain required both STING and cGAS. We also found that the three strains shed similar amounts of bacterial DNA. Interestingly, we found that the Lineage 6 strain was associated with less mitochondrial stress and less mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cytosol compared with the Lineage 4 strain. Treating macrophages with a mitochondria-specific antioxidant reduced cytosolic mtDNA and inhibited IFNβ induction by the Lineage 2 and 4 strains. We also found that the Lineage 2 strain did not induce more mitochondrial stress than the Lineage 4 strain, suggesting that additional pathways contribute to higher IFNβ induction. These results indicate that the mechanism for IFNβ by Mtb is more complex than the established model suggests. We show that mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA contribute to IFNβ induction by Mtb. Moreover, we show that the contribution of mtDNA to the IFNβ response varies by MTBC strain and that additional mechanisms exist for Mtb to induce IFNβ. PMID:27500737

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chelonae Type Strain CCUG 47445, a Rapidly Growing Species of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Seguí, Carolina; Busquets, Antonio; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruíz, Mikel; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chelonae strains are ubiquitous rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections, cellulitis, abscesses, osteomyelitis, catheter infections, disseminated diseases, and postsurgical infections after implants with prostheses, transplants, and even hemodialysis procedures. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. chelonae type strain CCUG 47445. PMID:27284158

  18. Identification of a hydride-Meisenheimer complex as a metabolite of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by a Mycobacterium strain.

    PubMed

    Vorbeck, C; Lenke, H; Fischer, P; Knackmuss, H J

    1994-02-01

    A bacterial strain, Mycobacterium sp. strain HL 4-NT-1, enriched with 4-nitrotoluene as its sole source of nitrogen, was able to metabolize 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene under aerobic conditions. The dark red-brown metabolite, which accumulated in the culture fluid, was identified as a hydride-Meisenheimer complex by comparison with an authentic synthetic sample.

  19. High-level relatedness among Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense strains from widely separated outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Tettelin, Hervé; Davidson, Rebecca M; Agrawal, Sonia; Aitken, Moira L; Shallom, Shamira; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Strong, Michael; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; De Groote, Mary Ann; Duarte, Rafael S; Hine, Erin; Parankush, Sushma; Su, Qi; Daugherty, Sean C; Fraser, Claire M; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; Holland, Steven M; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Olivier, Kenneth N; Jackson, Mary; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2014-03-01

    Three recently sequenced strains isolated from patients during an outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense infections at a cystic fibrosis center in the United States were compared with 6 strains from an outbreak at a cystic fibrosis center in the United Kingdom and worldwide strains. Strains from the 2 cystic fibrosis outbreaks showed high-level relatedness with each other and major-level relatedness with strains that caused soft tissue infections during an epidemic in Brazil. We identified unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms in cystic fibrosis and soft tissue outbreak strains, separate single-nucleotide polymorphisms only in cystic fibrosis outbreak strains, and unique genomic traits for each subset of isolates. Our findings highlight the necessity of identifying M. abscessus to the subspecies level and screening all cystic fibrosis isolates for relatedness to these outbreak strains. We propose 2 diagnostic strategies that use partial sequencing of rpoB and secA1 genes and a multilocus sequence typing protocol. PMID:24565502

  20. Development of modern InhA inhibitors to combat drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tonge, Peter J; Kisker, Caroline; Slayden, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Strategies for the development of novel tuberculosis chemotherapeutics against existing drug resistant strains involve the identification and inhibition of novel drug targets as well as the design and synthesis of compounds against historical targets. InhA, the enoyl reductase from the mycobacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, is a target of the frontline chemotherapeutic, isoniazid (INH). Importantly, the majority of INH-resistant clinical isolates arise from mutations in KatG, the enzyme responsible for activating isoniazid, into its active form. Thus compounds that inhibit InhA without first requiring KatG activation will be active against the majority of INH resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review describes the role of InhA in cell wall biosynthesis and recent progress in the development of novel diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors that have activity against both sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. tuberculosis.

  1. Clofazimine Prevents the Regrowth of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium Type Strains Exposed to Amikacin and Clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Meletiadis, Joseph; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug therapy is a standard practice when treating infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), but few treatment options exist. We conducted this study to define the drug-drug interaction between clofazimine and both amikacin and clarithromycin and its contribution to NTM treatment. Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium type strains were used. Time-kill assays for clofazimine alone and combined with amikacin or clarithromycin were performed at concentrations of 0.25× to 2× MIC. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed by response surface model of Bliss independence (RSBI) and isobolographic analysis of Loewe additivity (ISLA), calculating the percentage of statistically significant Bliss interactions and interaction indices (I), respectively. Monte Carlo simulations with predicted human lung concentrations were used to calculate target attainment rates for combination and monotherapy regimens. Clofazimine alone was bacteriostatic for both NTM. Clofazimine-amikacin was synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.55) and M. avium (I = 0.027; 95% CI, 0.007 to 0.048). Based on RSBI analysis, synergistic interactions of 28.4 to 29.0% and 23.2 to 56.7% were observed at 1× to 2× MIC and 0.25× to 2× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine-clarithromycin was also synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.72) and M. avium (I = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.35), RSBI analysis showed 23.5% and 23.3 to 53.3% at 2× MIC and 0.25× to 0.5× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine prevented the regrowth observed with amikacin or clarithromycin alone. Target attainment rates of combination regimens were >60% higher than those of monotherapy regimens for M. abscessus and M. avium. The combination of clofazimine with amikacin or clarithromycin was synergistic in vitro. This suggests a potential role for clofazimine in treatment regimens that warrants further

  2. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) PR10 strain.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A; Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Teh, Lay Kek; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Lee, Lian Shien; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Tang, Thean Hock; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-03-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10) isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from different regions of Italy and Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, L A; Zanetti, S; Delogu, G; Montinaro, B; Sanna, A; Fadda, G

    1996-01-01

    The use of the (GTG)5 oligonucleotide, a repetitive marker in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis chromosome, as a primer in association with an IS6110 outlooking primer has been successfully applied to a PCR-based fingerprinting method. This method classified 62 strains of M. tuberculosis, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive and -seronegative patients in different regions of Italy and Pakistan, as having 53 different patterns. The results were compared with traditional IS6110 fingerprinting, by which 47 distinct patterns were observed. PMID:8784602

  4. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) PR10 strain

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A.; Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Teh, Lay Kek; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Lee, Lian Shien; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Tang, Thean Hock; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10) isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968. PMID:26981419

  5. Genome sequencing and annotation of multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) PR10 strain.

    PubMed

    Halim, Mohd Zakihalani A; Jaafar, Mohammad Maaruf; Teh, Lay Kek; Ismail, Mohamad Izwan; Lee, Lian Shien; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Zainuddin, Zainul Fadziruddin; Tang, Thean Hock; Najimudin, Mohd Nazalan Mohd; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-03-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of a multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain PR10 (MDR-TB PR10) isolated from a patient diagnosed with tuberculosis. The size of the draft genome MDR-TB PR10 is 4.34 Mbp with 65.6% of G + C content and consists of 4637 predicted genes. The determinants were categorized by RAST into 400 subsystems with 4286 coding sequences and 50 RNAs. The whole genome shotgun project has been deposited at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number CP010968. PMID:26981419

  6. In vitro Anti-mycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden with one –third of the world’s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and annually 1.4 million deaths occur due to the disease. This high incidence of infection and the increased rate of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism further complicated the problem of TB control and have called for an urgent need to develop new anti-TB drugs from plants. In this study, the in vitro activity of root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were evaluated against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Methods Five Ethiopian medicinal plants, root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis used locally for the management of TB. They were investigated for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. 80% methanolic extracts of the plant materials were obtained by maceration. The antimycobacterial activity was determined using 96 wells of microplate with the help of visual Resazurin Microtiter Assay. Results The crude 80% methanolic extracts of the root of C. aurea, seeds of O. basilicum, and leaves of A. abyssinica, C. macrostachyus, and E. camaldulensis had anti-mycobacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 6.25–100 μg/mL. The MIC of 80% methanol extracts in the order mentioned above ranged 25-100 μg/ml and 12.5-75 μg/mL, 25–100 μg/mL and 25–50 μg/mL, 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, 12.5-100 μg/mL and 18.25-50 μg/mL and 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, respectively for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Conclusions The results support the local use of these plants in the treatment of TB and it is suggested that these plants may have therapeutic value in the treatment of TB. However

  7. [Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains collected from regional tuberculosis laboratories to major antituberculous drugs].

    PubMed

    Sayğan, M Bakir; Ocak, Fatih; Cesur, Salih; Tarhan, Gülnur; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gümüişlü, Feyzullah; Beker, Gülşan; Güner, Uğur; Coşkun, Erol

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains sent to Refik Saydam Hygiene Center, Tuberculosis Reference and Research Laboratory, Ankara, from seven different regional tuberculosis laboratories between the 1999-2002 period against major antituberculous drugs. The sensitivities of a total 505 M. tuberculosis strains to isoniazid (INAH), rifampicin (RIF), streptomycin (SM) and ethambutol (EMB) were determined by using proportion method in Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Of the strains, 385 (76.2%) were found sensitive to all of the tested drugs, while 120 strains were resistant to at least one of the antituberculous drugs. The resistant strains showed 14 different resistance patterns. The resistance rates were detected as 13.3% for INAH and RIF (67 strains of each), 9.1% for SM (46 strains), and 3.4% (17 strains) for EMB. Multidrug resistant (INAH+RIF) M. tuberculosis was 7.9% (40 strains). The highest resistance rate to INAH, RIF and EMB (21.2%, 21.2% and 10.6%, respectively) was detected in the isolates which were sent from Bursa province (located in northwestern Turkey); the highest SM (18.8%) and multidrug resistance (INAH+RIF) rates (18.8% and 10.6%, respectively) were detected in the strains sent from Elazig and Van provinces (both located in eastern Turkey). Since the inappropriate use of the first and second line antituberculous drugs leads to the development and spread of the resistant strains, "Directly Observed Therapy Shortcourse (DOTS)" is a very important practice. Therefore regional tuberculosis laboratories should be worth considering as the chains of a well-organized national laboratory network, in order to detect the antituberculous drug resistance patterns of the M. tuberculosis strains over the country.

  8. Novel multiplex real-time PCR diagnostic assay for identification and differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium canettii, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains.

    PubMed

    Reddington, Kate; O'Grady, Justin; Dorai-Raj, Siobhan; Maher, Majella; van Soolingen, Dick; Barry, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in humans is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). Rapid detection of the MTC is necessary for the timely initiation of antibiotic treatment, while differentiation between members of the complex may be important to guide the appropriate antibiotic treatment and provide epidemiological information. In this study, a multiplex real-time PCR diagnostics assay using novel molecular targets was designed to identify the MTC while simultaneously differentiating between M. tuberculosis and M. canettii. The lepA gene was targeted for the detection of members of the MTC, the wbbl1 gene was used for the differentiation of M. tuberculosis and M. canettii from the remainder of the complex, and a unique region of the M. canettii genome, a possible novel region of difference (RD), was targeted for the specific identification of M. canettii. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested using 125 bacterial strains (64 MTC isolates, 44 nontuberculosis mycobacteria [NTM], and 17 other bacteria). The assay was determined to be 100% specific for the mycobacteria tested. Limits of detection of 2.2, 2.17, and 0.73 cell equivalents were determined for M. tuberculosis/M. canettii, the MTC, and M. canettii, respectively, using probit regression analysis. Further validation of this diagnostics assay, using clinical samples, should demonstrate its potential for the rapid, accurate, and sensitive diagnosis of TB caused by M. tuberculosis, M. canettii, and the other members of the MTC.

  9. Comparative analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in three remote areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Eiji; Hachisu, Yushi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Nakanishi, Noriko; Arikawa, Kentaro; Wada, Takayuki; Seto, Junji; Kishida, Kazunori

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative and qualitative comparison was carried out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in three remote areas of Japan. A total of 452 strains from Chiba Prefecture, 75 from Yamagata Prefecture, and 315 from Kobe City were analyzed for 24 loci by variable number of tandem repeats typing (24(Beijing)-VNTR). All strains were classified in six Beijing subgroups (B(SUB)), B1 to B5 and T, based on a minimum spanning tree reconstructed using data of a standard set of 15 VNTR loci. No significant difference was found in the distribution of strains in the B(SUB) in the three areas, with one exception due to a B5 outbreak in Yamagata, indicating no significant quantitative difference in the B(SUB) in the three areas (P<0.01, Chi-square test). In addition, when strains in each B(SUB) isolated in the three areas were mixed and standardized index of association (I(A)(s)) and variance (Φ(PT)) values were calculated, no significant qualitative difference in the B(SUB) in the three areas was found. These results suggested that the B(SUB) diverged prior to the introduction of M. tuberculosis Beijing strains into Japan. Differences in the distribution of strains in each B(SUB) between Japan and continental Asian countries suggested there had been genetic drift in the continental Asian countries in which B4 had been dominant. PMID:26096775

  10. Comparative analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in three remote areas of Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Eiji; Hachisu, Yushi; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Nakanishi, Noriko; Arikawa, Kentaro; Wada, Takayuki; Seto, Junji; Kishida, Kazunori

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative and qualitative comparison was carried out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in three remote areas of Japan. A total of 452 strains from Chiba Prefecture, 75 from Yamagata Prefecture, and 315 from Kobe City were analyzed for 24 loci by variable number of tandem repeats typing (24(Beijing)-VNTR). All strains were classified in six Beijing subgroups (B(SUB)), B1 to B5 and T, based on a minimum spanning tree reconstructed using data of a standard set of 15 VNTR loci. No significant difference was found in the distribution of strains in the B(SUB) in the three areas, with one exception due to a B5 outbreak in Yamagata, indicating no significant quantitative difference in the B(SUB) in the three areas (P<0.01, Chi-square test). In addition, when strains in each B(SUB) isolated in the three areas were mixed and standardized index of association (I(A)(s)) and variance (Φ(PT)) values were calculated, no significant qualitative difference in the B(SUB) in the three areas was found. These results suggested that the B(SUB) diverged prior to the introduction of M. tuberculosis Beijing strains into Japan. Differences in the distribution of strains in each B(SUB) between Japan and continental Asian countries suggested there had been genetic drift in the continental Asian countries in which B4 had been dominant.

  11. Genetic diversity and transmission characteristics of Beijing family strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Tomotada; Grandjean, Louis; Arikawa, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Noriko; Caviedes, Luz; Coronel, Jorge; Sheen, Patricia; Wada, Takayuki; Taype, Carmen A; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Moore, David A J; Gilman, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    Beijing family strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have attracted worldwide attention because of their wide geographical distribution and global emergence. Peru, which has a historical relationship with East Asia, is considered to be a hotspot for Beijing family strains in South America. We aimed to unveil the genetic diversity and transmission characteristics of the Beijing strains in Peru. A total of 200 Beijing family strains were identified from 2140 M. tuberculosis isolates obtained in Lima, Peru, between December 2008 and January 2010. Of them, 198 strains were classified into sublineages, on the basis of 10 sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). They were also subjected to variable number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing using an international standard set of 15 loci (15-MIRU-VNTR) plus 9 additional loci optimized for Beijing strains. An additional 70 Beijing family strains, isolated between 1999 and 2006 in Lima, were also analyzed in order to make a longitudinal comparison. The Beijing family was the third largest spoligotyping clade in Peru. Its population structure, by SNP typing, was characterized by a high frequency of Sequence Type 10 (ST10), which belongs to a modern subfamily of Beijing strains (178/198, 89.9%). Twelve strains belonged to the ancient subfamily (ST3 [n=3], ST25 [n=1], ST19 [n=8]). Overall, the polymorphic information content for each of the 24 loci values was low. The 24 loci VNTR showed a high clustering rate (80.3%) and a high recent transmission index (RTI(n-1)=0.707). These strongly suggest the active and on-going transmission of Beijing family strains in the survey area. Notably, 1 VNTR genotype was found to account for 43.9% of the strains. Comparisons with data from East Asia suggested the genotype emerged as a uniquely endemic clone in Peru. A longitudinal comparison revealed the genotype was present in Lima by 1999.

  12. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of the Essential Oil of Myrtus communis L. against Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Stefania; Cannas, Sara; Molicotti, Paola; Bua, Alessandra; Cubeddu, Marina; Porcedda, Silvia; Marongiu, Bruno; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis. The World Health Organization has estimated that 8 million of people develop active TB every year and the situation is complicated by an increase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to drugs used in antitubercular therapy: MDR and XDR-TB. Myrtle leaf extracts, used as an antiseptic in Sardinian traditional medicine, have strong antibacterial activity as several investigations showed. In this study we investigated the antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Myrtus communis against clinical strains of M. tuberculosis and M. paratuberculosis. PMID:20706606

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium setense Type Strain DSM-45070 and the Nonpathogenic Strain Manresensis, Isolated from the Bank of the Cardener River in Manresa, Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Vilaplana, Cristina; Velasco, Juan; Pluvinet, Raquel; Santín, Sheila; Prat, Cristina; Julián, Esther; Alcaide, Fernando; Comas, Iñaki; Sumoy, Lauro; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2015-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences of two Mycobacterium setense strains. One of them corresponds to the M. setense type strain DSM-45070, originally isolated from a patient with a posttraumatic chronic skin abscess. The other one corresponds to the nonpathogenic M. setense strain Manresensis, isolated from the Cardener River crossing Manresa, Catalonia, Spain. A comparative genomic analysis shows a smaller genome size and fewer genes in M. setense strain Manresensis relative to those of the type strain, and it shows the genome segments unique to each strain. PMID:25657273

  14. Predominance of modern Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and active transmission of Beijing sublineage in Jayapura, Indonesia Papua.

    PubMed

    Chaidir, Lidya; Sengstake, Sarah; de Beer, Jessica; Oktavian, Antonius; Krismawati, Hana; Muhapril, Erfin; Kusumadewi, Inri; Annisa, Jessi; Anthony, Richard; van Soolingen, Dick; Achmad, Tri Hanggono; Marzuki, Sangkot; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotype distribution is different between West and Central Indonesia, but there are no data on the most Eastern part, Papua. We aimed to identify the predominant genotypes of M. tuberculosis responsible for tuberculosis in coastal Papua, their transmission, and the association with patient characteristics. A total of 199 M. tuberculosis isolates were collected. Spoligotyping was applied to describe the population structure of M. tuberculosis, lineage identification was performed using a combination of lineage-specific markers, and genotypic clusters were identified using a combination of 24-locus-MIRU-VNTR and spoligotyping. A high degree of genetic diversity was observed among isolates based on their spoligopatterns. Strains from modern lineage 4 made up almost half of strains (46.9%), being more abundant than the ancient lineage 1 (33.7%), and modern lineage 2 (19.4%). Thirty-five percent of strains belonged to genotypic clusters, especially strains in the Beijing genotype. Previous TB treatment and mutations associated with drug resistance were more common in patients infected with strains of the Beijing genotype. Papua shows a different distribution of M. tuberculosis genotypes compared to other parts of Indonesia. Clustering and drug resistance of modern strains recently introduced to Papua may contribute to the high tuberculosis burden in this region.

  15. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines.

  16. Mycobacterium marinum Strains Can Be Divided into Two Distinct Types Based on Genetic Diversity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    van der Sar, Astrid M.; Abdallah, Abdallah M.; Sparrius, Marion; Reinders, Erik; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum causes a systemic tuberculosis-like disease in a large number of poikilothermic animals and is used as a model for mycobacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we infected zebra fish (Danio rerio) with different strains of M. marinum to determine the variation in pathogenicity. Depending on the M. marinum isolate, the fish developed an acute or chronic disease. Acute disease was characterized by uncontrolled growth of the pathogen and death of all animals within 16 days, whereas chronic disease was characterized by granuloma formation in different organs and survival of the animals for at least 4 to 8 weeks. Genetic analysis of the isolates by amplified fragment length polymorphism showed that M. marinum strains could be divided in two clusters. Cluster I contained predominantly strains isolated from humans with fish tank granuloma, whereas the majority of the cluster II strains were isolated from poikilothermic species. Acute disease progression was noted only with strains belonging to cluster I, whereas all chronic-disease-causing isolates belonged to cluster II. This difference in virulence was also observed in vitro: cluster I isolate Mma20 was able to infect and survive more efficiently in the human macrophage THP-1 and the carp leukocyte CLC cell lines than was the cluster II isolate Mma11. We conclude that strain characteristics play an important role in the pathogenicity of M. marinum. In addition, the correlation between genetic variation and host origin suggests that cluster I isolates are more pathogenic for humans. PMID:15501758

  17. Desulfurization of 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl dibenzothiophene by recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimiko; Noda, Ken-ichi; Konishi, Jin; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-09-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65 harboring dszABCD genes was used to desulfurize alkyl dibenzothiophenes (Cx-DBTs) in n-hexadecane. The specific desulfurization activity for 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl DBT (C8-DBT) by DszC enzyme was about twice that for 4,6-dipropyl DBT (C6-DBT). However, the degradation rate of 2,4,6,8-tetraethyl DBT in n-hexadecane by resting cells of strain MR65 was only about 40% of that of 4,6-dipropyl DBT. These results indicated that the desulfurization ability for Cx-DBTs by resting cells depends on carbon number substituted at positions 4 and 6 and that the rate-limiting step in the desulfurization reaction of highly alkylated Cx-DBTs is the transfer process from the oil phase into the cell.

  18. Comparative Proteomic Analyses of Avirulent, Virulent, and Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identify Strain-specific Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Kumari, Sangeeta; Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Kalam, Haroon; Arora, Divya; Jain, Neharika; Kumaar, Lakshmi Krishna; Samal, Areejit; Rao, Kanury V. S.; Kumar, Dhiraj; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an adaptable intracellular pathogen, existing in both dormant as well as active disease-causing states. Here, we report systematic proteomic analyses of four strains, H37Ra, H37Rv, and clinical isolates BND and JAL, to determine the differences in protein expression patterns that contribute to their virulence and drug resistance. Resolution of lysates of the four strains by liquid chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry analysis, identified a total of 2161 protein groups covering ∼54% of the predicted M. tuberculosis proteome. Label-free quantification analysis of the data revealed 257 differentially expressed protein groups. The differentially expressed protein groups could be classified into seven K-means cluster bins, which broadly delineated strain-specific variations. Analysis of the data for possible mechanisms responsible for drug resistance phenotype of JAL suggested that it could be due to a combination of overexpression of proteins implicated in drug resistance and the other factors. Expression pattern analyses of transcription factors and their downstream targets demonstrated substantial differential modulation in JAL, suggesting a complex regulatory mechanism. Results showed distinct variations in the protein expression patterns of Esx and mce1 operon proteins in JAL and BND strains, respectively. Abrogating higher levels of ESAT6, an important Esx protein known to be critical for virulence, in the JAL strain diminished its virulence, although it had marginal impact on the other strains. Taken together, this study reveals that strain-specific variations in protein expression patterns have a meaningful impact on the biology of the pathogen. PMID:27151218

  19. Repeated Aerosolized-Boosting with Gamma-Irradiated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Confers Improved Pulmonary Protection against the Hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain HN878 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine, shows limited protection efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), particularly hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains, suggesting that a logistical and practical vaccination strategy is urgently required. Boosting the BCG-induced immunity may offer a potentially advantageous strategy for advancing TB vaccine development, instead of replacing BCG completely. Despite the improved protection of the airway immunization by using live BCG, the use of live BCG as an airway boosting agent may evoke safety concerns. Here, we analyzed the protective efficacy of γ-irradiated BCG as a BCG-prime boosting agent for airway immunization against a hypervirulent clinical strain challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 in a mouse TB model. After the aerosol challenge with the HN878 strain, the mice vaccinated with BCG via the parenteral route exhibited only mild and transient protection, whereas BCG vaccination followed by multiple aerosolized boosting with γ-irradiated BCG efficiently maintained long-lasting control of Mtb in terms of bacterial reduction and pathological findings. Further immunological investigation revealed that this approach resulted in a significant increase in the cellular responses in terms of a robust expansion of antigen (PPD and Ag85A)-specific CD4+ T cells concomitantly producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, as well as a high level of IFN-γ-producing recall response via both the local and systemic immune systems upon further boosting. Collectively, aerosolized boosting of γ-irradiated BCG is able to elicit strong Th1-biased immune responses and confer enhanced protection against a hypervirulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis HN878 infection in a boosting number-dependent manner. PMID:26509812

  20. [Investigation of Mycobacterium bovis subsp. bovis among the strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated in Düzce Province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Cihadiye Elif; Şahin, İdris; Öksüz, Şükrü; Kılıç, Nida; Kılınçel, Özge; Aydın, Leyla; Atik, Dursun; Afşin, Emine

    2016-07-01

    Throughout the history of mankind, tuberculosis (TB) has caused serious illness and still continues to do so. Archaeobiological studies indicated that TB in humans dates back to 4000-8000 BC, and cases were shown to be due to Mycobacterium bovis subsp.bovis rather than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, this situation was thought to begin with domestication of animals, consumption of their milk, and living together in the same environment with them. Over time, with the consumption of boiled milk and with the establishment of separate animal shelters, M.bovis subsp. bovis infection began to be seen rarely. Today, M.bovis infection is mostly transmitted from animals to humans and very rarely from humans to other humans. The most significant means of transmission of the infection are to the gastrointestinal tract via consumption of raw milk and to the respiratory system via droplet infection from the animals with disease. In this study, it was planned to investigate the cause of occurrence of TB in cattles in Düzce in the past few years along with the presence of bovine type TB in cases of human tuberculosis. We aimed to carry out subtype determination of the M.tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated in our mycobacteriology laboratory between the years 2004-2014, and evaluate the clinical and sociodemographic data of patients in whom M.bovis subsp. bovis was detected. The strains that were selected for the study have been isolated from radiometric BACTEC™ 12B broth and/or Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) media between 2004-2009, and BACTEC™ MGIT™ (Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube) and/or LJ media between 2009-2014 periods. The GenoType MTBC Kit (Hain-Lifescience GmbH, Germany) was used in the study for determination of the subspecies. Extraction and amplification of DNA and hybridizations were performed according to test procedure in order to investigate the presence of subtypes of the MTBC species in skimmed milk from collections stored at -20°C. In the

  1. [Investigation of Mycobacterium bovis subsp. bovis among the strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated in Düzce Province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Cihadiye Elif; Şahin, İdris; Öksüz, Şükrü; Kılıç, Nida; Kılınçel, Özge; Aydın, Leyla; Atik, Dursun; Afşin, Emine

    2016-07-01

    Throughout the history of mankind, tuberculosis (TB) has caused serious illness and still continues to do so. Archaeobiological studies indicated that TB in humans dates back to 4000-8000 BC, and cases were shown to be due to Mycobacterium bovis subsp.bovis rather than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, this situation was thought to begin with domestication of animals, consumption of their milk, and living together in the same environment with them. Over time, with the consumption of boiled milk and with the establishment of separate animal shelters, M.bovis subsp. bovis infection began to be seen rarely. Today, M.bovis infection is mostly transmitted from animals to humans and very rarely from humans to other humans. The most significant means of transmission of the infection are to the gastrointestinal tract via consumption of raw milk and to the respiratory system via droplet infection from the animals with disease. In this study, it was planned to investigate the cause of occurrence of TB in cattles in Düzce in the past few years along with the presence of bovine type TB in cases of human tuberculosis. We aimed to carry out subtype determination of the M.tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated in our mycobacteriology laboratory between the years 2004-2014, and evaluate the clinical and sociodemographic data of patients in whom M.bovis subsp. bovis was detected. The strains that were selected for the study have been isolated from radiometric BACTEC™ 12B broth and/or Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) media between 2004-2009, and BACTEC™ MGIT™ (Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube) and/or LJ media between 2009-2014 periods. The GenoType MTBC Kit (Hain-Lifescience GmbH, Germany) was used in the study for determination of the subspecies. Extraction and amplification of DNA and hybridizations were performed according to test procedure in order to investigate the presence of subtypes of the MTBC species in skimmed milk from collections stored at -20°C. In the

  2. Antimicrobial synergism against Mycobacterium avium complex strains isolated from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yajko, D M; Kirihara, J; Sanders, C; Nassos, P; Hadley, W K

    1988-01-01

    Pairs of 11 antimicrobial agents were tested in vitro for their ability to act synergistically against three strains of Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. From the combinations tested, four drugs (ethambutol, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin) were selected for more extensive study against 20 strains of M. avium complex. The inhibitory and killing synergism obtained with combinations of two, three, or four drugs was assessed by determining the fractional inhibitory concentration index and fractional bactericidal concentration index. Inhibitory synergism occurred against 90 to 100% of the strains for all drug combinations in which ethambutol was included. Killing synergism occurred against 85 to 95% of the strains when ethambutol was used in combinations which included either rifampin or ciprofloxacin. However, killing synergism occurred against only 45% of the strains when drugs were tested at concentrations that can be obtained in patient serum. In other experiments, rifabutin (Ansamycin) gave results that were comparable to those obtained with rifampin. Clofazimine did not show synergistic killing activity at a concentration that is achievable in serum for any of the drugs tested. Our results indicate that there is considerable variability in the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. avium isolates obtained from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This variability could have significant impact on the clinical response to various therapies. PMID:3196000

  3. Double recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain for screening of primary and rationale-based antimycobacterial compounds.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vandana; Biswas, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Bhupendra N

    2014-01-01

    Conventional antimycobacterial screening involves CFU analysis, which poses a great challenge due to slow growth of mycobacteria. Recombinant strains carrying reporter genes under the influence of constitutive promoters allow rapid and wide screening of compounds but without revealing their modes of action. Reporter strains using pathway-specific promoters provide a better alternative but allow a limited screening of compounds interfering with only a particular metabolic pathway. This reduces these strains to merely a second-line screening system, as they fail to identify even the more potent compounds if they are not inhibiting the pathway of interest. In this study, we have generated a double recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain carrying firefly and Renilla luciferase genes as two reporters under the control of a constitutive and an inducible mycobacterial promoter. The presence of dual reporters allows simultaneous expression and analysis of two reporter enzymes within a single system. The expression profile of the firefly luciferase gene, rendered by a constitutive mycobacterial promoter, coincides with the decline in bacterial growth in response to a wide range of antimycobacterial drugs, while the enhanced expression of Renilla luciferase mirrors the selective induction of the reporter gene expression as a result of pathway-specific inhibition. Thus, the double recombinant strain allows the screening of both primary and rationally synthesized antimycobacterial compounds in a single assay. The inhibiting response of drugs was monitored with a dual-luciferase reporter assay which can be easily adapted in high-throughput mode.

  4. Genomic variations associated with attenuation in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis vaccine strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) whole cell vaccines have been widely used tools in the control of Johne’s disease in animals despite being unable to provide complete protection. Current vaccine strains derive from stocks created many decades ago; however their genotypes, underlying mechanisms and relative degree of their attenuation are largely unknown. Results Using mouse virulence studies we confirm that MAP vaccine strains 316 F, II and 2e have diverse but clearly attenuated survival and persistence characteristics compared with wild type strains. Using a pan genomic microarray we characterise the genomic variations in a panel of vaccine strains sourced from stocks spanning over 40 years of maintenance. We describe multiple genomic variations specific for individual vaccine stocks in both deletion (26–32 Kbp) and tandem duplicated (11–40 Kbp) large variable genomic islands and insertion sequence copy numbers. We show individual differences suitable for diagnostic differentiation between vaccine and wild type genotypes and provide evidence for functionality of some of the deleted MAP-specific genes and their possible relation to attenuation. Conclusions This study shows how culture environments have influenced MAP genome diversity resulting in large tandem genomic duplications, deletions and transposable element activity. In combination with classical selective systematic subculture this has led to fixation of specific MAP genomic alterations in some vaccine strain lineages which link the resulting attenuated phenotypes with deficiencies in high reactive oxygen species handling. PMID:23339684

  5. Phylogenomics of Brazilian epidemic isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii reveals relationships of global outbreak strains.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Hasan, Nabeeh A; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Rapidly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) species are emerging pathogens that cause various diseases including skin and respiratory infections. The species has undergone recent taxonomic nomenclature refinement, and is currently recognized as two subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (MAB-A) and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii (MAB-B). The recently reported outbreaks of MAB-B in surgical patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2009 and in cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2006 to 2012 underscore the need to investigate the genetic diversity of clinical MAB strains. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of two Brazilian MAB-B epidemic isolates (CRM-0019 and CRM-0020) derived from an outbreak of skin infections in Rio de Janeiro, two unrelated MAB strains from patients with pulmonary infections in the United States (US) (NJH8 and NJH11) and one type MAB-B strain (CCUG 48898) and compared them to 25 publically available genomes of globally diverse MAB strains. Genome-wide analyses of 27,598 core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed that the two Brazilian derived CRM strains are nearly indistinguishable from one another and are more closely related to UK outbreak isolates infecting CF patients than to strains from the US, Malaysia or France. Comparative genomic analyses of six closely related outbreak strains revealed geographic-specific large-scale insertion/deletion variation that corresponds to bacteriophage insertions and recombination hotspots. Our study integrates new genome sequence data with existing genomic information to explore the global diversity of infectious M. abscessus isolates and to compare clinically relevant outbreak strains from different continents. PMID:24055961

  6. Contrasting Transcriptional Responses of a Virulent and an Attenuated Strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infecting Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Jason; Malloff, Chad A.; Bains, Manjeet; Hancock, Robert E.; Lam, Wan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background H37Rv and H37Ra are well-described laboratory strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis derived from the same parental strain, H37, that show dramatically different pathogenic phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the transcriptomes of the two strains during axenic growth in broth and during intracellular growth within murine bone-marrow macrophages were compared by whole genome expression profiling. We identified and compared adaptations of either strain upon encountering an intracellular environment, and also contrasted the transcriptomes of the two strains while inside macrophages. In the former comparison, both strains induced genes that would facilitate intracellular survival including those involved in mycobactin synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. However, this response was stronger and more extensive for H37Rv than for H37Ra. This was manifested as the differential expression of a greater number of genes and an increased magnitude of expression for these genes in H37Rv. In comparing intracellular transcriptional signatures, fifty genes were found to be differentially expressed between the strains. Of these fifty, twelve were under control of the PhoPR regulon. Further differences between strains included genes whose products were members of the ESAT-6 family of proteins, or were associated with their secretion. Conclusions/Significance Along with the recent identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in H37Ra when compared to H37Rv, our demonstration of differential expression of PhoP-regulated and ESX-1 region-related genes during macrophage infection further highlights the significance of these genes in the attenuation of H37Ra. PMID:20548782

  7. ISOLATION OF THE GENOME SEQUENCE STRAIN MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM 104 FROM MULTIPLE PATIENTS OVER A 17-YEAR PERIOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genome sequence strain 104 of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium avium was isolated form an adult AIDS patient in Southern California in 1983. Isolates of non-paratuberculosis M. avium from 207 other patients in Southern California and elsewhere were examined for genoty...

  8. Characterization to species level of Mycobacterium avium complex strains from human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakopoulos, A M; Tassios, P T; Matsiota-Bernard, P; Marinis, E; Tsaousidou, S; Legakis, N J

    1997-01-01

    Forty human clinical Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex strains isolated in Greece were characterized to the species level by PCR with three sets of primers specific for one or both species. M. avium predominated in both human immunodeficiency virus-positive and -negative patients, but the frequency of M. intracellulare isolation appeared to be higher in the latter. PMID:9350780

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium kansasii Strains 1010001454, 1010001458, 1010001468, 1010001493, 1010001495, and 1010001469, Isolated from Environmental Sources

    PubMed Central

    Strapagiel, Dominik; Borówka, Paulina; Marciniak, Błażej; Bakuła, Zofia; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii belongs to the nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and causes opportunistic infections with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of six environmental M. kansasii strains, designated 1010001495 (type I), 1010001469 (type II), 1010001468 (type III), 1010001458 (type IV), 1010001454 (type V), and 1010001493 (type V), originally isolated in five different European countries. PMID:27257194

  10. Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium bovis Strain MbURU-001, Isolated from Fresh Bovine Infected Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lasserre, Moira; Berná, Luisa; Greif, Gonzalo; Díaz-Viraqué, Florencia; Naya, Hugo; Castro-Ramos, Miguel; Juambeltz, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis in cattle has a high incidence in Uruguay, where it is considered a disease of national importance. We present the genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis strain MbURU-001, isolated from pectoral lymph nodes of a bovine host from a cattle farm. PMID:26543108

  11. Volatile Emissions from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Mirror Bacterial Growth and Enable Distinction of Different Strains

    PubMed Central

    Trefz, Phillip; Koehler, Heike; Klepik, Klaus; Moebius, Petra; Reinhold, Petra; Schubert, Jochen K.; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Control of paratuberculosis in livestock is hampered by the low sensitivity of established direct and indirect diagnostic methods. Like other bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) emits volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Differences of VOC patterns in breath and feces of infected and not infected animals were described in first pilot experiments but detailed information on potential marker substances is missing. This study was intended to look for characteristic volatile substances in the headspace of cultures of different MAP strains and to find out how the emission of VOCs was affected by density of bacterial growth. One laboratory adapted and four field strains, three of MAP C-type and one MAP S-type were cultivated on Herrold’s egg yolk medium in dilutions of 10-0, 10-2, 10-4 and 10-6. Volatile substances were pre-concentrated from the headspace over the MAP cultures by means of Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), thermally desorbed from the SPME fibers and separated and identified by means of GC-MS. Out of the large number of compounds found in the headspace over MAP cultures, 34 volatile marker substances could be identified as potential biomarkers for growth and metabolic activity. All five MAP strains could clearly be distinguished from blank culture media by means of emission patterns based on these 34 substances. In addition, patterns of volatiles emitted by the reference strain were significantly different from the field strains. Headspace concentrations of 2-ethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran, 2-pentylfuran, ethyl acetate, 1-methyl-1-H-pyrrole and dimethyldisulfide varied with density of bacterial growth. Analysis of VOCs emitted from mycobacterial cultures can be used to identify bacterial growth and, in addition, to differentiate between different bacterial strains. VOC emission patterns may be used to approximate bacterial growth density. In a perspective volatile marker substances could be used to diagnose MAP

  12. Immunological findings associated with Argentinean strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine models.

    PubMed

    Colavecchia, Silvia B; Fernández, Bárbara; Jolly, Ana; Minatel, Leonardo; Hajos, Silvia E; Paolicchi, Fernando A; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of ruminant paratuberculosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biological behavior of different Argentinean strains of MAP in two bovine infection models: macrophage (in vitro) and calf (in vivo) through the evaluation of early immune responses at the peripheral and local levels. Two MAP strains (A and C) were selected taking into account the different patterns of TNF-α and IL-10 secretion displayed by infected bovine macrophages in vitro. Two groups of calves were infected with 250mg of total wet weight live MAP: strain A infected group (MA, n=3), strain C infected group (MC, n=2). Another group of animals was mock-infected (MI, n=3). Infection was confirmed by MAP culture of feces and microscopic observation of granulomatous lesions in the gut tissue. All infected calves showed positive results in the DTH skin test. A significant increase in peripheral CD4CD25(+) cells in MC group on day 150 was detected. The specific cellular immune response developed allowed the identification of the infection as early as 30days in the MA group. However, the percentage of CD8CD25(+) cells was significantly increased on day 120 in MC group. Significant differences between groups in proliferation and cellular responses were also detected in ileocecal lymph node samples. In summary, the strains of MAP employed herein induced differential immune responses in peripheral cells, in the proliferative responses and in cell functionality at the local level. Our findings support the hypotheses that the in vitro behavior displayed by macrophages could be a tool to identify differences among MAP strains infecting bovines and that the host-pathogen interactions occurring upon infection are dependent on the strain of MAP involved.

  13. Clustering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from foreign-born patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Christie Y; Kang, Heeyoon; Kim, Mihye; Murray, Megan B; Kim, Heejin; Cho, Eun Hee; Park, Young Kil

    2011-12-01

    Information on drug resistance and transmission patterns of tuberculosis (TB) in foreign-born patients is lacking in Asia where immigration is increasing. We examined the drug-resistance profiles of 288 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from foreign-born patients in South Korea, and assessed for potential transmission in the host country by analysing their IS6110 genotypes, as well as those of 4780 strains from native Korean TB patients. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB was 9.7% and 42% among new and previously treated patients, respectively. Chinese nationality was associated with MDR TB (OR(China)=3.0, 95% CI 1.1-9.3). Of the 288 strains, 51 (17.7%) formed 31 clusters, of which 22 were identical to strains from native Koreans. A number of strains belonged to the K family, subtypes known to occur endemically in Korea. MDR TB was common, and clustering patterns showed potential cross-cultural transmission among foreign-born TB patients. Further molecular epidemiological studies of all isolates in the area are needed to determine the extent of international TB transmission in Asia.

  14. Estimation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Growth Parameters: Strain Characterization and Comparison of Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Elguezabal, Natalia; Bastida, Felix; Sevilla, Iker A.; González, Nuria; Molina, Elena; Garrido, Joseba M.; Juste, Ramón A.

    2011-01-01

    The growth rate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was assessed by different methods in 7H9 medium supplemented with OADC (oleic acid, albumin, dextrose, catalase), Tween 80, and mycobactin J. Generation times and maximum specific growth rates were determined by wet weight, turbidometric measurement, viable count, and quantitative PCR (ParaTB-Kuanti; F57 gene) for 8 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains (K10, 2E, 316F, 81, 445, 764, 22G, and OVICAP 49). Strain-to-strain differences were observed in growth curves and calculated parameters. The quantification methods gave different results for each strain at specific time points. Generation times ranged from an average of 1.4 days for viable count and qPCR to approximately 10 days for wet weight and turbidometry. The wet-weight, turbidometry, and ParaTB-Kuanti qPCR methods correlated best with each other. Generally, viability has been assessed by viable count as a reference method; however, due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clumping problems and the presence of noncultivable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells, we conclude that qPCR of a single-copy gene may be used reliably for rapid estimation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacterial numbers in a sample. PMID:22003015

  15. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Shanley, Crystal A.; Verma, Deepshikha; Zilavy, Andrew; Stapleton, Margaret C.; Furney, Synthia K.; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field. PMID:26368806

  16. The Efficacy of the BCG Vaccine against Newly Emerging Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Shanley, Crystal A; Verma, Deepshikha; Zilavy, Andrew; Stapleton, Margaret C; Furney, Synthia K; Podell, Brendan; Orme, Ian M

    2015-01-01

    To date, most new vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including new recombinant versions of the current BCG vaccine, have usually been screened against the laboratory strains H37Rv or Erdman. In this study we took advantage of our recent work in characterizing an increasingly large panel of newly emerging clinical isolates [from the United States or from the Western Cape region of South Africa], to determine to what extent vaccines would protect against these [mostly high virulence] strains. We show here that both BCG Pasteur and recombinant BCG Aeras-422 [used here as a good example of the new generation BCG vaccines] protected well in both mouse and guinea pig low dose aerosol infection models against the majority of clinical isolates tested. However, Aeras-422 was not effective in a long term survival assay compared to BCG Pasteur. Protection was very strongly expressed against all of the Western Cape strains tested, reinforcing our viewpoint that any attempt at boosting BCG would be very difficult to achieve statistically. This observation is discussed in the context of the growing argument made by others that the failure of a recent vaccine trial disqualifies the further use of animal models to predict vaccine efficacy. This viewpoint is in our opinion completely erroneous, and that it is the fitness of prevalent strains in the trial site area that is the centrally important factor, an issue that is not being addressed by the field.

  17. Whole genome sequencing identifies circulating Beijing-lineage Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Guatemala and an associated urban outbreak.

    PubMed

    Saelens, Joseph W; Lau-Bonilla, Dalia; Moller, Anneliese; Medina, Narda; Guzmán, Brenda; Calderón, Maylena; Herrera, Raúl; Sisk, Dana M; Xet-Mull, Ana M; Stout, Jason E; Arathoon, Eduardo; Samayoa, Blanca; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Limited data are available regarding the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains circulating in Guatemala. Beijing-lineage Mtb strains have gained prevalence worldwide and are associated with increased virulence and drug resistance, but there have been only a few cases reported in Central America. Here we report the first whole genome sequencing of Central American Beijing-lineage strains of Mtb. We find that multiple Beijing-lineage strains, derived from independent founding events, are currently circulating in Guatemala, but overall still represent a relatively small proportion of disease burden. Finally, we identify a specific Beijing-lineage outbreak centered on a poor neighborhood in Guatemala City.

  18. Whole genome sequencing identifies circulating Beijing-lineage Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Guatemala and an associated urban outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Saelens, Joseph W.; Lau-Bonilla, Dalia; Moller, Anneliese; Medina, Narda; Guzmán, Brenda; Calderón, Maylena; Herrera, Raúl; Sisk, Dana M.; Xet-Mull, Ana M.; Stout, Jason E.; Arathoon, Eduardo; Samayoa, Blanca; Tobin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Limited data are available regarding the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strains circulating in Guatemala. Beijing-lineage Mtb strains have gained prevalence worldwide and are associated with increased virulence and drug resistance, but there have been only a few cases reported in Central America. Here we report the first whole genome sequencing of Central American Beijing-lineage strains of Mtb. We find that multiple Beijing-lineage strains, derived from independent founding events, are currently circulating in Guatemala, but overall still represent a relatively small proportion of disease burden. Finally, we identify a specific Beijing-lineage outbreak centered on a poor neighborhood in Guatemala City. PMID:26542222

  19. Degradation of Phenanthrene and Anthracene by Cell Suspensions of Mycobacterium sp. Strain PYR-1

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Joanna D.; Freeman, James P.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2001-01-01

    Cultures of Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 were dosed with anthracene or phenanthrene and after 14 days of incubation had degraded 92 and 90% of the added anthracene and phenanthrene, respectively. The metabolites were extracted and identified by UV-visible light absorption, high-pressure liquid chromatography retention times, mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and comparison to authentic compounds and literature data. Neutral-pH ethyl acetate extracts from anthracene-incubated cells showed four metabolites, identified as cis-1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydroanthracene, 6,7-benzocoumarin, 1-methoxy-2-hydroxyanthracene, and 9,10-anthraquinone. A novel anthracene ring fission product was isolated from acidified culture media and was identified as 3-(2-carboxyvinyl)naphthalene-2-carboxylic acid. 6,7-Benzocoumarin was also found in that extract. When Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 was grown in the presence of phenanthrene, three neutral metabolites were identified as cis- and trans-9,10-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene and cis-3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophenanthrene. Phenanthrene ring fission products, isolated from acid extracts, were identified as 2,2′-diphenic acid, 1-hydroxynaphthoic acid, and phthalic acid. The data point to the existence, next to already known routes for both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, of alternative pathways that might be due to the presence of different dioxygenases or to a relaxed specificity of the same dioxygenase for initial attack on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:11282593

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii Strain JCM15466, a Species Closely Related to M. marinum.

    PubMed

    Hikima, Jun-Ichi; Sakai, Masahiro; Aoki, Takashi; Takeyama, Haruko; Hawke, John; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii is a slowly growing photochromogenic mycobacterium and fish pathogen isolated from wild marine fishes. M. pseudoshottsii closely resembles M. marinum, which is a human and animal pathogen. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of M. pseudoshottsii strain JCM15466, originally isolated from striped bass, Morone saxatilis. PMID:26868383

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii Strain JCM15466, a Species Closely Related to M. marinum

    PubMed Central

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Sakai, Masahiro; Takeyama, Haruko; Hawke, John; Mori, Kazuki; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii is a slowly growing photochromogenic mycobacterium and fish pathogen isolated from wild marine fishes. M. pseudoshottsii closely resembles M. marinum, which is a human and animal pathogen. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of M. pseudoshottsii strain JCM15466, originally isolated from striped bass, Morone saxatilis. PMID:26868383

  2. Degradation of Morpholine by an Environmental Mycobacterium Strain Involves a Cytochrome P-450

    PubMed Central

    Poupin, P.; Truffaut, N.; Combourieu, B.; Besse, P.; Sancelme, M.; Veschambre, H.; Delort, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    A Mycobacterium strain (RP1) was isolated from a contaminated activated sludge collected in a wastewater treatment unit of a chemical plant. It was capable of utilizing morpholine and other heterocyclic compounds, such as pyrrolidine and piperidine, as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The use of in situ 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy allowed the determination of two intermediates in the biodegradative pathway, 2-(2-aminoethoxy)acetate and glycolate. The inhibitory effects of metyrapone on the degradative abilities of strain RP1 indicated the involvement of a cytochrome P-450 in the biodegradation of morpholine. This observation was confirmed by spectrophotometric analysis and 1H NMR. Reduced cell extracts from morpholine-grown cultures, but not succinate-grown cultures, gave rise to a carbon monoxide difference spectrum with a peak near 450 nm, which indicated the presence of a soluble cytochrome P-450. 1H NMR allowed the direct analysis of the incubation medium containing metyrapone, a specific inhibitor of cytochrome P-450. The inhibition of morpholine degradation was dependent on the morpholine/metyrapone ratio. The heme-containing monooxygenase was also detected in pyrrolidine- and piperidine-grown cultures. The abilities of different compounds to support strain growth or the induction of a soluble cytochrome P-450 were assayed. The results suggest that this enzyme catalyzes the cleavage of the C—N bond of the morpholine ring. PMID:9435074

  3. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  4. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cohen, Keira A; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J; Shea, Terrance P; Almeida, Deepak V; Manson, Abigail L; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O'Donnell, Max R; Mlisana, Koleka P; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M; Pym, Alexander S

    2016-05-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs such as D-cycloserine. Here we used the whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify new resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss of function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss of function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted use of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections. PMID:27064254

  5. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Cohen, Keira A.; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J.; Shea, Terrance P.; Almeida, Deepak V.; Manson, Abigail L.; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O’Donnell, Max R.; Mlisana, Koleka P.; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W.; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M.; Pym, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs like D-cycloserine. Here, we used whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify novel resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss-of-function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss-of-function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted utilization of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections. PMID:27064254

  6. Genomic and functional analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains implicate ald in D-cycloserine resistance.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Cohen, Keira A; Munsamy, Vanisha; Abeel, Thomas; Maharaj, Kashmeel; Walker, Bruce J; Shea, Terrance P; Almeida, Deepak V; Manson, Abigail L; Salazar, Alex; Padayatchi, Nesri; O'Donnell, Max R; Mlisana, Koleka P; Wortman, Jennifer; Birren, Bruce W; Grosset, Jacques; Earl, Ashlee M; Pym, Alexander S

    2016-05-01

    A more complete understanding of the genetic basis of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for prompt diagnosis and optimal treatment, particularly for toxic second-line drugs such as D-cycloserine. Here we used the whole-genome sequences from 498 strains of M. tuberculosis to identify new resistance-conferring genotypes. By combining association and correlated evolution tests with strategies for amplifying signal from rare variants, we found that loss-of-function mutations in ald (Rv2780), encoding L-alanine dehydrogenase, were associated with unexplained drug resistance. Convergent evolution of this loss of function was observed exclusively among multidrug-resistant strains. Drug susceptibility testing established that ald loss of function conferred resistance to D-cycloserine, and susceptibility to the drug was partially restored by complementation of ald. Clinical strains with mutations in ald and alr exhibited increased resistance to D-cycloserine when cultured in vitro. Incorporation of D-cycloserine resistance in novel molecular diagnostics could allow for targeted use of this toxic drug among patients with susceptible infections.

  7. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of tunisian isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Soudani, Alya; Hadjfredj, Sondess; Zribi, Meriem; Messaadi, Feriel; Messaoud, Taieb; Masmoudi, Afef; Zribi, Mohamed; Fendri, Chedlia

    2011-06-01

    Forty three isoniazid (INH)-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were characterized on the basis of the most common INH associated mutations, katG315 and mabA -15C→T, and phenotypic properties (i.e. MIC of INH, resistance associated pattern, and catalase activity). Typing for resistance mutations was performed by Multiplex Allele-Specific PCR and sequencing reaction. Mutations at either codon were detected in 67.5% of isolates: katG315 in 37.2, mabA -15C→T in 27.9 and both of them in 2.4%, respectively. katG sequencing showed a G insertion at codon 325 detected in 2 strains and leading to amino acid change T326D which has not been previously reported. Distribution of each mutation, among the investigated strains, showed that katG S315T was associated with multiple-drug profile, high-level INH resistance and loss or decreased catalase activity; whereas the mabA -15C→T was more prevalent in mono-INH resistant isolates, but it was not only associated with a low-level INH resistance. It seems that determination of catalase activity aids in the detection of isolates for which MICs are high and could, in conjunction with molecular methods, provide rapid detection of most clinical INH-resistant strains.

  8. [MOLECULAR CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS STRAINS IN THE NORTHWEST RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Vyazovaya, A A; Mokrousov, I V; Zhuravlev, V Yu; Solovieva, N S; Otten, T F; Manicheva, O A; Vishnevsky, B I; Narvskaya, O V

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the genotypic characteristics of the multidrug-resistant (MDR, i.e., resistant to at least rifampicine and isoniazid) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in 2011-2012 from tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Northwest Russia. Spoligotyping of 195 M. tuberculosis isolates identified 14 different spoligotypes and assigned isolates to the genetic families Beijing (n = 162, 83%), LAM (n = 15), H3/URAL (n = 14), as well as T, Haarlem and X. Spoligotypes SIT1 (Beijing), SIT42 (LAM) and SIT262 (H3/URAL) were the most prevalent. Irrespective to the genotype, all the isolates were resistant to streptomycin. The multidrug resistance was accompanied by the resistance to ethionamide (56%), amikacin (31%), kanamycin (40%), and capreomycin (33%). The ethambutol resistance was found in 71% (n = 115) and 42% (n = 14) of the Beijing and non-Beijing strains, respectively (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis population circulating in the Northwest Russia continues to be dominated by the Beijing family strains.

  9. High affinity InhA inhibitors with activity against drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Todd J; Truglio, James J; Boyne, Melissa E; Novichenok, Polina; Zhang, Xujie; Stratton, Christopher F; Li, Huei-Jiun; Kaur, Tejinder; Amin, Amol; Johnson, Francis; Slayden, Richard A; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2006-02-17

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki' value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC99 values of 2-3 microg mL(-1) (6-10 microM) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC99, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  10. PE_PGRS30 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mediates suppression of proinflammatory immune response in macrophages through its PGRS and PE domains.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Shweta; Gupta, Vineet Kumar; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2016-09-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen relies on its ability to survive inside macrophages and evade host immune mechanisms. M. tuberculosis employs multiple strategies to confer resistance against immune system including inhibition of phago-lysosomal fusion, modulation of cytokine responses and granuloma formation. PE_PGRS proteins, uniquely present in pathogenic mycobacteria, are cell surface molecules that are suggested to interact with host cells. PE_PGRS proteins have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. In the present study, immuno-regulatory property of Rv1651c-encoded PE_PGRS30 protein was explored. Infection of PMA-differentiated human THP-1 macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring pVV(1651c) resulted in reduced production of IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6, as compared to infection with M. smegmatis harbouring the control plasmid pVV16. No differential effect was observed on bacterial persistence inside macrophages or on macrophage mortality upon infection with the two recombinant strains. Infection of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant M. smegmatis expressing deletion variants of PE_PGRS30 indicated that anti-inflammatory function of the protein is possessed by its PGRS and PE domains while the C-terminal domain, when expressed alone, displayed antagonistic effect in terms of TNF-α secretion. These results suggest that PE_PGRS30 interferes with macrophage immune functions important for activation of adaptive T-cell responses. PMID:27129781

  11. PE_PGRS30 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mediates suppression of proinflammatory immune response in macrophages through its PGRS and PE domains.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Shweta; Gupta, Vineet Kumar; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2016-09-01

    The success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a pathogen relies on its ability to survive inside macrophages and evade host immune mechanisms. M. tuberculosis employs multiple strategies to confer resistance against immune system including inhibition of phago-lysosomal fusion, modulation of cytokine responses and granuloma formation. PE_PGRS proteins, uniquely present in pathogenic mycobacteria, are cell surface molecules that are suggested to interact with host cells. PE_PGRS proteins have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. In the present study, immuno-regulatory property of Rv1651c-encoded PE_PGRS30 protein was explored. Infection of PMA-differentiated human THP-1 macrophages with Mycobacterium smegmatis harbouring pVV(1651c) resulted in reduced production of IL-12, TNF-α and IL-6, as compared to infection with M. smegmatis harbouring the control plasmid pVV16. No differential effect was observed on bacterial persistence inside macrophages or on macrophage mortality upon infection with the two recombinant strains. Infection of THP-1 macrophages with recombinant M. smegmatis expressing deletion variants of PE_PGRS30 indicated that anti-inflammatory function of the protein is possessed by its PGRS and PE domains while the C-terminal domain, when expressed alone, displayed antagonistic effect in terms of TNF-α secretion. These results suggest that PE_PGRS30 interferes with macrophage immune functions important for activation of adaptive T-cell responses.

  12. Virulence ranking of some Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis strains according to their ability to multiply in the lungs, induce lung pathology, and cause mortality in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, P L; North, R J

    1995-01-01

    Three virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27) and two virulent strains of M. bovis (Ravenel and Branch) were compared in terms of their growth rates in the livers and the lungs of mice, their ability to cause lung pathology, and the time taken for them to cause death. In immunocompetent mice, all strains caused an infection that progressed for 20 days or more and then underwent resolution in the liver but not in the lungs. In the lungs, infection persisted and induced progressive pathology. According to host survival time, Ravenel was the most virulent strain, followed, in decreasing order of virulence, by Branch, H37Rv, Erdman, and NYH-27. The much longer survival times of mice infected with M. tuberculosis strains allowed time for lung histopathology to change from a histiocytic alveolitis to a chronic fibroblastic fibrosis that eventually obliterated most of the lung architecture. By contrast, in mice infected with M. bovis strains, the alveolitis that developed during early infection was rapid and expansive enough to cause death before chronic lung pathology became evident. In mice depleted of CD4+ T cells, increased growth of all virulent strains induced necrotic exudative lung lesions that rapidly filled most of the alveolar sacs with inflammatory cells. These mice died much earlier than infected control mice did. Attenuated strains had longer population doubling times in vivo and failed to cause progressive disease or pathology in the lungs or livers of immunocompetent mice. PMID:7642273

  13. The rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L P; Crawford, J T; Shinnick, T M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides and used as a hybridization probe to isolate plasmid clones carrying the entire rpoB gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a virulent, rifampin-susceptible strain. Sequence analysis of a 5,084-bp SacI genomic DNA fragment revealed a 3,534-bp open reading frame encoding an 1,178-amino-acid protein with 57% identity with the Escherichia coli beta subunit. This SacI fragment also carried a portion of the rpoC gene located 43 bp downstream from the 3' end of the rpoB open reading frame; this organization is similar to that of the rpoBC operon of E. coli. The M. tuberculosis rpoB gene was cloned into the shuttle plasmid pMV261 and electroporated into the LR223 strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is highly resistant to rifampin (MIC > 200 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were relatively rifampin susceptible (MIC = 50 micrograms/ml). Using PCR mutagenesis techniques, we introduced a specific rpoB point mutation (associated with clinical strains of rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis) into the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene and expressed this altered gene in the LR222 strain of M. smegmatis, which is susceptible to rifampin (MIC = 25 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were rifampin resistant (MIC = 200 micrograms/ml). The mutagenesis and expression strategy of the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene that we have employed in this study will allow us to determine the rpoB mutations that are responsible for rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:8031050

  14. The genome sequence of 'Mycobacterium massiliense' strain CIP 108297 suggests the independent taxonomic status of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex at the subspecies level.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Joon; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik; Cho, Sang-Nae; Daley, Charles L; Koh, Won-Jung; Shin, Sung Jae

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex are rapidly growing mycobacteria that are emerging as human pathogens. The M. abscessus complex was previously composed of three species, namely M. abscessus sensu stricto, 'M. massiliense', and 'M. bolletii'. In 2011, 'M. massiliense' and 'M. bolletii' were united and reclassified as a single subspecies within M. abscessus: M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. However, the placement of 'M. massiliense' within the boundary of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii remains highly controversial with regard to clinical aspects. In this study, we revisited the taxonomic status of members of the M. abscessus complex based on comparative analysis of the whole-genome sequences of 53 strains. The genome sequence of the previous type strain of 'Mycobacterium massiliense' (CIP 108297) was determined using next-generation sequencing. The genome tree based on average nucleotide identity (ANI) values supported the differentiation of 'M. bolletii' and 'M. massiliense' at the subspecies level. The genome tree also clearly illustrated that 'M. bolletii' and 'M. massiliense' form a distinct phylogenetic clade within the radiation of the M. abscessus complex. The genomic distances observed in this study suggest that the current M. abscessus subsp. bolletii taxon should be divided into two subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense subsp. nov. and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, to correspondingly accommodate the previously known 'M. massiliense' and 'M. bolletii' strains. PMID:24312320

  15. Molecular strain identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in archival tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Zink, A R; Nerlich, A G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the use of different molecular analyses that can identify distinct strains of human pathogenic mycobacteria in formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded archival tissue samples to see whether it is possible to differentiate between the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (M tuberculosis, M bovis, M africanum, M microti, or M canettii) and/or substrains in a high number of samples. This would be of interest for identifying individual infection traits and superinfection by different mycobacterial strains. Methods: Forty nine archival tissue samples with clinically and/or histologically suspected tuberculosis infection were subjected to molecular DNA analysis. Results: The molecular analysis revealed the presence of M tuberculosis complex DNA in 20 samples, whereas acid fast bacilli could be detected by Ziehl-Neelsen staining in only eight samples. All IS6110 positive samples were further characterised by spoligotyping and seven cases provided M tuberculosis specific signatures, whereas M bovis specific signatures were obtained in four cases. The analysis of mtp40, oxyR, and pncA partial gene sequences confirmed the presence of M tuberculosis in six cases and M bovis in one case. The amplification and sequencing of four further genetic regions (katG, gyrA, TbD1, RD9) characterised six “modern” M tuberculosis strains belonging to genetic groups 2 or 3. Conclusion: This study provides clear evidence that archival paraffin wax embedded material can be used for further studies on the strain identification of M tuberculosis complex strains and can therefore unequivocally be used for the study of the epidemiology and evolution of tuberculosis pathogens. PMID:15509681

  16. Metabolism of 2-Methylpropene (Isobutylene) by the Aerobic Bacterium Mycobacterium sp. Strain ELW1

    PubMed Central

    Kottegoda, Samanthi; Waligora, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    An aerobic bacterium (Mycobacterium sp. strain ELW1) that utilizes 2-methylpropene (isobutylene) as a sole source of carbon and energy was isolated and characterized. Strain ELW1 grew on 2-methylpropene (growth rate = 0.05 h−1) with a yield of 0.38 mg (dry weight) mg 2-methylpropene−1. Strain ELW1 also grew more slowly on both cis- and trans-2-butene but did not grow on any other C2 to C5 straight-chain, branched, or chlorinated alkenes tested. Resting 2-methylpropene-grown cells consumed ethene, propene, and 1-butene without a lag phase. Epoxyethane accumulated as the only detected product of ethene oxidation. Both alkene consumption and epoxyethane production were fully inhibited in cells exposed to 1-octyne, suggesting that alkene oxidation is initiated by an alkyne-sensitive, epoxide-generating monooxygenase. Kinetic analyses indicated that 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane is rapidly consumed during 2-methylpropene degradation, while 2-methyl-2-propen-1-ol is not a significant metabolite of 2-methylpropene catabolism. Degradation of 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane by 2-methylpropene-grown cells led to the accumulation and further degradation of 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, two sequential metabolites previously identified in the aerobic microbial metabolism of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Growth of strain ELW1 on 2-methylpropene, 1,2-epoxy-2-methylpropane, 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol, and 2-hydroxyisobutyrate was fully inhibited when cobalt ions were omitted from the growth medium, while growth on 3-hydroxybutyrate and other substrates was unaffected by the absence of added cobalt ions. Our results suggest that, like aerobic MTBE- and TBA-metabolizing bacteria, strain ELW1 utilizes a cobalt/cobalamin-dependent mutase to transform 2-hydroxyisobutyrate. Our results have been interpreted in terms of their impact on our understanding of the microbial metabolism of alkenes and ether oxygenates. PMID:25576605

  17. Rifampin resistance, Beijing-W clade-single nucleotide polymorphism cluster group 2 phylogeny, and the Rv2629 191-C allele in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Aladegbami, Bola; Motiwala, Alifiya S; Dai, Yang; Safi, Hassan; Brimacombe, Michael; Helb, Danica; Alland, David

    2008-08-01

    Rifampin resistance is a key prognostic marker for treatment success in tuberculosis patients. Recently, Wang et al. demonstrated that Rv2629 A191C mutations were present in 99.1% of rifampin-resistant and 0% of rifampin-susceptible clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and that overexpression of the Rv2629 191C allele in Mycobacterium smegmatis produced an eightfold increase in rifampin resistance. These results suggested that Rv2629 could be a cause of rifampin resistance and a valuable target for rifampin resistance detection assays. We developed a molecular-beacon assay to study the association between Rv2629 191 alleles and rifampin resistance in 246 geographically and phylogenetically diverse clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. The 191C allele was present in 30/98 (30.6%) rifampin-resistant isolates and 25/148 (16.9%) rifampin-susceptible isolates and was more common in isolates from Asia. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated complete overlap between the 191C allele and single nucleotide polymorphism cluster group 2 (SCG-2), a phylogenetic lineage that corresponds to the Beijing-W clade of M. tuberculosis. All 55 (100%) 191C isolates were SCG-2, while none of the 191 191A isolates were SCG-2 (P < 0.001). No association was found between the 191C allele and rifampin resistance in an analysis that included the SCG type (P = 1.0). Also, in contrast to the findings of Wang et al., we found that overexpression of either Rv2629 191 allele in M. smegmatis did not produce an increase in rifampin resistance. We conclude that the Rv2629 191C allele is not associated with rifampin resistance and that the allele cannot be used as a molecular target to detect rifampin resistance. The allele appears to be an excellent marker for the Beijing-W clade/SCG-2 phylogenetic group.

  18. [Rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO mutation].

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Edeer Karaca, Neslihan; Azarsız, Elif; Ulusoy, Ezgi; Kütükçüler, Necil

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that disseminated Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection is developed after BCG vaccination in infants with congenital cellular immune deficiencies such as mutations in genes along the interleukin (IL)-12/interferon (IFN)-γ pathway and mutations in nuclear factor-kB essential modulator (NEMO). In this report, a rifampicin-resistant M.bovis BCG strain isolated from an infant with NEMO defect was presented. An 8-month-old male infant with NEMO defect admitted to the pediatric outpatient clinic of our hospital with fever, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Microscopic examination of the smears prepared from lymph node and liver biopsy specimens revealed abundant amount (3+) of acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Rifampicin-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) was detected by real-time PCR (GeneXpert MTB/RIF; Cepheid, USA) in the samples. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 20th day of culture performed in MGIT960 system (Becton Dickinson, USA). The isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG by GenoType MTBC kit (Hain Lifescience, Germany) and defined as M.bovis BCG [SIT 482 (BOV_1)] by spoligotyping. In the primary anti-tuberculosis drug susceptibility test performed by MGIT960 system, the isolate was found susceptible to rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), streptomycin (STM) and ethambutol (EMB). Then anti-tuberculosis treatment was started to the patient. However, the patient at the age of 2 years, re-admitted to the hospital with the complaint of hepatosplenomegaly. Smear of spontaneously draining abscess material obtained from subcutaneous nodules revealed intensive AFB positivity (3+) once again. In the present instance RIF-resistant MTC was detected with GeneXpert system in the specimen. The growth of mycobacteria was determined on the 13th day of culture and isolate was identified as M.bovis BCG. The present isolate was found susceptible to INH, STM and EMB but resistant to RIF. A mutation in the rpoB gene (codon 531, S

  19. Detection and Strain Typing of Ancient Mycobacterium leprae from a Medieval Leprosy Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. Michael; Tucker, Katie; Butler, Rachel; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Lewis, Jamie; Roffey, Simon; Marter, Philip; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H. T.; Minnikin, David E.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.; Stewart, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Nine burials excavated from the Magdalen Hill Archaeological Research Project (MHARP) in Winchester, UK, showing skeletal signs of lepromatous leprosy (LL) have been studied using a multidisciplinary approach including osteological, geochemical and biomolecular techniques. DNA from Mycobacterium leprae was amplified from all nine skeletons but not from control skeletons devoid of indicative pathology. In several specimens we corroborated the identification of M. leprae with detection of mycolic acids specific to the cell wall of M. leprae and persistent in the skeletal samples. In five cases, the preservation of the material allowed detailed genotyping using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Three of the five cases proved to be infected with SNP type 3I-1, ancestral to contemporary M. leprae isolates found in southern states of America and likely carried by European migrants. From the remaining two burials we identified, for the first time in the British Isles, the occurrence of SNP type 2F. Stable isotope analysis conducted on tooth enamel taken from two of the type 3I-1 and one of the type 2F remains revealed that all three individuals had probably spent their formative years in the Winchester area. Previously, type 2F has been implicated as the precursor strain that migrated from the Middle East to India and South-East Asia, subsequently evolving to type 1 strains. Thus we show that type 2F had also spread westwards to Britain by the early medieval period. PMID:23638071

  20. Genomics Study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains from Different Ethnic Populations in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Horng-Yunn; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Tsong; Chang, Jia-Ru; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Keh-Ming; Lin, Ming-Shian; Su, Ih-Jen; Tsai, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the transmission and evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in Taiwan, six different MTB isolates (representatives of the Beijing ancient sublineage, Beijing modern sublineage, Haarlem, East-African Indian, T1, and Latin-American Mediterranean (LAM)) were characterized and their genomes were sequenced. Discriminating among large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) that occur once versus those that occur repeatedly in a genomic region may help to elucidate the biological roles of LSPs and to identify the useful phylogenetic relationships. In contrast to our previous LSP-based phylogeny, the sequencing data allowed us to determine actual genetic distances and to define precisely the phylogenetic relationships between the main lineages of the MTB complex. Comparative genomics analyses revealed more nonsynonymous substitutions than synonymous changes in the coding sequences. Furthermore, MTB isolate M7, a LAM-3 clinical strain isolated from a patient of Taiwanese aboriginal origin, is closely related to F11 (LAM), an epidemic tuberculosis strain isolated in the Western Cape of South Africa. The PE/PPE protein family showed a higher dn/ds ratio compared to that for all protein-coding genes. Finally, we found Haarlem-3 and LAM-3 isolates to be circulating in the aboriginal community in Taiwan, suggesting that they may have originated with post-Columbus Europeans. Taken together, our results revealed an interesting association with historical migrations of different ethnic populations, thus providing a good model to explore the global evolution and spread of MTB. PMID:27721649

  1. Adaptation of aerobic, ethene-assimilating Mycobacterium strains to vinyl chloride as a growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang Oh; Mattes, Timothy E

    2008-07-01

    Contamination of drinking water source zones by vinyl chloride (VC), a known human carcinogen and common groundwater contaminant, poses a public health risk. Bioremediation applications involving aerobic, VC-assimilating bacteria could be useful in alleviating environmental VC cancer risk, but their evolution and activity in the environment are poorly understood. In this study, adaptation of ethene-assimilating Mycobacterium strains JS622, JS623, JS624, and JS625 to VC as a growth substrate was investigated to test the hypothesis that VC-assimilating bacteria arise from naturally occurring ethene-assimilating bacteria. VC consumption in the absence of microbial growth was initially observed in cultures grown in both ethene and 1/10-strength trypticase soy agar + 1% (w/v) glucose. After extended incubations (55-476 days), all strains commenced growth-coupled VC consumption patterns. VC-adapted cultures grown on 20 mM acetate subsequently retained their ability to assimilate VC. Three independent purity check methods (streak plates, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction) verified culture purity prior to and following VC adaptation. Overall, our results suggest that ethene-assimilating mycobacteria have a widespread ability to adapt to VC as a growth substrate.

  2. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the IS900 sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis are strain type specific.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Elena; Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucia; Alvarez, Julio; Rodríguez, Sabrina; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Stevenson, Karen; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2009-07-01

    Insertion sequence IS900 is used as a target for the identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Previous reports have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms within IS900. This study, which analyzed the IS900 sequences of a panel of isolates representing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types I, II, and III, revealed conserved type-specific polymorphisms that could be utilized as a tool for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes.

  4. In vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae to ticarcillin in combination with clavulanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Casal, M J; Rodriguez, F C; Luna, M D; Benavente, M C

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae (M. chelonei) to ticarcillin in combination with calvulanic acid (CA) was studied by the agar dilution method. All the M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and M. africanum strains were inhibited at a ticarcillin concentration of 32 micrograms/ml or lower in combination with 5 micrograms of CA. M. chelonae and M. avium strains proved resistant to more than 128 micrograms of ticarcillin plus 5 micrograms of CA per ml. M. fortuitum strains needed 128 micrograms of ticarcillin plus 5 micrograms of CA to inhibit approximately 30% of the isolates. PMID:3105441

  5. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Strains: A Fundamental Tool for Tuberculosis Control and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Angela; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Di Caro, Antonino; Delogu, Giovanni; Girardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An improvement of the strategies for disease control is necessary in both low- and high-incidence TB countries. Clinicians, epidemiologists, laboratory specialists, and public health players should work together in order to achieve a significant reduction in TB transmission and spread of drug-resistant strains. Effective TB surveillance relies on early diagnosis of new cases, appropriate therapy, and accurate detection of outbreaks in the community, in order to implement proper TB control strategies. To achieve this goal, information from classical and molecular epidemiology, together with patient clinical data need to be combined. In this review, we summarize the methodologies currently used in molecular epidemiology, namely molecular typing. We will discuss their efficiency to phylogenetically characterize Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, and their ability to provide information that can be useful for disease control. We will also introduce next generation sequencing as the methodology that potentially could provide in a short time both, detection of new outbreaks and identification of resistance patterns. This could envision a potential of next generation sequencing as an important tool for accurate patient management and disease control. PMID:27403266

  6. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372

    PubMed Central

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A.; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a “chemokine storm” in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process. PMID:25621360

  7. Sublineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype strains and unfavorable outcomes of anti-tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hang, Nguyen T L; Maeda, Shinji; Keicho, Naoto; Thuong, Pham H; Endo, Hiroyoshi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) lineages/sublineages on unfavorable tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of Beijing genotype sublineages and other factors contributing to treatment outcome. Patients newly diagnosed with sputum smear-positive and culture-positive TB in Hanoi, Vietnam, participated in the study. After receiving anti-TB treatment, they were intensively followed up for the next 16 months. MTB isolates collected before treatment were subjected to drug susceptibility testing, and further analyzed to determine MTB (sub) lineages and their clonal similarities. Of 430 patients, 17 had treatment failure and 30 had TB recurrence. Rifampicin resistance was associated with treatment failure {adjusted odds ratio = 6.64 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.48-29.73]}. The modern Beijing genotype was significantly associated with recurrent TB within 16 months [adjusted hazard ratio = 3.29 (95% CI, 1.17-9.27)], particularly after adjustment for the relevant antibiotic resistance. Human immunodeficiency virus coinfection and severity on chest radiographs were not significantly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Our findings provide further understanding of the influence of MTB strains on unfavorable treatment outcomes. Multiple risk factors should be considered for the optimal management of TB. PMID:25732626

  8. Whole genome response in guinea pigs infected with the high virulence strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis TT372.

    PubMed

    Aiyaz, Mohamed; Bipin, Chand; Pantulwar, Vinay; Mugasimangalam, Raja; Shanley, Crystal A; Ordway, Diane J; Orme, Ian M

    2014-12-01

    In this study we conducted a microarray-based whole genomic analysis of gene expression in the lungs after exposure of guinea pigs to a low dose aerosol of the Atypical Beijing Western Cape TT372 strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, after harvesting lung tissues three weeks after infection at a time that effector immunity is starting to peak. The infection resulted in a very large up-regulation of multiple genes at this time, particularly in the context of a "chemokine storm" in the lungs. Overall gene expression was considerably reduced in animals that had been vaccinated with BCG two months earlier, but in both cases strong signatures featuring gamma interferon [IFNγ] and tumor necrosis factor [TNFα] were observed indicating the potent TH1 response in these animals. Even though their effects are not seen until later in the infection, even at this early time point gene expression patterns associated with the potential emergence of regulatory T cells were observed. Genes involving lung repair, response to oxidative stress, and cell trafficking were strongly expressed, but interesting these gene patterns differed substantially between the infected and vaccinated/infected groups of animals. Given the importance of this species as a relevant and cost-effective small animal model of tuberculosis, this approach has the potential to provide new information regarding the effects of vaccination on control of the disease process.

  9. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  10. Degradation of 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine by a newly discovered bacterium, Mycobacterium sp. strain DM-11.

    PubMed

    Rappert, Sugima; Botsch, Kathrin Caroline; Nagorny, Stephanie; Francke, Wittko; Müller, Rudolf

    2006-02-01

    A bacterium was isolated from the waste gas treatment plant at a fishmeal processing company on the basis of its capacity to use 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine (DM) as a sole carbon and energy source. The strain, designated strain DM-11, grew optimally at 25 degrees C and had a doubling time of 29.2 h. The strain did not grow on complex media like tryptic soy broth, Luria-Bertani broth, or nutrient broth or on simple carbon sources like glucose, acetate, oxoglutarate, succinate, or citrate. Only on Löwenstein-Jensen medium was growth observed. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain DM-11 showed the highest similarity (96.2%) to Mycobacterium poriferae strain ATCC 35087T. Therefore, strain DM-11 merits recognition as a novel species within the genus Mycobacterium. DM also served as a sole nitrogen source for the growth of strain DM-11. The degradation of DM by strain DM-11 requires molecular oxygen. The first intermediate was identified as 5,6-diethyl-2-hydroxy-3-methylpyrazine (DHM). Its disappearance was accompanied by the release of ammonium into the culture medium. No other metabolite was detected. We conclude that ring fission occurred directly after the formation of DHM and ammonium was eliminated after ring cleavage. Molecular oxygen was essential for the degradation of DHM. The expression of enzymes involved in the degradation of DM and DHM was regulated. Only cells induced by DM or DHM converted these compounds. Strain DM-11 also grew on 2-ethyl-5(6)-methylpyrazine (EMP) and 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (TMP) as a sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In addition, the strain converted many pyrazines found in the waste gases of food industries cometabolically.

  11. Human Alveolar Macrophage Gene Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains H37Ra and H37Rv

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard F.; Walrath, Jessica; Lee, Hung; Jacobson, Bruce A.; Horton, Heidi; Bowman, Michael R.; Nocka, Karl; Sypek, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    H37Rv and H37Ra have been widely used as models of virulent and avirulent strains, respectively, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Since the sequencing of H37Rv, microarrays have been used to investigate gene expression of M. tuberculosis strains under various conditions, and to compare gene expression of specific isolates of the organism. Because differences in the virulence of these organisms could also be manifest via their differential induction of host genes, we used Affymetrix Human Genome Arrays U133A and U133B to evaluate human alveolar macrophage (AM) responses to infection with H37Rv and H37Ra. H37Rv altered expression of far more genes than did H37Ra. Moreover, the genes induced by H37Rv to a greater extent than by H37Ra were predominantly associated with the development of effective immunity. H37Rv markedly increased expression of IL-23 p19, whereas neither organism significantly induced IL-12 p35 expression. Quantitative PCR confirmed that H37Rv induced significantly more AM p19 expression than did H37Ra. After low-level infection of both AM and peripheral blood monocytes (MN) with H37Rv, neither cell type produced IL-12 (by ELISA). In contrast, AM displayed significant IL-23 production in response to H37Rv, whereas MN did not. Our findings thus suggest an important role for IL-23 in human host responses to pulmonary infection with M. tuberculosis, and are consistent with epidemiologic and genetic studies that imply that H37Rv may not have unusual capacity to cause human disease. PMID:18787177

  12. Comparison of the Membrane Proteome of Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the Attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine Strain by Label-free Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Feltcher, Meghan E.; Wrobel, John A.; Gu, Sheng; Braunstein, Miriam; Chen, Xian

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) membrane is rich in antigens that are potential targets for diagnostics and the development of new vaccines. To better understand the mechanisms underlying MTB virulence and identify new targets for therapeutic intervention we investigated the differential composition of membrane proteomes between virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv (MTB) and the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain. To compare the membrane proteomes, we used LC-MS/MS analysis in combination with label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomics, utilizing the area-under-curve (AUC) of the extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) of peptides obtained from m/z and retention time alignment of MS1 features. With this approach, we obtained relative abundance ratios for 2,203 identified membrane-associated proteins in high confidence. Of these proteins, 294 showed statistically significant differences of at least 2 fold, in relative abundance between MTB and BCG membrane fractions. Our comparative analysis detected several proteins associated with known genomic regions of difference between MTB and BCG as being absent, which validated the accuracy of our approach. In further support of our label-free quantitative data, we verified select protein differences by immunoblotting. To our knowledge we have generated the first comprehensive and high coverage profile of comparative membrane proteome changes between virulent MTB and its attenuated relative BCG, which helps elucidate the proteomic basis of the intrinsic virulence of the MTB pathogen. PMID:24093440

  13. Protection by novel vaccine candidates, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔmosR and ΔechA7, against challenge with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strain

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Sarah A.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects over two billion people, claiming around 1.5 million lives annually. The only vaccine approved for clinical use against this disease is the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Unfortunately, BCG has limited efficacy against the adult, pulmonary form of tuberculosis. This vaccine was developed from M. bovis with antigen expression and host specificity that differ from M. tuberculosis. To address these problems, we have designed two novel, live attenuated vaccine (LAV) candidates on an M. tuberculosis background: ΔmosR and ΔechA7. These targeted genes are important to M. tuberculosis pathogenicity during infection. To examine the efficacy of these strains, C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated subcutaneously with either LAV, BCG, or PBS. Both LAV strains persisted up to 16 weeks in the spleens or lungs of vaccinated mice, while eliciting minimal pathology prior to challenge. Following challenge with a selected, high virulence M. tuberculosis Beijing strain, protection was notably greater for both groups of LAV vaccinated animals as compared to BCG at both 30 and 60 days post-challenge. Additionally, vaccination with either ΔmosR or ΔechA7 elicited an immune response similar to BCG. Although these strains require further development to meet safety standards, this first evidence of protection by these two new, live attenuated vaccine candidates shows promise. PMID:26363381

  14. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-Mediated Protection against W-Beijing Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Diminished Concomitant with the Emergence of Regulatory T Cells▿†

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane J.; Shang, Shaobin; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Nold, Laura; Caraway, Megan; Shanley, Crystal A.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite issues relating to variable efficacy in the past, the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine remains the basis for new-generation recombinant vaccines currently in clinical trials. To date, vaccines have been tested mostly against laboratory strains and not against the newly emerging clinical strains. In this study, we evaluated the ability of BCG Pasteur to protect mice from aerosol infections with two highly virulent W-Beijing clinical strains, HN878 and SA161. In a conventional 30-day protection assay, BCG was highly protective against both strains, but by day 60 of the assay, this protection was diminished. Histological examination of the lungs of vaccinated animals showed reduced lung consolidation and smaller and more-organized granulomas in the vaccinated mice after 30 days, but in both cases, these tissues demonstrated worsening pathology over time. Effector T cell responses were increased in the vaccinated mice infected with HN878, but these diminished in number after day 30 of the infections concomitant with increased CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells in the lungs, draining lymph nodes, and the spleen. Given the concomitant decrease in effector immunity and continued expansion of regulatory Foxp3+ cells observed here, it is reasonable to hypothesize that downregulation of effector immunity by these cells may be a serious impediment to the efficacy of BCG-based vaccines. PMID:21795460

  15. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae strains using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) - fragment length analysis (FLA).

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ronald W; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-07-15

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year. The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites). Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci. Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA) has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China, Malawi, the Philippines, and Brazil. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS). The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions. The PCR products may be subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis to verify the

  16. DNA Fingerprinting of Mycobacterium leprae Strains Using Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) - Fragment Length Analysis (FLA)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Ronald W.; Rivest, Jason; Li, Wei; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    The study of the transmission of leprosy is particularly difficult since the causative agent, Mycobacterium leprae, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. The only sources of the bacteria are leprosy patients, and experimentally infected armadillos and nude mice. Thus, many of the methods used in modern epidemiology are not available for the study of leprosy. Despite an extensive global drug treatment program for leprosy implemented by the WHO1, leprosy remains endemic in many countries with approximately 250,000 new cases each year.2 The entire M. leprae genome has been mapped3,4 and many loci have been identified that have repeated segments of 2 or more base pairs (called micro- and minisatellites).5 Clinical strains of M. leprae may vary in the number of tandem repeated segments (short tandem repeats, STR) at many of these loci.5,6,7 Variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)5 analysis has been used to distinguish different strains of the leprosy bacilli. Some of the loci appear to be more stable than others, showing less variation in repeat numbers, while others seem to change more rapidly, sometimes in the same patient. While the variability of certain VNTRs has brought up questions regarding their suitability for strain typing7,8,9, the emerging data suggest that analyzing multiple loci, which are diverse in their stability, can be used as a valuable epidemiological tool. Multiple locus VNTR analysis (MLVA)10 has been used to study leprosy evolution and transmission in several countries including China11,12, Malawi8, the Philippines10,13, and Brazil14. MLVA involves multiple steps. First, bacterial DNA is extracted along with host tissue DNA from clinical biopsies or slit skin smears (SSS).10 The desired loci are then amplified from the extracted DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Fluorescently-labeled primers for 4-5 different loci are used per reaction, with 18 loci being amplified in a total of four reactions.10 The PCR products may be subjected to agarose

  17. Decreased capacity of recombinant 45/47-kDa molecules (Apa) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to stimulate T lymphocyte responses related to changes in their mannosylation pattern.

    PubMed

    Horn, C; Namane, A; Pescher, P; Rivière, M; Romain, F; Puzo, G; Bârzu, O; Marchal, G

    1999-11-01

    The Apa molecules secreted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, or BCG have been identified as major immunodominant antigens. Mass spectrometry analysis indicated similar mannosylation, a complete pattern from 1 up to 9 hexose residues/mole of protein, of the native species from the 3 reference strains. The recombinant antigen expressed in M. smegmatis revealed a different mannosylation pattern: species containing 7 to 9 sugar residues/mole of protein were in the highest proportion, whereas species bearing a low number of sugar residues were almost absent. The 45/47-kDa recombinant antigen expressed in E. coli was devoid of sugar residues. The proteins purified from M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, or BCG have a high capacity to elicit in vivo potent delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions and to stimulate in vitro sensitized T lymphocytes of guinea pigs immunized with living BCG. The recombinant Apa expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis was 4-fold less potent in vivo in the DTH assay and 10-fold less active in vitro to stimulate sensitized T lymphocytes than the native proteins. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was nearly unable to elicit DTH reactions in vivo or to stimulate T lymphocytes in vitro. Thus the observed biological effects were related to the extent of glycosylation of the antigen.

  18. Comprehensive Insights in the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Genome Using New WGS Data of Sheep Strain JIII-386 from Germany

    PubMed Central

    Möbius, Petra; Hölzer, Martin; Felder, Marius; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Groth, Marco; Köhler, Heike; Reichwald, Kathrin; Platzer, Matthias; Marz, Manja

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium (M. a.) subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP)—the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease—affects cattle, sheep, and other ruminants worldwide. To decipher phenotypic differences among sheep and cattle strains (belonging to MAP-S [Type-I/III], respectively, MAP-C [Type-II]), comparative genome analysis needs data from diverse isolates originating from different geographic regions of the world. This study presents the so far best assembled genome of a MAP-S-strain: Sheep isolate JIII-386 from Germany. One newly sequenced cattle isolate (JII-1961, Germany), four published MAP strains of MAP-C and MAP-S from the United States and Australia, and M. a. subsp. hominissuis (MAH) strain 104 were used for assembly improvement and comparisons. All genomes were annotated by BacProt and results compared with NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) annotation. Corresponding protein-coding sequences (CDSs) were detected, but also CDSs that were exclusively determined by either NCBI or BacProt. A new Shine–Dalgarno sequence motif (5′-AGCTGG-3′) was extracted. Novel CDSs including PE-PGRS family protein genes and about 80 noncoding RNAs exhibiting high sequence conservation are presented. Previously found genetic differences between MAP-types are partially revised. Four of ten assumed MAP-S-specific large sequence polymorphism regions (LSPSs) are still present in MAP-C strains; new LSPSs were identified. Independently of the regional origin of the strains, the number of individual CDSs and single nucleotide variants confirms the strong similarity of MAP-C strains and shows higher diversity among MAP-S strains. This study gives ambiguous results regarding the hypothesis that MAP-S is the evolutionary intermediate between MAH and MAP-C, but it clearly shows a higher similarity of MAP to MAH than to Mycobacterium intracellulare. PMID:26384038

  19. Characterization of microevolution events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains involved in recent transmission clusters.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Herranz, Marta; Lirola, Miguel Martínez; Bouza, Emilio; García de Viedma, Darío

    2011-11-01

    Under certain circumstances, it is possible to identify clonal variants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infecting a single patient, probably as a result of subtle genetic rearrangements in part of the bacillary population. We systematically searched for these microevolution events in a different context, namely, recent transmission chains. We studied the clustered cases identified using a population-based universal molecular epidemiology strategy over a 5-year period. Clonal variants of the reference strain defining the cluster were found in 9 (12%) of the 74 clusters identified after the genotyping of 612 M. tuberculosis isolates by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable-number tandem repeat typing. Clusters with microevolution events were epidemiologically supported and involved 4 to 9 cases diagnosed over a 1- to 5-year period. The IS6110 insertion sites from 16 representative isolates of reference and microevolved variants were mapped by ligation-mediated PCR in order to characterize the genetic background involved in microevolution. Both intragenic and intergenic IS6110 locations resulted from these microevolution events. Among those cases of IS6110 locations in intergenic regions which could have an effect on the regulation of adjacent genes, we identified the overexpression of cytochrome P450 in one microevolved variant using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Our results help to define the frequency with which microevolution can be expected in M. tuberculosis transmission chains. They provide a snapshot of the genetic background of these subtle rearrangements and identify an event in which IS6110-mediated microevolution in an isogenic background has functional consequences.

  20. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  1. Human IL-32 expression protects mice against a hypervirulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Shang, Shaobin; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall J; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Chan, Mallory M; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Kinney, William H; Trostel, Jessica; Bai, An; Honda, Jennifer R; Achcar, Rosane; Hartney, John; Joosten, Leo A B; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Orme, Ian; Dinarello, Charles A; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2015-04-21

    Silencing of interleukin-32 (IL-32) in a differentiated human promonocytic cell line impairs killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) but the role of IL-32 in vivo against MTB remains unknown. To study the effects of IL-32 in vivo, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the human IL-32γ gene is expressed using the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-IL-32γTg). Wild-type and SPC-IL-32γTg mice were infected with a low-dose aerosol of a hypervirulent strain of MTB (W-Beijing HN878). At 30 and 60 d after infection, the transgenic mice had 66% and 85% fewer MTB in the lungs and 49% and 68% fewer MTB in the spleens, respectively; the transgenic mice also exhibited greater survival. Increased numbers of host-protective innate and adaptive immune cells were present in SPC-IL-32γTg mice, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) positive lung macrophages and dendritic cells, and IFN-gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα positive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes. Alveolar macrophages from transgenic mice infected with MTB ex vivo had reduced bacterial burden and increased colocalization of green fluorescent protein-labeled MTB with lysosomes. Furthermore, mouse macrophages made to express IL-32γ but not the splice variant IL-32β were better able to limit MTB growth than macrophages capable of producing both. The lungs of patients with tuberculosis showed increased IL-32 expression, particularly in macrophages of granulomas and airway epithelial cells but also B cells and T cells. We conclude that IL-32γ enhances host immunity to MTB.

  2. Human IL-32 expression protects mice against a hypervirulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiyuan; Shang, Shaobin; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall J.; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Chan, Mallory M.; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Kinney, William H.; Trostel, Jessica; Bai, An; Honda, Jennifer R.; Achcar, Rosane; Hartney, John; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Orme, Ian; Dinarello, Charles A.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Silencing of interleukin-32 (IL-32) in a differentiated human promonocytic cell line impairs killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) but the role of IL-32 in vivo against MTB remains unknown. To study the effects of IL-32 in vivo, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the human IL-32γ gene is expressed using the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-IL-32γTg). Wild-type and SPC-IL-32γTg mice were infected with a low-dose aerosol of a hypervirulent strain of MTB (W-Beijing HN878). At 30 and 60 d after infection, the transgenic mice had 66% and 85% fewer MTB in the lungs and 49% and 68% fewer MTB in the spleens, respectively; the transgenic mice also exhibited greater survival. Increased numbers of host-protective innate and adaptive immune cells were present in SPC-IL-32γTg mice, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) positive lung macrophages and dendritic cells, and IFN-gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes. Alveolar macrophages from transgenic mice infected with MTB ex vivo had reduced bacterial burden and increased colocalization of green fluorescent protein-labeled MTB with lysosomes. Furthermore, mouse macrophages made to express IL-32γ but not the splice variant IL-32β were better able to limit MTB growth than macrophages capable of producing both. The lungs of patients with tuberculosis showed increased IL-32 expression, particularly in macrophages of granulomas and airway epithelial cells but also B cells and T cells. We conclude that IL-32γ enhances host immunity to MTB. PMID:25820174

  3. Use of the VNTR typing technique to determine the origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihye; Tupasi, Thelma E; Park, Young Kil

    2014-05-01

    With increasing international interchange of personnel, international monitoring is necessary to decrease tuberculosis incidence in the world. This study aims to develop a new tool to determine origin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated from Filipino patients living in Korea. Thirty-two variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci were used for discrimination of 50 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in the Philippines, 317 Korean strains isolated in Korea, and 8 Filipino strains isolated in Korea. We found that the VNTR loci 0580, 0960, 2531, 2687, 2996, 0802, 2461, 2163a, 4052, 0424, 1955, 2074, 2347, 2401, 3171, 3690, 2372, 3232, and 4156 had different mode among copy numbers or exclusively distinct copy number in VNTR typing between Filipino and Korean M. tuberculosis strains. When these differences of the VNTR loci were applied to 8 Filipino M. tuberculosis strains isolated in Korea, 6 of them revealed Filipino type while 2 of them had Korean type. Using the differences of mode or repeated number of VNTR loci were very useful in distinguishing the Filipino strain from Korean strain.

  4. Evaluation of pathogenesis caused in cattle and guinea pig by a Mycobacterium bovis strain isolated from wild boar

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In many regions of the world, wild mammals act as reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis, a situation that prevents the eradication of bovine tuberculosis. In order to observe whether a strain isolated from a wild boar, previously tested as highly virulent in a mice model, is also virulent in cattle, we performed cattle experimental inoculation with this strain Results Groups of Friesian calves were either infected with the wild boar strain M. bovis 04-303 or with the bovine strain NCTC10772 as a control. We found that antigen-specific IFN-γ release in whole blood samples occurred earlier in animals infected with M. bovis 04-303. Both M. bovis strains resulted in a positive skin test, with animals infected with the wild boar isolate showing a stronger response. These results and the presence of more severe organ lesions, with granuloma and pneumonic areas in cattle demonstrate that the wild boar isolate is more virulent than the NCTC10772 strain. Additionally, we tested the infectivity of the M. bovis strains in guinea pigs and found that M. bovis 04-303 had the highest pathogenicity. Conclusions M. bovis strains isolated from wild boars may be pathogenic for cattle, producing TB lesions. PMID:21745408

  5. Clade-Specific Virulence Patterns of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Human Primary Macrophages and Aerogenically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiling, Norbert; Homolka, Susanne; Walter, Kerstin; Brandenburg, Julius; Niwinski, Lisa; Ernst, Martin; Herzmann, Christian; Lange, Christoph; Diel, Roland; Ehlers, Stefan; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In infection experiments with genetically distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains, we identified clade-specific virulence patterns in human primary macrophages and in mice infected by the aerosol route, both reflecting relevant model systems. Exclusively human-adapted M. tuberculosis lineages, also termed clade I, comprising “modern” lineages, such as Beijing and Euro-American Haarlem strains, showed a significantly enhanced capability to grow compared to that of clade II strains, which include “ancient” lineages, such as, e.g., East African Indian or M. africanum strains. However, a simple correlation of inflammatory response profiles with strain virulence was not apparent. Overall, our data reveal three different pathogenic profiles: (i) strains of the Beijing lineage are characterized by low uptake, low cytokine induction, and a high replicative potential, (ii) strains of the Haarlem lineage by high uptake, high cytokine induction, and high growth rates, and (iii) EAI strains by low uptake, low cytokine induction, and a low replicative potential. Our findings have significant implications for our understanding of host-pathogen interaction and factors that modulate the outcomes of infections. Future studies addressing the underlying mechanisms and clinical implications need to take into account the diversity of both the pathogen and the host. PMID:23900170

  6. Endosymbiotic Mycobacterium chelonae in a Vermamoeba vermiformis strain isolated from the nasal mucosa of an HIV patient in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Vílchez, Alfonso Martín; Mena, Rosmery; Zuñiga, Johanna; Cermeño, Pablo; Martín-Navarro, Carmen Ma; González, Ana C; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; Piñero, José E; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-11-01

    In March 2010, a 35 year-old HIV/AIDS female patient was admitted to hospital to start treatment with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) since during a routine control a dramatic decrease in the CD4(+) levels was detected. At this stage, a nasal swab from each nostril was collected from the patient to include it in the samples for the case study mentioned above. Moreover, it is important to mention that the patient was diagnosed in 2009 with invasive pneumococcal disease, acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis and pulmonary tuberculosis. The collected nasal swabs from both nostrils were positive for Vermamoeba vermiformis species which was identified using morphological and PCR/DNA sequencing approaches. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) homology and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the amoebic strain to belong to V.vermiformis species. Molecular identification of the Mycobacterium strain was carried out using a bacterial universal primer pair for the 16S rDNA gene at the genus level and the rpoB gene was amplified and sequenced as previously described to identify the Mycobacterium species (Shin et al., 2008; Sheen et al., 2013). Homology and phylogenetic analyses of the rpoB gene confirmed the species as Mycobacterium chelonae. In parallel, collected swabs were tested by PCR and were positive for the presence of V.vermiformis and M.chelonae. This work describes the identification of an emerging bacterial pathogen,M.chelonae from a Free-Living Amoebae (FLA) strain belonging to the species V.vermiformis that colonized the nasal cavities of an HIV/AIDS patient, previously diagnosed with TB. Awareness within clinicians and public health professionals should be raised, as pathogenic agents such as M.chelonae may be using FLA to propagate and survive in the environment.

  7. [Efficacy and safety of vaccines against tuberculosis in the relation to genetic variability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains].

    PubMed

    Prygiel, Marta; Janaszek-Seydlitz, Wiesława; Bucholc, Bozena

    2011-01-01

    All vaccines against tuberculosis used actually over the world contain Mycobacterium bovis BCG strains (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) as active substance. Strain BCG, that was obtained in 1921 by Calmette and Guerin after 13 years ofpassaging on the potato-glicerol medium with addition of bile, was distributed to many laboratories for vaccine production. The repeated passages of M. bovis BCG strain in different culture conditions caused the numerous mutations and formation of many BCG substrains that differed according to efficacy and safety. The review of many publications related to genetic differences between BCG substrains was performed for identify the genes responsible for their virulence and protective characteristics. Possibility of development of new generation vaccines against tuberculosis is discussed. PMID:22390050

  8. Canonical pathways, networks and transcriptional factor regulation by clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko E; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-03-01

    Limited knowledge exists on pathways, networks and transcriptional factors regulated within epithelial cells by diverse Mycobacterium tuberculosis genotypes. This study aimed to elucidate these mechanisms induced in A549 epithelial cells by dominant clinical strains in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. RNA for sequencing was extracted from epithelial cells at 48 h post-infection with 5 strains at a multiplicity of infection of approximately 10:1. Bioinformatics analysis performed with the RNA-Seq Tuxedo pipeline identified differentially expressed genes. Changes in pathways, networks and transcriptional factors were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). The interferon signalling and hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation pathways were among the top 5 canonical pathways in all strains. Hierarchical clustering for enrichment of cholesterol biosynthesis and immune associated pathways revealed similar patterns for Beijing and Unique; F15/LAM4/KZN and F11; and, F28 and H37Rv strains, respectively. However, the induction of top scoring networks varied among the strains. Among the transcriptional factors, only EHL, IRF7, PML, STAT1, STAT2 and VDR were induced by all clinical strains. Activation of the different pathways, networks and transcriptional factors revealed in the current study may be an underlying mechanism that results in the differential host response by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis. PMID:26980499

  9. A genome-wide analysis of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zheng, Huajun; Zhang, Lu; Wen, Zilu; Zhang, Shulin; Pei, Hao; Yu, Guohua; Zhu, Yongqiang; Cui, Zhenling; Hu, Zhongyi; Wang, Honghai; Li, Yao

    2013-09-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful MTB lineages that has disseminated in the world. In China, the rate of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is significantly higher than the global average rate, and the Beijing genotype strains take the largest share of MDR strains. To study the genetic basis of the epidemiological findings that Beijing genotype has often been associated with tuberculosis outbreaks and drug resistance, we determined the genome sequences of four clinical isolates: two extensively drug resistant (XDR1219, XDR1221) and two multidrug resistant (WX1, WX3), using whole-genome sequencing. A large number of individual and shared SNPs of the four Beijing strains were identified. Our isolates harbored almost all classic drug resistance-associated mutations. The mutations responsible for drug resistance in the two XDR strains were consistent with the clinical quantitative drug resistance levels. COG analysis revealed that Beijing strains have significantly higher abundances of the mutations responsible for cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis (COG M), secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism (COG Q), lipid transport and metabolism (COG I) and defense mechanisms (COG V). The shared mutated genes of the four studied Beijing strains were significantly overrepresented in three DNA repair pathways. Our analyses promote the understanding of the genome polymorphism of the Beijing family strains and provide the molecular genetic basis for their wide dissemination capacity and drug resistance.

  10. Rapid and simple identification of Beijing genotype strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuhki; Iwade, Yoshito; Nakano, Manabu; Akachi, Shigehiro; Kobayashi, Takashi; Nishinaka, Takamichi

    2016-07-01

    Beijing genotype strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are geographically widespread and pose a notorious public health problem, these strains causing outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB); some studies have reported an association with drug resistance. Because the prevalence of Beijing strain has a substantial impact on TB control programs, the availability of a rapid and reliable method for detecting these strains is important for epidemiological monitoring of their circulation. The main methods currently used to identify Beijing genotype strains are IS6110 DNA fingerprinting, spoligotyping and PCR to detect specific deletions such as region of difference (RD)207. More recently, multiplex PCR assay using a Beijing-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been developed for detecting Beijing lineage strains. However, these methods are time-consuming and technically demanding. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that allows specific identification of Beijing genotype strain was developed. This Beijing genotype strain-identifying LAMP assay was performed 214 clinical isolates and the results compared with those of conventional PCR that targeted RD207 and Rv0679c-targreting multiplex PCR for Beijing lineage identification. LAMP assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity compared with RD207-PCR. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity were 99.3% and 100%, respectively, compared with Rv0679c-multiplex PCR. This LAMP assay could be used routinely in local laboratories to monitor the prevalence of the Beijing genotype strain and thereby used to help control the spread of these potentially highly virulent and drug resistant strains. PMID:27213686

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis belonging to family LAM and sublineage RD(Rio): common strains in Southern Brazil for over 10 years.

    PubMed

    Soares, Renata Oliveira; de Macedo, Maíra Bidart; von Groll, Andrea; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida

    2013-12-01

    A sublineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis called RD(Rio) was described in 2007. Although only recently described, this strain may have been present previously in the population, and its identification in clinical isolates will elucidate bacterial transmission dynamics and host-pathogen interactions. This study evaluated the clonal diversity of the RD(Rio) sublineage in clinical isolates from Rio Grande-RS obtained between 1998 and 2001. Among the 45 samples analyzed by the MIRU-VNTR method, there were six clusters with two samples each and 33 orphan strains with unique pattern. The strains were distributed across several different lineages including LAM (34.04%), × (14.89%), Haarlem (12.77%), UgandaI (10.64%), S (4.26%), NEW-1 (2.13%) and Cameroon (2.13%); 14.89% of the strains matched to multiple lineages. RD(Rio) strains were present in 28.9% of the samples and 81.25% of the identified strains belonged to the LAM family. The high clonal diversity observed in this study is a constant feature in this region. The RD(Rio) sublineage has been in Rio Grande-RS since 1998. The continued monitoring of RD(Rio) in clinical isolates will enhance the understanding of its epidemiological significance.

  12. In-depth analysis of the genome sequence of a clinical, extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis strain.

    PubMed

    Sagasti, Sara; Millán-Lou, María Isabel; Soledad Jiménez, María; Martín, Carlos; Samper, Sofía

    2016-09-01

    Although human-to-human transmission of Mycobacterium bovis strains and other members of the animal lineage of the tubercle bacilli is a rare event, an extensively drug resistant (XDR) strain, named M. bovis B strain, caused a lethal outbreak in the nineties in Spain. The genome of M. bovis B strain was re-sequenced by SOLiD platform and mapped to the reference M. bovis AF2122/97. The genetic polymorphisms detected have been analysed in depth. One hundred and fifty-eight specific non-synonymous SNPs were detected; ninety-two of these were non-conservative. In addition, one specific 3195-bp insertion could be identified as an ABC transporter gene by homology with tbd2 gene, which was found to be present in other clinical M. bovis strains. Its peculiar phenotype profile of resistance was explained by molecular characteristics, including a 5685-bp specific deletion that revealed a novel polymorphism associated with resistance to paraminosalicilic acid. From a phylogenetical point of view, according to the SNPs detected, M. bovis B could be included into the clonal complex M. bovis European 2. This is the first time that a deep analysis of the whole-genome sequencing of an extensively drug-resistant M. bovis strain is detailed. It offers the explanation for the resistance and found several data to be incorporated for future research. PMID:27553409

  13. Closely Related Mycobacterial Strains Demonstrate Contrasting Levels of Efficacy as Antitumor Vaccines and Are Processed for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Presentation by Multiple Routes in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, Eleanor J.; O'Donnell, Dearbhaile; Selby, Peter J.; Jackson, Andrew M.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacteria expressing recombinant antigens are already being developed as vaccines against both infections and tumors. Little is known about how dendritic cells might process such antigens. Two different mycobacterial species, the fast-growing Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow-growing M. bovis M. bovis BCG, were engineered to express a model tumor antigen, the Kb-restricted dominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope OVA257-264. Recombinant M. bovis BCG but not recombinant M. smegmatis conferred protection to mice challenged with the B16-OVA tumor cell line. We went on to investigate whether the contrast in antitumor efficacy could be due to differences in how dendritic cells process antigen from the two mycobacterial strains for class I presentation. Both strains of mycobacteria caused phenotypic maturation of dendritic cells, but recombinant M. smegmatis infection led to a greater degree of dendritic cell maturation than recombinant M. bovis BCG infection. Antigen from recombinant M. smegmatis was processed and presented as OVA257-264 on Kb molecules by the dendritic cell line DC2.4 but not by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) or splenic dendritic cells. In contrast, antigen from recombinant M. bovis BCG was presented by all three dendritic cell types as long as the mycobacteria were viable. Such presentation was dependent on proteasome function and nascent major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules in DC2.4 cells but independent of the proteasome and transporter associated with antigen processings (TAP) in BMDC and splenic dendritic cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that antigen vectored by the slow-growing M. bovis BCG but not that vectored by fast-growing, readily destroyed M. smegmatis is processed and presented on MHC class I by in vitro-generated dendritic cells, which has implications for recombinant microbial vaccine development. PMID:15664917

  14. Polymorphisms in the PE35 and PPE68 antigens in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains may affect strain virulence and reflect ongoing immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Wei, Jianhao; Liu, Haican; Li, Guilian; Guo, Qian; Qiu, Yan; Zhao, Lili; Li, Machao; Zhao, Xiuqin; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the Pro‑Glu/Pro‑Pro‑Glu (PE/PPE) genes in strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exhibit high sequence variation and may be involved in antigenic variation and immune evasion. Region of Difference 1 (RD1), encoding genes from Rv3871 to Rv3879, was observed to be lost during the original derivation of Bacillus Calmette‑Guérin between 1908 and 1921. It has been previously demonstrated that two PE/PPE proteins, PE35 (Rv3872) and PPE68 (Rv3873), are encoded by RD1 and exhibit immunodominance. To explore the genetic diversity of PE35 and PPE68, and to evaluate the impact of sequence variation on the immune recognition of these proteins, 161 clinical M. tuberculosis strains were selected from China and comparative sequence analysis of PE35 and PPE68 was performed. The results indicated that polymorphisms in PE35 and PPE68 may lead to alterations in the function of these proteins, which may potentially affect strain virulence. In addition, the human T‑cell epitopes of PE35 and PPE68 were highly variable, suggesting that the two antigens may be involved in diversifying selection to evade host immunity. The prevalence of strains with PE35 mutations in the non‑Beijing family was significantly greater compared with the Beijing family, indicating that Beijing strains may be more conservative than non‑Beijing strains in this gene.

  15. Cloning and sequence analysis of a class A beta-lactamase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Unsal, I; Chambers, H F

    1997-01-01

    A cosmid library from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra was introduced into Mycobacterium smegmatis, and eight recombinant clones with increased resistance to cefoxitin were identified. Isoelectric focusing detected an M. tuberculosis-derived beta-lactamase in one of these recombinant clones. A sequence analysis identified it as a class A beta-lactamase whose expression correlated with the increased resistance phenotype. PMID:9145897

  16. Importance of Confirming Data on the In Vivo Efficacy of Novel Antibacterial Drug Regimens against Various Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary A.; Gruppo, Veronica; Woolhiser, Lisa K.; Orme, Ian M.; Gilliland, Janet C.

    2012-01-01

    In preclinical testing of antituberculosis drugs, laboratory-adapted strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are usually used both for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it is unknown whether the heterogeneity of M. tuberculosis stocks used by various laboratories can result in different outcomes in tests of antituberculosis drug regimens in animal infection models. In head-to-head studies, we investigated whether bactericidal efficacy results in BALB/c mice infected by inhalation with the laboratory-adapted strains H37Rv and Erdman differ from each other and from those obtained with clinical tuberculosis strains. Treatment of mice consisted of dual and triple drug combinations of isoniazid (H), rifampin (R), and pyrazinamide (Z). The results showed that not all strains gave the same in vivo efficacy results for the drug combinations tested. Moreover, the ranking of HRZ and RZ efficacy results was not the same for the two H37Rv strains evaluated. The magnitude of this strain difference also varied between experiments, emphasizing the risk of drawing firm conclusions for human trials based on single animal studies. The results also confirmed that the antagonism seen within the standard HRZ regimen by some investigators appears to be an M. tuberculosis strain-specific phenomenon. In conclusion, the specific identity of M. tuberculosis strain used was found to be an important variable that can change the apparent outcome of in vivo efficacy studies in mice. We highly recommend confirmation of efficacy results in late preclinical testing against a different M. tuberculosis strain than the one used in the initial mouse efficacy study, thereby increasing confidence to advance potent drug regimens to clinical trials. PMID:22143517

  17. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    PubMed Central

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis outbreak strain of Danish origin spreading at worrying rates among greenland-born persons in Denmark and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Lillebaek, T; Andersen, A B; Rasmussen, E M; Kamper-Jørgensen, Z; Pedersen, M K; Bjorn-Mortensen, K; Ladefoged, K; Thomsen, V O

    2013-12-01

    Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues at high rates among Greenland-born persons in Greenland and Denmark, with 203 and 450 notified cases per 10(5) population, respectively, in the year 2010. Here, we document that the predominant M. tuberculosis outbreak strain C2/1112-15 of Danish origin has been transmitted to Greenland-born persons in Denmark and subsequently to Greenland, where it is spreading at worrying rates and adding to the already heavy tuberculosis burden in this population group. It is now clear that the C2/1112-15 strain is able to gain new territories using a new population group as the "vehicle." Thus, it might have the ability to spread even further, considering the potential clinical consequences of strain diversity such as that seen in the widely spread Beijing genotype. The introduction of the predominant M. tuberculosis outbreak strain C2/1112-15 into the Arctic circumpolar region is a worrying tendency which deserves attention. We need to monitor whether this strain already has, or will, spread to other countries.

  19. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae group strains from biofilms obtained after a ‘chlorine burn’ in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in drinking and hospital water distr...

  20. Whole-Genome Sequencing of an Isoniazid-Resistant Clinical Isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain MtURU-002 from Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Berná, Luisa; Iraola, Gregorio; Greif, Gonzalo; Coitinho, Cecilia; Rivas, Carlos M.; Naya, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis in Uruguay has been effectively reduced to <30 per 100,000 population, although an increase in nonrisk populations in the last few years is evident. Here, we present the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain MtURU-002 isolated from a patient showing bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis that was resistant to isoniazid. PMID:25035326

  1. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Revetta, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae strains from biofilms subjected to a “chlorine burn” in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in hospital and municipal water distribution systems, in which biofilms have been recognized as an important factor for their persistence. PMID:26798093

  2. Use of GeneXpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis/rifampicin for rapid detection of rifampicin resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of clinically suspected multi-drug resistance tuberculosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Guenaoui, Kheira; Ouardi, Aissa; Zeggai, Soumia; Sellam, Feriel; Bekri, Farid; Cherif Touil, Sakina

    2016-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistance (MDR) TB is defined as tuberculosis (TB) disease caused by a strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) that was resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin (RIF). Emerging Multidrug-Resistant TB is one of the major concerns of health policy and rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and detection of RIF resistance in infected patients are essential for disease management. The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of RIF resistance in cases of sputum positive pulmonary TB by using GeneXpert MTB/RIF and comparing between phenotypic and genotypic testing of RIF resistance in MTB strains of clinically suspected MDR-TB isolated cases in western Algeria. Methods In this study 50 sputum positive cases of pulmonary TB who were potential MDR suspect were included. Their sputum samples were collected and subjected to sputum smear microscopy, culture and conventional MTB/RIF test followed by GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay. Results Of total 50 cases included in this study, MTB was detected in all patients (100%) by GeneXpert MTB/RIF. However, RIF’s resistance was detected in only 21 cases (42%) by GeneXpert MTB/RIF. All RIF resistant strains detected by GeneXpert MTB/RIF were phenotypically confirmed as MDR strains. 42.85% of cases were retreatment failure cases, retreatment cases smear positive at 4 months were 23.82%. While 19.05% of cases were retreatment cases smear positive at diagnosis, and 14.28% patient had history of contact with MDR-TB. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Xpert MTB/RIF to detect RIF resistance in comparison to conventional phenotypic drug susceptibility technique were found equal to the rates of 100%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is efficient and reliable technique for the rapid diagnostic of TB. It’s simplicity, high sensitivity and specificity for RIF resistance detection make this technique a very attractive tool for

  3. Characterisation of porin genes from Mycobacterium fortuitum and their impact on growth

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Highly pathogenic mycobacteria like Mycobacterium tuberculosis are characterised by their slow growth and their ability to reside and multiply in the very hostile phagosomal environment and a correlation between the growth rate of mycobacteria and their pathogenicity has been hypothesised. Here, porin genes from M. fortuitum were cloned and characterised to address their impact on the growth rate of fast-growing and pathogenic mycobacteria. Results Two genes encoding porins orthologous to MspA from M. smegmatis, porM1 and porM2, were cloned from M. fortuitum strains, which were originally isolated from human patients. Both porin genes were at least partially able to complement the mutations of a M. smegmatis mutant strain lacking the genes mspA and mspC with respect to the growth rate. PorM1 and porM2 were present in different strains of M. fortuitum including the type strain. Comparative expression analysis of porM genes revealed divergent porin expression among analysed M. fortuitum strains. Repression of the expression of porins by antisense technique decreased the growth rates of different M. fortuitum. The effects of over-expression of porM1 as well as porM2 varied depending on the strain and the concentration of antibiotic added to the medium and indicated that PorM1 and PorM2 enhance the growth of M. fortuitum strains, but also the diffusion of the antibiotic kanamycin into the cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates the important role of porin expression in growth as well as antibiotic susceptibility of the opportunistic bacterium M. fortuitum. PMID:19203364

  4. [Frontier of mycobacterium research--host vs. mycobacterium].

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaji; Shirakawa, Taro

    2005-09-01

    During the past decade, we have observed advance in tuberculosis research including novel vaccines, innate immunity (TLR), SNIP analysis and molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Worldwide genome project enabled the whole genome sequence of host resistant against tuberculosis as well as the whole genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. DNA technology has also provided a great impact on the development of novel vaccine against TB. In this symposium, we have invited leading researchers in the field of the frontier study of Mycobacterium research in order to provide general overview of the cutting edge of frontier research. Molecular mechanism of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis has been clarified. On the other hand, molecular mechanism of host-defence (insusceptibility of host) against M. tuberculosis has not yet elucidated. Dr. Taro Shirakawa (Kyoto University) reviewed the susceptibility genes of host in TB infection and presented candidate genes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Naoto Keicho (International Medical Center of Japan) tried to identify host genetic factors involved in susceptibility to pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection by candidate gene approach and genome-wide approach. In Japan, Dr. Masaji Okada (National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center) has been engaged actively in the development of new tuberculosis vaccines (HVJ-liposome/Hsp65 DNA + IL-12 DNA vaccine and recombinant 72f BCG vaccine). He showed basic strategy for construction of new candidate vaccines and also showed significant efficacy on the protection of tuberculosis infection using cynomolgus monkeys, which are very similar to human tuberculosis. Dr. Hatsumi Taniguchi (University of Occupational and Environmental Health) presented that M. tuberculosis mIHF and the neighbor genes went into a dormacy-like state of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophage cells. This study might provide a weapon for elucidating the mechanism of dormacy

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of diverse Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Bustamante, Andrea; Jelfs, Peter; Chen, Sharon C-A; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2015-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex are emerging pathogens of increasing importance, causing both respiratory and soft tissue infections, but precise speciation is problematic. This study was performed to examine the subspecies and antibiotic susceptibility of M. abscessus complex isolates collected during 2013 at the statewide New South Wales Mycobacterium Reference Laboratory (NSW MRL), Australia. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus accounted for more than half of all M. abscessus isolates (n = 24, 57.1%), and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense comprised the remainder of the isolates (n = 18, 42.9%). There were no M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance to all antibiotics, apart from amikacin was high, with 26.3% of isolates being reliably susceptible to only amikacin. Most M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates (80%) demonstrated inducible clarithromycin resistance whereas the majority of M. abscessus subsp. massiliense isolates (94.4%) remained susceptible to clarithromycin. There was a good correlation between the erm(41) genotype and clarithromycin susceptibility results after 14 days of incubation for most isolates with only three exceptions. Further studies correlating in vitro susceptibility profiles with clinical outcomes of M. abscessus infections treated with combination antimicrobial therapy are warranted. PMID:26517625

  6. Metabolomic signatures in guinea pigs infected with epidemic-associated W-Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, Bagganahalli S; Amin, Anita G; Tripathi, Pratima; MacKinnon, Neil; Rithner, Christopher D; Shanley, Crystal A; Basaraba, Randall; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Orme, Ian M; Ordway, Diane J; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2012-10-01

    With the understanding that the laboratory propagated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv is of modest virulence and is drug susceptible, in the present study, we performed a nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomic analysis of lung tissues and serum obtained from guinea pigs infected by low dose aerosol exposure to clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning NMR coupled with multivariate statistical analysis of 159 lung tissues obtained from multiple locations of age-matched naïve and 30 and 60 days of infected guinea pig lungs revealed a wide dispersal of metabolic patterns, but within these, distinct clusters of signatures could be seen that differentiated between naive control and infected animals. Several metabolites were identified that changed in concert with the progression of each infection. Major metabolites that could be interpreted as indicating host glutaminolysis were consistent with activated host immune cells encountering increasingly hypoxic conditions in the necrotic lung lesions. Moreover, glutathione levels were constantly elevated, probably in response to oxygen radical production in these lesions. Additional distinct signatures were also seen in infected serum, with altered levels of several metabolites. Multivariate statistical analysis clearly differentiated the infected from the uninfected sera; in addition, Receiver Operator Characteristic curve generated with principal component 1 scores showed an area under the curve of 0.908. These data raise optimism that discrete metabolomic signatures can be defined that can predict the progression of the tuberculosis disease process, and form the basis of an innovative and rapid diagnostic process.

  7. Mapping IS6110 in high-copy number Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains shows specific insertion points in the Beijing genotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains are characterized by a large number of IS6110 copies, suggesting the potential implication of this element in the virulence and capacity for rapid dissemination characteristic of this family. This work studies the insetion points of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates specifically focusing on the Beijing genotype. Results In the present work we mapped the insertion points of IS6110 in all the Beijing strains available in the literature and in the DNA sequence databases. We generated a representative primer collection of the IS6110 locations, which was used to analyse 61 high-copy clinical isolates. A total of 440 points of insertion were identified and analysis of their flanking regions determined the exact location, the direct repeats (DRs), the orientation and the distance to neighboring genes of each copy of IS6110. We identified specific points of insertion in Beijing strains that enabled us to obtain a dendrogram that groups the Beijing genotype. Conclusions This work presents a detailed analysis of locations of IS6110 in high-copy clinical isolates, showing points of insertion present with high frequency in the Beijing family and absent in other strains. PMID:23800083

  8. Mutation in the transcriptional regulator PhoP contributes to avirulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Seok; Krause, Roland; Schreiber, Jörg; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Kowall, Jane; Stein, Robert; Jeon, Bo-Young; Kwak, Jeong-Yeon; Song, Min-Kyong; Patron, Juan Pablo; Jorg, Sabine; Roh, Kyoungmin; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2008-02-14

    Attenuated strains of mycobacteria can be exploited to determine genes essential for their pathogenesis and persistence. To this goal, we sequenced the genome of H37Ra, an attenuated variant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain. Comparison with H37Rv revealed three unique coding region polymorphisms. One polymorphism was located in the DNA-binding domain of the transcriptional regulator PhoP, causing the protein's diminished DNA-binding capacity. Temporal gene expression profiles showed that several genes with reduced expression in H37Ra were also repressed in an H37Rv phoP knockout strain. At later time points, genes of the dormancy regulon, typically expressed in a state of nonreplicating persistence, were upregulated in H37Ra. Complementation of H37Ra with H37Rv phoP partially restored its persistence in a murine macrophage infection model. Our approach demonstrates the feasibility of identifying minute but distinct differences between isogenic strains and illustrates the consequences of single point mutations on the survival stratagem of M. tuberculosis. PMID:18312844

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus phospholipase C expression is induced during coculture within amoebae and enhances M. abscessus virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Canaan, Stéphane; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria.

  10. Antigenic characterization of dimorphic surface protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, Takashi; Siddiqi, Umme Ruman; Hattori, Toshio; Nakajima, Chie; Fujii, Jun; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0679c protein is a surface protein that contributes to host cell invasion. We previously showed that a single nucleotide transition of the Rv0679c gene leads to a single amino acid substitution from asparagine to lysine at codon 142 in the Beijing genotype family. In this study, we examined the immunological effect of this substitution. Several recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis and characterized with antisera and two monoclonal antibodies named 5D4-C2 and 8G10-H2. A significant reduction of antibody binding was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot analysis in the Lys142-type protein. This reduction of 8G10-H2 binding was more significant, with the disappearance of a signal in the proteins expressed by recombinant mycobacteria in western blot analysis. In addition, epitope mapping analysis of the recombinant proteins showed a linear epitope by 5D4-C2 and a discontinuous epitope by 8G10-H2. The antibody recognizing the conformational epitope detected only mycobacterial Asn142-type recombinant protein. Our results suggest that a single amino acid substitution of Rv0679c has potency for antigenic change in Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27190237

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1152 is a Novel GntR Family Transcriptional Regulator Involved in Intrinsic Vancomycin Resistance and is a Potential Vancomycin Adjuvant Target

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jie; Deng, Wanyan; Yang, Wenmin; Luo, Hongping; Duan, Xiangke; Xie, Longxiang; Li, Ping; Wang, Rui; Fu, Tiwei; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Novel factors involved in Mycobacteria antibiotics resistance are crucial for better targets to combat the ever-increasing drug resistant strains. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1152, a novel GntR family transcriptional regulator and a promising vancomycin adjuvant target, was firstly characterized in our study. Overexpression of Rv1152 in Mycobacterium smegmatis decreased bacterial susceptibility to vancomycin. Moreover, a deficiency in MSMEG_5174, an Rv1152 homolog made M. smegmatis more sensitive to vancomycin, which was reverted by complementing the MSMEG_5174 deficiency with Rv1152 of M. tuberculosis. Rv1152 negatively regulated four vancomycin responsive genes, namely genes encoding the ribosome binding protein Hsp, small unit of sulfate adenylyltransferase CysD, L-lysine-epsilon aminotransferase Lat, and protease HtpX. Taken together, Rv1152 controls the expression of genes required for the susceptibility to vancomycin. This is the first report that links the GntR family transcriptional factor with vancomycin susceptibility. Inhibitors of Rv1152 might be ideal vancomycin adjuvants for controlling multi-drug resistant Mycobacterial infections. PMID:27349953

  12. 2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides Are Active against Drug-Susceptible and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    PubMed

    Pissinate, Kenia; Villela, Anne Drumond; Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês; Giacobbo, Bruno Couto; Grams, Estêvão Silveira; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; Roesler Nery, Laura; Bonan, Carla Denise; Back, Davi Fernando; Campos, Maria Martha; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Machado, Pablo

    2016-03-10

    2-(Quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides have been described as potent in vitro inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. Herein, additional chemical modifications of lead compounds were carried out, yielding highly potent antitubercular agents with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values as low as 0.05 μM. Further, the synthesized compounds were active against drug-resistant strains and were devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero and HaCat cells (IC50s ≥ 20 μM). In addition, the 2-(quinolin-4-yloxy)acetamides showed intracellular activity against the bacilli in infected macrophages with action similar to rifampin, low risk of drug-drug interactions, and no sign of cardiac toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) at 1 and 5 μM. Therefore, these data indicate that this class of compounds may furnish candidates for future development to, hopefully, provide drug alternatives for tuberculosis treatment.

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium africanum Strains from Mali Provides Insights into the Mechanisms of Geographic Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Abeel, Thomas; Shea, Terrance; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Diarra, Bassirou; Baya, Bocar; Sanogo, Moumine; Diallo, Souleymane; Earl, Ashlee M.; Bishai, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium africanum, made up of lineages 5 and 6 within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), causes up to half of all tuberculosis cases in West Africa, but is rarely found outside of this region. The reasons for this geographical restriction remain unknown. Possible reasons include a geographically restricted animal reservoir, a unique preference for hosts of West African ethnicity, and an inability to compete with other lineages outside of West Africa. These latter two hypotheses could be caused by loss of fitness or altered interactions with the host immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings We sequenced 92 MTC clinical isolates from Mali, including two lineage 5 and 24 lineage 6 strains. Our genome sequencing assembly, alignment, phylogeny and average nucleotide identity analyses enabled us to identify features that typify lineages 5 and 6 and made clear that these lineages do not constitute a distinct species within the MTC. We found that in Mali, lineage 6 and lineage 4 strains have similar levels of diversity and evolve drug resistance through similar mechanisms. In the process, we identified a putative novel streptomycin resistance mutation. In addition, we found evidence of person-to-person transmission of lineage 6 isolates and showed that lineage 6 is not enriched for mutations in virulence-associated genes. Conclusions This is the largest collection of lineage 5 and 6 whole genome sequences to date, and our assembly and alignment data provide valuable insights into what distinguishes these lineages from other MTC lineages. Lineages 5 and 6 do not appear to be geographically restricted due to an inability to transmit between West African hosts or to an elevated number of mutations in virulence-associated genes. However, lineage-specific mutations, such as mutations in cell wall structure, secretion systems and cofactor biosynthesis, provide alternative mechanisms that may lead to host specificity. PMID:26751217

  14. Marked microevolution of a unique Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain in 17 years of ongoing transmission in a high risk population.

    PubMed

    Mehaffy, Carolina; Guthrie, Jennifer L; Alexander, David C; Stuart, Rebecca; Rea, Elizabeth; Jamieson, Frances B

    2014-01-01

    The transmission and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within high risk populations is a threat to tuberculosis (TB) control. In the current study, we used whole genome sequencing (WGS) to decipher the transmission dynamics and microevolution of M. tuberculosis ON-A, an endemic strain responsible for an ongoing outbreak of TB in an urban homeless/under-housed population. Sixty-one M. tuberculosis isolates representing 57 TB cases from 1997 to 2013 were subjected to WGS. Sequencing data was integrated with available epidemiological information and analyzed to determine how the M. tuberculosis ON-A strain has evolved during almost two decades of active transmission. WGS offers higher discriminatory power than traditional genotyping techniques, dividing the M. tuberculosis ON-A strain into 6 sub-clusters, each defined by unique single nucleotide polymorphism profiles. One sub-cluster, designated ON-ANM (Natural Mutant; 26 isolates from 24 cases) was also defined by a large, 15 kb genomic deletion. WGS analysis reveals the existence of multiple transmission chains within the same population/setting. Our results help validate the utility of WGS as a powerful tool for identifying genomic changes and adaptation of M. tuberculosis.

  15. In vitro inhibition of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by ethnobotanically selected South African plants.

    PubMed

    Lall, N; Meyer, J J

    1999-09-01

    Twenty South African medicinal plants used to treat pulmonary diseases were screened for activity against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A preliminary screening of acetone and water plant extracts against a drug-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, was done by the agar plate method. Fourteen of the 20 acetone extracts showed inhibitory activity at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml against this strain. Acetone as well as water extracts of Cryptocarya latifolia, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Thymus vulgaris inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis. Given the activity of 14 acetone extracts at 0.5 mg/ml against the drug-sensitive strain by the agar plate method, a further study was done employing a rapid radiometric method to confirm the inhibitory activity. These active acetone extracts were screened against the H37Rv strain as well as a strain resistant to the drugs isoniazid and rifampin. The minimal inhibitory concentration of Croton pseudopulchellus, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia was 0.1 mg/ml against the H37Rv strain by the radiometric method. Extracts of Chenopodium ambrosioides, Ekebergia capensis, Euclea natalensis, Helichrysum melanacme, Nidorella anomala and Polygala myrtifolia were active against the resistant strain at 0.1 mg/ml. Eight plants showed activity against both strains at a concentration of 1.0 mg/ml.

  16. The viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra strain induces a stronger mouse macrophage response compared to the heat-inactivated H37Rv strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zong-Lin; Du, Fa-Wang; Du, Xian-Zhi

    2013-05-01

    Macrophages are the target cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) as well as key effector cells for clearance of this pathogen. The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the responses of mouse peritoneal macrophages following exposure to the live M. tuberculosis H37Ra and heat-inactivated H37Rv strains. In vitro phagocytosis assays indicated that the macrophages had a higher capacity to engulf the live H37Ra strain compared to the inactivated H37Rv strain. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that H37Ra‑stimulated macrophages produced significantly increased concentrations of interleukin‑12p40 (IL‑12p40), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF‑α) and interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ) compared to the untreated control cells. However, H37Rv exposure induced little to no increase in the levels of the cytokines examined. The results from ELISA were confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT‑PCR) at the mRNA level. There was a dose-dependent increase in nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from the H37Ra‑stimulated macrophages compared to the H37Rv‑stimulated ones. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometric analysis indicated that the IFN‑γ‑stimulated macrophages from viable H37Ra‑immunized mice had an enhanced surface expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L) compared to those from inactivated H37Rv‑immunized mice. Our data collectively indicate that exposure to the viable H37Ra strain induces a stronger macrophage response compared to exposure to the heat-inactivated H37Rv strain, which may be associated with the increased surface expression of CD40L in activated macrophages.

  17. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates. PMID:24484478

  18. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates.

  19. Detection of RD(Rio) strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) from a zoo in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Patricia Sayuri; Monego, Fernanda; Ho, John L; Gibson, Andrea; Javorouski, Manoel Lucas; Bonat, Marcelo; Lacerda, Oneida; Brockelt, Sonia Regina; Biesdorf, Sonia Maria; Nakatani, Sueli Massumi; Riediger, Irina Nastassja; Fuverki, Renata Benício Neves; Biava, Janaína Socolovski; Vieira, Rafael Felipe Costa; do Santos, Andrea Pires; de Barros Filho, Ivan Roque; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infection caused by strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and occurs in both animal and human populations. The death of a tapir showing purulent material and a hard mass in the lungs at necropsy raised suspicion of a potential disease caused by mycobacteria species in a Brazilian zoo. Later, two other tapirs with similar signs died and were further investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from bronco-alveolar lavages was performed, and both animals tested positive for the RD(Rio) strain of M. tuberculosis, which is a recently discovered Latin American-Mediterranean sublineage and the main cause of human tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To investigate the possibility of human infection and the source of transmission, all 50 zoo employees underwent tuberculin skin testing; four were reactive, but radiographic exams and direct sample staining did not suggest tuberculosis. Thus, direct human to animal transmission was not proven. However, the presence of RD(Rio) M. tuberculosis in tapirs highlights the lack of attention to diseases that human beings may transmit to wildlife. PMID:23272356

  20. Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium abscessus Isolates from Patients in the United States and Comparisons to Globally Diverse Clinical Strains

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Rebecca M.; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Totten, Sarah; Garcia, Benjamin; Levin, Adrah; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Heifets, Leonid; Daley, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium abscessus are responsible for a range of disease manifestations from pulmonary to skin infections and are notoriously difficult to treat, due to innate resistance to many antibiotics. Previous population studies of clinical M. abscessus isolates utilized multilocus sequence typing or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but high-resolution examinations of genetic diversity at the whole-genome level have not been well characterized, particularly among clinical isolates derived in the United States. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 11 clinical M. abscessus isolates derived from eight U.S. patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, compared them to 30 globally diverse clinical isolates, and investigated intrapatient genomic diversity and evolution. Phylogenomic analyses revealed a cluster of closely related U.S. and Western European M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates that are genetically distinct from other European isolates and all Asian isolates. Large-scale variation analyses suggested genome content differences of 0.3 to 8.3%, relative to the reference strain ATCC 19977T. Longitudinally sampled isolates showed very few single-nucleotide polymorphisms and correlated genomic deletion patterns, suggesting homogeneous infection populations. Our study explores the genomic diversity of clinical M. abscessus strains from multiple continents and provides insight into the genome plasticity of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:25056330

  1. Genome sequencing of Mycobacterium abscessus isolates from patients in the united states and comparisons to globally diverse clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Reynolds, Paul R; Totten, Sarah; Garcia, Benjamin; Levin, Adrah; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Heifets, Leonid; Daley, Charles L; Strong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial infections caused by Mycobacterium abscessus are responsible for a range of disease manifestations from pulmonary to skin infections and are notoriously difficult to treat, due to innate resistance to many antibiotics. Previous population studies of clinical M. abscessus isolates utilized multilocus sequence typing or pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but high-resolution examinations of genetic diversity at the whole-genome level have not been well characterized, particularly among clinical isolates derived in the United States. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 11 clinical M. abscessus isolates derived from eight U.S. patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, compared them to 30 globally diverse clinical isolates, and investigated intrapatient genomic diversity and evolution. Phylogenomic analyses revealed a cluster of closely related U.S. and Western European M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates that are genetically distinct from other European isolates and all Asian isolates. Large-scale variation analyses suggested genome content differences of 0.3 to 8.3%, relative to the reference strain ATCC 19977(T). Longitudinally sampled isolates showed very few single-nucleotide polymorphisms and correlated genomic deletion patterns, suggesting homogeneous infection populations. Our study explores the genomic diversity of clinical M. abscessus strains from multiple continents and provides insight into the genome plasticity of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:25056330

  2. Effect of Lagerstroemia tomentosa and Diospyros virginiana methanolic extracts on different drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, B. Nasr; Hozoorbakhsh, F.; Rashed, Kh.; Havaei, S.A.; Heidari, K.; Moghim, Sh.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative agent of tuberculosis. The increasing incidence of multi drug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistance tuberculosis (XDR-TB) worldwide highlighted the urgent need to search for alternative antimycobacterial agents. More and more people in developing countries utilize traditional medicine for their major primary health care needs. It has been determined that pharmaceutical plant, Lagerstroemia tomentosa and Diospyros virginiana, possesses some antibacterial effect. In this study, the antimycobacterial effects of L. tomentosa and D. virginiana methanolic extracts on sensitive and resistant isolates of MTB were examined. Leaf methanolic extract was prepared using methanol 70%. Sensitivity and resistance of isolates was determined by proportion method. The effects of two different methonolic extract concentrations (20 and 40 μg/ml) of the plants were examined against 6 sensitive and resistant strains of MTB with different patterns of drug resistance. MTB H37Rv (ATCC 27294) was set as control in all culturing and sensitivity testing processes. The results showed that L. tomentosa and D. virginiana methanolic extracts had weak inhibitory effect on different strains of MTB. The highest percentage of inhibition for L. tomentosa and D. virginiana was observed 38% and 33.3%, respectively. PMID:25657789

  3. Selective cleavage of 10-methyl benzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene by recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kimiko; Noda, Ken-ichi; Maruhashi, Kenji

    2003-05-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium sp. strain MR65 carrying dszABCD genes was used for desulfurization of 10-methylbenzo[b]naphtho[2,1-d]thiophene (10-methyl BNT) in the hexadecane phase. The specific activity was 25% of that of dibenzothiophene (DBT). One of two major metabolites of 10-methyl BNT produced by strain MR65 was identified as 1-methoxy-2-(3-methylphenyl)naphthalene by 1H and 13C NMR. The other major metabolite and two minor metabolites were determined as 1-hydroxy-2-(3-methylphenyl)naphthalene, 2-(2-methoxy-3-methylphenyl)naphthalene and 2-(2-hydroxy-3-methylphenyl)naphthalene, respectively, by HPLC and GC-MS. The production ratio of the two desulfurization metabolite isomers was 0.99:0.01, calculated on the basis of peak GC areas. These results indicated that the C-S bond adjacent to the naphthalene skeleton was selectively cleaved to form the two major compounds.

  4. Detection of RD(Rio) strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) from a zoo in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Patricia Sayuri; Monego, Fernanda; Ho, John L; Gibson, Andrea; Javorouski, Manoel Lucas; Bonat, Marcelo; Lacerda, Oneida; Brockelt, Sonia Regina; Biesdorf, Sonia Maria; Nakatani, Sueli Massumi; Riediger, Irina Nastassja; Fuverki, Renata Benício Neves; Biava, Janaína Socolovski; Vieira, Rafael Felipe Costa; do Santos, Andrea Pires; de Barros Filho, Ivan Roque; Biondo, Alexander Welker

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infection caused by strains of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and occurs in both animal and human populations. The death of a tapir showing purulent material and a hard mass in the lungs at necropsy raised suspicion of a potential disease caused by mycobacteria species in a Brazilian zoo. Later, two other tapirs with similar signs died and were further investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from bronco-alveolar lavages was performed, and both animals tested positive for the RD(Rio) strain of M. tuberculosis, which is a recently discovered Latin American-Mediterranean sublineage and the main cause of human tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. To investigate the possibility of human infection and the source of transmission, all 50 zoo employees underwent tuberculin skin testing; four were reactive, but radiographic exams and direct sample staining did not suggest tuberculosis. Thus, direct human to animal transmission was not proven. However, the presence of RD(Rio) M. tuberculosis in tapirs highlights the lack of attention to diseases that human beings may transmit to wildlife.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated during a 3-year period (1993 to 1995) in Seville, Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Safi, H; Aznar, J; Palomares, J C

    1997-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Seville, Spain, was studied by using computer-assisted analysis of the IS6110 fingerprint in order to determine the current situation and to evaluate the human-to-human transmission of this pathogen. One hundred seventy-six isolates from 175 patients among the 205 patients diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) during a 3-year period (1993 to 1995) were cultured and analyzed. One hundred nine patients (62%) were infected with genetically different isolates, and 67 isolates (38%) were grouped into 19 clusters. These results demonstrate that the level of clustering of strains in Seville is intermediate between those in developed and developing countries. Epidemiological relatedness was shown for isolates from only 10 of these clusters. Active and high transmission rates exist in children and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, while in non-HIV-infected adults this transmission rate is moderate. Although transmission from children to adults is uncommon, the probability of transmission from HIV-infected patients to young adults not infected with HIV may be higher. On the basis of these observations, we predict a constant rise in the rate of TB transmission among HIV-infected patients and probably in young adult patients not infected with HIV if measures for the effective prevention of TB among the HIV-infected population are not implemented. PMID:9316891

  6. 2-[4-(4-Methoxyphenylcarbonyloxy)benzylidene]-6-dimethylaminomethyl cyclohexanone hydrochloride: a Mannich base which inhibits the growth of some drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Das, S; Das, U; Bandy, B; Gorecki, D K J; Dimmock, J R

    2010-11-01

    2-[4-(4-Methoxyphenylcarbonyloxy)benzylidene]-6-dime-thylaminomethyl cyclohexanone hydrochloride 1 has a MIC value of 0.78 microg/mL towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and displays similar or identical MIC figures towards various drug-resistant strains of this microorganism. The enone 1 along with a partial structure 2-dimethylaminomethylcyclohexanone hydrochloride 3 affected respiration in isolated rat liver mitochondria differently which may contribute to the variation in toxicity to both normal cells and M. tuberculosis.

  7. Lymphadenitis caused by infection with an isoniazid- and rifampin-resistant strain of Mycobacterium bovis BCG in an infant with IFN-γ/IL-12 pathway defect*

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Lilian Martins Oliveira; Guimarães, Tiago; de Oliveira, Maria das Graças Rodrigues; Pinto, Jorge Andrade; de Miranda, Silvana Spindola

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case in a female infant (age, 3.5 months) with primary immunodeficiency (IFN-γ/IL-12 pathway defect) who presented with suppurative lymphadenitis after Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. The strain of M. bovis BCG identified was found to be resistant to isoniazid and rifampin. The patient was treated with a special pharmacological regimen involving isoniazid (in a limited, strategic manner), ethambutol, streptomycin, and IFN-γ, after which there was complete resolution of the lesions. PMID:24831405

  8. Spoligotype profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains from HIV-positive and -negative patients in Nigeria: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, Simeon; Hill, Véronique; van Soolingen, Dick; Rastogi, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    We ran a comparative analysis of all patients for whom a positive culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was available between April 2004 and October 2005 and whose HIV serology results were known, with spoligotyping results (n = 163) split into 49 HIV-positive patients and 114 HIV-negative patients. Spoligotype international type 373 (SIT373) (T1 lineage), which was highly prevalent among the HIV(+) patients, was totally absent from the HIV(-) population, suggesting that we had a specific clone affecting nearly 1/3 of all HIV-tuberculosis (TB)-coinfected patients. Among the LAM10-CAM sublineage strains, we had only a single strain of SIT403 among HIV(-) patients (0.88%), as opposed to 12.25% of the HIV(+) population (χ(2) = 10.77; P < 0.01), indicating a strong association between the strain and the HIV(+) population. The LAM10-CAM lineage spoligotype SIT61 was prevalent among the 2 subsets (37.72% in HIV(-) versus 12.24% in HIV(+) populations), though, with a significant difference between the 2 groups (χ(2) = 10.53; P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference for SIT53 (T1 lineage) in the 2 subsets: 6.14 versus 8.2% (χ(2) = 0.22; P > 0.05). A total of 7/49, or 14.3%, other SITs among HIV(+) patients were not found among the HIV(-) patients. When added to the most prevalent SIT among HIV(+) patients (SIT373; n = 16), 23/49, or 47%, isolates among HIV-TB-coinfected patients were unique. We conclude that further studies should be carried out to investigate the evolution of these genotypes and others in the emergence of multidrug resistance and control of tuberculosis in Nigeria. PMID:21048016

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Complex Evolution Patterns of Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Merker, Matthias; Kohl, Thomas A.; Roetzer, Andreas; Truebe, Leona; Richter, Elvira; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Fattorini, Lanfranco; Oggioni, Marco R.; Cox, Helen; Varaine, Francis; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains represent a major threat for tuberculosis (TB) control. Treatment of MDR-TB patients is long and less effective, resulting in a significant number of treatment failures. The development of further resistances leads to extensively drug-resistant (XDR) variants. However, data on the individual reasons for treatment failure, e.g. an induced mutational burst, and on the evolution of bacteria in the patient are only sparsely available. To address this question, we investigated the intra-patient evolution of serial MTBC isolates obtained from three MDR-TB patients undergoing longitudinal treatment, finally leading to XDR-TB. Sequential isolates displayed identical IS6110 fingerprint patterns, suggesting the absence of exogenous re-infection. We utilized whole genome sequencing (WGS) to screen for variations in three isolates from Patient A and four isolates from Patient B and C, respectively. Acquired polymorphisms were subsequently validated in up to 15 serial isolates by Sanger sequencing. We determined eight (Patient A) and nine (Patient B) polymorphisms, which occurred in a stepwise manner during the course of the therapy and were linked to resistance or a potential compensatory mechanism. For both patients, our analysis revealed the long-term co-existence of clonal subpopulations that displayed different drug resistance allele combinations. Out of these, the most resistant clone was fixed in the population. In contrast, baseline and follow-up isolates of Patient C were distinguished each by eleven unique polymorphisms, indicating an exogenous re-infection with an XDR strain not detected by IS6110 RFLP typing. Our study demonstrates that intra-patient microevolution of MDR-MTBC strains under longitudinal treatment is more complex than previously anticipated. However, a mutator phenotype was not detected. The presence of different subpopulations might confound phenotypic and molecular drug

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Soares Lima, Stella Sala; Palaci, Moises; Silva, Márcia S N; Sumnienski Rodrigues, Vivian F; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Possuelo, Lia; Cafrune, Patrícia Izquierdo; Ribeiro, Fabíola Karla; Gomes, Harisson M; Serufo, José Carlos

    2008-10-01

    Of 142 pulmonary tuberculosis patients, 76 were considered high risk for the development of resistance, and 24 were confirmed as resistant strain carriers. Resistant isoniazid strains presented a high frequency of katG and ahpC mutations (90%) correlated with an MIC >4 microg/mL (94%). inhA mutations were not seen. rpoB mutations were identified in 78.6% of rifampicin-resistant strains, usually in codon 531 (72.7%), and 75% had an MIC >16 microg/mL. katG and rpoB mutations recognized 88.2% of multidrug-resistant strains and proved more efficient than the katG and rpoB mutations alone. Seventy percent of resistant pyrazinamide strains had pncA mutations between genes 136 and 188, 62.5% of them with an MIC >900 microg/mL. Pyrazinamidase inactivity was not an efficient resistance marker because 60% of pncA-mutated strains maintained enzymatic activity despite displaying good correlation with high resistance levels. Resistant ethambutol strains had embB mutations in codon 306, with MIC >16 microg/mL.

  11. Stranger in a strange land: Ibero-American strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Wan, Kanglin; Shen, Adong

    2014-08-01

    The Latin-American-Mediterranean (LAM) family is among the largest, diverse and intriguing within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Widespread in some world regions, as justly reflected by its name, LAM remains in the shadow of the Beijing and East-African Indian families in East Asia. Here, we applied evolutionarily robust markers to the spoligotyped collection of 699 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates recovered from tuberculosis (TB) patients in different provinces across China between 2005 and 2013. As a result, only two isolates were assigned to LAM, hence we conclude that this family has a negligible impact on TB transmission in China. Interestingly, these two isolates represented two grand sublineages within LAM: RD115 and RD-Rio/RD174. Our results highlight the great caution to be taken when interpreting spoligotyping profiles with large deleted blocks. Here, three geographically distant Chinese isolates of spoligotype SIT803 were excluded from LAM. This is in clear contrast with described SIT803 isolates of the LAM family in Russia and Georgia (Mokrousov et al., 2014; Niemann et al., 2010). Interestingly, a drug resistant isolate of the Ibero-American LAM RD-Rio sublineage was recovered from TB patient of Tibetan ethnicity, a resident in the Lhasa district in Tibet. An additional in-depth analysis by whole genome sequencing might help to understand the evolutionary history of this isolate and its possible route to the rural setting of the Tibetan highlands.

  12. Virulent Mycobacterium bovis Beijing Strain Activates the NLRP7 Inflammasome in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Yang, Lifeng; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Xiangmei; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a wide range of mammals, including humans. Macrophages are the first line of host defense. They secrete proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), in response to mycobacterial infection, but the underlying mechanisms by which human macrophages are activated and release IL-1β following M. bovis infection are poorly understood. Here we show that the ‘nucleotide binding and oligomerization of domain-like receptor (NLR) family pyrin domain containing 7 protein’ (NLRP7) inflammasome is involved in IL-1β secretion and caspase-1 activation induced by M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages. NLRP7 inflammasome activation promotes the induction of pyroptosis as well as the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and IL-1β mRNAs. Thus, the NLRP7 inflammasome contributes to IL-1β secretion and induction of pyroptosis in response to M. bovis infection in THP-1 macrophages. PMID:27043315

  13. Stranger in a strange land: Ibero-American strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Tibet, China.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Jiao, Wei-Wei; Wan, Kanglin; Shen, Adong

    2014-08-01

    The Latin-American-Mediterranean (LAM) family is among the largest, diverse and intriguing within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Widespread in some world regions, as justly reflected by its name, LAM remains in the shadow of the Beijing and East-African Indian families in East Asia. Here, we applied evolutionarily robust markers to the spoligotyped collection of 699 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates recovered from tuberculosis (TB) patients in different provinces across China between 2005 and 2013. As a result, only two isolates were assigned to LAM, hence we conclude that this family has a negligible impact on TB transmission in China. Interestingly, these two isolates represented two grand sublineages within LAM: RD115 and RD-Rio/RD174. Our results highlight the great caution to be taken when interpreting spoligotyping profiles with large deleted blocks. Here, three geographically distant Chinese isolates of spoligotype SIT803 were excluded from LAM. This is in clear contrast with described SIT803 isolates of the LAM family in Russia and Georgia (Mokrousov et al., 2014; Niemann et al., 2010). Interestingly, a drug resistant isolate of the Ibero-American LAM RD-Rio sublineage was recovered from TB patient of Tibetan ethnicity, a resident in the Lhasa district in Tibet. An additional in-depth analysis by whole genome sequencing might help to understand the evolutionary history of this isolate and its possible route to the rural setting of the Tibetan highlands. PMID:24956435

  14. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  15. [Epidural abscess due to a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol].

    PubMed

    Sener, Alper; Akçalı, Alper; Karatağ, Ozan; Koşar, Sule; Değirmenci, Yıldız; Akman, Tarık

    2012-10-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily characterized by pulmonary involvement, however, one third of the cases exhibit extrapulmonary tuberculosis. In this report, a case of epidural abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol was presented. A 57-year-old male patient was admitted to emergency service with ten days history of weakness in legs, disability of walking and fever. Neurological examination revealed paraplegia of lower extremities, numbness distal to T2 disc level and hyperactivity of deep tendon reflexes indicating transverse myelitis. Laboratory findings were as follows; ESR: 74 mm/hour, CRP: 22 g/L, ALT: 42 IU/L, AST: 45 IU/L and white blood cell count 23.000/mm3 (45% polymorphonuclear leukocyte, 45% lymphocyte, 10% monocyte). Spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed a fusiform abscess localized at anterior epidural space and extending along levels of C5-6 and C6-7. The longitudinal dimension of the abscess was 3 cm. The lesion was hypointense on T1 and hyperintense on T2 weighted MRI images with prominent rim shaped contrast enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. At fourth day of hospitalization the patient underwent neurosurgical management. M.tuberculosis was isolated from the cultures of operation material by Mycobacteria Growth Incubator Tube system (MGIT, BBL; BD, USA) on the 12th day. The isolate was found susceptible to streptomycin and rifampisin, but resistant to isoniazid and ethambutol. The treatment was initiated with rifampicin 600 mg/day, pyrazinamid 2 g/day, ethambutol 1.5 g/day and levofloxacin 500 mg/day. At the end of second month levofloxacin 500 mg/day and rifampisin 600 mg/day combination was sustained and total treatment period was planned as nine months. As far as the national literature was considered, this was the first case of extrapulmonary tuberculosis with primary resistance to isoniazid and ethambutol. PMID:23188583

  16. Partial characterization of a major autolysin from Mycobacterium phlei.

    PubMed

    Li, Z S; Beveridge, T J; Betts, J; Clarke, A J

    1999-01-01

    Autolytic enzyme profiles of fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria were examined using SDS-PAGE zymography with incorporated mycobacterial peptidoglycan sacculi as substrate. Each species tested (Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium kansasii) appeared to produce a different set of enzymes on the basis of differing number and molecular masses. A major autolysin from M. phlei was purified to apparent homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, preparative gel electrophoresis and Mono Q FPLC. This enzyme had an estimated molecular mass of 38 kDa, an isoelectric point of 5.5 and a pH optimum of pH 7.5. Digestion of purified peptidoglycan by the enzyme resulted in the appearance of reducing sugars, suggesting that the 38 kDa autolysin is a beta-glycosidase. Partial internal amino acid sequence of the autolysin was determined and should facilitate identification, cloning and overexpression of the encoding gene. PMID:10206696

  17. Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Asare, P.; Asante-Poku, A.; Otchere, I. D.; Osei-Wusu, S.; Danso, E.; Forson, A.; Koram, K. A.; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a perception that genomic differences in the species/lineages of the nine species making the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) may affect the efficacy of distinct control tools in certain geographical areas. We therefore analyzed the prevalence and spatial distribution of MTBC species and lineages among isolates from pulmonary TB cases over an 8-year period, 2007–2014. Methodology Mycobacterial species isolated by culture from consecutively recruited pulmonary tuberculosis patients presenting at selected district/sub-district health facilities were confirmed as MTBC by IS6110 and rpoß PCR and further assigned lineages and sub lineages by spoligotyping and large sequence polymorphism PCR (RDs 4, 9, 12, 702, 711) assays. Patient characteristics, residency, and risks were obtained with a structured questionnaire. We used SaTScan and ArcMap analyses to identify significantly clustered MTBC lineages within selected districts and spatial display, respectively. Results Among 2,551 isolates, 2,019 (79.1%), 516 (20.2%) and 16 (0.6%) were identified as M. tuberculosis sensu stricto (MTBss), M. africanum (Maf), 15 M. bovis and 1 M. caprae, respectively. The proportions of MTBss and Maf were fairly constant within the study period. Maf spoligotypes were dominated by Spoligotype International Type (SIT) 331 (25.42%), SIT 326 (15.25%) and SIT 181 (14.12%). We found M. bovis to be significantly higher in Northern Ghana (1.9% of 212) than Southern Ghana (0.5% of 2339) (p = 0.020). Using the purely spatial and space-time analysis, seven significant MTBC lineage clusters (p< 0.05) were identified. Notable among the clusters were Ghana and Cameroon sub-lineages found to be associated with north and south, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that overall, 79.1% of TB in Ghana is caused by MTBss and 20% by M. africanum. Unlike some West African Countries, we did not observe a decline of Maf prevalence in Ghana. PMID:27564240

  18. Differential Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccine-Derived Efficacy in C3Heb/FeJ and C3H/HeOuJ Mice Exposed to a Clinical Strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Creissen, Elizabeth; Shanley, Crystal; Orme, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The global epidemic caused by the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues unabated. Moreover, the only available vaccine against tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), demonstrates variable efficacy. To respond to this global threat, new animal models that mimic the pathological disease process in humans are required for vaccine testing. One new model, susceptible C3Heb/FeJ mice, is similar to human tuberculosis in that these animals are capable of forming necrotic tubercle granulomas, in contrast to resistant C3H/HeOuJ mice. In this study, we evaluated the impact of prior BCG vaccination of C3Heb/FeJ and C3H/HeOuJ mice on exposure to a low-dose aerosol of Mycobacterium tuberculosis W-Beijing strain SA161. Both BCG-vaccinated murine strains demonstrated reduced bacterial loads 25 days after infection compared to controls, indicating vaccine efficacy. However, during chronic infection, vaccine efficacy waned in C3H/HeOuJ but not in C3Heb/FeJ mice. Protection in vaccinated C3Heb/FeJ mice was associated with reduced numbers of CD11b+ Gr1+ cells, increased numbers of effector and memory T cells, and an absence of necrotic granulomas. BCG vaccine efficacy waned in C3H/HeOuJ mice, as indicated by reduced expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and increased expressions of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-10, and Foxp3 by T cells compared to C3Heb/FeJ mice. This is the first murine vaccine model system described to date that can be utilized to dissect differential vaccine-derived immune efficacy. PMID:25392011

  19. Differential Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine-derived efficacy in C3Heb/FeJ and C3H/HeOuJ mice exposed to a clinical strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Creissen, Elizabeth; Shanley, Crystal; Orme, Ian; Ordway, Diane J

    2015-01-01

    The global epidemic caused by the bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues unabated. Moreover, the only available vaccine against tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), demonstrates variable efficacy. To respond to this global threat, new animal models that mimic the pathological disease process in humans are required for vaccine testing. One new model, susceptible C3Heb/FeJ mice, is similar to human tuberculosis in that these animals are capable of forming necrotic tubercle granulomas, in contrast to resistant C3H/HeOuJ mice. In this study, we evaluated the impact of prior BCG vaccination of C3Heb/FeJ and C3H/HeOuJ mice on exposure to a low-dose aerosol of Mycobacterium tuberculosis W-Beijing strain SA161. Both BCG-vaccinated murine strains demonstrated reduced bacterial loads 25 days after infection compared to controls, indicating vaccine efficacy. However, during chronic infection, vaccine efficacy waned in C3H/HeOuJ but not in C3Heb/FeJ mice. Protection in vaccinated C3Heb/FeJ mice was associated with reduced numbers of CD11b(+) Gr1(+) cells, increased numbers of effector and memory T cells, and an absence of necrotic granulomas. BCG vaccine efficacy waned in C3H/HeOuJ mice, as indicated by reduced expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and increased expressions of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-10, and Foxp3 by T cells compared to C3Heb/FeJ mice. This is the first murine vaccine model system described to date that can be utilized to dissect differential vaccine-derived immune efficacy.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum, Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacteria previously reported as the cause of hyp...

  1. Replication and long-term persistence of bovine and human strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis within Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Mura, Manuela; Bull, Tim J; Evans, Hugh; Sidi-Boumedine, Karim; McMinn, Liz; Rhodes, Glenn; Pickup, Roger; Hermon-Taylor, John

    2006-01-01

    Free-living protists are ubiquitous in the environment and form a potential reservoir for the persistence of animal and human pathogens. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the cause of Johne's disease, a systemic infection accompanied by chronic inflammation of the intestine that affects many animals, including primates. Most humans with Crohn's disease are infected with this chronic enteric pathogen. Subclinical infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in domestic livestock. Infected animals excrete large numbers of robust organisms into the environment, but little is known about their ability to replicate and persist in protists. In the present study we fed laboratory cultures of Acanthamoeba polyphaga with bovine and human strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Real-time PCR showed that the numbers of the pathogens fell over the first 4 to 8 days and recovered by 12 to 16 days. Encystment of the amoebic cultures after 4 weeks resulted in a 2-log reduction in the level of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which returned to the original level by 24 weeks. Extracts of resection samples of human gut from 39 patients undergoing abdominal surgery were fed to cultures of A. polyphaga. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detected by nested IS900 PCR with amplicon sequencing and visualized by IS900 in situ hybridization and auramine-rhodamine staining was found in cultures derived from 13 of the patients and was still present in the cultures after almost 4 years of incubation. Control cultures were negative. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis has the potential for long-term persistence in environmental protists.

  2. Human Genetic Ancestral Composition Correlates with the Origin of Mycobacterium leprae Strains in a Leprosy Endemic Population

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Cortés, Edwin; Beltrán, Camilo; Romero, Marcela; Badel-Mogollón, Jaime E.; Bedoya, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that leprosy originated in Africa, extended to Asia and Europe, and arrived in the Americas during European colonization and the African slave trade. Due to colonization, the contemporary Colombian population is an admixture of Native-American, European and African ancestries. Because microorganisms are known to accompany humans during migrations, patterns of human migration can be traced by examining genomic changes in associated microbes. The current study analyzed 118 leprosy cases and 116 unrelated controls from two Colombian regions endemic for leprosy (Atlantic and Andean) in order to determine possible associations of leprosy with patient ancestral background (determined using 36 ancestry informative markers), Mycobacterium leprae genotype and/or patient geographical origin. We found significant differences between ancestral genetic composition. European components were predominant in Andean populations. In contrast, African components were higher in the Atlantic region. M. leprae genotypes were then analyzed for cluster associations and compared with the ancestral composition of leprosy patients. Two M. leprae principal clusters were found: haplotypes C54 and T45. Haplotype C54 associated with African origin and was more frequent in patients from the Atlantic region with a high African component. In contrast, haplotype T45 associated with European origin and was more frequent in Andean patients with a higher European component. These results suggest that the human and M. leprae genomes have co-existed since the African and European origins of the disease, with leprosy ultimately arriving in Colombia during colonization. Distinct M. leprae strains followed European and African settlement in the country and can be detected in contemporary Colombian populations. PMID:26360617

  3. MspA-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-transformant with reduced virulence: the "unbirthday paradigm".

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Ghigo, Eric; Mège, Jean-Louis; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Expressing mspA porin gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis attenuated this pathogen. Intracellular growth of the transformants into free-living amoeba and murine and human macrophages decreased. Furthermore, transformants decreased the microbicidal program of human monocyte-derived macrophages. BALB/c mice inoculated with transformants exhibited higher weights, lower histological lesions and lower M. tuberculosis inoculum in the liver, spleen and lungs than control mice challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Preliminary evaluation indicated that mice inoculated with this transformant showed higher weights and lower numbers of lung nodules and tissular mycobacteria than control mice when challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Similar to the paradoxical "unbirthday" gift coined by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, adding mspA gene reduced the virulence of M. tuberculosis and yielded a protective effect. Lost of non-virulence genes is a mechanism for virulence in mycobacteria. Engineering non-virulence genes in M. tuberculosis may yield strains with decreased virulence and increased immunogenicity. PMID:25194334

  4. Phosphorylation of InhA inhibits mycolic acid biosynthesis and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Molle, Virginie; Gulten, Gulcin; Vilchèze, Catherine; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Sacchettini, James C.; Jacobs, Jr, William R.; Kremer, Laurent

    2011-08-24

    The remarkable survival ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in infected hosts is related to the presence of cell wall-associated mycolic acids. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that modulate expression of these lipids in response to environmental changes are unknown. Here we demonstrate that the enoyl-ACP reductase activity of InhA, an essential enzyme of the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway and the primary target of the anti-tubercular drug isoniazid, is controlled via phosphorylation. Thr-266 is the unique kinase phosphoacceptor, both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological relevance of Thr-266 phosphorylation was demonstrated using inhA phosphoablative (T266A) or phosphomimetic (T266D/E) mutants. Enoyl reductase activity was severely impaired in the mimetic mutants in vitro, as a consequence of a reduced binding affinity to NADH. Importantly, introduction of inhA{_}T266D/E failed to complement growth and mycolic acid defects of an inhA-thermosensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis strain, in a similar manner to what is observed following isoniazid treatment. This study suggests that phosphorylation of InhA may represent an unusual mechanism that allows M. tuberculosis to regulate its mycolic acid content, thus offering a new approach to future anti-tuberculosis drug development.

  5. MspA-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-transformant with reduced virulence: the "unbirthday paradigm".

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Ghigo, Eric; Mège, Jean-Louis; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Expressing mspA porin gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis attenuated this pathogen. Intracellular growth of the transformants into free-living amoeba and murine and human macrophages decreased. Furthermore, transformants decreased the microbicidal program of human monocyte-derived macrophages. BALB/c mice inoculated with transformants exhibited higher weights, lower histological lesions and lower M. tuberculosis inoculum in the liver, spleen and lungs than control mice challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Preliminary evaluation indicated that mice inoculated with this transformant showed higher weights and lower numbers of lung nodules and tissular mycobacteria than control mice when challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Similar to the paradoxical "unbirthday" gift coined by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, adding mspA gene reduced the virulence of M. tuberculosis and yielded a protective effect. Lost of non-virulence genes is a mechanism for virulence in mycobacteria. Engineering non-virulence genes in M. tuberculosis may yield strains with decreased virulence and increased immunogenicity.

  6. Persistent Infection by a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain That Was Theorized To Have Advantageous Properties, as It Was Responsible for a Massive Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Navarro, Yurena; Montilla, Pedro; Comas, Iñaki; Herranz, Marta; Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos; Ruiz Serrano, María Jesús; Bouza, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The strains involved in tuberculosis outbreaks are considered highly virulent and transmissible. We analyzed the case of a patient in Madrid, Spain, who was persistently infected over an 8-year period by the same Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. The strain was responsible for a severe outbreak on Gran Canaria Island. The case provides us with a unique opportunity to challenge our assumptions about M. tuberculosis Beijing strains. No clinical/radiological findings consistent with a virulent strain were documented, and the in vitro growth rate of the strain in macrophages was only moderate. No secondary cases stemming from this prolonged active case were detected in the host population. The strain did not acquire resistance mutations, despite constant treatment interruptions, and it remained extremely stable, as demonstrated by the lack of single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP)-based differences between the sequential isolates. Our data suggest that the general assumption about M. tuberculosis Beijing strains having advantageous properties (in terms of virulence, transmissibility, and the tendency to acquire mutations and resistance) is not always accurate. PMID:26269618

  7. The genetic population structure of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from cattle slaughtered at the Yaoundé and Douala abattoirs in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Koro Koro, F; Ngatchou, A F; Portal, J L; Gutierrez, C; Etoa, F X; Eyangoh, S I

    2015-12-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is still prevalent and under-evaluated in cattle destined for human consumption in Cameroon. Potential reservoirs of the disease include livestock imported from countries endemic for bovine tuberculosis, such as Nigeria and Chad, and potential residual reservoirs in local livestock and wildlife. Few studies have been done in Cameroon to genotype the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) strains responsible for bovine tuberculosis. The aim of this work is to describe the population structure of MTC strains isolated from cattle, using spoligotyping as the genotyping method. Out of 218 organs or tissues from cattle with suspected tuberculosis lesions, 90 MTC strains were isolated and underwent molecular typing; among them, 86 strains were identified as M. bovis and four strains as M. tuberculosis. The M. tuberculosis strains belonged to rare M. tuberculosis lineages of the U family; among the M. bovis strains SB0944 was the most prevalent. Eight new spoligotype patterns were identified, representing 33% (30/90) of all isolates. Among these new spoligotypes, SB1955 was dominant. The spoligotype patterns of 85 M. bovis strains lacked spacer 30, a common characteristic of the M. bovis lineage African 1, described earlier in Cameroon, Chad, Mali and Nigeria. This study shows ongoing tuberculosis transmission involving M. bovis lineages not previously described as the leading cause of disease. It also shows a possible reverse zoonosis from humans to cattle. PMID:27044168

  8. Virulence and Immune Response Induced by Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains in a Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Subcutaneous Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Mónica; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Parra-López, Carlos Alberto; Murcia, Martha Isabel; Marquina, Brenda; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Rodriguez-Míguez, Yadira; Baay-Guzman, Guillermina J.; Huerta-Yepez, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises more than 150 species, including important pathogens for humans which cause major public health problems. The vast majority of efforts to understand the genus have been addressed in studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biological differentiation between M. tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is important because there are distinctions in the sources of infection, treatments, and the course of disease. Likewise, the importance of studying NTM is not only due to its clinical significance but also due to the mechanisms by which some species are pathogenic while others are not. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most important group of NTM opportunistic pathogens, since it is the second largest medical complex in the genus after the M. tuberculosis complex. Here, we evaluated the virulence and immune response of M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium colombiense, using experimental models of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis and subcutaneous infection in BALB/c mice. Mice infected intratracheally with a high dose of MAC strains showed high expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase with rapid bacillus elimination and numerous granulomas, but without lung consolidation during late infection in coexistence with high expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, subcutaneous infection showed high production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and gamma interferon with relatively low production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, which efficiently eliminate the bacilli but maintain extensive inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MAC infection evokes different immune and inflammatory responses depending on the MAC species and affected tissue. PMID:23959717

  9. Genetic basis for the synthesis of the immunomodulatory mannose caps of lipoarabinomannan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dinadayala, Premkumar; Kaur, Devinder; Berg, Stefan; Amin, Anita G; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Chatterjee, Delphi; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C

    2006-07-21

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a high molecular weight, heterogenous lipoglycan present in abundant quantities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and many other actinomycetes. In M. tuberculosis, the non-reducing arabinan termini of the LAM are capped with alpha1-->2 mannose residues; in some other species, the arabinan of LAM is not capped or is capped with inositol phosphate. The nature and extent of this capping plays an important role in disease pathogenesis. MT1671 in M. tuberculosis CDC1551 was identified as a glycosyltransferase that could be involved in LAM capping. To determine the function of this protein a mutant strain of M. tuberculosis CDC1551 was studied, in which MT1671 was disrupted by transposition. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the LAM of the mutant strain migrated more rapidly than that of the wild type and did not react with concanavalin A as did wild-type LAM. Structural analysis using NMR, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, endoarabinanase digestion, Dionex high pH anion exchange chromatography, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry demonstrated that the LAM of the mutant strain was devoid of mannose capping. Since an ortholog of MT1671 is not present in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155, a recombinant strain was constructed that expressed this protein. Analysis revealed that the LAM of the recombinant strain was larger than that of the wild type, had gained concanavalin A reactivity, and that the arabinan termini were capped with a single mannose residue. Thus, MT1671 is the mannosyltransferase involved in deposition of the first of the mannose residues on the non-reducing arabinan termini and the basis of much of the interaction between the tubercle bacillus and the host cell.

  10. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  11. Reconstitution of Protein Translation of Mycobacterium Reveals Functional Conservation and Divergence with the Gram-Negative Bacterium Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aashish; Asahara, Haruichi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Haiying; Cui, Sheng; Jin, Qi; Chong, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is essential for all bacteria pathogens. It has also been a major focus of structural and functional studies and an important target of antibiotics. Here we report our attempts to biochemically reconstitute mycobacterial protein translation in vitro from purified components. This mycobacterial translation system consists of individually purified recombinant translation factors from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), purified tRNAs and ribosomes from Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), and an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (AARS) mixture from the cell-extract of M. smegmatis. We demonstrate that such mycobacterial translation system was efficient in in vitro protein synthesis, and enabled functional comparisons of translational components between the gram-positive Mycobacterium and the gram-negative E. coli. Although mycobacterial translation factors and ribosomes were highly compatible with their E. coli counterparts, M. smegmatis tRNAs were not properly charged by the E. coli AARSs to allow efficient translation of a reporter. In contrast, both E. coli and M. smegmatis tRNAs exhibited similar activity with the semi-purified M. smegmatis AARSs mixture for in vitro translation. We further demonstrated the use of both mycobacterial and E. coli translation systems as comparative in vitro assays for small-molecule antibiotics that target protein translation. While mycobacterial and E. coli translation were both inhibited at the same IC50 by the antibiotic spectinomycin, mycobacterial translation was preferentially inhibited by the antibiotic tetracycline, suggesting that there may be structural differences at the antibiotic binding sites between the ribosomes of Mycobacterium and E. coli. Our results illustrate an alternative approach for antibiotic discovery and functional studies of protein translation in mycobacteria and possibly other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27564552

  12. Rapid tests for the detection of the Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii strain responsible for an epidemic of surgical-site infections in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Ramos, Jesus Pais; Campos, Carlos Eduardo Dias; Caldas, Paulo Cesar de Souza; Lima, Karla Valeria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2012-12-01

    A single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, characterised by a particular rpoB sequevar and two highly related pulsed field gel electrophoresis patterns has been responsible for a nationwide outbreak of surgical infections in Brazil since 2004. In this study, we developed molecular tests based on polymerase chain reaction restriction-enzyme analysis (PRA) and sequencing for the rapid identification of this strain. Sequences of 15 DNA regions conserved in mycobacteria were retrieved from GenBank or sequenced and analysed in silico. Single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to the epidemic strain and located in enzyme recognition sites were detected in rpoB, the 3' region of the 16S rDNA and gyrB. The three tests that were developed, i.e., PRA-rpoB, PRA-16S and gyrB sequence analysis, showed 100%, 100% and 92.31% sensitivity and 93.06%, 90.28% and 100% specificity, respectively, for the discrimination of the surgical strain from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, including 116 isolates from 95 patients, one environmental isolate and two type strains. The results of the three tests were stable, as shown by results obtained for different isolates from the same patient. In conclusion, due to the clinical and epidemiological importance of this strain, these tests could be implemented in reference laboratories for the rapid preliminary diagnosis and epidemiological surveillance of this epidemic strain. PMID:23295745

  13. Use of various genetic markers in differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis strains from animals and humans and for studying epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van Soolingen, D; de Haas, P E; Haagsma, J; Eger, T; Hermans, P W; Ritacco, V; Alito, A; van Embden, J D

    1994-10-01

    One hundred fifty-three Mycobacterium bovis strains from cattle, various animal species from zoos and wild parks, and humans were analyzed for three different genetic markers for use in the epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis. M. bovis strains isolated from cattle were found to carry a single IS6110 element, whereas the majority of strains from other animals such as antelopes, monkeys, and seals harbored multiple IS6110 elements, suggesting that the reservoirs in cattle and wild animals are separated. Because the single IS6110 element in cattle strains is located at the same chromosomal position, strain differentiation by insertion sequence fingerprinting was hampered. Therefore, we investigated the usefulness of the direct repeat and polymorphic GC-rich repeat elements for strain differentiation. Both markers allowed sufficient strain discrimination for epidemiological purposes. Evidence is presented that in Argentina, most human M. bovis infections are due to transmission from cattle, whereas M. bovis infections among humans in the Netherlands are mainly contracted from animals other than cattle. Various outbreaks of M. bovis among animals and humans are described, including a small one which likely involved transmission from human to human.

  14. Proteomics Analysis of Three Different Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under In vitro Hypoxia and Evaluation of Hypoxia Associated Antigen's Specific Memory T Cells in Healthy Household Contacts.

    PubMed

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Gopalan, Akilandeswari; Das, Sulochana D; Raja, Alamelu

    2016-01-01

    In vitro mimicking conditions are thought to reflect the environment experienced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis inside the host granuloma. The majority of in vitro dormancy experimental models use laboratory-adapted strains H37Rv or Erdman instead of prevalent clinical strains involved during disease outbreaks. Thus, we included the most prevalent clinical strains (S7 and S10) of M. tuberculosis from south India in addition to H37Rv for our in vitro oxygen depletion (hypoxia) experimental model. Cytosolic proteins were prepared from hypoxic cultures, resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were characterized by mass spectrometry. In total, 49 spots were characterized as over-expressed or newly emergent between the three strains. Two antigens (ESAT-6, Lpd) out of the 49 characterized spots were readily available in recombinant form in our lab. Hence, these two genes were overexpressed, purified and used for in vitro stimulation of whole blood collected from healthy household contacts (HHC) and active pulmonary tuberculosis patients (PTB). Multicolor flow cytometry analysis showed high levels of antigen specific CD4(+) central memory T cells in the circulation of HHC compared to PTB (p < 0.005 for ESAT-6 and p < 0.0005 for Lpd). This shows proteins that are predicted to be up regulated during in vitro hypoxia in most prevalent clinical strains would indicate possible potential immunogens. In vitro hypoxia experiments with most prevalent clinical strains would also elucidate the probable true representative antigens involved in adaptive mechanisms. PMID:27667981

  15. Assessment of the Immune Responses Induced in Cattle after Inoculation of a Mycobacterium bovis Strain Deleted in Two mce2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Federico Carlos; Soria, Marcelo; Gravisaco, María José; Bianco, María Verónica; Meikle, Virginia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Vagnoni, Lucas; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Bigi, Fabiana

    2012-01-01

    The generation of efficient candidate vaccines against bovine tuberculosis will contribute to the control of this zoonotic disease. Rationally attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strains generated by knockout of virulence genes are promising candidate vaccines. However, to be effective, these candidate vaccines should at least maintain the immunological properties of their virulent parental M. bovis strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to obtain an M. bovis strain deleted in the mce2 genes and evaluate the effect of the mutation on the immunological profile elicited by the bacteria in cattle. We showed that the activation of CD4+ T cells in cattle inoculated with the mutant strain was equivalent to that in animals inoculated with the parental strain. Moreover, after in vitro stimulation, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from animals inoculated with the mutant produced higher levels of mRNA Th-1 cytokines than the parental strain. Therefore, these results indicate that the mce2 mutant is a promising candidate vaccine against bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22719207

  16. The influence of reduced oxygen availability on gene expression in laboratory (H37Rv) and clinical strains (S7 and S10) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Khan, Imran; Kumar, Neeraj; Das, Sulochana; Raja, Alamelu

    2015-09-20

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has the ability to persist within the host in a dormant stage. One important condition believed to contribute to dormancy is reduced access to oxygen known as hypoxia. However, the response of M. tuberculosis to such hypoxia condition is not fully characterized. Virtually all dormant models against tuberculosis tested in animals used laboratory strain H37Rv or Erdman strain. But major outbreaks of tuberculosis (TB) occur with the strains that have widely different genotypes and phenotypes compared to H37Rv. In this study, we used a custom oligonucleotide microarray to determine the overall transcriptional response of laboratory strain (H37Rv) and most prevalent clinical strains (S7 and S10) of M. tuberculosis from South India to hypoxia. Analysis of microarray results revealed that a total of 1161 genes were differentially regulated (≥1.5 fold change) in H37Rv, among them 659 genes upregulated and 502 genes down regulated. Microarray data of clinical isolates showed that a total of 790 genes were differentially regulated in S7 among which 453 genes were upregulated and 337 down regulated. Interestingly, numerous genes were also differentially regulated in S10 (total 2805 genes) of which 1463 genes upregulated and 1342 genes down regulated during reduced oxygen condition (Wayne's model). One hundred and thirty-four genes were found common and upregulated among all three strains (H37Rv, S7, and S10) and can be targeted for drug/vaccine development against TB.

  17. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex: Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. In non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), multiple copies of genes encoding homologous proteins have mainly been identified in pathogenic Mycobacterium species phylogenically related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Only ancestral copies of these genes have been identified in nonpathogenic NTM species like Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. KMS, Mycobacterium sp. MCS, and Mycobacterium sp. JLS. In this study we elucidated the genomes of four nonpathogenic NTM species, viz Mycobacterium komanii sp. nov., Mycobacterium malmesburii sp. nov., Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, and Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 6841. These genomes were investigated for genes encoding for the Esx and PE/PPE (situated in the esx cluster) family of proteins as well as adjacent genes situated in the ESX-1 to ESX-5 regions. To identify proteins actually expressed, comparative proteomic analyses of purified protein derivatives from three of the NTM as well as Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478 and the commercially available purified protein derivatives from Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium was performed. The genomic analysis revealed the occurrence in each of the four NTM, orthologs of the genes encoding for the Esx family, the PE and PPE family proteins in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. The identification of genes of the ESX-1, ESX-3, and ESX-4 region including esxA, esxB, ppe68, pe5, and pe35 adds to earlier reports of these genes in nonpathogenic NTM like M. smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. JLS and Mycobacterium KMS. This report is also the first to identify esxN gene situated within the ESX-5 locus in M. nonchromogenicum. Our proteomics analysis

  18. Comparative Genomics and Proteomic Analysis of Four Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Species and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex: Occurrence of Shared Immunogenic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gcebe, Nomakorinte; Michel, Anita; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Rutten, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The Esx and PE/PPE families of proteins are among the most immunodominant mycobacterial antigens and have thus been the focus of research to develop vaccines and immunological tests for diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis, mainly caused by Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. In non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), multiple copies of genes encoding homologous proteins have mainly been identified in pathogenic Mycobacterium species phylogenically related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Only ancestral copies of these genes have been identified in nonpathogenic NTM species like Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. KMS, Mycobacterium sp. MCS, and Mycobacterium sp. JLS. In this study we elucidated the genomes of four nonpathogenic NTM species, viz Mycobacterium komanii sp. nov., Mycobacterium malmesburii sp. nov., Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, and Mycobacterium fortuitum ATCC 6841. These genomes were investigated for genes encoding for the Esx and PE/PPE (situated in the esx cluster) family of proteins as well as adjacent genes situated in the ESX-1 to ESX-5 regions. To identify proteins actually expressed, comparative proteomic analyses of purified protein derivatives from three of the NTM as well as Mycobacterium kansasii ATCC 12478 and the commercially available purified protein derivatives from Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium was performed. The genomic analysis revealed the occurrence in each of the four NTM, orthologs of the genes encoding for the Esx family, the PE and PPE family proteins in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis. The identification of genes of the ESX-1, ESX-3, and ESX-4 region including esxA, esxB, ppe68, pe5, and pe35 adds to earlier reports of these genes in nonpathogenic NTM like M. smegmatis, Mycobacterium sp. JLS and Mycobacterium KMS. This report is also the first to identify esxN gene situated within the ESX-5 locus in M. nonchromogenicum. Our proteomics analysis

  19. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pellicles express unique proteins recognized by the host humoral response

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, Patrick W.; Ackart, David F.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Leid, Jeff; Shirtliff, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) causes both acute and chronic infections in humans characterized by tolerance to antibiotics and reactivation to cause secondary tuberculosis. These characteristics have led to renewed interested in the in vitro pellicle, or biofilm mode of growth, where bacteria grow to produce a thick aggregate at the air-liquid interface and exhibit increased phenotypic resistance to antibiotics. We infected guinea pigs with the virulent H37Rv strain of MTB for 60 days at which point we collected blood. To identify antigenic proteins, membrane protein extracts of MTB H37Ra pellicles and shaken cultures grown for 3, 5, or 7 weeks were probed with the infected animals’ sera after the proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE). Antigenic proteins were then identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting. Antigenic pellicle proteins were compared across the three timepoints to identify those that were produced consistently during pellicle growth. They were also compared to those membrane proteins identified from harvested shaken cultures to determine pellicle-specific versus universally-expressed proteins. Using this technique we identified 44 distinct antigenic proteins, nine of which were pellicle-specific. The sequence of antigenic pellicle-specific proteins was checked for sequence conservation across 15 sequenced MTB clinical isolates, three other members of the MTB complex, as well as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium smegmatis. The antigenic pellicle-specific protein Rv0097 was found to have very high sequence conservation within the MTB complex but not with related mycobacteria while FabG4 was highly conserved in all mycobacteria analyzed. These conserved pellicle-specific proteins represent targets for the development of future diagnostic tests and vaccines. PMID:24453174

  1. 4-Aminoquinoline derivatives as novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis GyrB inhibitors: Structural optimization, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Medapi, Brahmam; Suryadevara, Priyanka; Renuka, Janupally; Sridevi, Jonnalagadda Padma; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2015-10-20

    Mycobacterial DNA gyrase B subunit has been identified to be one of the potentially underexploited drug targets in the field of antitubercular drug discovery. In the present study, we employed structural optimization of the reported GyrB inhibitor resulting in synthesis of a series of 46 novel quinoline derivatives. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro Mycobacterium smegmatis GyrB inhibitory ability and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA supercoiling inhibitory activity. The antitubercular activity of these compounds was tested over Mtb H37Rv strain and their safety profile was checked against mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cell line. Among all, three compounds (23, 28, and 53) emerged to be active displaying IC₅₀ values below 1 μM against Msm GyrB and were found to be non-cytotoxic at 50 μM concentration. Compound 53 was identified to be potent GyrB inhibitor with 0.86 ± 0.16 μM and an MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) of 3.3 μM. The binding affinity of this compound towards GyrB protein was analysed by differential scanning fluorimetry which resulted in a positive shift of 3.3 °C in melting temperature (Tm) when compared to the native protein thereby reacertaining the stabilization effect of the compound over protein. PMID:26318054

  2. In vivo growth characteristics of leucine and methionine auxotrophic mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG generated by transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    McAdam, R A; Weisbrod, T R; Martin, J; Scuderi, J D; Brown, A M; Cirillo, J D; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1995-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a member of the slow-growing M. tuberculosis complex, was accomplished with transposons engineered from the Mycobacterium smegmatis insertion element IS1096. Transposons were created by placing a kanamycin resistance gene in several different positions in IS1096, and the resulting transposons were electroporated into BCG on nonreplicating plasmids. These analyses demonstrated that only one of the two open reading frames was necessary for transposition. A library of insertions was generated. Southern analysis of 23 kanamycin-resistant clones revealed that the transposons had inserted directly, with no evidence of cointegrate formation, into different restriction fragments in each clone. Sequence analysis of nine of the clones revealed junctional direct 8-bp repeats with only a slight similarity in target sites. These results suggest that IS1096-derived transposons transposed into the BCG genome in a relatively random fashion. Three auxotrophs, two for leucine and one for methionine, were isolated from the library of transposon insertions in BCG. They were characterized by sequencing and found to be homologous to the leuD gene of Escherichia coli and a sulfate-binding protein of cyanobacteria, respectively. When inoculated intravenously into C57BL/6 mice, the leucine auxotrophs, in contrast to the parent BCG strain or the methionine auxotroph, showed an inability to grow in vivo and were cleared within 7 weeks from the lungs and spleen. PMID:7868221

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the mig gene of Mycobacterium avium, which codes for a secreted macrophage-induced protein.

    PubMed Central

    Plum, G; Brenden, M; Clark-Curtiss, J E; Pulverer, G

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen that has evolved to be a frequent cause of disseminated infection in immunocompromised patients. Although these bacilli are readily phagocytized, they are able to survive and even multiply within human macrophages. The process whereby mycobacteria circumvent the lytic functions of the macrophages is currently not well understood, but this is a key aspect in the pathogenicity of all pathogenic mycobacteria. Previously, we identified a gene in M. avium, designated mig (for macrophage-induced gene), the expression of which is induced when the bacilli grow in human macrophages (G. Plum and J. E. Clark-Curtiss, Infect. Immun. 62:476-483, 1994). In the present study we show that (i) the nucleotide sequence of the mig gene has an open reading frame of 295 amino acids with a strong bias for mycobacterial codon usage, (ii) the mig gene also codes for a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues, (iii) mig is induced by acidity to be expressed as an early-secreted 30-kDa protein, and (iv) the Mig protein exhibits an AMP-binding domain signature. However, beyond this motif which is common to enzymes that activate a large variety of substrates, no homologies to known sequences are found. We also show that (v) Mycobacterium smegmatis strains expressing the Mig protein have a limited advantage for survival in macrophages. These findings may be concordant with a role of the mig gene in the virulence of M. avium. PMID:9353032

  4. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  5. Efficacies of selected disinfectants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Best, M; Sattar, S A; Springthorpe, V S; Kennedy, M E

    1990-10-01

    The activities of 10 formulations as mycobactericidal agents in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-contaminated suspensions (suspension test) and stainless steel surfaces (carrier test) were investigated with sputum as the organic load. The quaternary ammonium compound, chlorhexidine gluconate, and an iodophor were ineffective in all tests. Ethanol (70%) was effective against M. tuberculosis only in suspension in the absence of sputum. Povidone-iodine was not as efficacious when the test organism was dried on a surface as it was in suspension, and its activity was further reduced in the presence of sputum. Sodium hypochlorite required a higher concentration of available chlorine to achieve an effective level of disinfection than did sodium dichloroisocyanurate. Phenol (5%) was effective under all test conditions, producing at least a 4-log10 reduction in CFU. The undiluted glutaraldehyde-phenate solution was effective against M. tuberculosis and a second test organism, Mycobacterium smegmatis, even in the presence of dried sputum, whereas the diluted solution (1:16) was only effective against M. smegmatis in the suspension test. A solution of 2% glutaraldehyde was effective against M. tuberculosis. This investigation presents tuberculocidal efficacy data generated by methods simulating actual practices of routine disinfection. PMID:2121783

  6. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB. PMID:27364701

  7. Mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and in a murine model of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Villela, Anne D; Gonçalves, Raoni S B; Abbadi, Bruno Lopes; Trindade, Rogério Valim; López-Gavín, Alexandre; Tudó, Griselda; González-Martín, Julian; Basso, Luiz Augusto; de Souza, Marcus V N; Campos, Maria Martha; Santos, Diógenes Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Repurposing of drugs to treat tuberculosis (TB) has been considered an alternative to overcome the global TB epidemic, especially to combat drug-resistant forms of the disease. Mefloquine has been reported as a potent drug to kill drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, mefloquine-derived molecules have been synthesised and their effectiveness against mycobacteria has been assessed. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the activities of mefloquine and its oxazolidine derivative compound 1E in a murine model of TB infection following administration of both drugs by the oral route. The effects of associations between mefloquine or 1E with the clinically used antituberculosis drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol, moxifloxacin and streptomycin were also investigated. Importantly, combination of mefloquine with isoniazid and of 1E with streptomycin showed a two-fold decrease in their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Moreover, no tested combinations demonstrated antagonist interactions. Here we describe novel evidence on the activity of mefloquine and 1E against a series of quinolone-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. These data show MICs against quinolone-resistant strains (0.5-8 µg/mL) similar to or lower than those previously reported for multidrug-resistant strains. Taking these results together, we can suggest the use of mefloquine or 1E in combination with clinically available drugs, especially in the case of resistant forms of TB.

  8. Mycobacterium Lysine ε-aminotransferase is a novel alarmone metabolism related persister gene via dysregulating the intracellular amino acid level.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiangke; Li, Yunsong; Du, Qinglin; Huang, Qinqin; Guo, Siyao; Xu, Mengmeng; Lin, Yanping; Liu, Zhidong; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters, usually slow-growing, non-replicating cells highly tolerant to antibiotics, play a crucial role contributing to the recalcitrance of chronic infections and treatment failure. Understanding the molecular mechanism of persister cells formation and maintenance would obviously inspire the discovery of new antibiotics. The significant upregulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3290c, a highly conserved mycobacterial lysine ε-aminotransferase (LAT) during hypoxia persistent model, suggested a role of LAT in persistence. To test this, a lat deleted Mycobacterium smegmatis was constructed. The expression of transcriptional regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (LrpA) and the amino acids abundance in M. smegmatis lat deletion mutants were lowered. Thus, the persistence capacity of the deletion mutant was impaired upon norfloxacin exposure under nutrient starvation. In summary, our study firstly reported the involvement of mycobacterium LAT in persister formation, and possibly through altering the intracellular amino acid metabolism balance. PMID:26806099

  9. Genomics and Proteomics of Mycobacteriophage Patience, an Accidental Tourist in the Mycobacterium Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Welkin H.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Russell, Daniel A.; Rubin, Daniel H. F.; Kajee, Afsana; Msibi, Zama N. P.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newly emerging human viruses such as Ebola virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus, and HIV likely originate within an extant population of viruses in nonhuman hosts and acquire the ability to infect and cause disease in humans. Although several mechanisms preventing viral infection of particular hosts have been described, the mechanisms and constraints on viral host expansion are ill defined. We describe here mycobacteriophage Patience, a newly isolated phage recovered using Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155 as a host. Patience has genomic features distinct from its M. smegmatis host, including a much lower GC content (50.3% versus 67.4%) and an abundance of codons that are rarely used in M. smegmatis. Nonetheless, it propagates well in M. smegmatis, and we demonstrate the use of mass spectrometry to show expression of over 75% of the predicted proteins, to identify new genes, to refine the genome annotation, and to estimate protein abundance. We propose that Patience evolved primarily among lower-GC hosts and that the disparities between its genomic profile and that of M. smegmatis presented only a minimal barrier to host expansion. Rapid adaptions to its new host include recent acquisition of higher-GC genes, expression of out-of-frame proteins within predicted genes, and codon selection among highly expressed genes toward the translational apparatus of its new host. PMID:25467442

  10. Role of P27 -P55 operon from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the resistance to toxic compounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The P27-P55 (lprG-Rv1410c) operon is crucial for the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, during infection in mice. P55 encodes an efflux pump that has been shown to provide Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG with resistance to several drugs, while P27 encodes a mannosylated glycoprotein previously described as an antigen that modulates the immune response against mycobacteria. The objective of this study was to determine the individual contribution of the proteins encoded in the P27-P55 operon to the resistance to toxic compounds and to the cell wall integrity of M. tuberculosis. Method In order to test the susceptibility of a mutant of M. tuberculosis H37Rv in the P27-P55 operon to malachite green, sodium dodecyl sulfate, ethidium bromide, and first-line antituberculosis drugs, this strain together with the wild type strain and a set of complemented strains were cultivated in the presence and in the absence of these drugs. In addition, the malachite green decolorization rate of each strain was obtained from decolorization curves of malachite green in PBS containing bacterial suspensions. Results The mutant strain decolorized malachite green faster than the wild type strain and was hypersensitive to both malachite green and ethidium bromide, and more susceptible to the first-line antituberculosis drugs: isoniazid and ethambutol. The pump inhibitor reserpine reversed M. tuberculosis resistance to ethidium bromide. These results suggest that P27-P55 functions through an efflux-pump like mechanism. In addition, deletion of the P27-P55 operon made M. tuberculosis susceptible to sodium dodecyl sulfate, suggesting that the lack of both proteins causes alterations in the cell wall permeability of the bacterium. Importantly, both P27 and P55 are required to restore the wild type phenotypes in the mutant. Conclusions The results clearly indicate that P27 and P55 are functionally connected in

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium brumae ATCC 51384.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Giuseppe; Torrents, Eduard; Luquin, Marina; Comas, Iñaki; Julián, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Mycobacterium brumae type strain ATCC 51384. This is the first draft genome sequence of M. brumae, a nonpathogenic, rapidly growing, nonchromogenic mycobacterium, with immunotherapeutic capacities. PMID:27125480

  13. Tuberculous Lymphadenitis in Ethiopia Predominantly Caused by Strains Belonging to the Delhi/CAS Lineage and Newly Identified Ethiopian Clades of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Merker, Matthias; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.; Niemann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, newly defined clades of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains, namely Ethiopia 1–3 and Ethiopia H37Rv-like strains, and other clades associated with pulmonary TB (PTB) were identified in Ethiopia. In this study, we investigated whether these new strain types exhibit an increased ability to cause TB lymphadenitis (TBLN) and raised the question, if particular MTBC strains derived from TBLN patients in northern Ethiopia are genetically adapted to their local hosts and/or to the TBLN. Methods Genotyping of 196 MTBC strains isolated from TBLN patients was performed by spoligotyping and 24-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. A statistical analysis was carried out to see possible associations between patient characteristics and phylogenetic MTBC strain classification. Results Among 196 isolates, the majority of strains belonged to the Delhi/CAS (38.8%) lineage, followed by Ethiopia 1 (9.7%), Ethiopia 3 (8.7%), Ethiopia H37RV-like (8.2%), Ethiopia 2 and Haarlem (7.7% each), URAL (3.6%), Uganda l and LAM (2% each), S-type (1.5%), X-type (1%), and 0.5% isolates of TUR, EAI, and Beijing genotype, respectively. Overall, 15 strains (7.7%) could not be allocated to a previously described phylogenetic lineage. The distribution of MTBC lineages is similar to that found in studies of PTB samples. The cluster rate (35%) in this study is significantly lower (P = 0.035) compared to 45% in the study of PTB in northwestern Ethiopia. Conclusion In the studied area, lymph node samples are dominated by Dehli/CAS genotype strains and strains of largely not yet defined clades based on MIRU-VNTR 24-loci nomenclature. We found no indication that strains of particular genotypes are specifically associated with TBLN. However, a detailed analysis of specific genetic variants of the locally contained Ethiopian clades by whole genome sequencing may reveal new insights into the host-pathogen co

  14. Esters of Pyrazinoic Acid Are Active against Pyrazinamide-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Naturally Resistant Mycobacteria In Vitro and Ex Vivo within Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pires, David; Valente, Emília; Simões, Marta Filipa; Carmo, Nuno; Testa, Bernard; Constantino, Luís; Anes, Elsa

    2015-12-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against major Mycobacterium tuberculosis species (M. tuberculosis, M. africanum, and M. microti) but not against M. bovis and M. avium. The latter two are mycobacterial species involved in human and cattle tuberculosis and in HIV coinfections, respectively. PZA is a first-line agent for the treatment of human tuberculosis and requires activation by a mycobacterial pyrazinamidase to form the active metabolite pyrazinoic acid (POA). As a result of this mechanism, resistance to PZA, as is often found in tuberculosis patients, is caused by point mutations in pyrazinamidase. In previous work, we have shown that POA esters and amides synthesized in our laboratory were stable in plasma (M. F. Simões, E. Valente, M. J. Gómez, E. Anes, and L. Constantino, Eur J Pharm Sci 37:257-263, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejps.2009.02.012). Although the amides did not present significant activity, the esters were active against sensitive mycobacteria at concentrations 5- to 10-fold lower than those of PZA. Here, we report that these POA derivatives possess antibacterial efficacy in vitro and ex vivo against several species and strains of Mycobacterium with natural or acquired resistance to PZA, including M. bovis and M. avium. Our results indicate that the resistance probably was overcome by cleavage of the prodrugs into POA and a long-chain alcohol. Although it is not possible to rule out that the esters have intrinsic activity per se, we bring evidence here that long-chain fatty alcohols possess a significant antimycobacterial effect against PZA-resistant species and strains and are not mere inactive promoieties. These findings may lead to candidate dual drugs having enhanced activity against both PZA-susceptible and PZA-resistant isolates and being suitable for clinical development. PMID:26438493

  15. Genomic variability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Euro-American lineage based on large sequence deletions and 15-locus MIRU-VNTR polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Rindi, Laura; Medici, Chiara; Bimbi, Nicola; Buzzigoli, Andrea; Lari, Nicoletta; Garzelli, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    A sample of 260 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains assigned to the Euro-American family was studied to identify phylogenetically informative genomic regions of difference (RD). Mutually exclusive deletions of regions RD115, RD122, RD174, RD182, RD183, RD193, RD219, RD726 and RD761 were found in 202 strains; the RD(Rio) deletion was detected exclusively among the RD174-deleted strains. Although certain deletions were found more frequently in certain spoligotype families (i.e., deletion RD115 in T and LAM, RD174 in LAM, RD182 in Haarlem, RD219 in T and RD726 in the "Cameroon" family), the RD-defined sublineages did not specifically match with spoligotype-defined families, thus arguing against the use of spoligotyping for establishing exact phylogenetic relationships between strains. Notably, when tested for katG463/gyrA95 polymorphism, all the RD-defined sublineages belonged to Principal Genotypic Group (PGG) 2, except sublineage RD219 exclusively belonging to PGG3; the 58 Euro-American strains with no deletion were of either PGG2 or 3. A representative sample of 197 isolates was then analyzed by standard 15-locus MIRU-VNTR typing, a suitable approach to independently assess genetic relationships among the strains. Analysis of the MIRU-VNTR typing results by using a minimum spanning tree (MST) and a classical dendrogram showed groupings that were largely concordant with those obtained by RD-based analysis. Isolates of a given RD profile show, in addition to closely related MIRU-VNTR profiles, related spoligotype profiles that can serve as a basis for better spoligotype-based classification.

  16. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R. S.; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase

  17. Targeting Drug-Sensitive and -Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Inhibition of Src Family Kinases Lowers Disease Burden and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Pallavi; Rajmani, R S; Verma, Garima; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    In view of emerging drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the development of novel therapeutic strategies is increasingly being sought. A recent paradigm in antituberculosis (anti-TB) drug development is to target the host molecules that are crucial for intracellular survival of the pathogen. We previously showed the importance of Src tyrosine kinases in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Here, we report that inhibition of Src significantly reduced survival of H37Rv as well as multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis in THP-1 macrophages. Src inhibition was also effective in controlling M. tuberculosis infection in guinea pigs. In guinea pigs, reduced M. tuberculosis burden due to Src inhibition also led to a marked decline in the disease pathology. In agreement with the theoretical framework of host-directed approaches against the pathogen, Src inhibition was equally effective against an XDR strain in controlling infection in guinea pigs. We propose that Src inhibitors could be developed into effective host-directed anti-TB drugs, which could be indiscriminately used against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. IMPORTANCE The existing treatment regimen for tuberculosis (TB) suffers from deficiencies like high doses of antibiotics, long treatment duration, and inability to kill persistent populations in an efficient manner. Together, these contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Recently, several host factors were identified which help intracellular survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within the macrophage. These factors serve as attractive targets for developing alternate therapeutic strategies against M. tuberculosis. This strategy promises to be effective against drug-resistant strains. The approach also has potential to considerably lower the risk of emergence of new drug-resistant strains. We explored tyrosine kinase Src as a

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T.; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection. PMID:25819161

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has diminished capacity to counteract redox stress induced by elevated levels of endogenous superoxide.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Priyanka; Dharmaraja, Allimuthu T; Bhaskar, Ashima; Chakrapani, Harinath; Singh, Amit

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has evolved protective and detoxification mechanisms to maintain cytoplasmic redox balance in response to exogenous oxidative stress encountered inside host phagocytes. In contrast, little is known about the dynamic response of this pathogen to endogenous oxidative stress generated within Mtb. Using a noninvasive and specific biosensor of cytoplasmic redox state of Mtb, we for first time discovered a surprisingly high sensitivity of this pathogen to perturbation in redox homeostasis induced by elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS). We synthesized a series of hydroquinone-based small molecule ROS generators and found that ATD-3169 permeated mycobacteria to reliably enhance endogenous ROS including superoxide radicals. When Mtb strains including multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) patient isolates were exposed to this compound, a dose-dependent, long-lasting, and irreversible oxidative shift in intramycobacterial redox potential was detected. Dynamic redox potential measurements revealed that Mtb had diminished capacity to restore cytoplasmic redox balance in comparison with Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm), a fast growing nonpathogenic mycobacterial species. Accordingly, Mtb strains were extremely susceptible to inhibition by ATD-3169 but not Msm, suggesting a functional linkage between dynamic redox changes and survival. Microarray analysis showed major realignment of pathways involved in redox homeostasis, central metabolism, DNA repair, and cell wall lipid biosynthesis in response to ATD-3169, all consistent with enhanced endogenous ROS contributing to lethality induced by this compound. This work provides empirical evidence that the cytoplasmic redox poise of Mtb is uniquely sensitive to manipulation in steady-state endogenous ROS levels, thus revealing the importance of targeting intramycobacterial redox metabolism for controlling TB infection.

  20. Analysis of Mutations in Streptomycin-Resistant Strains Reveals a Simple and Reliable Genetic Marker for Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Villellas, Cristina; Aristimuño, Liselotte; Vitoria, María-Asunción; Prat, Cristina; Blanco, Silvia; García de Viedma, Darío; Domínguez, José; Samper, Sofía

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis pandemic is a major health problem, further complicated by an increasing incidence of drug-resistant isolates and the existence of highly transmissible strains, such as those in the Beijing family. Streptomycin (STR)-resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates have been analyzed to look for mutations in the rpsL, rrs, and gidB genes. In addition, the Rv1258c gene, which encodes Tap, an efflux pump that transports STR, has been sequenced. Mutations affecting codons 43 and 88 of the rpsL gene were found in 44.4% of the strains, and 16.7% of the strains carried mutations in the rrs gene, both of which probably contribute to STR resistance. Many strains presented with mutations in the gidB gene, but the implication of those mutations in STR resistance remains unclear. Interestingly, a cytosine nucleotide insertion between positions 580 and 581 (denominated Tap580) in the Rv1258c gene has been found in all Beijing isolates included in this study, suggesting that it might be a novel polymorphism specific to the Beijing family of M. tuberculosis. A simple and fast restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)-PCR method for detecting the Tap580 insertion has been developed and used to screen a collection of 220 DNA samples obtained from cultures of M. tuberculosis isolates and 30 respiratory specimens. In all cases, the Beijing and non-Beijing representative samples were identified correctly. Tap580 is a novel polymorphism specific to the highly transmissible Beijing family, which allows for fast detection of these strains even at the very early stages of infection. PMID:23616454

  1. Genomic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains isolated in Tuscany, Italy, based on large sequence deletions, SNPs in putative DNA repair genes and MIRU-VNTR polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Garzelli, Carlo; Lari, Nicoletta; Rindi, Laura

    2016-03-01

    The Beijing genotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is cause of global concern as it is rapidly spreading worldwide, is considered hypervirulent, and is most often associated to massive spread of MDR/XDR TB, although these epidemiological or pathological properties have not been confirmed for all strains and in all geographic settings. In this paper, to gain new insights into the biogeographical heterogeneity of the Beijing family, we investigated a global sample of Beijing strains (22% from Italian-born, 78% from foreign-born patients) by determining large sequence polymorphism of regions RD105, RD181, RD150 and RD142, single nucleotide polymorphism of putative DNA repair genes mutT4 and mutT2 and MIRU-VNTR profiles based on 11 discriminative loci. We found that, although our sample of Beijing strains showed a considerable genomic heterogeneity, yielding both ancient and recent phylogenetic strains, the prevalent successful Beijing subsets were characterized by deletions of RD105 and RD181 and by one nucleotide substitution in one or both mutT genes. MIRU-VNTR analysis revealed 47 unique patterns and 9 clusters including a total of 33 isolates (41% of total isolates); the relatively high proportion of Italian-born Beijing TB patients, often occurring in mixed clusters, supports the possibility of an ongoing cross-transmission of the Beijing genotype to autochthonous population. High rates of extra-pulmonary localization and drug-resistance, particularly MDR, frequently reported for Beijing strains in other settings, were not observed in our survey. PMID:26597137

  2. A genomic library-based amplification approach (GL-PCR) for the mapping of multiple IS6110 insertion sites and strain differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Namouchi, Amine; Mardassi, Helmi

    2006-11-01

    Evidence suggests that insertion of the IS6110 element is not without consequence to the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains. Thus, mapping of multiple IS6110 insertion sites in the genome of biomedically relevant clinical isolates would result in a better understanding of the role of this mobile element, particularly with regard to transmission, adaptability and virulence. In the present paper, we describe a versatile strategy, referred to as GL-PCR, that amplifies IS6110-flanking sequences based on the construction of a genomic library. M. tuberculosis chromosomal DNA is fully digested with HincII and then ligated into a plasmid vector between T7 and T3 promoter sequences. The ligation reaction product is transformed into Escherichia coli and selective PCR amplification targeting both 5' and 3' IS6110-flanking sequences are performed on the plasmid library DNA. For this purpose, four separate PCR reactions are performed, each combining an outward primer specific for one IS6110 end with either T7 or T3 primer. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the PCR products generated from a single ligation reaction allowed mapping of 21 out of the 24 IS6110 copies of two 12 banded M. tuberculosis strains, yielding an overall sensitivity of 87,5%. Furthermore, by simply comparing the migration pattern of GL-PCR-generated products, the strategy proved to be as valuable as IS6110 RFLP for molecular typing of M. tuberculosis complex strains. Importantly, GL-PCR was able to discriminate between strains differing by a single IS6110 band. PMID:16725220

  3. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) genotyping of mycobacterium intracellulare for strain comparison with establishment of a PCR-based database.

    PubMed

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; McNulty, Steven; Brown Elliott, Barbara A; Falkinham, Joseph O; Williams, Myra D; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wilson, Rebecca W; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    Strain comparison is important to population genetics and to evaluate relapses in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease, but the "gold standard" of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is time-consuming and complex. We used variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR) for fingerprinting of respiratory isolates of M. intracellulare from patients with underlying bronchiectasis, to establish a nonsequence-based database for population analysis. Different genotypes identified by PFGE underwent species identification using a 16S rRNA gene multiplex PCR. Genotypes of M. intracellulare were confirmed by internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequencing and characterized using seven VNTR primers. The pattern of VNTR amplicon sizes and repeat number defined each specific VNTR type. Forty-two VNTR types were identified among 84 genotypes. PFGE revealed most isolates with the same VNTR type to be clonal or exhibit similar grouping of bands. Repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) showed minimal pattern diversity between VNTR types compared to PFGE. Fingerprinting of relapse isolates from 31 treated patients using VNTR combined with 16S multiplex PCR unambiguously and reliably distinguished different genotypes from the same patient, with results comparable to those of PFGE. VNTR for strain comparison is easier and faster than PFGE, is as accurate as PFGE, and does not require sequencing. Starting with a collection of 167 M. intracellulare isolates, VNTR distinguished M. intracellulare into 42 clonal groups. Comparison of isolates from different geographic areas, habitats, and clinical settings is now possible.

  4. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by m-AMSA, a eukaryotic type II topoisomerase poison.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-18

    m-AMSA, an established inhibitor of eukaryotic type II topoisomerases, exerts its cidal effect by binding to the enzyme-DNA complex thus inhibiting the DNA religation step. The molecule and its analogues have been successfully used as chemotherapeutic agents against different forms of cancer. After virtual screening using a homology model of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I, we identified m-AMSA as a high scoring hit. We demonstrate that m-AMSA can inhibit the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase I from M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. In a whole cell assay, m-AMSA inhibited the growth of both the mycobacteria.

  5. Are the PE-PGRS proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis variable surface antigens?

    PubMed

    Banu, Sayera; Honoré, Nadine; Saint-Joanis, Brigitte; Philpott, Dana; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Cole, Stewart T

    2002-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv contains 67 PE-PGRS genes, with multiple tandem repetitive sequences, encoding closely related proteins that are exceptionally rich in glycine and alanine. As no functional information was available, 10 of these genes were selected and shown to be expressed in vitro by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Antibodies against five PE-PGRS proteins, raised in mice by DNA vaccination, detected single proteins when the same plasmid constructs used for immunization were expressed in epithelial cells or in reticulocyte extracts, confirming that the PE-PGRS proteins are antigenic. As expected from the conserved repetitive structure, the antibodies cross-reacted with more than one PE-PGRS protein, suggesting that different proteins share common epitopes. PE-PGRS proteins were detected by West-ern blotting in five different mycobacterial species (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. marinum and M. gordonae) and 11 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Whole-genome comparisons of M. tuberculosis predicted allelic diversity in the PE-PGRS family, and this was confirmed by immunoblot studies as size variants were detected in clinical strains. Subcellular fractionation studies and immunoelectron microscopy localized many PE-PGRS proteins in the cell wall and cell membrane of M. tuberculosis. The data suggest that some PE-PGRS proteins are variable surface antigens.

  6. Pulmonary immunity and durable protection induced by the ID93/GLA-SE vaccine candidate against the hyper-virulent Korean Beijing Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain K.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Han, Seung Jung; Cho, Sang-Nae; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G; Shin, Sung Jae

    2016-04-27

    The majority of tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidates advanced to clinical trials have been evaluated preclinically using laboratory-adapted strains. However, it has been proposed that challenge with clinical isolates in preclinical vaccine testing could provide further and more practical validation. Here, we tested the ID93/GLA-SE TB vaccine candidate against the clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain K (Mtb K) belonging to the Beijing family, the most prevalent Mtb strain in South Korea. Mice immunized with ID93/GLA-SE exhibited a significant reduction in bacteria and reduced lung inflammation against Mtb K when compared to non-immunized controls. In addition, we analyzed the immune responses in the lungs of ID93/GLA-SE-immunized mice, and showed that ID93/GLA-SE was able to elicit sustained Th1-biased immune responses including antigen-specific multifunctional CD4(+) T cell co-producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 as well as a high magnitude of IFN-γ response for up to 10 weeks post-challenge. Notably, further investigation of T cell subsets in the lung following challenge showed remarkable generation of CD8(+) central memory T cells by ID93/GLA-SE-immunization. Our findings showed that ID93/GLA-SE vaccine confers a high level of robust protection against the hypervirulent Mtb Beijing infection which was characterized by pulmonary Th1-polarized T-cell immune responses. These findings may also provide relevant information for potential utility of this vaccine candidate in East-Asian countries where the Beijing genotype is highly prevalent.

  7. High Sequence Variability of the ppE18 Gene of Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains Potentially Impacts Effectivity of Vaccine Candidate M72/AS01E.

    PubMed

    Homolka, Susanne; Ubben, Tanja; Niemann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine is urgently needed to fight tuberculosis (TB) which is still the leading cause of death from a single infectious agent worldwide. One of the promising vaccine candidates M72/AS01E consists of two proteins subunits PepA and PPE18 coded by Rv0125 and Rv1196. However, preliminary data indicate a high level of sequence variability among clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains that might have an impact on the vaccine efficacy. To further investigate this finding, we determined ppE18 sequence variability in a well-characterized reference collection of 71 MTBC strains from 23 phylogenetic lineages representing the global MTBC diversity. In total, 100 sequence variations consisting of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), three insertions and one deletion were detected resulting in 141 variable positions distributed over the entire gene. The majority of SNPs detected were non-synonymous (n = 68 vs. n = 28 synonymous). Strains from animal adapted lineages, e.g., M. bovis, showed a significant higher diversity than the human pathogens such as M. tuberculosis Haarlem. SNP patterns specific for different lineages as well as for deeper branches in the phylogeny could be identified. The results of our study demonstrate a high variability of the ppE18 gene even in the N-terminal domains that is normally highly conserved in ppe genes. As the N-terminal region interacts with TLR2 receptor inducing a protective anti-inflammatory immune response, genetic heterogeneity has a potential impact on the vaccine efficiency, however, this has to be investigated in future studies.

  8. First data on Eurasian wild boar response to oral immunization with BCG and challenge with a Mycobacterium bovis field strain.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, C; Garrido, J M; Vicente, J; Romero, B; Galindo, R C; Minguijón, E; Villar, M; Martín-Hernando, M P; Sevilla, I; Juste, R; Aranaz, A; de la Fuente, J; Gortázar, C

    2009-11-12

    The Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) is considered a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in south-central Spain. The vaccination of wildlife with BCG offers an alternative to culling and to movement restriction for the control of bTB among wildlife reservoirs. In this study, we hypothesized that oral BCG immunization of wild boar would affect the expression of immunoregulatory genes and confer protection against M. bovis. Three groups were used to describe the infection, pathological findings and gene expression profiles in wild boar: BCG-vaccinated and M. bovis-challenged (vaccinated challenged group; N=6), non-vaccinated and M. bovis-challenged (non-vaccinated challenged group; N=4), and non-vaccinated and mock-infected (control group; N=2) animals. M. bovis was isolated from 50% (3/6) and 75% (3/4) of vaccinated challenged and non-vaccinated challenged animals, respectively. All four wild boar from the non-vaccinated challenged group developed bTB-compatible lesions 114 days after challenge. In contrast, only 50% of vaccinated challenged wild boar developed lesions. The PBMC mRNA levels of IL4, RANTES, C3, IFN-gamma and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT) were analyzed at several days post-vaccination (dpi). When vaccinated challenged animals were compared to controls, all five genes were significantly upregulated at the time of M. bovis infection at 186dpi but IFN-gamma levels were also upregulated at 11 and 46dpi. The C3 and MUT mRNA levels were higher at 46dpi, and 11 and 186dpi, respectively, in vaccinated protected wild boar when compared to non-vaccinated challenged animals. At the end of the experiment (300dpi), the mRNA levels of selected genes were lower in non-vaccinated challenged animals when compared to control wild boar. Exposing wild boar to a dose of 10(4)cfu of M. bovis by the oropharyngeal route is an adequate protocol to produce an infection model

  9. Analysis of mycolic acid cleavage products and cellular fatty acids of Mycobacterium species by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, M A; Moss, C W; Silcox, V A; Good, R C

    1986-04-01

    After growth and experimental conditions were established, the mycolic acid cleavage products, constituent fatty acids, and alcohols of representative strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum complex, M. kansasii, M. gordonae, and M. avium complex were determined by capillary gas chromatography. Reproducible cleavage of mycolic acid methyl esters to tetracosanoic (24:0) or hexacosanoic (26:0) acid methyl esters was achieved by heating the sample in a high-temperature muffle furnace. The major constituent fatty acids in all species were hexadecanoic (16:0) and octadecenoic (18:1 omega 9-c, oleic) acids. With the exception of M. gordonae, 10-methyloctadecanoic acid was found in all species; moreover, M. gordonae was the only species tested which contained 2-methyltetradecanoic acid. M. kansasii was characterized by the presence of 2,4-dimethyltetradecanoic acid, M. avium complex by 2-eicosanol, and M. tuberculosis by 26:0 mycolic acid cleavage product. The mycolic acid cleavage product in the other five species tested was 24:0. Although a limited number of strains and species were tested, preliminary results indicate that this gas chromatographic method can be used to characterize mycobacterial cultures by their mycolic acid cleavage products and constituent fatty acid and alcohol content. PMID:3084554

  10. Comparison between RFLP and MIRU-VNTR genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Stockholm 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Jerker; Hoffner, Sven; Berggren, Ingela; Bruchfeld, Judith; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Groenheit, Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the difference between methods for genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates. We collected genotyping results from Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeat (MIRU-VNTR) in a geographically limited area (Stockholm) during a period of three years. The number and proportion of isolates belonging to clusters was reduced by 45 and 35% respectively when combining the two methods compared with using RFLP or MIRU-VNTR only. The mean size of the clusters was smaller when combining methods and smaller with RFLP compared to MIRU-VNTR. In clusters with confirmed epidemiological links RFLP coincided slightly better than MIRU-VNTR but where there was a difference, the variation in MIRU-VNTR pattern was only in a single locus. In isolates with few IS6110 bands in RFLP, MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates more, dividing the RFLP clusters. Since MIRU-VNTR is faster and less labour-intensive it is the method of choice for routine genotyping. In most cases it will be sufficient for epidemiological purposes but true clustering might still be considered if there are epidemiological links and the MIRU-VNTR results differ in only one of its 24 loci.

  11. Importance of Porins for Biocide Efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N′-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides. PMID:21398489

  12. Enhanced and durable protective immune responses induced by a cocktail of recombinant BCG strains expressing antigens of multistage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinping; Teng, Xindong; Yuan, Xuefeng; Zhang, Ying; Shi, Chunwei; Yue, Tingting; Zhou, Lei; Li, Jianrong; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-08-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine confers protection from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children, its immune protection gradually wanes over time, and consequently leads to an inability to prevent the reactivation of latent infection of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, improving BCG for better control of tuberculosis (TB) is urgently needed. We thus hypothesized that recombinant BCG overexpressing immunodominant antigens expressed at different growth stages of M. tuberculosis could provide a more comprehensive protection against primary and latent M. tuberculosis infection. Here, a novel cocktail of recombinant BCG (rBCG) strains, namely ABX, was produced by combining rBCG::85A, rBCG::85B, and rBCG::X, which overexpressed respective multistage antigens Ag85A, Ag85B, and HspX of M. tuberculosis. Our results showed that ABX was able to induce a stronger immune protection than individual rBCGs or BCG against primary TB infection in C57BL/6 mice. Mechanistically, the immune protection was attributed to stronger antigen-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses, higher numbers of IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) TEM and IL-2(+) CD8(+) TCM cells elicited by ABX. These findings thus provide a novel strategy for the improvement of BCG efficacy and potentially a promising prophylactic TB vaccine candidate, warranting further investigation.

  13. Structural basis for the inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis L,D-transpeptidase by meropenem, a drug effective against extensively drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye Jin; Kim, Jin Young; Min, Hye Kyeoung; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Jae Young; Han, Byung Woo; Suh, Se Won

    2013-03-01

    Difficulty in the treatment of tuberculosis and growing drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are a global health issue. Carbapenems inactivate L,D-transpeptidases; meropenem, when administered with clavulanate, showed in vivo activity against extensively drug-resistant Mtb strains. LdtMt2 (Rv2518c), one of two functional L,D-transpeptidases in Mtb, is predominantly expressed over LdtMt1 (Rv0116c). Here, the crystal structure of N-terminally truncated LdtMt2 (residues Leu131-Ala408) is reported in both ligand-free and meropenem-bound forms. The structure of meropenem-inhibited LdtMt2 provides a detailed structural view of the interactions between a carbapenem drug and Mtb L,D-transpeptidase. The structures revealed that the catalytic L,D-transpeptidase domain of LdtMt2 is preceded by a bacterial immunogloblin-like Big_5 domain and is followed by an extended C-terminal tail that interacts with both domains. Furthermore, it is shown using mass analyses that meropenem acts as a suicide inhibitor of LdtMt2. Upon acylation of the catalytic Cys354 by meropenem, the `active-site lid' undergoes a large conformational change to partially cover the active site so that the bound meropenem is accessible to the bulk solvent via three narrow paths. This work will facilitate structure-guided discovery of L,D-transpeptidase inhibitors as novel antituberculosis drugs against drug-resistant Mtb. PMID:23519417

  14. Effect of milk fermentation by kefir grains and selected single strains of lactic acid bacteria on the survival of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Macuamule, C L S; Wiid, I J; van Helden, P D; Tanner, M; Witthuhn, R C

    2016-01-18

    Mycobacterium bovis that causes Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) can be transmitted to humans thought consumption of raw and raw fermented milk products from diseased animals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) used in popular traditional milk products in Africa produce anti-microbial compounds that inhibit some pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. M. bovis BCG is an attenuated non-pathogenic vaccine strain of M. bovis and the aim of the study was to determine the effect of the fermentation process on the survival of M. bovis BCG in milk. M. bovis BCG at concentrations of 6 log CFU/ml was added to products of kefir fermentation. The survival of M. bovis BCG was monitored at 12-h intervals for 72 h by enumerating viable cells on Middlebrook 7H10 agar plates enriched with 2% BD BACTEC PANTA™. M. bovis BCG was increasingly reduced in sterile kefir that was fermented for a period of 24h and longer. In the milk fermented with kefir grains, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei or Lactobacillus casei, the viability of M. bovis BCG was reduced by 0.4 logs after 24h and by 2 logs after 48 h of fermentation. No viable M. bovis BCG was detected after 60 h of fermentation. Results from this study show that long term fermentation under certain conditions may have the potential to inactivate M. bovis BCG present in the milk. However, to ensure safety of fermented milk in Africa, fermentation should be combined with other hurdle technologies such as boiling and milk pasteurisation.

  15. Z-100, an immunomodulatory extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain Aoyama B, prevents spontaneous lymphatic metastasis of B16-BL6 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takayuki; Yoshinaga, Koji; Kobayashi, Nobuyoshi; Seto, Koichi; Orikawa, Yuki; Okamoto, Masahiro; Eta, Runa; Ohira, Yuta; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Hori, Yuko; Tanaka, Takao; Takei, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis is common in advanced-stage carcinoma and is associated with a poor prognosis. However, few effective treatments to inhibit it are available. Z-100 is an immunomodulatory extract of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain Aoyama B that contains polysaccharides such as arabinomannan and mannan. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of Z-100 on spontaneous lymphatic metastasis. C57BL/6N mice injected subcutaneously with B16-BL6 melanoma cells in the right hind footpad were administered Z-100 subcutaneously in the right inguinal region on a daily basis. On day twenty-one after the injection, the right inguinal lymph nodes were excised, and the extent of metastasis, the number of immune cells, and the amount of granzyme B protein in the lymph nodes were examined. We also investigated the combined effect of Z-100 and irradiation in this model. Results showed that Z-100 reduced number of animals with metastasis, with respective metastasis rates of 85.7%, 42.9%, 7.1% and 0.0% in saline, 0.1 mg/kg Z-100, 1 mg/kg Z-100 and 10 mg/kg Z-100 group. Further, mice that had been given Z-100 were found to have more immune cells and granzyme B protein in the lymph nodes than control mice. The combination of low dose Z-100 and irradiation also inhibited spontaneous lymph node metastases. These findings suggest that Z-100 may be beneficial in preventing lymphatic metastasis by enhancing the immune response.

  16. Inflammasomes-dependent regulation of IL-1β secretion induced by the virulent Mycobacterium bovis Beijing strain in THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Deming; Yue, Ruichao; Khan, Sher Hayat; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Yin, Xiaomin; Yang, Lifeng; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in cattle. Infection of macrophages with M. bovis leads to the activation of the "nucleotide binding and oligomerization, leucine-rich repeat and pyrin domains-containing protein 3" (NLRP3) and "absent in melanoma 2" (AIM2) inflammasomes, which in turn triggers release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) that contributes to bacterial clearance and plays a crucial role in the host defense. However, NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation is influenced by several factors and how IL-1β secretion by M. bovis-infected macrophages is regulated via the inflammasome pathway remains unclear. Here we found that IL-1β secretion and pro-IL-1β protein accumulation were inhibited in THP-1 macrophages upon exposure to the virulent M. bovis Beijing strain in the presence of high K(+) concentrations, cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) and PR-619 (a deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor). Scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by N-acetylcysteine reduced IL-1β release independent of the mitochondrial permeability transition. Collectively, our results suggest that IL-1β secretion by M. bovis-infected THP-1 macrophages is reduced by high extracellular K(+) concentration, inhibition of new protein synthesis, deubiquitination, and ROS generation. PMID:25980833

  17. Biochemical characterization of recombinant guaA-encoded guanosine monophosphate synthetase (EC 6.3.5.2) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain.

    PubMed

    Franco, Tathyana Mar A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Ducati, Rodrigo G; Lorenzini, Daniel M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine to newborns is not a reliable route for preventing TB in adults. The conversion of XMP to GMP is catalyzed by guaA-encoded GMP synthetase (GMPS), and deletions in the Shiguella flexneri guaBA operon led to an attenuated auxotrophic strain. Here we present the cloning, expression, and purification of recombinant guaA-encoded GMPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtGMPS). Mass spectrometry data, oligomeric state determination, steady-state kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and multiple sequence alignment are also presented. The homodimeric MtGMPS catalyzes the conversion of XMP, MgATP, and glutamine into GMP, ADP, PP(i), and glutamate. XMP, NH(4)(+), and Mg(2+) displayed positive homotropic cooperativity, whereas ATP and glutamine displayed hyperbolic saturation curves. The activity of ATP pyrophosphatase domain is independent of glutamine amidotransferase domain, whereas the latter cannot catalyze hydrolysis of glutamine to NH(3) and glutamate in the absence of substrates. ITC data suggest random order of binding of substrates, and PP(i) is the last product released. Sequence comparison analysis showed conservation of both Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad of N-terminal Class I amidotransferase and of amino acid residues of the P-loop of the N-type ATP pyrophosphatase family.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides essential oil extracts against Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

    PubMed Central

    Hozoorbakhsh, Fereshte; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Moghim, Sharareh; Asghari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), which remains one of the major public health problems in the world. The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) worldwide highlights the urgent need to search for alternative antimycobacterial agents. More and more people in developing countries utilize traditional medicine for their major primary health care needs. It has been determined that the medicinal plants Pulicaria gnaphalodes and Perovskia abrotanoides possess strong antibacterial effect. Materials and Methods: In this study, the antimycobacterial effects of P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil on MTB were examined. Essential oil was prepared from P. gnaphalodes aerial parts and P. abrotanoides flower. The effects of six different concentrations (20 μg/ml, 40 μg/ml, 80 μg/ml, 160 μg/ml, 320 μg/ml, and 640 μg/ml) were examined against sensitive isolates of MTB and MTB H37Rv (ATCC 27294). Results: The results showed that P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides essential oil extracts have strong inhibitory effects on MTB. This activity for P. gnaphalodes was observed from very low (4%) to good (70.9%) effect; meanwhile, this activity for P. abrotanoides was observed from very low (4%) to strong (86%) effect. Conclusion: The mean of inhibition percentage for P. gnaphalodes and P. abrotanoides in 640 μg/ml was 58.1% and 76.2%, respectively. So, P. abrotanoides plant is more effective against MTB than P. gnaphalodes. Identification of the effective fraction against MTB is a further step to be studied. PMID:27195252

  19. Genes involved in the methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) metabolic pathway of Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012.

    PubMed

    Lopes Ferreira, Nicolas; Labbé, Diane; Monot, Frédéric; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2006-05-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a persistent pollutant of surface and groundwater, and the reasons for its low biodegradability are poorly documented. Using one of the rare bacterial strains able to grow in the presence of MTBE, Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012, the protein profiles of crude extracts after growth in the presence of MTBE and glucose were compared by SDS-PAGE. Ten proteins with molecular masses of 67, 64, 63, 55, 50, 27, 24, 17, 14 and 11 kDa were induced after growth in the presence of MTBE. Partial amino acid sequences of N-terminal and internal peptide fragments of the 64 kDa protein were used to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers to amplify total DNA by PCR, yielding a DNA fragment that was used as a probe for cloning. A two-step cloning procedure was performed to obtain a 10 327 bp genomic DNA fragment containing seven ORFs, including a putative regulator, mpdR, and four genes, mpdC, orf1, mpdB and orf2, in the same cluster. The MpdB protein (64 kDa) was related to a flavoprotein of the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family, and the MpdC protein (55 kDa) showed a high similarity with NAD(P) aldehyde dehydrogenases. Heterologous expression of these gene products was performed in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2 155. The recombinant strain was able to degrade an intermediate of MTBE biodegradation, 2-methyl 1,2-propanediol, to hydroxyisobutyric acid. This is believed to be the first report of the cloning and characterization of a cluster of genes specifically involved in the MTBE biodegradation pathway of M. austroafricanum IFP 2012.

  20. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my PMID:26666970

  1. MycoCAP - Mycobacterium Comparative Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Choo, Siew Woh; Ang, Mia Yang; Dutta, Avirup; Tan, Shi Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Heydari, Hamed; Mutha, Naresh V R; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are renowned for being the causative agent of diseases like leprosy, Buruli ulcer and tuberculosis in human beings. With more and more mycobacterial genomes being sequenced, any knowledge generated from comparative genomic analysis would provide better insights into the biology, evolution, phylogeny and pathogenicity of this genus, thus helping in better management of diseases caused by Mycobacterium spp.With this motivation, we constructed MycoCAP, a new comparative analysis platform dedicated to the important genus Mycobacterium. This platform currently provides information of 2108 genome sequences of at least 55 Mycobacterium spp. A number of intuitive web-based tools have been integrated in MycoCAP particularly for comparative analysis including the PGC tool for comparison between two genomes, PathoProT for comparing the virulence genes among the Mycobacterium strains and the SuperClassification tool for the phylogenic classification of the Mycobacterium strains and a specialized classification system for strains of Mycobacterium abscessus. We hope the broad range of functions and easy-to-use tools provided in MycoCAP makes it an invaluable analysis platform to speed up the research discovery on mycobacteria for researchers. Database URL: http://mycobacterium.um.edu.my.

  2. Tuberculosis in Sudan: a study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain genotype and susceptibility to anti-tuberculosis drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sudan is a large country with a diverse population and history of civil conflict. Poverty levels are high with a gross national income per capita of less than two thousand dollars. The country has a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) with an estimated 50,000 incident cases during 2009, when the estimated prevalence was 209 cases per 100,000 of the population. Few studies have been undertaken on TB in Sudan and the prevalence of drug resistant disease is not known. Methods In this study Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 235 patients attending three treatment centers in Sudan were screened for susceptibility to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin by the proportion method on Lowenstein Jensen media. 232 isolates were also genotyped by spoligotyping. Demographic details of patients were recorded using a structured questionnaire. Statistical analyses were conducted to examine the associations between drug resistance with risk ratios computed for a set of risk factors (gender, age, case status - new or relapse, geographic origin of the patient, spoligotype, number of people per room, marital status and type of housing). Results Multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), being resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid, was found in 5% (95% CI: 2,8) of new cases and 24% (95% CI: 14,34) of previously treated patients. Drug resistance was associated with previous treatment with risk ratios of 3.51 (95% CI: 2.69-4.60; p < 0.001) for resistance to any drug and 5.23 (95% CI: 2.30-11.90; p < 0.001) for MDR-TB. Resistance was also associated with the geographic region of origin of the patient, being most frequently observed in patients from the Northern region and least in the Eastern region with risk ratios of 7.43 (95%CI:3.42,16.18; p: < 0.001) and 14.09 (95%CI:1.80,110.53; p:0.026) for resistance to any drug and MDR-TB. The major genotype observed was of the Central Asia spoligotype family (CAS1_Delhi), representing 49% of the 232 isolates

  3. The HtrA-Like Serine Protease PepD Interacts with and Modulates the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 35-kDa Antigen Outer Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    White, Mark J.; Savaryn, John P.; Bretl, Daniel J.; He, Hongjun; Penoske, Renee M.; Terhune, Scott S.; Zahrt, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant global health concern largely due to its ability to persist for extended periods within the granuloma of the host. While residing within the granuloma, the tubercle bacilli are likely to be exposed to stress that can result in formation of aberrant proteins with altered structures. Bacteria encode stress responsive determinants such as proteases and chaperones to deal with misfolded or unfolded proteins. pepD encodes an HtrA-like serine protease and is thought to process proteins altered following exposure of M. tuberculosis to extra-cytoplasmic stress. PepD functions both as a protease and chaperone in vitro, and is required for aspects of M. tuberculosis virulence in vivo. pepD is directly regulated by the stress-responsive two-component signal transduction system MprAB and indirectly by extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor SigE. Loss of PepD also impacts expression of other stress-responsive determinants in M. tuberculosis. To further understand the role of PepD in stress adaptation by M. tuberculosis, a proteomics approach was taken to identify binding proteins and possible substrates of this protein. Using subcellular fractionation, the cellular localization of wild-type and PepD variants was determined. Purified fractions as well as whole cell lysates from Mycobacterium smegmatis or M. tuberculosis strains expressing a catalytically compromised PepD variant were immunoprecipitated for PepD and subjected to LC-MS/MS analyses. Using this strategy, the 35-kDa antigen encoding a homolog of the PspA phage shock protein was identified as a predominant binding partner and substrate of PepD. We postulate that proteolytic cleavage of the 35-kDa antigen by PepD helps maintain cell wall homeostasis in Mycobacterium and regulates specific stress response pathways during periods of extracytoplasmic stress. PMID:21445360

  4. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  5. Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., two rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao-Feng; Chen, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Ji-Cheng; Jiang, Yi; Xiong, Zhi; Li, Wen-jun

    2013-11-01

    Two novel isolates of rapidly growing, Gram-stain-positive, non-chromogenic species of the genus Mycobacterium, strain YIM M13028(T) from a sediment sample collected from the South China Sea (19° 30.261' N 111° 0.247' E) at a depth of 42 m and strain YIM 121001(T) from a coastal zone sand sample collected in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, were obtained in our laboratory. Their taxonomic positions were determined by a polyphasic approach. Good growth of the two strains was observed at 28 °C and pH 7.0 with 0-2 % NaCl on tryptic soy agar medium. Both strains formed round orange-red colonies, strain YIM M13028(T) had a rough surface, while YIM 121001(T) was smooth. Cellular fatty acids, whole-cell protein profiles and TLC analysis of their mycolic acids show significant differences from reference stains. Phenotypic characteristics and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, rpoB and 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences indicated that both strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) belong to the genus Mycobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization values revealed a low relatedness (<70 %) of the two isolates with the type strains Mycobacterium neoaurum DSM 44074(T) and Mycobacterium hodleri DSM 44183(T). The low DNA-DNA hybridization values (40.4±3.5 %) between strains YIM M13028(T) and YIM 121001(T) and phenotypic distinctiveness indicated that the two strains were representatives of different novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The names proposed for these novel species are Mycobacterium sediminis sp. nov. and Mycobacterium arabiense sp. nov., and the type strains are YIM M13028(T) ( = DSM 45643(T) = KCTC 19999(T)) and YIM 121001(T) ( = DSM 45768(T) = JCM 18538(T)), respectively.

  6. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  7. Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Behr, Marcel A

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies have provided a refined understanding of the genetic diversity within the Mycobacterium genus, and more specifically within Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These results have informed a new perspective on the macro- and micro-evolution of the tubercle bacillus. In the first step, a M. kansasii-like opportunistic pathogen acquired new genes, through horizontal gene transfer, that enabled it to better exploit an intracellular niche and ultimately evolve into a professional pathogen. In the second step, different subspecies and strains of the M. tuberculosis complex emerged through mutation and deletion of unnecessary DNA. Understanding the differences between M. tuberculosis and related less pathogenic mycobacteria is expected to reveal key bacterial virulence mechanisms and provide opportunities to understand host resistance to mycobacterial infection. Understanding differences within the M. tuberculosis complex and the evolutionary forces shaping these differences is important for investigating the basis of its success as both a symbiont and a pathogen.

  8. Relative frequency of 4 major strain types of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis in Canadian dairy herds using a novel single nucleotide polymorphism-based polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, Christina; Barkema, Herman W; De Buck, Jeroen

    2016-10-01

    Johne's disease is a worldwide concern, as it causes huge economic losses. The etiological agent, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), has limited genetic diversity, impeding efforts to understand transmission and distribution of strain types. Whole-genome sequencing was previously performed on a representative set of MAP isolates from Canadian dairy herds and 9 divergent clades were identified. Four clades were of particular interest, as they were either MAP types rarely reported in North America, or they represented a substantial proportion of isolates recovered from dairy farms in Canada. One clade included type I/III isolates, whereas the remaining clades included type II isolates. Variant sites in the MAP genome are often separated by thousands of base pairs, limiting use of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotyping on a single genomic region. Therefore, a SNP-PCR assay was developed to facilitate interrogation of 5 SNP in 2 distant regions of the genome, linking them together in a single PCR reaction for subsequent Sanger sequencing. This high-throughput assay enabled discrimination of 602 MAP isolates from 264 herds (from all 10 provinces). More than 1 isolate was cultured from 133 herds, 14 of which included multiple subtypes. A previously identified dominant type included 87% of isolates, whereas the Bison type was more widespread than previously reported. The latter type and isolates from a second clade of interest were overrepresented in Québec and Saskatchewan, respectively. In conclusion, the distribution and relative frequency of MAP subtypes within Canadian dairy herds were assessed using a novel SNP-based typing assay. These findings will contribute to understanding the clinical relevance and transmission dynamics of MAP in this population and elsewhere. PMID:27497900

  9. Structural basis for the inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis l,d-transpeptidase by meropenem, a drug effective against extensively drug-resistant strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Ji Young; An, Doo Ri; Yoon, Hye Jin; Kim, Jin Young; Min, Hye Kyeoung; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Jae Young; Han, Byung Woo; Suh, Se Won

    2013-01-01

    Difficulty in the treatment of tuberculosis and growing drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are a global health issue. Carbapenems inactivate l,d-transpeptidases; meropenem, when administered with clavulanate, showed in vivo activity against extensively drug-resistant Mtb strains. LdtMt2 (Rv2518c), one of two functional l,d-transpeptidases in Mtb, is predominantly expressed over LdtMt1 (Rv0116c). Here, the crystal structure of N-terminally truncated LdtMt2 (residues Leu131–Ala408) is reported in both ligand-free and meropenem-bound forms. The structure of meropenem-inhibited LdtMt2 provides a detailed structural view of the interactions between a carbapenem drug and Mtb l,d-transpeptidase. The structures revealed that the catalytic l,d-­transpeptidase domain of LdtMt2 is preceded by a bacterial immunogloblin-like Big_5 domain and is followed by an extended C-terminal tail that interacts with both domains. Furthermore, it is shown using mass analyses that meropenem acts as a suicide inhibitor of LdtMt2. Upon acylation of the catalytic Cys354 by meropenem, the ‘active-site lid’ undergoes a large conformational change to partially cover the active site so that the bound meropenem is accessible to the bulk solvent via three narrow paths. This work will facilitate structure-guided discovery of l,d-transpeptidase inhibitors as novel antituberculosis drugs against drug-resistant Mtb. PMID:23519417

  10. Role of the pks15/1 gene in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evidence that all strains synthesize glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic methyl esters and that strains devoid of phenolglycolipids harbor a frameshift mutation in the pks15/1 gene.

    PubMed

    Constant, Patricia; Perez, Esther; Malaga, Wladimir; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Saurel, Olivier; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2002-10-11

    Diesters of phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol are important virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the two main mycobacterial pathogens in humans. They are both long-chain beta-diols, and their biosynthetic pathway is beginning to be elucidated. Although the two classes of molecules share a common lipid core, phthiocerol diesters have been found in all the strains of the M. tuberculosis complex examined although phenolphthiocerol diesters are produced by only a few groups of strains. To address the question of the origin of this diversity 8 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analyzed. We report the presence of glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl esters, structurally related to the type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipids, in the culture media of all reference strains of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that the strains devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are unable to elongate the putative p-hydroxybenzoic acid precursor. We also show that all the strains of M. tuberculosis examined and deficient in the production of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are natural mutants with a frameshift mutation in pks15/1 whereas a single open reading frame for pks15/1 is found in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. leprae, and strains of M. tuberculosis that produce phenolphthiocerol derivatives. Complementation of the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis, which is devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives, with the fused pks15/1 gene from M. bovis BCG restored phenolphthiocerol glycolipids production. Conversely, disruption of the pks15/1 gene in M. bovis BCG led to the abolition of the synthesis of type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipid. These data indicate that Pks15/1 is involved in the elongation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid to give p-hydroxyphenylalkanoates, which in turn are converted, presumably by the PpsA-E synthase, to phenolphthiocerol derivatives.

  11. Mycobacterium bovis Infection, Lyon, France

    PubMed Central

    Pichat, Catherine; Carret, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    In a 5-year retrospective study, we used spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units to type 13 strains of Mycobacterium bovis isolated from human sources. Despite the relatively high incidence of human tuberculosis caused by M. bovis (2%), these tools showed no clonal evolution and no relationships between the isolates. PMID:17073096

  12. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  13. [Mycobacterium avium complex in water buffaloes slaughtered for consumption].

    PubMed

    Freitas, J; Panetta, J C; Curcio, M; Ueki, S Y

    2001-06-01

    Two mycobacterium strains isolated from lung tissue a apical lymph nodes of slaughtered water buffaloes were biochemically analyzed and identified as Mycobacterium avium complex strains. Association between these microorganisms and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and the potential risk posed by eating infected animals and their products, was discussed.

  14. The PE_PGRS Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Ca(2+) Binding Mediators of Host-Pathogen Interaction.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Khandelwal, Radhika; Sharma, Yogendra; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2016-08-23

    The phenomenal success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) as a pathogen is primarily based on its ability to modulate host immune responses. The genome of M.tb encodes multiple immunomodulatory proteins, including several members of the multigenic PE_PPE family of which the PE_PGRS proteins are a subset. Curiously, 56 of the 61 PE_PGRS proteins contain multiple copies of the glycine-rich sequence motif GGXGXD/NXUX, a nonapeptide sequence predicted to bind Ca(2+), but the functional significance of these motifs remains a mystery. Here we provide evidence via isothermal titration calorimetry, (45)Ca blotting, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy that Ca(2+) binds to the PE_PGRS proteins, PE_PGRS33 (Rv1818c) (10 motifs) and PE_PGRS61 (Rv3653) (one motif). Ca(2+) was observed not to bind to PE_PGRS8 (Rv0742), which lacks nonapeptide motifs. Using recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains expressing Rv1818c and Rv3653 and the THP-1 macrophage model of infection, we show that the two proteins mediate Ca(2+)-dependent upregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, events critical to the pathogenesis of M.tb. Both Rv1818c and Rv3653 interact with TLR2 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, providing a novel mechanistic basis for their immunomodulatory effects. Mutations in the nonapeptide motif of Rv3653 led to compromised Ca(2+) binding, validating the functional criticality of this motif. This study demonstrates for the first time not only their Ca(2+) binding properties but also an essential role for Ca(2+) in the functioning of the M.tb PE_PGRS proteins, opening up the possibility of developing novel anti-tuberculosis therapeutics that inhibit Ca(2+)-PE_PGRS binding. PMID:27483162

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxO (Rv2346c) promotes bacillary survival by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Dal Molin, Michael; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Jena, Prajna; Selchow, Petra; Sengupta, Srabasti; Meuli, Michael; Sander, Peter; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives inside the macrophages by modulating the host immune responses in its favor. The 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6; esxA) of Mtb is known as a potent virulence and T-cell antigenic determinant. At least 23 such ESAT-6 family proteins are encoded in the genome of Mtb; however, the function of many of them is still unknown. We herein report that ectopic expression of Mtb Rv2346c (esxO), a member of ESAT-6 family proteins, in non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis strain (MsmRv2346c) aids host cell invasion and intracellular bacillary persistence. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MsmRv2346c infection abated macrophage immunity by inducing host cell death and genomic instability as evident from the appearance of several DNA damage markers. We further report that the induction of genomic instability in infected cells was due to increase in the hosts oxidative stress responses. MsmRv2346c infection was also found to induce autophagy and modulate the immune function of macrophages. In contrast, blockade of Rv2346c induced oxidative stress by treatment with ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented the host cell death, autophagy induction and genomic instability in infected macrophages. Conversely, MtbΔRv2346c mutant did not show any difference in intracellular survival and oxidative stress responses. We envision that Mtb ESAT-6 family protein Rv2346c dampens antibacterial effector functions namely by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in infected macrophages, while loss of Rv2346c gene function may be compensated by other redundant ESAT-6 family proteins. Thus EsxO plays an important role in mycobacterial pathogenesis in the context of innate immunity. PMID:26786654

  16. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE Proteins Rv0285 and Rv1386 Modulate Innate Immunity and Mediate Bacillary Survival in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Bhavana Mishra; Kannan, Nisha; Vemu, Lakshmi; Raghunand, Tirumalai R.

    2012-01-01

    The unique PE/PPE multigene family of proteins occupies almost 10% of the coding sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the causative agent of human tuberculosis. Although some members of this family have been shown to be involved in pathways essential to M.tb pathogenesis, their precise physiological functions remain largely undefined. Here, we investigate the roles of the conserved members of the ‘PE only’ subfamily Rv0285 (PE5) and Rv1386 (PE15) in mediating host-pathogen interactions. Recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains expressing PE5 and PE15 showed enhanced survival vs controls in J774.1 and THP-1 macrophages - this increase in viable counts was correlated with a reduction in transcript levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase. An up-regulation of anti- and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels was also observed in infected macrophages implying an immuno-modulatory function for these proteins. Induction of IL-10 production upon infection of THP-1 macrophages was associated with increased phosphorylation of the MAP Kinases p38 and ERK1/2, which was abolished in the presence of the pharmacological inhibitors SB203580 and PD98059. The PE5-PPE4 and PE15-PPE20 gene pairs were observed to be co-operonic in M.tb, hinting at an additional level of complexity in the functioning of these proteins. We conclude that M.tb exploits the PE proteins to evade the host immune response by altering the Th1 and Th2 type balance thereby favouring in vivo bacillary survival. PMID:23284742

  17. The PE_PGRS Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Are Ca(2+) Binding Mediators of Host-Pathogen Interaction.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Khandelwal, Radhika; Sharma, Yogendra; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2016-08-23

    The phenomenal success of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) as a pathogen is primarily based on its ability to modulate host immune responses. The genome of M.tb encodes multiple immunomodulatory proteins, including several members of the multigenic PE_PPE family of which the PE_PGRS proteins are a subset. Curiously, 56 of the 61 PE_PGRS proteins contain multiple copies of the glycine-rich sequence motif GGXGXD/NXUX, a nonapeptide sequence predicted to bind Ca(2+), but the functional significance of these motifs remains a mystery. Here we provide evidence via isothermal titration calorimetry, (45)Ca blotting, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy that Ca(2+) binds to the PE_PGRS proteins, PE_PGRS33 (Rv1818c) (10 motifs) and PE_PGRS61 (Rv3653) (one motif). Ca(2+) was observed not to bind to PE_PGRS8 (Rv0742), which lacks nonapeptide motifs. Using recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis strains expressing Rv1818c and Rv3653 and the THP-1 macrophage model of infection, we show that the two proteins mediate Ca(2+)-dependent upregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, events critical to the pathogenesis of M.tb. Both Rv1818c and Rv3653 interact with TLR2 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, providing a novel mechanistic basis for their immunomodulatory effects. Mutations in the nonapeptide motif of Rv3653 led to compromised Ca(2+) binding, validating the functional criticality of this motif. This study demonstrates for the first time not only their Ca(2+) binding properties but also an essential role for Ca(2+) in the functioning of the M.tb PE_PGRS proteins, opening up the possibility of developing novel anti-tuberculosis therapeutics that inhibit Ca(2+)-PE_PGRS binding.

  18. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Downregulating Genes for the Development of Antituberculous Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Aaron; Chen, Yong; Ji, Qingzhou; Zhu, Guofeng; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Vilchèze, Catherine; Weisbrod, Torin; Li, Weimin; Xu, Jiayong; Larsen, Michelle; Zhang, Jinghang; Porcelli, Steven A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) plays a critical role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in part by augmenting T cell responses through promoting macrophage phagolysosomal fusion (thereby optimizing CD4+ T cell immunity by enhancing antigen presentation) and apoptosis (a process that can lead to cross-priming of CD8+ T cells). M. tuberculosis can evade antituberculosis (anti-TB) immunity by inhibiting host cell TNF production via expression of specific mycobacterial components. We hypothesized that M. tuberculosis mutants with an increased capacity to induce host cell TNF production (TNF-enhancing mutants) and thus with enhanced immunogenicity can be useful for vaccine development. To identify mycobacterial genes that regulate host cell TNF production, we used a TNF reporter macrophage clone to screen an H37Rv M. tuberculosis cosmid library constructed in M. smegmatis. The screen has identified a set of TNF-downregulating mycobacterial genes that, when deleted in H37Rv, generate TNF-enhancing mutants. Analysis of mutants disrupted for a subset of TNF-downregulating genes, annotated to code for triacylglycerol synthases and fatty acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase, enzymes that concern lipid biosynthesis and metabolism, has revealed that these strains can promote macrophage phagolysosomal fusion and apoptosis better than wild-type (WT) bacilli. Immunization of mice with the TNF-enhancing M. tuberculosis mutants elicits CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that are superior to those engendered by WT H37Rv. The results suggest that TNF-upregulating M. tuberculosis genes can be targeted to enhance the immunogenicity of mycobacterial strains that can serve as the substrates for the development of novel anti-TB vaccines. PMID:27247233

  19. Proteomics Analysis of Three Different Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under In vitro Hypoxia and Evaluation of Hypoxia Associated Antigen’s Specific Memory T Cells in Healthy Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Gopalan, Akilandeswari; Das, Sulochana D.; Raja, Alamelu

    2016-01-01

    In vitro mimicking conditions are thought to reflect the environment experienced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis inside the host granuloma. The majority of in vitro dormancy experimental models use laboratory-adapted strains H37Rv or Erdman instead of prevalent clinical strains involved during disease outbreaks. Thus, we included the most prevalent clinical strains (S7 and S10) of M. tuberculosis from south India in addition to H37Rv for our in vitro oxygen depletion (hypoxia) experimental model. Cytosolic proteins were prepared from hypoxic cultures, resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were characterized by mass spectrometry. In total, 49 spots were characterized as over-expressed or newly emergent between the three strains. Two antigens (ESAT-6, Lpd) out of the 49 characterized spots were readily available in recombinant form in our lab. Hence, these two genes were overexpressed, purified and used for in vitro stimulation of whole blood collected from healthy household contacts (HHC) and active pulmonary tuberculosis patients (PTB). Multicolor flow cytometry analysis showed high levels of antigen specific CD4+ central memory T cells in the circulation of HHC compared to PTB (p < 0.005 for ESAT-6 and p < 0.0005 for Lpd). This shows proteins that are predicted to be up regulated during in vitro hypoxia in most prevalent clinical strains would indicate possible potential immunogens. In vitro hypoxia experiments with most prevalent clinical strains would also elucidate the probable true representative antigens involved in adaptive mechanisms. PMID:27667981

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Three Different Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under In vitro Hypoxia and Evaluation of Hypoxia Associated Antigen’s Specific Memory T Cells in Healthy Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Gopalan, Akilandeswari; Das, Sulochana D.; Raja, Alamelu

    2016-01-01

    In vitro mimicking conditions are thought to reflect the environment experienced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis inside the host granuloma. The majority of in vitro dormancy experimental models use laboratory-adapted strains H37Rv or Erdman instead of prevalent clinical strains involved during disease outbreaks. Thus, we included the most prevalent clinical strains (S7 and S10) of M. tuberculosis from south India in addition to H37Rv for our in vitro oxygen depletion (hypoxia) experimental model. Cytosolic proteins were prepared from hypoxic cultures, resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were characterized by mass spectrometry. In total, 49 spots were characterized as over-expressed or newly emergent between the three strains. Two antigens (ESAT-6, Lpd) out of the 49 characterized spots were readily available in recombinant form in our lab. Hence, these two genes were overexpressed, purified and used for in vitro stimulation of whole blood collected from healthy household contacts (HHC) and active pulmonary tuberculosis patients (PTB). Multicolor flow cytometry analysis showed high levels of antigen specific CD4+ central memory T cells in the circulation of HHC compared to PTB (p < 0.005 for ESAT-6 and p < 0.0005 for Lpd). This shows proteins that are predicted to be up regulated during in vitro hypoxia in most prevalent clinical strains would indicate possible potential immunogens. In vitro hypoxia experiments with most prevalent clinical strains would also elucidate the probable true representative antigens involved in adaptive mechanisms.

  1. Utilization of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to Identify environmental Strains of Mycobacterium Complex

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species within the Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) group are found to be both prevalent and persistent in drinking water distribution systems. The MAC is composed of two predominant species: M. avium and M. intracellulare. These species have the ability to survive drinking ...

  2. Rv1698 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Represents a New Class of Channel-forming Outer Membrane Proteins*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Siroy, Axel; Mailaender, Claudia; Harder, Daniel; Koerber, Stephanie; Wolschendorf, Frank; Danilchanka, Olga; Wang, Ying; Heinz, Christian; Niederweis, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane composed of mycolic acids and a large variety of other lipids. Its protective function is an essential virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only OmpA, which has numerous homologs in Gram-negative bacteria, is known to form channels in the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis so far. Rv1698 was predicted to be an outer membrane protein of unknown function. Expression of rv1698 restored the sensitivity to ampicillin and chloramphenicol of a Mycobacterium smegmatis mutant lacking the main porin MspA. Uptake experiments showed that Rv1698 partially complemented the permeability defect of the M. smegmatis porin mutant for glucose. These results indicated that Rv1698 provides an unspecific pore that can partially substitute for MspA. Lipid bilayer experiments demonstrated that purified Rv1698 is an integral membrane protein that indeed produces channels. The main single channel conductance is 4.5 ± 0.3 nanosiemens in 1 m KCl. Zero current potential measurements revealed a weak preference for cations. Whole cell digestion of recombinant M. smegmatis with proteinase K showed that Rv1698 is surface-accessible. Taken together, these experiments demonstrated that Rv1698 is a channel protein that is likely involved in transport processes across the outer membrane of M. tuberculosis. Rv1698 has single homologs of unknown functions in Corynebacterineae and thus represents the first member of a new class of channel proteins specific for mycolic acid-containing outer membranes. PMID:18434314

  3. Some South African Rubiaceae Tree Leaf Extracts Have Antimycobacterial Activity Against Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Mycobacterium Species.

    PubMed

    Aro, Abimbola O; Dzoyem, Jean P; Hlokwe, Tiny M; Madoroba, Evelyn; Eloff, Jacobus N; McGaw, Lyndy J

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains an ongoing threat to human health. Many plant species contain antimycobacterial compounds, which may serve as template molecules for new anti-TB drugs. The Rubiaceae family is the largest family of trees in southern Africa, and preliminary evidence revealed antimycobacterial activity in several species of the genus, motivating further studies. Leaf extracts of 15 tree species from the Rubiaceae family were screened for antimycobacterial activity against pathogenic M. tuberculosis and non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) using a twofold serial microdilution assay. Cytotoxicity was determined using a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay against C3A liver cells and Vero kidney cells. Minimum inhibitory concentration values as low as 0.04 mg/mL against M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis were recorded. Activity against M. aurum was the best predictor of activity against pathogenic M. tuberculosis (correlation coefficient = 0.9). Bioautography indicated at least 40 different antimycobacterial compounds in the extracts. Cytotoxicity of the extracts varied, and Oxyanthus speciosus had the most promising selectivity index values. PMID:25857273

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium massiliense

    PubMed Central

    Raiol, Tainá; Ribeiro, Guilherme Menegói; Maranhão, Andréa Queiroz; Bocca, Anamélia Lorenzetti; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense is a rapidly growing bacterium associated with opportunistic infections. The genome of a representative isolate (strain GO 06) recovered from wound samples from patients who underwent arthroscopic or laparoscopic surgery was sequenced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first announcement of the complete genome sequence of an M. massiliense strain. PMID:22965084

  5. Protein Kinase B (PknB) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is Essential for Growth of the Pathogen in Vitro as well as for Survival within the Host*

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Khan, Shazia; Nagarajan, Sathya Narayanan; Forti, Francesca; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein kinase B (PknB) comprises an intracellular kinase domain, connected through a transmembrane domain to an extracellular region that contains four PASTA domains. The present study describes the comprehensive analysis of different domains of PknB in the context of viability in avirulent and virulent mycobacteria. We find stringent regulation of PknB expression necessary for cell survival, with depletion or overexpression of PknB leading to cell death. Although PknB-mediated kinase activity is essential for cell survival, active kinase lacking the transmembrane or extracellular domain fails to complement conditional mutants not expressing PknB. By creating chimeric kinases, we find that the intracellular kinase domain has unique functions in the virulent strain, which cannot be substituted by other kinases. Interestingly, we find that although the presence of the C-terminal PASTA domain is dispensable in the avirulent M. smegmatis, all four PASTA domains are essential in M. tuberculosis. The differential behavior of PknB vis-à-vis the number of essential PASTA domains and the specificity of kinase domain functions suggest that PknB-mediated growth and signaling events differ in virulent compared with avirulent mycobacteria. Mouse infection studies performed to determine the role of PknB in mediating pathogen survival in the host demonstrate that PknB is not only critical for growth of the pathogen in vitro but is also essential for the survival of the pathogen in the host. PMID:24706757

  6. Insights into the distribution and functions of the eukaryotic GPI-like anchored genes among Mycobacterium from a comparative genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wanyan; Zeng, Jie; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins range from small peptides to larger antigens and fulfill a variety of cellular functions in eukaryotes. We speculated there should be such molecules in intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium due to their complex interplay with the host. However, no prior publications have touched this topic. To explore the existence and distribution of GPI-like molecules among Mycobacterium, we exhaustively analyzed all publicly available Mycobacterium genomes and found that the GPI-like signal sequences are prevalent among Mycobacterium, and a significant dichotomy between nonpathogenic Mycobacterium (exemplified by Mycobacterium smegmatis) and pathogenic Mycobacterium (exemplified by Mycobacterium tuberculosis), through genome-wide GPI-SOM analysis. Some well-documented anti-tuberculosis drug targets are predicted to have GPI-like anchored signals, such as KasA and atpE. Interestingly, Pro-Glu (PE) and Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) proteins predicted to have GPI-anchoring sequence are unique to pathogenic Mycobacterium. These results can be further explored for better control measures against tuberculosis. PMID:23272800

  7. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  8. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A.; Bannantine, John P.; Shoyama, Fernanda M.; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  9. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    PubMed

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted. PMID:27597934

  10. Biological activity of secondary metabolites produced by a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Boruah, H P Deka; Kumar, B S Dileep

    2002-01-01

    Biological activity of secondary metabolites produced by a plant-growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens was evaluated. The strain produced antibiotics phenazine (PHE), 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (PHL) and siderophore pyoverdin (PYO) in standard King's B and succinic acid media, respectively. After extraction, PYO was identified by comparing the UV-spectra and moss-green color development after 'diazotized sulfanilic acid' (DSA) spray in TLC. PHE and PHL were identified by comparing standard compounds on TLC and orange-color development immediately after DSA spray. In vitro antibiosis study of the metabolites revealed their antibacterial and antifungal activity against bacterial test organisms Corynebacterium sp., Mycobacterium phlei and M. smegmatis and test fungi Fusarium moniliforme, F. oxysporum, F. semitectum, F. solani and Rhizoctonia solani. A statistically significantly higher plant growth was recorded in siderophore-amended plantlets under gnotobiotic conditions whereas PHE and PHL did not show any plant-growth-promoting activity. These results support the importance of the secondary metabolites produced by the strain P. fluorescens in enhancing plant growth and in controlling fungal and bacterial pathogens. PMID:12422510

  11. Diterpene production in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Prach, Lisa; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.; Alber, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes are a structurally diverse class of molecules common in plants, although they are very rarely found in bacteria. We report the identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) of three diterpenes proposed to promote phagolysosome maturation arrest. MS analysis reveals that these diterpenes are novel compounds not previously identified in other organisms. The diterpene with highest abundance in Mtb has a mass fragmentation pattern identical to edaxadiene, which is produced in vitro from geranylgeranyl diphosphate by the enzymes Rv3377c and Rv3378c [Mann FM et al. (2009) J Am Chem Soc 131, 17526–17527]. A second diterpene found in Mtb has a similar mass spectrum, and is always observed in the same proportion relative to edaxadiene, indicating that it is a side product of the Rv3378c reaction in vivo. We name this second diterpene olefin edaxadiene B. The least abundant of the three diterpenes in Mtb extracts is tuberculosinol, a dephosphorylated side-product of the edaxadiene pathway intermediate produced by Rv3377c [Nakano C et al. (2009) Chembiochem 10, 2060–2071; Nakano C et al. (2005) Chem Commun (Camb) 8, 1016–1018]. A frameshift in Rv3377c in Mtb completely eliminates diterpene production, whereas expression of Rv3377c and Rv3378c in the nonpathogenic M. smegmatis is sufficient to produce edaxadiene and edaxadiene B. These studies define the pathway of edaxadiene and edaxadiene B biosynthesis in vivo. Rv3377c and Rv3378c are unique to Mtb and M. bovis, making them candidates for selective therapeutics and diagnostics. PMID:20670276

  12. Adaptive immunity in the colostrum-deprived calf: response to early vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis strain bacille Calmette Guerin and ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Nonnecke, B J; Waters, W R; Goff, J P; Foote, M R

    2012-01-01

    Responses of the newborn calf to vaccination are frequently characterized by marginal antibody (Ab) responses. The present study evaluated effects of colostrum ingestion on the adaptive immune response of the preruminant calf to early vaccination. Colostrum-fed (CF) and colostrum-deprived (CD) calves were vaccinated at 2 d of age with Mycobacterium bovis, Pasteur strain of bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG), and ovalbumin (OVA) to track development of the adaptive immune response during the first 8 wk of life. Dams were also vaccinated with BCG prepartum. At wk 0, serum IgG(1), IgG(2), IgA, and IgM were elevated in CF calves, with IgG(1) predominating. In these calves, IgG(2), IgA, and IgM concentrations decreased with age. The CD calves, in contrast, had very low or undetectable serum immunoglobulin concentrations at wk 0 followed by an age-related increase in IgG(1), IgG(2), and IgM concentrations, suggesting endogenous production of these immunoglobulin classes. Immunoblot and ELISA analyses of Ab response to BCG vaccination indicated that colostrum ingestion was associated with measurable serum anti-mycobacterial Ab in CF calves during the first month postpartum, with substantially lower levels at 7 wk of age. Although mycobacteria-specific Ab was undetectable in CD calves at wk 0, it was present at 4 and 7 wk of age, suggesting that these calves, unlike CF calves, were capable of generating an Ab response to BCG vaccination. Antibody responses of CF and CD calves to vaccination with OVA, an antigen not present in the natural environment of dairy cattle, were of comparable magnitude and characterized by a progressive increase in Ab levels from birth (wk 0) to 7 wk of age. The disparate Ab responses of CF calves to BCG and OVA suggest that maternal antigenic experience or exposure influences Ab responses of the colostrum-fed preruminant calf to early vaccination. Ex vivo, antigen [OVA and M. bovis-derived purified protein derivative (PPDb)]-induced IFN-γ and nitric

  13. The Chromosomal parDE2 Toxin–Antitoxin System of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv: Genetic and Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Manish; Nayyar, Nishtha; Chawla, Meenakshi; Sitaraman, Ramakrishnan; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; Banerjee, Nirupama

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv escapes host-generated stresses by entering a dormant persistent state. Activation of toxin-antitoxin modules is one of the mechanisms known to trigger such a state with low metabolic activity. M. tuberculosis harbors a large number of TA systems mostly located within discernible genomic islands. We have investigated the parDE2 operon of M. tuberculosis H37Rv encoding MParE2 toxin and MParD2 antitoxin proteins. The parDE2 locus was transcriptionally active from growth phase till late stationary phase in M. tuberculosis. A functional promoter located upstream of parD2 GTG start-site was identified by 5′-RACE and lacZ reporter assay. The MParD2 protein transcriptionally regulated the PparDE2 promoter by interacting through Arg16 and Ser15 residues located in the N-terminus. In Escherichia coli, ectopic expression of MParE2 inhibited growth in early stages, with a drastic reduction in colony forming units. Live-dead analysis revealed that the reduction was not due to cell death alone but due to formation of viable but non-culturable cells (VBNCs) also. The toxic activity of the protein, identified in the C-terminal residues Glu98 and Arg102, was neutralized by the antitoxin MParD2, both in vivo and in vitro. MParE2 inhibited mycobacterial DNA gyrase and interacted with the GyrB subunit without affecting its ATPase activity. Introduction of parE2 gene in the heterologous M. smegmatis host prevented growth and colony formation by the transformed cells. An M. smegmatis strain containing the parDE2 operon also switched to a non-culturable phenotype in response to oxidative stress. Loss in colony-forming ability of a major part of the MParE2 expressing cells suggests its potential role in dormancy, a cellular strategy for adaptation to environmental stresses. Our study has laid the foundation for future investigations to explore the physiological significance of parDE2 operon in mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:27379032

  14. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Alex I.; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Leite, Luciana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  15. New Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Expression Vectors: Improving Genetic Control over Mycobacterial Promoters.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Alex I; Goulart, Cibelly; Rofatto, Henrique K; Oliveira, Sergio C; Leite, Luciana C C; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2016-04-01

    The expression of many antigens, stimulatory molecules, or even metabolic pathways in mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium bovis BCG or M. smegmatis was made possible through the development of shuttle vectors, and several recombinant vaccines have been constructed. However, gene expression in any of these systems relied mostly on the selection of natural promoters expected to provide the required level of expression by trial and error. To establish a systematic selection of promoters with a range of strengths, we generated a library of mutagenized promoters through error-prone PCR of the strong PL5 promoter, originally from mycobacteriophage L5. These promoters were cloned upstream of the enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter gene, and recombinant M. smegmatis bacteria exhibiting a wide range of fluorescence levels were identified. A set of promoters was selected and identified as having high (pJK-F8), intermediate (pJK-B7, pJK-E6, pJK-D6), or low (pJK-C1) promoter strengths in both M. smegmatis and M. bovisBCG. The sequencing of the promoter region demonstrated that it was extensively modified (6 to 11%) in all of the plasmids selected. To test the functionality of the system, two different expression vectors were demonstrated to allow corresponding expression levels of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen Sm29 in BCG. The approach used here can be used to adjust expression levels for synthetic and/or systems biology studies or for vaccine development to maximize the immune response. PMID:26850295

  16. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the apa gene coding for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 45/47-kilodalton secreted antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Laqueyrerie, A; Militzer, P; Romain, F; Eiglmeier, K; Cole, S; Marchal, G

    1995-10-01

    Effective protection against a virulent challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is induced mainly by previous immunization with living attenuated mycobacteria, and it has been hypothesized that secreted proteins serve as major targets in the specific immune response. To identify and purify molecules present in culture medium filtrate which are dominant antigens during effective vaccination, a two-step selection procedure was used to select antigens able to interact with T lymphocytes and/or antibodies induced by immunization with living bacteria and to counterselect antigens interacting with the immune effectors induced by immunization with dead bacteria. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG 45/47-kDa antigen complex, present in BCG culture filtrate, has been previously identified and isolated (F. Romain, A. Laqueyrerie, P. Militzer, P. Pescher, P. Chavarot, M. Lagranderie, G. Auregan, M. Gheorghiu, and G. Marchal, Infect. Immun. 61:742-750, 1993). Since the cognate antibodies recognize the very same antigens present in M. tuberculosis culture medium filtrates, a project was undertaken to clone, express, and sequence the corresponding gene of M. tuberculosis. An M. tuberculosis shuttle cosmid library was transferred in Mycobacterium smegmatis and screened with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the clones expressing the proteins. A clone containing a 40-kb DNA insert was selected, and by means of subcloning in Escherichia coli, a 2-kb fragment that coded for the molecules was identified. An open reading frame in the 2,061-nucleotide sequence codes for a secreted protein with a consensus signal peptide of 39 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 28,779 Da. The gene was referred to as apa because of the high percentages of proline (21.7%) and alanine (19%) in the purified protein. Southern hybridization analysis of digested total genomic DNA from M. tuberculosis (reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra) indicated that the apa gene was present as a

  18. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T). PMID:27189351

  19. Analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 85A antigen promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, L; Baulard, A; Estaquier, J; Content, J; Capron, A; Locht, C

    1995-01-01

    A mycobacterial expression-secretion vector was constructed in which the Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (phoA) reporter gene was placed under the control of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 85A promoter and secretion signal sequences. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG, PhoA activity could readily be detected on the mycobacterial cell surface and in the culture supernatant, indicating that the 85A signals can drive heterologous expression and secretion in both species. In contrast to the mycobacteria, the 85A promoter did not function in E. coli. We mapped the promoter region by progressive deletions using BAL 31 exonuclease and by primer extension analysis. Insertion and deletion mutations within the promoter region indicated that, unlike most E. coli promoters but similar to Streptomyces promoters, the position of the putative -35 region was not critical for efficient promoter activity. In addition, we investigated the ability of the identified signals to drive the production and secretion in BCG of recombinant Schistosoma mansoni glutathione S-transferase (Sm28GST), a protective antigen against schistosomiasis. BALB/c mice immunized with the recombinant BCG by a single dose exhibited a weak but specific T-cell response to Sm28GST. PMID:7836298

  20. Whole genome analyses of marine fish pathogenic isolate, Mycobacterium sp. 012931.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Hwang, Seong Don; Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Mori, Tetsushi; Aoki, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium is a genus within the order Actinomycetales that comprises of a large number of well-characterized species, several of which includes pathogens known to cause serious disease in human and animal. Here, we report the whole genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931 isolated from the marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). Mycobacterium sp. 012931 is a fish pathogen causing serious damage to aquaculture farms in Japan. DNA dot plot analysis showed that Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was more closely related to Mycobacterium marinum when compared across several Mycobacterium species. However, little conservation of the gene order was observed between Mycobacterium sp. 012931 and M. marinum genome. The annotated 5,464 genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was classified into 26 subsystems. The insertion/deletion gene analysis shows Mycobacterium sp. 012931 had 643 unique genes that were not found in the M. marinum strains. In the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem, both insertion and deletion genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 were associated with the PPE gene cluster of Mycobacteria. Of seven plcB genes in Mycobacterium sp. 012931, plcB_2 and plcB_3 showed low identities with those of M. marinum strains. Therefore, Mycobacterium sp. 012931 has differences on genetic and virulence from M. marinum and may induce different interaction mechanisms between host and pathogen. PMID:24879010

  1. Whole genome analyses of marine fish pathogenic isolate, Mycobacterium sp. 012931.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Satoru; Kabayama, Jun; Hwang, Seong Don; Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Jung, Tae Sung; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Takeyama, Haruko; Mori, Tetsushi; Aoki, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium is a genus within the order Actinomycetales that comprises of a large number of well-characterized species, several of which includes pathogens known to cause serious disease in human and animal. Here, we report the whole genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. strain 012931 isolated from the marine fish, yellowtail (Seriola quinqueradiata). Mycobacterium sp. 012931 is a fish pathogen causing serious damage to aquaculture farms in Japan. DNA dot plot analysis showed that Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was more closely related to Mycobacterium marinum when compared across several Mycobacterium species. However, little conservation of the gene order was observed between Mycobacterium sp. 012931 and M. marinum genome. The annotated 5,464 genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 was classified into 26 subsystems. The insertion/deletion gene analysis shows Mycobacterium sp. 012931 had 643 unique genes that were not found in the M. marinum strains. In the virulence, disease, and defense subsystem, both insertion and deletion genes of Mycobacterium sp. 012931 were associated with the PPE gene cluster of Mycobacteria. Of seven plcB genes in Mycobacterium sp. 012931, plcB_2 and plcB_3 showed low identities with those of M. marinum strains. Therefore, Mycobacterium sp. 012931 has differences on genetic and virulence from M. marinum and may induce different interaction mechanisms between host and pathogen.

  2. Development of cyclobutene- and cyclobutane-functionalized fatty acids with inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sittiwong, Wantanee; Zinniel, Denise K.; Fenton, Robert J.; Marshall, Darrel; Story, Courtney B.; Kim, Bohkyung; Lee, Ji-Young; Powers, Robert; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven fatty acid analogs incorporating four-membered carbocycles (cyclobutenes, cyclobutanes, cyclobutanones, and cyclobutanols) were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). A number of the analogs displayed inhibitory activity against both mycobacterial species in minimal media. Several of the molecules displayed potent levels of inhibition against Mtb with MIC values equal to or below those obtained with the anti-tuberculosis drugs D-cycloserine and isoniazid. In contrast, two of the analogs displaying the greatest activity against Mtb failed to inhibit E. coli growth under either set of conditions. Thus, the active molecules identified here (1, 2, 6, and 8) may provide the basis for development of anti-mycobacterial agents against Mtb. PMID:24902951

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens.

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Extensively Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Belonging to the Euro-American S Lineage.

    PubMed

    Malinga, Lesibana A; Abeel, Thomas; Desjardins, Christopher A; Dlamini, Talent C; Cassell, Gail; Chapman, Sinéad B; Birren, Bruce W; Earl, Ashlee M; van der Walt, Martie

    2016-01-01

    We report the whole-genome sequencing of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains belonging to the Euro-American S lineage. The RSA 114 strain showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms predicted to have drug efflux activity. PMID:26941159

  5. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Extensively Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Belonging to the Euro-American S Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Abeel, Thomas; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Dlamini, Talent C.; Cassell, Gail; Chapman, Sinéad B.; Birren, Bruce W.; Earl, Ashlee M.; van der Walt, Martie

    2016-01-01

    We report the whole-genome sequencing of two extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis strains belonging to the Euro-American S lineage. The RSA 114 strain showed single-nucleotide polymorphisms predicted to have drug efflux activity. PMID:26941159

  6. A 35-kilodalton protein is a major target of the human immune response to Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Triccas, J A; Roche, P W; Winter, N; Feng, C G; Butlin, C R; Britton, W J

    1996-01-01

    The control of leprosy will be facilitated by the identification of major Mycobacterium leprae-specific antigens which mirror the immune response to the organism across the leprosy spectrum. We have investigated the host response to a 35-kDa protein of M. leprae. Recombinant 35-kDa protein purified from Mycobacterium smegmatis resembled the native antigen in the formation of multimeric complexes and binding by monoclonal antibodies and sera from leprosy patients. These properties were not shared by two forms of 35-kDa protein purified from Escherichia coli. The M. smegmatis-derived 35-kDa protein stimulated a gamma interferon-secreting T-cell proliferative response in the majority of paucibacillary leprosy patients and healthy contacts of leprosy patients tested. Cellular responses to the protein in patients with multibacillary leprosy were weak or absent, consistent with hyporesponsiveness to M. leprae characteristic of this form of the disease. Almost all leprosy patients and contacts recognized the 35-kDa protein by either a T-cell proliferative or an immunoglobulin G antibody response, whereas few tuberculosis patients recognized the antigen. This specificity was confirmed in guinea pigs, with the 35-kDa protein eliciting strong delayed-type hypersensitivity in M. leprae-sensitized animals but not in those sensitized with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Therefore, the M. leprae 35-kDa protein appears to be a major and relatively specific target of the human immune response to M. leprae and is a potential component of a diagnostic test to detect exposure to leprosy or a vaccine to combat the disease. PMID:8945562

  7. Non Mycobacterial Virulence Genes in the Genome of the Emerging Pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Schenowitz, Chantal; Dossat, Carole; Barbe, Valérie; Rottman, Martin; Macheras, Edouard; Heym, Beate; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Daffé, Mamadou; Brosch, Roland; Risler, Jean-Loup; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) causing a pseudotuberculous lung disease to which patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are particularly susceptible. We report here its complete genome sequence. The genome of M. abscessus (CIP 104536T) consists of a 5,067,172-bp circular chromosome including 4920 predicted coding sequences (CDS), an 81-kb full-length prophage and 5 IS elements, and a 23-kb mercury resistance plasmid almost identical to pMM23 from Mycobacterium marinum. The chromosome encodes many virulence proteins and virulence protein families absent or present in only small numbers in the model RGM species Mycobacterium smegmatis. Many of these proteins are encoded by genes belonging to a “mycobacterial” gene pool (e.g. PE and PPE proteins, MCE and YrbE proteins, lipoprotein LpqH precursors). However, many others (e.g. phospholipase C, MgtC, MsrA, ABC Fe(3+) transporter) appear to have been horizontally acquired from distantly related environmental bacteria with a high G+C content, mostly actinobacteria (e.g. Rhodococcus sp., Streptomyces sp.) and pseudomonads. We also identified several metabolic regions acquired from actinobacteria and pseudomonads (relating to phenazine biosynthesis, homogentisate catabolism, phenylacetic acid degradation, DNA degradation) not present in the M. smegmatis genome. Many of the “non mycobacterial” factors detected in M. abscessus are also present in two of the pathogens most frequently isolated from CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia. This study elucidates the genetic basis of the unique pathogenicity of M. abscessus among RGM, and raises the question of similar mechanisms of pathogenicity shared by unrelated organisms in CF patients. PMID:19543527

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsX extracellular domain activates the peptidoglycan hydrolase, RipC

    PubMed Central

    Mavrici, Daniela; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J.; Holton, James M.; Prigozhin, Daniil M.; Gee, Christine L.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial growth and cell division are coordinated with hydrolysis of the peptidoglycan (PG) layer of the cell wall, but the mechanisms of regulation of extracellular PG hydrolases are not well understood. Here we report the biochemical, structural, and genetic analysis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis homolog of the transmembrane PG-hydrolase regulator, FtsX. The purified FtsX extracellular domain binds the PG peptidase Rv2190c/RipC N-terminal segment, causing a conformational change that activates the enzyme. Deletion of ftsEX and ripC caused similar phenotypes in Mycobacterium smegmatis, as expected for genes in a single pathway. The crystal structure of the FtsX extracellular domain reveals an unprecedented fold containing two lobes connected by a flexible hinge. Mutations in the hydrophobic cleft between the lobes reduce RipC binding in vitro and inhibit FtsX function in M. smegmatis. These studies suggest how FtsX recognizes RipC and support a model in which a conformational change in FtsX links the cell division apparatus with PG hydrolysis. PMID:24843173

  9. In Vitro Activity of Selected West African Medicinal Plants against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Kissi-Twum, Abena Adomah; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Addo, Phyllis; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ngoutane Mfopa, Alvine; Fekam Boyom, Fabrice; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most prevalent mycobacteriosis, after tuberculosis and leprosy. The currently recommended combination of rifampicin-streptomycin suffers from side effects and poor compliance, which leads to reliance on local herbal remedies. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimycobacterial properties and toxicity of selected medicinal plants. Sixty-five extracts from 27 plant species were screened against Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium smegmatis, using the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA). The cytotoxicity of promising extracts was assayed on normal Chang liver cells by an MTT assay. Twenty five extracts showed activity with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 16 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL against M. smegmatis, while 17 showed activity against M. ulcerans with MIC values ranging from 125 µg/mL to 250 µg/mL. In most of the cases, plant extracts with antimycobacterial activity showed no cytotoxicity on normal human liver cells. Exception were Carica papaya, Cleistopholis patens, and Polyalthia suaveolens with 50% cell cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) ranging from 3.8 to 223 µg/mL. These preliminary results support the use of some West African plants in the treatment of Buruli ulcer. Meanwhile, further studies are required to isolate and characterize the active ingredients in the extracts. PMID:27089314

  10. An Unconventional Hexacoordinated Flavohemoglobin from Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Pawaria, Sudesh; Lu, Changyuan; Hade, Mangesh Dattu; Singh, Chaahat; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Dikshit, Kanak L.

    2012-01-01

    Being an obligate aerobe, Mycobacterium tuberculosis faces a number of energetic challenges when it encounters hypoxia and environmental stress during intracellular infection. Consequently, it has evolved innovative strategies to cope with these unfavorable conditions. Here, we report a novel flavohemoglobin (MtbFHb) from M. tuberculosis that exhibits unique features within its heme and reductase domains distinct from conventional FHbs, including the absence of the characteristic hydrogen bonding interactions within the proximal heme pocket and mutations in the FAD and NADH binding regions of the reductase domain. In contrast to conventional FHbs, it has a hexacoordinate low-spin heme with a proximal histidine ligand lacking imidazolate character and a distal heme pocket with a relatively low electrostatic potential. Additionally, MtbFHb carries a new FAD binding site in its reductase domain similar to that of d-lactate dehydrogenase (d-LDH). When overexpressed in Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium smegmatis, MtbFHb remained associated with the cell membrane and exhibited d-lactate:phenazine methosulfate reductase activity and oxidized d-lactate into pyruvate by converting the heme iron from Fe3+ to Fe2+ in a FAD-dependent manner, indicating electron transfer from d-lactate to the heme via FAD cofactor. Under oxidative stress, MtbFHb-expressing cells exhibited growth advantage with reduced levels of lipid peroxidation. Given the fact that d-lactate is a byproduct of lipid peroxidation and that M. tuberculosis lacks the gene encoding d-LDH, we propose that the novel d-lactate metabolizing activity of MtbFHb uniquely equips M. tuberculosis to balance the stress level by protecting the cell membrane from oxidative damage via cycling between the Fe3+/Fe2+ redox states. PMID:22437825

  11. Strain Classification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Brazil Based on Genotypes Obtained by Spoligotyping, Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Unit Typing and the Presence of Large Sequence and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcellos, Sidra E. G.; Acosta, Chyntia Carolina; Gomes, Lia Lima; Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Lima, Karla Valéria; de Araujo, Marcelo Ivens; Leite, Maria de Lourdes; Tannure, Flávio; Caldas, Paulo Cesar de Souza; Gomes, Harrison M.; Santos, Adalberto Rezende; Gomgnimbou, Michel K.; Sola, Christophe; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Boechat, Neio; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2014-01-01

    Rio de Janeiro is endemic for tuberculosis (TB) and presents the second largest prevalence of the disease in Brazil. Here, we present the bacterial population structure of 218 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, derived from 186 patients that were diagnosed between January 2008 and December 2009. Genotypes were generated by means of spoligotyping, 24 MIRU-VNTR typing and presence of fbpC103, RDRio and RD174. The results confirmed earlier data that predominant genotypes in Rio de Janeiro are those of the Euro American Lineages (99%). However, we observed differences between the classification by spoligotyping when comparing to that of 24 MIRU-VNTR typing, being respectively 43.6% vs. 62.4% of LAM, 34.9% vs. 9.6% of T and 18.3% vs. 21.5% of Haarlem. Among isolates classified as LAM by MIRU typing, 28.0% did not present the characteristic spoligotype profile with absence of spacers 21 to 24 and 32 to 36 and we designated these conveniently as “LAM-like”, 79.3% of these presenting the LAM-specific SNP fbpC103. The frequency of RDRio and RD174 in the LAM strains, as defined both by spoligotyping and 24 MIRU-VNTR loci, were respectively 11% and 15.4%, demonstrating that RD174 is not always a marker for LAM/RDRio strains. We conclude that, although spoligotyping alone is a tool for classification of strains of the Euro-American lineage, when combined with MIRU-VNTRs, SNPs and RD typing, it leads to a much better understanding of the bacterial population structure and phylogenetic relationships among strains of M. tuberculosis in regions with high incidence of TB. PMID:25314118

  12. Biological evaluation of potent triclosan-derived inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stec, Jozef; Vilchèze, Catherine; Lun, Shichun; Perryman, Alexander L; Wang, Xin; Freundlich, Joel S; Bishai, William; Jacobs, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2014-11-01

    New triclosan (TRC) analogues were evaluated for their activity against the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase InhA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). TRC is a well-known inhibitor of InhA, and specific modifications to its positions 5 and 4' afforded 27 derivatives; of these compounds, seven derivatives showed improved potency over that of TRC. These analogues were active against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Mtb strains. The most active compound in this series, 4-(n-butyl)-1,2,3-triazolyl TRC derivative 3, had an MIC value of 0.6 μg mL(-1) (1.5 μM) against wild-type Mtb. At a concentration equal to its MIC, this compound inhibited purified InhA by 98 %, and showed an IC50 value of 90 nM. Compound 3 and the 5-methylisoxazole-modified TRC 14 were able to inhibit the biosynthesis of mycolic acids. Furthermore, mc(2) 4914, an Mtb strain overexpressing inhA, was found to be less susceptible to compounds 3 and 14, supporting the notion that InhA is the likely molecular target of the TRC derivatives presented herein.

  13. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  14. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, "Mycobacterium virginiense" sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wengenack, Nancy L; Eke, Uzoamaka A; Benwill, Jeana L; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species ("M. virginiense" sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594.

    PubMed

    Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Viana-Niero, Cristina; Ramos, Rommel Thiago Jucá; Carneiro, Adriana Ribeiro; Barbosa, Maria Silvanira; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic of surgical-site infections by a single strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii affected >1,700 patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2008. The genome of the epidemic prototype strain M. abscessus subsp. bolletii INCQS 00594, deposited in the collection of the National Institute for Health Quality Control (INCQS), was sequenced. PMID:24201191

  16. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  17. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  18. Evaluation of MGIT 960-Based Antimicrobial Testing and Determination of Critical Concentrations of First- and Second-Line Antimicrobial Drugs with Drug-Resistant Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Krüüner, Annika; Yates, Malcolm D.; Drobniewski, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (i) compare agreement of the MGIT 960 system for first-line drugs with a methodology (the resistance ratio method [RRM]) that had been used in clinical trials, relating drug susceptibility to clinical outcome; (ii) compare the performance of the MGIT 960, RRM, and microtiter plate assay (MPA) methodologies for second-line drug testing; and (iii) define critical concentrations for ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin for liquid-culture-based testing. The large collection of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (n = 247) used included 176 (71%) multidrug-resistant isolates. The results for MGIT 960 and the RRM for rifampin and isoniazid (n = 200) were in excellent (99 to 100%) agreement for all strains. For streptomycin, 97% of the results at the critical concentration and 92% at high concentration, and for pyrazinamide 92% of results overall, were concordant, but for ethambutol, fewer than 85% (65% for the critical concentration and 84% for the high concentration) of the MGIT-based results were concordant with those for the RRM. The MGIT 960, RRM, and MPA assays (n = 133) correlated well for most second-line drugs tested. For susceptibility to ofloxacin, the MGIT 960 and MPA results were in full agreement. The amikacin and rifabutin results obtained by MGIT 960 agreed with the RRM results in 131 (99%) cases, and for capreomycin, they agreed for 129 of 133 isolates tested (97%). For prothionamide testing, only a limited number of drug-resistant isolates were available for testing and drawing definitive conclusions. We propose critical concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml for ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin, respectively, for liquid-culture-based testing. PMID:16517859

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3628 drives Th1-type T cell immunity via TLR2-mediated activation of dendritic cells and displays vaccine potential against the hyper-virulent Beijing K strain

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seung Bin; Kim, Hongmin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Kim, So Jeong; Han, Seung Jung; Choi, Soo Young; Cho, Sang-Nae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Shin, Sung Jae

    2016-01-01

    Identification of vaccine target antigens (Ags) that induce Ag-specific Th1 immunity is the first step toward the development of a tuberculosis vaccine. Here, we evaluated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) protein Rv3628, a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase, as a vaccine target and characterized the molecular details of its interaction with dendritic cells (DCs). Rv3628 activated DCs, increasing their expression of cell surface molecules and augmenting their production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70. Rv3628 mediated these effects by binding to TLR2 and activating downstream MyD88-, MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways. Rv3628-stimulated DCs induced the expansion of OVA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which secreted IFN-γ and IL-2. Rv3628-specific effector/memory T cells expanded to a similar extent as those stimulated with ESAT-6 Ag in samples of lung and spleen cells collected from Mtb-infected mice. Finally, an Rv3628 subunit vaccine adjuvanted with dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid-A caused significant reductions in bacterial counts and lung inflammation after challenge with the hyper-virulent Mtb K strain. Importantly, protective efficacy was correlated with the generation of Rv3628-specific CD4+ T cells co-producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 and exhibiting an elevated IFN-γ recall response. Thus, Rv3628 polarizes DCs toward a Th1 phenotype and promotes protective immunity against Mtb infection. PMID:27097115

  20. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms That Cause Structural Changes in the Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Transcriptional Regulator of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Alter Global Gene Expression without Attenuating Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Debbie M.; Saldanha, José W.; Brennan, John F.; Benjamin, Pearline; Strom, Molly; Cole, Jeffrey A.; Spreadbury, Claire L.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present in the global transcriptional regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) of the attenuated vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We have found that these SNPs resulted in small but significant changes in the expression of a number of genes in M. tuberculosis when a deletion of the Rv3676 CRP was complemented by the BCG allele, compared to complementation by the M. tuberculosis allele. We can explain these changes in gene expression by modeling the structure of the mycobacterial protein on the known structure of CRP from Escherichia coli. Thus, the SNP change in the DNA-binding domain, Lys178, is predicted to form a hydrogen bond with the phosphate backbone of the DNA, as does the equivalent residue in E. coli, whereas Glu178 in M. tuberculosis/M. bovis does not, thus explaining the stronger binding reported for CRP of BCG to CRP-binding sites in mycobacterial DNA. In contrast, the SNP change in the nucleotide binding domain (Leu47Pro) is predicted to result in the loss of one hydrogen bond, which is accommodated by the structure, and would not therefore be expected to cause any change in function relating to cAMP binding. The BCG allele fully complemented the growth defect caused by the deletion of the Rv3676 protein in M. tuberculosis, both in vitro and in macrophage and mouse infections, suggesting that these SNPs do not play any role in the attenuation of BCG. However, they may have allowed BCG to grow better under the in vitro-selective conditions used in its derivation from the M. bovis wild type. PMID:18332206

  1. Draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium avium complex isolate from a broadbill bird

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the draft genome sequences of ten Mycobacterium avium complex isolates obtained from diverse hosts. This collection includes isolates obtained from deer, pig, elephant, ruddy duck and Red-tailed hawk species. The type strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies silvaticum (ATCC 49884) is also...

  2. Variable transcriptional adaptation between the laboratory (H37Rv) and clinical strains (S7 and S10) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Raja, Alamelu

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a major public health problem in many parts of the world, despite intensified efforts taken to control the disease. The remarkable success of M. tuberculosis as a pathogen is largely due to its ability to persist within the host for long periods. To develop the effective intervention strategies, understanding the biology of persistence is highly required. Accumulating evidences showed oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) as a potential stimulus for triggering the transition of M. tuberculosis to a non-replicating persistent state analogous to latency in vivo. To date, in vitro hypoxia experimental models used the laboratory adapted isolate H37Rv and very little is known about the behavior of clinical isolates that are involved during disease outbreaks. Hence, we compared the transcription profiles of H37Rv and two south Indian clinical isolates (S7 and S10) under hypoxia to find differences in gene expression pattern. The main objective of this current work is to find "differentially regulated genes" (genes that are down regulated in H37Rv but upregulated in both the clinical isolates) under hypoxia. Microarray results showed, a total of 502 genes were down regulated in H37Rv under hypoxia and 10 out of 502 genes were upregulated in both the clinical isolates. Thus, giving less importance to down regulated genes based on H37Rv model strain might exclude the true representative gene candidates in clinical isolates. Our study suggests the use of most prevalent clinical isolates for in vitro experimental model to minimize the variation in understanding the adaptation mechanisms of the strains.

  3. Variable transcriptional adaptation between the laboratory (H37Rv) and clinical strains (S7 and S10) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Devasundaram, Santhi; Raja, Alamelu

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a major public health problem in many parts of the world, despite intensified efforts taken to control the disease. The remarkable success of M. tuberculosis as a pathogen is largely due to its ability to persist within the host for long periods. To develop the effective intervention strategies, understanding the biology of persistence is highly required. Accumulating evidences showed oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) as a potential stimulus for triggering the transition of M. tuberculosis to a non-replicating persistent state analogous to latency in vivo. To date, in vitro hypoxia experimental models used the laboratory adapted isolate H37Rv and very little is known about the behavior of clinical isolates that are involved during disease outbreaks. Hence, we compared the transcription profiles of H37Rv and two south Indian clinical isolates (S7 and S10) under hypoxia to find differences in gene expression pattern. The main objective of this current work is to find "differentially regulated genes" (genes that are down regulated in H37Rv but upregulated in both the clinical isolates) under hypoxia. Microarray results showed, a total of 502 genes were down regulated in H37Rv under hypoxia and 10 out of 502 genes were upregulated in both the clinical isolates. Thus, giving less importance to down regulated genes based on H37Rv model strain might exclude the true representative gene candidates in clinical isolates. Our study suggests the use of most prevalent clinical isolates for in vitro experimental model to minimize the variation in understanding the adaptation mechanisms of the strains. PMID:26780642

  4. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  5. The biosynthesis of cyclopropanated mycolic acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Identification and functional analysis of CMAS-2.

    PubMed

    George, K M; Yuan, Y; Sherman, D R; Barry, C E

    1995-11-10

    The major mycolic acid produced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains two cis-cyclopropanes in the meromycolate chain. The gene whose product cyclopropanates the proximal double bond was cloned by homology to a putative cyclopropane synthase identified from the Mycobacterium leprae genome sequencing project. This gene, named cma2, was sequenced and found to be 52% identical to cma1 (which cyclopropanates the distal double bond) and 73% identical to the gene from M. leprae. Both cma genes were found to be restricted in distribution to pathogenic species of mycobacteria. Expression of cma2 in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in the cyclopropanation of the proximal double bond in the alpha 1 series of mycolic acids. Coexpression of both cyclopropane synthases resulted in cyclopropanation of both centers, producing a molecule structurally similar to the M. tuberculosis alpha-dicyclopropyl mycolates. Differential scanning calorimetry of purified cell walls and mycolic acids demonstrated that cyclopropanation of the proximal position raised the observed transition temperature by 3 degrees C. These results suggest that cyclopropanation contributes to the structural integrity of the cell wall complex.

  6. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish). PMID:15748591

  7. Identification of Functional Tat Signal Sequences in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteins▿ †

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Justin A.; McCann, Jessica R.; Tekippe, Erin McElvania; Silverman, Jason S.; Rigel, Nathan W.; Braunstein, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway is a system used by some bacteria to export proteins out from the cytosol to the cell surface or extracellular environment. A functional Tat pathway exists in the important human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Identification of the substrates exported by the Tat pathway can help define the role that this pathway plays in the physiology and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. Here we used a reporter of Tat export, a truncated β-lactamase, ′BlaC, to experimentally identify M. tuberculosis proteins with functional Tat signal sequences. Of the 13 proteins identified, one lacks the hallmark of a Tat-exported substrate, the twin-arginine dipeptide, and another is not predicted by in silico analysis of the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. Full-length versions of a subset of these proteins were tested to determine if the native proteins are Tat exported. For three proteins, expression in a Δtat mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed a defect in precursor processing compared to expression in the wild type, indicating Tat export of the full-length proteins. Conversely, two proteins showed no obvious Tat export in M. smegmatis. One of this latter group of proteins was the M. tuberculosis virulence factor phospholipase C (PlcB). Importantly, when tested in M. tuberculosis a different result was obtained and PlcB was exported in a twin-arginine-dependent manner. This suggests the existence of an M. tuberculosis-specific factor(s) for Tat export of a proven virulence protein. It also emphasizes the importance of domains beyond the Tat signal sequence and bacterium-specific factors in determining if a given protein is Tat exported. PMID:18658266

  8. Regulation of lipid biosynthesis, sliding motility, and biofilm formation by a membrane-anchored nucleoid-associated protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Indi, Shantinath S; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria use a number of small basic proteins for organization and compaction of their genomes. By their interaction with DNA, these nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) also influence gene expression. Rv3852, a NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is conserved among the pathogenic and slow-growing species of mycobacteria. Here, we show that the protein predominantly localizes in the cell membrane and that the carboxy-terminal region with the propensity to form a transmembrane helix is necessary for its membrane localization. The protein is involved in genome organization, and its ectopic expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in altered nucleoid morphology, defects in biofilm formation, sliding motility, and change in apolar lipid profile. We demonstrate its crucial role in regulating the expression of KasA, KasB, and GroEL1 proteins, which are in turn involved in controlling the surface phenotypes in mycobacteria. PMID:23396914

  9. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  10. Microaerophilic Conditions Promote Growth of Mycobacterium genavense

    PubMed Central

    Realini, L.; De Ridder, K.; Palomino, J.-C.; Hirschel, B.; Portaels, F.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies show that microaerophilic conditions promote the growth of Mycobacterium genavense in semisolid medium. The growth of M. genavense at 2.5 or 5% oxygen was superior to that obtained at 21% oxygen in BACTEC primary cultures (Middlebrook 7H12, pH 6.0, without additives). By using nondecontaminated specimens, it was possible to detect growth with very small inocula (25 bacilli/ml) of 12 different M. genavense strains (from nude mice) within 6 weeks of incubation under low oxygen tension; conversely, with 21% oxygen, no growth of 8 of 12 (66.7%) M. genavense strains was detected (growth index, <10). The same beneficial effect of 2.5 or 5% oxygen was observed in primary cultures of a decontaminated clinical specimen. Low oxygen tension (2.5 or 5%) is recommended for the primary isolation of M. genavense. Microaerophilic cultivation of other atypical mycobacteria, especially slow-growing (e.g., Mycobacterium avium) and difficult-to-grow (e.g., Mycobacterium ulcerans) species, is discussed. PMID:9705393

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of sugar-derived esters, [alpha]-ketoesters and [alpha]-ketoamides as inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85C

    SciTech Connect

    Sanki, Aditya K.; Boucau, Julie; Umesiri, Francis E.; Ronning, Donald R.; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2010-08-16

    Peptide-based 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds have emerged as potent inhibitors for serine proteases. Herein, we have designed and synthesized D-arabinose and D-trehalose-based esters, {alpha}-ketoesters and {alpha}-ketoamides, and evaluated their inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen 85C (ag85C), an acyltransferase in the serine hydrolase superfamily. In addition the compounds were evaluated for the ability to inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis ATCC 14468, a non-pathogenic surrogate for Mtb. Among the synthetic analogs evaluated only the methyl ester1 derived from D-arabinose was found to inhibit the acyltransferase activity of ag85C (IC{sub 50} = 25 mM). Based on this weak inhibitory activity it was not surprising that none of the compounds inhibits the growth of M. smegmatis. In spite of the weak inhibitory activity of 1, X-ray crystallography on crystals of ag85C soaked with 1 suggested the formation of a covalent ester adduct between 1 and the Ser124 side chain hydroxyl moiety found within the catalytic site of ag85C; however, some of the active site electron density appears to result from bound glycerol. The lack of activity associated with the {alpha}-ketoester and {alpha}-ketoamide derivatives of D-trehalose may be the result of intramolecular cyclization of the {alpha}-keto moiety with the nearby C-4/4' hydroxyls leading to the formation of stable bicyclo-ester and amide derivatives.

  12. Overexpression and functional characterization of an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter encoded by the genes drrA and drrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Baisakhee Saha; Bhakta, Sanjib; Barik, Rajib; Basu, Joyoti; Kundu, Manikuntala; Chakrabarti, Parul

    2002-01-01

    The genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters occupy 2.5% of the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, none of these putative ABC transporters has been characterized so far. We describe the development of expression systems for simultaneous expression of the ATP-binding protein DrrA and the membrane integral protein DrrB which together behave as a functional doxorubicin efflux pump. Doxorubicin uptake in Escherichia coli or Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing DrrAB was inhibited by reserpine, an inhibitor of ABC transporters. The localization of DrrA to the membrane depended on the simultaneous expression of DrrB. ATP binding was positively regulated by doxorubicin and daunorubicin. At the same time, DrrB appeared to be sensitive to proteolysis when expressed alone in the absence of DrrA. Simultaneous expression of the two polypeptides was essential to obtain a functional doxorubicin efflux pump. Expression of DrrAB in E. coli conferred 8-fold increased resistance to ethidium bromide, a cationic compound. 2',7'-bis-(2-Carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), a neutral compound, also behaved as a substrate of the reconstituted efflux pump. When expressed in M. smegmatis, DrrAB conferred resistance to a number of clinically relevant, structurally unrelated antibiotics. The resistant phenotype could be reversed by verapamil and reserpine, two potent inhibitors of ABC transporters. PMID:12057006

  13. Copper resistance is essential for virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Ackart, David; Shrestha, Tej B; Hascall-Dove, Laurel; Nolan, Scott; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Wang, Ying; Bossmann, Stefan H; Basaraba, Randall J; Niederweis, Michael

    2011-01-25

    Copper (Cu) is essential for many biological processes, but is toxic when present in excessive amounts. In this study, we provide evidence that Cu plays a crucial role in controlling tuberculosis. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mutant lacking the outer membrane channel protein Rv1698 accumulated 100-fold more Cu and was more susceptible to Cu toxicity than WT Mtb. Similar phenotypes were observed for a M. smegmatis mutant lacking the homolog Ms3747, demonstrating that these mycobacterial copper transport proteins B (MctB) are essential for Cu resistance and maintenance of low intracellular Cu levels. Guinea pigs responded to infection with Mtb by increasing the Cu concentration in lung lesions. Loss of MctB resulted in a 1,000- and 100-fold reduced bacterial burden in lungs and lymph nodes, respectively, in guinea pigs infected with Mtb. In mice, the persistence defect of the Mtb mctB mutant was exacerbated by the addition of Cu to the diet. These experiments provide evidence that Cu is used by the mammalian host to control Mtb infection and that Cu resistance mechanisms are crucial for Mtb virulence. Importantly, Mtb is much more susceptible to Cu than other bacteria and is killed in vitro by Cu concentrations lower than those found in phagosomes of macrophages. Hence, this study reveals an Achilles heel of Mtb that might be a promising target for tuberculosis chemotherapy. PMID:21205886

  14. Characterization of Three Mycobacterium spp. with Potential Use in Bioremediation by Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B.M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    We provide the genome sequences of the type strains of the polychlorophenol-degrading Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum (DSM43826), the degrader of chlorinated aliphatics Mycobacterium chubuense (DSM44219) and Mycobacterium obuense (DSM44075) that has been tested for use in cancer immunotherapy. The genome sizes of M. chlorophenolicum, M. chubuense, and M. obuense are 6.93, 5.95, and 5.58 Mb with GC-contents of 68.4%, 69.2%, and 67.9%, respectively. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 3,254 genes are common and we predicted approximately 250 genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer from different sources including proteobacteria. The data also showed that the biodegrading Mycobacterium spp. NBB4, also referred to as M. chubuense NBB4, is distantly related to the M. chubuense type strain and should be considered as a separate species, we suggest it to be named Mycobacterium ethylenense NBB4. Among different categories we identified genes with potential roles in: biodegradation of aromatic compounds and copper homeostasis. These are the first nonpathogenic Mycobacterium spp. found harboring genes involved in copper homeostasis. These findings would therefore provide insight into the role of this group of Mycobacterium spp. in bioremediation as well as the evolution of copper homeostasis within the Mycobacterium genus. PMID:26079817

  15. Characterization of Three Mycobacterium spp. with Potential Use in Bioremediation by Genome Sequencing and Comparative Genomics.

    PubMed

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2015-07-01

    We provide the genome sequences of the type strains of the polychlorophenol-degrading Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum (DSM43826), the degrader of chlorinated aliphatics Mycobacterium chubuense (DSM44219) and Mycobacterium obuense (DSM44075) that has been tested for use in cancer immunotherapy. The genome sizes of M. chlorophenolicum, M. chubuense, and M. obuense are 6.93, 5.95, and 5.58 Mb with GC-contents of 68.4%, 69.2%, and 67.9%, respectively. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that 3,254 genes are common and we predicted approximately 250 genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer from different sources including proteobacteria. The data also showed that the biodegrading Mycobacterium spp. NBB4, also referred to as M. chubuense NBB4, is distantly related to the M. chubuense type strain and should be considered as a separate species, we suggest it to be named Mycobacterium ethylenense NBB4. Among different categories we identified genes with potential roles in: biodegradation of aromatic compounds and copper homeostasis. These are the first nonpathogenic Mycobacterium spp. found harboring genes involved in copper homeostasis. These findings would therefore provide insight into the role of this group of Mycobacterium spp. in bioremediation as well as the evolution of copper homeostasis within the Mycobacterium genus.

  16. Demonstration of plasmid-mediated drug resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Bispo, Paulo José Martins; Santin, Katiane; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2014-05-01

    Plasmid-mediated kanamycin resistance was detected in a strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii responsible for a nationwide epidemic of surgical infections in Brazil. The plasmid did not influence susceptibility to tobramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clarithromycin, or ciprofloxacin. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance has not been described so far in mycobacteria. PMID:24574286

  17. Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum in acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo; Fernandes, João; Fernandes, Nuno; Oliveira, Fernanda; Cadete, Manuela

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum was found in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, in a system composed of two acidic (pH 3.0) springs with temperatures between 56 degrees C at the source and 40 degrees C at the confluence of both springs. Growth and survival assays at 56 degrees C for 60 days were performed, confirming the origin of the strain.

  18. Rapid Detection and Immune Characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mayatepek, Ertan; Mackenzie, Colin R.; Schramm, Dirk; Jacobsen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients are highly susceptible to infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Especially Mycobacterium abscessus infections are common but reliable diagnosis is hampered by non-specific clinical symptoms and insensitive mycobacterial culture. In the present study we established novel methods for rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We performed Mycobacterium abscessus specific DNA-strip- and quantitative PCR-based analyses of non-cultured sputum samples to detect and characterize Mycobacterium abscessus infections. Concomitantly in vitro T-cell reactivation with purified protein derivatives (PPDs) from different mycobacterial species was used to determine Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cell cytokine expression of infected cystic fibrosis patients. Four of 35 cystic fibrosis patients (11.4%) were Mycobacterium abscessus culture positive and showed concordant DNA-strip-test results. Quantitative PCR revealed marked differences of mycobacterial burden between cystic fibrosis patients and during disease course. Tandem-repeat analysis classified distinct Mycobacterium abscessus strains of infected cystic fibrosis patients and excluded patient-to-patient transmission. Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cells were detected in the blood of cystic fibrosis patients with confirmed chronic infection and a subgroup of patients without evidence of Mycobacterium abscessus infection. Comparison of cytokine expression and phenotypic markers revealed increased proportions of CD40L positive T-cells that lack Interleukin-2 expression as a marker for chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Direct sputum examination enabled rapid diagnosis and quantification of Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients. T-cell in vitro reactivation and cytokine expression analyses may contribute to diagnosis of chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infection. PMID:25742660

  19. Rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Steindor, Mathis; Nkwouano, Vanesa; Mayatepek, Ertan; Mackenzie, Colin R; Schramm, Dirk; Jacobsen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients are highly susceptible to infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Especially Mycobacterium abscessus infections are common but reliable diagnosis is hampered by non-specific clinical symptoms and insensitive mycobacterial culture. In the present study we established novel methods for rapid detection and immune characterization of Mycobacterium abscessus infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We performed Mycobacterium abscessus specific DNA-strip- and quantitative PCR-based analyses of non-cultured sputum samples to detect and characterize Mycobacterium abscessus infections. Concomitantly in vitro T-cell reactivation with purified protein derivatives (PPDs) from different mycobacterial species was used to determine Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cell cytokine expression of infected cystic fibrosis patients. Four of 35 cystic fibrosis patients (11.4%) were Mycobacterium abscessus culture positive and showed concordant DNA-strip-test results. Quantitative PCR revealed marked differences of mycobacterial burden between cystic fibrosis patients and during disease course. Tandem-repeat analysis classified distinct Mycobacterium abscessus strains of infected cystic fibrosis patients and excluded patient-to-patient transmission. Mycobacterium abscessus specific T-cells were detected in the blood of cystic fibrosis patients with confirmed chronic infection and a subgroup of patients without evidence of Mycobacterium abscessus infection. Comparison of cytokine expression and phenotypic markers revealed increased proportions of CD40L positive T-cells that lack Interleukin-2 expression as a marker for chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Direct sputum examination enabled rapid diagnosis and quantification of Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients. T-cell in vitro reactivation and cytokine expression analyses may contribute to diagnosis of chronic Mycobacterium abscessus infection. PMID:25742660

  20. Mycobactin analysis as an aid for the identification of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae subspecies.

    PubMed Central

    Bosne, S; Lévy-Frébault, V V

    1992-01-01

    Mycobactin patterns from 65 Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae strains have been determined by thin-layer chromatography. By use of a rich liquid medium containing an iron chelator (ethylenediamine-di-o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid [EDDA]) to ensure iron starvation, all strains were able to form mycobactins. The method developed here allows sensitive detection of mycobactin by thin-layer chromatography from as little as 5 ml of culture after a 2-week incubation. Within M. fortuitum two mycobactin patterns were identified, whereas within M. chelonae four were recognized. Comparisons with the subspecific identification performed by using biochemical tests showed that 73% of the M. fortuitum subsp. fortuitum strains shared the same mycobactin pattern (designated F), whereas 75% of the M. fortuitum subsp. peregrinum strains shared the other mycobactin pattern (designated P). Within the M. fortuitum strains that cannot be assigned to a subspecies on the basis of their biochemical features, only F and P patterns were determined. Similarly, 93% of the M. chelonae subsp. chelonae strains produced the so-called C1 and C2 patterns and 86% of the M. chelonae subsp. abscessus strains produced A1 and A2 patterns. C2 and A2 were the patterns most frequently encountered; they were represented by 65 and 50% of the M. chelonae subsp. chelonae and M. chelonae subsp. abscessus strains, respectively. Within the biochemically M. chelonae strains that did not fit any subspecies on the basis of biochemical test results, C1, C2, and A1 patterns were found. Whereas about 30% of both M. fortuitum and M. chelonae strains cannot be characterized to the subspecies level on the basis of biochemical tests, 100% of the strains of both species can be characterized on the basis of mycobactin patterns. Images PMID:1583124

  1. Mycobacterium malmoense--report of a case in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, P; Aubert, J D; Beer, V

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense was isolated in four different sputum samples of a 45-year-old alcoholic smoker. The biochemical and culture characteristics of this species are described and compared with a reference strain (ATCC 29571). The isolated strain was sensitive in vitro to rifampicine, ethionamide, kanamycine and erythromycin. Therapy consisted of right-upper-lobe lobectomy and a two-year antimicrobial therapy. There was no sign of relapse at the end of the treatment period. PMID:3659578

  2. Evaluation of Mycobacterium bovis double knockout mce2-phoP as candidate vaccine against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    García, Elizabeth; Bianco, María V; Gravisaco, María José; Rocha, Rosana V; Blanco, Federico C; Bigi, Fabiana

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a Mycobacterium bovis knockout strain in phoP-phoR and mce2 operons was tested as an antituberculosis experimental vaccine in animal models. The double mutant strain was significantly more attenuated than the wild type strain in inmunocompetent and inmunodeficient mice. Vaccination with the double mutant protected mice against challenge with a virulent M. bovis strain.

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Najiah, M; Lee, K L; Noorasikin, H; Nadirah, M; Lee, S W

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacteriosis due to mycobacteria is one of the most common bacterial diseases in ornamental fish. We describe here the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. using ATCC Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae as references. A total of four isolates (M1, M2, M3, M4) were obtained from four out of 106 fish samples using selective agar, and identified to Mycobacterium genus using acid-fast staining and 16s rRNA gene-based genus specific polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing and NCBI-BLAST analysis further identified isolate M1 as M. marinum and isolates M2, M3, M4 as M. fortuitum. Morphological, physiological and biochemical tests were carried out for phenotypic characterizations. Universal M13 and wild-type phage M13 RAPD dendogram was generated to illustrate the genetic relationship of the isolates and reference strains.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Najiah, M; Lee, K L; Noorasikin, H; Nadirah, M; Lee, S W

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacteriosis due to mycobacteria is one of the most common bacterial diseases in ornamental fish. We describe here the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium isolates from fighting fish Betta spp. using ATCC Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae as references. A total of four isolates (M1, M2, M3, M4) were obtained from four out of 106 fish samples using selective agar, and identified to Mycobacterium genus using acid-fast staining and 16s rRNA gene-based genus specific polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequencing and NCBI-BLAST analysis further identified isolate M1 as M. marinum and isolates M2, M3, M4 as M. fortuitum. Morphological, physiological and biochemical tests were carried out for phenotypic characterizations. Universal M13 and wild-type phage M13 RAPD dendogram was generated to illustrate the genetic relationship of the isolates and reference strains. PMID:20971487

  5. A nose-only apparatus for airborne delivery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to mice: calibration of biological parameters.

    PubMed

    Louveau, Céline; Descroix, Damien; Garnier, Laurence; Delamanche, Iroudayanadin; Chavarot, Pierre; Ramisse, Françoise; Marchal, Gilles; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main cause of tuberculosis and is still a public health concern worldwide. This mycobacterium is transmitted through aerosols from human beings suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis to susceptible persons. To study this natural route of infection, we designed a new nose-only aerosol apparatus--system of aerosolisation of microorganisms (SAM)--in a carefully designed biohazard facility. For safety reasons, Mycobacterium smegmatis was first used to calibrate several parameters, such as inoculum density, atmospheric conditions (i.e. hygrometry) and particle size distribution. We present evidence that our apparatus is totally adapted to airborne delivery; the particle size of generated aerosol ranges from 1 to 7 microm, which is ideal for an infection by inhalation. We found that 99% of generated particles (<7 microm) could be retained by the respiratory tract, and among these particles, 62-79% (<3.3 microm) were able to reach pulmonary compartments. The next step was to simultaneously challenge 48 mice with M. tuberculosis in a highly reproducible way. We showed that a moderate dose (4 log10 colony-forming units (CFU) per mice) of M. tuberculosis was capable of causing progressive lung pathology and death in mice 30 days post-aerosolisation. Therefore, our apparatus, once calibrated, is easy to handle, safe, and can be used with any pathogen, which is spread by aerosol.

  6. Mycolic acid biosynthesis and enzymic characterization of the beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase A-condensing enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Laurent; Dover, Lynn G; Carrère, Séverine; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Lesjean, Sarah; Brown, Alistair K; Brennan, Patrick J; Minnikin, David E; Locht, Camille; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2002-06-01

    Mycolic acids consist of long-chain alpha-alkyl-beta-hydroxy fatty acids that are produced by successive rounds of elongation catalysed by a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II). A key feature in the elongation process is the condensation of a two-carbon unit from malonyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) to a growing acyl-ACP chain catalysed by a beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (Kas). In the present study, we provide evidence that kasA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an enzyme that elongates in vivo the meromycolate chain, in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae. We demonstrate that KasA belongs to the FAS-II system, which utilizes primarily palmitoyl-ACP rather than short-chain acyl-ACP primers. Furthermore, in an in vitro condensing assay using purified recombinant KasA, palmitoyl-AcpM and malonyl-AcpM, KasA was found to express Kas activity. Also, mutated KasA proteins, with mutation of Cys(171), His(311), Lys(340) and His(345) to Ala abrogated the condensation activity of KasA in vitro completely. Finally, purified KasA was highly sensitive to cerulenin, a well-known inhibitor of Kas, which may lead to the development of novel anti-mycobacterial drugs targeting KasA. PMID:12023885

  7. The Development of a Novel Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli Shuttle Vector System Using pMyong2, a Linear Plasmid from Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungki; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system, equipped with the pAL5000 replicon, is widely used for heterologous gene expression and gene delivery in mycobacteria. Despite its extensive use, this system has certain limitations, which has led to the development of alternative mycobacterial vector systems. The present study describes the molecular structure and expression profiles of a novel 18-kb linear plasmid, pMyong2, from Mycobacterium yongonense. Sixteen open reading frames and a putative origin of replication were identified, and the compatibility of the pMyong2 and pAL5000 vector systems was demonstrated. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rSmeg), the pMyong2 vector system showed a copy number that was approximately 37 times greater than that of pAL5000. Furthermore, pMyong2 increased the mRNA and protein expression of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) over pAL5000 levels by approximately 10-fold and 50-fold, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of the pMyong2 vector system in heterologous gene expression in mycobacteria. Successful delivery of the EGFP gene into mammalian cells via rSmeg carrying the pMyong2 vector system was also observed, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for DNA delivery. In conclusion, the pMyong2 vector system could be effectively used not only for the in vivo delivery of recombinant protein and DNA but also for mycobacterial genetic studies as an alternative or a complement to the pAL5000 vector system. PMID:25822634

  8. The development of a novel Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system using pMyong2, a linear plasmid from Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungki; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium-Escherichia coli shuttle vector system, equipped with the pAL5000 replicon, is widely used for heterologous gene expression and gene delivery in mycobacteria. Despite its extensive use, this system has certain limitations, which has led to the development of alternative mycobacterial vector systems. The present study describes the molecular structure and expression profiles of a novel 18-kb linear plasmid, pMyong2, from Mycobacterium yongonense. Sixteen open reading frames and a putative origin of replication were identified, and the compatibility of the pMyong2 and pAL5000 vector systems was demonstrated. In recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (rSmeg), the pMyong2 vector system showed a copy number that was approximately 37 times greater than that of pAL5000. Furthermore, pMyong2 increased the mRNA and protein expression of the human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (hMIF) over pAL5000 levels by approximately 10-fold and 50-fold, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of the pMyong2 vector system in heterologous gene expression in mycobacteria. Successful delivery of the EGFP gene into mammalian cells via rSmeg carrying the pMyong2 vector system was also observed, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for DNA delivery. In conclusion, the pMyong2 vector system could be effectively used not only for the in vivo delivery of recombinant protein and DNA but also for mycobacterial genetic studies as an alternative or a complement to the pAL5000 vector system.

  9. Csor Is a Novel Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Copper-Sensing Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Ramesh, A.; Ma, Z.; Ward, S.K.; Zhang, L.; George, G.N.; Talaat, A.M.; Sacchettini, J.C.; Giedroc, D.P.; /Texas A-M /Wisconsin U., Madison /Saskatchewan U.

    2007-07-10

    Copper is an essential element that becomes highly cytotoxic when concentrations exceed the capacity of cells to sequester the ion. Here, we identify a new copper-specific repressor (CsoR) of a copper-sensitive operon (cso) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) that is representative of a large, previously uncharacterized family of proteins (DUF156). Electronic and X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal that CsoR binds a single-monomer mole equivalent of Cu(I) to form a trigonally coordinated (S(2)N) Cu(I) complex. The 2.6-A crystal structure of copper-loaded CsoR shows a homodimeric antiparallel four-helix bundle architecture that represents a novel DNA-binding fold. The Cu(I) is coordinated by Cys36, Cys65' and His61' in a subunit bridging site. Cu(I) binding negatively regulates the binding of CsoR to a DNA fragment encompassing the operator-promoter region of the Mtb cso operon; this results in derepression of the operon in Mtb and the heterologous host Mycobacterium smegmatis. Substitution of Cys36 or His61 with alanine abolishes Cu(I)- and CsoR-dependent regulation in vivo and in vitro. Potential roles of CsoR in Mtb pathogenesis are discussed.

  10. EBP50 induces apoptosis in macrophages by upregulating nitric oxide production to eliminate intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yang; Deng, Yating; Huang, Zikun; Luo, Qing; Peng, Yiping; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Hong; Ye, Jianqing; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is known to have the capacity to inhibit the positioning of iNOS on BCG-containing phagosomes by interfering with EBP50, a scaffolding protein that controls the recruitment of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the vicinity of phagosomes in macrophages. However, knockdown of the expression of EBP50 still facilitates the intracellular survival of BCG, which suggested that EBP50 may have some other unknown antimycobacterial properties. In this study we show that overexpression of EBP50 by a recombinant lentivirus had no effect on the iNOS recruitment to M.tuberculosis-containing phagosomes, but significantly promoted the elimination of intracellular M.tuberculosis. We revealed in the present study that the enhancement of intracellular killing to M. tuberculosis upon EBP50 overexpression was due to the increased level of apoptosis in macrophages. We showed that EBP50 overexpression significantly increased the expression of iNOS and generation of nitric oxide (NO), and EBP50-induced apoptosis was NO-dependent and mediated by Bax and caspase-3. We found that M. tuberculosis decreases while Mycobacterium smegmatis increases the expression of EBP50 in RAW264.7 cells, which suggested that virulent mycobacteria are capable of modulating the antimycobacterial properties of macrophages by inhibiting the expression and interfering with the function of EBP50. PMID:26729618

  11. Does khat chewing increases the risk of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by macrophage immune modulation?

    PubMed

    Alvi, Ayesha; Rizwan, Mohammed; Sunosi, Rashad A L; Bin Ali Jerah, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Drug abuse is a serious problem associated with different pathological outcomes including modulating the immune system. Drug abuse is rising in Saudi Arabia and so as TB, a disease of worldwide significance, caused by immunological modulation in the host system. Khat chewing is a common practice in Arabian Peninsula which is now gaining momentum in other parts of the world. It is considered as an addiction. It has been associated with different adverse outcomes such as periodontitis, oral leukoplakia and oral cancer and also has shown to promote apoptotic cell death through cysteine proteases. The active ingredient of khat, cathinone is shown to have immunomodulatory effect. In principle, this leads to enhanced susceptibility to various infections. The present study is designed to delineate the mechanism of immunomodulation produced by khat/cathinone in human/mouse macrophage. Further, this activity will be evaluated both in vivo and in vitro in response to infection with Mycobacterium smegmatis to get an insight if there exists a co relation between the Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and khat chewing.

  12. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  13. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  14. Mycobacterium chelonae Is an Ubiquitous Atypical Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Gameiro, Ana; Ramos, Leonor; Cardoso, José Carlos; Brites, Maria Manuel; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2015-01-01

    The type of cutaneous infection varies mainly according to the patient's immune status, and the disseminated form is mostly found in the context of immunosuppression. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who was under long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy and presented with a 7-month history of multiple painless cutaneous lesions at various stages of development: papules, nodules, pustules and hemorrhagic crusts, as well as small erosions and ulcers distributed over the limbs and scalp. Cutaneous biopsy showed a suppurative granulomatous infiltrate with abscess formation. Fite stain revealed numerous extracellular bacilli, suggesting mycobacterial infection, particularly by atypical mycobacteria. Culture of a skin sample revealed Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient started multidrug therapy and showed clinical improvement despite of resistance to one of the antibiotics. This striking presentation underlines the role of immunosuppression with corticotherapy as a major risk factor for these infections. Multidrug therapy is advised and antibiogram is essential in directing treatment. PMID:26351432

  15. Genotypic characteristics of a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from yellowtail Seriola quinqueradiata and striped jack Pseudocaranx dentex in Japan.

    PubMed

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Sugiura, Hidehiro; Hashida, Yumiko; Hatai, Kishio; Oshima, Syun-ichirou; Daibata, Masanori; Kawai, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, a Mycobacterium marinum-like mycobacterium was isolated from the yellowtail, Seriola quinqueradiata. The species was identified as M. marinum by a commercial mycobacterial DNA-DNA hybridization kit. Nevertheless, PCR restriction analysis of the DNA of its RNA polymerase β-subunit gene definitively showed that this Mycobacterium sp. was M. ulcerans. PCR analysis revealed the genotypic characteristics of M. ulcerans in the Mycobacterium sp., only the mup053 gene sequence being absent, as has been found previously in other piscine mycobacteria such as M. marinum strains DL240490 and DL045 and M. pseudoshottsii. With one exception, this Mycobacterium sp. and M. pseudoshottsii had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, which is also probably true of M. marinum strains DL240490 and DL045. Similarly, according to comparisons of the 16S rRNA gene, ITS region, and hsp65 gene sequences, this Mycobacterium sp. is more closely related to M. pseudoshottsii than to M. ulcerans or M. marinum. A PCR product of approximately 2000 bp was amplified from region of difference 9 in the Mycobacterium sp. The nucleotide sequence revealed insertion of IS2404, the sequence of which is 1366 bp long. The novel single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in this region distinguished this Mycobacterium sp. from M. marinum strain DL240490 and M. pseudoshottsii. The present findings raise the possibility that these species have a common ancestor. Further studies are required to improve our understanding of the relationship between their geographical origin and genetic diversity. PMID:23043488

  16. Bactericidal activities of povidone-iodine against Mycobacterium.

    PubMed

    Rikimaru, T; Kondo, M; Kondo, S; Oizumi, K

    1997-01-01

    Three standard strains of Mycobacterium (M. tuberculosis H37Rv, M. avium ATCC15769 and M. kansasii ATCC12478) and 15 clinical isolates of Mycobacterium (7 M. tuberculosis, 2 M. avium, 3 M. kansasii, 1 M. intracellulare, 1 M. chelonae subsp. abscessus and 1 M. gordonae) were selected in order to study the bactericidal activities of povidone-iodine (PVP-I) drug substance and a commercially available PVP-I solution (Isodine solution) against Mycobacterium. After the bacilli had been exposed to the disinfectant solution at concentrations of 0.1 or 0.02% with 2% human serum for various incubation periods from 30 to 120 s, the PVP-I drug substance was inactivated by addition of 0.5% sodium thiosulfate. In the case of the commercially available PVP-I solution, a mixture of 10% Tween 80, 3% soybean lecithin and 0.5% sodium thiosulfate was used as inactivator. It was demonstrated that the 3 standard strains were completely inactivated within 30 s by 0.1% PVP-I drug substance and that the 15 clinical isolates were almost killed by 0.1% commercially available PVP-I solution within 60 s. As a result, the commercially available PVP-I product appeared to be a useful agent as disinfectant against all the tested species of Mycobacterium. PMID:9403266

  17. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  18. Pathway Profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; VanderVen, Brian C.; Sherman, David R.; Russell, David G.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-14C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-13C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2′-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3′-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2′-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2′-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  19. Mycobacterium abscessus multispacer sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus group includes antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic mycobacteria that are responsible for sporadic cases and outbreaks of cutaneous, pulmonary and disseminated infections. However, because of their close genetic relationships, accurate discrimination between the various strains of these mycobacteria remains difficult. In this report, we describe the development of a multispacer sequence typing (MST) analysis for the simultaneous identification and typing of M. abscessus mycobacteria. We also compared MST with the reference multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) typing method. Results Based on the M. abscessus CIP104536T genome, eight intergenic spacers were selected, PCR amplified and sequenced in 21 M. abscessus isolates and analysed in 48 available M. abscessus genomes. MST and MLSA grouped 37 M. abscessus organisms into 12 and nine types, respectively; four formerly “M. bolletii” organisms and M. abscessus M139 into three and four types, respectively; and 27 formerly “M. massiliense” organisms grouped into nine and five types, respectively. The Hunter-Gaston index was off 0.912 for MST and of 0.903 for MLSA. The MST-derived tree was similar to that based on MLSA and rpoB gene sequencing and yielded three main clusters comprising each the type strain of the respective M. abscessus sub-species. Two isolates exhibited discordant MLSA- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position, one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position and one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and MLSA-derived position. MST spacer n°2 sequencing alone allowed for the accurate identification of the different isolates at the sub-species level. Conclusions MST is a new sequencing-based approach for both identifying and genotyping M. abscessus mycobacteria that clearly differentiates formerly “M. massiliense” organisms from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii organisms. PMID:23294800

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of 17 Rapidly Growing Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of 17 rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) strains, including 16 Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains and one M. immunogenum strain. These sequences add value to studies of the genetic diversity of rapidly growing NTM strains recovered from human specimens. PMID:27660787

  2. Molecular analysis of Mycobacterium isolates from extrapulmonary specimens obtained from patients in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; García-Corral, Nora; Carrero-Dominguez, David; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Gurrola-Morales, Teodoro; Portillo-Gómez, Leopoldo; Rossau, Rudi; Mijs, Wouter

    2009-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the molecular epidemiology in Mexico of Mycobacterium species infecting extrapulmonary sites in humans. This study used molecular methods to determine the Mycobacterium species present in tissues and body fluids in specimens obtained from patients in Mexico with extrapulmonary disease. Methods Bacterial or tissue specimens from patients with clinical or histological diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis were studied. DNA extracts from 30 bacterial cultures grown in Löwenstein Jensen medium and 42 paraffin-embedded tissues were prepared. Bacteria were cultured from urine, cerebrospinal fluid, pericardial fluid, gastric aspirate, or synovial fluid samples. Tissues samples were from lymph nodes, skin, brain, vagina, and peritoneum. The DNA extracts were analyzed by PCR and by line probe assay (INNO-LiPA MYCOBACTERIA v2. Innogenetics NV, Gent, Belgium) in order to identify the Mycobacterium species present. DNA samples positive for M. tuberculosis complex were further analyzed by PCR and line probe assay (INNO-LiPA Rif.TB, Innogenetics NV, Gent, Belgium) to detect mutations in the rpoB gene associated with rifampicin resistance. Results Of the 72 DNA extracts, 26 (36.1%) and 23 (31.9%) tested positive for Mycobacterium species by PCR or line probe assay, respectively. In tissues, M. tuberculosis complex and M. genus were found in lymph nodes, and M. genus was found in brain and vagina specimens. In body fluids, M. tuberculosis complex was found in synovial fluid. M. gordonae, M. smegmatis, M. kansasii, M. genus, M. fortuitum/M. peregrinum complex and M. tuberculosis complex were found in urine. M. chelonae/M. abscessus was found in pericardial fluid and M. kansasii was found in gastric aspirate. Two of M. tuberculosis complex isolates were also PCR and LiPA positive for the rpoB gene. These two isolates were from lymph nodes and were sensitive to rifampicin. Conclusion 1) We describe the Mycobacterium species diversity

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium avium, Isolated from Commercial Domestic Pekin Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica), Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Heng; Chen, Hong-Xi; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Cheng, An-Chun; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue; Zhu, De-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an important pathogenic bacterium in birds and has never, to our knowledge, reported to be isolated from domestic ducks. We present here the complete genome sequence of a virulent strain of Mycobacterium avium, isolated from domestic Pekin ducks for the first time, which was determined by PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. PMID:27587804

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium avium, Isolated from Commercial Domestic Pekin Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos domestica), Determined Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiao-Heng; Chen, Hong-Xi; Zhou, Wang-Shu; Wang, Jiang-Bo; Liu, Ma-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shu; Cheng, An-Chun; Jia, Ren-Yong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kun-Feng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yue

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an important pathogenic bacterium in birds and has never, to our knowledge, reported to be isolated from domestic ducks. We present here the complete genome sequence of a virulent strain of Mycobacterium