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Sample records for mycoplasma mycoplasma gallisepticum

  1. Mycoplasma gallisepticum invades chicken erythrocytes during infection.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Gunther; Plaickner, Astrid; Szathmary, Susan; Stipkovits, László; Rosengarten, Renate; Szostak, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated using in vitro assays that the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum is able to invade nonphagocytic cells. It was also shown that this mycoplasma can survive and multiply intracellularly for at least 48 h and that this cell invasion capacity contributes to the systemic spread of M. gallisepticum from the respiratory tract to the inner organs. Using the gentamicin invasion assay and a differential immunofluorescence technique combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy, we were able to demonstrate in in vitro experiments that M. gallisepticum is also capable of invading sheep and chicken erythrocytes. The frequencies of invasion of three well-defined M. gallisepticum strains were examined over a period of 24 h, and a significant increase in invasiveness occurred after 8 h of infection. In addition, blood samples derived from chickens experimentally infected via the aerosol route with the virulent strain M. gallisepticum R(low) were analyzed. Surprisingly, M. gallisepticum R(low) was detected in the bloodstream of infected chickens by nested PCR, as well as by differential immunofluorescence and interference contrast microscopy that showed that mycoplasmas were not only on the surface but also inside chicken erythrocytes. This finding provides novel insight into the pathomechanism of M. gallisepticum and may have implications for the development of preventive strategies.

  2. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Control by live attenuated vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  3. An epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Mason, S J; Maiers, J D

    1984-01-01

    A major epornitic of Mycoplasma gallisepticum occurred in the Monroe, North Carolina, area between January and June of 1983. The outbreak involved 304,000 turkeys of various ages, which were slaughtered in the eradication program at a cost of more than $550,000 to growers and poultry companies. An infected peafowl was the likely source of infection on the first farm. Traffic between farms by growers and company personnel was theorized to be the means of further spread.

  4. Use of polymerase chain reactions to detect Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma imitans, Mycoplasma iowae, Mycoplasma meleagridis and Mycoplasma synoviae in birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Hagen, N; Lueschow, D; Hafez, H M

    2008-10-01

    Certain Mycoplasma spp. are pathogens of poultry, but little is known of the role of mycoplasmas in disease of birds of prey. Species-specific polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for the detection of the poultry pathogens Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma imitans, Mycoplasma iowae, Mycoplasma meleagridis and Mycoplasma synoviae were therefore evaluated for use in birds of prey. The specificities of the PCR methods were established using avian and other mycoplasmas and also selected walled bacteria. The sensitivities of the different PCR assays varied between 100 fg and 10 pg DNA. Fifty-three tracheal swabs from healthy captive and free-ranging birds of prey were then investigated using these PCRs, and in no case was an amplicon obtained for M. gallisepticum/M. imitans, M. iowae or M. synoviae. Species-specific primers for M. meleagridis amplified a product from eight birds of prey but restriction enzyme analysis as well as sequencing of PCR products demonstrated these results to be false positives. Alignment studies of the sequenced products with the 16S rRNA gene sequence of various Mycoplasma species in GenBank demonstrated an identity of 91% to M. meleagridis but of 98% to Mycoplasma buteonis or Mycoplasma gallopavonis. Isolation and attempted identification of these mycoplasmas suggested it may be a previously unrecognized species.

  5. Attachment of killed Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells and membranes to erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Banai, M.; Kahane, I.; Feldner, J.; Razin, S.

    1981-11-01

    To correlate viability with attachment capacity, Mycoplasma gallisepticum cells harvested at different growth phases and treated by various agents were tested for their capacity to attach to human erythrocytes. The results show that viability per se is not essential for M. gallisepticum attachment to erythrocytes, as cells killed by ultraviolet irradiation and membranes isolated by lysing M. gallisepticum cells by various means retained attachment capacity. However, treatment of the mycoplasmas by protein-denaturing agents, such as heart, glutaraldehyde, or prolonged exposure to low pH, drastically affected or even abolished attachment, supporting the protein nature of the mycoplasma membrane components responsible for specific binding to the sialoglycoprotein receptors on the erythrocytes.

  6. Mechanisms of volume regulation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, a cell wall-less bacterium, must confront the problem of colloid osmotic swelling. Cell volume was determined by optical density and intracellular water measurements. Transmembrane pH and electrical gradients were determined by the distribution of the weak acid benzoate and lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium respectively. Cells incubated in sodium chloride without glucose exhibited a progressive fall in ATP over several hours. When ATP fell below 40 uM the cells swelled, leaked protein and became permeable to inulin. Subsequent addition of glucose induced shrinkage and restored the original permeability properties. Energized cells exhibited an electrochemical gradient of protons of up to 130 mV, inside negative and alkaline. The proton-ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), which collapsed the chemical and electrical components of the proton gradient, induced rapid swelling despite high ATP levels thus implicating the proton gradient in volume regulation. Either the pH gradient or the membrane potential could maintain volume. Energy-dependent sodium efflux in exchange for protons was demonstrated in sodium-loaded cells using radioactive sodium and 9-aminoacridine fluorescence to follow sodium and proton translocation respectively.

  7. Stability of rehydrated Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine homogeneity over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper vaccine application is required to maximize the results of the vaccination, with maintenance of a homogenous solution is critical to obtain uniform results. This study was designed to analyze the need for continued mixing of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine solution in order to maintain a ...

  8. Proteomic analysis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and displacement abilities of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain F (F-strain) are well documented. Understanding the mechanism(s) of colonization and persistence of F-strain will aid in the current intervention strategies to diagnose and control MG infections in poultry. In ...

  9. First identification of proteins involved in motility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Indikova, Ivana; Vronka, Martin; Szostak, Michael P

    2014-10-17

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, the most pathogenic mycoplasma in poultry, is able to glide over solid surfaces. Although this gliding motility was first observed in 1968, no specific protein has yet been shown to be involved in gliding. We examined M. gallisepticum strains and clonal variants for motility and found that the cytadherence proteins GapA and CrmA were required for gliding. Loss of GapA or CrmA resulted in the loss of motility and hemadsorption and led to drastic changes in the characteristic flask-shape of the cells. To identify further genes involved in motility, a transposon mutant library of M. gallisepticum was generated and screened for motility-deficient mutants, using a screening assay based on colony morphology. Motility-deficient mutants had transposon insertions in gapA and the neighbouring downstream gene crmA. In addition, insertions were seen in gene mgc2, immediately upstream of gapA, in two motility-deficient mutants. In contrast to the GapA/CrmA mutants, the mgc2 motility mutants still possessed the ability to hemadsorb. Complementation of these mutants with a mgc2-hexahistidine fusion gene restored the motile phenotype. This is the first report assigning specific M. gallisepticum proteins to involvement in gliding motility.

  10. The development and application of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum sequence database.

    PubMed

    Armour, Natalie K; Laibinis, Victoria A; Collett, Stephen R; Ferguson-Noel, Naola

    2013-01-01

    Molecular analysis was conducted on 36 Mycoplasma gallisepticum DNA extracts from tracheal swab samples of commercial poultry in seven South African provinces between 2009 and 2012. Twelve unique M. gallisepticum genotypes were identified by polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region (IGSR), M. gallisepticum cytadhesin 2 (mgc2), MGA_0319 and gapA genetic regions. The DNA sequences of these genotypes were distinct from those of M. gallisepticum isolates in a database composed of sequences from other countries, vaccine and reference strains. The most prevalent genotype (SA-WT#7) was detected in samples from commercial broilers, broiler breeders and layers in five provinces. South African M. gallisepticum sequences were more similar to those of the live vaccines commercially available in South Africa, but were distinct from that of F strain vaccine, which is not registered for use in South Africa. The IGSR, mgc2 or MGA_0319 sequences of three South African genotypes were identical to those of the ts-11 vaccine strain, necessitating a combination of mgc2 and IGSR targeted sequencing to differentiate South African wild-type genotypes from ts-11 vaccine. To identify and differentiate all 12 wild-types, mgc2, IGSR and MGA_0319 sequencing was required. Sequencing of gapA was least effective at strain differentiation. This research serves as a model for the development of an M. gallisepticum sequence database, and illustrates its application to characterize M. gallisepticum genotypes, select diagnostic tests and better understand the epidemiology of M. gallisepticum.

  11. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in chukar partridges, pheasants, and peafowl.

    PubMed

    Cookson, K C; Shivaprasad, H L

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection was diagnosed in a group of chukar partridges, pheasants, and peafowl based on serology and isolation techniques. The farm also had quail, chickens, and ducks. Clinical signs in growing birds consisted of foamy eyes, swollen infraorbital sinuses, respiratory distress, and death. Breeding birds experienced a severe drop in egg production. Histologically, the growing birds exhibited lymphoplasmacytic inflammation of the conjunctiva, sinus, and trachea. The most likely source of infection was either chickens, which had been introduced before the onset of clinical signs, or the chukar partridge breeders, which had been obtained at various hunting field trials.

  12. Spray application of live attenuated F Strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live attenuated vaccines (LAVs) are commonly utilized to protect commercial table egg producers from economic losses associated with challenges by the respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). Currently there are four MG LAVs commercially available within the United States. Consistent am...

  13. The PK/PD Interactions of Doxycycline against Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Gu, Xiaoyan; Ye, Xiaomei; Wu, Xun; Zhang, Bingxu; Zhang, Longfei; Shen, Xiangguang; Jiang, Hongxia; Ding, Huanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is one of the most important pathogens that cause chronic respiratory disease in chicken. This study investigated the antibacterial activity of doxycycline against M. gallisepticum strain S6. In static time–killing studies with constant antibiotic concentrations [0–64 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)], M. gallisepticum colonies were quantified and kill rates were calculated to estimate the drug effect. The half-life of doxycycline in chicken was 6.51 ± 0.63 h. An in vitro dynamic model (the drug concentrations are fluctuant) was also established and two half-lives of 6.51 and 12 h were simulated. The samples were collected for drug concentration determination and viable counting of M. gallisepticum. In static time–killing studies, doxycycline produced a maximum antimycoplasmal effect of 5.62log10 (CFU/mL) reduction and the maximum kill rate was 0.11 h−1. In the in vitro dynamic model, doxycycline had a mycoplasmacidal activity in the two regimens, and the maximum antimycoplasmal effects were 4.1 and 4.75log10 (CFU/mL) reduction, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative percentage of time over a 48-h period that the drug concentration exceeds the MIC (%T > MIC) was the pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic index that best correlated with antimicrobial efficacy (R2 = 0.986, compared with 0.897 for the peak level divided by the MIC and 0.953 for the area under the concentration–time curve over 48 h divided by the MIC). The estimated %T > MIC values for 0log10 (CFU/mL) reduction, 2log10 (CFU/mL) reduction and 3log10 (CFU/mL) reduction were 32.48, 45.68, and 54.36%, respectively, during 48 h treatment period of doxycycline. In conclusion, doxycycline shows excellent effectiveness and time-dependent characteristics against M. gallisepticum strain S6 in vitro. Additionally, these results will guide optimal dosing strategies of doxycycline in M. gallisepticum infection. PMID:27199972

  14. Mycoplasma gallisepticum: Influence of cell invasiveness on the outcome of experimental infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Much, Peter; Winner, Florian; Stipkovits, László; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2002-11-15

    Recently we have shown that a low (R(low)) and a high laboratory passage (R(high)) of the poultry pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum prototype strain R differ markedly in their capability to invade non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells. In the present study the infection traits of these two mycoplasma passages were compared in an in vivo setting. After aerosol inoculation of chickens, M. gallisepticum was re-isolated from the inner organs of birds infected with R(low), whereas no mycoplasma was recovered from the inner organs of birds infected with R(high). These results indicate that the two mycoplasma populations derived from strain R differ in their capacity to cross the mucosal barrier and suggest that cell invasion may play a major role in the observed systemic spreading of M. gallisepticum in its chicken host.

  15. In vitro susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones in current and archived Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae isolates from meat-type turkeys.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irina; Lysnyansky, Inna; Perk, Shimon; Levisohn, Sharon

    2008-10-15

    Monitoring of susceptibility to antibiotics in field isolates of pathogenic avian mycoplasmas is important for appropriate choice of treatment. Our study compared in vitro susceptibility to enrofloxacin and difloxacin in recent (2005-2006) isolates of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae from meat-type turkey flocks with archived (1997-2003) isolates and reference strains. Comparison of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values determined by microtest, agar dilution and commercial Etest showed good agreement, but underscored the need for standardized methods for testing. Notably, while the commercial Etest was convenient and accurate for determining MICs for enrofloxacin in the range 0.002-0.094microg/ml, the endpoint of inhibition for M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae strains with MIC values > or =1.0microg/ml could not be determined. A decrease in susceptibility to both fluoroquinolones was detected in archived strains but to a greater degree in recent isolates, most of which had MICs above the NCCLS susceptibility breakpoint for these antibiotics (< or =0.5microg/ml). In contrast, except for one flock, M. synoviae isolates were susceptible, although intrinsically less susceptible than M. gallisepticum. Overall for the 88 strains tested (45 M. gallisepticum, 43 M. synoviae), the MIC50 for both enrofloxacin and difloxacin was 0.5microg/ml. The isolation of fluoroquinolone-resistant M. gallisepticum isolates from breeder and broiler flocks as well as from meat-type turkeys suggests that these strains have become established in Israel, necessitating a reevaluation of antibiotic therapy. Periodic survey of MICs in field isolates of avian mycoplasmas to monitor for the possible appearance of resistant strains is recommended.

  16. Effects of prelay ts11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation and time specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum inoculation overlays on internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma infections are pandemic in multiage layer chicken flocks with M. gallisepticum being the species of greatest concern to commercial egg producers. Live M. gallisepticum vaccines are presently being used to help control M. gallisepticum outbreaks. However, vaccination of layers with F-str...

  17. Experimental Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections in captive-reared wild turkeys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Yuill, Thomas M.; Amundson, Terry E.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infections on egg production, fertility, and hatchability were studied in captive-reared wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). Three groups of adult birds, each consisting of four hens and two toms, were exposed to MG by the respiratory route at the beginning of their breeding season. Fourteen control birds received sterile growth medium. Although no mortality of infected or control birds occurred, egg production during the first breeding season after infection was reduced. The mean number of eggs/hen/day produced by infected groups the first breeding season postexposure (PE) was significantly lower than the control value. The mean number of eggs produced daily by the same hens 1 yr later was unaffected by MG infection. The pecentage of fertile eggs produced by infected groups was slightly reduced in both the first and second breeding seasons PE. Hatchability of fertile eggs from infected hens was significantly lower than eggs from control hens. Productivity may be impaired if MG infections occur in free-ranging wild turkey populations.

  18. Change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum field isolates.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al-Rashdan, Mohammad

    2011-06-02

    This study compares the antimicrobial susceptibility over time between two groups of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) isolates from the same geographical area. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 13 antimicrobials was determined against two groups of MG isolates from chickens. Group 1 strains (n=22) were isolated in 2004-2005 while group 2 strains (n=7) were isolated in 2007-2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration 50 for group 1 versus group 2 was 4/4, 0.5/0.5, ≤ 0.031/≥ 64, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/0.125, 1/0.5, 1/1, ≤ 0.031/≤ 0.031, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/2, 1/4, ≤ 0.031/0.062, and 0.062/2 μg/ml against gentamicin, spectinomycin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, florfenicol, thiamphenicol, tiamulin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase in resistance of group 2 to erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline. This dramatic increase in resistance against 8 antimicrobials belonging to three different families of antimicrobials in a relatively short period of time appears to be rare and of concern. The cause of this increased resistance observed in group 2 of MG isolates was not determined and should be further investigated. Monitoring of MG field strain susceptibility is highly recommended to implement successful treatment and prophylaxis programs in endemic areas.

  19. Effect of infection route and concurrent infectious bronchitis virus vaccination on Mycoplasma gallisepticum disease pathology in an experimental model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infections is needed, not only to understand the disease process, but also to understand the mechanisms by which M. gallisepticum vaccines protect the host. Many model systems have been used to study the M. gallisepticum disease process. This work compared two...

  20. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Tiamulin in an Experimental Intratracheal Infection Model of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Yang, Tao; Fang, Xi; Cheng, Jie; Xiong, Yan Q.; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most important pathogen in poultry among four pathogenic Mycoplasma species. Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that shows a great activity against M. gallisepticum and has been approved for use in veterinary medicine particularly for poultry. However, the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) profiles of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum are not well understood. Therefore, in the current studies, we investigated the in vivo PK/PD profiles of tiamulin using a well-established experimental intratracheal infection model of M. gallisepticum. The efficacy of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum was studied in 8-day-old chickens after intramuscular (i.m.) administration at 10 doses between 0–80 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to evaluate the PK parameters of tiamulin following i.m. administration at doses of 5, 40, and 80 mg/kg in Mycoplasma gallisepticum-infected neutropenic chickens. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used for quantitative detection of M. gallisepticum. The MIC of tiamulin against M. gallisepticum strain S6 was 0.03 μg/mL. The PK/PD index, AUC24h/MIC, correlated well with the in vivo antibacterial efficacy. The in vivo data suggest that animal dosage regimens should supply AUC24h/MIC of tiamulin of 382.68 h for 2 log10 ccu equivalents M. gallisepticum reduction. To attain that goal, the administered dose is expected to be 45 mg/kg b.w. for treatment of M. gallisepticum infection with an MIC90 of 0.03 μg/mL. PMID:27656647

  1. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on blood characteristics in commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects ...

  2. A comparative study of live attenuated F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available attenuated strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) are commonly used within the layer industry to control MG-induced mycoplasmosis. Among these are two live MG vaccines derived from the moderately pathogenic MG “chick F” strain. In the present study, the commercially availa...

  3. A surface epitope undergoing high-frequency phase variation is shared by Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Yogev, D; Menaker, D; Strutzberg, K; Levisohn, S; Kirchhoff, H; Hinz, K H; Rosengarten, R

    1994-01-01

    We have recently reported that three distinct size- and phase-variable surface lipoproteins (Vsps) of the bovine pathogen Mycoplasma bovis possess a common epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody 1E5. In the present study, we show that this epitope is also present on a size-variant protein (PvpA) of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Application of monoclonal antibody 1E5 in Western immunoblot analysis of Triton X-114 phase-fractionated proteins and in colony immunoblots, as well as in trypsin and carboxypeptidase digestion experiments, has demonstrated that (i) PvpA is an integral membrane protein with a free C terminus, (ii) the shared epitope is surface exposed, and (iii) PvpA is subjected to high-frequency phase variation in expression. By using serum antibodies from M. gallisepticum-infected chickens, we were able to demonstrate the immunogenic nature of PvpA and identify three additional highly immunogenic Triton X-114 phase proteins (p67, p72, and p75) also undergoing high-frequency phase variation spontaneously and independently. Metabolic labeling experiments with [14C]palmitate and [14C]oleate revealed that PvpA, in contrast to p67, p72, and p75, is not lipid modified. Southern blot hybridization with restriction fragments carrying the pvpA gene of M. gallisepticum or the vspA gene of M. bovis against digested genomic DNA of the two Mycoplasma species indicated the absence of genetic relatedness between the pvpA and vspA genes. The apparent complexity of the antigenic variation phenomenon in M. gallisepticum is discussed. Images PMID:7523302

  4. A chronicle of serologic response in commercial layer chickens to vaccination with commercial F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initial efforts by the poultry industry at controlling and containing Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) included testing and slaughter of reactor flocks. Ultimately, using the aforementioned measures coupled with heat treatment of hatching eggs together with biosecurity and biosurveillance procedures, ...

  5. Effect of selected water temperatures used in Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine reconstitution on titer at selected time intervals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are currently used throughout the poultry industry for the administration of vaccines. Each utilizes water for vaccine reconstitution and/or administration, including two of the three commercially available live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccines. Selected water temperatures w...

  6. Serological Screening Suggests Extensive Presence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae in Backyard Chickens in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Taunde, Paula; Zandamela, Ana Felicidade; Junior, Alberto Pondja; Chilundo, Abel; Costa, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    A total of 459 serum samples from unvaccinated backyard chickens originating from 4 villages in Mandlakazi district, Southern Mozambique, were tested for the presence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae antibodies through commercial enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay [ELISA] kits. Anti-MG and anti-MS antibodies were detected in all villages surveyed and the overall seroprevalence was 48.8% [95% CI 39.1–57.8] and 84.5% [95% CI 76.8–90.4], respectively. The risk of being seropositive for both diseases was higher [P < 0.05] in Chidenguele village than other villages. It is concluded that MG and MS serum antibodies are present in backyard chickens. PMID:28243629

  7. Effects of Time-Specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays on Prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum Vaccination on Blood Characteristics of Commercial Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts-11-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (ts-11MG) vaccination alone or in combination with subsequent time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculations on the blood characteristics of commercial laying hens. The following 4 treat...

  8. Effects of Prelay 6/85-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Alone or in Conjunction with the Inoculation of F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum During Lay on the Blood Characteristics of Commercial Egg-Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 6/85 Mycoplasma gallisepticum (6/85MG) inoculation alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. Gallisepticum (FMG) overlays and their timing on the blood characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens were investigated. Control birds received sham inoculations at 10 wk of age. Birds in ...

  9. Characterisation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains involved in respiratory disease in pheasants and peafowl.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Mrzel, I; RoJs, O Zorman; Bidovec, A; Dovc, A

    2003-02-22

    Two cases of Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in different avian species in backyard gamebird operations in Slovenia were investigated. In the first case, M gallisepticum was associated with severe respiratory disease with almost 20 per cent mortality in pheasants, whereas the infection was less pathogenic for chickens and turkeys reared at the same site. The M gallisepticum isolates from pheasants had a unique pMGA gene sequence containing a repeat of 12 nucleotides, and they contained only small amounts of the cytadhesins MGC1 and MGC3 and no PvpA protein. However, they expressed some typical M gallisepticum proteins and several proteins which were immunogenic for pheasants, chickens and turkeys. A strain of M gallisepticum isolated from the sinus of a pheasant was highly pathogenic for chicken embryos. In the second case, the M gallisepticum strain that was associated with respiratory disease and mortality in peafowl also affected chickens. M gallisepticum strain ULB 992 was isolated from the infraorbital sinus of a dead peafowl. The ULB 992 strain synthesised a small amount of MGC3, a truncated form of MGC1 and lacked PvpA. However, it expressed several proteins which were immunogenic for the birds infected with M gallisepticum at both gamebird operations.

  10. Development of a Site-Directed Integration Plasmid for Heterologous Gene Expression in Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Indikova, Ivana; Szostak, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering the molecular basis of the interactions between the parasite Mycoplasma gallisepticum and its avian hosts suffers from the lack of genetic tools available for the pathogen. In the absence of well established methods for targeted disruption of relevant M. gallisepticum genes, we started to develop suicide vectors and equipped them with a short fragment of M. gallisepticum origin or replication (oriCMG). We failed to create a disruption vector, although by adding a further short fragment of the M. gallisepticum tufB upstream region we created a “Trojan horse” plasmid. This is fully integrated into the genomic DNA of M. gallisepticum, always at the same site, oriCMG, and is able to carry and express any gene of interest in the genetic background of M. gallisepticum. Successful expression of a heterologous gene was shown with the lacZ gene of E. coli. When used for gene complementation or expression of hybrid genes in M. gallisepticum, a site-specific combined integration/expression vector constitutes an improvement on randomly integrating transposons, which might have unexpected effects on the expression of chromosomal genes. PMID:24278444

  11. Identification of Strain-Specific Sequences That Distinguish a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccine Strain from Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, Camir; Pickler, Larissa; Maurer, John; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; García, Maricarmen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite attempts to control avian mycoplasmosis through management, vaccination, and surveillance, Mycoplasma gallisepticum continues to cause significant morbidity, mortality, and economic losses in poultry production. Live attenuated vaccines are commonly used in the poultry industry to control avian mycoplasmosis; unfortunately, some vaccines may revert to virulence and vaccine strains are generally difficult to distinguish from natural field isolates. In order to identify genome differences among vaccine revertants, vaccine strains, and field isolates, whole-genome sequencing of the M. gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 and several “ts-11-like” strains isolated from commercial flocks was performed using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing and the sequenced genomes compared to the M. gallisepticum Rlow reference genome. The collective contigs for each strain were annotated using the fully annotated Mycoplasma reference genome. The analysis revealed genetic differences among vlhA alleles, as well as among genes annotated as coding for a cell wall surface anchor protein (mg0377) and a hypothetical protein gene, mg0359, unique to M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain. PCR protocols were designed to target 5 sequences unique to the M. gallisepticum ts-11 strain: vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.04b, vlhA3.05, mg0377, and mg0359. All ts-11 isolates were positive for the five gene alleles tested by PCR; however, 5 to 36% of field isolates were also positive for at least one of the alleles tested. A combination of PCR tests for vlhA3.04a, vlhA3.05, and mg0359 was able to distinguish the M. gallisepticum ts-11 vaccine strain from field isolates. This method will further supplement current approaches to quickly distinguish M. gallisepticum vaccine strains from field isolates. PMID:27847370

  12. GapA and CrmA Coexpression Is Essential for Mycoplasma gallisepticum Cytadherence and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Papazisi, L.; Frasca Jr., S.; Gladd, M.; Liao, X.; Yogev, D.; Geary, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that avirulent Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain Rhigh (passage 164) is lacking three proteins that are expressed in its virulent progenitor, strain Rlow (passage 15). These proteins were identified as the cytadhesin molecule GapA, the putative cytadhesin-related molecule CrmA, and a component of a high-affinity transporter system, HatA. Complementation of Rhigh with wild-type gapA restored expression in the transformant (GT5) but did not restore the cytadherence phenotype and maintained avirulence in chickens. These results suggested that CrmA might play an essential role in the M. gallisepticum cytadherence process. CrmA is encoded by the second gene in the gapA operon and shares significant sequence homology to the ORF6 gene of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which has been shown to play an accessory role in the cytadherence process. Complementation of Rhigh with wild-type crmA resulted in the transformant (SDCA) that lacked the cytadherence and virulence phenotype comparable to that found in Rhigh and GT5. In contrast, complementation of Rhigh with the entire wild-type gapA operon resulted in the transformant (GCA1) that restored cytadherence to the level found in wild-type Rlow. In vivo pathogenesis trials revealed that GCA1 had regained virulence, causing airsacculitis in chickens. These results demonstrate that both GapA and CrmA are required for M. gallisepticum cytadherence and pathogenesis. PMID:12438360

  13. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-11-20

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities.

  14. Proteomic analysis of tylosin-resistant Mycoplasma gallisepticum reveals enzymatic activities associated with resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Cui, Yaowen; Kang, Mengjiao; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a significant pathogenic bacterium that infects poultry, causing chronic respiratory disease and sinusitis in chickens and turkeys, respectively. M. gallisepticum infection poses a substantial economic threat to the poultry industry, and this threat is made worse by the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. The mechanisms of resistance are often difficult to determine; for example, little is known about antibiotic resistance of M. gallisepticum at the proteome level. In this study, we performed comparative proteomic analyses of an antibiotic (tylosin)-resistant M. gallisepticum mutant and a susceptible parent strain using a combination of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and nano-liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry. Thirteen proteins were identified as differentially expressed in the resistant strain compared to the susceptible strain. Most of these proteins were related to catalytic activity, including catalysis that promotes the formylation of initiator tRNA and energy production. Elongation factors Tu and G were over-expressed in the resistant strains, and this could promote the binding of tRNA to ribosomes and catalyze ribosomal translocation, the coordinated movement of tRNA, and conformational changes in the ribosome. Taken together, our results indicate that M. gallisepticum develops resistance to tylosin by regulating associated enzymatic activities. PMID:26584633

  15. Testing the efficacy of fermented wheat germ extract against Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection of chickens.

    PubMed

    Stipkovits, L; Lapis, K; Hidvégi, M; Kósa, E; Glávits, R; Resetár, A

    2004-11-01

    The effect of fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE, Immunovet-HBM) was studied in chickens challenged with Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Ninety M. gallisepticum- and M. synoviae-free 3-wk-old chickens were exposed to aerosol infection of M. gallisepticum. One group (30 birds) was treated with FWGE, a second group with tiamulin, and a third group was untreated. The fourth group was exposed to PBS aerosol as a negative control. On d 9, all chickens were slaughtered and examined for the presence of gross and histological lesions, the presence of the challenge strain in the organs and specific antibodies in the serum. Body weight gains and feed conversion rates were recorded. In the groups treated with FWGE and with tiamulin, the chickens remained clinically healthy: their BW gains were 441.7 g and 446.8 g, respectively. Feed conversion ratios were 1.72 and 1.71 for FWGE- and tiamulin-treated birds, respectively. Control birds had BW gain of 480.8 g, and feed conversion ratio of 1.78. The numbers of birds with gross lesions (15 and 11, respectively) and lesion scores (25 and 25, respectively) of the FWGE- and tiamulin-treated groups were significantly lower than in the infected untreated group (25 birds, lesion score of 190). No mycoplasma was reisolated from brain, liver, spleen, heart, or kidneys of the FWGE-treated birds, and the number of mycoplasma isolations from the respiratory tract samples was less frequent (10) than from the infected untreated group (64). In addition, 35 samples from other internal organs were also positive. Twenty percent of the birds treated with FWGE showed serological response with a 5.0% reaction score, whereas in the infected untreated group, 83.3% of birds were reactors, with a 62.5% reaction score.

  16. Effects of sialidase knockout and complementation on virulence of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    May, Meghan; Szczepanek, Steven M; Frasca, Salvatore; Gates, Amy E; Demcovitz, Dina L; Moneypenny, Craig G; Brown, Daniel R; Geary, Steven J

    2012-05-25

    Reannotation of the pathogenic Mycoplasma gallisepticum strain R(low) genome identified the hypothetical gene MGA_0329 as a homolog of the sialidase gene MS53_0199 of Mycoplasma synoviae strain MS53. Potent sialidase activity was subsequently quantitated in several M. gallisepticum strains. Because sialidase activity levels correlate significantly with differing M. synoviae strain virulence, we hypothesized this enzyme may also influence the virulence of M. gallisepticum. MGA_0329 was disrupted in strain R(low) to create mutants 6, 358 and P1C5, which resulted in the loss of sialidase activity in all three mutants. Chickens infected with the knockout mutants had significantly less severe (P<0.05) tracheal lesions and tracheal mucosal thickening than chickens infected with equal doses of strain R(low). Significantly fewer (P<0.05) CCU especially of strains 6 and P1C5 were recovered at necropsy. Mini-Tn4001tet plasmid pTF20 carrying a wild-type copy of MGA_0329 with its native promoter was used to complement the genetic lesion in strain P1C5. Three clones derived from P1C5, each having one copy of MGA_0329 stably transposed into a different site in its genome, expressed sialidase restored to wild-type activity levels (1.58×10(-8)U/CFU). Complementation of P1C5 with MGA_0329 did not restore it to wild-type levels of virulence, indicating that the contribution of sialidase to M. gallisepticum virulence is not straightforward.

  17. Interaction of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells Contributes to Macrophage Chemotaxis and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sanjukta

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum colonizes the chicken respiratory mucosa and mediates a severe inflammatory response hallmarked by subepithelial leukocyte infiltration. We recently reported that the interaction of M. gallisepticum with chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TECs) mediated the upregulation of chemokine and inflammatory cytokine genes in these cells (S. Majumder, F. Zappulla, and L. K. Silbart, PLoS One 9:e112796, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112796). The current study extends these observations and sheds light on how this initial interaction may give rise to subsequent inflammatory events. Conditioned medium from TECs exposed to the virulent Rlow strain induced macrophage chemotaxis to a much higher degree than the nonvirulent Rhigh strain. Coculture of chicken macrophages (HD-11) with TECs exposed to live mycoplasma revealed the upregulation of several proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β), CXCL-13, and RANTES. The upregulation of these genes was similar to that observed upon direct contact of HD-11 cells with live M. gallisepticum. Coculture of macrophages with Rlow-exposed TECs also resulted in prolonged expression of chemokine genes, such as those encoding CXCL-13, MIP-1β, RANTES, and IL-8. Taken together, these studies support the notion that the initial interaction of M. gallisepticum with host respiratory epithelial cells contributes to macrophage chemotaxis and activation by virtue of robust upregulation of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, thereby setting the stage for chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:26527215

  18. The Effect of an Alternate Start Codon on Heterologous Expression of a PhoA Fusion Protein in Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Indu S; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2015-01-01

    While the genomes of many Mycoplasma species have been sequenced, there are no collated data on translational start codon usage, and the effects of alternate start codons on gene expression have not been studied. Analysis of the annotated genomes found that ATG was the most prevalent translational start codon among Mycoplasma spp. However in Mycoplasma gallisepticum a GTG start codon is commonly used in the vlhA multigene family, which encodes a highly abundant, phase variable lipoprotein adhesin. Therefore, the effect of this alternate start codon on expression of a reporter PhoA lipoprotein was examined in M. gallisepticum. Mutation of the start codon from ATG to GTG resulted in a 2.5 fold reduction in the level of transcription of the phoA reporter, but the level of PhoA activity in the transformants containing phoA with a GTG start codon was only 63% of that of the transformants with a phoA with an ATG start codon, suggesting that GTG was a more efficient translational initiation codon. The effect of swapping the translational start codon in phoA reporter gene expression was less in M. gallisepticum than has been seen previously in Escherichia coli or Bacillus subtilis, suggesting the process of translational initiation in mycoplasmas may have some significant differences from those used in other bacteria. This is the first study of translational start codon usage in mycoplasmas and the impact of the use of an alternate start codon on expression in these bacteria.

  19. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the internal egg and eggshell characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Live F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccines are presently being used to help control field strain MG outbreaks. However, they may exert some adverse effects on egg production. Live strains of MG of lesser virulence as well as killed vaccines have little or no effect on egg production, bu...

  20. Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. Different strains of MG have been used as vaccines in multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect the birds against more virulent field strains. The lower level of protection afforded b...

  1. EFFECTS OF BROILER REARING ENVIRONMENT ON TRANSMISSION OF F-STRAIN MYCOPLASMA GALLISEPTICUM FROM COMMERCIAL LAYER HENS TO BROILER CHICKENS: ROLE OF ACID-BASE BALANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted concurrently to determine and compare, blood pH, blood gases, hematocrit, and hemoglobin in mycoplasma-free, F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers, and FMG contact-infected broilers. FMG-inoculated layers had the highest partial pressure of O2 and the l...

  2. Ex vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of valnemulin against Mycoplasma gallisepticum S6 in Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli co-infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yi; Zou, Mengting; Zhao, Dong-Hao; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2015-04-01

    Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indices against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) S6 were investigated in an ex vivo PK/PD model following oral administration of valnemulin to chickens co-infected with M. gallisepticum and Escherichia coli. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for valnemulin against MG S6 in artificial medium and chicken serum were determined. In vitro time-killing curves were established according to a series of multiples of the MIC value in an artificial medium, and ex vivo time-killing curves were established in serum samples obtained from infected chickens at different time points after oral administration with an initial titer of 1 × 10(6) color change units (CCU)/mL MG S6. The sigmoid Emax model was used to provide 24 h area under concentration-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration ratios (AUC0-24h/MIC) for mycoplasmastasis, mycoplasmacidal activity and mycoplasmal elimination, respectively. The inoculum size and micro or macro methods exhibited little effect on MIC determination of MG, whereas matrix had a large effect. The rapid killing activity observed in in vitro time-killing curves seems to indicate that valnemulin was mycoplasmacidal and concentration dependent against MG. The AUC0-24h/MIC ratio for mycoplasmacidal activity and mycoplasmal elimination was 1321 h and 1960 h, respectively. A dosage regimen of 12.4 mg/kg/day and 18.3 mg/kg/day valnemulin was calculated for mycoplasmacidal activity and mycoplasmal elimination against MG S6, respectively.

  3. Serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys to experimental infections of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Yuill, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    The serologic response of Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) to Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) was determined. Free-ranging turkeys were caught in southern Texas, shipped to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and housed in isolation facilities. Fourteen birds were exposed to MG, by intratracheal and intranasal inoculation. Eight birds received sterile broth only. Two wk prior to the end of the experiment, MG exposed turkeys were stressed by challenge with a serologically unrelated mycoplasma. Serum from all exposed birds reacted positively for MG antibody by the rapid plate agglutination (RPA) procedure within 2 mo postexposure (PE) and all but one remained positive for 14 mo PE. Less than one half of the exposed birds developed positive MG antibody titers detectable by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test within 2 mo PE, and by 10 mo PE, none had positive titers. Antibody was detected by the HI test in two of 11 infected turkeys, 14 mo PE, and titers increased significantly within 2 wk. MG was isolated from tracheal swabs from two infected birds 2 mo PE, but attempts thereafter failed. However, at the termination of the experiment 15 mo later, MG was isolated from lung tissue of three of 11 exposed turkeys and from a blood clot found in the lower trachea of one bird.

  4. Evaluation of the egg transmission and pathogenicity of Mycoplasma gallisepticum isolates genotyped as ts-11.

    PubMed

    Armour, Natalie K; Ferguson-Noel, Naola

    2015-01-01

    Live Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccines are used for the control of respiratory disease, egg production losses and egg transmission associated with M. gallisepticum infection in long-lived poultry. The first field case of apparent increased virulence and vertical transmission of ts-11, a live M. gallisepticum vaccine, has been reported. In that study a M. gallisepticum isolate from the broiler progeny of ts-11-vaccinated breeders was genotyped as ts-11 by sequence analysis of four different genetic targets and Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA and found to be significantly more virulent than ts-11 vaccine. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the rate of egg transmission and pathogenicity of ts-11 vaccine and isolates recovered from ts-11-vaccinated breeders (K6222B) and their broiler progeny (K6216D) which had been genotyped as ts-11. Groups of 28-week-old specific pathogen-free chickens at 87% average weekly egg production were inoculated with sterile broth media (negative controls), ts-11 vaccine, K6222B, K6216D or R strain (positive controls) by eye-drop and aerosol. K6216D transmitted via the egg at an average rate of 4.0% in the third and fourth weeks post-infection, while egg transmission of K6222B and ts-11 vaccine was not detected. M. gallisepticum was isolated from the air sacs, ovaries and oviducts of hens infected with K6216D and K6222B, but not from those infected with ts-11 vaccine. K6216D and K6222B both induced respiratory signs and significantly more tracheal colonization and more severe tracheal and air sac lesions than ts-11 vaccine (P ≤ 0.05). There were no substantial differences in the egg production of ts-11, K6216D and K6222B infected groups. These results provide the first conclusive evidence of transovarian transmission of an isolate genotyped as ts-11 and indicate that isolates genotyed as ts-11 vary in their virulence and ability to transmit via the egg.

  5. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on blood characteristics in commercial layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E David; Jacob, Roymon; Branton, Scott L; Evans, Jeffrey D; Leigh, Spencer A; Gerard, Patrick D

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of pre-lay vaccinations of ts11MG, MG-Bacterin (MGBac), or their combination, in conjunction with an FMG challenge overlay after peak production on the blood characteristics of commercial layers. In each trial, 160 mycoplasma-free Hy-Line W-36 layers were housed in negative-pressure biological isolation units (4 units per treatment, 10 birds per unit) from 9 through 52 wk of age (woa). The following vaccination treatments were administered at 10 woa: 1) Control (no vaccinations); 2) MGBac; 3) ts11MG; and 4) ts11MG and MGBac combination (ts11MG+MGBac). At 45 woa, half of the birds were challenged with a laboratory stock of high-passage FMG. Parameters measured in both trials were whole-blood hematocrit and serum concentrations of cholesterol (SCHOL), triglycerides, calcium, and total protein (STP). An age×treatment interaction (P=0.04) was observed for STP between 23 and 43 woa. The STP concentration in the ts11MG and ts11MG+MGBac groups was higher at 33 woa, but was lower at 43 woa, in comparison to the Control group. Also, at 38 woa, the STP of the ts11MG+MGBac group was higher than that of the MGBac group. Although use of the ts11MG vaccine alone or in combination with MGBac may influence circulating STP concentrations when administered before lay, it remains effective in protecting layers against the adverse effect of a post-peak challenge of FMG on egg production, as was observed in a previous companion study.

  6. [Antimycoplasmal activities of ofloxacin and commonly used antimicrobial agents on Mycoplasma gallisepticum].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, I; Yoshida, T

    1989-05-01

    In vitro activities of ofloxacin (OFLX), a new quinolone derivative, against 29 strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum was compared with those of 4 commonly used antimicrobial agents, doxycycline (DOXY), tylosin (TS), spectinomycin (SPCM) and thiamphenicol (TP). Antimycoplasmal activities of the drugs were evaluated on the MIC (final MIC) and MPC (minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration) values which were determined by a broth dilution procedure. The following results were obtained. 1. The MIC90s of OFLX and DOXY were both 0.20 micrograms/ml. The MICs of TS were distributed through a wide range (less than or equal to 0.006 - 0.78 micrograms/ml), and its MIC90 was 0.78 micrograms/ml. Of 29 M. gallisepticum strains, 27.6% were recognized as TS-resistant. The MIC90 values of SPCM and TP were 1.56 micrograms/ml and 3.13 micrograms/ml, respectively. The MIC90 of OFLX was equal to that of DOXY and 4- to 16-fold smaller than the values of the other 3 antibiotics. 2. The MPC of OFLX was the lowest among the antibiotics tested, its MPC90 value was 0.39 micrograms/ml and was followed by DOXY (1.56 micrograms/ml). The MPCs of TS were distributed in a wide range (0.012 - 3.13 micrograms/ml), and its MPC90 was 3.13 micrograms/ml. The MPC90 values of SPCM and TP were both 6.25 micrograms/ml. Therefore, the mycoplasmacidal activity of OFLX evaluated with MPC90 values was 4- to 16-fold greater than those of the other 4 antibiotics.

  7. Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli mixed infection model in broiler chickens for studying valnemulin pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, X; Zhao, D H; Yang, X; Shi, W; Deng, H; Ma, J; Zhang, S; Liu, Y H

    2014-02-01

    A Mycoplasma gallisepticum-Escherichia coli mixed infection model was developed in broiler chickens, which was applied to pharmacokinetics of valnemulin in the present experiment. The velogenic M. gallisepticum standard strain S6 was rejuvenated to establish the animal model, and the wild E. coli strain O78 was injected as supplementary inoculum to induce chronic respiratory disease in chickens. The disease model was evaluated based on its clinical signs, histopathological examination, bacteriological assay, and serum plate agglutination test. The pharmacokinetics of valnemulin in infected chickens was determined by intramuscular (i.m.) injection and oral administration (per os, p.o.) of a single dose of 10 mg/kg body weight (BW). Plasma samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The plasma concentration-time curve of valnemulin was analyzed using the noncompartmental method. After the i.m. administration, the mean values of Cmax , Tmax , AUClast , MRT, CLβ /F, Vz /F, and t1⁄2β , were 27.94 μg/mL, 1.57 h, 171.63 μg·h/mL, 4.51 h, 0.06 L/h/kg, 0.56 L/kg, and 6.50 h, respectively. By contrast, the corresponding values after p.o. administration were 5.93 μg/mL, 7.14 h, 47.60 μg·h/mL, 9.80 h, 0.22 L/h/kg, 3.35 L/kg, and 10.60 h. The disposition of valnemulin was retarded in infected chickens after both modes of extravascular administration as compared to the healthy controls. More attention should be given to monitoring the therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of mixed infection because of higher required plasma drug concentration and enlarged AUC with valnemulin treatment.

  8. The efficacy of Mycoplasma gallisepticum K-strain live vaccine in broiler and layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Noel, N M; Williams, S M

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine candidate (K-strain) was compared to commercially available vaccines in broiler-type chickens (Trial 1) and layer-type chickens (Trial 2). In Trial 1, three-week-old broiler-type chickens were vaccinated via aerosol with K-strain or an F-strain vaccine. The vaccinated chickens and 10 non-vaccinated controls were subsequently challenged with virulent R-strain via aerosol at six weeks post vaccination; both K-strain and F-strain vaccination resulted in significant protection from air sac and tracheal lesions, as well as R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). In Trial 2, commercial layer-type chickens were vaccinated with ts-11 (via eye drop) or K-strain (via aerosol) at 12 weeks of age. At 25 weeks of age these birds were challenged with R-strain via aerosol. The ts-11 and K-strain vaccinated groups both had significantly lower air sac lesion scores and a lower prevalence of ovarian regression after challenge as compared to non-vaccinated chickens (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain vaccination also prevented significant tracheal lesions and R-strain colonization (P ≤ 0.05). K-strain shows great potential as a highly efficacious live MG vaccine in broiler and layer-type chickens for protection of the respiratory and reproductive systems as well as prevention of infection with field strains.

  9. Enhanced conformational flexibility of the histone-like (HU) protein from Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Altukhov, Dmitry A; Talyzina, Anna A; Agapova, Yulia K; Vlaskina, Anna V; Korzhenevskiy, Dmitry A; Bocharov, Eduard V; Rakitina, Tatiana V; Timofeev, Vladimir I; Popov, Vladimir O

    2016-12-29

    The histone-like (HU) protein is one of the major nucleoid-associated proteins involved in DNA supercoiling and compaction into bacterial nucleoid as well as in all DNA-dependent transactions. This small positively charged dimeric protein binds DNA in a non-sequence specific manner promoting DNA super-structures. The majority of HU proteins are highly conserved among bacteria; however, HU protein from Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HUMgal) has multiple amino acid substitutions in the most conserved regions, which are believed to contribute to its specificity to DNA targets unusual for canonical HU proteins. In this work, we studied the structural dynamic properties of the HUMgal dimer by NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations. The obtained all-atom model displays compliance with the NMR data and confirms the heterogeneous backbone flexibility of HUMgal. We found that HUMgal, being folded into a dimeric conformation typical for HU proteins, has a labile α-helical body with protruded β-stranded arms forming DNA-binding domain that are highly flexible in the absence of DNA. The amino acid substitutions in conserved regions of the protein are likely to affect the conformational lability of the HUMgal dimer that can be responsible for complex functional behavior of HUMgal in vivo, e.g. facilitating its spatial adaptation to non-canonical DNA-targets.

  10. Mycoplasma pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Walking pneumonia; Community-acquired pneumonia - mycoplasma; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Mycoplasma pneumonia usually affects people younger than 40. People who live or work in crowded areas such ...

  11. Role of the GapA and CrmA cytadhesins of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in promoting virulence and host colonization.

    PubMed

    Indiková, Ivana; Much, Peter; Stipkovits, László; Siebert-Gulle, Karin; Szostak, Michael P; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2013-05-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is an important avian pathogen that commonly induces chronic respiratory disease in chicken. To better understand the mycoplasma factors involved in host colonization, chickens were infected via aerosol with two hemadsorption-negative (HA(-)) mutants, mHAD3 and RCL2, that were derived from a low passage of the pathogenic strain R (Rlow) and are both deficient in the two major cytadhesins GapA and CrmA. After 9 days of infection, chickens were monitored for air sac lesions and for the presence of mycoplasmas in various organs. The data showed that mHAD3, in which the crmA gene has been disrupted, did not promote efficient colonization or significant air sac lesions. In contrast, the spontaneous HA(-) RCL2 mutant, which contains a point mutation in the gapA structural gene, successfully colonized the respiratory tract and displayed an attenuated virulence compared to that of Rlow. It has previously been shown in vitro that the point mutation of RCL2 spontaneously reverts with a high frequency, resulting in on-and-off switching of the HA phenotype. Detailed analyses further revealed that such an event is not responsible for the observed in vivo outcome, since 98.4% of the mycoplasma populations recovered from RCL2-infected chickens still display the mutation and the associated phenotype. Unlike Rlow, however, RCL2 was unable to colonize inner organs. These findings demonstrate the major role played by the GapA and CrmA proteins in M. gallisepticum host colonization and virulence.

  12. Transfer of maternal immunoglobulins and antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae to the allantoic and amniotic fluid of chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Bencina, Dusan; Narat, Mojca; Bidovec, Andrej; Zorman-Rojs, Olga

    2005-12-01

    Maternal antibodies can protect avian embryos against vertically transmitted pathogens during embryogenesis and also young birds after hatching. In contrast to the well-known transfer of maternal immunoglobulin (Ig) G (also termed IgY) from the yolk to embryonic blood, information about the transfer of IgA, IgG and IgM from the egg albumen to the extra-embryonic fluids is very limited. In our study, IgA, IgG and IgM to Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae were detected in oviduct washings of naturally infected hens and in the corresponding egg albumen samples. In their progeny embryos, IgA, IgG and IgM antibodies to these Mycoplasma species were detected in the allantoic fluid (ALF) and amniotic fluid (AMF) on day 14 of embryonic development (ED). Examination of embryos from chickens immunized with antigens of M. synoviae revealed that the appearance of IgA and IgG and of antibodies to M. synoviae in ALF could vary even among embryos of the same dam. However, IgA, IgG and IgM were detected as early as day 7 of ED in ALF and AMF in certain embryos from hens infected with M. synoviae. In five groups of embryos examined on day 7, IgG to M.synoviae was found in 51% of ALF and 33% of AMF samples. M. synoviae was isolated from 2.3% of ALF samples. IgA to M. synoviae appeared in ALF and AMF on day 12 of ED, and could be found in the majority of AMF samples examined from day 14 onwards. IgM to M. synoviae appeared in AMF on day 13 and in ALF on day 14, but was detected in those fluids less frequently than IgA or IgG.

  13. A Multiplex real-time PCR for detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae in clinical samples from Brazilian commercial poultry flocks

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Aline Padilha; de Vargas, Tatiana; Ikuta, Nilo; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Celmer, Álvaro José; Marques, Edmundo Kanan; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MS) and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) are important avian pathogens and cause economic losses to the poultry industry. Molecular biology techniques are currently used for a rapid detection of these pathogens and the adoption of control measures of the diseases. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a technique for simultaneous detection of MG and MS by multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The complete assay (Multiplex MGMS) was designed with primers and probes specific for each pathogen and developed to be carried out in a single tube reaction. Vaccines, MG and MS isolates and DNA from other Mycoplasma species were used for the development and validation of the method. Further, 78 pooled clinical samples from different poultry flocks in Brazil were obtained and used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique in comparison to 2 real time PCR assays specific for MG (MG PCR) and MS (MS PCR). The results demonstrated an agreement of 100% (23 positive and 44 negative samples) between Multiplex MGMS and MG PCR in the analysis of 67 samples from MG positive and negative poultry flocks, and an agreement of 96.9% between Multiplex MGMS and MS PCR in the analysis of 64 samples from MS positive and negative poultry flocks. Considering the single amplification tests as the gold standard, the Multiplex MGMS showed 100% of specificity and sensitivity in the MG analysis and 94.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the MS analysis. This new assay could be used for rapid analysis of MG and MS in the poultry industry laboratories. PMID:24294247

  14. Serologic response of roosters to gradient dosage levels of a commercially available live F strain-derived Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine over time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray application is a commonly used time- and labor-efficient means to deliver live Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) vaccine to laying hens in commercial production facilities. The dosage of vaccine received by spray vaccinated birds can vary due to variation in the spray plume and vaccine suspension...

  15. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects ...

  16. Mycoplasma gallisepticum in the commercial egg-laying hen: an historical perspective considering effects of pathogen strain, age of bird at inoculation, and diet on performance and physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), a pathogenic organism, primarily causes respiratory distress, but can also spread systemically to subsequently reduce egg production and egg quality in laying hens. However, the effects of MG on the performance and physiology of the commercial laying hen have been sho...

  17. Mycoplasma gallisepticum transmission: Comparison of commercial F-strain vaccine versus layer complex-derived field strains in a tunnel ventilated house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two simultaneous trials were conducted using a commercially available, live, F strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) vaccine [Trial 1] or two inocula of layer complex-derived MG strains (LCD-MG) [Trial 2]. In each of the two trials, four commercial turkeys were housed in each of two adjoining pens ...

  18. Effects of single and combined Mycoplasma gallisepticums vaccinations on blood electrolytes and acid-base balance in commercial egg-laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study, it was shown to occur in response to an F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation layers from our laboratory a significant increase in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), which is generally associated with an oxygen-dependent improvement in tissue oxygenation to...

  19. Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum buffers the effects of acute stress on innate immunity in house finches.

    PubMed

    Fratto, Melanie; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    When wild animals become infected, they still must cope with the rigors of daily life, and, thus, they still can be exposed to acute stressors. The suite of physiological responses to acute stress includes modifying the innate immune system, but infections can also cause similar changes. We examined the effects of an acute stressor (capture stress) on leukocyte abundance and bacteria-killing ability (BKA) in wild birds (house finches Haemorhous mexicanus) with and without a naturally occurring infection (Mycoplasma gallisepticum) to determine whether infection alters the typical immune response to stress. Birds were captured and bled within 3 min (baseline sample) and then held in paper bags for 2 h and bled again (stress sample). From blood smears made at both time points, we obtained estimates of total white blood cell (WBC) counts and relative numbers of each cell. We also measured BKA of plasma at both time points. In uninfected birds (n = 26), total WBC count decreased by 30% over time, while in infected birds (n = 9), it decreased by 6%. Relative numbers of heterophils did not change over time in uninfected birds but increased in infected birds. Combined with a reduction in lymphocyte numbers, this led to a threefold increase in heterophil-lymphocyte values in infected birds after the stressor, compared to a twofold increase in uninfected birds. There was a nonsignificant tendency for BKA to decline with stress in uninfected birds but not in diseased birds. Collectively, these results suggest that infections can buffer the negative effects of acute stress on innate immunity.

  20. Plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in experimentally infected chickens with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ding, H; Wang, L; Shen, X; Gu, X; Zeng, D; Zeng, Z

    2013-10-01

    The plasma and tissue pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin in chickens experimentally infected with Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli were studied. Marbofloxacin was given to 66 infected chickens by oral administration at a dosage of 5 mg/kg b.w., once a day for three days. Plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea were collected and marbofloxacin concentrations were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography method. In the infected chickens, maximal marbofloxacin concentrations in plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea were 1.84, 1.33, 7.35, 5.61, 3.12, 2.98, and 4.51 g/mL (g); the elimination half-lives of marbofloxacin were 6.8, 2.74, 9.31, 8.45, 9.55, 11.53 and 5.46 h for plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea, respectively. AUC were calculated to be 9.68, 8.04, 45.1, 27.03, 20.56, 19.47, and 32.68 μg/mL (g) for plasma, brain, kidney, liver, lung, muscle and trachea, respectively. Marbofloxacin concentration in tissues except for brain exceeded marbofloxacin concentration in plasma, with AUC(tissue) /AUC(plasma) ranging from 2.01 to 4.66 and Peak(tissue) /Peak(plasma) ranging from 1.62 to 3.99. The results showed that a marbofloxacin dosage of 5 mg/kg administered orally at 24 h intervals may provide successful treatment of chicken with MG and E. coli infection.

  1. Molecular characterization and determination of antimicrobial resistance of Mycoplasma gallisepticum isolated from chickens.

    PubMed

    Pakpinyo, Somsak; Sasipreeyajan, Jiroj

    2007-11-15

    In this study, three consecutive approaches of molecular characterization, determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and antimicrobial tested on Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) isolated from chicken farms were investigated. These approaches were conducted between 2004 and 2005 to 134 MG samples collected from five different regions of the intensive farming area of Thailand. Twenty MG isolates and four reference strains including S6, F, ts-11, and 6/85 were classified according to Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns prior to the antimicrobial tests. These isolates exhibited 5 different genotypes (A-E). Consequently, MG isolates representing each genotype were tested on 11 registered antibiotics. The levels of MIC were determined. Three antibiotics, doxycycline (0.20 microg/ml), tiamulin (0.10 microg/ml), and tylosin (0.33 microg/ml), gave the least MICs among all effective drugs. Break point comparisons of each antimicrobial suggested that the MG isolates were most sensitive to lincomycin, oxytetracycline, tiamulin, and tylosin. Some MG isolates had an intermediate effect on josamycin and were resistant to enrofloxacin and erythromycin. Our results also indicated that MG isolated and collected from the region and nearby districts had similar RAPD patterns showing properties of antimicrobial resistance. The RAPD patterns may imply the frequent use of antibiotics and a resistant strain of MG. This is the first report of genetic characterization using RAPD reflected by the levels of MIC against MG. The information is useful to plan for prophylactic and therapeutic impacts on the poultry industry especially in the area of intensive use of antibiotics.

  2. Mycoplasma viruses.

    PubMed

    Maniloff, J

    1988-01-01

    Unlike bacterial viruses that infect cells bounded by a cell wall, mycoplasma viruses have evolved to enter and propagate in mycoplasma cells bounded only by a single lipid-protein cell membrane. In addition, mycoplasmas have the smallest amount of genetic information of any known cells, so their complexity is constrained by a limited genetic coding capacity. As a consequence of these host cell differences, mycoplasma viruses have been found to have a variety of structures and replication strategies which are different from those of the bacterial viruses. This article is a critical review of mycoplasma viruses infecting the genera Acholeplasma, Spiroplasma, and Mycoplasma; included are data on classification, morphology and structure, biological and physical properties, chemical composition, and productive and lysogenic replication cycles.

  3. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  4. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  5. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  6. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  7. 9 CFR 113.408 - Avian mycoplasma antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ion concentration shall be determined with a pH meter which has been standardized with a pH buffer... with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (chicken origin); Mycoplasma Meleagridis Antigen shall be examined for cross-agglutination with five Mycoplasma gallisepticum antiserums (turkey origin) and...

  8. Phase Transition of the Bacterium upon Invasion of a Host Cell as a Mechanism of Adaptation: a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Model

    PubMed Central

    Matyushkina, Daria; Pobeguts, Olga; Butenko, Ivan; Vanyushkina, Anna; Anikanov, Nicolay; Bukato, Olga; Evsyutina, Daria; Bogomazova, Alexandra; Lagarkova, Maria; Semashko, Tatiana; Garanina, Irina; Babenko, Vladislav; Vakhitova, Maria; Ladygina, Valentina; Fisunov, Gleb; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    What strategies do bacteria employ for adaptation to their hosts and are these strategies different for varied hosts? To date, many studies on the interaction of the bacterium and its host have been published. However, global changes in the bacterial cell in the process of invasion and persistence, remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated phase transition of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum upon invasion of the various types of eukaryotic cells (human, chicken, and mouse) which was stable during several passages after isolation of intracellular clones and recultivation in a culture medium. It was shown that this phase transition is manifested in changes at the proteomic, genomic and metabolomic levels. Eukaryotic cells induced similar proteome reorganization of M. gallisepticum during infection, despite different origins of the host cell lines. Proteomic changes affected a broad range of processes including metabolism, translation and oxidative stress response. We determined that the activation of glycerol utilization, overproduction of hydrogen peroxide and the upregulation of the SpxA regulatory protein occurred during intracellular infection. We propose SpxA as an important regulator for the adaptation of M. gallisepticum to an intracellular environment. PMID:27775027

  9. Semi-automated Curation of Metabolic Models via Flux Balance Analysis: A Case Study with Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, Steven M.; Johnson, Erik L.; Tulman, Edan R.; Ching, Wei-Mei; Geary, Steven J.; Srivastava, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Primarily used for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, genome-scale metabolic modeling shows tremendous potential as a tool for fundamental research and curation of metabolism. Through a novel integration of flux balance analysis and genetic algorithms, a strategy to curate metabolic networks and facilitate identification of metabolic pathways that may not be directly inferable solely from genome annotation was developed. Specifically, metabolites involved in unknown reactions can be determined, and potentially erroneous pathways can be identified. The procedure developed allows for new fundamental insight into metabolism, as well as acting as a semi-automated curation methodology for genome-scale metabolic modeling. To validate the methodology, a genome-scale metabolic model for the bacterium Mycoplasma gallisepticum was created. Several reactions not predicted by the genome annotation were postulated and validated via the literature. The model predicted an average growth rate of 0.358±0.12, closely matching the experimentally determined growth rate of M. gallisepticum of 0.244±0.03. This work presents a powerful algorithm for facilitating the identification and curation of previously known and new metabolic pathways, as well as presenting the first genome-scale reconstruction of M. gallisepticum. PMID:24039564

  10. Effects of live and killed vaccines against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the performance characteristics of commercial layer chickens.

    PubMed

    Jacob, R; Branton, S L; Evans, J D; Leigh, S A; Peebles, E D

    2014-06-01

    Different vaccine strains of Mycoplasma gallisepticum have been used on multiple-age commercial layer farms in an effort to protect birds against virulent field-strain infections. Use of the F-strain of M. gallisepticum (FMG), as an overlay vaccine during lay, may be necessary because of the lower level of protection afforded by M. gallisepticum vaccines of low virulence given before lay. Two replicate trials were conducted to investigate effects of live and killed M. gallisepticum vaccines administered individually and in combination before lay, in conjunction with an FMG vaccine overlay after peak egg production (EP), on the performance characteristics of commercial layers. The following treatments were utilized at 10 wk of age (woa): 1) control (no vaccinations); 2) ts11 strain M. gallisepticum (ts11MG) vaccine; 3) M. gallisepticum-Bacterin vaccine (MG-Bacterin); and 4) ts11MG and MG-Bacterin vaccines combination. At 45 woa, half of the birds were overlaid with an FMG vaccine. Hen mortality, BW, egg weight, percentage hen-day EP, egg blood spots, and egg meat spots were determined at various time periods between 18 and 52 woa. The data from each trial were pooled. Treatment did not affect performance in interval I (23 to 45 woa). However, during interval II (46 to 52 woa), the EP of control and MG-Bacterin-vaccinated birds that later received an FMG vaccine overlay was lower than that in the other treatment groups. Furthermore, treatment application reduced bird BW during interval II. Despite the effects on BW and EP, no differences were observed for egg blood or meat spots among the various treatments. It is suggested that the vaccination of commercial layers before lay with ts11MG, but not MG-Bacterin, may reduce the negative impacts of an FMG overlay vaccination given during lay. These results establish that the vaccination of pullets with ts11MG in combination with the vaccination of hens with an FMG overlay, for continual protection against field-strain M

  11. gga-miR-101-3p Plays a Key Role in Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection of Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiao; Wang, Zaiwei; Bi, Dingren; Hou, Yue; Zhao, Yabo; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasma, has caused tremendous economic loss in the poultry industry. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that micro ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about potential roles of miRNAs in MG infection of chicken. In the present study, using miRNA Solexa sequencing we have found that gga-miR-101-3p was up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. Moreover, gga-miR-101-3p regulated expression of the host enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) through binding to the 3’ un-translated region (3’-UTR) of EZH2 gene. Over-expression of gga-miR-101-3p significantly inhibited EZH2 expression and hence inhibited proliferation of chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1 cells) by blocking the G1-to-S phase transition. Similar results were obtained in MG-infected chicken embryos and DF-1 cells, where gga-miR-101-3p was significantly up-regulated, while EZH2 was significantly down-regulated. This study reveals that gga-miR-101-3p plays an important role in MG infection through regulation of EZH2 expression and provides a new insight into the mechanisms of MG pathogenesis. PMID:26633386

  12. pMGA Phenotypic Variation in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Occurs In Vivo and Is Mediated by Trinucleotide Repeat Length Variation

    PubMed Central

    Glew, M. D.; Browning, Glenn F.; Markham, Philip F.; Walker, Ian D.

    2000-01-01

    Chickens were infected with a pathogenic strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and the expression of pMGA, the major surface protein, was inferred by examination of colonies from ex vivo cells. Within 2 days postinfection, 40% of cells had ceased the expression of the original pMGA surface protein (pMGA1.1), and by day 6, the majority of recovered cells were in this category. The switch in pMGA phenotype which had occurred in vivo was reversible, since most colonies produced from ex vivo progenitors exhibited frequent pMGA1.1+ sectors. After prolonged in vivo habitation, increasing proportions of recovered cells gave rise to variant pMGA colonies which had switched from the expression of pMGA1.1 to another gene, pMGA1.2, concomitant with the acquisition of a (GAA)12 motif 5′ to its promoter. Collectively, the results suggest that changes in M. gallisepticum pMGA gene expression in vivo are normal, common, and possibly obligate events for successful colonization of the host. Surprisingly, the initial cessation of pMGA1.1 expression occurred in the absence of detectable pMGA antibodies and seemed to precede the adaptive immune response. PMID:10992515

  13. Determination of the Mutant Selection Window and Evaluation of the Killing of Mycoplasma gallisepticum by Danofloxacin, Doxycycline, Tilmicosin, Tylvalosin and Valnemulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Ye, Xiaomei; Wu, Yuzhi; Huang, Zilong; Gu, Xiaoyan; Cai, Qinren; Shen, Xiangguang; Jiang, Hongxia; Ding, Huanzhong

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a common etiological cause of a chronic respiratory disease in chickens; its increasing antimicrobial resistance compromises the use of tetracyclines, macrolides and quinolones in the farm environment. Mutant selection window (MSW) determination was used to investigate the propensity for future resistance induction by danofloxacin, doxycycline, tilmicosin, tylvalosin and valnemulin. Killing of M. gallisepticum strain S6 by these antimicrobials was also studied by incubating M. gallisepticum into medium containing the compounds at the minimal concentration that inhibits colony formation by 99% (MIC99) and the mutant prevention concentration (MPC). Based on the morphology and colony numbers of M. gallisepticum on agar plates, the four kinds of sera in the order of the applicability for culturing M. gallisepticum were swine serum > horse serum > bovine serum > mixed serum. The MPC/MIC99 values for each agent were as follows: danofloxacin > tilmicosin > tylvalosin > doxycycline > valnemulin. MPC generated more rapid and greater magnitude killing than MIC99 against M. gallisepticum. Under exposure of 105–109 CFU/mL at MPC drug levels, valnemulin had the slowest rate of reduction in viable organisms and danofloxacin had the highest rate of reduction. PMID:28052123

  14. Influence of enrofloxacin traces in drinking water to doxycycline tissue pharmacokinetics in healthy and infected by Mycoplasma gallisepticum broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gbylik-Sikorska, Malgorzata; Posyniak, Andrzej; Sniegocki, Tomasz; Sell, Bartosz; Gajda, Anna; Sawicka, Anna; Olszewska-Tomczyk, Monika; Bladek, Tomasz; Tomczyk, Grzegorz; Zmudzki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Most of antibiotics, administrated in the treatment of poultry diseases are dissolved in drinking water, and it can lead to water supply systems contamination, especially when the regular cleaning is not using. This situation can lead to unconscious administration of low doses of antibiotics to untreated animals. The aim of this study was to clarify the impact of the exposure of enrofloxacin traces (500 μg l(-1)) to doxycycline pharmacokinetics in healthy and experimentally Mycoplasma gallisepticum infected broiler chickens., Two experimental groups, received of enrofloxacin in water and all groups, received 20 mg kg(-1) bw of doxycycline. The compounds concentrations in muscles and livers were determined by LC-MS/MS. The maximum drug tissue concentration (Cmax) of doxycycline was highest in liver obtained from infected chickens which, received enrofloxacin traces (ENR + DC/MG). It was about 40% higher than in healthy chickens from group I which received only doxycycline. It was found that the concentration-time curve AUC(0-t) values in group ENR + DC/MG were almost 75% higher than in the group (DC) and 35% higher than in group (ENR + DC) which also received enrofloxacin traces. The constant exposure of broiler chickens on enrofloxacin traces as well as infection, may significantly influenced on doxycycline tissue pharmacokinetic profile.

  15. Identification of genes involved in Mycoplasma gallisepticum biofilm formation using mini-Tn4001-SGM transposon mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yi, Li; Zhang, Fanqing; Qiu, Xusheng; Tan, Lei; Yu, Shengqing; Cheng, Xiangchao; Ding, Chan

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important pathogen that can cause chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. MG has the ability to form biofilms. The molecular mechanisms underlying MG biofilm formation are complex and poorly understood. To better understand the mechanisms involved in biofilm formation, mini-Tn4001-SGM, a novel transposon vector containing the gentamicin gene was constructed and electroporated into MG strain Rlow. Of the 738 mutants obtained, 12 had significantly reduced capacity to form biofilms in a polystyrene microtiter-plate biofilm assay. Ten different genes were identified as disrupted in these mutants using genomic walking from the transposon insertion sites and Southern bolt hybridization with a transposon-based probe. Four genes were associated with cellular processes, especially synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide and several lipoproteins encoded. Other genes were associated with translation, metabolism and gene regulation, and one had unknown function. Seven genes identified in this study have been previously associated with biofilm formation in MG or other bacterial species. The other three have not been previously reported to play a role in biofilm formation in MG. In conclusion, a new transposon vector was shown to be a powerful tool for future studies of MG pathogenesis. This study adds to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in MG biofilm formation and may shed light on the persistence of MG infections.

  16. Effects of an S6 strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum challenge at onset of lay on digestive and reproductive tract characteristics in commercial layers.

    PubMed

    Parker, T A; Branton, S L; Jones, M S; Peebles, E D; Gerard, P D; Willeford, K O; Pharr, G T; Maslin, W R

    2003-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), a reproductive/respiratory pathogen in poultry, has been implicated in suboptimum egg production and decreased hatchability. Commercial layer hens raised in a controlled environment were inoculated with the S6 strain of MG at 20 wk of age. The S6 inoculation had no effect on bird weight, egg production, digestive tract weight and length, or histopathologic lesion scores, although significant differences were noted in the lengths and weights of various portions of the reproductive tract. This study shows that S6MG inoculation does not detrimentally affect layer hen performance when in the absence of environmental stressors customary to a caged layer facility.

  17. Dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol influence the digestive and reproductive organ characteristic of commercial...at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum 1 , 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Effects of 2 supplemental concentrations of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D] on the gross digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) w...

  18. Influence of supplemental dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the blood characteristics of commercial layers inoculated before or at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 supplemental levels of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D] on the blood characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG ino...

  19. Influence of supplemental dietary poultry fat, phytase, and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the egg characteristics of commercial layers inoculated before or at the onset of lay with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 supplemental levels of dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (D3) on the egg characteristics of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG inoculatio...

  20. Influence of Supplemental Dietary Poultry Fat, Phytase, and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Performance of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of 2 levels of supplemental dietary poultry fat (PF) and the combination of PF, phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (D3) on the performance of commercial layers inoculated with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were investigated in 2 trials. Sham and FMG inoculations were ...

  1. Effects of Supplemental Dietary Phytase and 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol on the Performance Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated before or at the Onset of Lay with the F-Strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary supplementation with phytase and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the performance characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated prelay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum were assessed. Experimental layer diets, w...

  2. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  3. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-08-02

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides.

  4. Mechanism of action of the copper(I) complex of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline on Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, H.; van der Goot, H.; Nauta, W.T.; Timmerman, H.; de Bolster, M.W.; Stouthamer, A.H.; Vis, R.D.

    1982-06-01

    Evidence was found that the inhibitory action of Cu(DMP)/sub 2/NO/sub 3/, the copper(I) complex of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (DMP), on Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a consequence of the ultimate toxicity of copper, and not that of the ligand, DMP. From uptake studies with radiolabeled /sup 67/Cu and (/sup 14/C)DMP, we concluded that significantly more copper than DMP is bound to the mycoplasmal cell. It appeared that dissociation of Cu(DMP)2+ occurred shortly after interaction with the cell membrane. Copper was transported across the cytoplasmic membrane. A strong dependence of copper uptake on the incubation medium was observed in the absence of DMP. The main function of the ligand DMP appeared to be as a vehicle for the transport of copper from nontoxic copper-medium complexes to membrane-buried cellular ligands.

  5. [Pathogenic factors of mycoplasma].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are smallest organisms capable of self-replication and cause various diseases in human. Especially, Mycoplasma pneumoniae is known as an etiological agent of pneumonia. From 2010 to 2012, epidemics of M. pneumoniae infections were reported worldwide (e.g., in France, Israel, and Japan). In the diseases caused by mycoplasmas, strong inflammatory responses induced by mycoplasmas have been thought to be important. However, mycoplasmas lack of cell wall and do not possess inflammation-inducing endotoxin such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We purified inflammation-inducing factors from pathogenic mycoplasmas and identified that they were lipoproteins. Lipoproteins derived from mycoplasmas induced inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. In addition, we demonstrated that cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae played an important role in induction of inflammatory responses. Cytadherent property of M. pneumoniae induced inflammatory responses through TLR2 independent pathway. TLR4, inflammasomes, and autophagy were involved in this TLR2 independent induction of inflammatory responses.

  6. Feline hemotropic mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2010-11-01

    Three species of hemotropic mycoplasmas are known to infect cats worldwide, Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum." These organisms were previously known as Haemobartonella felis, but are now known to be mycoplasmas. Assays based on polymerase chain reaction technology are the most sensitive and specific diagnostic tests available for these organisms. M haemofelis is the most pathogenic species, and causes hemolytic anemia in immunocompetent cats. Other differential diagnoses for hemolytic anemia should be considered in cats testing positive for "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," because the presence of these organisms is not always associated with anemia. Blood from infected cats should be handled with care because of the potential zoonotic nature of hemoplasma infections. The treatment of choice for cats with clinical disease is doxycycline.

  7. Effects of a Prelay 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Alone or in Conjunction with Subsepuent F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation During Lay on the Internal Egg Characteristics of .....

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a pre-lay 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) inoculation alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays during lay on the internal egg characteristics of commercial egg laying hens were investigated. In the first 2 treatment groups, birds were sh...

  8. Chicken gga-miR-19a Targets ZMYND11 and Plays an Important Role in Host Defense against Mycoplasma gallisepticum (HS Strain) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qingchang; Zhao, Yabo; Wang, Zaiwei; Hou, Yue; Bi, Dingren; Sun, Jianjun; Peng, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), one of the most pathogenic Mycoplasmas, can cause chronic respiratory disease (CRD) in chickens. It has been suggested that micro-ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are involved in microbial pathogenesis. However, little is known about the roles of miRNAs in MG infection. Previously, we found by deep sequencing that gga-miR-19a was significantly up-regulated in the lungs of MG-infected chicken embryos. In this work, we confirmed that gga-miR-19a was up-regulated in both MG-infected chicken embryonic lungs and MG-infected DF-1 (chicken embryo fibroblast) cells. At 72 h post-transfection, we found that the over-expression of gga-miR-19a significantly enhanced the proliferation of MG-infected DF-1 cells by promoting the transition from the G1 phase to the S and G2 phases, while a gga-miR-19a inhibitor repressed the proliferation of MG-infected DF-1 cells by arresting the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Moreover, we found that gga-miR-19a regulated the expression of the host zinc-finger protein, MYND-type containing 11 (ZMYND11), through binding to its 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). DAVID analysis revealed that ZMYND11 could negatively regulate the NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in chickens (Gallus gallus). Upon MG infection, gga-miR-19a, NF-κB, MyD88, and TNF-α were all up-regulated, whereas ZMYND11 was down-regulated. The over-expression of gga-miR-19a in the DF-1 cells did not affect the above gene expression patterns, and gga-miR-19a inhibitor repressed the expression of NF-κB, MyD88, and TNF-α, but enhanced the expression of ZMYND11. In conclusion, gga-miR-19a might suppress the expression of ZMYND11 in MG-infected chicken embryonic lungs and DF-1 cells, activate the NF-κB signaling pathway, and promote pro-inflammatory cytokines expression, the cell cycle progression and cell proliferation to defend against MG infection. PMID:27683641

  9. Mycoplasma gallisepticum Lipid Associated Membrane Proteins Up-regulate Inflammatory Genes in Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells via TLR-2 Ligation through an NF-κB Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sanjukta; Zappulla, Frank; Silbart, Lawrence K.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum-mediated respiratory inflammation in chickens is associated with accumulation of leukocytes in the tracheal submucosa. However the molecular mechanisms underpinning these changes have not been well described. We hypothesized that the initial inflammatory events are initiated upon ligation of mycoplasma lipid associated membrane proteins (LAMP) to TLRs expressed on chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TEC). To test this hypothesis, live bacteria or LAMPs isolated from a virulent (Rlow) or a non-virulent (Rhigh) strain were incubated with primary TECs or chicken tracheae ex vivo. Microarray analysis identified up-regulation of several inflammatory and chemokine genes in TECs as early as 1.5 hours post-exposure. Kinetic analysis using RT-qPCR identified the peak of expression for most genes to be at either 1.5 or 6 hours. Ex-vivo exposure also showed up-regulation of inflammatory genes in epithelial cells by 1.5 hours. Among the commonly up-regulated genes were IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, CCL-20, and NOS-2, all of which are important immune-modulators and/or chemo-attractants of leukocytes. While these inflammatory genes were up-regulated in all four treatment groups, Rlow exposed epithelial cells both in vitro and ex vivo showed the most dramatic up-regulation, inducing over 100 unique genes by 5-fold or more in TECs. Upon addition of a TLR-2 inhibitor, LAMP-mediated gene expression of IL-1β and CCL-20 was reduced by almost 5-fold while expression of IL-12p40, IL-6, IL-8 and NOS-2 mRNA was reduced by about 2–3 fold. Conversely, an NF-κB inhibitor abrogated the response entirely for all six genes. miRNA-146a, a negative regulator of TLR-2 signaling, was up-regulated in TECs in response to either Rlow or Rhigh exposure. Taken together we conclude that LAMPs isolated from both Rhigh and Rlow induced rapid, TLR-2 dependent but transient up-regulation of inflammatory genes in primary TECs through an NF-κB dependent pathway. PMID:25401327

  10. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  11. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  12. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been shown... publications: (a) Bigland, C. H. and A. J. DaMassa, “A Bio-Assay for Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.” In:...

  13. Effects of different vaccine combinations against Mycoplasma gallisepticum on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E D; Jacob, R; Branton, S L; Evans, J D; Leigh, S A; Gerard, P D

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major and economically significant pathogen of avian species. When administered before lay, F-strain MG (FMG) can reduce egg production during lay, but the ts-11 strain of MG (ts11MG) does not exert this effect. Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of pre-lay vaccinations of ts11MG, MG-Bacterin (MGBac), or their combination, in conjunction with an FMG vaccination overlay after peak production on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of Hy-Line W-36 layers housed in biological isolation units (4 units per treatment, 10 birds per unit). The following vaccination treatments were administered at 10 wk of age (woa): 1) Control (no vaccinations); 2) MGBac; 3) ts11MG; and 4) ts11MG and MGBac combination (ts11MG+MGBac). At 45 woa, half of the birds were vaccinated with a laboratory stock of high passage FMG. In both trials, parameters determined in 4 birds per unit at 55 woa included: BW; fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome incidence; mean number of mature ovarian follicles; ovarian, oviduct, and small intestine weights; and the weights and lengths of the various portions of the oviduct and small intestine. Treatment effects were observed for the weights of the entire small intestine and the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, as percentages of BW; and for vagina weight as a percentage of total oviduct weight. In general, the weights of the small intestine and its 3 components were increased in response to the FMG vaccine that was administered at 45 woa. An FMG vaccination at 45 woa may increase relative intestine weight in layers; however, use of a prelay MGBac vaccine alone or in combination with ts11MG, with or without an FMG overlay, does not affect the gross characteristics of their digestive and reproductive organs, and may be used without having an adverse effect on their performance, as was observed in a previous companion study.

  14. Evaluation of the Capacity of PCR and High-Resolution Melt Curve Analysis for Identification of Mixed Infection with Mycoplasma gallisepticum Strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Kanci, Anna; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenicity and presentation of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) infection may differ from one strain to another and this may have implications on control measures. Infection of individual birds with more than one MG strain has been reported. A PCR followed by high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis has been developed in our laboratory and routinely used for detection and differentiation of MG strains. However the potential of this test for identification of MG strains in a mixed specimen has not been evaluated. In the present study, the capability of PCR-HRM curve analysis technique, targeting vlhA and pvpA genes was assessed for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed population. Different DNA ratios of two MG strains from 1 to 10(-4) ng were tested with some generated conventional and normalized curves distinct from those of individual strains alone. Using genotype confidence percentages (GCP) generated from HRM curve analysis, it was found that vlhA PCR-HRM was more consistent than pvpA PCR-HRM for the detection of MG ts-11 vaccine strain mixed with any of the MG strains 6/85, F, S6 or a field isolate. The potential of vlhA PCR-HRM to detect mixed MG strains in a specimen was found to be primarily dependent on quantity and proportion of the target DNAs in the mixture. This is the first study examining the capacity of PCR-HRM technique for identification of individual MG strains in a mixed strain population.

  15. Development and immunogenicity of recombinant GapA(+) Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein and chicken interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Shil, Pollob K; Kanci, Anna; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2011-04-12

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen of poultry that causes chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. A live attenuated vaccine, ts-11, has been used for the control of MG in several countries. The efficacy of this vaccine is highly dose dependent and the flock antibody response is weak. To improve the functionality of the vaccine and investigate its potential as a delivery vector for foreign antigens and immunomodulatory proteins, we developed a derivative of ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein (IBV-S1) and releasing chicken interleukin-6 into the extracellular milieu (MG ts-11 C3 (+CS)) using a transposon-based delivery vector. Following administration of MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) to chickens by eye-drop, an antibody response to MG and IBV-S1, as determined by the rapid serum agglutination test (RSA) and Western blotting, respectively, could be detected. Birds inoculated with the recombinant vaccine had significantly enhanced weight gain and were partially protected against damage by pathogenic IBV. These results indicate that the ChIL-6 released by MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) may have had a non-specific effect on growth rate. They also suggest that ts-11 is a promising vaccine vector, capable of delivering heterologous protective antigens, and may also provide non-specific benefits when engineered to express immunomodulatory proteins. With some improvements in the expression system, it could be used to induce a targeted immune response against specific mucosal pathogens, and co-expression of several antigens would allow development of a novel multivalent vaccine.

  16. Competitor internal standards for quantitative detection of mycoplasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, M K; Rashidbaigi, A; Testa, D; Liao, M J

    1995-05-01

    Homologous internal controls were used as competitor DNA in the polymerase chain reaction for the quantitative detection of mycoplasma DNA. PCR primer sets were designed on the basis of the most conserved nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene of mycoplasma species. Amplification of this gene was examined in five different mycoplasma species: Mycoplasma orale, M. hyorhinus, M. synoviae, M. gallisepticum and M. pneumoniae. To evaluate the primers, a number of different cell lines were assayed for the detection of mycoplasma infections. All positive cell lines showed a distinct product on agarose gels while uninfected cells showed no DNA amplification. Neither bacterial nor eukaryotic DNA produced any cross-reaction with the primers used, thus confirming their specificity. Internal control DNA to be used for quantitation was constructed by modifying the sizes of the wild-type amplified products and cloning them in plasmid vectors. These controls used the same primer binding sites as the wild-type and the amplified products were differentiated by a size difference. The detection limits for all the mycoplasma species by competitive quantitative PCR were estimated to range from 4 to 60 genome copies per assay as determined by ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels. These internal standards also serve as positive controls in PCR-based detection of mycoplasma DNA, and therefore accidental contamination of test samples with wild-type positive controls can be eliminated. The quantitative PCR method developed will be useful in monitoring the progression and significance of mycoplasma in the disease process.

  17. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis in bison is a newly emerging and potentially devastating threat to the bison industry. This bacterium is increasingly being identified, both in the United States and Canada, as the cause of severe respiratory disease outbreaks with devastating consequences for the health of the ani...

  18. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections.

  19. Swine and Poultry Pathogens: the Complete Genome Sequences of Two Strains of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a Strain of Mycoplasma synoviae†

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.; Ferreira, Henrique B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Carvalho, Marcos O.; Pinto, Paulo M.; Almeida, Darcy F.; Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Almeida, Rosana; Alves-Filho, Leonardo; Assunção, Enedina N.; Azevedo, Vasco A. C.; Bogo, Maurício R.; Brigido, Marcelo M.; Brocchi, Marcelo; Burity, Helio A.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Camargo, Sandro S.; Carepo, Marta S.; Carraro, Dirce M.; de Mattos Cascardo, Júlio C.; Castro, Luiza A.; Cavalcanti, Gisele; Chemale, Gustavo; Collevatti, Rosane G.; Cunha, Cristina W.; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; Dambrós, Bibiana P.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Falcão, Clarissa; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Fiorentin, Laurimar; Franco, Gloria R.; Freitas, Nara S. A.; Frías, Diego; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Grisard, Edmundo C.; Guimarães, Claudia T.; Hungria, Mariangela; Jardim, Sílvia N.; Krieger, Marco A.; Laurino, Jomar P.; Lima, Lucymara F. A.; Lopes, Maryellen I.; Loreto, Élgion L. S.; Madeira, Humberto M. F.; Manfio, Gilson P.; Maranhão, Andrea Q.; Martinkovics, Christyanne T.; Medeiros, Sílvia R. B.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Neiva, Márcia; Ramalho-Neto, Cicero E.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Paixão, Roger F. C.; Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Pereira, Maristela; Pereira-Ferrari, Lilian; Piffer, Itamar; Pinto, Luciano S.; Potrich, Deise P.; Salim, Anna C. M.; Santos, Fabrício R.; Schmitt, Renata; Schneider, Maria P. C.; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene S.; Schuck, Adriana F.; Seuanez, Hector N.; Silva, Denise W.; Silva, Rosane; Silva, Sérgio C.; Soares, Célia M. A.; Souza, Kelly R. L.; Souza, Rangel C.; Staats, Charley C.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.; Urmenyi, Turan P.; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Zuccherato, Luciana W.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2005-01-01

    This work reports the results of analyses of three complete mycoplasma genomes, a pathogenic (7448) and a nonpathogenic (J) strain of the swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and a strain of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae; the genome sizes of the three strains were 920,079 bp, 897,405 bp, and 799,476 bp, respectively. These genomes were compared with other sequenced mycoplasma genomes reported in the literature to examine several aspects of mycoplasma evolution. Strain-specific regions, including integrative and conjugal elements, and genome rearrangements and alterations in adhesin sequences were observed in the M. hyopneumoniae strains, and all of these were potentially related to pathogenicity. Genomic comparisons revealed that reduction in genome size implied loss of redundant metabolic pathways, with maintenance of alternative routes in different species. Horizontal gene transfer was consistently observed between M. synoviae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our analyses indicated a likely transfer event of hemagglutinin-coding DNA sequences from M. gallisepticum to M. synoviae. PMID:16077101

  20. Intestinal mycoplasma in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Roediger, W E W

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal diversion with reconnection in active Crohn's disease (CD) indicates that luminal contents or bacteria contribute to the formation of CD lesions. Fluorescent staining for mycoplasma in freshly resected Crohn's tissue and electron microscopy reveal intracellular organisms akin to mycoplasma. Historically, tissue culture of CD has shown mycoplasma described as contaminants. Mycoplasma are surface epithelial parasites requiring exogenous cholesterol for membrane stability and cell entry. PCR of intestinal tissue has shown Mycoplasma pneumoniae to be detectable more significantly in CD. Oral M. iowae in experimental poultry localizes to the distal small bowel and colon. Hypothetically, lipopeptides of mycoplasmal membranes are proposed to cause chronicity and stronger immune responses than by other bacteria. 'Intestinal' mycoplasmas, from a number of observations, deserve consideration as organisms mediating inflammation of acute and chronic CD.

  1. Animal model of Mycoplasma fermentans respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with respiratory, genitourinary tract infections and rheumatoid diseases but its role as pathogen is controversial. The purpose of this study was to probe that Mycoplasma fermentans is able to produce respiratory tract infection and migrate to several organs on an experimental infection model in hamsters. One hundred and twenty six hamsters were divided in six groups (A-F) of 21 hamsters each. Animals of groups A, B, C were intratracheally injected with one of the mycoplasma strains: Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 (wild strain), Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18 (type strain) or Mycoplasma pneumoniae Eaton strain. Groups D, E, F were the negative, media, and sham controls. Fragments of trachea, lungs, kidney, heart, brain and spleen were cultured and used for the histopathological study. U frequency test was used to compare recovery of mycoplasmas from organs. Results Mycoplasmas were detected by culture and PCR. The three mycoplasma strains induced an interstitial pneumonia; they also migrated to several organs and persisted there for at least 50 days. Mycoplasma fermentans P 140 induced a more severe damage in lungs than Mycoplasma fermentans PG 18. Mycoplasma pneumoniae produced severe damage in lungs and renal damage. Conclusions Mycoplasma fermentans induced a respiratory tract infection and persisted in different organs for several weeks in hamsters. This finding may help to explain the ability of Mycoplasma fermentans to induce pneumonia and chronic infectious diseases in humans. PMID:23298636

  2. Mycoplasma polysaccharide protects against complement

    PubMed Central

    Bolland, Jeffrey R.; Simmons, Warren L.; Daubenspeck, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Although they lack a cell wall, mycoplasmas do possess a glycocalyx. The interactions between the glycocalyx, mycoplasmal surface proteins and host complement were explored using the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis as a model. It was previously shown that the length of the tandem repeat region of the surface lipoprotein Vsa is associated with susceptibility to complement-mediated killing. Cells producing a long Vsa containing about 40 repeats are resistant to complement, whereas strains that produce a short Vsa of five or fewer repeats are susceptible. We show here that the length of the Vsa protein modulates the affinity of the M. pulmonis EPS-I polysaccharide for the mycoplasma cell surface, with more EPS-I being associated with mycoplasmas producing a short Vsa protein. An examination of mutants that lack EPS-I revealed that planktonic mycoplasmas were highly susceptible to complement killing even when the Vsa protein was long, demonstrating that both EPS-I and Vsa length contribute to resistance. In contrast, the mycoplasmas were resistant to complement even in the absence of EPS-I when the cells were encased in a biofilm. PMID:22504437

  3. Effects of supplemental dietary phytase and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers inoculated before or at the onset of lay with the F-strain of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Peebles, E D; Branton, S L; Burnham, M R; Whitmarsh, S K; Gerard, P D

    2007-08-01

    In 3 trials, the effects of dietary supplementation with phytase (PHY) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-D3) on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commercial layers that were inoculated prelay (12 wk of age) or at the onset of lay (22 wk of age) with F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) were assessed at 58 wk of age. Experimental layer diets that included a basal control diet or a control diet supplemented with 0.025% PHY and 25-D3 were fed from 20 through 58 wk of age. As a percentage of total oviduct weight, magnum weight was lower in birds that were inoculated (sham or FMG) at lay onset compared with those that were inoculated prelay, and in FMG-inoculated birds, relative duodenum length was greater in those inoculated at 12 compared with 22 wk. Also, as percentages of organ weight or length, infundibulum length and isthmus weight were increased, whereas duodenum length was decreased by dietary supplementation with PHY and 25-D3. The overall timing (12 vs. 22 wk) of inoculation can affect the reproductive organ characteristics of layers, whereas, more specifically, the timing of an FMG inoculation may affect their digestive organ structure. Furthermore, independent of inoculation timing and type, the reproductive organ and digestive systems of laying hens may be influenced by dietary supplementation with PHY and 25-D3.

  4. Effects of 6/85-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Vaccination Alone at Ten Weeks of Age or in Conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays at 22 or 45 Weeks of Age on the Reproductive and Digestive....Hens.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay 6/85-strain M. gallisepticum (6/85MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with time specific F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays on the gross reproductive and digestive organ characteristics of commercial egg-laying hens...

  5. Effects of Time Specific F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum Inoculation Overlays on Prelay ts-11-strain M. gallisepticum Vaccination on Digestive and Reproductive Organ Characteristics of Commercial Egg-Laying Hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two trials were conducted to determine the effects of a prelay ts11-strain M. gallisepticum (ts11MG) vaccination alone or in conjunction with F-strain M. gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation overlays at 2 different age periods during lay on the digestive and reproductive organ characteristics of commerci...

  6. Mycoplasmas in diseases of humans.

    PubMed Central

    Embree, J E; Embil, J A

    1980-01-01

    The roles of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, M. hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in diseases of humans are currently under investigation. M. pneumoniae, which causes primary atypical pneumonia, is a well established pathogen of the respiratory tract. Complications of infection by this organism are also being recognized; they include disorders of the hematopoietic, cardiovascular, central nervous, musculoskeletal, cutaneous and gastrointestinal systems. The roles of the genital mycoplasmas M. hominis and U. urealyticum are controversial but may include infections of the genitourinary tract and in pregnancy as well as diseases of the newborn, such as neonatal pneumonia and meningitis. In this review atypical pneumonia due to M. pneumoniae is described and the role of mycoplasmas in other diseases is discussed. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B FIG. 2 PMID:6790148

  7. Identification of Lipoprotein MslA as a Neoteric Virulence Factor of Mycoplasma gallisepticum▿

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, S. M.; Frasca, S.; Schumacher, V. L.; Liao, X.; Padula, M.; Djordjevic, S. P.; Geary, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Many lipoproteins are expressed on the surfaces of mycoplasmas, and some have been implicated as playing roles in pathogenesis. Family 2 lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have a conserved “mycoplasma lipoprotein X” central domain and a “mycoplasma lipoprotein 10” C-terminal domain and are differentially expressed in response to environmental conditions. Homologues of family 2 lipoproteins are Mycoplasma specific and include the lipoprotein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, encoded by the MGA0674 gene. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the M. gallisepticum live attenuated vaccine strain F and the virulent strain Rlow, reported in this study, indicated that MGA0674 is one of several differentially expressed genes. The MGA0674-encoded lipoprotein is a proteolytically processed, immunogenic, TX-114 detergent-phase protein which appears to have antigenic divergence between field strains Rlow and S6. We examined the virulence of an Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutant (P1H9) in vivo and observed reduced recovery and attenuated virulence in the tracheas of experimentally infected chickens. The virulence of two additional Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutants, 2162 and 2204, was assessed in a second in vivo virulence experiment. These mutants exhibited partial to complete attenuation in vivo, but recovery was observed more frequently. Since only Mycoplasma species harbor homologues of MGA0674, the gene product has been renamed “Mycoplasma-specific lipoprotein A” (MslA). Collectively, these data indicate that MslA is an immunogenic lipoprotein exhibiting reduced expression in an attenuated strain and plays a role in M. gallisepticum virulence. PMID:20515935

  8. Mycoplasma infections in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, D C

    2001-07-01

    Mycoplasmas have complex mechanisms of antigenic variation that allow them to evade the immune system. These organisms cause a variety of clinical syndromes that can have a significant economic effect on small ruminant production. The syndromes range from acute septicemia and death to chronic infection resulting in decreased production. Recent research findings have shed light on the means by which these organisms evade the host immune response and cause or contribute to the development of disease in the host. This article provides a review of the pathogenesis, clinical signs, and treatment options for common disease syndromes involving Mycoplasma spp. in small ruminants.

  9. Pathobiology of Mycoplasma suis.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, Ludwig E; Zeder, Michael; Felder, Kathrin M; Hoelzle, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    Mycoplasma suis is an uncultivable bacterium lacking a cell wall that attaches to and may invade the red blood cells of pigs. M. suis infections occur worldwide and cause the pig industry serious economic losses due to the disease known as infectious anaemia of pigs or, historically, porcine eperythrozoonosis. Infectious anaemia of pigs is characterised predominantly by acute haemolytic or chronic anaemia, along with non-specific manifestations, such as growth retardation in feeder pigs and poor reproductive performance in sows. The fastidious nature of M. suis, as well as the lack of an in vitro cultivation system, has hampered the understanding of the biology and pathogenicity of this organism. Pathogenetic mechanisms of M. suis include direct destruction of red blood cells by adhesion, invasion, nutrient scavenging, immune-mediated lysis and eryptosis, as well as endothelial targeting. Recently published genome sequences, in combination with proteome analyses, have generated new insights into the pathogenicity of M. suis. The present review combines these data with the knowledge provided by experimental M. suis infections.

  10. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  11. Comparison of multiple genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region for their capacity in high resolution melt curve analysis to differentiate Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 from field strains.

    PubMed

    Ghorashi, Seyed A; Bradbury, Janet M; Ferguson-Noel, Naola M; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is an important avian pathogen causing significant economic losses in the global poultry industry. In an attempt to compare and evaluate existing genotyping methods for differentiation of MG strains/isolates, high resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis was applied to 5 different PCR methods targeting vlhA, pvpA, gapA, mgc2 genes and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic space region (IGSR). To assess the discriminatory power of PCR-HRM of examined genes and IGSR, MG strains ts-11, F, 6/85 and S6, and, initially, 8 field isolates were tested. All MG strains/isolates were differentiated using PCR-HRM curve analysis and genotype confidence percentage (GCP) values of vlhA and pvpA genes, while only 0, 3 and 4 out of 12 MG strains/isolates were differentiated using gapA, mgc2 genes and IGSR, respectively. The HRM curve analysis of vlhA and pvpA genes was found to be highly correlated with the genetic diversity of the targeted genes confirmed by sequence analysis of amplicons generated from MG strains. The potential of the vlhA and pvpA genes was also demonstrated for genotyping of 12 additional MG strains from Europe and the USA. Results from this study provide a direct comparison between genes previously used in sequencing-based genotyping methods for MG strain identification and highlight the usefulness of vlhA and pvpA HRM curve analyses as rapid and reliable tools specially for diagnosis and differentiation of MG strains used here.

  12. Impact of fowlpox-vectored Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine Vectormune® FP MG on layer hen egg production and egg quality parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of vaccination with Vectormune®FP MG on egg production and egg quality characteristics of white leghorn hens. Due to questions of the efficacy of this vaccine in preventing M. gallisepticum mediated pathology, the ability of this vaccine to protect a...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos," a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio D; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel; Quiroz-Castañeda, Rosa Estela

    2016-07-07

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease.

  14. Activity of moxifloxacin against the urogenital mycoplasmas Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma genitalium and Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Bébéar, C M; de Barbeyrac, B; Pereyre, S; Renaudin, H; Clerc, M; Bébéar, C

    2008-08-01

    The activity of moxifloxacin was compared with that of other antimicrobial agents against 54 strains of Ureaplasma spp., 54 strains of Mycoplasma hominis, 14 strains of Mycoplasma genitalium, and 44 strains of Chlamydia trachomatis. Moxifloxacin inhibited 90% of all isolates at a concentration mycoplasmas. Moxifloxacin killed the 30 mycoplasma isolates tested at a concentration

  15. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rachel E; Prassinos, Alexandre J; Osborne, John D; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute.

  16. The characterization of Mycoplasma synoviae EF-Tu protein and proteins involved in hemadherence and their N-terminal amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Bencina, D; Narat, M; Dovc, P; Drobnic-Valic, M; Habe, F; Kleven, S H

    1999-04-01

    An abundant cytoplasmic 43-kDa protein from Mycoplasma synoviae, a major pathogen from poultry, was identified as elongation factor Tu. The N-terminal amino acid sequence (AKLDFDRSKEHVNVGTIGHV) has 90% identity with the sequence of the Mycoplasma hominis elongation factor Tu protein. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with the M. synoviae elongation factor Tu protein also reacted with 43-kDa proteins from the avian Mycoplasma species Mycoplasma gallinarum, Mycoplasma gallinaceum, Mycoplasma pullorum, Mycoplasma cloacale, Mycoplasma iners and Mycoplasma meleagridis, but not with the proteins from Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Mycoplasma imitans or Mycoplasma iowae. In addition, two groups of phase variable integral membrane proteins, pMSA and pMSB, associated with hemadherence and pathogenicity of M. synoviae strains AAY-4 and ULB925 were identified. The cleavage of a larger hemagglutinating protein encoded by a gene homologous to the vlhA gene of M. synoviae generates pMSB1 and pMSA1 proteins defined by mAb 125 and by hemagglutination inhibiting mAb 3E10, respectively. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of pMSA proteins (SENKLI ... and SENETQ ...) probably indicate the cleavage site of the M. synoviae strain ULB 925 hemagglutinin.

  17. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Laleh; Farzaneh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importance of mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasma contamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6. available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sources of mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detection methods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture. PMID:23508237

  18. Mycoplasma infection of ducks and geese.

    PubMed

    Stipkovits, L; Szathmary, S

    2012-11-01

    Production of ducks and geese in certain parts of the world is very important. Mycoplasma diseases cause significant losses to the duck and goose industry. This review summarizes the epidemiological, clinical, and pathomorphological characteristics of mycoplasma diseases of ducks and geese and the involvement of the various mycoplasma species in their pathogenesis. The role of mycoplasma infections in the development of clinical signs, pathological lesions, and mortality of challenged birds is demonstrated in challenge experiments. Transmission of mycoplasma in the ovary and eggs resulting in the reduction of egg production and an increase of embryo mortality has been shown in challenge experiments as well as in field studies. The susceptibility of many mycoplasma isolates of the most important mycoplasma species of duck and goose origin were tested and showed relatively high average minimum inhibitory concentrations of lincomycin, tilosin, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, and enrofloxacin but not for tiamulin. The successful treatment of mycoplasma infections with antibiotics in ducks and geese should be selected based on the minimum inhibitory concentration values against the mycoplasmas isolated from the flock.

  19. Molecular Biology and Pathogenicity of Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Razin, Shmuel; Yogev, David; Naot, Yehudith

    1998-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the entire genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae has attracted considerable attention to the molecular biology of mycoplasmas, the smallest self-replicating organisms. It appears that we are now much closer to the goal of defining, in molecular terms, the entire machinery of a self-replicating cell. Comparative genomics based on comparison of the genomic makeup of mycoplasmal genomes with those of other bacteria, has opened new ways of looking at the evolutionary history of the mycoplasmas. There is now solid genetic support for the hypothesis that mycoplasmas have evolved as a branch of gram-positive bacteria by a process of reductive evolution. During this process, the mycoplasmas lost considerable portions of their ancestors’ chromosomes but retained the genes essential for life. Thus, the mycoplasmal genomes carry a high percentage of conserved genes, greatly facilitating gene annotation. The significant genome compaction that occurred in mycoplasmas was made possible by adopting a parasitic mode of life. The supply of nutrients from their hosts apparently enabled mycoplasmas to lose, during evolution, the genes for many assimilative processes. During their evolution and adaptation to a parasitic mode of life, the mycoplasmas have developed various genetic systems providing a highly plastic set of variable surface proteins to evade the host immune system. The uniqueness of the mycoplasmal systems is manifested by the presence of highly mutable modules combined with an ability to expand the antigenic repertoire by generating structural alternatives, all compressed into limited genomic sequences. In the absence of a cell wall and a periplasmic space, the majority of surface variable antigens in mycoplasmas are lipoproteins. Apart from providing specific antimycoplasmal defense, the host immune system is also involved in the development of pathogenic lesions and exacerbation of mycoplasma induced diseases. Mycoplasmas are

  20. Mycoplasmas, plants, insect vectors: a matrimonial triangle.

    PubMed

    Garnier, M; Foissac, X; Gaurivaud, P; Laigret, F; Renaudin, J; Saillard, C; Bové, J M

    2001-10-01

    Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas were discovered by electron microscopy, in 1967, long after the discovery and culture in 1898 of the first pathogenic mycoplasma of animal origin, Mycoplasma mycoides. Mycoplasmas are Eubacteria of the class Mollicutes, a group of organisms phylogenetically related to Gram-positive bacteria. Their more characteristic features reside in the small size of their genomes, the low guanine (G) plus cytosine (C) content of their genomic DNA and the lack of a cell wall. Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas are responsible for several hundred diseases and belong to two groups: the phytoplasmas and the spiroplasmas. The phytoplasmas (previously called MLOs, for mycoplasma like organisms) were discovered first; they are pleiomorphic, and have so far resisted in vitro cultivation. Phytoplasmas represent the largest group of plant pathogenic Mollicutes. Only three plant pathogenic spiroplasmas are known today. Spiroplasma citri, the agent of citrus stubborn was discovered and cultured in 1970 and shown to be helical and motile. S. kunkelii is the causal agent of corn stunt. S. phoeniceum, responsible for periwinkle yellows, was discovered in Syria. There are many other spiroplasmas associated with insects and ticks. Plant pathogenic mycoplasmas are restricted to the phloem sieve tubes in which circulates the photosynthetically-enriched sap, the food for many phloem-feeding insects (aphids, leafhoppers, psyllids, etc.). Interestingly, phytopathogenic mycoplasmas are very specifically transmitted by leafhoppers or psyllid species. In this paper, the most recent knowledge on phytopathogenic mycoplasmas in relation with their insect and plant habitats is presented as well as the experiments carried out to control plant mycoplasma diseases, by expression of mycoplasma-directed-antibodies in plants (plantibodies).

  1. Mycoplasma genitalium mg200 and mg386 genes are involved in gliding motility but not in cytadherence.

    PubMed

    Pich, Oscar Q; Burgos, Raul; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2006-06-01

    Isolation and characterization of transposon-generated Mycoplasma genitalium gliding-deficient mutants has implicated mg200 and mg386 genes in gliding motility. The proposed role of these genes was confirmed by restoration of the gliding phenotype in deficient mutants through gene complementation with their respective mg386 or mg200 wild-type copies. mg200 and mg386 are the first reported gliding-associated mycoplasma genes not directly involved in cytadherence. Orthologues of MG200 and MG386 proteins are also found in the slow gliding mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum, suggesting the existence of a unique set of proteins involved in slow gliding motility. MG200 and MG386 proteins share common features, such as the presence of enriched in aromatic and glycine residues boxes and an acidic and proline-rich domain, suggesting that these motifs could play a significant role in gliding motility.

  2. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... tested for the presence of Mycoplasma, as follows: Samples of the virus for this test shall be...

  3. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... tested for the presence of Mycoplasma, as follows: Samples of the virus for this test shall be...

  4. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... tested for the presence of Mycoplasma, as follows: Samples of the virus for this test shall be...

  5. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Test for Mycoplasma. 610.30 Section 610.30 Food... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Mycoplasma § 610.30 Test for Mycoplasma. Except as provided... tested for the presence of Mycoplasma, as follows: Samples of the virus for this test shall be...

  6. House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) Conjunctivitis, and Mycoplasma spp. Isolated from North American Wild Birds, 1994-2015.

    PubMed

    Ley, David H; Hawley, Dana M; Geary, Steven J; Dhondt, André A

    2016-07-01

    Sampling wild birds for mycoplasma culture has been key to the study of House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) conjunctivitis, yielding isolates of Mycoplasma gallisepticum spanning the temporal and geographic ranges of disease from emergence to endemicity. Faced with the challenges and costs of sample collection over time and from remote locations for submission to our laboratory for mycoplasma culture, protocols evolved to achieve a practical optimum. Herein we report making M. gallisepticum isolates from House Finches almost every year since the disease emerged in 1994, and we now have 227 isolates from 17 states. Our wild bird host range for M. gallisepticum isolates includes Blue Jay ( Cyanocitta cristata ), American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis), Lesser Goldfinch (Spinus psaltria), Purple Finch (Haemorhous purpureus), Evening Grosbeak ( Coccothraustes vespertinus ), and herein first reports for Western Scrub-jay ( Aphelocoma californica ), and American Crow ( Corvus brachyrhynchos ). By collecting and identifying isolates from birds with clinical signs similar to those of House Finch conjunctivitis, we also expanded the known host range of Mycoplasma sturni and obtained isolates from additional wild bird species. Accumulating evidence shows that a diverse range of wild bird species may carry or have been exposed to M. gallisepticum in the US, as in Europe and Asia. Therefore, the emergence of a pathogenic M. gallisepticum strain in House Finches may actually be the exception that has allowed us to identify the broader epidemiologic picture.

  7. Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont

    PubMed Central

    Gesink, Dionne; Racey, C. Sarai; Seah, Christine; Zittermann, Sandra; Mitterni, Leo; Juzkiw, Jerry; Jamieson, Heather; Greer, Jane; Singh, Sudesh; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Allen, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in Toronto, Ont; detect mutations associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance; and describe treatment outcomes. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Setting A sexual health clinic in Toronto. Participants A consecutive sample of men and women attending the sexual health clinic between September 1, 2013, and December 20, 2013. Interventions Participants underwent testing for M genitalium, along with standard sexually transmitted infection screening. All samples that had positive results for M genitalium were tested for mutations associated with resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Mycoplasma genitalium treatment was based on resistance profile and verified with a test of cure. Main outcome measures Positive results for M genitalium and antibiotic resistance. Results A total of 1193 men and women participated in the study. Overall, 4.5% of the 884 men and 3.2% of the 309 women had positive test results for M genitalium. Asymptomatic infection was common (52.0%). Macrolide resistance–mediating mutations were found in 58.0% of the M genitalium infections. No treatment failure was observed for azithromycin-treated cases. Treatment failure was suspected for 16.7% of cases treated with moxifloxacin. Conclusion Mycoplasma genitalium is present in Canada, with a prevalence comparable to chlamydia and gonorrhea, and has high macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:27331225

  8. Bilateral optic papillitis following mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Milla, E; Zografos, L; Piguet, B

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that can cause a great variety of respiratory infections and be responsible for ocular involvement such as conjunctivitis, anterior uveitis and very rarely optic neuropathy. We report herein an additional case of bilateral optic disc swelling with profound visual loss following Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and review the world literature on the ocular manifestations associated with this pathogen.

  9. Submasseteric abscess caused by Mycoplasma salivarium infection.

    PubMed

    Grisold, Andrea J; Hoenigl, Martin; Leitner, Eva; Jakse, Klaus; Feierl, Gebhard; Raggam, Reinhard B; Marth, Egon

    2008-11-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium preferentially resides in the human oral cavity. Unlike other Mycoplasma species, M. salivarium has not been regarded as a pathogen, although one case of M. salivarium-caused arthritis in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia has been reported. We describe the first case of submasseteric abscess caused by M. salivarium.

  10. One test microbial diagnostic microarray for identification of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and other Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, A; Sacchini, F; Krasteva, I; Zilli, K; Scacchia, M; Beaurepaire, C; Nantel, A; Pini, A

    2012-11-01

    The present study describes the use of microarray technology for rapid identification and differentiation of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides from other mycoplasmas that may be pathogenic to ruminants, including those of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, genetically and antigenically strictly correlated with Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. A microarray containing genetic sequences of 55 different bacterial species from Acholeplasma, Mycoplasma, Spiroplasma and Ureaplasma genera was constructed. Sequences to genes of interest were collected in FASTA format from NCBI. The collected sequences were processed with OligoPicker software. Oligonucleotides were then checked for their selectivity with BLAST searches in GenBank. The microarray was tested with ATCC/NCTC strains of Mycoplasma spp. of veterinary importance in ruminants including Mycoplasma belonging to the mycoides cluster as well as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri field strains. The results showed that but one ATCC/NCTC reference strains hybridized with their species-specific sequences showed a profile/signature different and distinct from each other. The heat-map of the hybridization results for the nine genes interrogated for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides demonstrated that the reference strain Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides PG1 was positive for all of the gene sequences spotted on the microarray. CBPP field, vaccine and reference strains were all typed to be M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, and seven of the nine strains gave positive hybridization results for all of the nine genes. Two Italian strains were negative for some of the genes. Comparison with non-Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides reference strains showed some positive signals or considerable homology to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides genes. As expected, some correlations were observed between the strictly genetically and antigenically correlated Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and

  11. Eradication of Mycoplasma contaminations from cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Uphoff, Cord C; Drexler, Hans G

    2014-04-14

    Mycoplasma contaminations have a multitude of effects on cultured cell lines that may influence the results of experiments or pollute bioactive substances isolated from the eukaryotic cells. The elimination of mycoplasma contaminations from cell cultures with antibiotics has been proven to be a practical alternative to discarding and re-establishing important or irreplaceable cell lines. Different fluoroquinolones, tetracyclins, pleuromutilins, and macrolides shown to have strong anti-mycoplasma properties are employed for the decontamination. These antibiotics are applied as single treatments, as combination treatment of two antibiotics in parallel or successively, or in combination with a surface-active peptide to enhance the action of the antibiotic. The protocols in this unit allow eradication of mycoplasmas, prevention of the development of resistant mycoplasma strains, and potential cure of heavily contaminated and damaged cells. Consistent and permanent alterations to eukaryotic cells attributable to the treatment have not been demonstrated.

  12. Detection of Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum in dairy cattle from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tamiozzo, Pablo J; Estanguet, Abel A; Maito, Julia; Tirante, Liliana; Pol, Martin; Giraudo, José A

    2014-01-01

    Different species of Mycoplasma can affect bovine cattle, causing several diseases. PCR sequencing and further analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA ITS region have shown a significant interspecies variability among Mollicutes. Sixteen suspected isolates of Mycoplasma spp. obtained from milk samples from dairy herds were amplified (16S-23S rRNA ITS region). Fourteen out of those 16 suspected Mycoplasma spp. isolates were PCR-positive. To confirm the identity of Mycoplasma bovis, these 14 isolates were tested by another species-specific PCR. Seven of the isolates rendered a positive result. The products of 16S-23S rRNA ITS PCR from one isolate that was identified as M. bovis and from two other isolates, identified as non- M. bovis were randomly selected, sequenced and analyzed. The three sequences (A, B and C) showed 100% similarity with M. bovis, Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma californicum respectively.

  13. Co-infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in three cats from Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Helio A; Guimarães, Ana Marcia S; Vidotto, Odilon; Baumann, Aline; Biondo, Alexander W; Messick, Joanne B

    2007-12-01

    The two most common haemotropic Mycoplasma of cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' have been identified using molecular techniques in all continents, except Antarctica. We report the first molecular characterization in South America of a dual infection with M haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' in three domestic cats. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified in three anaemic cats in which haemoplasma organisms were seen attached to the erythrocytes in the peripheral blood smear. Bands of the expected size for M haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' were observed in all three cats. The 393 bp segment of one of the amplicons had a similarity value of 100% to M haemofelis, whereas the other amplicon, a 192 bp segment, was 100% similar to 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum'. After diagnosis, two cats received blood transfusion and they were all treated with doxycycline. All three cats recovered uneventfully.

  14. Sedimentation counting and morphology of Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Clark, H W

    1965-11-01

    Clark, Harold W. (The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C.). Sedimentation counting and morphology of Mycoplasma. J. Bacteriol. 90:1373-1386. 1965.-The sedimentation technique for counting viral particles was applied to the quantitation and morphological identification of Mycoplasma in broth cultures. Mycoplasma, apparently in their native form, firmly adhered to the surface, when sedimented on glass cover slips or onto electron microscope grids. The sedimented cover slip preparations stained with crystal violet could be readily counted in the light microscope. The cultures sedimented onto electron microscope grids were readily counted at low magnification and provided excellent preparations for morphological examination at higher magnifications. It was found that air-dried Mycoplasma particles were enlarged considerably because of excessive flattening. Fixation of sedimented Mycoplasma particles in diluted OsO(4) prior to air drying yielded a more realistic morphology, with various sizes and shapes in the stages of the growth cycle exhibited. A new technique of differentially staining Mycoplasma colonies on agar plates was developed to facilitate the quantitation of viable colony-forming units for comparison with total counts. The use of plastic or Parafilm gaskets for dry mounting was developed to facilitate the handling and examination of the stained cover slip preparations. The results of this investigation indicated that the growth cycle of some Mycoplasma species includes a stage of hexadic fission with the cleavage of minimal reproductive units (less than 100 mmu) containing a limited deoxyribonucleic acid genetic coding molecule (approximately 4 x 10(6)).

  15. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). (a) DNA extraction. Use Qiagen Qiamp Mini Kit for DNA extraction or equivalent validated technique/procedure. This kit utilizes the following methods: 100 µl of... extraction kit recommendations. (b) Primer selection. A forward primer mglpU26 (5′-CTA GAG GGT TGG ACA...

  16. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). (a) DNA extraction. Use Qiagen Qiamp Mini Kit for DNA extraction or equivalent validated technique/procedure. This kit utilizes the following methods: 100 µl of... extraction kit recommendations. (b) Primer selection. A forward primer mglpU26 (5′-CTA GAG GGT TGG ACA...

  17. 9 CFR 147.31 - Laboratory procedures recommended for the real-time polymerase chain reaction test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... test for Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MGLP ReTi). (a) DNA extraction. Use Qiagen Qiamp Mini Kit for DNA extraction or equivalent validated technique/procedure. This kit utilizes the following methods: 100 µl of... extraction kit recommendations. (b) Primer selection. A forward primer mglpU26 (5′-CTA GAG GGT TGG ACA...

  18. A College Epidemic of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, David; Cochran, Burt

    1979-01-01

    The article reports on an outbreak of mycoplasma pneumoniae at the California Polytechnic State University including a historical background of the disease, clinical features, laboratory findings for treated patients, treatment, and clinical clues for diagnosis. (JMF)

  19. Survey of plasmids in various mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Harasawa, R.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-three strains representing 15 distinct Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Spiroplasma species were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNAs of three strains, Mycoplasma sp. strain 747, Spiroplasma mirum strain SMCA, and M. hominis strain 1257, suggested the presence of a plasmid with molecular weights of approximately 70, 10, and 9 megadaltons, respectively. The functions of these plasmids are currently unknown. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6679154

  20. Detection and prevention of mycoplasma hominis infection

    DOEpatents

    DelVecchio, Vito G.; Gallia, Gary L.; McCleskey, Ferne K.

    1997-01-21

    The present invention is directed to a rapid and sensitive method for detecting Mycoplasma hominis using M. hominis-specific probes, oligonucleotides or antibodies. In particular a target sequence can be amplified by in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, detected by nucleic acid hybridization using the subject probes and oligonucleotides or detected by immunoassay using M. hominis-specific antibodies. M. hominis-specific nucleic acids which do not recognize or hybridize to genomic nucleic acid of other Mycoplasma species are also provided.

  1. Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas as Neonatal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Katz, Brenda; Schelonka, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mycoplasmas represent a complex and unique group of microorganisms that have been associated with a wide array of infectious diseases in adults and infants. The lack of conclusive knowledge regarding the pathogenic potential of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. in many conditions is due to a general unfamiliarity of physicians and microbiology laboratories with their fastidious growth requirements, leading to difficulty in their detection; their high prevalence in healthy persons; the poor design of research studies attempting to base association with disease on the mere presence of the organisms in the lower urogenital tract; the failure to consider multifactorial aspects of diseases; and considering these genital mycoplasmas only as a last resort. The situation is now changing because of a greater appreciation of the genital mycoplasmas as perinatal pathogens and improvements in laboratory detection, particularly with regard to the development of powerful molecular nucleic acid amplification tests. This review summarizes the epidemiology of genital mycoplasmas as causes of neonatal infections and premature birth; evidence linking ureaplasmas with bronchopulmonary dysplasia; recent changes in the taxonomy of the genus Ureaplasma; the neonatal host response to mycoplasma and ureaplasma infections; advances in laboratory detection, including molecular methods; and therapeutic considerations for treatment of systemic diseases. PMID:16223956

  2. Molecular detection of Mycoplasma wenyonii and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' in cattle in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Michihito; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2008-11-25

    Blood samples from 78 cattle were tested for hemoplasma infection using molecular methods. PCR and sequence analysis revealed that 17 cattle were infected with Mycoplasma wenyonii, while 13 were infected with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos'. Four animals were infected with both species. This is the first study to report hemoplasma species infection among cattle in Japan.

  3. Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis Isolated from Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are major contaminants of mammalian cell cultures. Here, the complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis recovered from Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells is reported. PMID:27738034

  4. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... serum. Additionally, some of these reagents consist of Mycoplasma spp. antisera conjugated with a.... The identification aids in the diagnosis of disease caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Mycoplasma and provides epidemiological information on diseases caused by these microorganisms....

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos,” a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio D.; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos” strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease. PMID:27389272

  6. Genes Found Essential in Other Mycoplasmas Are Dispensable in Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shukriti; Markham, Philip F.; Browning, Glenn F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are regarded to be useful models for studying the minimum genetic complement required for independent survival of an organism. Mycoplasma bovis is a globally distributed pathogen causing pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis, otitis media and reproductive tract disease, and genome sequences of three strains, the type strain PG45 and two strains isolated in China, have been published. In this study, several Tn4001 based transposon constructs were generated and used to create a M. bovis PG45 insertional mutant library. Direct genome sequencing of 319 independent insertions detected disruptions in 129 genes in M. bovis, 48 of which had homologues in Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies mycoides SC and 99 of which had homologues in Mycoplasma agalactiae. Sixteen genes found to be essential in previous studies on other mycoplasma species were found to be dispensable. Five of these genes have previously been predicted to be part of the core set of 153 essential genes in mycoplasmas. Thus this study has extended the list of non-essential genes of mycoplasmas from that previously generated by studies in other species. PMID:24897538

  7. Eosinophilic Fasciitis Associated with Mycoplasma arginini Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silló, Pálma; Pintér, Dóra; Ostorházi, Eszter; Mazán, Mercedes; Wikonkál, Norbert; Pónyai, Katinka; Volokhov, Dmitriy V.; Chizhikov, Vladimir E.; Szathmary, Susan; Stipkovits, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF) with generalized sclerodermiform skin lesions developed over a 19-month period in a previously healthy 23-year-old man. Although we confirmed EF by skin histology and laboratory tests, the recurrent fevers and the clinical observation of sclerotic prepuce with urethritis indicated further bacteriological analysis by conventional microbiological and DNA-based tests. Urethra cultures were positive for an arginine-hydrolyzing mycoplasma and Ureaplasma urealyticum. The patient also had serum IgM antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based qualitative detection. Mycoplasma arginini was isolated from two independent venous blood serum samples and was identified by conventional microbiological tests and sequencing of the 16S rRNA and rpoB genes (GenBank sequence accession numbers HM179555 and HM179556, respectively). M. arginini genomic DNA also was detected by species-specific PCR in the skin lesion biopsy sample. Treatment with corticosteroids and long-term courses of selected antibiotics led to remission of skin symptoms and normalization of laboratory values. This report provides the first evidence of EF associated with mycoplasma infection and the second report of human infection with M. arginini and therefore suggests that this mycoplasma infection might have contributed to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:22189109

  8. Identification of cross-reactive antigens between Mycoplasma pulmonis and Mycoplasma arthritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Minion, F C; Brown, M B; Cassell, G H

    1984-01-01

    Serological cross-reactivity between Mycoplasma pulmonis and Mycoplasma arthritidis was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoanalysis of electrophoretic blots, and protein A immunoprecipitation reactions. The results demonstrate that one-way cross-reactivity was present in both hyperimmunized and naturally infected rats and that the predominant cross-reactive antigens were M. pulmonis surface proteins. Distinct immunoblot patterns were demonstrated for M. pulmonis and M. arthritidis, allowing differentiation of the two species. The response to M. arthritidis antigens during natural infections differed greatly from that during hyperimmunization. Evidence suggested that nonprotein antigens were major determinants eliciting the antibody response to this mycoplasma. Images PMID:6690399

  9. The occurrence of mycoplasmas in selected wild North American waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.; Thomas, C.B.; Sharp, P.; Krapu, G.L.; Robb, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of mycoplasma infection in breeding mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) hens and their broods from the central United States (1988 to 1990); and wintering American black duck (Anas rubripes) and mallard hens from the eastern United States (1990 to 1993). Mycoplasmas were isolated by culturing tracheal swabs from 656 live birds and tissue samples from 112 dead waterfowl. Nine (18%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma anatis; M. anatis was recovered from four mallards, a black duck, and a gadwall (Anas strepera) duckling. Nineteen (37%) of 51 mycoplasma isolates were identified as Mycoplasma cloacale; these isolates were obtained from mallard, canvasback, and black duck adults, and from a mallard duckling. Additional unspeciated mycoplasmas were isolated from mallards, black ducks, and one canvasback.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE (EATON'S AGENT)

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Adnan S.; Clyde, Wallace A.; Denny, Floyd W.

    1965-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection was studied in the Syrian hamster with qualitative and quantitative culture methods and special histopathologic techniques. The animals were readily infected with the mycoplasma, which multiplied throughout the respiratory tract. Sensitivity of this experimental host to infection was indicated by the 50 per cent infective dose, which was 10 colony-forming units of the organism. Inoculation consistently resulted in the production of peribronchial pneumonitis which was induced by the mycoplasma. The organisms were visualized in a superficial location in the mucosa of involved bronchi, by means of indirect fluorescent antibody staining and by a modification of the Brown and Brenn technique. The data indicate applicability of the hamster to the study of problems concerned with M. pneumoniae disease which are impractical or impossible to resolve in the human host. PMID:14319403

  11. Sialidase Activity in Mycoplasma synoviae

    PubMed Central

    May, Meghan; Kleven, Stanley H.; Brown, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Eleven strains of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma synoviae were evaluated for the presence of sialidase activity by using the fluorogenic substrate 2′-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid and the sialidase inhibitor 2-deoxy-2,3-didehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid. The kinetics of in vitro growth in modified Frey’s medium were also assessed for each strain. Five strains had been isolated from clinically symptomatic chickens, and strains WVU1853T and K3344 have been demonstrated to be capable of reproducing disease in specific pathogen-free chickens. All strains exhibited sialidase activity, although the amount varied 65 fold (P < 0.0001) from 1.3 x 10−7 to 2.0 x 10−9 activity units/colony-forming unit among strains. Strains originally isolated from clinically symptomatic birds had more (P < 0.05) sialidase activity than strains from asymptomatic birds. Strain WVU1853T exhibited the most sialidase activity (P < 0.0001) and grew to the highest culture density (P < 0.0001) among strains, but across strains the rank correlation of growth rate with sialidase activity was not significant. Negligible activity was detected in conditioned culture supernatant fluid. This is the first report of sialidase activity in pathogenic strains of M. synoviae, which suggests a potential enzymatic basis for virulence of the organism. PMID:18251389

  12. Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum and Mycoplasma haemocanis infections in dogs from the United States.

    PubMed

    Compton, S M; Maggi, R G; Breitschwerdt, E B

    2012-12-01

    Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhc) and Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum (CMhp) have been described in dogs. Historically, microscopic visualization of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. has occurred most often in immunocompromised or splenectomized dogs. The aim of this study was to determine the Mhc and CMhp prevalences among dogs from the United States. Novel 16S rRNA and RNAseP gene PCR assays were used to amplify hemotropic Mycoplasma species DNA for GenBank sequence alignment. Among the study population, hemoplasma prevalence was 1.3% (7 out of 506), with Mhc and CMhp prevalences of 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Two of six CMhp-infected dogs were co-infected with a Bartonella sp., and a third dog was seroreactive to Bartonella henselae antigens. The prevalence of Mhc and CMhp in this study was low; potential blood donors should be screened; and dogs and people can be co-infected with hemoplasma and Bartonella spp.

  13. Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov., a fast growing Mycoplasma species isolated from wild Caprinae.

    PubMed

    Jores, Joerg; Fischer, Anne; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Thomann, Andreas; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth M; Schnee, Christiane; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Heller, Martin; Frey, Joachim

    2013-12-01

    Five Mycoplasma strains from wild Caprinae were analyzed: four from Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) which died at the Berlin Zoo between 1993 and 1994, one from a Rocky Mountain goat collected in the USA prior to 1987. These five strains represented a population different from the populations belonging to the 'Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' as tested using multi locus sequence typing, Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene (rrs), genomic sequence based in silico as well as laboratory DNA-DNA hybridization, and the analysis of phenotypic traits in particular their exceptionally rapid growth all confirmed that they do not belong to any Mycoplasma species described to date. We therefore suggest these strains represent a novel species, for which we propose the name Mycoplasma feriruminatoris sp. nov. The type strain is G5847(T) (=DSM 26019(T)=NCTC 13622(T)) [corrected].

  14. Conditions for growing Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Sotomayor, P

    1990-07-01

    Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum were cultured in a serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin, cholesterol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid in order to avoid the addition of horse serum. Growth was detected by measurement of A640 and by colony formation. The level of growth attained in this medium was less than that obtained in the horse serum-supplemented media, but colonies retained their distinctive morphology.

  15. Conditions for growing Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum in a serum-free medium.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, G; Sotomayor, P

    1990-01-01

    Mycoplasma canadense and Mycoplasma verecundum were cultured in a serum-free medium containing bovine serum albumin, cholesterol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid in order to avoid the addition of horse serum. Growth was detected by measurement of A640 and by colony formation. The level of growth attained in this medium was less than that obtained in the horse serum-supplemented media, but colonies retained their distinctive morphology. Images PMID:2202260

  16. Demonstration of neuraminidase activity in Mycoplasma neurolyticum and of neuraminidase proteins in three canine Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Berčič, Rebeka Lucijana; Cizelj, Ivanka; Benčina, Mateja; Narat, Mojca; Bradbury, Janet M; Dovč, Peter; Benčina, Dušan

    2012-03-23

    Neuraminidases are virulence factors in many pathogenic microorganisms. They are present also in some Mycoplasma species that cause disease in birds, dogs and alligators. Thirty-seven Mycoplasma species have been examined previously for neuraminidase (sialidase) activity, whereas many of the species causing disease in man, ruminants, pigs, rodents and other animals have not. In this study neuraminidase enzymatic activity (NEAC) was examined in 45 previously untested Mycoplasma species, including those causing diseases in man, farm animals and laboratory animals. The only species in which NEAC was found was Mycoplasma neurolyticum, specifically, its type strain (Type A(T)) which is capable of inducing neurologic signs in inoculated young mice and rats. The NEAC of washed cells was relatively weak, but it differed even more than 10-fold among cells of cultures derived from individual colonies of M. neurolyticum. A weak NEAC was also detected in the supernatant of the M. neurolyticum broth culture. Canine Mycoplasma spp. with high sialidase activity reported previously, Mycoplasma canis, Mycoplasma cynos and Mycoplasma molare had 100-fold more NEAC than M. neurolyticum, but apparent differences in NEAC levels existed among strains of M. canis and of M. cynos. Zymograms using neuraminidase-specific chromogenic substrate were used to show proteins having NEAC. In M. canis (a field isolate Larissa and the type strain PG14(T)), M. cynos (isolate 896) and M. molare (type strain H542(T)) proteins with NEAC had molecular masses of ∼130kDa, 105kDa and 110kDa, respectively. Identification of these neuraminidases could provide the basis for their molecular characterization.

  17. Identification of mycoplasma membrane proteins by systematic Tn phoA mutagenesis of a recombinant library.

    PubMed

    Cleavinger, C M; Kim, M F; Im, J H; Wise, K S

    1995-10-01

    Wall-less prokaryotes in the genus Mycoplasma include over 90 species of infectious agents whose pathogenicity for humans and other animals is currently being assessed. Molecular characterization of surface proteins is critical in this regard but is hampered by the lack of genetic systems in these organisms. We used TnphoA transposition to systematically mutagenize, in Escherichia coli, a genomic plasmid library constructed from Mycoplasma fermentans, a potential human pathogen. The strategy circumvented problems of expressing mycoplasma genes containing UGA (Trp) codons and relied on the construction of the vector pG7ZCW, designed to reduce TnphoA transposition into vector sequences. Functional phoA gene fusions directly identified genes encoding 19 putative membrane-associated proteins of M. fermentans. Sequences of fusion constructs defined three types of export sequence: (1) non-cleavable, membrane-spanning sequences, (2) signal peptides with signal peptidase (SPase) I-like cleavage sites, and (3) signal peptides with SPase II-like lipoprotein-cleavage sites which, like most other mycoplasmal lipoprotein signals analysed to date, differed from those in several Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria in their lack of a Leu residue at the -3 position. Antibodies to synthetic peptides that were deduced from two fusions to predicted lipoproteins, identified corresponding amphiphilic membrane proteins of 57 kDa and 78 kDa expressed in the mycoplasma. The P57 sequence contained a proline-rich N-terminal region analogous to an adhesin of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. The P78 protein was identical to a serologically defined phase-variant surface lipoprotein. TnphoA mutagenesis provides an efficient means of systematically characterizing functionally diverse lipoproteins and other exported proteins in mycoplasmas.

  18. Isolation and characterization of unusual Mycoplasma spp. from captive Eurasian Griffon (Gyps fulvus) in Sicily.

    PubMed

    Loria, G R; Ferrantelli, E; Giardina, G; Li Vecchi, L; Sparacino, L; Oliveri, F; McAuliffe, L; Nicholas, R A J

    2008-01-01

    Mycoplasmas have been isolated from birds of prey during clinical examinations, but their significance to the health of raptors is unclear. We report the isolation and characterization of four mycoplasmas found in the upper respiratory tract of four sick Eurasian Griffon (Gyps fulvus) that were housed in a Sicilian rehabilitation center at Ficuzza, near Palermo in Sicily, before reintroduction into the wild. These included Mycoplasma gallinarum, an unidentified mycoplasma highly similar to Mycoplasma glycophilum, and two unidentified mycoplasmas with similarities to Mycoplasma falconis and Mycoplasma gateae.

  19. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infections of Adults and Children

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, James D.; Welliver, Robert C.

    1976-01-01

    Although the hallmark of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is pneumonia, the organism is also responsible for a protean array of other symptoms. With an increased awareness of the board clinical spectrum of M. pneumoniae disease and the ready availability of the cold agglutinin and M. pneumoniae complement-fixation tests, interested clinicians will note additional clinical-mycoplasmal associations in their patients. PMID:782043

  20. Mycoplasma genitalium: An emergent sexually transmitted disease?

    PubMed

    Manhart, Lisa E

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking Mycoplasma genitalium to sexually transmitted disease syndromes, including male urethritis, and female cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and adverse birth outcomes. It discusses the relationship of this bacterium to human immunodeficiency virus infection and reviews the available literature on the efficacy of standard antimicrobial therapies against M genitalium.

  1. A Compendium for Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Gretchen L.; Kinjo, Takeshi; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Historically, atypical pneumonia was a term used to describe an unusual presentation of pneumonia. Currently, it is used to describe the multitude of symptoms juxtaposing the classic symptoms found in cases of pneumococcal pneumonia. Specifically, atypical pneumonia is a syndrome resulting from a relatively common group of pathogens including Chlamydophila sp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The incidence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia in adults is less than the burden experienced by children. Transmission rates among families indicate children may act as a reservoir and maintain contagiousness over a long period of time ranging from months to years. In adults, M. pneumoniae typically produces a mild, “walking” pneumonia and is considered to be one of the causes of persistent cough in patients. M. pneumoniae has also been shown to trigger the exacerbation of other lung diseases. It has been repeatedly detected in patients with bronchitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and cystic fibrosis. Recent advances in technology allow for the rapid diagnosis of M. pneumoniae through the use of polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen tests. With this, more effort has been afforded to identify the causative etiologic agent in all cases of pneumonia. However, previous practices, including the overprescribing of macrolide treatment in China and Japan, have created increased incidence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. Reports from these countries indicate that >85% of M. pneumoniae pneumonia pediatric cases are macrolide-resistant. Despite its extensively studied past, the smallest bacterial species still inspires some of the largest questions. The developments in microbiology, diagnostic features and techniques, epidemiology, treatment and vaccines, and upper respiratory conditions associated with M. pneumoniae in adult populations are included within this review. PMID:27148202

  2. Cellular Microbiology of Mycoplasma canis

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Dina L.; Leibowitz, Jeffrey A.; Azaiza, Mohammed T.; Shil, Pollob K.; Shama, Suzanne M.; Kutish, Gerald F.; Distelhorst, Steven L.; Balish, Mitchell F.; May, Meghan A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma canis can infect many mammalian hosts but is best known as a commensal or opportunistic pathogen of dogs. The unexpected presence of M. canis in brains of dogs with idiopathic meningoencephalitis prompted new in vitro studies to help fill the void of basic knowledge about the organism's candidate virulence factors, the host responses that it elicits, and its potential roles in pathogenesis. Secretion of reactive oxygen species and sialidase varied quantitatively (P < 0.01) among strains of M. canis isolated from canine brain tissue or mucosal surfaces. All strains colonized the surface of canine MDCK epithelial and DH82 histiocyte cells and murine C8-D1A astrocytes. Transit through MDCK and DH82 cells was demonstrated by gentamicin protection assays and three-dimensional immunofluorescence imaging. Strains further varied (P < 0.01) in the extents to which they influenced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and the neuroendocrine regulatory peptide endothelin-1 by DH82 cells. Inoculation with M. canis also decreased major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen expression by DH82 cells (P < 0.01), while secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and complement factor H was unaffected. The basis for differences in the responses elicited by these strains was not obvious in their genome sequences. No acute cytopathic effects on any homogeneous cell line, or consistent patterns of M. canis polyvalent antigen distribution in canine meningoencephalitis case brain tissues, were apparent. Thus, while it is not likely a primary neuropathogen, M. canis has the capacity to influence meningoencephalitis through complex interactions within the multicellular and neurochemical in vivo milieu. PMID:27045036

  3. Chronic "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infection.

    PubMed

    Novacco, Marilisa; Boretti, Felicitas S; Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Willi, Barbara; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2011-04-20

    "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" infects felids. The pathogenesis of "Candidatus M. turicensis" chronic infection is poorly understood. The goals of the present study were to (1) induce reactivation of the infection in chronic carrier cats by attempted immunosuppression, (2) identify potential tissue sequestration using real-time TaqMan® PCR and (3) monitor the humoral immune response by DnaK enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ten specified pathogen-free cats that had ostensibly recovered from experimental "Candidatus M. turicensis" infection were used: five cats (group 1) received high dose methylprednisolone (attempted immunosuppression), while five cats served as untreated controls (group 2). Besides weekly blood samples, tissue samples were collected from bone marrow, kidney, liver and salivary glands at selected time points. The cats in group 1 had significantly lower lymphocyte counts and higher blood glucose levels after methylprednisolone administration than the controls. After methylprednisolone administration one blood and three tissue samples from cats in group 1 tested PCR-positive; before the administration, only one sample was positive. All other samples tested PCR-negative. All cats stayed seropositive; the antibody levels of the cats in group 1 showed a significant transient decrease after methylprednisolone administration. This is the first study to report the presence of "Candidatus M. turicensis" in tissues of chronically infected cats and the persistence of anti-feline hemoplasma antibodies in the absence of detectable bacteremia. Methylprednisolone administration did not lead to a significant reactivation of the infection. Our results enhance the knowledge of "Candidatus M. turicensis" infection pathogenesis and are clinically relevant to the prognosis of hemoplasma-infected cats.

  4. Development of fluorescence expression tools to study host-mycoplasma interactions and validation in two distant mycoplasma clades.

    PubMed

    Bonnefois, Tiffany; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Rodrigues, Valérie; Totté, Philippe; Puech, Carinne; Ripoll, Chantal; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2016-10-20

    Fluorescence expression tools for stable and innocuous whole mycoplasma cell labelling have been developed. A Tn4001-derivative mini-transposon affording unmarked, stable mutagenesis in mycoplasmas was modified to allow the constitutive, high-level expression of mCherry, mKO2 and mNeonGreen. These tools were used to introduce the respective fluorescent proteins as chromosomal tags in the phylogenetically distant species Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides and Mycoplasma bovis. The production, selection and characterisation of fluorescent clones were straightforward and resulted in the unprecedented observation of red and green fluorescent mycoplasma colonies in the two species, with no apparent cytotoxicity. Equivalent fluorescence expression levels were quantified by flow cytometry in both species, suggesting that these tools can be broadly applied in mycoplasmas. A macrophage infection assay was performed to assess the usefulness of mNeonGreen-expressing strains for monitoring mycoplasma infections, and notably cell invasion. The presence of fluorescent mycoplasmas inside live phagocytic cells was detected and quantified by flow cytometry and corroborated by confocal microscopy, which allowed the identification of individual mycoplasmas in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The fluorescence expression tools developed in this study are suitable for host-pathogen interaction studies and offer innumerable perspectives for the functional analysis of mycoplasmas both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Mycoplasma isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazuhiro; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Iwakuma, Akihiro; Onda, Ken; Sato, Reiichiro; Hayashi, Tomohito; Nagahata, Hajime; Oshida, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp. are highly contagious pathogens and intramammary Mycoplasma infection is a serious issue for the dairy industry. As there is no effective vaccine for Mycoplasma infection, control depends on good husbandry and chemo-antibiotic therapy. In this study, antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains recently isolated from cases of bovine mastitis in Japan was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All Mycoplasma bovis strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin and enrofloxacin, but not kanamycin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin or tylosin. M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium strains were sensitive to pirlimycin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin and tylosin, but not to kanamycin. This is the first report to describe the MIC of major antimicrobial agents for Mycoplasma species isolated from bovine mastitis in Japan.

  6. Conjunctivitis, rhinitis, and sinusitis in cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) found in association with Mycoplasma sturni infection and cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Ley, David H; Moresco, Anneke; Frasca, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Fledgling cliff swallows were cared for at a rehabilitation facility when clinical signs of ocular disease, characterized by conjunctivitis, epiphora, and hyperaemia of palpebrae and nictitans, were recognized. Treatment consisted of topical and oral antibiotic therapy and one topical steroid administration. However, one cliff swallow died and three were killed due to poor therapeutic response. Conjunctival swabs were obtained ante-mortem from the three cliff swallows and were submitted for mycoplasma culture and molecular diagnostics. Heads of the three birds were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin and submitted for histopathologic examination of oculonasal tissues. Mycoplasma cultures and molecular evaluation of isolates identified Mycoplasma sturni, but not Mycoplasma gallisepticum, from each specimen. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphoplasmacytic conjunctivitis, rhinitis and infraorbital sinusitis with follicular lymphoid hyperplasia, epithelial hyperplasia, and protozoal stages compatible with Cryptosporidium spp. arranged in and along the apical surfaces of epithelial cells. Identification of concurrent M. sturni and Cryptosporidium spp. infections in these cliff swallows demonstrates an alternative infectious condition that can produce gross and microscopic lesions comparable with those commonly observed in M. gallisepticum infections of house finches and other passerine species. Conjunctivitis associated with M. sturni and Cryptosporidium spp. in cliff swallows may represent an emerging disease risk to a naïve, high-density and colonial species such as colony-nesting cliff swallows.

  7. Secretomes of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare reveal differences associated to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Paes, Jéssica A; Lorenzatto, Karina R; de Moraes, Sofia N; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2017-02-10

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare cohabit the porcine respiratory tract. However, M. hyopneumoniae causes the porcine enzootic pneumonia, while M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Comparative analyses demonstrated high similarity between these species, which includes the sharing of all predicted virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies related to soluble secretomes of mycoplasmas were little known, although they are important for bacterial-host interactions. The aim of this study was to perform a comparative analysis between the soluble secreted proteins repertoires of the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and its closely related commensal Mycoplasma flocculare. For that, bacteria were cultured in medium with reduced serum concentration and secreted proteins were identified by a LC-MS/MS proteomics approach. Altogether, 62 and 26 proteins were identified as secreted by M. hyopneumoniae and M. flocculare, respectively, being just seven proteins shared between these bacteria. In M. hyopneumoniae secretome, 15 proteins described as virulence factors were found; while four putative virulence factors were identified in M. flocculare secretome. For the first time, clear differences related to virulence were found between these species, helping to elucidate the pathogenic nature of M. hyopneumoniae to swine hosts.

  8. Synergism between upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation caused by mycoplasma facilitates intracellular mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaopeng; Yu, Jie; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Zhaoming; Xia, Yun; Luo, Zhiyong; Wu, Yaqun

    2014-03-01

    Following fusion of a mycoplasma with a host cell membrane, the inserted components of mycoplasma may then be transported through the endocytic pathway. However, the effects of mycoplasmas on the host cell endomembrane system are largely unknown. In this study, mycoplasma‑induced changes in the dynamics of endocytic and autophagic systems were investigated. Endocytosis and autophagy are two major processes involved in the survival of intracellular prokaryotic pathogens. It was found that, immediately following infection, mycoplasmas induce endocytosis in the host cell; however, in the long term the mycoplasmas suppress turnover of the components of the endocytic pathway. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that Rab7 and LC3‑II are recruited to the intracellular mycoplasma‑containing compartments. Western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that mycoplasmas increase expression of Rab7 by upregulating transcription, but increase levels of LC3‑II and p62 by post‑translational regulation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that mycoplasma infection causes inhibition of autophagic degradation of LC3‑II and p62. In addition, it was found that upregulation of Rab7 and inhibition of autophagic degradation synergistically contributes to intracellular mycoplasma accumulation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mycoplasmas may manipulate host cell endosomal and autophagic systems in order to facilitate intracellular infection.

  9. Development of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Recombinant Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Simionatto, Simone; Dellagostin, Odir

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Research using genome-based approach has the potential to elucidate the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines. Here, we describe the protocol for developing M. hyopneumoniae recombinant vaccines using reverse vaccinology approaches.

  10. "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque" and Bartonella quintana bacteremia in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Rohde, Cynthia M; Kelly, Catherine M; Ramaiah, Lila; Leach, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report latent infections with Bartonella quintana and a hemotropic Mycoplasma sp. in a research colony of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis, and signature nucleotide sequence motifs of the hemotropic Mycoplasma 16S rRNA and RNase P genes indicate the presence of a novel organism.

  11. Mycoplasma hominis, a Rare but True Cause of Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Grattard, Florence; Morel, Jerome; Suy, Florence; Fuzellier, Jean-François; Verhoeven, Paul; Cazorla, Celine; Guglielminotti, Claire; Fresard, Anne; Lucht, Frederic; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Mycoplasma spp. are rarely recognized agents of infective endocarditis. We report a case of Mycoplasma hominis prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosed by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and culture of valves in a 74-year-old man. We reviewed the literature and found only 8 other cases reported.

  12. 21 CFR 610.30 - Test for Mycoplasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produced from in vitro living cell cultures, and prior to inactivation in the case of inactivated virus vaccines produced from such living cell cultures, each virus harvest pool and control fluid pool shall be... Mycoplasma and each test shall include control cultures of at least two known strains of Mycoplasma, one...

  13. Alice in Wonderland syndrome associated with mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Omata, Taku; Fujii, Katsunori; Kuroki, Haruo; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a rare condition in which patients report distorted size perception of objects and their own bodies. Although specific causes and pathology have not been elucidated, an association between AIWS and infection has been suggested. To our knowledge, mycoplasma-induced AIWS has not been examined. A girl aged 7 years 11 months presented with fever (temperature, 40°C) and cough. Although the fever disappeared after approximately 10 days, she complained that her mother's face suddenly appeared smaller to her. Subsequently, she complained that objects intermittently appeared smaller than normal. Particle agglutination test indicated elevated serum antibodies against Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The patient was therefore diagnosed the patient with AIWS secondary to mycoplasma infection. Although mycoplasma infection is known to cause various central nervous system symptoms, this is the first report involving AIWS, suggesting that mycoplasma could affect visual function in children.

  14. Putative essential and core-essential genes in Mycoplasma genomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma, which was used to create the first "synthetic life", has been an important species in the emerging field, synthetic biology. However, essential genes, an important concept of synthetic biology, for both M. mycoides and M. capricolum, as well as 14 other Mycoplasma with available genomes, are still unknown. We have developed a gene essentiality prediction algorithm that incorporates information of biased gene strand distribution, homologous search and codon adaptation index. The algorithm, which achieved an accuracy of 80.8% and 78.9% in self-consistence and cross-validation tests, respectively, predicted 5880 essential genes in the 16 Mycoplasma genomes. The intersection set of essential genes in available Mycoplasma genomes consists of 153 core essential genes. The predicted essential genes (available from pDEG, tubic.tju.edu.cn/pdeg) and the proposed algorithm can be helpful for studying minimal Mycoplasma genomes as well as essential genes in other genomes.

  15. Putative essential and core-essential genes in Mycoplasma genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma, which was used to create the first “synthetic life”, has been an important species in the emerging field, synthetic biology. However, essential genes, an important concept of synthetic biology, for both M. mycoides and M. capricolum, as well as 14 other Mycoplasma with available genomes, are still unknown. We have developed a gene essentiality prediction algorithm that incorporates information of biased gene strand distribution, homologous search and codon adaptation index. The algorithm, which achieved an accuracy of 80.8% and 78.9% in self-consistence and cross-validation tests, respectively, predicted 5880 essential genes in the 16 Mycoplasma genomes. The intersection set of essential genes in available Mycoplasma genomes consists of 153 core essential genes. The predicted essential genes (available from pDEG, tubic.tju.edu.cn/pdeg) and the proposed algorithm can be helpful for studying minimal Mycoplasma genomes as well as essential genes in other genomes. PMID:22355572

  16. Significance of Genital Mycoplasmas in Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Innocent Bystander!

    PubMed Central

    Harmanli, Ozgur H.; Nyirjesy, Paul; Reece, E. Albert

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to determine the role of Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum in pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Methods: The clinical and microbiologic variables in 114 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PID were compared prospectively according to the isolation of M. hominis and U. urealyticum from their endometrial cavities. Results: The groups were epidemiologically well matched. Clinical parameters such as temperature, leukocyte count, erythrocyte count, and C-reactive protein on admission and length of hospital stay were similar in the patients, regardless of their mycoplasma status. A significant percentage of the patients either continued or started to harbor genital mycoplasmas after the resolution of PID without any significant clinical sequelae. Conclusions: The presence of genital mycoplasmas does not change the clinical presentation and course of PID. Both M. hominis and U. urealyticum can persist or colonize the endometrium after complete recovery from PID. Therefore, the genital mycoplasmas do not seem to have a dominant pathogenic role in PID. PMID:18476105

  17. Use of Real-Time PCR To Detect and Quantify Mycoplasma haemofelis and “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Séverine; Helps, Chris R.; Day, Michael J.; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim J.; Harbour, Dave A.

    2003-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay using Taqman probes was developed to detect and quantify Mycoplasma haemofelis and “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” in feline blood samples. The assay was rapid and sensitive and was successfully used to monitor the in vivo kinetics of cats experimentally infected with each species. PMID:12517888

  18. New models of chronic synovitis in rabbits induced by mycoplasmas: microbiological, histopathological, and immunological observations on rabbits injected with Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Griffiths, M M; Eichwald, E J; Ward, J R

    1977-01-01

    A dose-dependent chronic synovitis was induced in rabbit knees after the intra-articular injection of both Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis. The inflammation progressed from an initial acute phase at 1 week characterized by edema, infiltration of the synovium with monocytes and heterophils, and desquamation of lining cells, to a more chronic phase at 1 and 3 months, in which villus hyperplasia, lymph "nodules," mononuclear cell infiltration, fibroplasia, and collagen deposition were prominent. With one exception, mycoplasmas could no longer be cultivated from the joints 1 month postinoculation. Both mycoplasma species evoked a humoral antibody response that was more marked in synovial fluids than in peripheral blood. A cell-mediated immune reaction, as evidence by enhanced uptake by [3H]thymidine by sensitized blood, spleen, or node lymphocytes in the presence of homologous antigen, was detected only in rabbits injected with M. pulmonis. Lymphocytes taken from arthritic rabbits were no more cytotoxic toward synovial cells derived from normal or arthritic rabbits than were normal lymphocytes. The models of synovitis described in this study offer a convenient probe for determining the mechanisms of mycoplasma-induced inflammation, since they require only a single injection of the initiating agent and, in addition, utilize an animal host large enough for detailed investigation into the nature of mycoplasma/synovium interactions. Images PMID:873616

  19. Quantitative assessment of Mycoplasma hemadsorption activity by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Luis; González-González, Luis; Costa, Manuela; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    A number of adherent mycoplasmas have developed highly complex polar structures that are involved in diverse aspects of the biology of these microorganisms and play a key role as virulence factors by promoting adhesion to host cells in the first stages of infection. Attachment activity of mycoplasma cells has been traditionally investigated by determining their hemadsorption ability to red blood cells and it is a distinctive trait widely examined when characterizing the different mycoplasma species. Despite the fact that protocols to qualitatively determine the hemadsorption or hemagglutination of mycoplasmas are straightforward, current methods when investigating hemadsorption at the quantitative level are expensive and poorly reproducible. By using flow cytometry, we have developed a procedure to quantify rapidly and accurately the hemadsorption activity of mycoplasmas in the presence of SYBR Green I, a vital fluorochrome that stains nucleic acids, allowing to resolve erythrocyte and mycoplasma cells by their different size and fluorescence. This method is very reproducible and permits the kinetic analysis of the obtained data and a precise hemadsorption quantification based on standard binding parameters such as the dissociation constant K d. The procedure we developed could be easily implemented in a standardized assay to test the hemadsorption activity of the growing number of clinical isolates and mutant strains of different mycoplasma species, providing valuable data about the virulence of these microorganisms.

  20. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  1. The minimal gene complement of mycoplasma genitalium

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; White, O.

    1995-10-20

    The complete nucleotide sequence (580,070 base pairs) of the Mycoplasma genitalium genome, the smallest known genome of any free-living organism, has been determined by whole-genome random sequencing and assembly. A total of only 470 predicted coding regions were identified that include genes required for DNA replication, transcription and translation, DNA repair, cellular transport, and energy metabolism. Comparison of this genome to that of Haemophilus influenzae suggests that differences in genome content are reflected as profound differences in physiology and metabolic capacity between these two organisms. 43 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Salzman, M B; Sood, S K; Slavin, M L; Rubin, L G

    1992-05-01

    Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, other than conjunctivitis, are uncommon. Optic disk swelling, optic nerve atrophy, retinal exudates and hemorrhages, and cranial nerve palsies have been infrequently reported. We describe a 15-year-old patient who developed bilateral optic disk edema and iritis during an acute infection with M. pneumoniae and review the world literature on findings associated with ocular manifestations of infection with this pathogen. Although our patient experienced complete resolution of iritis and optic disk edema after 6 weeks, several patients described in the literature have experienced permanent sequelae as a result of optic neuropathy.

  3. Neurological complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Hely, M A; Williamson, P M; Terenty, T R

    1984-01-01

    This study documents five patients with neurological disease associated with evidence of recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Four patients had encephalitis associated with coma. Two of these had hemiparesis (one with dysphasia), one had seizures, and one had cerebellar and brainstem involvement. Two also had evidence of a radiculopathy and peripheral neuropathy. One patient had aseptic meningitis with later transverse myelitis. Three patients had multiple sites of neurological involvement. Respiratory infections preceded the neurological syndromes in four cases. Antibiotic therapy did not appear to alter the course of the disease. All patients had a favourable outcome.

  4. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  5. Effect of a Mycoplasma hominis-like Mycoplasma on the infection of HEp-2 cells by the TW-183 strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Castilla, E A; Wadowsky, R M

    2000-02-01

    We isolated a Mycoplasma hominis-like mycoplasma from a stock culture of Chlamydia pneumoniae TW-183 obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and eradicated the contaminant by treating the stock suspension with a nonionic detergent, Igepal CA-630. The M. hominis-like mycoplasma neither inhibits nor enhances the infectivity of C. pneumoniae for HEp-2 cells.

  6. Sequence homologies between Mycoplasma and Chlamydia spp. lead to false-positive results in chlamydial cell cultures tested for mycoplasma contamination with a commercial PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Maass, Viola; Kern, Jan Marco; Poeckl, Matthias; Maass, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a frequent problem in chlamydial cell culture. After obtaining contradictory contamination results, we compared three commercial PCR kits for mycoplasma detection. One kit signaled contamination in mycoplasma-free Chlamydia pneumoniae cultures. Sequencing of cloned PCR products revealed primer homology with the chlamydial genome as the basis of this false-positive result.

  7. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Warren L.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases. PMID:25894997

  8. The role of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Murtha, Amy P; Edwards, James M

    2014-12-01

    Genital mycoplasmas are frequently found in the vaginal flora across socioeconomic and ethnic groups and have been demonstrated to be involved in adverse perinatal outcomes. Both Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp cause inflammation potentially leading to spontaneous preterm birth and PPROM as well as postdelivery infectious complications and neonatal infections. Herein we have provided an overview of the existing literature and supportive evidence for genital mycoplasma's role in perinatal complications. Future research will need to focus on clearly delineating the species, allowing for discrimination of their effects.

  9. Mycoplasma hominis necrotizing pleuropneumonia in a previously healthy adolescent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma hominis is a fastidious micro-organism causing systemic infections in the neonate and genital infections in the adult. It can also be the cause of serious extra-genital infections, mainly in immunosuppressed or predisposed subjects. Case Presentation We describe a case of severe pneumonia and pericarditis due to Mycoplasma hominis in a previously healthy adolescent who did not respond to initial therapy. Conclusions Mycoplasma hominis could be an underestimated cause of severe pneumonia in immunocompetent patients and should be particularly suspected in those not responding to standard therapy. PMID:21106079

  10. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5’ upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile. PMID:28005945

  11. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  12. Mycoplasma genitalium: An emerging sexually transmitted pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sunil; Singh, Gagandeep; Samanta, Palash; Sharma, Meera

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a member of genital mycoplasmas, which is emerging as an important causative agent of sexually transmitted infections both in males and females. The advent of polymerase chain reaction and other molecular methods have made studies on M. genitalium more feasible, which is otherwise a difficult organism to isolate. Besides Chlamydia trachomatis, M. genitalium is now an important and established cause of non gonococcal urethritis (NGU) in men, more so in persistent and recurrent NGU. Multiple studies have also shown a positive association of M. genitalium with mucopurulent cervicitis and vaginal discharge in females as well. The evidences for M. genitalium pelvic inflammatory diseases and infertility are quite convincing and indicate that this organism has potential to cause ascending infection. Lack of clear association with M. genitalium has been reported for bacterial vaginosis and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Diagnosis of M. genitalium infections is performed exclusively using nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs), owing to poor or slow growth of bacterium in culture. Although there are no guidelines available regarding treatment, macrolide group of antimicrobials appear to be more effective than tetracyclines. The present review provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and management of sexually transmitted infections due to M. genitalium. PMID:23391789

  13. Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces cytotoxic activity in guinea pig bronchoalveolar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kist, M.; Koester, H.; Bredt, W.

    1985-06-01

    Precultured guinea pig alveolar macrophages (AM) and freshly harvested alveolar cells (FHAC) activated by interaction with Mycoplasma pneumoniae were cytotoxic for xenogeneic /sup 75/selenomethionine-labeled tumor target cells. Phagocytosis of whole opsonized or nonopsonized M. pneumoniae cells was more effective in eliciting cytotoxicity than uptake of sonicated microorganisms. The addition of living mycoplasma cells to the assay system enhanced the cytotoxic effect considerably. Target cells were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxic action of phagocytes if they were coated with mycoplasma antigen or cocultured together with M. pneumoniae. The activation of the phagocytes could be inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose but not by antimicrobial substances suppressing mycoplasma protein synthesis. It was accompanied by /sup 51/Cr release without detectable signs of cell damage. The supernatants of activated cells were cytotoxic for approximately 24 h. Inhibition, release, and cytotoxic activity indicate the necessity of an intact metabolism of the effector cells and suggest a secretion of cytotoxic substances.

  14. Mycoplasma hominis Induces Mediastinitis after a Tonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Grancini, Anna; Colosimo, Manuela; Restelli, Antonella; Colombo, Rosaria; Maraschini, Anna; Pozzi, Cristina; Breda, Giuseppe; Protti, Alessandro; Arghittu, Milena; Maiavacca, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is commonly involved in genitourinary tract infections. We report a 59-year-old man who developed a M. hominis-associated mediastinitis following acute tonsillar infection. PMID:27957362

  15. Characteristics of a new sterol-nonrequiring Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Tully, J G; Razin, S

    1969-06-01

    Two Mycoplasma strains recovered from tissue culture environments were found to grow in complex media devoid of serum or serum fractions containing cholesterol and in a cholesterol-free synthetic medium. Neither strain was capable of synthesizing pigmented carotenoids, although these compounds are present in, and characteristic of, other sterol-nonrequiring mycoplasmas. Serological tests and an analysis of their cell protein patterns obtained by gel electrophoresis indicated that the isolates were similar to each other but distinct from other sterol-nonrequiring serotypes, Mycoplasma laidlawii and M. granularum, as well as from sterol-requiring species. The existence of Mycoplasma other than M. laidlawii and M. granularum without sterol requirements suggested the need for some taxonomic changes in this group of organisms.

  16. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  17. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline.

  18. Functional characterization of the RuvB homologs from Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Estevão, Silvia; Sluijter, Marcel; Hartwig, Nico G; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Vink, Cornelis

    2011-12-01

    Homologous recombination between repeated DNA elements in the genomes of Mycoplasma species has been hypothesized to be a crucial causal factor in sequence variation of antigenic proteins at the bacterial surface. To investigate this notion, studies were initiated to identify and characterize the proteins that form part of the homologous DNA recombination machinery in Mycoplasma pneumoniae as well as Mycoplasma genitalium. Among the most likely participants of this machinery are homologs of the Holliday junction migration motor protein RuvB. In both M. pneumoniae and M. genitalium, genes have been identified that have the capacity to encode RuvB homologs (MPN536 and MG359, respectively). Here, the characteristics of the MPN536- and MG359-encoded proteins (the RuvB proteins from M. pneumoniae strain FH [RuvB(FH)] and M. genitalium [RuvB(Mge)], respectively) are described. Both RuvB(FH) and RuvB(Mge) were found to have ATPase activity and to bind DNA. In addition, both proteins displayed divalent cation- and ATP-dependent DNA helicase activity on partially double-stranded DNA substrates. The helicase activity of RuvB(Mge), however, was significantly lower than that of RuvB(FH). Interestingly, we found RuvB(FH) to be expressed exclusively by subtype 2 strains of M. pneumoniae. In strains belonging to the other major subtype (subtype 1), a version of the protein is expressed (the RuvB protein from M. pneumoniae strain M129 [RuvB(M129)]) that differs from RuvB(FH) in a single amino acid residue (at position 140). In contrast to RuvB(FH), RuvB(M129) displayed only marginal levels of DNA-unwinding activity. These results demonstrate that M. pneumoniae strains (as well as closely related Mycoplasma spp.) can differ significantly in the function of components of their DNA recombination and repair machinery.

  19. Selective inhibition of DNA amplification in nonadhering Mycoplasma pneumoniae cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Zigangirova, N.A.; Solov`eva, S.V.; Rakovskaya, I.V.

    1995-08-01

    Inhibition of amplification of various genome regions of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was observed in the polymerase chain reaction, and was dependent on cultivation conditions. A protein stably associated with DNA is responsible for the inhibitory effect. It is assumed that when the protein selectively associates with separate DNA regions, it can inhibit genes encoding pathogenicity factors, thus promoting mycoplasma transformation into persistent variants. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures by a mycoplasma group-specific PCR.

    PubMed Central

    van Kuppeveld, F J; Johansson, K E; Galama, J M; Kissing, J; Bölske, G; van der Logt, J T; Melchers, W J

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of a 16S rRNA-based mycoplasma group-specific PCR for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures was investigated. A total of 104 cell cultures were tested by using microbiological culture, DNA fluorochrome staining, DNA-rRNA hybridization, and PCR techniques. A comparison of the results obtained with these techniques revealed agreement for 95 cell cultures. Discrepant results, which were interpreted as false negative or false positive on the basis of a comparison with the results obtained with other methods, were observed with nine cell cultures. The microbiological culture technique produced false-negative results for four cell cultures. The hybridization technique produced false-negative results for two cell cultures, and for one of these cell cultures the DNA staining technique also produced a false-negative result. The PCR may have produced false-positive results for one cell culture. Ambiguous results were obtained with the remaining two cell cultures. Furthermore, the presence of contaminating bacteria interfered with the interpretation of the DNA staining results for 16 cell cultures. For the same reason the hybridization signals of nine cell cultures could not be interpreted. Our results demonstrate the drawbacks of each of the detection methods and the suitability of the PCR for the detection of mycoplasmas in cell cultures. PMID:7509584

  1. Comparison of the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA Amplification Assay and Culture for Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Amy E.; Duffy, Lynn B.

    2014-01-01

    A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) system, the illumigene Mycoplasma DNA amplification assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc., Cincinnati, OH) was evaluated to determine its analytical sensitivity, specificity, and clinical application in comparison to historic culture in a collection of archived respiratory specimens. The illumigene limit of detection was ≤88 CFU/reaction for 10 Mycoplasma pneumoniae reference strains. This assay correctly identified 36 M. pneumoniae reference strains and clinical isolates from various geographic origins, including both of the main subtypes. No cross-reactions were detected with other mycoplasmas, ureaplasmas, other bacterial species, viruses, yeasts, or human DNA. Among 214 respiratory specimens previously cultured for M. pneumoniae, when real-time PCR with bidirectional sequencing of the PCR products was used to resolve discrepancies, the sensitivity was 22 of 22 (100%) and the specificity was 190 of 192 (99%). This commercial LAMP assay is a useful rapid method for detecting M. pneumoniae in clinical specimens. Additional prospective clinical trials with direct comparison to culture and PCR are warranted. PMID:24430454

  2. Mycoplasma insons sp. nov., a twisted mycoplasma from green iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    May, Meghan; Ortiz, G Javier; Wendland, Lori D; Rotstein, David S; Relich, Ryan F; Balish, Mitchell F; Brown, Daniel R

    2007-09-01

    Mycoplasma insons sp. nov., first cultured from the choanae and tracheae of healthy green iguanas (Iguana iguana) from El Salvador, was readily distinguished from all previously described mollicutes and assigned to the Mycoplasma fastidiosum phylogenetic cluster by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons. Growth inhibition assays distinguished the isolates serologically from the other two members of that cluster. Many M. insons cells exhibit a remarkable twisted rod morphology despite lacking a cell wall. The organism is nonmotile, produces acid from glucose, but does not hydrolyze arginine, esculin, or urea. Mycoplasma insons 16S rRNA gene was also detected by PCR in packed blood cells from culture-negative iguanas. The type strain I17P1(T) has been deposited with the Mollicutes Collection at Purdue University and with the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC BAA-1435) in the USA. A limited number of cultures generated by the authors have also been deposited with the Culture Collection, University of Göteborg, in Sweden (CCUG 53461).

  3. A Mycoplasma species of Emydidae turtles in the northeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Ossiboff, Robert J; Raphael, Bonnie L; Ammazzalorso, Alyssa D; Seimon, Tracie A; Niederriter, Holly; Zarate, Brian; Newton, Alisa L; McAloose, Denise

    2015-04-01

    Mycoplasma infections can cause significant morbidity and mortality in captive and wild chelonians. As part of a health assessment of endangered bog turtles (Glyptemys muhlenbergii) in the northeastern US, choanal and cloacal swabs from these and other sympatric species, including spotted turtles (Clemmys guttata), eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta), and common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) from 10 sampling sites in the states (US) of Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, were tested by PCR for Mycoplasma. Of 108 turtles tested, 63 (58.3%) were PCR positive for Mycoplasma including 58 of 83 bog turtles (70%), three of three (100%) eastern box turtles, and two of 11 (18%) spotted turtles; all snapping turtles (n = 7) and wood turtles (n = 4) were negative. Sequence analysis of portions of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed a single, unclassified species of Mycoplasma that has been previously reported in eastern box turtles, ornate box turtles (Terrapene ornata ornata), western pond turtles (Emys marmorata), and red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans). We document a high incidence of Mycoplasma, in the absence of clinical disease, in wild emydid turtles. These findings, along with wide distribution of the identified Mycoplasma sp. across a broad geographic region, suggest this bacterium is likely a commensal inhabitant of bog turtles, and possibly other species of emydid turtles, in the northeastern US.

  4. Genomic repeats, genome plasticity and the dynamics of Mycoplasma evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Blanchard, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Mycoplasmas evolved by a drastic reduction in genome size, but their genomes contain numerous repeated sequences with important roles in their evolution. We have established a bioinformatic strategy to detect the major recombination hot-spots in the genomes of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma pulmonis. This allowed the identification of large numbers of potentially variable regions, as well as a comparison of the relative recombination potentials of different genomic regions. Different trends are perceptible among mycoplasmas, probably due to different functional and structural constraints. The largest potential for illegitimate recombination in M.pulmonis is found at the vsa locus and its comparison in two different strains reveals numerous changes since divergence. On the other hand, the main M.pneumoniae and M.genitalium adhesins rely on large distant repeats and, hence, homologous recombination for variation. However, the relation between the existence of repeats and antigenic variation is not necessarily straightforward, since repeats of P1 adhesin were found to be anti-correlated with epitopes recognized by patient antibodies. These different strategies have important consequences for the structures of genomes, since large distant repeats correlate well with the major chromosomal rearrangements. Probably to avoid such events, mycoplasmas strongly avoid inverse repeats, in comparison to co-oriented repeats. PMID:11972343

  5. Mycoplasma Removal from Cell Culture Using Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hasebe, Akira; Ishikawa, Isao; Shamsul, Haque M.; Ohtani, Makoto; Segawa, Taku; Saeki, Ayumi; Tanizume, Naoho; Oouchi, Manabu; Okagami, Yoshihide; Okano, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in the removal of mycoplasmas from contaminated cells. Background data: Mycoplasmas often contaminate cell cultures. The cell-contaminating mycoplasmas are removed by antibiotics, but the use of antibiotics usually induces antibiotic-resistant bacteria. aPDT is expected to be a possible alternative to antibiotic treatments for suppressing infections. Materials and Methods: Mycoplasma salivarium (Ms)-infected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were irradiated using a red light-emitting diode (LED) in the presence of methylene blue (MB) as a photosensitizer. The Ms viable count was determined using culture on agar plates or using a mycoplasma detection kit. Results: aPDT performed using red LED irradiation was effective in decreasing live Ms in the presence of MB without damaging the HEK293 cells. aPDT removed live Ms from the infected cells after washing the cells with sterilized phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to decrease the initial number of live Ms before aPDT. Conclusions: This study suggests that aPDT could remove mycoplasmas from contaminated cells. PMID:23402393

  6. Role of Vpma phase variation in Mycoplasma agalactiae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Baumgartner, Martina; Gamper, Erika; Innerebner, Carmen; Zimmermann, Martina; Schilcher, Franz; Tichy, Alexander; Winter, Petra; Rosengarten, Renate; Spergser, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other bacterial pathogens, the molecular mechanisms of mycoplasma pathogenicity are largely unknown. Several studies in the past have shown that pathogenic mycoplasmas are equipped with sophisticated genetic systems that allow them to undergo high-frequency surface antigenic variations. Although never clearly proven, these variable mycoplasma surface components are often implicated in host immune evasion and adaptation. Vpma surface lipoproteins of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae are encoded on a genomic pathogenicity island–like locus and are considered as one of the well-characterized model systems of mycoplasma surface antigenic variation. The present study assesses the role of these phase-variable Vpmas in the molecular pathogenesis of M. agalactiae by testing the wild-type strain PG2 in comparison with the xer1-disrupted Vpma ‘phase-locked’ mutants in sheep infection models. The data clearly illustrate that although Xer1 recombinase is not a virulence factor of M. agalactiae and Vpma phase variation is not necessary for establishing an infection, it might critically influence the survival and persistence of the pathogen under natural field conditions, mainly due to a better capacity for dissemination and evoking systemic responses. This is the first study where mycoplasma ‘phase-locked’ mutants are tested in vivo to elucidate the role of phase variation during infection. PMID:22809092

  7. Role of binding in Mycoplasma mobile and Mycoplasma pneumoniae gliding analyzed through inhibition by synthesized sialylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Taishi; Nakane, Daisuke; Ishida, Hideharu; Ando, Hiromune; Kiso, Makoto; Miyata, Makoto

    2013-02-01

    Mycoplasmas, which have been shown to be the causative pathogens in recent human pneumonia epidemics, bind to solid surfaces and glide in the direction of the membrane protrusion at a pole. During gliding, the legs of the mycoplasma catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. Sialylated oligosaccharides are major structures on animal cell surfaces and are sometimes targeted by pathogens, such as influenza virus. In the present study, we analyzed the inhibitory effects of 16 chemically synthesized sialylated compounds on the gliding and binding of Mycoplasma mobile and Mycoplasma pneumoniae and concluded the following. (i) The recognition of sialylated oligosaccharide by mycoplasma legs proceeds in a "lock-and-key" fashion, with the binding affinity dependent on structural differences among the sialylated compounds examined. (ii) The binding of the leg and the sialylated oligosaccharide is cooperative, with Hill constants ranging from 2 to 3. (iii) Mycoplasma legs may generate a drag force after a stroke, because the gliding speed decreased and pivoting motion occurred more frequently when the number of working legs was reduced by the addition of free sialylated compounds.

  8. Immunological characterization of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana B; Galli, Vanessa; Brum, Clarice B; Klein, Catia S; Rebelatto, Raquel; Silva, Everton F; Borsuk, Sibele; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, is highly prevalent worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. Commercial vaccines are widely used in the control of this disease, however, they provide only partial protection. The aim of this study was to evaluate 34 recombinant proteins of M. hyopneumoniae expressed in Escherichia coli. Antigenic and immunogenic properties of these proteins were analyzed. For this, the proteins were tested against hyperimmune and convalescent pig sera through ELISA and Western blot. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was evaluated in BALB/c mice following intramuscular inoculation. Most antigens were able to induce a strong immune response and sera from inoculated mice were able to recognize native proteins by cell ELISA and Western blot. Several recombinant proteins were specifically recognized by convalescent pig sera, indicating they are expressed during infection. These data may help to develop more efficacious vaccines against M. hyopneumoniae.

  9. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae: from disease to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Simionatto, Simone; Marchioro, Silvana Beutinger; Maes, Dominiek; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2013-08-30

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the etiological agent of swine enzootic pneumonia (EP), a disease that affects swine production worldwide. Vaccination is the most cost-effective strategy for the control and prevention of the disease. Despite efforts to control M. hyopneumoniae infection, significant economic losses in pig production continue to occur. The results of genome-based research have the potential to help understand the biology and pathogenesis of M. hyopneumoniae, and contribute to the development of more effective vaccines and diagnostic tests. In this review, the characteristics of M. hyopneumoniae related to pathogenesis and control measures will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on vaccination strategies that have been proposed with the use of reverse vaccinology approaches.

  10. Cytoskeletal elements in the bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegermann, Jan; Herrmann, Richard; Mayer, Frank

    2002-09-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a pathogenic eubacterium lacking a cell wall. Three decades ago, a "rod", an intracellular cytoskeletal structure, was discovered that was assumed to define and stabilize the elongated cell shape. Later, by treatment with detergent, a "Triton shell" (i.e. a fraction of detergent-insoluble cell material) could be obtained, believed to contain additional cytoskeletal elements. Now, by application of a modified Triton X-100 treatment, we are able to demonstrate that M. pneumoniae possesses a cytoskeleton consisting of a blade-like rod and a peripheral lining located close to the inner face of the cytoplasmic membrane, exhibiting features of a highly regular network. Attached "stalks" may support the cytoplasmic membrane. The rod was connected to the cell periphery by "spokes" and showed a defined ultrastructure. Its proximal end was found to be attached to a wheel-like complex. Fibrils extended from the proximal end of the rod into the cytoplasm.

  11. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  12. Hemotropic mycoplasma in a free-ranging black howler monkey (Alouatta caraya) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonilda C; Cubilla, Michelle P; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Oliveira, Marcos J; Estrada, Marko; Leutenegger, Christian M; Sykes, Jane E; Lindsay, Leann L; Marcondes, Mary; Barros Filho, Ivan R; Biondo, Alexander W

    2013-07-01

    Hemotropic mycoplasmas are bacteria that infect erythrocytes and cause subclinical infections to life-threatening disease. We describe hemotropic mycoplasma infection in a free-ranging black howler monkey (Alouatta caraya). This is the first molecular detection of a hemotropic mycoplasma in a nonhuman primate from Brazil.

  13. Survival and replication of Mycoplasma species in recycled bedding sand and association with mastitis on dairy farms in Utah.

    PubMed

    Justice-Allen, A; Trujillo, J; Corbett, R; Harding, R; Goodell, G; Wilson, D

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp., usually Mycoplasma bovis, are important bovine pathogens that can cause mastitis, metritis, pneumonia, and arthritis. The currently documented routes of transmission of Mycoplasma spp. are through contaminated milking equipment and by direct animal contact. The existence of environmental sources for Mycoplasma spp. and their role in transmission and clinical disease is poorly characterized. Mycoplasma spp. (confirmed as M. bovis in 2 of 4 samples tested using PCR) was found in recycled bedding sand originating from a dairy experiencing an outbreak of clinical mycoplasma mastitis. Mycoplasma spp. were subsequently found in bedding sand from 2 other dairies whose bulk-tank milk was mycoplasma-positive. The association between the occurrence of Mycoplasma spp. in recycled bedding sand and mycoplasma mastitis in cows was further investigated using a pile of recycled sand from dairy 1. Study objectives included the determination of factors associated with the concentration of Mycoplasma spp. in recycled bedding sand and the duration of survival of mycoplasmas in the sand. We also evaluated the efficacy of 2 disinfectants at 2 different concentrations each for the elimination of Mycoplasma spp. from contaminated sand. Mycoplasma spp. survived in the sand pile for 8 mo. The concentration of Mycoplasma spp. within the sand pile was directly related to temperature and precipitation. It was also positively associated with the growth of gram-negative microorganisms, suggesting the possibility of the formation of a biofilm. Ideal temperatures for replication of Mycoplasma spp. occurred between 15 and 20 degrees C. Moisture in the sand and movement of the sand pile also appeared to play a role in replication of mycoplasmas. We found that 0.5% sodium hypochlorite or 2% chlorhexidine were efficacious in eliminating Mycoplasma spp. from contaminated bedding sand. Recycled bedding sand could be an environmental source of Mycoplasma spp., including M. bovis

  14. The in vitro effect of six antimicrobials against Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolated from sheep and goats in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, W; Nicholas, R A J; Janakat, S; Abu-Basha, E; Ayling, R D

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory disease in sheep and goats is a major problem in Jordan and is often associated with Mycoplasma species. Without effective vaccines, control is mainly by chemotherapy, but the uncontrolled use of antimicrobials has led to concerns about the potential development of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of chloramphenicol, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, tylosin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline was determined against 32 isolates of Mycoplasma species-M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (6), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (8) and M. putrefaciens (18), all isolated from either nasal swabs or milk, from sheep and goats in different regions of Jordan. The antimicrobial susceptibility showed some Mycoplasma species-specific differences, with M. capricolum subsp. capricolum being more susceptible to tylosin and erythromycin. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were the least effective for all three Mycoplasma species. No trends or significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibilities were observed between sheep and goat isolates, between milk or nasal swab isolates, or between isolates from different regions of Jordan. Some isolates of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum and M. putrefaciens showed higher MIC levels with oxytetracycline, as did two isolates of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC with tylosin, possibly indicating signs of development of antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Mycoplasma iowae: relationships among oxygen, virulence, and protection from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rachel E; Balish, Mitchell F

    2015-03-21

    The poultry-associated bacterium Mycoplasma iowae colonizes multiple sites in embryos, with disease or death resulting. Although M. iowae accumulates in the intestinal tract, it does not cause disease at that site, but rather only in tissues that are exposed to atmospheric O2. The activity of M. iowae catalase, encoded by katE, is capable of rapid removal of damaging H2O2 from solution, and katE confers a substantial reduction in the amount of H2O2 produced by Mycoplasma gallisepticum katE transformants in the presence of glycerol. As catalase-producing bacteria are often beneficial to hosts with inflammatory bowel disease, we explored whether M. iowae was exclusively protective against H2O2-producing bacteria in a Caenorhabditis elegans model, whether its protectiveness changed in response to O2 levels, and whether expression of genes involved in H2O2 metabolism and virulence changed in response to O2 levels. We observed that M. iowae was in fact protective against H2O2-producing Streptococcus pneumoniae, but not HCN-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and that M. iowae cells grown in 1% O2 promoted survival of C. elegans to a greater extent than M. iowae cells grown in atmospheric O2. Transcript levels of an M. iowae gene encoding a homolog of Mycoplasma pneumoniae CARDS toxin were 5-fold lower in cells grown in low O2. These data suggest that reduced O2, representing the intestinal environment, triggers M. iowae to reduce its virulence capabilities, effecting a change from a pathogenic mode to a potentially beneficial one.

  16. Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination interferes with the metabolism of PANC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Wang, Yongtao; Zhang, Huizhen; Johnson, Caroline H; Jiang, Yiming; Li, Xiangjun; Wu, Zeming; Liu, Tian; Krausz, Kristopher W; Yu, Aiming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2016-06-01

    Mycoplasma contamination is a common problem in cell culture and can alter cellular functions. Since cell metabolism is either directly or indirectly involved in every aspect of cell function, it is important to detect changes to the cellular metabolome after mycoplasma infection. In this study, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-based metabolomics was used to investigate the effect of mycoplasma contamination on the cellular metabolism of human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that mycoplasma contamination induced significant metabolic changes in PANC-1 cells. Twenty-three metabolites were identified and found to be involved in arginine and purine metabolism and energy supply. This study demonstrates that mycoplasma contamination significantly alters cellular metabolite levels, confirming the compelling need for routine checking of cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination, particularly when used for metabolomics studies. Graphical abstract Metabolomics reveals mycoplasma contamination changes the metabolome of PANC-1 cells.

  17. EPS-I Polysaccharide Protects Mycoplasma pulmonis from Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Brandon M.; Daubenspeck, James M.; Simmons, Warren L.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Few mycoplasmal polysaccharides have been described and little is known about their role in pathogenesis. The infection of mice with Mycoplasma pulmonis has been utilized in many in vivo and in vitro studies to gain a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions during chronic respiratory infection. Although alveolar macrophages have a primary role in host defense, M. pulmonis is killed inefficiently in vitro. One antiphagocytic factor produced by the mycoplasma is the family of phase- and size-variable Vsa lipoproteins. However, bacteria generally employ multiple strategies for combating host defenses, with capsular polysaccharide often having a key role. We show here that mutants lacking the EPS-I polysaccharide of M. pulmonis exhibit increased susceptibility to binding and subsequent killing by alveolar macrophages. These results give further insight into how mycoplasmas are able to avoid the host immune system and sustain a chronic infection. PMID:23190331

  18. Occurrence of Urease in T Strains of Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Maurice C.; Lunceford, Carl D.

    1967-01-01

    A previously unknown metabolite necessary for growth of T strains of Mycoplasma in artificial culture media has been identified as urea. The source of this metabolite was the mammalian plasma or serum enrichment of the culture medium. Normal horse serum was the most satisfactory native protein enrichment for cultivation of T strains of mycoplasma, and it is believed that its superior performance in agar and fluid culture media is associated with its relatively high urea content (approximately 40 mg/100 ml). T-strain urease activity was maximal at pH 6.0 ± 0.5. This is also the optimal pH for growth of T strains. Substrate concentrations greater than 1.0% urea were inhibitory to growth and urease activity of T-strain organisms, and optimal urea concentrations in fluid media appeared to lie within the range of 0.008 to 0.01 m. This range of urea concentration permitted maximal growth of T-strain organisms without rapid loss of viability due to excessive ammonia accumulation and rise in pH to lethal levels. T strains of Mycoplasma were cultivated in a serum-free fluid medium containing urea as the only added metabolite and nitrogen source. T strains are the only known human mycoplasmas which exhibit urease activity, and this biochemical marker can be employed as an aid in the detection and identification of T strains of Mycoplasma (urease color test) and in distinguishing T strains from other members of the human Mycoplasma group. PMID:6025439

  19. Gliding Motility of Mycoplasma mobile on Uniform Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Taishi; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The binding and gliding of Mycoplasma mobile on a plastic plate covered by 53 uniform oligosaccharides were analyzed. Mycoplasmas bound to and glided on only 21 of the fixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs), showing that sialic acid is essential as the binding target. The affinities were mostly consistent with our previous results on the inhibitory effects of free SOs and suggested that M. mobile recognizes SOs from the nonreducing end with four continuous sites as follows. (i and ii) A sialic acid at the nonreducing end is tightly recognized by tandemly connected two sites. (iii) The third site is recognized by a loose groove that may be affected by branches. (iv) The fourth site is recognized by a large groove that may be enhanced by branches, especially those with a negative charge. The cells glided on uniform SOs in manners apparently similar to those of the gliding on mixed SOs. The gliding speed was related inversely to the mycoplasma's affinity for SO, suggesting that the detaching step may be one of the speed determinants. The cells glided faster and with smaller fluctuations on the uniform SOs than on the mixtures, suggesting that the drag caused by the variation in SOs influences gliding behaviors. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma is a group of bacteria generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide in the direction of the protrusion. These procedures are essential for parasitism. Usually, mycoplasmas glide on mixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs) derived from glycoprotein and glycolipid. Since gliding motility on uniform oligosaccharides has never been observed, this study gives critical information about recognition and interaction between receptors and SOs. PMID:26148712

  20. Tissue sequestration of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis'.

    PubMed

    Novacco, Marilisa; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Grest, Paula; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2013-12-27

    'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' ('Candidatus M. turicensis') is a hemoplasma species that infects felids. It differs from other feline hemoplasma species due to its particular infection kinetics and phylogenetic similarity to rodent hemoplasma species. The lower and shorter bacteremia produced by 'Candidatus M. turicensis' suggests a possible tissue sequestration of the organism. The aim of this study was to explore this possibility. Five specified-pathogen free cats were subcutaneously inoculated with 'Candidatus M. turicensis' and sacrificed 86 days after inoculation. Thirty-one selected organs were collected upon necropsy, and samples were analyzed by real-time Taqman(®) PCR. The humoral immune response was monitored by DnaK ELISA. All five cats had detectable 'Candidatus M. turicensis' loads in the majority (52-100%) of the tested tissues. High 'Candidatus M. turicensis' tissue loads (average 3.46×10(4) copies/10 mg) were detected in the samples. The presence of the organisms in the tissues could not be explained by the blood burdens because the blood of four out of five cats tested PCR-negative at the time of necropsy. This is the first study to describe the distribution of 'Candidatus M. turicensis' in various organs; it also demonstrates that, in contrast to other feline hemoplasma species, significant sequestration of 'Candidatus M. turicensis' occurs in many tissues. These results represent an important step toward the understanding of the pathogenesis of 'Candidatus M. turicensis'.

  1. Mycoplasma genitalium: An Emerging Sexually Transmitted Infection.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Jessian L; Goje, Oluwatosin Jaiyeoba

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium has been recognized as a cause of male urethritis, and there is now evidence suggesting that it causes cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. M. genitalium is a slow growing organism, and, with the advent of nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT), more studies are being performed, and knowledge about the pathogenicity of this organism elucidated. With NAAT detection, treatment modalities have been studied, and the next challenge is to determine the most effective antimicrobial therapy. Doxycycline, the first-line antibiotic for urethritis, is largely ineffective in the treatment of M. genitalium and furthermore, resistance to macrolide has also emerged. The most effective drug is Moxifloxacin although there are emerging reports of resistance to it in various parts of the world. This paper not only highlights the current research and knowledge, but also reviews the diversity of health implications on the health of men and women infected with M. genitalium. Alternate antibiotics and the impact of M. genitalium on infertility are areas that require more studies as we continue to research into this microorganism.

  2. Mycoplasma genitalium, an emerging sexually transmitted pathogen.

    PubMed

    Cazanave, C; Manhart, L E; Bébéar, C

    2012-09-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted organism associated with non-gonococcal urethritis in men and several inflammatory reproductive tract syndromes in women such as cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and infertility. There was evidence for an association of M. genitalium with endometritis and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but additional studies are necessary to confirm this. The evidence as to whether M. genitalium can cause adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm labor is conflicting. But the authors of some studies on M. genitalium as a cause of infertility have reported this association. This species is very difficult to culture; thus, nucleic acid amplification testing is the only method available for M. genitalium detection. The lack of a cell wall makes M. genitalium intrinsically resistant to antibiotics acting at this level, such as beta-lactams. The treatment of M. genitalium infections is not standardized. Macrolides are recommended, especially single-dose azithromycin; tetracyclines are responsible for a great number of therapeutic failures even no resistance mechanism has yet been demonstrated. Acquired resistance to macrolides and fluoroquinolones leading to therapeutic failure has also been reported. All this raises the issue of the most appropriate therapeutic management and requires drafting diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of M. genitalium infections.

  3. Selective medium for culture of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Cook, Beth S; Beddow, Jessica G; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Maglennon, Gareth A; Rycroft, Andrew N

    2016-11-15

    The fastidious porcine respiratory pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has proven difficult to culture since it was first isolated in 1965. A reliable solid medium has been particularly challenging. Moreover, clinical and pathological samples often contain the fast-growing M. hyorhinis which contaminates and overgrows M. hyopneumoniae in primary culture. The aim of this study was to optimise the culture medium for recovery of M. hyopneumoniae and to devise a medium for selection of M. hyopneumoniae from clinical samples also containing M. hyorhinis. The solid medium devised by Niels Friis was improved by use of Purified agar and incorporation of DEAE-dextran. Addition of glucose or neutralization of acidity in liquid medium with NaOH did not improve the final yield of viable organisms or alter the timing of peak viability. Analysis of the relative susceptibility of M. hyopneumoniae and M. hyorhinis strains to four antimicrobials showed that M. hyopneumoniae is less susceptible than M. hyorhinis to kanamycin. This was consistent in all UK and Danish strains tested. A concentration of 2μg/ml of kanamycin selectively inhibited the growth of all M. hyorhinis tested, while M. hyopneumoniae was able to grow. This forms the basis of an effective selective culture medium for M. hyopneumoniae.

  4. Proposal for 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris subsp. musculi' in mice, and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris subsp. ratti' in rats.

    PubMed

    Harasawa, Ryô; Fujita, Hiromi; Kadosaka, Teruki; Ando, Shuji; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2015-02-01

    Mycoplasma haemomuris is causative of infectious anaemia or splenomegaly in rodents. We examined the nucleotide sequences of the non-ribosomal genes, rnpB and dnaK, in strains of the species M. haemomuris detected in small field mice and black rats. rnpB nucleotide sequences in strains of the species M. haemomuris isolated from small field mice and black rats had only 89 % sequence similarity, suggesting their separation into two distinct subgroups. dnaK had a nucleotide sequence similarity of 84 % between the subgroups. These results support the classification of M. haemomuris into two genetically distinct subgroups. Here we propose the establishment of these subgroups as 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris subsp. musculi', detected in small field mice (Apodemus argenteus), and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomuris subsp. ratti', detected in black rats (Rattus rattus).

  5. Nanotransformation of the haemotrophic Mycoplasma suis during in vitro cultivation attempts using modified cell free Mycoplasma media.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Sabrina A; Hoelzle, Katharina; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hamburger, Anja; Wittenbrink, Max M; Kramer, Manuela M; Sokoli, Albina; Felder, Kathrin M; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2012-11-09

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to haemotrophic mycoplasmas (HMs) which cause infectious anaemia in a large variety of mammals. To date, no in vitro cultivation system for M. suis or other HMs has been established. We hypothesised that M. suis could grow in classical Mycoplasma media supplemented with nutrients (e.g. glucose, iron-binding proteins) which are naturally available from its host environment, the porcine blood. Blood from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs was used to inoculate either standard SP-4 Mycoplasma medium supplemented with iron-binding proteins (transferrin, haemin, and haemoglobin) or glucose-enriched Hayflick Mycoplasma medium. A quantitative M. suis-specific real-time PCR assay was applied to determine and quantify M. suis loads weekly during 12 week-incubation. The first 2 weeks after inoculation M. suis loads decreased remarkably and then persisted at a stationary level over the observation time of 12 weeks in iron-binding protein- or glucose supplemented media variants. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of liquid M. suis sub-cultures on Hayflick agar showed small, densely-packed microcolonies of irregular M. suis cells of reduced size (0.2-0.6μm) indicating nanotransformation. The partial 16S rDNA sequence of these cultured M. suis nanocells was 99.9% identical to M. suis. M. suis cells derived from liquid cultures interact in vitro with porcine erythrocytes by fibril-like structures. We conclude, that the modified Mycoplasma media used for M. suis cultivation are obviously unfavourable for growth but lead to culture persistence. M. suis adapt to inappropriate culture conditions by alteration into nanoforms.

  6. A novel rapid DNA microarray assay enables identification of 37 Mycoplasma species and highlights multiple Mycoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Christiane; Schulsse, Samuel; Hotzel, Helmut; Ayling, Roger D; Nicholas, Robin A J; Schubert, Evelyn; Heller, Martin; Ehricht, Ralf; Sachse, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Mycoplasmas comprise a conglomerate of pathogens and commensals occurring in humans and animals. The genus Mycoplasma alone contains more than 120 species at present, and new members are continuously being discovered. Therefore, it seems promising to use a single highly parallel detection assay rather than develop separate tests for each individual species. In this study, we have designed a DNA microarray carrying 70 oligonucleotide probes derived from the 23S rRNA gene and 86 probes from the tuf gene target regions. Following a PCR amplification and biotinylation step, hybridization on the array was shown to specifically identify 31 Mycoplasma spp., as well as 3 Acholeplasma spp. and 3 Ureaplasma spp. Members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster can be recognized at subgroup level. This procedure enables parallel detection of Mollicutes spp. occurring in humans, animals or cell culture, from mono- and multiple infections, in a single run. The main advantages of the microarray assay include ease of operation, rapidity, high information content, and affordability. The new test's analytical sensitivity is equivalent to that of real-time PCR and allows examination of field samples without the need for culture. When 60 field samples from ruminants and birds previously analyzed by denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were tested by the microarray assay both tests identified the same agent in 98.3% of the cases. Notably, microarray testing revealed an unexpectedly high proportion (35%) of multiple mycoplasma infections, i.e., substantially more than DGGE (15%). Two of the samples were found to contain four different Mycoplasma spp. This phenomenon deserves more attention, particularly its implications for epidemiology and treatment.

  7. Anatomic location of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri and Mycoplasma agalactiae in naturally infected goat male auricular carriers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martín, Angel; De la Fe, Christian; Amores, Joaquín; Sánchez, Antonio; Contreras, Antonio; Paterna, Ana; Buendía, Antonio J; Corrales, Juan C

    2012-06-15

    This study sought to determine whether male goat auricular carriers of mycoplasmas known to cause contagious agalactia could harbour these microorganisms at anatomical sites other than the ears. A microbiological study was conducted in 6 naturally infected bucks that had been diagnosed as chronic auricular asymptomatic carriers of Mycoplasma (M.) mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) more than one year previously. To detect mycoplasmas, cultures and PCR were performed on 46 samples taken from each goat from the cardio-respiratory, digestive, nervous, lymph and genitourinary systems and several joints. Of a total of 274 samples analyzed, 28 were positive for mycoplasmas (10.1%): Mmc was detected in 17 (6.1%), Mycoplasma (M.) agalactiae in 12 (4.3%) and both microorganisms were identified in one of the samples. In all 6 goats, mixed infection was observed despite none being auricular carriers of M. agalactiae. Mycoplasma spp. were identified at 15 different sites; the most frequent sites being the joints (31.2%, 5 positive samples), lymph nodes (25%, 4 positive samples) and respiratory tract (25%, 4 positive samples). Positive results were also obtained in three brain tissue (18.7%), two cardiac tissue (12.5%) and one ileum, urethra, testicle and bulbourethral gland (6.25%) samples. The histopathological findings may suggest the presence of mild chronic conditions in some of the organs where the bacteria were found. Our findings reveal for the first time the capacity of Mmc and M. agalactiae to colonize several other organ systems in chronically naturally infected auricular carriers, possibly representing an added risk factor for the spread of these microorganisms. In the case of M. agalactiae, colonization seemed to be independent of the animal's auricular carrier state.

  8. Identification of Mycoplasma bovigenitalium and Mycoplasma canadense from outbreaks of granulopapular vulvovaginitis in dairy cattle in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lysnyansky, I; Brenner, J; Alpert, N; Benjamin, A; Bernstein, M; Elad, D; Blum, S; Friedgut, O; Rotenberg, D

    2009-09-12

    A syndrome in which white foci and granulopustular lesions appeared on the vaginal mucous membranes of Holstein cows in several dairy herds in Israel is described. During clinical and diagnostic investigations, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium was isolated from 11 of 20 clinical cases. Vaginal swabs taken from the same cows yielded three isolates of Mycoplasma canadense, which were all associated with the M bovigenitalium infection. Two isolates of small, round, non-enveloped viral particles were approximately 25 nm in diameter and characteristic of enteroviruses on negative-staining electron microscopy.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3375 - Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycoplasma spp. serological reagents. 866.3375 Section 866.3375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3375...

  13. Rhabdomyolysis associated with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Aizawa, Yuta; Matsuo, Mai; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Tsukano, Shinya; Taguchi, Testuo

    2012-05-01

    We describe a case of rhabdomyolysis in a patient infected with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae The patient's acute-phase serum levels of interleukin-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α were high, which suggests a pathogenic role for M. pneumoniae. In an era of increasing antimicrobial drug resistance, a system for rapidly identifying resistant M. pneumoniae would be beneficial.

  14. Macrolide susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Morozumi, T; Munthali, G; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Yamamoto, K

    1996-01-01

    Twenty strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis were investigated for their in vitro susceptibilities to 15 antimicrobial agents by broth and agar dilution methods. Two of the 20 field strains showed low susceptibility to 14- and 16-membered macrolide antimicrobial agents tested. The two field strains were considered inducibly resistant to macrolides. PMID:8849222

  15. Mycoplasma bovis: an emerging pathogen of ranched bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is an emerging, primary pathogen of ranched bison (Bison bison) in North America. It causes severe disease among animals in feedlots as well as breeding-age cows and bulls on pasture. Mortality in adult bison is as high as 25 percent, resulting in significant economic l...

  16. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma faucium DNA in the Human Oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Edouard, Sophie; Courtois, Gaëlle Denis; Gautret, Philippe; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Minodier, Philippe; Noël, Guilhem; Roch, Antoine; Brouqui, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Drancourt, Michel; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma faucium has recently been associated with brain abscesses and seems to originate from the mouth. We evaluated its prevalence by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in the oropharynxes of 644 subjects and found that 25% harbored M. faucium, probably constituting the gateway for entrance of the bacteria into cerebral abscesses.

  17. Methyl-prednisolone in neurologic complications of Mycoplasma pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gücüyener, K; Simşek, F; Yilmaz, O; Serdaroğlu, A

    2000-06-01

    In patients with Mycoplasma pneumonia extrapulmonary manifestations such as encephalitis, meningitis, cerebellar and brain stem involvement, cranial nerve lesions, peripheral neuropathy, polymyositis have been observed. We report a 16-year-old girl with M. pneumonia infection, acute behavioral changes and coma. Treatment with high dose methyl-prednisolone and clarithromycin led to rapid clinical improvement.

  18. Cranial neuropathy, myeloradiculopathy, and myositis: complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, T L; Kenny, G E

    1979-08-01

    Polymyositis, transverse myelitis, ascending polyneuritis, bilateral optic neuritis, and hearing loss developed in a patient with high complement-fixing antibody titers to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Each of her three children had primary atypical pneumonia with isolation of the organism. The neurologic disturbance is thought to represent a postinfectious complication of M pneumoniae infection.

  19. Interaction of Mycoplasma dispar with bovine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, R A; Wannemuehler, M J; Rosenbusch, R F

    1992-01-01

    The capacity to avoid phagocytosis and the activation of bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) by encapsulated Mycoplasma dispar or purified M. dispar capsule was investigated. Encapsulated and unencapsulated M. dispar were cocultured with BAM in the presence or absence of antisera prepared against unencapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule antiserum. Unopsonized mycoplasmas resisted phagocytosis, while only anti-capsule antibodies enhanced the phagocytosis of encapsulated mycoplasmas. BAM were cultured in the presence of purified M. dispar capsule or either live or heat-killed encapsulated or unencapsulated M. dispar. These BAM were then activated with Escherichia coli endotoxin or left without further activation. The supernatants of these cultures were assayed for tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and glucose consumption as indicators of macrophage activation. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 were produced by BAM stimulated with unencapsulated M. dispar but not when encapsulated M. dispar or its purified capsule was used. Similarly, glucose consumption was increased in the presence of unencapsulated M. dispar, but not when BAM were cocultured with encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule. When BAM were treated with purified capsule or encapsulated mycoplasmas, they could not be subsequently activated by endotoxin. These results indicate that encapsulated M. dispar or purified capsule exerts an inhibitory effect on the activity of BAM and prevents the activation of these cells. PMID:1612758

  20. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma faucium DNA in the Human Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Edouard, Sophie; Courtois, Gaëlle Denis; Gautret, Philippe; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Minodier, Philippe; Noël, Guilhem; Roch, Antoine; Brouqui, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Drancourt, Michel; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma faucium has recently been associated with brain abscesses and seems to originate from the mouth. We evaluated its prevalence by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in the oropharynxes of 644 subjects and found that 25% harbored M. faucium, probably constituting the gateway for entrance of the bacteria into cerebral abscesses. PMID:26511735

  1. Atypical pneumonia associated with a Mycoplasma isolate in a kitten.

    PubMed

    Bongrand, Yannick; Blais, Marie-Claude; Alexander, Kate

    2012-10-01

    An atypical case of Mycoplasma pneumonia with an unusual radiographic and computed tomographic pattern was diagnosed in a Siamese kitten. The cat showed no response to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy including enrofloxacin. The administration of doxycycline led to a dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement.

  2. Control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Maes, D; Segales, J; Meyns, T; Sibila, M; Pieters, M; Haesebrouck, F

    2008-01-25

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, the primary pathogen of enzootic pneumonia, occurs worldwide and causes major economic losses to the pig industry. The organism adheres to and damages the ciliated epithelium of the respiratory tract. Affected pigs show chronic coughing, are more susceptible to other respiratory infections and have a reduced performance. Control of the disease can be accomplished in a number of ways. First, management practices and housing conditions in the herd should be optimized. These include all-in/all-out production, limiting factors that may destabilize herd immunity, maintaining optimal stocking densities, prevention of other respiratory diseases, and optimal housing and climatic conditions. Strategic medication with antimicrobials active against M. hyopneumoniae and, preferably, also against major secondary bacteria may be useful during periods when the pigs are at risk for respiratory disease. Finally, commercial bacterins are widely used to control M. hyopneumoniae infections. The main effects of vaccination include less clinical symptoms, lung lesions and medication use, and improved performance. However, bacterins provide only partial protection and do not prevent colonization of the organism. Different vaccination strategies (timing of vaccination, vaccination of sows, vaccination combined with antimicrobial medication) can be used, depending on the type of herd, the production system and management practices, the infection pattern and the preferences of the pig producer. Research on new vaccines is actively occurring, including aerosol and feed-based vaccines as well as subunit and DNA vaccines. Eradication of the infection at herd level based on age-segregation and medication is possible, but there is a permanent risk for re-infections.

  3. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Allam, N. M.; Lemcke, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Ten mycoplasmas were isolated from 130 nasopharyngeal swabs from thoroughbred horses with acute respiratory disease and three from 198 apparently normal horses. Two mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 tracheal swabs taken at necropsy. These mycoplasmas, together with six isolated from the equine respiratory tract by other workers, were subjected to biochemical and serological tests. Other properties examined in certain representative strains were appearance under the electron microscope, ability to adsorb or agglutinate the erythrocytes of various animal species and the electrophoretic pattern of the cell proteins. On the basis of these test, mycoplasmas from the equine respiratory tract were divided into seven species. Three species belonged to the genus Acholeplasma, members of which do not require sterol for growth, and were identified as A. laidlawii, A. oculi (formerly A. oculusi) originally isolated from the eyes of goats, and a recently named species A. equifoetale, previously isolated from aborted equine fetuses. Of the four sterol-dependent Mycoplasma species, one was indentified as M. pulmonis, a common rodent pathogen. Another cross-reacted serologically with M. felis and should probably be classified as that species. The other two species probably represent new species peculiar to the horse. One of these, represented by the strains N3 and N11, ferments glucose and is serologically distinct from 19 recognized species of glucose-utilizing mycoplasmas and from two species which do not metabolize either glucose or arginine. The other species, represented by four strains, hydrolyses arginine and, because it is serologically distinct from all the named arginine-hydrolysing Mycoplasma species, the name M. equirhinis sp.nov. is proposed for it. Of the seven species, only M. pulmonis and the glucose-utilizing species represented by N3 and N11 were found exclusively in horses with acute respiratory disease. A. oculi was isolated from an apparently normal horse. The

  4. Discrimination between Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum using PCR-RFLP and PCR.

    PubMed

    Cillara, Grazia; Manca, Maria Giovanna; Longheu, Carla; Tola, Sebastiana

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (lpdA) gene was used to distinguish Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) from Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum (Mcc), two of four Mycoplasma species that cause contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. After alignment of nucleotide sequences of both species, specific primer sets were designed from unchanging and variable gene segments. The first primer set LPD-C1-F/LPD-C1-R was used to amplify a 911 bp fragment that was subsequently co-digested with FastDigest PstI, SspI, EcoRI and ClaI enzymes. The PCR-RFLP profiles differentiated the two mycoplasma species. The second primer set was used to distinguish Mmc from Mcc by single tube PCR. Both methods were further applied to identify 54 isolates collected from dairy herds from different provinces in Sardinia. The results of this study showed that PCR-RFLP and PCR could be used in routine diagnosis for rapid and specific simultaneous discrimination of Mmc and Mcc.

  5. What are mycoplasmas: the relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1984-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  6. What are mycoplasmas - The relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrand, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1985-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  7. Infection with hemotropic Mycoplasma species in patients with or without extensive arthropod or animal contact.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Compton, Sarah M; Trull, Chelsea L; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Mozayeni, B Robert; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2013-10-01

    PCR amplification targeting the 16S rRNA gene was used to test individuals with and without extensive arthropod and animal contact for the possibility of hemotropic mycoplasma infection. The prevalence of hemotropic mycoplasma infection (4.7%) was significantly greater in previously reported cohorts of veterinarians, veterinary technicians, spouses of veterinary professionals, and others with extensive arthropod exposure and/or frequent animal contact than in a previously reported cohort of patients examined by a rheumatologist because of chronic joint pain or evidence of small-vessel disease (0.7%). Based upon DNA sequence analysis, a Mycoplasma ovis-like species was the most prevalent organism detected; however, infection with "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" and a potentially novel, but incompletely characterized, hemotropic Mycoplasma species was also documented. Historical exposure to animals and arthropod vectors that can harbor hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. should be considered during epidemiological investigations and in the evaluation of individual patients.

  8. Novel hemotropic Mycoplasma species in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Chitwood, M Colter; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne; DePerno, Christopher S

    2013-12-01

    Globally, hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. are emerging or re-emerging zoonotic pathogens that affect livestock, wildlife, companion animals, and humans, potentially causing serious and economically important disease problems. Little is known about hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. prevalence, host-specificity, or route of transmission in most species, including wildlife. DNA amplification by PCR targeting the 16SrRNA and the RNaseP genes was used to establish the presence and prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in a white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) population in eastern North Carolina. Sixty-five deer (89%) tested positive for hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. where sequence analysis of the 16SsRNA and the RNaseP genes indicated the presence of at least three distinct species. This study represents the first detection of three distinct hemotropic Mycoplasma species in white-tailed deer and the first report of two novel hemotropic Mycoplasma species.

  9. Identification and purification of arginine deiminase that originated from Mycoplasma arginini.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, K; Fukuda, S; Wada, Y; Taniai, M; Suzuki, M; Kimura, T; Ohno, T; Yamamoto, K; Azuma, I

    1990-01-01

    A lymphocyte blastogenesis inhibitory factor, (LBIF), was purified from the culture supernatant of human histiocytic lymphoma U937 by fast protein liquid chromatography. In this study, we demonstrated, first, that LBIF originated from a mycoplasma, Mycoplasma arginini, infecting U937 cells, and second, that LBIF bore the arginine deiminase activity. The implication of in vivo immunosuppression induced by arginine-utilizing mycoplasma species is discussed. Images PMID:2370103

  10. Mycoplasma detection and isolation from one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Mederos-Iriarte, Lidia E; Poveda, José B; Poveda, Carlos G; Vega-Orellana, Orestes M; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Corbera, Juan A; Ramírez, Ana S

    2014-10-01

    In scientific literature, a small amount of information is found concerning mycoplasmosis in camel species. Mycoplasma (M.) arginini, Acholeplasma (A.) laidlawii, and Acholeplasma oculi have been reported to be isolated from these host species. Serologically positive results have been reported for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC type, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, and M. mycoides subsp. capri. The aims of this study were to detect, isolate, and identify mycoplasmas from camels (Camelus dromedarius). Initially, saliva and ear smears plus conjunctival and vaginal secretions were taken from five female animals, but only conjunctival secretions in three male animals, all belonging to the same farm. An unknown mycoplasma was isolated from one of the vagina samples. Additionally, another unknown and uncultured mycoplasma was detected with molecular biology in the same sample. In the second stage, 23 vaginal secretions were taken from the same farm plus another secretion from a different one. Ten isolates of the same unknown and previously isolated mycoplasma were detected, nine of them recovered from the vagina of female camels. Some mycoplasmas have been related to reproductive disorders; however, there is no evidence that the isolated mycoplasmas are related to such disorders.

  11. Comparison of the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in dogs with and without respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Bianka S; Raufeisen, Katharina; Weber, Karin; Laberke, Siija; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in dogs with and without signs of respiratory disease. Bronchoalveolarlavage fluid (BALF) and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 29 dogs with respiratory diseases (RD) and 16 dogs without signs of RD that were euthanised because of other diseases. Samples were tested for Mycoplasma species by PCR and culture, and sequencing was performed in Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples. Pharyngeal swabs were positive for Mycoplasma species by PCR in 91.7% of dogs with RD and 86.7% of dogs without signs of RD (p = 1.000); BALF samples were PCR-positive in 37.9% of dogs with RD and 18.8% of dogs without signs of RD (p = 0.194) Mycoplasmo culture of BALF was positive in 28.6% of dogs with RD and in 18.8% without signs of RD (p = 0.730). When culture and PCR were compared, there was no significant difference in the detection rate of Mycoplasma species (p = 0.658) Sequencing detected different Mycoplasma species. Out of these, however, Mycoplasma cynos was isolated from four dogs with RD. There is no significant difference in the prevalence of Mycoplasma species between dogs with RD and dogs without evidence of RD; however, Mycoplasma cynos seems to be associated with respiratory disease.

  12. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of AZD0914 against Human Mycoplasmas and Ureaplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, Donna M.; Duffy, Lynn B.; Huband, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, susceptibilities were determined for AZD0914, a spiropyrimidinetrione DNA gyrase inhibitor, azithromycin, doxycycline, and levofloxacin against Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma species. The activity of AZD0914 was comparable to that of levofloxacin and doxycycline against Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The AZD0914 MIC90 against Mycoplasma hominis was 8-fold greater than that for levofloxacin. The AZD0914 MIC90 against Ureaplasma species was 4-fold less than that for azithromycin and 8-fold less than that for levofloxacin and doxycycline. PMID:25824220

  13. Detection and antibiotic treatment of Mycoplasma arginini contamination in a mouse epithelial cell line restore normal cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Boslett, Brianna; Nag, Subhra; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination of cultured cell lines is difficult to detect by routine observation. Infected cells can display normal morphology and the slow growth rate of mycoplasma can delay detection for extended periods of time, compromising experimental results. Positive identification of mycoplasma typically requires cells to be either fixed and stained for DNA or processed with PCR. We present a method to detect mycoplasma using live-cell optical microscopy typically used for routine observation of cell cultures. Images of untreated mycoplasma-infected epithelial cells alongside images of infected cells treated with Plasmocin, a commercially available antibiotic targeted to mycoplasma, are shown. We found that optical imaging is an effective screening tool for detection of mycoplasma contamination. Importantly, we found that cells regained normal function after the contamination was cleared. In conclusion, we present a technique to diagnose probable mycoplasma infections in live cultures without fixation, resulting in faster response times and decreased loss of cell material.

  14. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  15. Collaborative study report: evaluation of the ATCC experimental mycoplasma reference strains panel prepared for comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods.

    PubMed

    Dabrazhynetskaya, Alena; Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Lin, Tsai-Lien; Beck, Brian; Gupta, Rajesh K; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    The main goal of this collaborative study was to evaluate the experimental panel of cryopreserved mycoplasma reference strains recently prepared by the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC(®)) in order to assess the viability and dispersion of cells in the mycoplasma stocks by measuring the ratio between the number of genomic copies (GC) and the number of colony forming units (CFU) in the reference preparations. The employment of microbial reference cultures with low GC/CFU ratios is critical for unbiased and reliable comparison of mycoplasma testing methods based on different methodological approaches, i.e., Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) and compendial culture-based techniques. The experimental panel included ten different mycoplasma species known to represent potential human and animal pathogens as well as common contaminants of mammalian and avian cell substrates used in research, development, and manufacture of biological products. Fifteen laboratories with expertise in field of mycoplasma titration and quantification of mycoplasmal genomic DNA participated in the study conducted from February to October of 2012. The results of this study demonstrated the feasibility of preparing highly viable and dispersed (possessing low GC/CFU ratios) frozen stocks of mycoplasma reference materials, required for reliable comparison of NAT-based and conventional mycoplasma detection methods.

  16. Studies into the prevalence of Mycoplasma species in small ruminants in Benue State, North-central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akwuobu, Chinedu A; Ayling, Roger D; Chah, Kennedy Foinkfu; Oboegbulem, Stephen I

    2014-08-01

    The indicative prevalence of respiratory Mycoplasma species in small ruminants (SR) was determined in North-central Nigeria. Nasal swabs from 172 sheep and 336 goats from the Northeast, Northwest and South Senatorial Districts of Benue State were examined. Initial Mycoplasma isolation used Mycoplasma culture techniques followed by digitonin sensitivity testing. Species identification was done using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Overall, Mycoplasma organisms were isolated from 131 (25.8 %) of the 508 SR examined. Prevalence rates of 18.1 and 29.8 % were recorded for sheep and goats, respectively. A total of 135 isolates of Mycoplasma belonging to three different species were identified: Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (127), Mycoplasma arginini (7) and Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri (1). More than one Mycoplasma species were detected in four (3.1 %) of the 131 confirmed Mycoplasma positive cultures. Mycoplasma was isolated from 16.2 and 29.1 % of animals with and without respiratory signs, respectively. The high isolation rate of mycoplasmas in apparently healthy and clinically sick sheep and goats in this study indicates a carrier status in these SR which may constitute a serious problem in disease control.

  17. Detection of feline Mycoplasma species in cats with feline asthma and chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Bianka S; Richter, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S; Wess, Gerhard; Zenker, Isabella; Hartmann, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the aetiology of inflammatory lower airway disease in cats. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Mycoplasma species in cats with feline asthma (FA) and chronic bronchitis (CB). The study population consisted of 17 cats with FA/CB, and 14 sick cats without clinical and historical signs of respiratory disease, which were euthanased for various other reasons. Nasal swabs, nasal lavage and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were taken from patients from both groups. Mycoplasma species culture with modified Hayflick agar and Mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed on all samples followed by sequencing of all Mycoplasma species-positive samples for differentiation of subspecies. PCR testing detected significantly more Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples than Mycoplasma culture (P = 0.021). When cats with oropharyngeal contamination were excluded from comparison, the numbers of Mycoplasma species-positive BALF samples in the group with FA/CB (6/17) and the control group (4/9) were not significantly different (P = 0.6924). While all nasal samples of the cats with FA/CB were negative for Mycoplasma organisms, five samples in the control group (P = 0.041) were positive on PCR. Sequencing revealed Mycoplasma felis in all PCR-positive samples. Mycoplasma species can be detected in the lower airways of cats with FA/CB, as well as in the BALF of sick cats without respiratory signs. Further studies are warranted to investigate the possibility that Mycoplasma species represent commensals of the lower respiratory tract of cats.

  18. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet, C; Garret, M; de Barbeyrac, B; Bebear, C; Bonnet, J

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A specific DNA sequence for M. pneumoniae was selected from a genomic library, and two oligonucleotides were chosen in this sequence to give an amplified fragment of 144 base pairs. We show that DNA from different M. pneumoniae strains can be detected by PCR, with DNA from other Mycoplasma species giving negative results. Analysis of biological samples (throat swabs) obtained from hamsters that were experimentally infected with M. pneumoniae showed that PCR was more sensitive and reliable than conventional culture techniques for the detection of M. pneumoniae. Initial experiments on artificially seeded human bronchoalveolar lavages showed that PCR can be used to detect 10(2) to 10(3) organisms. Images PMID:2509513

  19. Analysis of energy sources for Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Jurkovic, Dominika A; Hughes, Michael R; Balish, Mitchell F

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans, a potential human pathogen found mainly in HIV-infected individuals, uses a tip structure for both adherence and gliding motility. To improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of M. penetrans gliding motility, we used chemical inhibitors of energy sources associated with motility of other organisms to determine which of these is used by M. penetrans and also tested whether gliding speed responded to temperature and pH. Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility was not eliminated in the presence of a proton motive force inhibitor, a sodium motive force inhibitor, or an agent that depletes cellular ATP. At near-neutral pH, gliding speed increased as temperature increased. The absence of a clear chemical energy source for gliding motility and a positive correlation between speed and temperature suggest that energy derived from heat provides the major source of power for the gliding motor of M. penetrans.

  20. Mycoplasma testudineum in free-ranging desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2012-01-01

    We performed clinico-pathological evaluations of 11 wild Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) from a translocation project in the central Mojave Desert, California, USA. Group 1 consisted of nine tortoises that were selected primarily due to serologic status, indicating exposure to Mycoplasma testudineum (seven) or both M. agassizii and M. testudineum (two), and secondarily due to clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). Group 2 consisted of two tortoises that were antibody-negative for Mycoplasma and had no clinical signs of URTD, but did have other signs of illness. Of the Group 1 tortoises, M. testudineum, but not M. agassizii, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and DNA fingerprinted from two tortoises. Using light microscopy, mild to severe pathologic changes were observed in one or more histologic sections of either one or both nasal cavities of each tortoise in Group 1. Our findings support a causal relationship between M. testudineum and URTD in desert tortoises.

  1. Phospholipids and Glycolipids of Sterol-requiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Koostra, Walter L.

    1967-01-01

    The phospholipids of Mycoplasma hominis type 2 strain 07 are composed almost entirely of phosphatidyl glycerol. Traces of other glycerophospholipids may exist. No glycolipids are found. The phospholipids of Mycoplasma sp. avian strain J are composed of diphosphatidyl glycerol, which predominates in older cultures, a monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate, which may serve as a precursor of diphosphatidyl glycerol, and phosphatidyl glycerophosphate. This organism also contains cholesteryl glucoside and an unidentified glycolipid which appears to be similar to a monoglucosyl diglyceride. No turnover or radioisotope labeling of the phospholipids occurs during metabolism. This lack of turnover during growth is indicative of a structural role for these glycerophospholipids. A concomitant decrease of monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate and increase of diphosphatidyl glycerol occurs during growth. PMID:6025304

  2. Mycoplasma synoviae infection on Newcastle disease vaccination of chickens

    PubMed Central

    de Cássia Figueira Silva, Rita; do Nascimento, Elmiro Rosendo; de Almeida Pereira, Virgínia Léo; Barreto, Maria Lúcia; do Nascimento, Maria da Graça Fichel

    2008-01-01

    Newcastle disease is characterized by respiratory manifestations in association with nervous and/or digestive symptoms. Its prevention is done by vaccination with live attenuated (lentogenic strains) and/or killed vaccines. The lentogenic strains can lead to strong post-vaccination reaction, principally due to the presence of other pathogenic agents. Among them, Mycoplasma synoviae is worldwide important, mainly in Brazil. The dissemination of this agent in poultry flocks has been achieved due to difficulties in diagnosis and disease reproduction, virulence variations among different M.synoviae strains, and attribution of typical M.synoviae disease manifestation to other disease agents. This experimental study in SPF chicks (Gallus gallus), previously infected by M.synoviae and thereafter vaccinated against Newcastle disease, was done with the objective of evaluating M.synoviae pathogenicity through assessment of post-vaccinal respiratory reactions and serologic responses to Newcastle disease virus vaccine in the absence of environmental factors. A total of 86 three days old chicks were used, being 57 infected by eye and nostril drop, with chicken activated M. synoviae strain WVU 1853. Seven days later, 21 mycoplasma infected birds plus 29 not mycoplasma infected ones were vaccinated against Newcastle disease. As results, the not infected and vaccinated birds yielded, significantly, higher and longer lasting serologic responses to Newcastle disease vaccine virus than those infected and vaccinated. Similarly, the infected and vaccinated birds yielded lower serologic reactions to M.synoviae than those only mycoplasma infected. No post-vaccinal respiratory reaction was observed in the vaccinated birds. PMID:24031234

  3. A change in the genetic code in Mycoplasma capricolum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum was previously found to use UGA instead of UGG as its codon for tryptophan and to contain 75 percent A + T in its DNA. The codon change could have been due to mutational pressure to replace C + G by A + T, resulting in the replacement of UGA stop codons by UAA, change of the anticodon in tryptophan tRNA from CCA to UCA, and replacement of UGG tryptophan codons by UGA. None of these changes should have been deleterious.

  4. Tissue Protecting Antidotes From Anti-Apoptotic Factors of Mycoplasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-12

    release of proinflammatory from human peripheral blood monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Comparison of the effects of intact lipoproteins with those...comparative genomics of B. cereus and B. anthracis, as well as functional reconstruction of metabolism of numerous sequenced microorganisms. Pavel Komarov...Hoyer, J., Kirchner, H. (1992) Induction of cytokines in human peripheral blood and spleen cells by the Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen

  5. A serological investigation of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection on the Witwatersrand.

    PubMed

    Joosting, A C; Harwin, R M; Coppin, A; Battaglia, P; van der Hoef, P

    1976-12-18

    Sera from patients with respiratory disease were examined for antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae by complement fixation test. During the study period of about 6 years, a 3-year cycle of infection was observed, which coincided with some epidemics in the UK and USA, suggesting the possibility of an approximately simultaneous world-wide spread. The epidemics lasted about 18 months each, during which the incidence of infection was over 10 times that of the interepidemic periods.

  6. Characterization of Free Exopolysaccharides Secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Tardy, Florence; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS), also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical β(1−>6)-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan) and associated with an

  7. Rhamnose Links Moonlighting Proteins to Membrane Phospholipid in Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Liu, Runhua; Dybvig, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins that have a primary function as a cytoplasmic protein are known to have the ability to moonlight on the surface of nearly all organisms. An example is the glycolytic enzyme enolase, which can be found on the surface of many types of cells from bacteria to human. Surface enolase is not enzymatic because it is monomeric and oligomerization is required for glycolytic activity. It can bind various molecules and activate plasminogen. Enolase lacks a signal peptide and the mechanism by which it attaches to the surface is unknown. We found that treatment of whole cells of the murine pathogen Mycoplasma pulmonis with phospholipase D released enolase and other common moonlighting proteins. Glycostaining suggested that the released proteins were glycosylated. Cytoplasmic and membrane-bound enolase was isolated by immunoprecipitation. No post-translational modification was detected on cytoplasmic enolase, but membrane enolase was associated with lipid, phosphate and rhamnose. Treatment with phospholipase released the lipid and phosphate from enolase but not the rhamnose. The site of rhamnosylation was identified as a glutamine residue near the C-terminus of the protein. Rhamnose has been found in all species of mycoplasma examined but its function was previously unknown. Mycoplasmas are small bacteria with have no peptidoglycan, and rhamnose in these organisms is also not associated with polysaccharide. We suggest that rhamnose has a central role in anchoring proteins to the membrane by linkage to phospholipid, which may be a general mechanism for the membrane association of moonlighting proteins in mycoplasmas and perhaps other bacteria. PMID:27603308

  8. Mycoplasma and associated bacteria isolated from ovine pink-eye.

    PubMed

    Langford, E V

    1971-01-01

    A mycoplasma was recovered from the untreated conjunctival membranes of nine sheep affected by Pink-eye. It was neither isolated from the conjunctiva of treated animals which were affected nor from the conjunctiva of normal animals either in contact or not in contact with affected animals. Bacteria found on normal conjunctival membranes were Neisseria ovis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermididis, Streptococcus and Bacillus spp. Bacteria found in clinical cases of Pink-eye were N. ovis, E. coli, a Streptococcus and Pseudomonas spp.

  9. An emerging mycoplasma associated with trichomoniasis, vaginal infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Fettweis, Jennifer M; Serrano, Myrna G; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J Paul; Glascock, Abigail L; Sheth, Nihar U; Strauss, Jerome F; Jefferson, Kimberly K; Buck, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as "Mnola." In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name "Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii" for this potential new pathogen.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Gene Content Evolution in Phytoplasmas and Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chan-Pin; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas are two groups of important pathogens in the bacterial class Mollicutes. Because of their economical and clinical importance, these obligate pathogens have attracted much research attention. However, difficulties involved in the empirical study of these bacteria, particularly the fact that phytoplasmas have not yet been successfully cultivated outside of their hosts despite decades of attempts, have greatly hampered research progress. With the rapid advancements in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis provides a new approach to facilitate our understanding of these bacteria. In this study, our main focus is to investigate the evolution of gene content in phytoplasmas, mycoplasmas, and their common ancestor. By using a phylogenetic framework for comparative analysis of 12 complete genome sequences, we characterized the putative gains and losses of genes in these obligate parasites. Our results demonstrated that the degradation of metabolic capacities in these bacteria has occurred predominantly in the common ancestor of Mollicutes, prior to the evolutionary split of phytoplasmas and mycoplasmas. Furthermore, we identified a list of genes that are acquired by the common ancestor of phytoplasmas and are conserved across all strains with complete genome sequences available. These genes include several putative effectors for the interactions with hosts and may be good candidates for future functional characterization. PMID:22479625

  11. An Emerging Mycoplasma Associated with Trichomoniasis, Vaginal Infection and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fettweis, Jennifer M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Huang, Bernice; Brooks, J. Paul; Glascock, Abigail L.; Sheth, Nihar U.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Jefferson, Kimberly K.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are colonized by thousands of bacterial species, but it is difficult to assess the metabolic and pathogenic potential of the majority of these because they have yet to be cultured. Here, we characterize an uncultivated vaginal mycoplasma tightly associated with trichomoniasis that was previously known by its 16S rRNA sequence as “Mnola.” In this study, the mycoplasma was found almost exclusively in women infected with the sexually transmitted pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, but rarely observed in women with no diagnosed disease. The genomes of four strains of this species were reconstructed using metagenome sequencing and assembly of DNA from four discrete mid-vaginal samples, one of which was obtained from a pregnant woman with trichomoniasis who delivered prematurely. These bacteria harbor several putative virulence factors and display unique metabolic strategies. Genes encoding proteins with high similarity to potential virulence factors include two collagenases, a hemolysin, an O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase and a feoB-type ferrous iron transport system. We propose the name “Candidatus Mycoplasma girerdii” for this potential new pathogen. PMID:25337710

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae during Heat Shock Using Microarrays†

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Melissa L.; Nettleton, Dan; Thacker, Eileen L.; Edwards, Robert; Minion, F. Chris

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens undergo stress during host colonization and disease processes. These stresses result in changes in gene expression to compensate for potentially lethal environments developed in the host during disease. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonizes the swine epithelium and causes a pneumonia that predisposes the host to enhanced disease from other pathogens. How M. hyopneumoniae responds to changing environments in the respiratory tract during disease progression is not known. In fact, little is known concerning the capabilities of mycoplasmas to respond to changing growth environments. With limited genes, mycoplasmas are thought to possess only a few mechanisms for gene regulation. A microarray consisting of 632 of the 698 open reading frames of M. hyopneumoniae was constructed and used to study gene expression differences during a temperature shift from 37°C to 42°C, a temperature swing that might be encountered during disease. To enhance sensitivity, a unique hexamer primer set was employed for generating cDNA from only mRNA species. Our analysis identified 91 genes that had significant transcriptional differences in response to heat shock conditions (P < 0.01) with an estimated false-discovery rate of 4 percent. Thirty-three genes had a change threshold of 1.5-fold or greater. Many of the heat shock proteins previously characterized in other bacteria were identified as significant in this study as well. A proportion of the identified genes (54 of 91) currently have no assigned function. PMID:16368969

  13. Experimental infection of BHK21 and Vero cell lines with different Mycoplasma spp

    PubMed Central

    Netto, Cristiane; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Sepulveda, Lya Madureira; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp, belongs to the class Mollicutes and is capable to produce alterations in cellular cultures causing damages to the biotechnological industry. Bioproducts generally require two essential inputs, bovine serum and cells. The study herein aims to evaluate the mycoplasma concentrations that affect the growing of BHK21 and Vero cells. The species used were: Mycoplasma orale, M. salivarium, M. arginini and M. hyorhinis, cultivated in a SP4 media. Two contamination tests were performed with BHK21 and Vero cells and one of them applied different concentrations of mycoplasma. In the first one, mycoplasma was applied at the day zero and, in the second one, the contamination was performed after the monolayer establishment. The both cellular cultures presented cytopathic effects with mycoplasma contamination, but the Vero cells suffered more damages than the BHK21 ones. It was also observed that the severity of the cytopathic effect depended on the mycoplasma specie, on the concentration and on the time of contact with the cellular culture, which evidences the importance of controlling the presence of mycoplasma in biotechnological industries. PMID:25763061

  14. Detection, characterization, and molecular typing of human Mycoplasma spp. from major hospitals in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Mirihan A; Yassin, Aymen S; Essam, Tamer M; Hamouda, Hayam M; Amin, Magdy A

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are fastidious slow growing organisms lacking a cell wall and mostly isolated from the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts. There is a dearth of information regarding clinical Mycoplasma spp. isolates among Egyptian patients. A total of 170 samples were collected from patients and apparently healthy personnel in local public hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Isolation of Mycoplasma spp. was carried out using appropriate culture media and further identification was carried out by biochemical tests followed by serotyping using specific antisera. Confirmation was done by PCR for detection of different Mycoplasma spp. using genus-specific primers targeting 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Characterization of the antibiotic resistance and sensitivity pattern against different antimicrobials was carried out using disc diffusion test. The results indicated the presence of six Mycoplasma spp. in 22.94% of the samples. Mycoplasmas were detected more frequently in throat swabs than sputum. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was highly sensitive to macrolides and quinolones but less sensitive to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Molecular techniques were found to be of more rapid, highly sensitive, able to detect nonviable organisms, and cost effective. These results shed light on difficulties of Mycoplasma detection and the superiority of molecular techniques over culture.

  15. Experimental infection of BHK21 and Vero cell lines with different Mycoplasma spp.

    PubMed

    Netto, Cristiane; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Sepulveda, Lya Madureira; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma spp, belongs to the class Mollicutes and is capable to produce alterations in cellular cultures causing damages to the biotechnological industry. Bioproducts generally require two essential inputs, bovine serum and cells. The study herein aims to evaluate the mycoplasma concentrations that affect the growing of BHK21 and Vero cells. The species used were: Mycoplasma orale, M. salivarium, M. arginini and M. hyorhinis, cultivated in a SP4 media. Two contamination tests were performed with BHK21 and Vero cells and one of them applied different concentrations of mycoplasma. In the first one, mycoplasma was applied at the day zero and, in the second one, the contamination was performed after the monolayer establishment. The both cellular cultures presented cytopathic effects with mycoplasma contamination, but the Vero cells suffered more damages than the BHK21 ones. It was also observed that the severity of the cytopathic effect depended on the mycoplasma specie, on the concentration and on the time of contact with the cellular culture, which evidences the importance of controlling the presence of mycoplasma in biotechnological industries.

  16. World Health Organization International Standard To Harmonize Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Nübling, C Micha; Baylis, Sally A; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Montag-Lessing, Thomas; Chudy, Michael; Kreß, Julia; Ulrych, Ursula; Czurda, Stefan; Rosengarten, Renate

    2015-09-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays (referred to here as NAT assays) are increasingly used as an alternative to culture-based approaches for the detection of mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures. Assay features, like the limit of detection or quantification, vary widely between different mycoplasma NAT assays. Biological reference materials may be useful for harmonization of mycoplasma NAT assays. An international feasibility study included lyophilized preparations of four distantly related mycoplasma species (Acholeplasma laidlawii, Mycoplasma fermentans, M. orale, M. pneumoniae) at different concentrations which were analyzed by 21 laboratories using 26 NAT assays with a qualitative, semiquantitative, or quantitative design. An M. fermentans preparation was shown to decrease the interassay variation when used as a common reference material. The preparation was remanufactured and characterized in a comparability study, and its potency (in NAT-detectable units) across different NATs was determined. The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) established this preparation to be the "1st World Health Organization international standard for mycoplasma DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique-based assays designed for generic mycoplasma detection" (WHO Tech Rep Ser 987:42, 2014) with a potency of 200,000 IU/ml. This WHO international standard is now available as a reference preparation for characterization of NAT assays, e.g., for determination of analytic sensitivity, for calibration of quantitative assays in a common unitage, and for defining regulatory requirements in the field of mycoplasma testing.

  17. Association of Raillietia caprae with the presence of Mycoplasmas in the external ear canal of goats.

    PubMed

    Jimena, Otero Negrete; Laura, Jaramillo Meza; Elena, Miranda Morales Rosa; Alonso, Navarro Hernández Jaime; Teresa, Quintero Martínez María

    2009-11-01

    We did a descriptive study to determine whether the presence in the external ear canal of the Raillietia caprae mites and Mycoplasmas were associated. For that we sampled 360 goats slaughtered at abattoirs in the summer to identify those infested with the mite. We found only 20 infested, so used all of those plus another 47 uninfested goats selected systematically from the population negative for the isolation of Mycoplasmas. These goats came from the regions of Queretaro, Guanajuato, Sinaloa and Estado de México. Sterile swabs were taken from each ear canal of the carcass after removal of the pinna for microscopic observation of the mites and for the isolation of Mycoplasmas in both study groups. The swab samples were inoculated in Friis media for the isolation of Mycoplasmas; then, the isolates were biochemically characterized and identified serologically. We recovered isolates from the earwax of only nine of the 47 control goats, but from the earwax of 11 of the 20 infested goats; another four infested goats had Mycoplasma isolated from the mites but not from the earwax. Mycoplasma cottewii and Mycoplasma yeatsii were the only Mycoplasmas isolated from the uninfested goats, and also were the predominant (29 of 34) isolates from the infested goats and/or from the mites.

  18. Detection, Characterization, and Molecular Typing of Human Mycoplasma spp. from Major Hospitals in Cairo, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, Mirihan A.; Yassin, Aymen S.; Essam, Tamer M.; Hamouda, Hayam M.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are fastidious slow growing organisms lacking a cell wall and mostly isolated from the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts. There is a dearth of information regarding clinical Mycoplasma spp. isolates among Egyptian patients. A total of 170 samples were collected from patients and apparently healthy personnel in local public hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Isolation of Mycoplasma spp. was carried out using appropriate culture media and further identification was carried out by biochemical tests followed by serotyping using specific antisera. Confirmation was done by PCR for detection of different Mycoplasma spp. using genus-specific primers targeting 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Characterization of the antibiotic resistance and sensitivity pattern against different antimicrobials was carried out using disc diffusion test. The results indicated the presence of six Mycoplasma spp. in 22.94% of the samples. Mycoplasmas were detected more frequently in throat swabs than sputum. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was highly sensitive to macrolides and quinolones but less sensitive to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Molecular techniques were found to be of more rapid, highly sensitive, able to detect nonviable organisms, and cost effective. These results shed light on difficulties of Mycoplasma detection and the superiority of molecular techniques over culture. PMID:25506614

  19. Severe anemia associated with Mycoplasma wenyonii infection in a mature cow

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Velguth, Karen E.; Snider, Timothy A.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment of clinical anemia in a mature Angus cow infected with the hemoplasma Mycoplasma wenyonii are described. Mycoplasma wenyonii has been previously reported to cause clinical anemia in young or splenectomized cattle; however, infection has not been associated with severe anemia in mature animals. PMID:22379205

  20. Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma sp. in farmed bison (Bison bison) herds in western Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is emerging as an important pathogen of farmed bison in North America, associated with high morbidity and mortality. An in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect antibodies against Mycoplasma sp. in bison sera. The aims of the study were to estimate ...

  1. Mycoplasma membrane lipoproteins induced proinflammatory cytokines by a mechanism distinct from that of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Rawadi, G; Roman-Roman, S

    1996-01-01

    To gain a clear understanding of the mechanisms by which mycoplasmas induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytic cells, we have studied the induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6 by mycoplasmas in three distinct human myelomonocytic cell lines in comparison with induction by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). HL-60 cell line did not release cytokines when induced with either LPS or mycoplasmas. In contrast to LPS, mycoplasmas failed to increase the weak levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha secreted by phorbol myristate acetate-differentiated U937 cells. In addition, Northern (RNA) blot analysis of cytokine expression in these cells showed that the induction of IL-1 beta by mycoplasmas involves, unlike that by LPS, posttranscriptional events. Interestingly, in THP-1 cells, cytokine induction pathways triggered by mycoplasmas remained operational under conditions where LPS pathways were abolished, suggesting functional independence. The study of cytokine-inducing activity displayed by distinct fractions derived from a series of different mycoplasma species demonstrated that lipid membrane constituents were largely responsible for these effects. Finally, we have demonstrated that tyrosine phosphorylation is a crucial event in the mycoplasma-mediated induction of proinflammatory cytokines in either THP-1 cells or human monocytes. PMID:8550219

  2. World Health Organization International Standard To Harmonize Assays for Detection of Mycoplasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, Sally A.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Montag-Lessing, Thomas; Chudy, Michael; Kreß, Julia; Ulrych, Ursula; Czurda, Stefan; Rosengarten, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technique (NAT)-based assays (referred to here as NAT assays) are increasingly used as an alternative to culture-based approaches for the detection of mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures. Assay features, like the limit of detection or quantification, vary widely between different mycoplasma NAT assays. Biological reference materials may be useful for harmonization of mycoplasma NAT assays. An international feasibility study included lyophilized preparations of four distantly related mycoplasma species (Acholeplasma laidlawii, Mycoplasma fermentans, M. orale, M. pneumoniae) at different concentrations which were analyzed by 21 laboratories using 26 NAT assays with a qualitative, semiquantitative, or quantitative design. An M. fermentans preparation was shown to decrease the interassay variation when used as a common reference material. The preparation was remanufactured and characterized in a comparability study, and its potency (in NAT-detectable units) across different NATs was determined. The World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (ECBS) established this preparation to be the “1st World Health Organization international standard for mycoplasma DNA for nucleic acid amplification technique-based assays designed for generic mycoplasma detection” (WHO Tech Rep Ser 987:42, 2014) with a potency of 200,000 IU/ml. This WHO international standard is now available as a reference preparation for characterization of NAT assays, e.g., for determination of analytic sensitivity, for calibration of quantitative assays in a common unitage, and for defining regulatory requirements in the field of mycoplasma testing. PMID:26070671

  3. Host Cell Responses to Persistent Mycoplasmas - Different Stages in Infection of HeLa Cells with Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of

  4. Lesions associated with a novel Mycoplasma sp. in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) undergoing rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Haulena, Martin; Gulland, Frances M D; Lawrence, Judith A; Fauquier, Deborah A; Jang, Spencer; Aldridge, Brian; Spraker, Terry; Thomas, Linda C; Brown, Daniel R; Wendland, Lori; Davidson, Maureen K

    2006-01-01

    From July 1999 to November 2001, Mycoplasma sp. was cultured from lesions in 16 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) undergoing rehabilitation. The Mycoplasma sp. was the likely cause of death of four animals in which it was associated with either pneumonia or polyarthritis. The most common lesion associated with this bacterium was subdermal abscessation, found in 12 animals. Other lesions included intramuscular abscesses, septic arthritis, and lymphadenopathy. Infection was associated with a leukocytosis and left shift in 12 animals. Animals with abscesses improved clinically after surgical lancing, irrigation, and systemic antibiotic therapy. The mycoplasma isolates had a consistent 16S rRNA sequence dissimilar from other Mycoplasma spp. and represent a novel species, Mycoplasma zalophi proposed sp. nov.

  5. Identification and characterization of novel Mycoplasma spp. belonging to the hominis group from griffon vultures.

    PubMed

    Lecis, R; Chessa, B; Cacciotto, C; Addis, M F; Coradduzza, E; Berlinguer, F; Muzzeddu, M; Lierz, M; Carcangiu, L; Pittau, M; Alberti, A

    2010-08-01

    Mycoplasmas are commensals and pathogens of various avian species, and are also regularly found in birds of prey, although their significance to birds' health remains unclear. Here we describe two novel Mycoplasma isolated from the upper respiratory tract of four Eurasian griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus) housed in a wildlife recovery centre in Sardinia (Italy). By sequencing the 16S rRNA gene and the entire 16S/23S intergenic spacer region, the new strains were classified within the Mycoplasma taxonomy at the group and cluster levels, showing that the two isolates fall into the Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hominis clusters of the hominis group, respectively. We combined molecular tools and immunoblotting methods in order to further characterize these isolates, and antigenic analyses overall confirmed the molecular findings. Different levels of pathogenicity and prevalence of these strains might have different implications for the conservation and reintroduction of vultures.

  6. Occurrence of mycoplasmas in free-ranging birds of prey in Germany.

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Hagen, N; Hernadez-Divers, S J; Hafez, H M

    2008-10-01

    Mycoplasmas are well-known avian pathogens of poultry and some passerines. Although reported in birds of prey, their role as pathogens is still unclear. Healthy, free-ranging raptor nestlings sampled during a routine ringing (banding) program, and birds of prey from rehabilitation centers, tested positive for Mycoplasma spp. by culture and a genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Given the lack of clinical signs and disease, we suggest that mycoplasmas in raptors may be commensal rather than pathogenic. Using immunobinding assay and species-specific PCR tests, Mycoplasma buteonis, M. falconis, and M. gypis were identified; M. falconis was only detected in falcons. Additionally, some isolates could not be identified. This is the first report of Mycoplasma spp. isolations from Western Marsh Harriers (Circus aeroginosus), a Eurasian Hobby (Falco subbuteo), and a Barn Owl (Tyto alba).

  7. Mycoplasma species isolated from harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) and a Sowerby's beaked whale (Mesoplodon bidens) stranded in Scottish waters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Geoffrey; McAuliffe, Laura; Dagleish, Mark P; Barley, Jason; Howie, Fiona; Nicholas, Robin A J; Ayling, Roger D

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma species were recovered from 10 cetacean carcasses that stranded around Scotland. Mycoplasma phocicerebrale was isolated from the lungs of three harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) as well as from the liver of one of these animals. Novel Mycoplasma spp. were isolated from the lungs of five additional harbor porpoises and the kidney of another. In addition an isolate closely related to Mycoplasma species 13CL was obtained from the kidney of a Sowerby's beaked whale (Mesoplodon bidens). The role of these Mycoplasma species in the disease of cetaceans, their host specificity, diversity, and any relation to cetacean strandings are unknown.

  8. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    PubMed

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-07

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study.

  9. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalshingi, Habu A; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Gouws, Johan; van Vuuren, Moritz

    2015-06-08

    Biochemical and molecular analysis were conducted on 34 strains of Mycoplasma species isolated between 2003 and 2009 from the genital tract of clinically healthy Dorper sheep and sheep with ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis. Earlier publications identified the causative agent as Mycoplasma mycoides mycoides large colony (MmmLC) and Arcanobacterium pyogenes. The aims of the study were to characterise Mycoplasma species isolated from the genital tract of Dorper sheep with polymerase chain reaction assay, cloning and gene sequencing. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) results revealed six predominant Mycoplasma species: Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, Arcanobacterium laidlawii, MmmLC, Mycoplasma sp. ovine/caprine serogroup II and M. canadense. Sequencing of the 34 isolates were analysed using phylogenetic methods, and 18 (50%) were identified as M. arginini with 99% - 100% similarity to M. arginini from England and Sweden. Six isolates showed 99% similarity to M. bovigenitalium strains from Turkey and Germany. Two isolates had 99% similarity to an M. sp. ovine/caprine sero group II from the United Kingdom. BLAST for two isolates revealed 99% similarity to Acholeplasma laidlawii from India, another two were 99% similar to MmmLC strain from Sweden, two showed 98% similarity to Mycoplasma sp. Usp 120 from Brazil, and two isolates have a 97% - 99% similarity to M. mm. Jcv1 strain from the United States of America. Finally, one isolate showed similarity of 99% to Mycoplasma canadense strain from Italy. The findings support the hypothesis that ulcerative vulvitis and balanitis of Dorper sheep in South Africa (SA) is a multifactorial disease with involvement of different Mycoplasma species.

  10. The role of mycoplasmas in a conservation project of the lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni).

    PubMed

    Lierz, M; Obon, E; Schink, B; Carbonell, F; Hafez, H M

    2008-12-01

    The lesser kestrel (Falco naumanni) is one of the most endangered bird species in Europe, and a captive breeding and reintroduction project was established. A breeding project is vulnerable to pathogens, e.g., mycoplasmas, reducing the reproductive success and carrying the risk to release pathogens with the birds to the wild. Therefore, 18 infertile eggs and 43 dead in shell embryos of the breeding project, as well as 27 nestlings and 34 adult birds of the captive and three different free-ranging populations were investigated for the occurrence of mycoplasmas by culture and a Mycoplasma genus-specific polymerase chain reaction. All eggs, embryos, and hand-reared nestlings from the captive group were negative. In contrast, all parent-reared nestlings and 88% of the adults were positive. Mycoplasma falconis and unidentifiable mycoplasmas were detected in all groups. Mycoplasma buteonis was found in the captive and only in two of the three free-ranging populations. Sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of six randomly selected unidentified isolates showed that five isolates were similar and most likely had been found previously in a falcon from Germany. The remaining isolate demonstrated a very high homology to unidentified Mycoplasma isolates obtained previously from semen samples of raptors. The results suggest that these isolates might represent two new species. Mycoplasmas seem not to play a major role as pathogens in the breeding project, and there is no evidence that releasing birds poses a risk to the free-ranging population with regard to mycoplasmas. The study seems to be the first to describe the occurrence and role of mycoplasmas in the lesser kestrel.

  11. Detection and prevalence of four different hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in Eastern North Carolina American black bears (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Lori S H; Stoskopf, Michael K; Maggi, Ricardo G

    2017-02-01

    Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. are globally emerging, obligate parasitic, epierythrocytic bacteria that infect many vertebrates, including humans. Hemoplasma infection can cause acute life-threatening symptoms or lead to a chronic sub-clinical carrier state. Hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. transmission, prevalence, and host specificity are uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular prevalence of Mycoplasma species in blood from 68 free-ranging black bears from the eastern coast of North Carolina. DNA amplification of Mycoplasma 16S rRNA gene identified four distinct species infecting 34/68 (50%) of the black bear blood samples, including Candidatus M. haematoparvum. The high prevalence of hemotropic Mycoplasma infection in this wildlife species highlights the importance of understanding intra and inter species transmission. Black bears may play a role in the transmission of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. between animals, arthropod vectors, and humans. Further studies are needed to elucidate black bears as a potential reservoir for hemotropic Mycoplasma infections.

  12. Mycoplasma-dependent activation of normal mouse lymphocytes: requirement for functional T lymphocytes in the cytotoxicity reaction mediated by Mycoplasma arthritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Aldridge, K E; Sullivan, G J; Ward, J R

    1980-01-01

    Syngeneic and allogeneic target cells were killed in the presence of CBA mouse lymphocytes and viable Mycoplasma arthritidis. Medium supplementation had no effect on the response. Nonviable M. arthritidis was also capable of stimulating lymphocytotoxicity, although to a much lesser extent. Cytotoxicity was shown to be largely dependent upon the lymphocytes, since lymphocytes preincubated with mycoplasmas and treated to remove remaining organisms were highly toxic to target cells, whereas supernatants prepared from lymphocyte/mycoplasma mixtures exhibited minimal effects. A 6-h exposure of lymphocytes to mycoplasmas at a ratio of 100:1 was sufficient for commitment to target cell killing. Functional lymphocytes were required for the reaction, since gamma-irradiated lymphocytes did not develop cytotoxic potential despite the fact that the mycoplasmas replicated equally well in the presence of these and untreated lymphocytes. Furthermore, lymphocytes already activated with mycoplasmas lost cytotoxic potential after disruption. The kinetics and degree of lymphocytotoxicity induced by M. arthritidis and phytohemagglutinin toward 51Cr-labeled syngeneic fibroblasts were similar. Removal of most B cells and other adherent cells by column separation did not abrogate the cytotoxic effect. Lymphocyte suspensions treated with anti-Thy 1 antiserum and complement exhibited a marked decrease in their cytotoxic potential when added to labeled target cells in the presence of M. arthritidis. We conclude that the cytotoxic reaction is dependent upon the T-lymphocyte subpopulation. PMID:6969227

  13. The effects of mycoplasma contamination upon the ability to form bioengineered 3D kidney cysts.

    PubMed

    DesRochers, Teresa M; Kuo, Ivana Y; Kimmerling, Erica P; Ehrlich, Barbara E; Kaplan, David L

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination of cell cultures is a pervasive, often undiagnosed and ignored problem in many laboratories that can result in reduced cell proliferation and changes in gene expression. Unless contamination is specifically suspected, it is often undetected in two dimensional (2D) cultures and the resulting effects of mycoplasma contamination are rarely appreciated and can lead to incorrect conclusions. Three dimensional (3D) tissue cultures are increasingly utilized to explore tissue development and phenotype. However, 3D cultures are more complex than 2D cell cultures and require a more controlled cellular environment in order to generate structures necessary to mimic in vivo responses and are often maintained for longer time periods. Changes to the microenvironment are assumed to have a more extreme effect upon the success of 3D tissue cultures than 2D cell cultures, but the effects of mycoplasma have not been studied. To test this hypothesis, we grew 2D cell cultures and 3D tissues from pig kidney epithelial cells (LLC-PK1) that were contaminated with mycoplasma and the same stock of cells after mycoplasma removal. We did not observe an effect of mycoplasma contamination on proliferation in 2D monolayer cell culture. However, cyst formation in 3D tissues was altered, with effects upon the number, size and structure of cysts formed. These data serve to reinforce the necessity of testing cell stocks for mycoplasma contamination.

  14. Mycoplasma corogypsi-associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus).

    PubMed

    Van Wettere, A J; Ley, D H; Scott, D E; Buckanoff, H D; Degernes, L A

    2013-03-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi.

  15. Extracellular membrane vesicles secreted by mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 are enriched in virulence proteins.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Vladislav M; Mouzykantov, Alexey A; Baranova, Natalia B; Medvedeva, Elena S; Grygorieva, Tatiana Yu; Trushin, Maxim V; Vishnyakov, Innokentii E; Sabantsev, Anton V; Borchsenius, Sergei N; Chernova, Olga A

    2014-10-14

    Mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest prokaryotes capable of self-replication, as well as Archaea, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria constitutively produce extracellular vesicles (EVs). However, little is known regarding the content and functions of mycoplasma vesicles. Here, we present for the first time a proteomics-based characterisation of extracellular membrane vesicles from Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8. The ubiquitous mycoplasma is widespread in nature, found in humans, animals and plants, and is the causative agent of phytomycoplasmoses and the predominant contaminant of cell cultures. Taking a proteomics approach using LC-ESI-MS/MS, we identified 97 proteins. Analysis of the identified proteins indicated that A. laidlawii-derived EVs are enriched in virulence proteins that may play critical roles in mycoplasma-induced pathogenesis. Our data will help to elucidate the functions of mycoplasma-derived EVs and to develop effective methods to control infections and contaminations of cell cultures by mycoplasmas. In the present study, we have documented for the first time the proteins in EVs secreted by mycoplasma vesicular proteins identified in this study are likely involved in the adaptation of bacteria to stressors, survival in microbial communities and pathogen-host interactions. These findings suggest that the secretion of EVs is an evolutionally conserved and universal process that occurs in organisms from the simplest wall-less bacteria to complex organisms and indicate the necessity of developing new approaches to control infects.

  16. Genomic characterization of symbiotic mycoplasmas from the stomach of deep-sea isopod bathynomus sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Jiao-Mei; Wang, Shao-Lu; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Danchin, Antoine; He, Li-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Deep-sea isopod scavengers such as Bathynomus sp. are able to live in nutrient-poor environments, which is likely attributable to the presence of symbiotic microbes in their stomach. In this study we recovered two draft genomes of mycoplasmas, Bg1 and Bg2, from the metagenomes of the stomach contents and stomach sac of a Bathynomus sp. sample from the South China Sea (depth of 898 m). Phylogenetic trees revealed a considerable genetic distance to other mycoplasma species for Bg1 and Bg2. Compared with terrestrial symbiotic mycoplasmas, the Bg1 and Bg2 genomes were enriched with genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and sodium-driven symporters responsible for the uptake of sugars, amino acids and other carbohydrates. The genome of mycoplasma Bg1 contained sialic acid lyase and transporter genes, potentially enabling the bacteria to attach to the stomach sac and obtain organic carbons from various cell walls. Both of the mycoplasma genomes contained multiple copies of genes related to proteolysis and oligosaccharide degradation, which may help the host survive in low-nutrient conditions. The discovery of the different types of mycoplasma bacteria in the stomach of this deep-sea isopod affords insights into symbiotic model of deep-sea animals and genomic plasticity of mycoplasma bacteria.

  17. Detection of multiple Mycoplasma species in bulk tank milk samples using real-time PCR and conventional culture and comparison of test sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Justice-Allen, A; Trujillo, J; Goodell, G; Wilson, D

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to further validate a SYBR PCR protocol for Mycoplasma spp. by comparing it with standard microbial culture in the detection of Mycoplasma spp. in bulk tank milk samples. Additionally, we identified Mycoplasma spp. present by analysis of PCR-generated amplicons [dissociation (melt) temperature (T(m)), length, and DNA sequence]. The research presented herein tests the hypothesis that the SYBR PCR protocol is as sensitive as conventional culture for the detection of Mycoplasma spp. in bulk tank milk samples. Mycoplasmas cause several important disease syndromes in cattle, including mastitis in dairy cows. The standard diagnostic method at the herd level has been microbial isolation of mycoplasmas on 1 of several specialized media and speciation through biochemical or immunological techniques; repeated sampling schemes are recommended. The development of a real-time SYBR PCR protocol offers advantages in decrease of time to detection, cost, and complexity. The T(m) of the double-stranded DNA generated from the PCR reaction was used to detect the presence of and tentatively identify the species of mycoplasmas other than Mycoplasma bovis. In the SYBR PCR protocol, the presence of multiple species of mycoplasmas is indicated by an atypical dissociation curve. Gel electrophoresis and sequencing of the amplicons was used to confirm the mycoplasma species present when a non-M. bovis organism was detected (T(m) not equal to M. bovis) and used to identify all the mycoplasma species present for the samples with atypical dissociation curves. Mycoplasma bovis was identified in 83% of SYBR PCR mycoplasma-positive bulk tank samples. Another mycoplasma was identified either alone or in addition to M. bovis in 25% of SYBR PCR mycoplasma-positive bulk tank milk samples. Four species of mycoplasma other than M. bovis (Mycoplasma alkalescens, Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, and Mycoplasma gateae) were identified in bulk tank milk samples

  18. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed.

  19. Rapid imaging of mycoplasma in solution using Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy (ASEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chikara; Manaka, Sachie; Nakane, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Miyata, Makoto; Maruyama, Yuusuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mycoplasma mobile was observed in buffer with the Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M. mobile attached to sialic acid on the SiN film surface within minutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells were observed at low concentrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ASEM should promote study and early-stage diagnosis of mycoplasma. -- Abstract: Mycoplasma is a genus of bacterial pathogen that causes disease in vertebrates. In humans, the species Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes 15% or more of community-acquired pneumonia. Because this bacterium is tiny, corresponding in size to a large virus, diagnosis using optical microscopy is not easy. In current methods, chest X-rays are usually the first action, followed by serology, PCR amplification, and/or culture, but all of these are particularly difficult at an early stage of the disease. Using Mycoplasma mobile as a model species, we directly observed mycoplasma in buffer with the newly developed Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscope (ASEM). This microscope features an open sample dish with a pressure-resistant thin film window in its base, through which the SEM beam scans samples in solution, from below. Because of its 2-3 {mu}m-deep scanning capability, it can observe the whole internal structure of mycoplasma cells stained with metal solutions. Characteristic protein localizations were visualized using immuno-labeling. Cells were observed at low concentrations, because suspended cells concentrate in the observable zone by attaching to sialic acid on the silicon nitride (SiN) film surface within minutes. These results suggest the applicability of the ASEM for the study of mycoplasmas as well as for early-stage mycoplasma infection diagnosis.

  20. Genital mycoplasmas in women attending the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Njunda, Anna L.; Nsagha, Dickson S.; Assob, Jules C.N.; Palle, John N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Nde, Peter F.; Ntube, Mengang N.C.; Weledji, Patrick E.

    2011-01-01

    Genital mycoplasmas are implicated in pelvic inflammatory diseases, puerperal infection, septic abortions, low birth weight, nongonococcal urethritis and prostatitis as well as spontaneous abortion and infertility in women. There is paucity of data on colonisation of genital mycoplasma in women and their drug sensitivity patterns. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of genital mycoplasmas (Ureaplasma urealiticum and Mycoplasma hominis) infection and their drug sensitivity patterns in women. A mycofast kit was used for biochemical determination of mycoplasma infection in 100 randomly selected female patients aged 19–57 years, attending the University of Yaoundé Teaching Hospital (UYTH) from March to June 2010. Informed consent was sought and gained before samples were collected. Genital mycoplasmas were found in 65 patients (65%) [95% CI=55.7–74.3%] and distributed as 41 (41%) [95% CI=31.4–50.6%] for U. urealiticum and 4 (4%) [95% CI=0.20– 7.8%] for M. hominis while there was co-infection in 20 women (20%) [95% CI=12.16–27.84%]. In our study, 57 (57%) [95% CI=47.3–67%] had other organisms, which included C. albicans (19 [19%]), G. vaginalis (35 [35%]) and T. vaginalis (3 [3%]). Among the 65 women with genital mycoplasma, the highest co-infection was with G. vaginalis (33.8%). Pristinamycine was the most effective antibiotic (92%) and sulfamethoxazole the most resistant (8%) antibiotic to genital mycoplasmas. We conclude that genital mycoplasma is a problem in Cameroon and infected women should be treated together with their partners. PMID:28299057

  1. Pilot study to evaluate the role of Mycoplasma species in cat bite abscesses.

    PubMed

    Torres-Henderson, Camille; Hesser, Jeff; Hyatt, Doreene R; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Mycoplasma species are common inhabitants of the feline oral cavity, and so likely contaminate many cat bite abscesses. The objectives of this study were to determine whether Mycoplasma species are common contaminants of cat bite abscesses and whether they are are associated with β-lactam-resistant clinical disease. Twenty-six privately owned cats with clinical evidence of an abscess suspected to be from a cat bite were included in the study. Samples from each cat were evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, as well as Mycoplasma species culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All cats were initially treated with appropriate wound management and were administered an antibiotic of the β-lactam class (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate or cefovecin sodium). Mycoplasma species DNA was amplified by PCR from 4/26 samples (15.4%); one of these cases was concurrently culture positive. Adequate DNA for sequencing was present for 2/4 positive PCR samples; one was most homologous with Mycoplasma felis, and the other was most homologous with Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma elephantis. Of the 26 cats, 25 responded to the initial treatment by day 7. The cat that failed initial treatment was positive for M equigenitalium or M elephantis DNA on days 0 and 12, and ultimately responded to administration of enrofloxacin and clindamycin. The results suggest that while Mycoplasma species can contaminate cat bite abscesses, routine wound management and β-lactam antibiotic therapy is adequate for treatment in most cases of abscess. However, as Mycoplasma species infections do not respond to β-lactam class antibiotic therapy, these organisms should be on the differential list for cats with abscesses that fail treatment with this antibiotic class.

  2. MIB–MIP is a mycoplasma system that captures and cleaves immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Arfi, Yonathan; Minder, Laetitia; Di Primo, Carmelo; Le Roy, Aline; Ebel, Christine; Coquet, Laurent; Claverol, Stephane; Vashee, Sanjay; Jores, Joerg; Blanchard, Alain; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are “minimal” bacteria able to infect humans, wildlife, and a large number of economically important livestock species. Mycoplasma infections include a spectrum of clinical manifestations ranging from simple fever to fulminant inflammatory diseases with high mortality rates. These infections are mostly chronic, suggesting that mycoplasmas have developed means to evade the host immune response. Here we present and functionally characterize a two-protein system from Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies capri that is involved in the capture and cleavage of IgG. The first component, Mycoplasma Ig binding protein (MIB), is an 83-kDa protein that is able to tightly bind to the Fv region of a wide range of IgG. The second component, Mycoplasma Ig protease (MIP), is a 97-kDa serine protease that is able to cleave off the VH domain of IgG. We demonstrate that MIB is necessary for the proteolytic activity of MIP. Cleavage of IgG requires a sequential interaction of the different partners of the system: first MIB captures the IgG, and then MIP is recruited to the MIB–IgG complex, enabling protease activity. MIB and MIP are encoded by two genes organized in tandem, with homologs found in the majority of pathogenic mycoplasmas and often in multiple copies. Phylogenetic studies suggest that genes encoding the MIB–MIP system are specific to mycoplasmas and have been disseminated by horizontal gene transfer. These results highlight an original and complex system targeting the host immunoglobulins, playing a potentially key role in the immunity evasion by mycoplasmas. PMID:27114507

  3. Occurrence and Relevance of Mycoplasma sturni in Free-Ranging Corvids in Germany.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Luisa; Möller Palau-Ribes, Franca Möller; Schmidt, Liane; Lierz, Michael

    2017-01-18

    Several Mycoplasma spp. are well-known pathogens in poultry. In birds of prey, White Storks ( Ciconia ciconia ), and some waterfowl (Anatidae, Pelecanidae) species, mycoplasmas occur commonly and seem to be apathogenic or commensal and most likely belong to the physiologic microbial flora of the respiratory tract. In other bird species, such as Common Nightingales ( Luscinia megarhynchos ) and tits (Paridae), Mycoplasma spp. are absent in healthy birds. In corvids, the prevalence and role of Mycoplasma spp. in disease remains unclear. In previous studies, Mycoplasma sturni was detected in diseased corvids; however, those studies included only a limited sample size or preselected individuals. We collected tracheal swabs of 97 free-ranging Corvidae, including 68 randomly selected individuals from hunting bags and 29 birds that had been admitted to a veterinary clinic. Tracheal swabs were examined for Mycoplasma spp. using culture and genus-specific PCR. If Mycoplasma spp. were detected, the species were identified by sequencing the 16S ribosomal (r)RNA gene and 16-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer region. Five of 68 (7%) of the hunted birds and nine of 29 (31%) of the birds admitted to the veterinary clinic were PCR positive. In 13 of 14 PCR-positive samples, mycoplasmas were cultured and M. sturni was the only mycoplasmal species identified. None of the positive corvids from the hunting bags had clinical signs, whereas five of nine birds admitted to the veterinary clinic showed apathy, lameness, injuries, or fractures, which may not be associated with mycoplasmal infections. These data support the notion that M. sturni is the Mycoplasma sp. most frequently found in corvids, though its prevalence and ability to cause disease may involve interaction with other aspects of bird health.

  4. [In vitro antibiotic sensitivity of French strains of Mycoplasma bovis].

    PubMed

    Poumarat, F; Martel, J L

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro activity of 15 antibiotics was tested with 30-90 Mycoplasma bovis representative strains of bovine lung pathology in France. The distribution of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) is homogeneous with low values for spectinomycin, lincomycin, tylosin, gentamicin and baytril, intermediate for chloramphenicol and neomycin, high for nalidixic acid, Flumequine and erythromycin. The MIC distribution is heterogeneous with intermediate values for spiramycin and tetracyclines, and high values for streptomycin. For the later antibiotics, the heterogeneity of the susceptibility suggests a mechanism of acquired resistance.

  5. Anti-Gal-C antibody in autoimmune neuropathies subsequent to mycoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, S; Chiba, A; Hitoshi, S; Takizawa, H; Kanazawa, I

    1995-04-01

    Four of 82 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and 1 of 12 with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), who previously had had Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, had serum antibody to galactocerebroside (Gal-C). Two patients with GBS without mycoplasma infection also had anti-Gal-C antibody, whereas none of the normal or the disease controls had it. As Gal-C is a major glycolipid antigen in myelin, anti-Gal-C antibody may function in the pathogenesis of autoimmune demyelinative neuropathies. Mycoplasma pneumoniae appears to be an important preceding infectious agent in autoimmune neuropathies with anti-Gal-C antibody.

  6. Characterisation of mycoplasmas isolated from genital tract infections of sheep in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chima, J C; Ojo, M O; Molokwu, J U; Okewole, P A

    1995-09-01

    Four mycoplasma-like organisms isolated from ewes with mucopurulent vaginal discharge and swollen vulva were characterised. Biochemical tests showed three of the isolates to be negative for glucose fermentation and arginine hydrolysis, while the remaining isolate was negative for glucose fermentation but hydrolysed arginine. Serological identification using the growth inhibition, growth precipitation and indirect immunofluorescence tests indicated the three similar isolates as Mycoplasma bovigenitalium and the other isolate as Mycoplasma arginini. There are apparently no previous reports of the isolation of these organisms from the genital tract of sheep in Nigeria.

  7. Short communication: The effect of centrifugation and resuspension on the recovery of Mycoplasma species from milk.

    PubMed

    Punyapornwithaya, V; Fox, L K; Gay, G M; Hancock, D D; Alldredge, J R

    2009-09-01

    Low sensitivity of a single bulk tank milk culture is a major limitation for detection of mycoplasma organisms. We hypothesized that sedimentation of Mycoplasma spp. in a milk sample by centrifugation followed by resuspension in a small volume of fluid before agar plating would increase the ability to detect Mycoplasma spp. compared with direct conventional culture. The experiment was conducted to determine recovery of Mycoplasma spp. from milk as affected by 1) treatment (centrifugation vs. conventional method); 2) 2 species (Mycoplasma bovis and Mycoplasma californicum and 4 strains for each species); and 3) 4 different concentrations of Mycoplasma spp. (1,000, 100, 10, and 1 cfu/mL). A 5-mL portion of mycoplasma suspension from each strain was inoculated into 45 mL of fresh bulk tank milk to achieve concentrations of 1,000, 100, 10, and 1 cfu/mL. Treatment samples were vigorously mixed and centrifuged at 5,000 x g for 30 min. Control samples were vigorously mixed. All samples were plated on modified Hayflick agar. Plates were incubated at 37 degrees C and 5% CO(2) for 5 d. Mean (+/-SE) log(10) mycoplasma counts (cfu/mL) in the treatment groups (1.91 +/- 0.15) were higher than those in the control groups (1.70 +/- 0.16). Recovery of at least 1 mycoplasma colony on agar culture was 100% in both treatment and control groups at high, medium, and low concentrations. At the lowest concentration, recovery of at least 1 mycoplasma colony on agar culture in treatment and control groups was 75% (n = 12/16) and 18.75% (n = 3/16), respectively. Centrifugation of milk followed by suspension in a smaller volume of saline before conventional culture increased the ability to detect mycoplasma microorganisms in the milk sample compared with controls. Recovery by centrifugation appeared best at the lowest concentration where detection of a positive sample was 4 times more likely than when conventional methods were used.

  8. Global transcriptional analysis of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae following exposure to norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Oneal, Michael J; Schafer, Erin R; Madsen, Melissa L; Minion, F Chris

    2008-09-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, a component of the porcine respiratory disease complex, colonizes the respiratory tract of swine by binding to the cilia of the bronchial epithelial cells. Mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood for M. hyopneumoniae, but previous work has indicated that it responds to the environmental stressors heat shock, iron deprivation and oxidative compounds. For successful infection, M. hyopneumoniae must effectively resist host responses to the colonization of the respiratory tract. Among these are changes in hormonal levels in the mucosal secretions. Recent work in the stress responses of other bacteria has included the response to the catecholamine norepinephrine. The idea that M. hyopneumoniae can respond to a host hormone, however, is novel and has not previously been demonstrated. To test this, organisms in the early exponential phase of growth were exposed to 100 muM norepinephrine for 4 h, and RNA samples from these cultures were collected and compared to RNA samples from control cultures using two-colour PCR-based M. hyopneumoniae microarrays. The M. hyopneumoniae response included slowed growth and changes in mRNA transcript levels of 84 genes, 53 of which were upregulated in response to norepinephrine. A larger proportion of the genes upregulated than those downregulated were involved with transcription and translation. The downregulated genes were mostly involved with metabolism, which correlated with the reduction in growth of the mycoplasma. Approximately 51 % of the genes were hypothetical with no known function. Thus, in response to norepinephrine, M. hyopneumoniae appears to upregulate protein expression while downregulating general metabolism.

  9. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  10. Prevalence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in desert bighorn sheep in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justice-Allen, Anne E.; Luedtke, Clint J.; Overstreet, Matthew; Cain, James W.; Stephenson, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the potential for an epizootic of pneumonia to result from either natural immigration or translocation, we compared the seroprevalence to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae in several populations of desert bighorn sheep in Arizona. We collected blood samples and nasal or oropharyngeal swabs from 124 desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) from 6 populations in Arizona in 2009 and 2010. M. ovipneumoniae organisms were detected by PCR in 22%, whereas antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were detected in 47% of tested bighorn sheep. Mycoplasma antibodies were not found in 2 of 6 populations, indicating some bighorn sheep populations in Arizona are naïve to this bacterium. In contrast, others had seroprevalence rates up to 80%. We were able to compare seroprevalence rates and titers over time in 9 individuals (7 individuals included in the 124 bighorn sheep sampled in 2009 and 2010, and 2 individuals originally captured in 2006). Antibody titers persisted for 12 months in individuals from the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (n = 7) while antibody titers appeared to decline in the Kanab Creek population (n = 2). M. ovipneumoniae is present or has been present in several, but not all, populations of bighorn sheep in Arizona. The results demonstrate the importance of routine health testing for future translocation efforts to reduce disease risk for naive populations.

  11. Mycoplasma agassizii in Morafka's desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Berry, Kristin H; Brown, Mary B; Vaughn, Mercy; Gowan, Timothy A; Hasskamp, Mary Ann; Torres, Ma Cristina Meléndez

    2015-01-01

    We conducted health evaluations of 69 wild and 22 captive Morafka's desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico between 2005 and 2008. The wild tortoises were from 11 sites in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa, and the captive tortoises were from the state-managed Centro Ecológico de Sonora Zoo in Hermosillo and a private residence in the town of Alamos. We tested 88 tortoises for mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for specific antibody and by culture and PCR for detection of Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum. Fifteen of 22 captive tortoises had one or more positive diagnostic test results for M. agassizii whereas no wild tortoises had positive tests. Tortoises with positive tests also had significantly more moderate and severe clinical signs of mycoplasmosis on beaks and nares compared to tortoises with negative tests. Captive tortoises also exhibited significantly more clinical signs of illness than did wild tortoises, including lethargy and moderate to severe ocular signs. The severity of trauma and diseases of the shell and integument did not differ significantly among tortoises by site; however, clinical signs of moderate to severe trauma and disease were more prevalent in older tortoises. Similar to research findings for other species in the genus Gopherus in the US, we found that URTD is an important disease in captive tortoises. If they escape or are released by intention or accident to the wild, captive tortoises are likely to pose risks to healthy, naïve wild populations.

  12. A Major Determinant for Gliding Motility in Mycoplasma genitalium

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Luca; Lalli, Daniela; García-Morales, Luis; Ratera, Mercè; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Calisto, Bárbara M.

    2015-01-01

    Several mycoplasmas, such as the emergent human pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium, developed a complex polar structure, known as the terminal organelle (TO), responsible for a new type of cellular motility, which is involved in a variety of cell functions: cell division, adherence to host cells, and virulence. The TO cytoskeleton is organized as a multisubunit dynamic motor, including three main ultrastructures: the terminal button, the electrodense core, and the wheel complex. Here, we describe the interaction between MG200 and MG491, two of the main components of the TO wheel complex that connects the TO with the cell body and the cell membrane. The interaction between MG200 and MG491 has a KD in the 80 nm range, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. The interface between the two partners was confined to the “enriched in aromatic and glycine residues” (EAGR) box of MG200, previously described as a protein-protein interaction domain, and to a 25-residue-long peptide from the C-terminal region of MG491 by surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy studies. An atomic description of the MG200 EAGR box binding surface was also provided by solution NMR. An M. genitalium mutant lacking the MG491 segment corresponding to the peptide reveals specific alterations in cell motility and cell morphology indicating that the MG200-MG491 interaction plays a key role in the stability and functioning of the TO. PMID:25471372

  13. Experimentally induced bovine abortion with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis.

    PubMed

    Stalheim, O H; Proctor, S J

    1976-08-01

    Two pregnant cows aborted 11 and 18 days after Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis was inoculated into the amniotic fluids. The placentas were retained. The fetuses (approx 100 and 150 days of age) were decomposed; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from several tissues of the fetuses, the placentas, and fetal fluids. The same organism was given by intraperitoneal injection to 2 other pregnant (130 and 180 days, respectively) cows. At necropsy of the latter 36 days later, placentitis was severe; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from the placentas of both cows and from the fetus of 1 cow. Control cows given sterile mycoplasma cultural medium by intraamnion or intraperitoneal injection did not abort and were not infected. When first recovered from the bovine placenta and fetus, M agalactiae subsp bovis grew slowly in liquid medium and assumed bizarre colonial morphology on solidified medium. Colonies were small (0.1 to 0.5 mm) and dark and lacked halos, but they reacted specifically in the direct fluorescent antibody test with equine M agalactiae subsp bovis antiserum. After 1 or 2 subcultures, the isolates grew at a normal rate and displayed their usual colonial morphology.

  14. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcription Unit Organization: Genome Survey and Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Augusto; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is associated with swine respiratory diseases. Although gene organization and regulation are well known in many prokaryotic organisms, knowledge on mycoplasma is limited. This study performed a comparative analysis of three strains of M. hyopneumoniae (7448, J and 232), with a focus on genome organization and gene comparison for open read frame (ORF) cluster (OC) identification. An in silico analysis of gene organization demonstrated 117 OCs and 34 single ORFs in M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and J, while 116 OCs and 36 single ORFs were identified in M. hyopneumoniae 232. Genomic comparison revealed high synteny and conservation of gene order between the OCs defined for 7448 and J strains as well as for 7448 and 232 strains. Twenty-one OCs were chosen and experimentally confirmed by reverse transcription–PCR from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 genome, validating our prediction. A subset of the ORFs within an OC could be independently transcribed due to the presence of internal promoters. Our results suggest that transcription occurs in ‘run-on’ from an upstream promoter in M. hyopneumoniae, thus forming large ORF clusters (from 2 to 29 ORFs in the same orientation) and indicating a complex transcriptional organization. PMID:22086999

  15. First isolation of Mycoplasma iowae in grey partridge flocks.

    PubMed

    Catania, S; Gobbo, F; Rodio, S; Qualtieri, K; Santone, C; Nicholas, R A J

    2014-06-01

    Mycoplasma iowae, an occasional pathogen of turkeys, was isolated for the first time from captive grey partridges (Perdix perdix). Clinical signs including respiratory and intestinal disorder were seen in birds of all ages but mainly in those kept housed during rearing. Mortality rates averaged over 20% during the year. Treatment with antibiotics and antiparasitic drugs produced only a transient improvement in condition. The gross pathology findings included poor body growth, lack of development of the breast muscles, abnormalities in the keel development, and bone fragility. Some birds showed infraorbital sinusitis with serous or fibrinous exudates and catarrhal tracheitis, while others presented serofibrinous airsacculitis and splenomegaly. Laboratory investigations revealed pure cultures of M. iowae in the gut as well as sinus and air sacs. While other organisms such as coccidia, Trichomonas, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, and Aspergillus spp. were detected, the similarity of the disease with that seen in turkeys infected with M. iowae strongly suggests that this mycoplasma may be the primary pathogen here. The presence of M. iowae in game birds commonly released into the wild could have serious implications particularly in areas where industrial poultry farms are concentrated.

  16. Macromolecular Synthesis and Thymineless Death in Mycoplasma laidlawii B1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Douglas W.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    1968-01-01

    The relationships between macromolecular synthesis and viability have been studied in the pleuropneumonia-like organism Mycoplasma laidlawii B adapted to a semidefined grwoth medium. This organism exhibited an absolute growth requirement for the nucleosides uridine and thymidine, a partial requirement for guanosine and deoxyguanosine, but no requirement for adenosine, deoxyadenosine, cytosine, and deoxycytosine. Cytosine and deoxycytosine partially satisfied the requirement for uridine. Loss in viability resulted from thymidine deprivation, but not from a deficiency in other growth requirements. This phenomenon of thymineless death in a mycoplasma is similar in many respects to that reported in other bacterial systems. Chloramphenicol specifically inhibited protein synthesis and allowed deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis to proceed to only about 40% of that normally produced per generation period, while causing less inhibition of ribonucleic acid synthesis. Protein synthesis inhibition permitted thymineless death to a survival level of less than 0.5%, but ribonucleic acid synthesis inhibition resulted in a higher (10%) survival level. These results are consistent with previously noted aspects of thymineless death in Escherichia coli strains, which suggest that thymineless death is coupled to ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4881702

  17. Clinical Features of Severe or Fatal Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Izumikawa, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. The incidence of fulminant M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is relatively rare despite the high prevalence of M. pneumoniae infection. This literature review highlights the clinical features of fulminant MPP by examining the most recent data in epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment. Fulminant MPP accounts for 0.5–2% of all MPP cases and primarily affects young adults with no underlying disease. Key clinical findings include a cough, fever, and dyspnea along with diffuse abnormal findings in radiological examinations. Levels of inflammatory markers such as white blood cells and C-reactive protein are elevated, as well as levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-18, aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase. The exact pathogenesis of fulminant MPP remains unclear, but theories include a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to M. pneumoniae and the contribution of delayed antibiotic administration to disease progression. Treatment options involve pairing the appropriate anti-mycoplasma agent with a corticosteroid that will downregulate the hypersensitivity response, and mortality rates are quite low in this treatment group. Further research is necessary to determine the exact pathogenesis of severe and fulminant types of MPP. PMID:27313568

  18. Molecular characterization of the uncultivatable hemotropic bacterium Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Emily N; Darby, Alistair C; Helps, Chris R; Peters, Iain R; Heesom, Kate J; Arthur, Christopher J; Crossett, Ben; Hughes, Margaret A; Radford, Alan D; Tasker, Séverine

    2011-07-12

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a pathogenic feline hemoplasma. Despite its importance, little is known about its metabolic pathways or mechanism of pathogenicity due to it being uncultivatable. The recently sequenced M. haemofelis str. Langford 1 genome was analysed and compared to those of other available hemoplasma genomes.Analysis showed that in hemoplasmas genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are limited to enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, with glucose appearing to be the sole energy source. The majority of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes that catalyze the de novo synthesis of ribonucleotides were absent, as were cell division protein FtsZ and chaperonins GroEL/ES. Uncharacterized protein paralogs containing putative surface expression motifs, comprised 62% of M. haemofelis and 19% of Mycoplasma suis genome coverage respectively, the majority of which were present in a small number of unstructured islands. Limited mass spectrometry and immunoblot data matched a number of characterized proteins and uncharacterized paralogs, confirming their expression and immunogenicity in vivo.These data have allowed further characterization of these important pathogens, including their limited metabolic capabilities, which may contribute to their uncultivatable status. A number of immunogenic proteins, and a potential mechanism for host immune system evasion, have been identified.

  19. Molecular characterization of the uncultivatable hemotropic bacterium Mycoplasma haemofelis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis is a pathogenic feline hemoplasma. Despite its importance, little is known about its metabolic pathways or mechanism of pathogenicity due to it being uncultivatable. The recently sequenced M. haemofelis str. Langford 1 genome was analysed and compared to those of other available hemoplasma genomes. Analysis showed that in hemoplasmas genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are limited to enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, with glucose appearing to be the sole energy source. The majority of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes that catalyze the de novo synthesis of ribonucleotides were absent, as were cell division protein FtsZ and chaperonins GroEL/ES. Uncharacterized protein paralogs containing putative surface expression motifs, comprised 62% of M. haemofelis and 19% of Mycoplasma suis genome coverage respectively, the majority of which were present in a small number of unstructured islands. Limited mass spectrometry and immunoblot data matched a number of characterized proteins and uncharacterized paralogs, confirming their expression and immunogenicity in vivo. These data have allowed further characterization of these important pathogens, including their limited metabolic capabilities, which may contribute to their uncultivatable status. A number of immunogenic proteins, and a potential mechanism for host immune system evasion, have been identified. PMID:21749699

  20. Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination Directly from Culture Supernatant Using Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Pisal, R V; Hrebíková, H; Chvátalová, J; Kunke, D; Filip, S; Mokrý, J

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring mycoplasma-free cell culture is of prime importance as they severely affect cellular characteristics leading to experimental artefacts and spurious results. Various methods persist for mycoplasma detection; out of the whole array of methods polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most favoured one because it is highly sensitive, specific and quick. The PCR-based detection procedure involves three steps: cell culture supernatant collection, DNA isolation, and PCR. We have modified this procedure so that cell culture supernatant can directly be used for PCR without the need for DNA extraction. This modification makes the procedure quicker and more sensitive because loss of mycoplasma DNA is prevented and this loss becomes more significant when the level of mycoplasma contamination is very low.

  1. Molecular biology of mycoplasmas: from the minimum cell concept to the artificial cell.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Caio M M; Hoeltgebaum, Daniela L; Machado, Laís D P N; Santos, Larissa Dos

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are a large group of bacteria, sorted into different genera in the Mollicutes class, whose main characteristic in common, besides the small genome, is the absence of cell wall. They are considered cellular and molecular biology study models. We present an updated review of the molecular biology of these model microorganisms and the development of replicative vectors for the transformation of mycoplasmas. Synthetic biology studies inspired by these pioneering works became possible and won the attention of the mainstream media. For the first time, an artificial genome was synthesized (a minimal genome produced from consensus sequences obtained from mycoplasmas). For the first time, a functional artificial cell has been constructed by introducing a genome completely synthesized within a cell envelope of a mycoplasma obtained by transformation techniques. Therefore, this article offers an updated insight to the state of the art of these peculiar organisms' molecular biology.

  2. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  3. Effects of mycoplasma contamination on phenotypic expression of mitochondrial mutants in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doersen, C.J.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1981-04-01

    HeLa cells sensitive to the mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitors erythromycin (ERY) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and HeLa variants resistant to the effects of these drugs were purposefully infected with drug-sensitive and -resistnat mycoplasma strains. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and the ERY-resistant strain of Mycoplasma orale, MO-ERY/sup r/, did not influence the growth of HeLa and ERY-resistant ERY2301 cells in the presence or absence of ERY. M. hyorhinis also did not affect the growth of HeLa and CAP-resistant Cap-2 cells in the presence or absence of CAP. However, both HeLa and Cap-2 cells infected with the CAP-resistant strain of M. hyorhinis, MH-CAP/sup r/, were more sensitive to the cytotoxix effect of CAP. This maybe due to the glucose dependence of the cells, which was compromised by the increased utilization of glucose by MH-CAP/sup r/ in these infected cell cultures. In vitro protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria was significantly altered by mycoplasma infection of the various cell lines. A substantial number of mycoplasmas copurified with the mitochondria, resulting in up to a sevenfold increase in the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. More importantly, the apparent drug sensitivity or resistance of mitchondrial preparations from mycoplasma-infected cells reflected the drug sensitivity or resistance of the contaminating mycoplasmas. These results illustrate the hazards in interpreting mitochondrial protein synthesis data derived from mycoplasma-infected cell lines, particularly putative mitochondrially encoded mutants resistant to inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  4. Cranial Sixth-Nerve Palsy and Eosinophilia in an Outbreak of Mycoplasma Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Howard J.; Lindzon, Martin

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss a case in which three siblings presented with Mycoplasma pneumonia. All three had a typical rise in complement fixation antibody titres. However, the sibling with the highest titre also developed cranial sixth-nerve palsy; in addition, she was the only one of the three who did not have an eosinophilia. The authors review the symptomatology of Mycoplasma pneumonia and the involvement of the central nervous system. PMID:21263943

  5. [Case of tuberculous pleurisy distinguished from pleurisy caused by Mycoplasma infection].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Yamanaka, Tohru; Yoshioka, Yuichi; Horio, Yuko; Iyama, Shinji; Suzumura, Tomoko; Esaki, Toshihiro

    2013-04-01

    We report a case of tuberculous pleurisy that required differentiation from pleurisy caused by Mycoplasma infection. A 28-year-old woman presented to a clinic with fever and pain on the left side of her chest. A chest radiograph revealed pleural effusion in the left thorax, and the condition was diagnosed as bacterial pleurisy. The patient was referred to our hospital because of an increase in the pleural effusion despite antibiotic treatment. Mycoplasma infection was suspected because the patient was young, the white blood cell count was not elevated, and the result of the ImmunoCard Mycoplasma test (IC) for Mycoplasma pneumoniae-specific IgM antibodies was positive. However, the fever persisted even after treatment with azithromycin and pazufloxacin. The left pleural effusion was exudative, with lymphocytosis and high adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels. The results of the QuantiFERON test were positive. Therefore, tuberculous pleurisy was diagnosed, and the effusion subsided after treatment with standard anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Although detection of Mycoplasma infection using the IC is rapid and simple, the accuracy of this test is poor. The patient was first diagnosed with pleurisy of Mycoplasma origin because of a single high-particle agglutination titer of 1: 320 and because of the presence of exudative pleural effusion with lymphocytosis and elevated ADA levels, which has been reported in patients with Mycoplasma infection. The results of the IC test and the ADA level of the pleural effusion might not be reliable when distinguishing between tuberculous pleurisy and pleurisy caused by Mycoplasma infection.

  6. MRI appearances of the CNS manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Francis, D A; Brown, A; Miller, D H; Wiles, C M; Bennett, E D; Leigh, N

    1988-09-01

    Two patients are reported with Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related cervical myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging in each case demonstrated clinically silent lesions suggesting more extensive neurological involvement. This supports the concept of widespread immunologically mediated disease occurring as a remote effect of initial M. pneumoniae respiratory infection. Differences from the MRI appearances of a patient with mycoplasma-related Guillian-Barré syndrome imply that more than one antigenic determinant is involved.

  7. Integrative conjugative elements are widespread in field isolates of Mycoplasma species pathogenic for ruminants.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Florence; Mick, Virginie; Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Marenda, Marc Serge; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Blanchard, Alain; Citti, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Comparative genomics have revealed massive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between Mycoplasma species sharing common ruminant hosts. Further results pointed toward an integrative conjugative element (ICE) as an important contributor of HGT in the small-ruminant-pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae. To estimate the prevalence of ICEs in ruminant mycoplasmas, we surveyed their occurrence in a collection of 166 field strains representing 4 (sub)species that are recognized as major pathogens. Based on available sequenced genomes, we first defined the conserved, minimal ICE backbone as composed of 4 coding sequences (CDSs) that are evenly distributed and predicted to be essential for ICE chromosomal integration-excision and horizontal transfer. Screening of the strain collection revealed that these 4 CDSs are well represented in ruminant Mycoplasma species, suggesting widespread occurrence of ICEs. Yet their prevalence varies within and among species, with no correlation found with the individual strain history. Extrachromosomal ICE forms were also often detected, suggesting that ICEs are able to circularize in all species, a first and essential step in ICE horizontal transfer. Examination of the junction of the circular forms and comparative sequence analysis of conserved CDSs clearly pointed toward two types of ICE, the hominis and spiroplasma types, most likely differing in their mechanism of excision-integration. Overall, our data indicate the occurrence and maintenance of functional ICEs in a large number of field isolates of ruminant mycoplasmas. These may contribute to genome plasticity and gene exchanges and, presumably, to the emergence of diverse genotypes within pathogenic mycoplasmas of veterinary importance.

  8. Identification of Chlamydiae and Mycoplasma species in ruminants with ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Chahota, R; Bhardwaj, B; Malik, P; Verma, S; Sharma, M

    2015-02-01

    Infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC) is a highly contagious ocular inflammatory condition, which is often reported in domestic small and large ruminants. Multiple infectious aetiologies are reported to be involved, but information about the role of certain fastidious bacterial pathogens such as chlamydiae and mycoplasmas is limited in India. Hence, this study was performed to determine the role of these pathogens and their identification by molecular approach. A total of 53 samples from 31 ovine, 14 caprine and eight bovine having clinical symptoms were collected and tested using species-specific PCR tests for chlamydiae and mycoplasmas followed by nucleotide sequence analysis. The results showed 77.41, 14.29 and 25% samples were chlamydiae positive in ovine, caprine and bovine, respectively, whereas 41.93, 14.29 and 37.5% prevalence of mycoplasma infection was detected in ovine, caprine and bovines, respectively. Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila psittaci, Mycoplasma arginini and Mycoplasma hyorhinis were detected from tested samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time these species are identified in IKC cases from India. Coinfection of both chlamydial and mycoplasmal species was detected in eight IKC cases of ovine which suggest synergistic roles played by both chlamydiae and mycoplasma in IKC samples.

  9. Investigations into the seasonal presence of Mycoplasma species in fattening lambs.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sara; Galapero, Javier; Rey, Joaquín; Pérez, Carlos Javier; Ramos, Alfonso; Rosales, Rubén; Ayling, Roger; Alonso, Juan Manuel; Gómez, Luis

    2016-06-01

    The presence of infection with Mycoplasma species in association with lung consolidation, environmental temperature and relative humidity was investigated in 410 clinically healthy fattening lambs from five different feedlots in Extremadura (southwestern Spain). Isolates of Mycoplasma species were obtained (n= 117), including Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (n = 18) and Mycoplasma arginini (n = 99). Two seasonal periods were identified. The first period, which included February, March, September, October, and November, had an average temperature of 17.5 ± 4.7 °C and a relative humidity of 61.3 ± 15.8%. The second seasonal period, which included the months from April to August, had an average temperature of 22.9 ± 5.5 °C and a relative humidity of 48.4 ± 10.7%. Most Mycoplasma species were isolated from the second seasonal period, indicating that higher temperatures and lower relative humidity favour the presence of Mycoplasma species. M. arginini was also associated with lung consolidation.

  10. Adenovirus and mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Szilvia L; Gál, János

    2009-07-02

    A female, adult ornate box turtle (Terrapene ornata ornata) with fatty liver was submitted for virologic examination in Hungary. Signs of an adenovirus infection including degeneration of the liver cells, enlarged nuclei and intranuclear inclusion bodies were detected by light microscopic examination. The presence of an adenovirus was later confirmed by obtaining partial sequence data from the adenoviral DNA-dependent DNA-polymerase. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this novel chelonian adenovirus was distinct from previously described reptilian adenoviruses, not belonging to any of the recognized genera of the family Adenoviridae. As a part of the routine diagnostic procedure for chelonians the detection of herpes-, rana- and iridoviruses together with Mycoplasma spp. was attempted. Amplicons were generated by a general mycoplasma polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S/23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) intergenic spacer region, as well as, a specific Mycoplasma agassizii PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Based on the analyses of partial sequences of the 16S rRNA gene, the Mycoplasma sp. of the ornate box turtle seemed to be identical with the recently described eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) Mycoplasma sp. This is the first report of a novel chelonian adenovirus and a mycoplasma infection in an ornate box turtle (T. ornata ornata) in Europe.

  11. The detection of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" in cattle and buffalo in China.

    PubMed

    Su, Q L; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q; Yuan, Z G; Yang, J F; Zhao, G H; Huang, W Y; Zhu, Xing Quan

    2010-12-01

    "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" is a hemoplasma species found in cattle and has been recently reported in Switzerland and Japan. In this study, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" was shown to occur in cattle and buffalo in tropical China by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from blood samples. Based on the 16S rDNA sequence, a specific PCR assay was developed. Occurrence of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" in cattle and buffalo in Guangxi, China, was determined by examining 25 buffalo blood samples, 12 yellow cattle blood samples and 42 dairy cow blood samples. The results showed that 32% (8/25) of buffalo, 41.7% (5/12) of yellow cattle, and 14.3% (6/42) of dairy cows were positive for "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos", respectively. Direct sequencing of representative PCR products confirmed that the amplified partial 16S rDNA sequence represented "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos". This is the first report of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" in buffalo, yellow cattle, and dairy cows in China.

  12. High quality draft genomes of the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides challenge strains Afadé and B237.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Anne; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Hegerman, Jan; Gourlé, Hadrien; Schieck, Elise; Lambert, Mathieu; Nadendla, Suvarna; Wesonga, Hezron; Miller, Rachel A; Vashee, Sanjay; Weber, Johann; Meens, Jochen; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster' represent important livestock pathogens worldwide. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP), which is still endemic in many parts of Africa. We report the genome sequences and annotation of two frequently used challenge strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Afadé and B237. The information provided will enable downstream 'omics' applications such as proteomics, transcriptomics and reverse vaccinology approaches. Despite the absence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae like cyto-adhesion encoding genes, the two strains showed the presence of protrusions. This phenotype is likely encoded by another set of genes.

  13. Standardized methods and quality control limits for agar and broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Waites, Ken B; Duffy, Lynn B; Bébéar, Cécile M; Matlow, Anne; Talkington, Deborah F; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A; Bade, Donald J; Zheng, Xiaotian; Davidson, Maureen K; Shortridge, Virginia D; Watts, Jeffrey L; Brown, Steven D

    2012-11-01

    An international multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted to develop standard media and consensus methods for the performance and quality control of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, and Ureaplasma urealyticum using broth microdilution and agar dilution techniques. A reference strain from the American Type Culture Collection was designated for each species, which was to be used for quality control purposes. Repeat testing of replicate samples of each reference strain by participating laboratories utilizing both methods and different lots of media enabled a 3- to 4-dilution MIC range to be established for drugs in several different classes, including tetracyclines, macrolides, ketolides, lincosamides, and fluoroquinolones. This represents the first multilaboratory collaboration to standardize susceptibility testing methods and to designate quality control parameters to ensure accurate and reliable assay results for mycoplasmas and ureaplasmas that infect humans.

  14. Molecular detection of Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' Infection in cats by direct PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hisasue, Masaharu; Souma, Takehisa; Ohshiro, Shuichi; Yamada, Takatsugu; Tsuchiya, Ryo

    2008-10-01

    Detection of hemotropic Mycoplasma spp. infection was attempted in cats by PCR using whole blood without DNA extraction. A total 46 of 54 (85%) cats with suspected Mycoplasma spp. infection showed a positive reaction, corresponding completely with the results of standard PCR testing. The direct PCR assay was sensitive enough to detect more than 0.0061% parasitemia for ;C. M. haemominutum' and 0.0075% parasitemia for M. haemofelis. These data indicate that the direct PCR assay might be sufficient for use as a tool in clinical examinations.

  15. A serological and molecular study on the occurrence of mycoplasmas in European bison (Bison bonasus) from two areas of Eastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Dudek, K; Bednarek, D; Szacawa, E; Ayling, R D; Krzysiak, M K; Marczuk, J

    2015-01-01

    European bison (Bison bonasus) from two different areas of Eastern Poland showing gross pathology possibly associated with mycoplasma infections were tested for ruminant Mycoplasma species using serological and molecular methods. Fifty-five samples, blood or tissue were collected from 28 animals during 2013-2014. Six sera were positive for Mycoplasma bovis. The ELISA and complement fixation test for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides gave a few weak reactions, but were negative by immunoblotting and molecular methods.

  16. MLVA typing of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and field strains

    PubMed Central

    Tamiozzo, P.; Zamora, R.; Lucchesi, P. M. A.; Estanguet, A.; Parada, J.; Carranza, A.; Camacho, P.; Ambrogi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the lack of information about both the genetic characteristics of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae commercial vaccines and their relationship with field strains, the authors attempted to identify genetic subtypes of some M hyopneumoniae bacterins, and to compare them with M. hyopneumoniae field strains. Six commercial M hyopneumoniae bacterins and 28 bronchoalveolar lavages from pigs at slaughter from three herds were analysed by Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis (MLVA) on p146R1, p146R3, H4, H5 and p95 loci. The results obtained showed the presence of more than one M hyopneumoniae genotype in some pigs and also in one of the bacterins analysed. It is also worth noting that MLVA typing allowed the distinction among circulating field strains and also when comparing them with vaccine strains, which, knowing the relatedness among them, could be useful in the research of the efficacy of the vaccines. PMID:26495127

  17. Comparative susceptibilities of various animal-pathogenic mycoplasmas to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, P C; Windsor, G D; de Jong, A; Schmeer, N; Stegemann, M

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activities of six antimicrobial agents were tested against 162 mycoplasma strains of eight species isolated from poultry and livestock at different geographic sites. Tiamulin was most active (MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited [MIC90s], 0.025 to 0.25 microg/ml); enrofloxacin and danofloxacin had near equivalent activities (MIC90s, 0.05 to 1.0 microg/ml), but were much more active than flumequine (MIC90s, 1 to 50 microg/ml). The MIC90s of tylosin and oxytetracycline were 0.25 to > 100 microg/ml and 0.25 to 100 microg/ml, respectively. PMID:9303412

  18. Unitary step of gliding machinery in Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Nakane, Daisuke; Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Masaike, Tomoko; Mizutani, Kana; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Among the bacteria that glide on substrate surfaces, Mycoplasma mobile is one of the fastest, exhibiting smooth movement with a speed of 2.0–4.5 μm⋅s−1 with a cycle of attachment to and detachment from sialylated oligosaccharides. To study the gliding mechanism at the molecular level, we applied an assay with a fluorescently labeled and membrane-permeabilized ghost model, and investigated the motility by high precision colocalization microscopy. Under conditions designed to reduce the number of motor interactions on a randomly oriented substrate, ghosts took unitary 70-nm steps in the direction of gliding. Although it remains possible that the stepping behavior is produced by multiple interactions, our data suggest that these steps are produced by a unitary gliding machine that need not move between sites arranged on a cytoskeletal lattice. PMID:24912194

  19. Molecular distinctions among clinical isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Su, C J; Dallo, S F; Baseman, J B

    1990-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fingerprinting of genomic DNA and Southern blots probed with subclones of the Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene were used to characterize clinical isolates of M. pneumoniae. On the basis of the examination of 29 individual M. pneumoniae isolates, two distinct groups were established. Group 1, which displayed a 12-kilobase band following DNA digestion with HindIII, consisted of strain M129-B16 and three others obtained in the state of Washington during the 1960s. The remaining M. pneumoniae strains belonged to group 2, which lacked the 12-kilobase band and included samples from the 1940s, 1970s, and 1980s. This category also included the only M. pneumoniae strain isolated from the synovial fluid of an arthritic patient. Images PMID:2166088

  20. Ageing-related changes in Mycoplasma canadense membranes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G E; Sotomayor, C P

    1992-01-01

    Fluidity and composition of cell membranes during progression of Mycoplasma canadense cultures grown in a serum-free medium was assessed. The fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene at 25 degrees C of intact cells and liposomes in the exponential and stationary phases of growth was compared. A decrease in fluidity and an increase in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids was detected in cell membranes on aging. Nevertheless, membrane density remained unaltered although the molar ratio of cholesterol to phospholipids decreased. It is proposed that the increase in lipid order is primarily due to the increase in the ratio of saturated to unsaturated membrane fatty acids, being the diminished molar ratio of cholesterol to phospholipids involved in the reduced unsaturated fatty acid uptake.

  1. Mycoplasma genitalium: Is It a Sexually Transmitted Pathogen?

    PubMed

    Manhart, Lisa E; Kay, Noa

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an emerging pathogen that has been detected in the male and female reproductive tracts. It is an established cause of nongonococcal urethritis and evidence linking it to cervicitis, endometritis, and tubal factor infertility is accumulating. Whether a pathogen is sexually transmitted has important implications for clinical management because partner management strategies are an essential part of the treatment plan for sexually transmitted infections. However, mere detection in the genital tract and associations with reproductive tract disease are insufficient to conclude that an organism is sexually transmitted. Therefore, to assess whether M. genitalium is sexually transmitted, we evaluated the literature in terms of associations with established risk factors for other sexually transmitted infections, comparisons of sexually experienced individuals to nonsexually experienced individuals, consideration of other modes of transmission, assessment of concordant infection status among sexual partners, and examination of molecular strain typing in concordantly infected partners.

  2. Identification of Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma haemofelis) in captive nondomestic cats.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Monika; Burke, Thomas J; Kitchell, Barbara E; Lamont, Leigh A; Schaeffer, David J; Behr, Melissa; Messick, Joanne B

    2003-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether Haemobartonella felis (Mycoplasma haemofelis), the causative bacterial agent of feline infectious anemia, infects nondomestic cats. Routine complete blood count and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to detect the gene for 16S ribosomal RNA for the organism. Sixty-four blood samples were collected from 54 nondomestic cats, including tigers (Panthera tigris), cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), lions (P. leo), mountain lions (Felis concolor), snow leopards (P. unica), and a jaguar (P. onca). Some cats were sampled on two or three different dates. Two tigers were positive for H. felis by PCR analysis. As previously described in domestic cats, the parasitemia appears to be intermittent in nondomestic cats.

  3. Detection of Mycoplasma agassizii in the Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guthrie, Amanda L.; White, C. LeAnn; Brown, Mary B.; deMaar, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii causes upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in Texas tortoises (Gopherus berlandieri). To determine exposure to and shedding of M. agassizii, we collected blood samples and nasal swabs from 40 free-ranging Texas tortoises on public and private lands in Texas, USA, from May to October 2009. We used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect M. agassizii–specific antibodies. Eleven (28%) tortoises were antibody positive, three (8%) were suspect, and the remaining 26 (65%) were negative. Nasal lavage samples were collected from 35 of the 40 tortoises for M. agassizii culture and PCR to detect shedding of M. agassizii. Current infection with M. agassizii was confirmed in one tortoise that had mild clinical signs of URTD and was positive by ELISA (antibody titer >512), PCR, and culture. The clinical isolate was confirmed as M. agassizii by restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunobinding.

  4. Mycoplasma bovis: Mechanisms of Resistance and Trends in Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Ayling, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a cell-wall-less bacterium and belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is the most important etiological agent of bovine mycoplasmoses in North America and Europe, causing respiratory disease, mastitis, otitis media, arthritis, and reproductive disease. Clinical disease associated with M. bovis is often chronic, debilitating, and poorly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, resulting in significant economic loss, the full extent of which is difficult to estimate. Until M. bovis vaccines are universally available, sanitary control measures and antimicrobial treatment are the only approaches that can be used in attempts to control M. bovis infections. However, in vitro studies show that many of the current M. bovis isolates circulating in Europe have high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for many of the commercially available antimicrobials. In this review we summarize the current MIC trends indicating the development of antimicrobial resistance in M. bovis as well as the known molecular mechanisms by which resistance is acquired. PMID:27199926

  5. Mycoplasma pneumoniae associated opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome in three cases.

    PubMed

    Huber, Benedikt Maria; Strozzi, Susi; Steinlin, Maja; Aebi, Christoph; Fluri, Simon

    2010-04-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare acquired movement disorder occurring in all age groups, predominantly in infants. Although the exact pathogenesis is still undefined, there is strong evidence for a paraneoplastic or parainfectious immune process resulting in central nervous system dysfunction. Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been implicated in a number of immune-mediated neurologic diseases [28]. However, the association of M. pneumoniae and opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome is not well established so far. We present three cases with opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome in adolescents following an infection with M. pneumoniae. Monophasic disease course and full recovery correspond to the favorable prognosis known from parainfectious cases in young adults. This should affect therapeutic consideration. OMS should be added to the spectrum of M. pneumoniae-associated neurologic complications. Nevertheless, neuroblastoma has to be ruled out in all cases of OMS.

  6. Mycoplasmas hyorhinis in different regions of cuba. diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Evelyn; Poveda, Carlos; Gupta, Rakesh; Suarez, Alejandro; Hernández, Yenney; Ramírez, Ana; Poveda, José B.

    2011-01-01

    M. hyorhinis is considered one of the etiological agents of arthritis in sucking pigs, but recently as seen, some strains can produce pneumonia that could not be distinguished from the mycoplasmosis caused by M. hyopneumoniae. The study was conducted to research the presence of Mycoplasma hyorhinis (M. hyorhinis ) in different regions of the country from exudates of pig lungs with typical EP lesions. Exudates from 280 pig lungs with typical EP lesions were studied using molecular techniques such as PCR, real time PCR and amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA. It was detected that the 66% of the samples studied resulted positive to M. hyorhinis, and the presence of this species was detected in all the provinces. Amplification and studies on the intergenic region 16S-23S of M. hyorhinis rRNA demonstrated the existing variability among strains of a same species. This study is the first report on M. hyorhinis detection in Cuba. PMID:24031686

  7. Unitary step of gliding machinery in Mycoplasma mobile.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Nakane, Daisuke; Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Masaike, Tomoko; Mizutani, Kana; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki

    2014-06-10

    Among the bacteria that glide on substrate surfaces, Mycoplasma mobile is one of the fastest, exhibiting smooth movement with a speed of 2.0-4.5 μm⋅s(-1) with a cycle of attachment to and detachment from sialylated oligosaccharides. To study the gliding mechanism at the molecular level, we applied an assay with a fluorescently labeled and membrane-permeabilized ghost model, and investigated the motility by high precision colocalization microscopy. Under conditions designed to reduce the number of motor interactions on a randomly oriented substrate, ghosts took unitary 70-nm steps in the direction of gliding. Although it remains possible that the stepping behavior is produced by multiple interactions, our data suggest that these steps are produced by a unitary gliding machine that need not move between sites arranged on a cytoskeletal lattice.

  8. Cortical Blindness in a Child Secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia Tirado, A; Jimenez-Rolando, B; Noval, S; Martinez Bermejo, A

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to present a case of an uncommon complication associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a child where cortical blindness was the main clinical feature. Stroke due to an infection by M. pneumoniae is very uncommon. No consensus has been reached on the pathogenesis, although several pathogenic mechanisms have been proposed. Occlusion of posterior cerebral circulation is the most uncommon central nervous system complication of M. pneumoniae infection being reported. Symptoms are usually hemiplegia and dysarthria. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who suffered cortical blindness due to a stroke 2 days after M. pneumoniae infection. This is the first case of documented cortical blindness due to posterior cerebral arteries occlusion in children after M. pneumoniae infection.

  9. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonization of pigs sired by different boars.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Alvaro; Galina, Lucina; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-04-01

    Differences in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonization were evaluated in experimentally inoculated pigs sired by 3 different boars of the same genetic line. Forty-six pigs were used, including a treatment group and positive and negative control groups. The pigs were intratracheally inoculated with an M. hyopneumoniae suspension or with Friis media as a placebo. To evaluate differences in the magnitude of colonization during a 35-day period, nasal and tracheal swabs were collected weekly and tested by nested polymerase chain reaction (N-PCR). Temperature, weight and circulating antibodies were measured for 35 days. At 11 and 35 d postinoculation the pigs were necropsied and macroscopic and microscopic lesions were determined. A section of bronchus was tested by the indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N-PCR. The N-PCR results from the nasal and tracheal swabs showed that the pigs sired by one boar (B3) had a distinctive colonization pattern, different from that of the pigs from the other 2 boars and from the positive controls. SEM studies demonstrated that at 35 d postinoculation a higher proportion of B3 pigs had lower numbers of mycoplasmas attached to the cilia compared with B1 and B2 offspring. No significant differences were observed in temperature and weight gain among groups by ANOVA; however, with use of a 2 x 2 table, temperature differences were observed between pigs sired by boars B1 and B2 at 4 d postinoculation. No pigs seroconverted, showed gross or microscopic lesions, or had positive IFAT results. These results provide evidence of differences in patterns of colonization between pigs sired by different boars, suggesting a possible genetic effect.

  10. Mycoplasma agassizii in Morafka's desert tortoise (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Brown, Mary B.; Vaughn, Mercy; Gowan, Timothy A.; Hasskamp, Mary Ann; Torres, Ma. Cristina Melendez

    2015-01-01

    We conducted health evaluations of 69 wild and 22 captive Morafka's desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in Mexico between 2005 and 2008. The wild tortoises were from 11 sites in the states of Sonora and Sinaloa, and the captive tortoises were from the state-managed Centro Ecológico de Sonora Zoo in Hermosillo and a private residence in the town of Alamos. We tested 88 tortoises for mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for specific antibody and by culture and PCR for detection of Mycoplasma agassizii and Mycoplasma testudineum. Fifteen of 22 captive tortoises had one or more positive diagnostic test results for M. agassizii whereas no wild tortoises had positive tests. Tortoises with positive tests also had significantly more moderate and severe clinical signs of mycoplasmosis on beaks and nares compared to tortoises with negative tests. Captive tortoises also exhibited significantly more clinical signs of illness than did wild tortoises, including lethargy and moderate to severe ocular signs. The severity of trauma and diseases of the shell and integument did not differ significantly among tortoises by site; however, clinical signs of moderate to severe trauma and disease were more prevalent in older tortoises. Similar to research findings for other species in the genus Gopherusin the US, we found that URTD is an important disease in captive tortoises. If they escape or are released by intention or accident to the wild, captive tortoises are likely to pose risks to healthy, naïve wild populations.

  11. Cis-regulatory sequence variation and association with Mycoplasma load in natural populations of the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Niclas; Shipilina, Daria; Blom, Mozes P K; Edwards, Scott V

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the genetic basis of fitness traits in natural populations is important for understanding how organisms adapt to the changing environment and to novel events, such as epizootics. However, candidate fitness-influencing loci, such as regulatory regions, are usually unavailable in nonmodel species. Here, we analyze sequence data from targeted resequencing of the cis-regulatory regions of three candidate genes for disease resistance (CD74, HSP90α, and LCP1) in populations of the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) historically exposed (Alabama) and naïve (Arizona) to Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Our study, the first to quantify variation in regulatory regions in wild birds, reveals that the upstream regions of CD74 and HSP90α are GC-rich, with the former exhibiting unusually low sequence variation for this species. We identified two SNPs, located in a GC-rich region immediately upstream of an inferred promoter site in the gene HSP90α, that were significantly associated with Mycoplasma pathogen load in the two populations. The SNPs are closely linked and situated in potential regulatory sequences: one in a binding site for the transcription factor nuclear NFYα and the other in a dinucleotide microsatellite ((GC)6). The genotype associated with pathogen load in the putative NFYα binding site was significantly overrepresented in the Alabama birds. However, we did not see strong effects of selection at this SNP, perhaps because selection has acted on standing genetic variation over an extremely short time in a highly recombining region. Our study is a useful starting point to explore functional relationships between sequence polymorphisms, gene expression, and phenotypic traits, such as pathogen resistance that affect fitness in the wild. PMID:23532859

  12. Seroprevalence of Salmonella and Mycoplasma infection in backyard chickens in the state of Entre Rios in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J; Pascal, D; Crespo, E; Schell, H L; Trinidad, J A; Bueno, D J

    2011-04-01

    The present work was conducted to study the seroprevalence of Salmonella, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) infection in backyard chickens located in Entre Ríos, Argentina, over 3 periods of time. A total of 2,441 sera samples were collected from backyard chickens belonging to 256 family farms in 16 counties in the state of Entre Ríos from January to May 2003 (first period), December 2004 to April 2005 (second period), and October 2006 to May 2007 (third period). The prevalence of family farms testing seropositive for Salmonella averaged 23.9, 15.9, and 28.6% during the first, second, and third period, respectively. The highest prevalence of Salmonella-seropositive farms recorded (66.7%) was on farms from Concordia county, and the lowest prevalence (0%) was on farms from La Paz county. In contrast, the prevalence of family farms seropositive for MG averaged 32.8, 55.1, and 76.2% during the first, second, and third periods, respectively. The highest prevalence of MG-seropositive farms (100%) was found in the counties of Victoria and Tala, and the lowest prevalence (8.7%) was found on farms on Colón county. The prevalence of family farms seropositive for MS averaged 68.6 and 100% during the first and second periods, respectively. The highest prevalence of MS-seropositive farms (100%) was on farms in 85% of the counties tested, and the lowest prevalence (21.7%) was on farms from Colón county. Salmonella, MG, and MS infection are present at high levels in backyard chicken farms, and this presents a high risk to commercial poultry production in Entre Ríos, the state with the highest chicken population and density in Argentina.

  13. Mycoplasma corogypsi associated polyarthritis and tenosynovitis in black vultures (Coragyps atratus)

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, A. J.; Ley, D. H.; Scott, D. E.; Buckanoff, H. D.; Degernes, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Three wild American black vultures (Coragyps atratus) were presented to rehabilitation centers with swelling of multiple joints, including elbows, stifles, hocks, and carpal joints, and of the gastrocnemius tendons. Cytological examination of the joint fluid exudate indicated heterophilic arthritis. Radiographic examination in 2 vultures demonstrated periarticular soft tissue swelling in both birds and irregular articular surfaces with subchondral bone erosion in both elbows in 1 bird. Prolonged antibiotic therapy administered in 2 birds did not improve the clinical signs. Necropsy and histological examination demonstrated a chronic lymphoplasmacytic arthritis involving multiple joints and gastrocnemius tenosynovitis. Articular lesions varied in severity and ranged from moderate synovitis and cartilage erosion and fibrillation to severe synovitis, diffuse cartilage ulceration, subchondral bone loss and/or sclerosis, pannus, synovial cysts, and epiphyseal osteomyelitis. No walled bacteria were observed or isolated from the joints. However, mycoplasmas polymerase chain reactions were positive in at least 1 affected joint from each bird. Mycoplasmas were isolated from joints of 1 vulture that did not receive antibiotic therapy. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from joint samples and the mycoplasma isolate identified Mycoplasma corogypsi in 2 vultures and was suggestive in the third vulture. Mycoplasma corogypsi identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of mycoplasma isolates. This report provides further evidence that M. corogypsi is a likely cause of arthritis and tenosynovitis in American black vultures. Cases of arthritis and tenosynovitis in New World vultures should be investigated for presence of Mycoplasma spp, especially M. corogypsi. PMID:22903399

  14. Risk of Mycoplasma bovis transmission from contaminated sand bedding to naive dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D J; Justice-Allen, A; Goodell, G; Baldwin, T J; Skirpstunas, R T; Cavender, K B

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible transmission of Mycoplasma bovis from positive sand bedding to naïve dairy calves. Twelve preweaned Holstein bull calves were blocked in pairs and randomly assigned as unexposed controls (n=6) bedded with control sand, or exposed calves (n=6) bedded with sand previously positive for M. bovis at a dairy farm. Bedding sand was cultured weekly. Nasal and ear swabs and sera were collected weekly, tracheal swabs were collected monthly, and by the end of the 105-d study, all calves were euthanized (n=10) or died (n=2). Sera were tested for M. bovis-specific antibody. Mycoplasma spp. culture was performed on nasal and ear swabs; culture and a PCR differentiating multiple Mycoplasma spp. were performed on postmortem samples of lung, retropharyngeal lymph node, and trachea from each calf. A complete necropsy also was performed. During 6 wk, mycoplasma concentration in exposed group sand was between 200 and 32,000 cfu/g. All 166 tracheal swabs, nasal and ear swabs, and postmortem tests from all calves were negative for mycoplasma. All 94 sera were negative for M. bovis-specific antibody. No gross pathology suggestive of mycoplasma disease was detected. The probability of mycoplasma detection, if an exposed calf had become infected 4 wk after exposure, ranged between 97 and 99% depending on time of exposure for individual calves. There was no evidence that sand bedding contaminated with M. bovis might serve as a source of transmission to naïve dairy calves.

  15. Systemic Disease in Vaal Rhebok (Pelea capreolus) Caused by Mycoplasmas in the Mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Melissa M.; Stalis, Ilse H.; Clippinger, Tracy L.; Busch, Martin; Nordhausen, Robert; Maalouf, Gabriel; Schrenzel, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    In the winter of 2002, an outbreak of mycoplasma infection in Vaal rhebok (Pelea capreolus) originating from South Africa occurred 15 weeks after their arrival in San Diego, Calif. Three rhebok developed inappetence, weight loss, lethargy, signs related to pulmonary or arthral dysfunction, and sepsis. All three rhebok died or were euthanized. Primary postmortem findings were erosive tracheitis, pleuropneumonia, regional cellulitis, and necrotizing lymphadenitis. Mycoplasmas were detected in numerous tissues by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and PCR. The three deceased rhebok were coinfected with ovine herpesvirus-2, and two animals additionally had a novel gammaherpesvirus. However, no lesions indicative of herpesvirus were seen microscopically in any animal. The rheboks' mycoplasmas were characterized at the level of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region, and the fructose biphosphate aldolase gene. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was carried out to address the possibility of infection with multiple strains. Two of the deceased rhebok were infected with a single strain of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum, and the third animal had a single, unique strain most closely related to Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large-colony. A PCR survey of DNA samples from 46 other ruminant species demonstrated the presence of several species of mycoplasmas in the mycoides cluster, including a strain of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum identical to that found in two of the rhebok. These findings demonstrate the pervasiveness of mycoplasmas in the mycoides cluster in small ruminants and the potential for interspecies transmission and disease when different animal taxa come in contact. PMID:15750104

  16. Widespread infection with hemotropic mycoplasmas in bats in Spain, including a hemoplasma closely related to "Candidatus Mycoplasma hemohominis".

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; López-Roig, Marc; Delicado, Verónica; Serra-Cobo, Jordi; Esperón, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Molecular analyses of blood samples revealed infection with hemoplasmas in 97% of 31 cave bats captured in three caves in North-Eastern Spain. The characterization of 1250 bp of the 16S rRNA gene in 29 of the positive bats identified two different groups of sequences. Twenty-two Schreibers' bats (Miniopterus schreibersii) and one long-eared bat (Myotis capaccinii) shared one group, composed of seven closely related sequences. These sequences showed an identity of about 97% with "Candidatus Mycoplasma hemohominis" and the phylogenetic branch including bat and human sequences showed a 100% bootstrap value, supporting a close phylogenetic relationship between these hemoplasmas. The second group, representing a potentially novel species, was composed of a single sequence shared by six Schreibers' bats that had 91% identity with the recently reported hemoplasma from little brown bats in North America. Large bat aggregations in roosting caves probably benefits intra and inter-species transmission explaining the high observed prevalence.

  17. Mycoplasma suis infection results endothelial cell damage and activation: new insight into the cell tropism and pathogenicity of hemotrophic mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Sokoli, Albina; Groebel, Katrin; Hoelzle, Katharina; Amselgruber, Werner M; Mateos, José M; Schneider, Mårten K J; Ziegler, Urs; Felder, Kathrin M; Hoelzle, Ludwig E

    2013-02-11

    Hemotrophic mycoplasmas (HM) are highly specialized red blood cell parasites that cause infectious anemia in a variety of mammals, including humans. To date, no in vitro cultivation systems for HM have been available, resulting in relatively little information about the pathogenesis of HM infection. In pigs, Mycoplasma suis-induced infectious anemia is associated with hemorrhagic diathesis, and coagulation dysfunction. However, intravasal coagulation and subsequent consumption coagulopathy can only partly explain the sequence of events leading to hemorrhagic diathesis manifesting as cyanosis, petechial bleeding, and ecchymosis, and to disseminated coagulation. The involvement of endothelial activation and damage in M. suis-associated pathogenesis was investigated using light and electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and cell sorting. M. suis interacted directly with endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial activation, widespread endothelial damage, and adherence of red blood cells to the endothelium were evident in M. suis-infected pigs. These alterations of the endothelium were accompanied by hemorrhage, intravascular coagulation, vascular occlusion, and massive morphological changes within the parenchyma. M. suis biofilm-like microcolonies formed on the surface of endothelial cells, and may represent a putative persistence mechanism of M. suis. In vitro analysis demonstrated that M. suis interacted with the endothelial cytoskeletal protein actin, and induced actin condensation and activation of endothelial cells, as determined by the up-regulation of ICAM, PECAM, E-selectin, and P-selectin. These findings demonstrate an additional cell tropism of HM for endothelial cells and suggest that M. suis interferes with the protective function of the endothelium, resulting in hemorrhagic diathesis.

  18. Lack of cross-protection against Mycoplasma haemofelis infection and signs of enhancement in "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis"-recovered cats.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Julia; Novacco, Marilisa; Willi, Barbara; Riond, Barbara; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2015-09-24

    "Mycoplasma haemofelis" and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis" are feline hemoplasmas that induce hemolytic anemia. Protection from homologous re-challenge was recently demonstrated in cats recovered from primary infection. Here, we determined if cats recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" infection were protected against infections with the more pathogenic M. haemofelis. Ten specified pathogen-free cats were exposed to M. haemofelis. Five of the ten cats had recovered from "Cand. M. turicensis" bacteremia (group A), and five cats were naïve controls (group B). No cross-protection was observed. By contrast, the "Cand. M. turicensis"-recovered cats displayed faster M. haemofelis infection onset (earlier PCR-positive and anemic) than the controls. No "Cand. M. turicensis" was detected in any cat. M. haemofelis shedding was observed in saliva, feces and urine. In both groups, evidence of a Th1 response was observed (high IFN-γ, low IL-4), but IL-10 levels were also high. In group A, total, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased within days after M. haemofelis exposure. At times of maximal bacteremia, macrocytic hypochromic anemia, neutropenia, monocytosis and a decrease in leukocyte, eosinophil, and lymphocyte counts and subsets thereof (B- and T-cells, CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD25+ cells) were particularly significant in group A. Moreover, an increase in protein concentrations, hypoalbuminemia and a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia were observed. Five of ten M. haemofelis-infected cats subsequently cleared bacteremia without antibiotic treatment. In conclusion, the study suggests that a previous hemoplasma infection, even when the cat has ostensibly recovered, may influence subsequent infections, lead to an enhancement phenomenon and other differences in infection kinetics.

  19. Development and use of real-time PCR to detect and quantify Mycoplasma haemocanis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" in dogs.

    PubMed

    Barker, E N; Tasker, S; Day, M J; Warman, S M; Woolley, K; Birtles, R; Georges, K C; Ezeokoli, C D; Newaj-Fyzul, A; Campbell, M D; Sparagano, O A E; Cleaveland, S; Helps, C R

    2010-01-06

    Two canine haemoplasma species have been recognised to date; Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhc), which has been associated with anaemia in splenectomised or immunocompromised dogs, and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" (CMhp), recently described in an anaemic splenectomised dog undergoing chemotherapy. The study aim was to develop quantitative real-time PCR assays (qPCRs) incorporating an endogenous internal control to detect Mhc and CMhp and to apply these assays to DNA samples extracted from canine blood collected in Northern Tanzania (n=100) and from dogs presented to a Trinidadian veterinary hospital (n=185). QPCRs specific for Mhc and CMhp were designed using 16S rRNA gene sequence data, and each was duplexed with an assay specific for canine glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The assays detected < or =10 copies of a sequence-specific haemoplasma plasmid per reaction and neither assay showed cross-reactivity with 10(6) copies of the sequence-specific plasmid from the non-target canine haemoplasma species. Nineteen of the 100 Tanzanian samples (19%) were positive for Mhc alone and one (1%) was dually infected. One Trinidadian sample was negative for canine GAPDH DNA and was excluded from the study. Of the 184 remaining Trinidadian samples, nine (4.9%) were positive for Mhc alone, five (2.7%) for CMhp alone, and two (1.1%) dually infected. This is the first report of canine haemoplasma qPCR assays that use an internal control to confirm the presence of amplifiable sample DNA, and their application to prevalence studies. Mhc was the most commonly detected canine haemoplasma species.

  20. Plant Viruses and Mycoplasmas. Proceedings of a Workshop on Plant Viruses and Mycoplasmas Held at the Botany Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore, May 24-27, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, G., Ed.; And Others

    A workshop on plant viruses and mycoplasmas brought together scientists and researchers working on these microorganisms in the countries of eastern Asia, and enabled them to discuss their studies, to exchange ideas, and to become familiar with their counterparts These proceedings of the workshop contain papers which include country reports,…

  1. Molecular evidence for hemotropic Mycoplasma infection in a Japanese badger (Meles meles anakuma) and a raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus).

    PubMed

    Harasawa, Ryô; Orusa, Riccardo; Giangaspero, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    We report detection of hemoplasma in wild Japanese badgers (Meles meles anakuma) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides viverrinus). Sequence analysis of the entire 16S rRNA genes identified Mycoplasma haemocanis in the raccoon dog sample, and a potential novel Mycoplasma species in the Japanese badger.

  2. General N-and O-Linked Glycosylation of Lipoproteins in Mycoplasmas and Role of Exogenous Oligosaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Daubenspeck, James M.; Jordan, David S.; Simmons, Warren; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a cell wall, flagella, fimbria, and other extracellular appendages and the possession of only a single membrane render the mycoplasmas structurally simplistic and ideal model organisms for the study of glycoconjugates. Most species have genomes of about 800 kb and code for few proteins predicted to have a role in glycobiology. The murine pathogens Mycoplasma arthritidis and Mycoplasma pulmonis have only a single gene annotated as coding for a glycosyltransferase but synthesize glycolipid, polysaccharide and glycoproteins. Previously, it was shown that M. arthritidis glycosylated surface lipoproteins through O-linkage. In the current study, O-linked glycoproteins were similarly found in M. pulmonis and both species of mycoplasma were found to also possess N-linked glycans at residues of asparagine and glutamine. Protein glycosylation occurred at numerous sites on surface-exposed lipoproteins with no apparent amino acid sequence specificity. The lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae also are glycosylated. Glycosylation was dependent on the glycosidic linkages from host oligosaccharides. As far as we are aware, N-linked glycoproteins have not been previously described in Gram-positive bacteria, the organisms to which the mycoplasmas are phylogenetically related. The findings indicate that the mycoplasma cell surface is heavily glycosylated with implications for the modulation of mycoplasma-host interactions. PMID:26599081

  3. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments. PMID:26565413

  4. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments.

  5. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been...

  6. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been...

  7. Drying and irradiation of calf and horse serum. I. Influence on the growth of cell cultures and mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Veber, P; Jurmanová, K; Lesko, J; Hána, L

    1975-05-01

    Gamma-irradiation of liquid and dried calf sera with 2.5 Mrads did not affect their capacity to promote the growth of chick embryo, L cell and human embryonic lung cell cultures. Drying and gamma-irradiation of horsesera did not affect their capacity to support the growth of 3 mycoplasma of the species Acholeplasma laidawii and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium.

  8. Effects on goat milk quality of the presence of Mycoplasma spp. in herds without symptoms of contagious agalactia.

    PubMed

    de la Fe, Christian; Sánchez, Antonio; Gutierrez, Aldo; Contreras, Antonio; Carlos Corrales, Juan; Assunçao, Patricia; Poveda, Carlos; Poveda, José B

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the possible effects of mycoplasmas on the quality of milk produced by goat herds in a contagious agalactia (CA) endemic area with absence of classical symptoms. Several factors related to milk quality (percentages of fat, total protein, lactose and total solids, standard plate counts (SPC) and presence of Staphylococcus aureus) were compared in mycoplasma-infected and non-infected herds. To define the CA status of 26 herds on the island of Lanzarote (Spain), where CA is endemic, 570 individual milk samples and 266 bulk tank milk (BTM) samples were microbiologically analysed for the presence of Mycoplasma spp. A herd was considered infected by mycoplasmas when at least a sample (individual or BTM) was positive. BTM samples were also used to determine milk quality parameters. Mycoplasma infection was confirmed in 13 herds. A total of 31, 10 and 11 strains of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (MmmLC), Mp. agalactiae and Mp. capricolum subsp. capricolum were isolated. No significant differences were observed between the least square means of the variables fat, total protein, lactose and total solids or SPC recorded for the infected v. non-infected herds. The Staph. aureus status of a herd was also found to be independent of the presence of Mycoplasma spp. Our findings indicate that neither the presence of mycoplasmas in a goat herd with absence of classical symptoms seem to compromise the quality of the BTM.

  9. A 48-kilodalton Mycoplasma fermentans membrane protein induces cytokine secretion by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kostyal, D A; Butler, G H; Beezhold, D H

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is one of several Mycoplasma species that have been reported to stimulate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion from monocytes. This activity has been associated primarily with the mycoplasma membrane fraction. In this article, we have characterized a membrane protein that stimulates TNF and interleukin 1 beta secretion. The TNF-releasing activity partitioned into the Triton X-114 detergent phase, suggesting that the molecules is hydrophobic. The secretion of TNF is elevated in the presence of serum, which suggests that a serum component may play a role in the interaction between this mycoplasma protein and monocytes. Treatment of monocytes with monoclonal anti-CD14 antibody had no effect on the levels of TNF-releasing activity. By using the monocyte Western blot (immunoblot) technique, we have determined the molecular mass of the active molecule to be 48 kDa. This molecule appears to be distinct from the recently described family of variable lipoproteins of M. fermentans. Mycoplasma particulate material treated with proteinase K lost all inducing activity, whereas lipoprotein lipase-treated samples retained some level of activity. Images PMID:7520421

  10. Humoral immune response to a recombinant hemoplasma antigen in experimental 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' infection.

    PubMed

    Novacco, Marilisa; Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind; Riond, Barbara; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2012-06-15

    'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' is a feline hemoplasma species that was isolated in a cat with hemolytic anemia. PCR has been widely used to investigate and diagnose 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' infection, but so far, little is known about the humoral immune response in infected cats. Recently, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were developed to monitor anti-feline hemoplasma antibodies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the humoral immune response in cats experimentally infected with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' and to monitor the influence of the pre-administration of methylprednisolone and subsequent antibiotic treatment. Serum and plasma samples from 15 specified pathogen-free cats infected with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' were analyzed by ELISA. Seroconversion was demonstrated in all cats, and the antibodies remained detectable until the end of the study (up to 100 weeks post-exposure). In some cats, the ELISA seemed more sensitive and better able to demonstrate exposure to 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' than PCR. The peak antibody level occurred after the peak of the bacterial blood loads. The methylprednisolone administrations were associated with increased antibody levels, while antibiotic treatment, particularly with doxycycline, resulted in a decrease in antibody levels. Additionally, preliminary data indicated that three of four seropositive cats were protected from bacteremia after a subsequent challenge. In conclusion, the ELISA was found to be a useful tool to investigate the humoral immune response in hemoplasma-infected cats and a desirable addition to PCR to study the pathogenesis of hemoplasma infections.

  11. Evaluation of different hybridization procedures for the detection of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Johansson, K E; Johansson, I; Göbel, U B

    1990-02-01

    Cell culture samples were analysed for mycoplasma contaminations with two different DNA probes which have been described earlier. One probe (the H900 probe), derived from the 23S rRNA gene of Mycoplasma hyorhinis, cross-hybridized with virtually all mycoplasmas (including the acholeplasmas). The other probe (the T2 probe), derived from a protein gene of Acholeplasma laidlawii, cross-hybridized with most acholeplasmas. The two probes were compared in three different direct filter hybridization procedures without previous isolation of DNA or RNA. One of the procedures, developed in the present study, gave the highest sensitivity in DNA-RNA hybridization but also worked satisfactorily in DNA-DNA hybridization. The sensitivity of the H900 probe in filter hybridization experiments was compared with the sensitivity of a commercial probe for detection of mycoplasma contaminations in cell cultures. The H900 probe was found to be at least 25 times more sensitive for all cell culture mycoplasmas except for A. laidlawii, for which they were equally sensitive.

  12. Detection of mycoplasma infection in circulating tumor cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Hyun Min; Kim, Won-Tae; Kim, Min Kyu; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Hye Ran; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Dae Shick; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-04-04

    Many studies have shown that persistent infections of bacteria promote carcinogenesis and metastasis. Infectious agents and their products can modulate cancer progression through the induction of host inflammatory and immune responses. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is considered as an important indicator in the metastatic cascade. We unintentionally produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein in mycoplasma-infected cancer cells during the searching process of novel surface markers of CTCs. Mycoplasma-infected cells were enriched by CA27-conjugated magnetic beads in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed by confocal microscopy with anti-CD45 and CA27 antibodies. CD45-negative and CA27-positive cells were readily detected in three out of seven patients (range 12-30/8.5 ml blood), indicating that they are mycoplasma-infected circulating epithelial cells. CA27-positive cells had larger size than CD45-positive hematological lineage cells, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and irregular nuclear morphology, which identified them as CTCs. The results show for the first time the existence of mycoplasma-infected CTCs in patients with HCC and suggest a possible correlation between mycoplasma infection and the development of cancer metastasis.

  13. Mycoplasma bovis infection in respiratory disease of dairy calves less than one month old.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, S; Zanoni, M G; Salogni, C; Cinotti, S; Alborali, G L

    2013-10-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is an important cause of bovine respiratory disease, especially in young calves where it can also cause arthritis, tenosynovitis and otitis. During 2009 and 2010 a survey was carried out on carcasses of calves less than one month old sent to the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna in Brescia, regardless of the presence of lung lesions, to detect this pathogen. PCR tests for Mycoplasma spp. and M. bovis were applied. 83 out of 224 (37%) lung tissue samples examined were positive at PCR test for Mycoplasma spp.; in 64 cases of these we observed typical respiratory lesions (P<0.001). M. bovis was identified in 26 out of 83 (31%) lung tissue samples positive at PCR test for Mycoplasma spp.; in 24 cases of these we observed typical respiratory lesions (P=0.039). Our data demonstrate that presence of Mycoplasma spp. and M. bovis positively correlates with pneumonic lung lesions in young dairy calves.

  14. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis sensitivity to bacteriocins produced by two Lactobacilli strains.

    PubMed

    Daniele, M; Ruiz, F; Pascual, L; Barberis, L

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the inhibitory activities of two bacteriocins, produced by lactobacilli, against genital mycoplasmas. In this study, infections produced by genital mycoplasmas were studied; of these, 1.3% were caused by Mycoplasma hominis, 10.7% by Ureaplasma urealyticum and 5.6% by U. urealyticum + M. hominis. U. urealyticum was isolated from 75 out of 123 patients with genital mycoplasmas, while M. hominis was isolated from 9 patients (7.3%) and both U. urealyticum and M. hominis from 39 patients (31.7%). Bacteriocins, L23 and L60, produced by Lactobacillus fermentum and L. rhamnosus, respectively, appear to be two novel inhibitors of bacterial infection with potential antibacterial activity. Both bacteriocins proved to be active against 100% of strains tested; MICs of bacteriocin L23 ranged between 320 and 160 UA ml(-1) for 78% of the M. hominis strains and between 320 and 80 UA ml(-1) for 95% of the U. urealyticum strains. In addition, bacteriocin L60 was still active at 160 UA ml(-1) for a high percentage (56%) of M. hominis strains, and at 80 UA ml(-1) for 53% of the U. urealyticum strains. Interestingly, these antimicrobial substances produced by lactobacilli showed an inhibitory activity against genital mycoplasmas even when diluted. Altogether, our study indicates that the bacteriocins, L23 and L60, are good candidates for the treatment or prevention of genital infections in women.

  15. Biochemical and serological characterization of mycoplasma strains isolated from the genital tracts of humans in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Agbakoba, N R; Adetosoye, A I; Adewole, I F

    2006-06-01

    Fifty-five (55) Mycoplasma strains isolated from the genital tracts of humans were biochemically characterized using various biochemical tests and also serologically identified by growth inhibition technique using 5 mycoplasma antisera namely M. hominis PG2 1: M. genitalium G37: M. penetrans GTU54 and 2 strains of M. fermentans PG18 (HRC 6-62-S-170 and MB713-501-069). Biochemically, 43 (78.2%) strains were identified as Mycoplasma hominis, 8 (14.5%) strains as M. fermentans and 4 (7.3%) as M. penetrans. The M. hominis strains hydrolyzed only arginine while the M. fermentans and M. penetrans strains in addition to arginine hydrolysis also broke down glucose fermentatively and oxidatively. The M. fermentans strains showed varying reactions to phosphatase activity and to the reduction of tetrazolium chloride. Serologically, 4 (7.3%) mycoplasma strains were confirmed as M. penetrans GTU54 and of the 8 M. fermentans strains, 4 (7.3%) were identified as M. fermentans PG18 serotype HRC 6-62-S-170 and the other 4 (7.3%) as M. fermentans PG18 serotype MB 713-501-069. Only 13 (30.2%) of the 43 M. hominis strains were identified as M. hominis serotype PG2 1. None was identified as M. genitalium. The heterogeneity of the mycoplasma strains especially M. hominis was observed in this study and the need for the use of multiple antisera in growth inhibition test is hereby supported.

  16. Persistence of Functional Protein Domains in Mycoplasma Species and their Role in Host Specificity and Synthetic Minimal Life

    PubMed Central

    Kamminga, Tjerko; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Vermeij, Paul; Slagman, Simen-Jan; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.; Schaap, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are the smallest self-replicating organisms and obligate parasites of a specific vertebrate host. An in-depth analysis of the functional capabilities of mycoplasma species is fundamental to understand how some of simplest forms of life on Earth succeeded in subverting complex hosts with highly sophisticated immune systems. In this study we present a genome-scale comparison, focused on identification of functional protein domains, of 80 publically available mycoplasma genomes which were consistently re-annotated using a standardized annotation pipeline embedded in a semantic framework to keep track of the data provenance. We examined the pan- and core-domainome and studied predicted functional capability in relation to host specificity and phylogenetic distance. We show that the pan- and core-domainome of mycoplasma species is closed. A comparison with the proteome of the “minimal” synthetic bacterium JCVI-Syn3.0 allowed us to classify domains and proteins essential for minimal life. Many of those essential protein domains, essential Domains of Unknown Function (DUFs) and essential hypothetical proteins are not persistent across mycoplasma genomes suggesting that mycoplasma species support alternative domain configurations that bypass their essentiality. Based on the protein domain composition, we could separate mycoplasma species infecting blood and tissue. For selected genomes of tissue infecting mycoplasmas, we could also predict whether the host is ruminant, pig or human. Functionally closely related mycoplasma species, which have a highly similar protein domain repertoire, but different hosts could not be separated. This study provides a concise overview of the functional capabilities of mycoplasma species, which can be used as a basis to further understand host-pathogen interaction or to design synthetic minimal life. PMID:28224116

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of Mycoplasma synoviae by an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction-based assay on a field-deployable device

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hung-Chih; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Chen, Chiou-Lin; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ping, Jia-Fong; Lee, Chien-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), causing respiratory diseases, arthritis, and eggshell apex abnormalities in avian species, is an important pathogen in the poultry industry. Implementation of a biosecurity plan is important in MS infection management. Working on a field-deployable POCKIT™ device, an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay has a potential for timely MS detection on the farm. The MS iiPCR assay had limit of detection 95% of about 9 genome equivalents by testing serial dilutions of a standard DNA. The detection endpoint of the assay for detection of MS genomic DNA was comparable to a reference real-time PCR. The assay did not crossreact with other important avian pathogens, including avian reovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, and Salmonella Pullorum. When 92 synovial fluid and respiratory tract swab samples collected from chickens, turkeys, and geese suspected of MS infection were tested, the clinical performance of the MS iiPCR had 97.8% agreement (Cohen's kappa value, 0.95) with that of the reference real-time PCR. In conclusion, the MS iiPCR/POCKIT™ system, working with field-deployable manual or automatic nucleic acid extraction methods, has potential to serve as a rapid and sensitive on-site tool to facilitate timely detection of MS. PMID:27389062

  18. An improved loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    HIGA, Yumiko; UEMURA, Ryoko; YAMAZAKI, Wataru; GOTO, Shinya; GOTO, Yoshitaka; SUEYOSHI, Masuo

    2016-01-01

    We improved a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay permitting sensitive and rapid Mycoplasma bovis detection. A total of 55 bacterial strains were examined in this study, including 33 M. bovis strains, 14 non-M. bovis mycoplasmas and eight non-mycoplasma bacterial strains. M. bovis was successfully detected by the LAMP assay within 60 min without cross-reaction to any other bacteria. Furthermore, a total of 135 nasal swab samples were tested directly using our LAMP assays, the previously reported LAMP assay, conventional PCR assay without pre-culture and comparing standard culture methods. The improved LAMP assay showed sensitivity and specificity of 97.2% and 90.9%, respectively (with a kappa coefficient of 0.8231), and the sensitivity of our revised LAMP assay was increased compared to existing methods. PMID:27109067

  19. Mycoplasma lagogenitalium sp. nov., from the preputial smegma of Afghan pikas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Runge, M; Schmidt, R; Kubo, M; Yamamoto, K; Kirchhoff, H

    1997-10-01

    Organisms with characteristics typical of mycoplasmas were isolated from the preputial smegma of Afghan picas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens). The results of growth inhibition tests, metabolic inhibition tests, and immunobinding assays showed that the isolated strains were identical and that they were distinct from previously described Mycoplasma, Entomoplasma, Mesoplasma, and Acholeplasma species. These organisms represent a new species, for which the name Mycoplasma lagogenitalium is proposed. M. lagogenitalium ferments glucose, does not hydrolyze arginine or urea, reduces tetrazolium chloride, possesses phosphatase activity, does not digest gelatin or casein, and does not produce films or spots. It lyses sheep erythrocytes and does not adsorb sheep, rabbit, or horse erythrocytes. Cholesterol or serum is required for growth. The growth temperature is 37 degrees C. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the DNA is 23.0 +/- 1.0 mol%. The type strain is M. lagogenitalium 12MS (= ATCC 700289T).

  20. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis and Genital Mycoplasmas: Pathogens with an Impact on Human Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Ljubin-Sternak, Sunčanica; Meštrović, Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    The most prevalent, curable sexually important diseases are those caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) and genital mycoplasmas. An important characteristic of these infections is their ability to cause long-term sequels in upper genital tract, thus potentially affecting the reproductive health in both sexes. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tubal factor infertility (TFI), and ectopic pregnancy (EP) are well documented complications of C. trachomatis infection in women. The role of genital mycoplasmas in development of PID, TFI, and EP requires further evaluation, but growing evidence supports a significant role for these in the pathogenesis of chorioamnionitis, premature membrane rupture, and preterm labor in pregnant woman. Both C. trachomatis and genital mycoplasmas can affect the quality of sperm and possibly influence the fertility of men. For the purpose of this paper, basic, epidemiologic, clinical, therapeutic, and public health issue of these infections were reviewed and discussed, focusing on their impact on human reproductive health. PMID:25614838

  2. Mycoplasmas and Their Antibiotic Resistance: The Problems and Prospects in Controlling Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, O.A.; Medvedeva, E.S.; Mouzykantov, A.A.; Baranova, N.B.; Chernov, V.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present review discusses the problem of controlling mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes), the smallest of self-replicating prokaryotes, parasites of higher eukaryotes, and main contaminants of cell cultures and vaccines. Possible mechanisms for the rapid development of resistance to antimicrobial drugs in mycoplasmas have been analyzed. Omics technologies provide new opportunities for investigating the molecular basis of bacterial adaptation to stress factors and identifying resistomes, the total of all genes and their products contributing to antibiotic resistance in microbes. The data obtained using an integrated approach with post-genomics methods show that antibiotic resistance may be caused by more complex processes than has been believed heretofore. The development of antibiotic resistance in mycoplasmas is associated with essential changes in the genome, proteome, and secretome profiles, which involve many genes and proteins related to fundamental cellular processes and virulence. PMID:27437137

  3. In situ immunohistochemical detection of intracellular Mycoplasma salivarium in the epithelial cells of oral leukoplakia

    PubMed Central

    Mizuki, Harumi; Kawamura, Takafumi; Nagasawa, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycoplasmas are the smallest free-living organisms; Mycoplasma salivarium and Mycoplasma orale are the most common species isolated from the oropharynx. Oral leukoplakia is the most prevalent potentially malignant disorder of the oral mucosa; its etiology has not been defined. Our previous study with DNA-binding fluorescent dye suggested the presence of mycoplasmas in the epithelial cells of leukoplakia tissue. Objective Our aim was to detect M. salivarium in the epithelial cells of leukoplakia by immunohistochemistry. Design We produced a polyclonal antibody (PAb) reactive to Mycoplasma by injecting a rabbit with M. salivarium cells (ATCC 23064) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant and a monoclonal antibody specific to M. salivarium by injecting M. salivarium cells (ATCC 23557) mixed with complete Freund's adjuvant into the footpads of a rat. Then, we attempted to detect M. salivarium in the epithelium of leukoplakia tissues by immunohistochemistry. Results We obtained an antimycoplasma rabbit PAb reactive to all seven Mycoplasma species used in this study. Three hybridoma clones producing monoclonal antibodies specific to M. salivarium were obtained, and an M. salivarium-specific monoclonal antibody, designated 7-6H, was established. Immunohistochemistry with these antibodies revealed M. salivarium in the epithelial cells of leukoplakia with hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis on histology. PCR and sequencing verified the presence of M. salivariumDNA in the epithelial cells of leukoplakia. Conclusion Intracellular M. salivarium was identified in the epithelial cells of leukoplakia. PMID:25065471

  4. Sequence and TnphoA analysis of a Mycoplasma hyorhinis protein with membrane export function.

    PubMed

    Yogev, D; Watson-McKown, R; McIntosh, M A; Wise, K S

    1991-03-01

    Proteins translocated across the single plasma membrane of mycoplasmas (class Mollicutes) represent important components likely to affect several interactions of these wall-less microbes with their respective hosts. However, identification and functional analysis of such proteins is hampered by the lack of mutational systems in mycoplasmas and by a perceived limitation in translating recombinant mycoplasma genes containing UGA (Trp) codons in other eubacteria. Here we directly analyze a gene encoding a Mycoplasma hyorhinis protein capable of promoting its membrane translocation. It was initially detected by screening a recombinant phage genomic library with antibody from a host with M. hyorhinis-induced arthritis and was localized by Tn5 and deletion mutations affecting expression of antigenic translational products. Sequence analysis of the isolated gene predicted a hydrophilic protein, P101, containing three UGA codons and a putative signal peptide with an uncharacteristic cluster of positively charged amino acids near its C terminus. Nevertheless, lambda::TnphoA transposon mutagenesis of an Escherichia coli plasmid bearing the p101 gene resulted in p101::TnphoA fusions expressing products that could translocate as much as 48 kDa of the P101 sequence (up to the first UGA codon) across the E. coli plasma membrane. Fusion proteins containing mature P101 sequences expressed mycoplasma epitopes and were found by cell fractionation and detergent phase partitioning to be integral membrane proteins in E. coli, suggesting a lack of signal peptide cleavage in this system. Importantly, identification of P101 by direct analysis of its export function relied neither on prior identification of the mycoplasmal product nor on complete expression of the product from the cloned mycoplasma gene.

  5. Detection of mycoplasma infection in circulating tumor cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Hyun Min; Kim, Won-Tae; Kim, Min Kyu; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Hye Ran; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Dae Shick; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • This study generates a monoclonal antibody CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein. • CA27 isolates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of liver cancer patients. • Results show the first evidence for mycoplasma infected-CTCs in cancer patients. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that persistent infections of bacteria promote carcinogenesis and metastasis. Infectious agents and their products can modulate cancer progression through the induction of host inflammatory and immune responses. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is considered as an important indicator in the metastatic cascade. We unintentionally produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein in mycoplasma-infected cancer cells during the searching process of novel surface markers of CTCs. Mycoplasma-infected cells were enriched by CA27-conjugated magnetic beads in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed by confocal microscopy with anti-CD45 and CA27 antibodies. CD45-negative and CA27-positive cells were readily detected in three out of seven patients (range 12–30/8.5 ml blood), indicating that they are mycoplasma-infected circulating epithelial cells. CA27-positive cells had larger size than CD45-positive hematological lineage cells, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and irregular nuclear morphology, which identified them as CTCs. The results show for the first time the existence of mycoplasma-infected CTCs in patients with HCC and suggest a possible correlation between mycoplasma infection and the development of cancer metastasis.

  6. NK cells in gamma-interferon-deficient mice suppress lung innate immunity against Mycoplasma spp.

    PubMed

    Woolard, Matthew D; Hudig, Dorothy; Tabor, Leslie; Ivey, James A; Simecka, Jerry W

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the 100-fold difference in mycoplasma levels in lungs of gamma interferon knockout (IFN-gamma(-/-)) mice compared to those seen with wild-type BALB/c mice at 3 days postinfection. NK cells secreted IFN-gamma; however, their cytotoxic granule extracts failed to kill mycoplasma. We found a conundrum: the clearance of organisms was as effective in NK-depleted IFN-gamma(-/-) animals as in wild-type mice (with both IFN-gamma and NK cells). NK(+) IFN-gamma(-/-) animals had high mycoplasma burdens, but, after NK-like cell depletion, mycoplasma numbers were controlled. Essentially, IFN-gamma was important in animals with NK-like cells and unimportant in animals without NK cells, suggesting that IFN-gamma counters deleterious effects of NK-like cells. Impairment of innate immunity in IFN-gamma(-/-) mice was not due to NK-like cell killing of macrophages. The increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and neutrophils in lung fluids of NK(+) IFN-gamma(-/-) mice were reduced after NK cell depletion. In summary, in the murine model that resembles chronic human disease, innate immunity to mycoplasma requires IFN-gamma when there are NK-like cells and the positive effects of IFN-gamma counteract negative effects of NK-like cells. When imbalanced, NK-like cells promote disease. Thus, it was not the lack of IFN-gamma but the presence of a previously unrecognized NK-like cell-suppressive activity that contributed to the higher mycoplasma numbers. It appears that pulmonary NK cells may contribute to the immunosuppressive environment of the lung, but when needed, these dampening effects can be counterbalanced by IFN-gamma. Furthermore, there may be instances where perturbation of this regulatory balance contributes to the susceptibility to and severity of disease.

  7. In-vitro activity of grepafloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone, against mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Bébéar, C M; Renaudin, H; Schaeverbeke, T; Leblanc, F; Bébéar, C

    1999-05-01

    The in-vitro activity of grepafloxacin, a new oral fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was compared with those of three other fluoroquinolones and two unrelated antimicrobials, doxycycline and erythromycin, against various Mycoplasma spp. For 65 mycoplasma and 42 ureaplasma strains, grepafloxacin (MIC range 0.03-2 mg/L) was some two to 16 times more active than ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, showing similar activity to that of sparfloxacin. MBCs of grepafloxacin increased two- to 16-fold when compared with MICs and were comparable to those of sparfloxacin, and lower than those of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin.

  8. In vitro drug susceptibility pattern of Mycoplasma alligatoris isolated from symptomatic American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Brown, Daniel R; Jacobson, Elliott R; Brown, Mary B

    2002-06-01

    A recently described mycoplasma, Mycoplasma alligatoris, was isolated from dead American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) that had demonstrated clinical signs of lethargy, anorexia, bilateral ocular discharge, edema. paraparesis, and polyarthritis. The in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration for nine antibacterial agents was determined through serial dilution in broth and plate culture for M. alligatoris isolates. The inhibitory concentration obtained for doxycycline, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, oxytetracycline, tilmicosin, and tylosin (< 1 microg/ml) was lower than that of clindamycin (1-8 microg/ml), chloramphenicol (8-16 microg/ml), and erythromycin (32-138 microg/ml).

  9. DNA microarray-based detection of multiple pathogens: Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Christiane; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Rapid detection of slow-growing or non-culturable microorganisms, such as Mycoplasma spp. and Chlamydia spp., is still a challenge to diagnosticians in the veterinary field. In addition, as epidemiological evidence on the frequency of mixed infections involving two and more bacterial species has been emerging, detection methods allowing simultaneous identification of different pathogens are required. In the present chapter, we describe DNA microarray-based procedures for the detection of 83 Mollicutes species (Mycoplasma assay) and 11 Chlamydia spp. (Chlamydia assay). The assays are suitable for use in a routine diagnostic environment, as well as in microbiological research.

  10. Mycoplasma iguanae sp. nov., from a green iguana (Iguana iguana) with vertebral disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, D R; Demcovitz, D L; Plourdé, D R; Potter, S M; Hunt, M E; Jones, R D; Rotstein, D S

    2006-04-01

    Strain 2327T, first cultured from vertebral abscesses of green iguanas (Iguana iguana) collected in Florida, USA, was readily distinguished from all previously described mollicutes by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons. Strain 2327T lacks a cell wall, ferments glucose, does not hydrolyse arginine, aesculin or urea and is sensitive to digitonin. Western blots distinguished the novel isolate serologically from the most closely related members of the Mycoplasma neurolyticum cluster. On the basis of these data, the isolate represents a novel species for which the name Mycoplasma iguanae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 2327T (=ATCC BAA-1050T = NCTC 11745T).

  11. Acridine orange staining for diagnosis of Mycoplasma bovis infection in cow milk.

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, D E; Rosendal, S; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    Mycoplasma organisms were readily recognized in samples of milk or udder secretions from cows with clinical Mycoplasma bovis mastitis when these samples were stained with 0.01% acridine orange at pH 3.0. Samples could be stored at -4 degrees C for several days or subjected to repeated freezing and thawing without loss of staining or fluorescence properties. Use of this procedure in diagnostic laboratories on suspect samples from cows with clinical mastitis could hasten inauguration of control measures against this highly contagious disease by several days; however, definitive diagnosis still requires standard culture methods. PMID:6208217

  12. Mycoplasma pneumoniae outbreak at a university - Georgia, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-08-02

    On October 17, 2012, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified by the Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness that a local university, the Georgia Institute of Technology, was experiencing a pneumonia outbreak among students. DPH epidemiologists investigated to identify the etiology, find additional cases, and recommend control measures. Respiratory swabs collected from students with pneumonia and tested at CDC using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay were positive for Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The university alerted students, faculty, and staff members to the outbreak and recommended prevention measures by e-mail, social media, and posters. A survey administered to students assessed illness prevention behaviors, outbreak awareness, and communication preferences. Eighty-three cases were diagnosed among students during September 1-December 4, 2012, making this outbreak the largest reported at a U.S. university in 35 years. No cases were reported among faculty or staff members. Of the 83 patients, 19 had specimens tested by qPCR, of which 12 (63%) were positive for M. pneumoniae. Despite university communication efforts, approximately half of students surveyed were unaware of the outbreak when surveyed in December. DPH recommendations included implementing university policies that facilitate students staying home and seeking medical care when ill and refining health messages and communication methods to improve awareness of disease outbreaks among students.

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in pigs infected experimentally with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Andrada, M; Quesada-Canales, O; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Paz-Sánchez, Y; Espinosa de Los Monteros, A; Rodríguez, F

    2014-01-01

    Porcine enzootic pneumonia, primarily caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mh), is a contagious disease characterized by catarrhal bronchointerstitial pneumonia. Previous studies have evaluated immunohistochemically the distribution of Mh, different cellular populations and cytokines during Mh-induced pneumonia. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 is overexpressed during inflammatory responses by different cell types in the lung. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible role of COX-2 in the pathogenesis of porcine enzootic pneumonia. COX-2 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lung tissues from 10 pigs infected experimentally with Mh. Ten pigs were inoculated intranasally with Mh and killed in pairs weekly from 1 to 5 weeks post inoculation. Three Mh-free pigs were taken as controls. Bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells, bronchial submucosal glands and a small number of macrophages in the bronchoalveolar exudate expressed COX-2. COX-2 protein was always associated with areas of pneumonia and expression was minimal in lungs from control pigs. These results suggest that COX-2 plays a role in the pathogenesis of Mh-infection.

  14. Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in pigs in subtropical southern China.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Xu, M J; Zhou, D H; Zou, F C; Lin, R Q; Yin, C C; He, X H; Liang, R; Liang, M; Zhu, X Q

    2011-03-01

    Enzootic pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a severe disease of pigs, causing significant economic losses to the pig industry worldwide, including the tropical and subtropical regions. In order to obtain the baseline prevalence of M. hyopneumoniae in pigs from intensive farms in southern China, double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect M. hyoneumoniae antibodies in 460 pig serum samples collected from 12 administrative cities in China's southern Guangdong province. According to the proportions of the infected animals, among the 12 intensive farms, only two of them showed no infection of M. hyoneumoniae and the seroprevalence ranged from 0% to 90%, with an averaged prevalence of 45.7%. The highest prevalence was found in breeding boars (68.8%), followed by sows (54.5%). These data showed that the infection of pigs with M. hyopneumoniae is severe, and boars might be more important carriers and transfers of M. hyoneumoniae than sows. Integrated strategies and measures should be taken to control the infection of pigs with M. hyopneumoniae in southern China.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and susceptibility testing of Mycoplasma hominis: a review.

    PubMed

    Bygdeman, S M; Mårdh, P A

    1983-01-01

    The determination of the minimal growth-inhibiting concentration (MIC), the minimal metabolism-inhibiting concentration (MMC), and the minimal mycoplasmacidal concentration (MCC) of various antimicrobial compounds for Mycoplasma hominis is influenced by the pH of the test media, the inoculum size, and the incubation time, although each of these factors generally do not affect the minimal concentration more than fourfold. M. hominis is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B. There are great differences in the susceptibility of M. hominis to various macrolide antibiotics. Thus the organism is resistant to erythromycin and oleandomycin, moderately resistant to tylosin and spiramycin, susceptible to josamycin as well as to another macrolide drug, labelled M-4365G. M. hominis is also highly susceptible to the macrolide-like compound rosaramicin and to the tetracyclines (although resistant strains occur). It is susceptible to lincomycin and clindamycin, and moderately susceptible to chloramphenicol and rifampicin. The aminoglycosides have limited activity against M. hominis.

  16. Characterization of western X-disease mycoplasma-like organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    The causal agent of western X-disease, an important disease of cherry (Prunus avium) and peach (Prunus persica) in the western United States, was shown to be a non-culturable, mycoplasma-like organism (WX-MLO). Procedures were developed to purify WX-MLOs from celery and leafhoppers infected with a greenhouse-maintained isolate of the peach yellow leaf roll (ghPYLR) strain of western X-disease. WX-MLOs, purified from ghPYLR-infected leafhoppers, elicited the production of specific antisera (WX antisera) when injected into rabbits. When used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), WX antisera quantitatively detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers experimentally infected with either ghPYLR or the Green Valley (GVX) strain of western X-disease. Recombinant clones were screened by colony, dot and southern hybridizations using /sup 32/P-nick translated DNA extracted from healthy and ghPYLR-infected celery and leafhoppers. Twenty-four clones were identified which hybridized with DNA from diseased but not healthy hosts. DNA hybridization assays, using radiolabeled, cloned WX-MLO DNA, readily detected WX-MLOs in celery, periwinkle, and leafhoppers infected with either GVX or ghPYLR and in cherry and peach with symptoms of GVX.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Its Role as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B.; Talkington, Deborah F.

    2004-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a unique bacterium that does not always receive the attention it merits considering the number of illnesses it causes and the degree of morbidity associated with it in both children and adults. Serious infections requiring hospitalization, while rare, occur in both adults and children and may involve multiple organ systems. The severity of disease appears to be related to the degree to which the host immune response reacts to the infection. Extrapulmonary complications involving all of the major organ systems can occur in association with M. pneumoniae infection as a result of direct invasion and/or autoimmune response. The extrapulmonary manifestations are sometimes of greater severity and clinical importance than the primary respiratory infection. Evidence for this organism's contributory role in chronic lung conditions such as asthma is accumulating. Effective management of M. pneumoniae infections can usually be achieved with macrolides, tetracyclines, or fluoroquinolones. As more is learned about the pathogenesis and immune response elicited by M. pneumoniae, improvement in methods for diagnosis and prevention of disease due to this organism may occur. PMID:15489344

  18. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms.

  19. Systematic Structural Analyses of Attachment Organelle in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Lisa; Miyata, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a human pathogenic bacterium, glides on host cell surfaces by a unique and unknown mechanism. It forms an attachment organelle at a cell pole as a membrane protrusion composed of surface and internal structures, with a highly organized architecture. In the present study, we succeeded in isolating the internal structure of the organelle by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The negative-staining electron microscopy clarified the details and dimensions of the internal structure, which is composed of terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex from the end of cell front. Peptide mass fingerprinting of the structure suggested 25 novel components for the organelle, and 3 of them were suggested for their involvement in the structure through their subcellular localization determined by enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) tagging. Thirteen component proteins including the previously reported ones were mapped on the organelle systematically for the first time, in nanometer order by EYFP tagging and immunoelectron microscopy. Two, three, and six specific proteins localized specifically to the terminal button, the paired plates, and the bowl, respectively and interestingly, HMW2 molecules were aligned parallel to form the plate. The integration of these results gave the whole image of the organelle and allowed us to discuss possible gliding mechanisms. PMID:26633540

  20. Mycoplasma genitalium: An Overlooked Sexually Transmitted Pathogen in Women?

    PubMed

    Ona, Samsiya; Molina, Rose L; Diouf, Khady

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a facultative anaerobic organism and a recognized cause of nongonococcal urethritis in men. In women, M. genitalium has been associated with cervicitis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and adverse birth outcomes, indicating a consistent relationship with female genital tract pathology. The global prevalence of M. genitalium among symptomatic and asymptomatic sexually active women ranges between 1 and 6.4%. M. genitalium may play a role in pathogenesis as an independent sexually transmitted pathogen or by facilitating coinfection with another pathogen. The long-term reproductive consequences of M. genitalium infection in asymptomatic individuals need to be investigated further. Though screening for this pathogen is not currently recommended, it should be considered in high-risk populations. Recent guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control regarding first-line treatment for PID do not cover M. genitalium but recommend considering treatment in patients without improvement on standard PID regimens. Prospective studies on the prevalence, pathophysiology, and long-term reproductive consequences of M. genitalium infection in the general population are needed to determine if screening protocols are necessary. New treatment regimens need to be investigated due to increasing drug resistance.

  1. Experimental animal infections with Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, S J; Jacobs, N F; Chandler, F W; Arum, E S

    1977-01-01

    Subcutaneous tissue cavities in mice and guinea pigs were infected with human isolates of Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis. The minimal infective dose for M. hominis was as low as less than 10 color-changing units (CCU) for mice and 10(2) CCU for guinea pigs. The minimal infective dose for U. urealyticum was as low as less than 10 CCU for mice and 10(4) CCU for guinea pigs. Mouse infections with either U. urealyticum or M. hominis persisted for 1 day to greater than 4 months. Guinea pigs remained infected for up to 4 weeks. Two M. hominis isolates were similar in their ability to infect subcutaneous tissue cavities but two U. urealyticum isolates varied in their ability to infect the cavities. The histopathology of the M. hominis and U. urealyticum infections was similar: an initial intense polymorphonuclear response with giant cells, followed in 4 weeks by histiocytes and giant cells with some plasma cells and lymphocytes. Images PMID:873611

  2. New insights in the outbreak pattern of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Enno; Ehrhardt, Ingrid; Dumke, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Since a well-documented incidence peak in 2011/12 in European countries, infections due to the cell wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae have gained the increased attention of clinicians, microbiologists and health authorities. Despite the mild or asymptomatic clinical course of most M. pneumoniae infections, the microorganism is responsible for severe interstitial pneumonia and extra-pulmonary complications. Here, we report the time-dependence of 5545 notified cases of laboratory-confirmed M. pneumoniae disease in Saxony from 2001 until June 2014 as measured by serodiagnosis. In parallel, from 2003 until 2012 467 M. pneumoniae-positive respiratory samples or isolated strains were analysed by molecular typing based on sequence differences in the main P1 adhesin of M. pneumoniae. The epidemiological data showed a prolonged outbreak especially in the period 2011-2013. The typing of circulating strains during the outbreak did not support predominance of one of the two major P1 subtypes (mean proportion of subtype 1: 57%) or a change of one to the other subtype during the endemic situation before and during the outbreak period. From the last major outbreak in Europe, we conclude that the notification of M. pneumoniae-positive cases, which is legally required only in Saxony, should be expanded to the whole country, to optimise awareness of this human pathogen and to reflect upon antibiotic therapy.

  3. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dong-Ya; Sun, Chang-Jian; Yu, Jing-Bo; Ma, Jun; Xue, Wen-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones resistance in Mycoplasma hominis (MH) clinical strains isolated from urogenital specimens. 15 MH clinical isolates with different phenotypes of resistance to fluoroquinolones antibiotics were screened for mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) in comparison with the reference strain PG21, which is susceptible to fluoroquinolones antibiotics. 15 MH isolates with three kinds of quinolone resistance phenotypes were obtained. Thirteen out of these quinolone-resistant isolates were found to carry nucleotide substitutions in either gyrA or parC. There were no alterations in gyrB and no mutations were found in the isolates with a phenotype of resistance to Ofloxacin (OFX), intermediate resistant to Levofloxacin (LVX) and Sparfloxacin (SFX), and those susceptible to all three tested antibiotics. The molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of MH was reported in this study. The single amino acid mutation in ParC of MH may relate to the resistance to OFX and LVX and the high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones for MH is likely associated with mutations in both DNA gyrase and the ParC subunit of topoisomerase IV.

  4. Mycoplasma genitalium: An Overlooked Sexually Transmitted Pathogen in Women?

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Samsiya; Molina, Rose L.; Diouf, Khady

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a facultative anaerobic organism and a recognized cause of nongonococcal urethritis in men. In women, M. genitalium has been associated with cervicitis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and adverse birth outcomes, indicating a consistent relationship with female genital tract pathology. The global prevalence of M. genitalium among symptomatic and asymptomatic sexually active women ranges between 1 and 6.4%. M. genitalium may play a role in pathogenesis as an independent sexually transmitted pathogen or by facilitating coinfection with another pathogen. The long-term reproductive consequences of M. genitalium infection in asymptomatic individuals need to be investigated further. Though screening for this pathogen is not currently recommended, it should be considered in high-risk populations. Recent guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control regarding first-line treatment for PID do not cover M. genitalium but recommend considering treatment in patients without improvement on standard PID regimens. Prospective studies on the prevalence, pathophysiology, and long-term reproductive consequences of M. genitalium infection in the general population are needed to determine if screening protocols are necessary. New treatment regimens need to be investigated due to increasing drug resistance. PMID:27212873

  5. Pelvic abscess due to Mycoplasma hominis following caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Takigawa, Aya; Kagawa, Narito; Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Shinji; Shibayama, Keigo; Aoki, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mycoplasma hominis is associated with genito-urinary tract infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, whether the species is a true pathogen or part of the genito-urinary tracts natural flora remains unclear. Case presentation: A 41-year-old pregnant woman was admitted to our hospital at 38 weeks and 5 days of gestation owing to premature rupture of the membranes. The patient delivered by caesarean section. Subsequently, the patient complained of lower abdominal pain and had persistent fever. Enhanced computed tomography revealed pelvic abscesses. Gram staining of pus from the abscess and vaginal secretions indicated presence of polymorphonuclear leucocytes but no pathogens. Cultures on blood agar showed growth of pinpoint-sized colonies in an anaerobic environment within 48 h. Although administration of carbapenem and metronidazole was ineffective and we could not fully drain the abscess, administration of clindamycin led to clinical improvement. The isolates 16S rRNA gene and yidC gene sequences exhibited identity with those of M. hominis. Conclusion: Physicians should consider M. hominis in cases of pelvic abscesses where Gram staining yields negative results, small colonies are isolated from the abscess and treatment with β-lactam antibiotics is ineffective. PMID:28348780

  6. Contagious agalactia due to Mycoplasma spp. in small dairy ruminants: epidemiology and prospects for diagnosis and control.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Martín, Angel; Amores, Joaquín; Paterna, Ana; De la Fe, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Contagious agalactia (CA) is a serious disease of small dairy ruminants that has a substantial economic impact on the goat and sheep milk industries. The main aetiological agent of the disease is Mycoplasma agalactiae, although other species, such as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri, Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum and Mycoplasma putrefaciens, are pathogenic in goats. There are two clinical-epidemiological states of CA in sheep and goats; herds and flocks may exhibit outbreaks of CA or may be chronically infected, the latter with a high incidence of subclinical mastitis and only occasional clinical cases. The complex epidemiology of CA is related to the genetic characteristics and mechanisms of molecular variation of the Mycoplasma spp. involved, along with presence of CA-mycoplasmas in wild ruminant species. In goats, the situation is particularly complex and asymptomatic carriers have been detected in chronically infected herds. The coexistence of other non-pathogenic mycoplasmas in the herd further complicates the diagnosis of CA and the design of efficient strategies to control the disease. Routes of infection, such as the venereal route, may be involved in the establishment of chronic infection in herds. Current challenges include the need for improved diagnostic methods for detection of chronic and subclinical infections and for the design of more efficient vaccines.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells infected with Mycoplasma arginini secrete complement C3 to regulate immunoglobulin production in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, D-S; Yi, T G; Lee, H-J; Kim, S-N; Park, S; Jeon, M-S; Song, S U

    2014-04-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunomodulatory functions such as the suppression of T and B cells. MSCs suppress immunoglobulin (Ig) production by B cells via cell-cell contact as well as via secretion of soluble factors. Our study showed that the conditioned medium (CM) of MSCs infected with a mycoplasma strain, Mycoplasma arginini, has marked inhibitory effects on Ig production by lipopolysaccharide/interleukin-4-induced B cells compared with mycoplasma-free MSC-CM. We analyzed mycoplasma-infected MSC-CM by fast protein liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography to screen the molecules responsible for Ig inhibition. Complement C3 (C3) was the most critical molecule among the candidates identified. C3 was shown to be involved in the suppression of the Ig production of B cells. C3 was secreted by mycoplasma-infected MSCs, but not by mycoplasma-free MSCs or B cells. It was able to directly inhibit Ig production by B cells. In the presence of a C3 inhibitor, Ig inhibition by MSC-CM was abrogated. This inhibitory effect was concomitant with the downregulation of B-cell-induced maturation protein-1, which is a regulator of the differentiation of antibody-secreting plasma cells. These results suggest that C3 secreted from mycoplasma-infected MSCs has an important role in the immunomodulatory functions of MSCs. However, its role in vivo needs to be explored.

  8. Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis among outpatients in central Greece: absence of tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) over a 4-year period study.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidis, A; Venetis, C; Georgantzis, D; Giaslakiotis, V; Kolovos, V; Efstathiou, K; Moschou, M; Κoutsiaris, Ε; Panopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    A total of 301 men and women attending local urologists and gynaecologists in the state of Thessaly, central Greece, were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma genitalium and Mycoplasma hominis DNA. Investigation of the tet(M) gene, which confers tetracycline resistance in these genera, was also performed. Low incidence of C. trachomatis and Mycoplasma spp. as well as high prevalence of Ureaplasma spp., especially among women, were found. The tet(M) gene was absent in all cases, notably in a region where doxycycline administration remains the first therapeutic option unless special medical conditions direct otherwise.

  9. The resistance and carrier status of meat-type hens exposed to Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Verdaman, T H

    1976-01-01

    Forty-eight 32-week-old meat-type females, free from Mycoplasma synoviae (Ms.) and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg.) were aerosol exposed with a 24-hour broth culture of Ms. 1331 and placed in 3 pens. 16 birds per pen. Two males were placed in each of the 3 pens and used as contact birds. All birds were bled at 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 24, 26, and 30 weeks post Ms. exposure. After the 24-week bleeding, the females were equally divided into 4 pens. All females in 2 of the pens were given a foot pad injection of 0.3 ml. of Ms. 1331 broth culture. Ms. isolation attempts were made from the trachea of all birds at 2, 14, and 24 weeks post Ms. exposure. Ms. isolation attempts were made from all eggs produced, either from the allantoic fluid and egg yolk of 17- or 18-day-old embryos, dead embryos, and infertile eggs, or from the tracheas of day-old progenies. Each day-old progeny was bled. Ms. and Mg. serum plate tests were conducted on the serums from the progeny and adult birds from each bleeding. Ms. hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests were conducted on the serums of the adult birds. In the Ms.-exposed birds, the geometric mean HI titer of the serums from each bleeding rose significantly over the previous bleeding. The percentages of Ms. serum plate reactions increased with length of time after Ms. exposure. There were false Mg. serum plate reactions in the early stages of Ms. infection. A foot pad challenge with a broth culture of Ms. 1331 24 weeks after Ms. exposure did not significantly increase the geometric mean HI titer over the Ms. exposed birds that did not have a Ms. foot pad challenge. Ms. was isolated from the trachea of 91.6%, 100%, and 100% of the Ms.-exposed birds at 2, 14, and 24 weeks after Ms. exposure, respectively. There were 35 Ms. isolates from 575 attempts from 17- or 18-day embryos, dead embryos, or infertile eggs, and 7 Ms. isolates from 67 attempts from the trachea of day-old progenies. All isolates were made from eggs collected from 6 through 31 days

  10. Epidemiology of Mycoplasma acquisition in male HIV-1 infected patients: a multistage cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-S; Wu, J-R; Wang, B; Yang, T; Yuan, R; Zhao, Y-Y; Xu, J-S; Guo, H-X; Huan, X-P

    2015-11-01

    Mycoplasma infections are most frequently associated with disease in the urogenital or respiratory tracts and, in most cases, mycoplasmas infect the host persistently. In HIV-infected individuals the prevalence and role of genital mycoplasmas has not been well studied. To investigate the six species of Mycoplasma and the risk factors for infection in Jiangsu province, first-void urine and venous blood samples were collected and epidemiological questionnaires were administered after informed consent. A total of 1541 HIV/AIDS patients were recruited in this study. The overall infection rates of six Mycoplasma species were: Ureaplasma urealyticum (26·7%), Mycoplasma hominis (25·3%), M. fermentans (5·1%), M. genitalium (20·1%), M. penetrans (1·6%) and M. pirum (15·4%). The Mycoplasma infection rate in the unmarried group was lower than that of the married, divorced and widowed groups [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·432, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·077-1·904, P < 0·05]. The patients who refused highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a much higher risk of Mucoplasma infection (aOR 1·357, 95% CI 1·097-1·679, P < 0·05). Otherwise, a high CD4+ T cell count was a protective factor against Mycoplasma infection (aOR 0·576, 95% CI 0·460-0·719, P < 0·05). Further research will be required to confirm a causal relationship and to identify risk factors for Mycoplasma infection in HIV/AIDS populations.

  11. Management practices associated with the bulk tank milk prevalence of Mycoplasma spp. in dairy herds in Northwestern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinho, L; Thompson, G; Machado, M; Carvalheira, J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of some management practices on the prevalence of Mycoplasma spp. in Northwestern Portuguese dairy farms from bulk tank milk (BTM) samples. Additionally, the within-herd prevalence of Mycoplasma spp. was also determined, but only in BTM positive herds. From May 2007 to November 2008, 492 BTM samples from 164 dairies randomly chosen in a population of 1234 dairy farms were analyzed. Five herds (3.0%) had positive mycoplasmal culture results, from which 4 out of 164 (2.4%) were Mycoplasma bovis, with simultaneous presence of Mycoplasma bovigenitalium or Mycoplasma canadense in two of those samples. In one out of 164 (0.6%) herds Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum was also found. In BTM positive Mycoplasma spp. herds, the apparent intra-herd prevalence was low and varied between 2.5% and 4.5%. Multiple locus variable-number of tandem-repeat analysis was conducted in order to compare the genetic relationship between the isolates. Mycoplasma spp. was found to be present in cows with subclinical mastitis with or without California Mastitis Test positive results, hence all cows should be tested when the agent is isolated from bulk tank rather than selecting suspected cows. A multivariable logistic regression using the Firth's penalized maximum likelihood estimation was performed showing that increasing number of lactating cows (OR=1.05; P<0.01) was associated with a higher probability of isolating Mycoplasma spp. On the other hand, identifying problem cows was associated with a lower probability (OR=0.06; P<0.05). Particular importance was given to the prevalence of M. bovis, and the results obtained highlight the need to include this agent in mastitis control protocols in national dairies and in sanitary controls of transitioned animals between European countries.

  12. Development of a bead-based multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of multiple Mycoplasma species.

    PubMed

    Righter, Daniel J; Rurangirwa, Fred R; Call, Douglas R; McElwain, Terry F

    2011-12-15

    We describe the development and analytical validation of a 7-plex polymerase chain reaction assay coupled to a bead-based liquid suspension array for detection of multiple ruminant Mycoplasma spp. The assay employs a combination of newly designed and previously validated primer-probe sets that target genetic loci specific for Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma mycoides cluster, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC (MmmSC) and Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp). Analytical sensitivity for the targeted Mycoplasma species ranged from 10 fg to 1 pg of purified gDNA extracted from broth cultures (approximately 8-800 MmmSC genome equivalents). In silico comparison of primers and probes, and analytical assessment with a range of near-neighbor Mycoplasma species and multiple bacterial respiratory pathogens demonstrated 100% analytical specificity of the assay. To assess assay performance and diagnostic specificity, 192 bovine respiratory samples were analyzed by incorporating a high throughput DNA extraction platform. The assay correctly classified all samples as negative for MmmSC or Mccp. All 33 field samples confirmed as positive for M. bovis by sequencing the uvrC gene were positive in the assay. The results from this study indicate that the bead-based liquid suspension array will provide a reliable, analytically sensitive and specific platform to simultaneously interrogate ruminant respiratory samples for multiple Mycoplasma species, including M. mycoides cluster organisms that are exotic to the United States. Sequential addition of primer-probe sets to the assay did not significantly impact analytical sensitivity of individual primer-probe combinations, suggesting that expanding the assay to include more Mycoplasma species will not compromise overall performance.

  13. Genital mycoplasmas in semen samples of males attending a tertiary care hospital in Nigeria: any role in sperm count reduction?

    PubMed

    Agbakoba, N R; Adetosoye, A I; Ikechebelu, J I

    2007-06-01

    Semen samples from 54 married men attending the outpatient clinics for problems of infertility and routine semen analysis were examined for the presence of genital mycoplasmas. The mean age of the men was 36.1 years with a range of 25 55 years. Majority of the men 57.4% (31 of 54) were in their fourth decade of life (30 39 years). This age group also had the highest percentage 57.2% (8 of 14) of positive isolates of genital mycoplasmas on semen culture. A total of 21 organisms obtained from 14 (26.0%) positive samples were isolated. Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp. separately isolated from the samples yielded frequencies of 1 (1.9%) and 6 (11.1%) respectively and the remaining 7 (13.0%) samples were infected with both organisms. A breakdown of the mycoplasma species include 5 (23.8%) M. hominis, 2 (9.5%) M. fermentans and 1 (4.8%) M. penetrans. Apart from one isolate of M. hominis other Mycoplasma species were found in association with Ureaplasma species. Fifteen (71.4%) of the 21 isolates [8 (53.3%) ureaplasmas and 7 (46.7%) mycoplasmas] were isolated from samples with sperm counts less than 20 million/ml while the remaining 6 (21.6%) isolates [5 (83.3%) ureaplasmas and 1 (16.7) mycoplasma] were from samples with counts greater than 20 million/ml. This finding could indicate a possible influence of genital mycoplasmas especially mycoplasmas species on sperm count.

  14. A Possible Novel Prosthetic Joint Infection Pathogen, Mycoplasma salivarium, Identified by Metagenomic Shotgun Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thoendel, Matthew; Jeraldo, Patricio; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Chia, Nicholas; Abdel, Matthew P; Steckelberg, James M; Osmon, Douglas R; Patel, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Defining the microbial etiology of culture-negative prosthetic joint infection (PJI) can be challenging. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing is a new tool to identify organisms undetected by conventional methods. We present a case where metagenomics was used to identify Mycoplasma salivarium as a novel PJI pathogen in a hypogammaglobulinemic individual.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae type 2a strain 309, isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kenri, Tsuyoshi; Horino, Atsuko; Matsui, Mari; Sasaki, Yuko; Suzuki, Satowa; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Okazaki, Norio; Shibayama, Keigo

    2012-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae strain 309, a type 2a (subtype 2 variant) strain of this bacterium, has variations in the P1 protein, which is responsible for attachment of the bacterium to host cells. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of M. pneumoniae strain 309 isolated from a pneumonia patient in Japan.

  16. Isolation of Mycoplasma bovirhinis from the kidneys of a bull with urinary obstruction and subacute nephritis.

    PubMed

    Panangala, V S; Stringfellow, J S; Oliver, J L; Wolfe, D F

    1990-08-01

    A bull with urethral obstruction secondary to urolithiasis died following exploratory laparotomy. Postmortem examination revealed renal, cystic, and urethral calculi. Gross and histologic findings were consistent with acute urethral and bilateral renal obstruction. Bacteriologic culture of renal tissue revealed Mycoplasma bovirhinis.

  17. Association of microRNAs with antibody response to mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in t...

  18. Association of selenocysteine transfer RNA fragments with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to identify transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected...

  19. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  20. IgM binding to sialosyllactosaminylparagloboside in a patient with polyradiculoneuropathy due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, T; Miyatani, N; Baba, H; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, K; Sato, S; Nakamura, K; Miyatake, T

    1988-07-01

    IgM in serum without paraprotein in a patient with polyradiculoneuropathy due to a Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection reacted specifically with a ganglioside, sialosyllactosaminylparagroboside (SLPG), in a human peripheral nerve on a thin-layer chromatogram plate by an immunostaining technique. This finding suggests the possibility that anti-SLPG antibody in the patient's serum may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuropathy.

  1. Mononeuritis multiplex with brachial plexus neuropathy coincident with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Kidron, D; Barron, S A; Mazliah, J

    1989-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection has been associated with a variety of neurologic complications involving the central nervous system, the peripheral nervous system and muscle. We present a patient who developed a previously unreported complication: mononeuritis multiplex. This consisted of a severe brachial plexus neuropathy with contralateral cervical monoradiculopathy.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum.

    PubMed

    Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; de la Fe, Christian; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Antonio; Tola, Sebastiana; Gómez-Martin, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is one of the causative agents of contagious agalactia (CA). Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information about its antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and genetic variability of different Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum field isolates. For this purpose, the growth inhibition effect of 18 antimicrobials and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on five housekeeping genes (fusA, glpQ, gyrB, lepA and rpoB) were performed on 32 selected field isolates from Italy and Spain.The results showed a wide range of growth inhibitory effects for almost all the antimicrobials studied. Macrolides presented lower efficacy inhibiting Mcc growth than in previous works performed on other CA-causative mycoplasmas. Erythromycin was not able to inhibit the growth of any of the studied strains, contrary to doxycycline, which inhibited the growth of all of them from low concentrations. On the other hand, the study of the concatenated genes revealed a high genetic variability among the different Mcc isolates. Hence, these genetic variations were greater than the ones reported in prior works on other mycoplasma species.

  3. Comparison of nucleic acid extraction methods for the detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Thurman, Kathleen A; Cowart, Kelley C; Winchell, Jonas M

    2009-12-01

    Four nucleic acid extraction procedures (2 automated and 2 manual) were compared for their efficiency at isolating Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA. Oropharyngeal swabs from healthy volunteers were spiked with varying amounts of M. pneumoniae, extracted, and tested using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Our data indicate that both automated extraction methods consistently outperform the manual procedures.

  4. A multilocus sequence typing method and curated database for Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant problem in bison, causing necrotic pha...

  5. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necro...

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    PubMed Central

    Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Antonio; Tola, Sebastiana; Gómez-Martin, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is one of the causative agents of contagious agalactia (CA). Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information about its antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and genetic variability of different Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum field isolates. For this purpose, the growth inhibition effect of 18 antimicrobials and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on five housekeeping genes (fusA, glpQ, gyrB, lepA and rpoB) were performed on 32 selected field isolates from Italy and Spain.The results showed a wide range of growth inhibitory effects for almost all the antimicrobials studied. Macrolides presented lower efficacy inhibiting Mcc growth than in previous works performed on other CA-causative mycoplasmas. Erythromycin was not able to inhibit the growth of any of the studied strains, contrary to doxycycline, which inhibited the growth of all of them from low concentrations. On the other hand, the study of the concatenated genes revealed a high genetic variability among the different Mcc isolates. Hence, these genetic variations were greater than the ones reported in prior works on other mycoplasma species. PMID:28346546

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma bovigenitalium Strain HAZ 596 from a Bovine Vagina in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kazuya; Murakami, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, a mycoplasmal species involved in various bovine diseases, including genital disease and mastitis, is also a commensal microorganism that inhabits the bovine genital organs. We present here the complete 853,553-bp genome sequence of M. bovigenitalium strain HAZ 596, which was isolated from a bovine vagina in Japan. PMID:28183755

  8. Relative virulence in bison and cattle of bison-associated genotypes of Mycoplasma bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Mycoplasma bovis is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from bovine respiratory disease complex. It has recently emerged as a major health problem in bison, causing pharyngitis, pneumonia, arthritis, dystocia and abortion. In cattle, M. b...

  9. Abortion associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in a bison (Bison bison) herd

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant health threat in bison and is an increasing concern and source of economic loss for producers. Clinical manifestations of infection documented in bison include pneumonia, respiratory distress and polyarthritis. The current study des...

  10. Microbiological survey for Mycoplasma spp. in a contagious agalactia endemic area.

    PubMed

    De la Fe, C; Assunção, P; Antunes, T; Rosales, R S; Poveda, J B

    2005-09-01

    In this work, we report a microbiological survey for Mycoplasma spp. undertaken between 2001 and 2002 in 28 goat herds in Gran Canaria, Spain, an area where contagious agalactia is endemic. All herds were randomly selected and represented approximately 15.5% of the total goat population of the island. A variable number of milk, articular and auricular swab samples were collected from each flock and cultured in specific mycoplasma culture media. There was a total of 38.5% positive flocks from which 37 mycoplasma isolates were obtained. In contrast with previous data obtained in Spain, our results showed that the large colony variant of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm LC) was the most commonly isolated agent associated with contagious agalactia. This species was isolated from 90% of the positive herds and accounted for 54.1% of all isolations. M. agalactiae was isolated from 40% of the positive herds (27% of all isolations) and in six herds M. arginini was isolated (18.7% of all isolations). No M. capricolum or M. putrefaciens strains were isolated. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 21 milk samples, 15 ear canals swabs and one articular sample. The association of several species was reported in several herds. These results are at variance with previous serological studies, which indicated a higher disease prevalence, and suggest that it could be necessary to use detection techniques such PCR to confirm the existence of contagious agalactia in goats.

  11. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 12

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... culture as needed to maintain the original isolates. Incubate tubes at 37 °C for at least 21 days before... incubation, inoculate broth culture onto a plate of Mycoplasma Agar Medium (MAM). (See paragraph (g) of this section.) Several cultures may be inoculated on one plate by using a wire loop or a cotton swab....

  12. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 12

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... culture as needed to maintain the original isolates. Incubate tubes at 37 °C for at least 21 days before... incubation, inoculate broth culture onto a plate of Mycoplasma Agar Medium (MAM). (See paragraph (g) of this section.) Several cultures may be inoculated on one plate by using a wire loop or a cotton swab....

  13. Neurological diseases associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, F.; Gispen, R.; Kleemola, M.; Syrůček, L.; Esteves, K.

    1980-01-01

    In 1963 the World Health Organization established a system for the collection and dissemination of information on viral infections and by 1976, laboratories in 49 countries were participating in this scheme. The present study is in two parts: part 1 is an analysis of almost 60 000 reports on neurological disease associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections reported during the 10-year period 1967-76. This analysis showed a steady increase in the yearly number of reports of viral neurological diseases, which closely followed the general increase in the overall reporting of virus diseases. Likewise, the seasonal pattern was similar to that seen in general for any given virus. Over 75% of the cases were in children. Over half of all viral neurological diseases were associated with enteroviruses, while the myxoviruses accounted for almost 30%. Among the myxoviruses, mumps virus was by far the most frequently reported. The polioviruses were the agents most commonly detected in cases of paralytic disease. The other enteroviruses, mumps virus, and the herpesviruses were the most frequently reported viruses in cases of aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. On the other hand, one-third to over one-half of the reports on the myxoviruses (excluding mumps and measles) related to ill-defined clinical conditions. Part 2 of the study deals in particular with viruses whose role in neurological disease is less well documented. One laboratory reported an outbreak of adenoviral aseptic meningitis in Czechoslovakia, while another described neurological disease associated with M. pneumoniae infection in Finland. Part 2 also includes a detailed appraisal of viral infections diagnosed in the Netherlands during the period 1973-76. The results are very similar to those routinely reported. PMID:6249511

  14. Molecular characterization of Mycoplasma arthritidis variable surface protein MAA2.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, K E; Weaver, E J; Donelan, W; Al-Sheboul, S

    1998-06-01

    Earlier studies implied a role for Mycoplasma arthritidis surface protein MAA2 in cytadherence and virulence and showed that it exhibited both size and phase variability. Here we report the further analysis of MAA2 and the cloning and sequencing of the maa2 gene from two M. arthritidis strains, 158p10p9 and H606, expressing two size variants of MAA2. Triton X-114 partitioning and metabolic labeling with [3H]palmitic acid suggested lipid modification of MAA2. Surface exposure of the C terminus was indicated by cleavage of monoclonal antibody-specific epitopes from intact cells by carboxypeptidase Y. The maa2 genes from both strains were highly conserved, consisting largely of six (for 158p10p9) or five (for H606) nearly identical, 264-bp tandem direct repeats. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted a largely hydrophilic, highly basic protein with a 29-amino-acid lipoprotein signal peptide. The maa2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli from the lacZ promoter of vector pGEM-T. The recombinant product was approximately 3 kDa larger than the native protein, suggesting that the signal peptide was not processed in E. coli. The maa2 gene and upstream DNA sequences were cloned from M. arthritidis clonal variants differing in MAA2 expression state. Expression state correlated with the length of a poly(T) tract just upstream of a putative -10 box. Full-sized recombinant MAA2 was expressed in E. coli from genes derived from both ON and OFF expression variants, indicating that control of expression did not include alterations within the coding region.

  15. Description and prevalence of Mycoplasma ciconiae sp. nov. isolated from white stork nestlings (Ciconia ciconia).

    PubMed

    Möller Palau-Ribes, Franca; Enderlein, Dirk; Hagen, Nils; Herbst, Werner; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Lierz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The mycoplasma strain ST 57T was isolated from the trachea of a clinically healthy, free-ranging white stork nestling in Nielitz, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany. Strain ST 57T grew in fried-egg-shaped colonies on mycoplasma (SP4) agar plates and was dependent on sterol for growth. The organism fermented glucose and did not hydrolyse arginine or urea. The optimal growth temperature was 37 °C, with a temperature range from 23 to 44 °C. Strain ST 57Tcould not be identified as a representative of any of the currently described mycoplasma species by alignment of the 16S rRNA gene sequence or 16S-23S intergenic transcribed spacer region, or by immunobinding assays. Thus, this organism appears to be a representative of a novel species, for which the name Mycoplasma ciconiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST 57T (=ATCC BAA-2401T=DSM 25251T). Four further strains of this species are included in this description (ST 24=DSM 29908, ST 56 Clone 1=DSM 29054, ST 99=DSM 29909, ST 102=DSM 29010). The prevalence of this mycoplasma species in clinically healthy, white stork nestlings in northern Germany was determined. Our species-specific PCR detected 57.8 % (48/83) of the samples positive for M. ciconiae sp. nov. As this species appears to be widespread in the healthy free-ranging white stork population, we conclude that this species is either apathogenic or an opportunistic pathogen in white storks.

  16. A Novel Mycoplasma sp. Associated with Phallus Disease in Goose Breeders: Pathological and Bacteriological Findings.

    PubMed

    Carnaccini, S; Ferguson-Noel, N M; Chin, R P; Santoro, T; Black, P; Bland, M; Bickford, A A; Sentíes-Cué, C G

    2016-06-01

    In April 2014, poor fertility in a major commercial goose breeder operation in California triggered the submission of six live affected Toulouse ganders ( Anser anser ) to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, Turlock branch (University of California-Davis). Toulouse were principally affected among all breeds, and their egg fertility dropped from 65.7% to less than 33.9% in the first 40 days of the 2014 breeding season. The flock consisted of 410 adult birds, 90 males and 320 females, between 2 and 5 yr of age. Inspection of the flock revealed that 44.4% of the Toulouse ganders had severe phallic deformities that prevented them from mating. At postmortem examination, severe yellowish fibrocaseous exudate disrupted the architecture of the phallus and occasionally produced fistulating tracts through the wall of the organ. Microscopically, multifocal lymphoid nodules were noted in the mucosa and submucosa of the phallus and were associated with extensive granulomatous reaction, intralesional bacteria, and spermatozoa. Mycoplasma spp. were isolated from the phallus of affected and nonaffected birds, and PCR protocols targeting the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer regions and the RNA polymerase beta subunit gene were performed to identify the isolates. Three distinct species were identified on sequencing and analysis using the National Center for Biotechnology Information basic local alignment search tool: Mycoplasma cloacale , Mycoplasma anseris , and an unknown novel Mycoplasma sp. Additionally, Pasteurella multocida , in combination with other bacteria, was also isolated from the phallic lesions and identified as serotype 3 with a DNA profile of 1511 (National Veterinary Service Laboratory). This is the first report of these Mycoplasma spp. and other bacteria associated with reproductive disease in ganders in the United States.

  17. Characterization of In Vivo acquired resistance of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to macrolides and lincosamides.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; Minion, F Chris; Peeters, Johan; De Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2005-01-01

    Macrolides and related antibiotics are used to control mycoplasma infections in the pig industry worldwide. Some porcine mycoplasmas, however, survive these treatments by acquiring resistance. The mechanism of acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides was studied in more detail for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by comparing both the phenotype and genotype of a resistant field isolate to five susceptible isolates. The MICs were significantly higher for the resistant strain for all antibiotics tested. The MICs for the 16-membered macrolide tylosin ranged from 8 to 16 microg for the resistant strain and from 0.03 to 0.125 microg/ml for the five susceptible strains. The MICs for the 15-membered macrolides and lincosamides were higher than 64 microg/ml for the resistant strain while only 0.06 to 0.5 microg/ml for the susceptible strains. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains are intrinsically resistant to the 14-membered macrolides due to a G 2057 A transition (E. coli numbering) in their 23S rDNA. Therefore, high MICs were observed for all strains, although the MICs for the resistant strain were clearly increased. An additional, acquired A 2058 G point mutation was found in the 23S rRNA gene of the resistant strain. No differences linked to resistance were found in the ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. The present study showed that 23S rRNA mutations resulting in resistance to macrolides and lincosamides as described in other Mycoplasma spp. also occur under field conditions in M. hyopneumoniae.

  18. Characterization of the mycoplasma membrane proteins. VI. Composition and disposition of proteins in membranes from aging Mycoplasma hominis cultures.

    PubMed

    Amar, A; Rottem, S; Kahane, I; Razin, S

    1976-03-05

    Membranes of Mycoplasma hominis cells from cultures progressing from the mid to the end of the logarithmic phase of growth became richer in protein, poorer in phospholipids and cholesterol, heavier in density, and more viscous as determined by EPR. The membrane-bound ATPase activity declined steeply. Electrophoretic analysis failed to show marked changes in membrane protein composition on aging, apart from an increase in the staining intensity of one protein band (Mr approximately 130 000) concomitant with a decrease in the staining intensity of several minor protein bands of high molecular weight. To test for possible changes in the disposition of the various membrane proteins on aging of cultures, a comparison was made of the susceptibility of membrane proteins of intact cells and isolated membranes to trypsinization and lactoperoxidase-mediated iodination. The iodination values and the percent of membrane protein released by trypsinization of intact cells were similar in cells from cultures of different ages, indicating no significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the outer surface. On the other hand, trypsinization and iodination of isolated membranes were found to be most markedly affected by the culture age, indicating significant changes in the organization of the proteins on the inner membrane surface. Thus, the iodination values of isolated membranes decreased by almost two fold, while the percentage of protein released from the membrane by trypsin increased from 28% to 50% during the experimental period. It is suggested that aging in M. hominis cultures is accompanied by a continuous increase in the packing density of the protein molecules on the inner surface of the cell membrane.

  19. Mycoplasma species in cats with lower airway disease: improved detection and species identification using a polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Reed, Nicki; Simpson, Kerry; Ayling, Roger; Nicholas, Robin; Gunn-Moore, Danielle

    2012-12-01

    There is some evidence that Mycoplasma species may be associated with lower airway disease in cats. Retrospective and prospective studies were carried out on a total population of 76 cats but failed to identify any cases of Mycoplasma species infection by bacterial culture alone. The overall prevalence of bacterial infection (15.8%) was also lower than that identified in previous studies. When a molecular detection technique, the PCR-DGGE, was employed the prevalence of Mycoplasma species detected was 15.4%, with M felis, M gateae and M feliminutum species identified, although the significance of these Mycoplasma species in feline lower airway disease remains in question. However, the PCR-DGGE technique allowed species identification and indicated the presence of M feliminutum, a species not previously isolated from the lower airways of cats.

  20. A novel mycoplasma detected in association with upper respiratory disease syndrome in free-ranging eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Marchang, Rachel E; Johnson, April J; Brown, William; Mitchell, Joseph C; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2006-04-01

    Clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease-like syndrome (URTD-LS) were observed in free-ranging eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) from Virginia, USA (May 2001-August 2003), some of which also had aural abscesses. After a Mycoplasma sp. was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a study was undertaken to better define the range of clinical signs of disease and to distinguish mycoplasma-associated URTD-LS from other suspected causes of URTD-LS and aural abscessation in box turtles. Nasal and/or ocular swabs (from turtles possessing URTD-LS) or nasal washes (from asymptomatic turtles) were collected from turtles May 2001-August 2003; samples were assayed for Mycoplasma spp., chelonian herpesvirus, and iridoviruses by PCR testing. A partial DNA sequence (933 bases) of the small ribosomal subunit (16S rRNA) of the box turtle Mycoplasma sp. was analyzed to determine its phylogenetic relatedness to other Mycoplasma spp. of veterinary interest. Mycoplasma sp. was detected in seven (six with clinical signs of URTD-LS; one asymptomatic) of 23 fortuitously collected animals from six of 11 Virginia counties. Clinical signs in Mycoplasma sp.-infected animals included unilateral to bilateral serous to mucopurulent nasal discharge, epiphora, ocular edema, and conjunctival injection. Five Mycoplasma sp.-positive animals possessed aural abscesses; two did not. Analysis of the mycoplasma 16S rRNA gene sequence from one asymptomatic and three symptomatic animals representing four counties revealed a consensus Mycoplasma sp. sequence closely related to, but distinct from, M. agassizii. None of the samples collected contained viral DNA of chelonian herpesviruses or invertebrate and vertebrate (including FV3) iridoviruses. In conclusion, a new Mycoplasma sp. was associated with URTD-LS in native box turtles from Virginia that was not codetected with other suspected causes of chelonian upper respiratory disease; there was no proof of a direct relationship

  1. Assessing the prevalence of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture via a survey of NCBI's RNA-seq archive

    PubMed Central

    Olarerin-George, Anthony O.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are notorious contaminants of cell culture and can have profound effects on host cell biology by depriving cells of nutrients and inducing global changes in gene expression. Over the last two decades, sentinel testing has revealed wide-ranging contamination rates in mammalian culture. To obtain an unbiased assessment from hundreds of labs, we analyzed sequence data from 9395 rodent and primate samples from 884 series in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive. We found 11% of these series were contaminated (defined as ≥100 reads/million mapping to mycoplasma in one or more samples). Ninety percent of mycoplasma-mapped reads aligned to ribosomal RNA. This was unexpected given 37% of contaminated series used poly(A)-selection for mRNA enrichment. Lastly, we examined the relationship between mycoplasma contamination and host gene expression in a single cell RNA-seq dataset and found 61 host genes (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with mycoplasma-mapped read counts. In all, this study suggests mycoplasma contamination is still prevalent today and poses substantial risk to research quality. PMID:25712092

  2. Assessing the prevalence of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture via a survey of NCBI's RNA-seq archive.

    PubMed

    Olarerin-George, Anthony O; Hogenesch, John B

    2015-03-11

    Mycoplasmas are notorious contaminants of cell culture and can have profound effects on host cell biology by depriving cells of nutrients and inducing global changes in gene expression. Over the last two decades, sentinel testing has revealed wide-ranging contamination rates in mammalian culture. To obtain an unbiased assessment from hundreds of labs, we analyzed sequence data from 9395 rodent and primate samples from 884 series in the NCBI Sequence Read Archive. We found 11% of these series were contaminated (defined as ≥100 reads/million mapping to mycoplasma in one or more samples). Ninety percent of mycoplasma-mapped reads aligned to ribosomal RNA. This was unexpected given 37% of contaminated series used poly(A)-selection for mRNA enrichment. Lastly, we examined the relationship between mycoplasma contamination and host gene expression in a single cell RNA-seq dataset and found 61 host genes (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with mycoplasma-mapped read counts. In all, this study suggests mycoplasma contamination is still prevalent today and poses substantial risk to research quality.

  3. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  4. [Incidence and quantification of mycoplasma in saliva in patients with periodontal disease and subjects with healthy gingiva].

    PubMed

    Mazzali de Ilja, R

    1990-01-01

    The ecological niche of oral mycoplasmas are both gingival pockets in patients suffering periodontitis (PP) and gingival sulci in individuals with healthy gingiva (HG). The mycoplasmas migrate from these anatomical sites to the saliva and to entire oral cavity. The purpose of this report was to examine whether differences exist in the incidence and concentration of mycoplasma as determined in the saliva of thirty (30) PP and fifty (50) individuals with HG. Saliva samples were obtained from both groups, with capillary tubes and cotton swabs, and used for mycoplasma isolation and quantification. The methods employed were those recommended by the Centers for Diseases Control (CDC Atlanta, Georgia). The results showed an 80% mycoplasma incidence in group PP and 50% HG, with the following concentrations: 5.0 x 10(3) to 8.0 x 10(6) Colony Forming Units/ml (CFU/ml) in PP, and 3.0 x 10(3) to 4.5 x 10(4) UFC/ml in the HG (P less than 0.001). We conclude the both mycoplasma incidence and concentration were higher in PP than in HG individuals.

  5. Multi-primer qPCR assay capable of highly efficient and specific detection of the vast majority of all known Mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Salling, H K; Bang-Christensen, S R

    2016-05-01

    Mycoplasma bacteria are able to pass through sterilizing grade filters due to their small size and lack of a cell wall, making them a common contaminant of biopharmaceutical productions. The classical method for detecting Mycoplasma is described in the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur) 2.6.7. The method takes 28 days to perform, due to the slow growing nature of some Mycoplasma species. The Ph.Eur has described Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) as a rapid alternative to the classical method. Here we present the development of a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay capable of unambiguous detection of Mycoplasma with high sensitivity and specificity. The broadness of detection and the specificity towards Mycoplasma has been investigated by in silico analysis of the primer sequences followed by testing on purified Mycoplasma DNA as well as DNA from closely related genera. The assay will in all probability detect at least 356 species and strains of Mycoplasma, Spiroplasma and Acholeplasma with high sensitivity. To our knowledge this assay has the most uniform amplification efficiency over the broadest range of species and it is extremely specific towards Mycoplasma. With appropriate validation, the assay can be applied as a powerful tool for rapid Mycoplasma detection in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  6. A case of septic arthritis caused by a Mycoplasma salivarium strain resistant towards Ciprofloxacin and Clarithromycin in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Büchsel, Martin; Pletschen, Lars; Fleiner, Michael; Häcker, Georg; Serr, Annerose

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium is a rare agent of septic arthritis in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of septic arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia who underwent chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustin. Therapy of arthritis due to Mycoplasma salivarium is difficult because there are almost no susceptibility data available. The present case illustrates that antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma strains is not necessarily predictable and that antibiotic therapy should therefore be guided by in vitro susceptibility testing.

  7. Molecular characterisation of the Mycoplasma cynos haemagglutinin HapA.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Saša; Cizelj, Ivanka; Narat, Mojca; Tozon, Nataša; Chalker, Victoria J; Lysnyansky, Inna; Spergser, Joachim; Benčina, Dušan

    2015-01-30

    Mycoplasma (M.) cynos is a proven pathogen of dogs causing respiratory infections including pneumonia. We examined 19 M. cynos strains isolated from different organs of dogs in Austria, Denmark and Israel. All strains agglutinated mammalian and chicken erythrocytes. Using erythrocytes of chickens or dogs as specific ligands we isolated an approximately 65 kDa protein from cell-free supernatants of 3 M. cynos strains, which showed an apparent capacity for haemagglutination. The N-terminal sequence of a 25 kDa fragment of this protein was identified as NNEMTPKVTVEAKSMELLLSVEK. The identical amino acid sequence is encoded by the gene MCYN_0308 in the genome of M. cynos C142. This gene belongs to a family of some 20 genes which encode putative lipoproteins with proline-rich regions (PRR) in the first third of their molecules. We termed the 65 kDa haemagglutinin HapA and sequenced hapA gene homologues of 16 M. cynos strains. Analyses of hapA gene homologues revealed similar but not identical sequences, some having insertions and/or deletions in the PRR. We produced a recombinant HapA protein (rHapA) and also mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing HapA. However, enzyme immunoassays using native M. cynos colonies and mAbs 5G2 or 3B7 showed variable expression of HapA in all M. cynos strains. This was further confirmed by Western blot analyses which showed different HapA quantities and also size-variation of HapA among strains. Analyses of cDNA of the expressed hapA genes showed that besides the hapA gene cultures of M. cynos (strains 105, 2002, 2297) can also express other forms of hap genes. In addition, in cloned cultures of strain 2297 altered HapA epitopes for mAbs 5G2 and 3B7 with distinct hapA gene mutations that resulted in altered HapA amino acid sequence were found. Most of the dogs examined had serum antibodies to rHapA. In conclusion, we characterized the M. cynos haemagglutinin HapA protein and encoding gene hapA, a factor involved in cytadherence to

  8. [Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis infections in newborns: personal data and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Aujard, Y; Maury, L; Doit, C; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Baud, O; Farnoux, C; Bingen, E

    2005-04-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis colonized 20-40% of newborns and are more frequent in premature. They are responsible for localized infections such as pleural effusion, pneumopathy, adenopathy, abscess or systemic sepsis. An important hyperleukocytosis is often associated with pulmonary infections. Their responsibility, as pathogen agents, is questionable in some non bacterial meningitis. There is large controversy for their role as cofactor, in chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia) and periventricular leukomalacia, because of a too low number of newborns in prospective trials. Genital mycoplamas are resistant to beta lactamines. Macrolides have a good sensitivity, particularly josamycine, but Mycoplasma hominis is resistant to erythromycin. For systemic sepsis, fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacine have less deleterious effects than IV erythromycin.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Mycoplasma arginini from camels (Camelus dromedarius) with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Elfaki, M G; Abbas, B; Mahmoud, O M; Kleven, S H

    2002-01-01

    Post-mortem examinations of 100 camels with pneumonic lesions were made at a local abattoir for Mycoplasma species. Sixteen isolates with indistinguishable biochemical and immunological characters were identified. The biochemical profile of these isolates showed that they were sensitive to digitonin, negative for urease production, glucose fermentation, and phosphatase activity but were positive for arginine hydrolysis. The identity of these isolates was further confirmed by disk growth inhibition test using a panel of specific antisera against selected reference Mycoplasma spp. Based on the biochemical profile and growth inhibition results, the camel isolates were identified as M. arginini. The pathological findings associated with M. arginini isolation consisted mostly of chronic interstitial pneumonia. The isolation rate of M. arginini from these specimens was 8.8%. These results suggest that the role of M. arginini in pneumonia in camels should be explored in greater detail.

  10. A PCR detection method for testing Mycoplasma contamination of veterinary vaccines and biological products.

    PubMed

    Ingebritson, A L; Gibbs, C P; Tong, C; Srinivas, G B

    2015-02-01

    A rapid test method was developed for detecting mycoplasma contamination in veterinary biological products. The method reduces testing time by 2 weeks and shows comparable sensitivity to the current agar-based detection model. The primary goals for the development of the test were to reduce the testing time, incorporate a method that was easily adaptable across the veterinary biologics industry and reduce the subjective interpretation of results. We found that biological enrichment is necessary to maintain sensitivity of the detection method when compared to the standard culture-based test and that periodic sampling of enrichment cultures is essential to detect a wide variety of mycoplasma species that may be present as contaminants. The PCR detection method is comparable to the agar-based model and can reduce the overall testing time by up to 14 days.

  11. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  12. Mycoplasma gallinarum infection in commercial layers and onset of fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Branton, S L; Bearson, S M D; Bearson, B L; Maslin, W R; Collier, S D; Evans, J D; Miles, D M; Pharr, G T

    2003-01-01

    Fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) was observed in each of three trials in which commercial layers were utilized to determine the effect of Mycoplasma gallinarum (MGn) on egg and eggshell quality parameters and egg production. In each of three trials, FLHS occurred 31-54 days later in MGn-inoculated hens as compared with the Mycoplasma-clean (control) hens. In trials 1 and 2, no therapeutic intervention was initiated to ameliorate FLHS. In trial 3, therapeutic intervention was instituted and consisted of the addition of 1 pound of choline chloride/ton of feed. Total mortality recorded throughout the duration of each trial and attributable to FLHS was not significantly different between the control and the MGn-inoculated treatment. However, FLHS-associated mortality in each of the three trials was numerically greater for the control treatment.

  13. Detection of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by polymerase chain reaction in swine presenting respiratory problems

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguti, M.; Muller, E.E.; Piffer, A.I.; Kich, J.D.; Klein, C.S.; Kuchiishi, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Since Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae isolation in appropriate media is a difficult task and impractical for daily routine diagnostics, Nested-PCR (N-PCR) techniques are currently used to improve the direct diagnostic sensitivity of Swine Enzootic Pneumonia. In a first experiment, this paper describes a N-PCR technique optimization based on three variables: different sampling sites, sample transport media, and DNA extraction methods, using eight pigs. Based on the optimization results, a second experiment was conducted for testing validity using 40 animals. In conclusion, the obtained results of the N-PCR optimization and validation allow us to recommend this test as a routine monitoring diagnostic method for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in swine herds. PMID:24031248

  14. Observations on the occurrence of mycoplasmas in the central nervous system of some laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Furr, P M

    1981-07-01

    Mycoplasma pulmonis was isolated from the brains of 6 (23%) of 26 mice which had a naturally-occurring respiratory infection with this mycoplasma, and from the brains of 6 (8%) of 71 mice which had been inoculated intranasally or intravenously. The incidence of natural infection was greater in older mice, but there was no obvious mouse strain difference except for higher incidence in athymic nudes. There was no evidence that the organisms passed the blood-brain barrier. Some isolations, especially from nudes, may have been extraneous contaminants, as these were fewer when the mouse skulls were sterilized with ignited methanol. M. pneumoniae was not isolated from the brains of 14 hamsters which had a respiratory infection after intranasal inoculation nor were ureaplasmas isolated from the cerebrospinal fluids of 12 marmosets with a natural oropharyngeal infection. The aetiology of M. pneumoniae encephalitis in man is discussed.

  15. Preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigen for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, S; Yagihashi, T; Seto, K

    1989-01-01

    Methods of preparation of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens for the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect specific antibody, and properties of the antigens, are described. The reactivity and specificity of antigen prepared by Sephacryl S-300 column chromatography after treatment of M. hyopneumoniae cells with Tween 20 (S-300 antigen) were superior to those of antigen prepared by Sephadex G-25 column chromatography after treatment with Tween 20, or to lipid antigen. There were no differences among strains MI-3, J and VPP11 of M. hyopneumoniae. The S-300 antigen did not show cross-reactivity against porcine hyperimmune sera produced by M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae, M. hyopharyngis, M. flocculare and Acholeplasma granularum. Antibody was first detected in sera of pigs inoculated intranasally with M. hyopneumoniae at two to four weeks after inoculation and seven to eight weeks after pigs were contact-exposed to the same mycoplasma. PMID:2523756

  16. Construction of the first shuttle vectors for gene cloning and homologous recombination in Mycoplasma agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini; Marenda, Marc; Rosengarten, Renate; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Citti, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae is a worldwide ruminant pathogen that causes significant economic losses by inflicting contagious agalactia in sheep and goats. The development of efficient control strategies requires a better understanding of the mycoplasma factors that promote successful infection. However, lack of genetic tools has been a major impediment in studying the pathogenic mechanisms of M. agalactiae. This study describes the identification and cloning of the M. agalactiae origin of replication (oriC) in order to construct the first shuttle vectors for targeted gene disruption, gene complementation and expression studies. Additionally, this report provides the first evidence of the occurrence of homologous recombination and the functionality of heterologous tetM determinant in this pathogen.

  17. Survey of infectious agents in the endangered Darwin's fox (Lycalopex fulvipes): high prevalence and diversity of hemotrophic mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Javier; Altet, Laura; Napolitano, Constanza; Sastre, Natalia; Hidalgo, Ezequiel; Dávila, José Antonio; Millán, Javier

    2013-12-27

    Very little is known about the diseases affecting the Darwin's fox (Lycalopex fulvipes), which is considered to be one of the most endangered carnivores worldwide. Blood samples of 30 foxes captured on Chiloé Island (Chile) were tested with a battery of PCR assays targeting the following pathogens: Ehrlichia/Anaplasma sp., Rickettsia sp., Bartonella sp., Coxiella burnetti, Borrelia sp., Mycoplasma sp., Babesia sp., Hepatozoon canis, Hepatozoon felis, Leishmania donovani complex, and Filariae. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the presence of Mycoplasma spp. in 17 samples (56.7%, 95% Confidence Intervals= 38.2-73.7). Of these, 15 infections were caused by a Mycoplasma belonging to the M. haemofelis/haemocanis (Mhf/Mhc) group, whereas two were caused by a Mycoplasma showing between 89% and 94% identity with different Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis from felids and rodents hemoplasmas. The analysis of the sequence of the RNA subunit of the RNase P gene of 10 of the foxes positive for Mhf/Mhc showed that eight were infected with M. haemocanis (Mhc), one with a Mycoplasma showing 94% identity with Mhc, and one by M. haemofelis (Mhf). One of the foxes positive for Mhc was infected with a Ricketssia closely related to R. felis. All foxes were negative for the other studied pathogens. Our results are of interest because of the unexpectedly high prevalence of Mycoplasma spp. detected, the variability of species identified, the presence of a potentially new species of hemoplasma, and the first time a hemoplasma considered to be a feline pathogen (Mhf) has been identified in a canid. Though external symptoms were not observed in any of the infected foxes, further clinical and epidemiological studies are necessary to determine the importance of hemoplasma infection in this unique species.

  18. Highly Dynamic Genomic Loci Drive the Synthesis of Two Types of Capsular or Secreted Polysaccharides within the Mycoplasma mycoides Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Tardy, Florence; Poumarat, François; Citti, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmas of the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster are all ruminant pathogens. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is responsible for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and is known to produce capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS). Previous studies have strongly suggested a role for Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides polysaccharides in pathogenicity. Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted EPS was recently characterized as a β(1→6)-galactofuranose homopolymer (galactan) identical to the capsular product. Here, we extended the characterization of secreted polysaccharides to all other members of the M. mycoides cluster: M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum, M. leachii, and M. mycoides subsp. capri (including the LC and Capri serovars). Extracted EPS was characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, resulting in the identification of a homopolymer of β(1→2)-glucopyranose (glucan) in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii. Monoclonal antibodies specific for this glucan and for the Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides-secreted galactan were used to detect the two polysaccharides. While M. mycoides subsp. capri strains of serovar LC produced only capsular galactan, no polysaccharide could be detected in strains of serovar Capri. All strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and M. leachii produced glucan CPS and EPS, whereas glucan production and localization varied among M. capricolum subsp. capricolum strains. Genes associated with polysaccharide synthesis and forming a biosynthetic pathway were predicted in all cluster members. These genes were organized in clusters within two loci representing genetic variability hot spots. Phylogenetic analysis showed that some of these genes, notably galE and glf, were acquired via horizontal gene transfer. These findings call for a reassessment of the specificity of the serological tests based on mycoplasma polysaccharides. PMID:25398856

  19. A PCR assay and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism combination identifying the 3 primary Mycoplasma species causing mastitis.

    PubMed

    Boonyayatra, S; Fox, L K; Besser, T E; Sawant, A; Gay, J M; Raviv, Z

    2012-01-01

    The focus of the current research was to develop real-time PCR assays with improved sensitivity and the capacity to simultaneously speciate the 3 most common mycoplasma mastitis agents: Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma californicum, and Mycoplasma bovigenitalium. Real-time PCR was chosen because it provides rapid results. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used as the gold standard for evaluating candidate real-time PCR assays. To ascertain the real-time PCR assay specificity, reference strains of Mycoplasma species, Acholeplasma axanthum, and common gram-positive and gram-negative mastitis pathogens were tested. No cross-reactions were observed. Mycoplasma spp. isolated from bovine milk samples (n=228) and other organ sites (n=40) were tested by the real-time PCR assays and the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay. Overall accuracy of this novel real-time PCR was 98.51%; 4 of 228 isolates identified as M. bovis by the partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing assay were identified as both M. bovis and M. californicum by real-time PCR. Subsequent amplicon sequencing suggested the presence of both M. bovis and M. californicum in these 4 samples. Using a cycle threshold of 37, the detection limits for real-time PCR were 10 copies of DNA template for both M. bovis and M. bovigenitalium, and 1 copy for M. californicum. This real-time PCR assay is a diagnostic technique that may be used as a screening tool or as a confirmation test for mycoplasma mastitis.

  20. Evaluation of the Hologic Panther Transcription-Mediated Amplification Assay for Detection of Mycoplasma genitalium

    PubMed Central

    Costa, A. M.; Su, J.; Lowe, P.; Bradshaw, C. S.; Fairley, C. K.; Garland, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of Mycoplasma genitalium was evaluated on 1,080 urine samples by the use of a Panther instrument. Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were 100%, 99.4%, 93.6%, and 100%, respectively. Detection of M. genitalium by the use of the Panther transcription-mediated amplification assay offers a simple, accurate, and sensitive platform for diagnostic laboratories. PMID:27307453

  1. Genital Mycoplasma infections and their resistance phenotypes in an African setting.

    PubMed

    Kouegnigan Rerambiah, L; Ndong, J-C; Medzegue, S; Elisee-Ndam, M; Djoba Siawaya, J F

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial susceptibilities of mycoplasmas in Gabonese men and women. A total of 1,332 men and women were included in the study. Sperm, urine, ureteral or vaginal swabs were collected from the subjects. Mycoplasmas identification and antimicrobial susceptibility to azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, josamycin, pristinamycin, doxycycline, tetracycline, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were tested using the Mycoplasma IST 2 kit. 794 subjects were positive for Mycoplasma. Respectively, 1.6 % and 82.24 % of subjects were singly infected with M. hominis and Ureaplasma urealyticum and 15.87 % had a mixed infection. M. hominis isolates were resistant to erythromycin and had an intermediate (I) to resistant (R) profile to azithromycin and clarithromycin. 84.6 % of M. hominis strains were sensitive (S) to josamycin and pristinamycin. 30.8 % and 92.3 % of M. hominis strains were sensitive to tetracycline and doxycycline, respectively. 76.9 and 84.6 % of M. hominis isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, respectively. The sensitivity rates of U. urealyticum strains were 45.23 %, 47.7 %, 63.84 %, 90.8 % and 92 % for azithromycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, pristinamycin and josamycin, respectively. U. urealyticum strains showed 62.2 % and 79.7 % sensitivity to tetracycline and doxycycline, respectively. The resistance rates to azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin for samples with mixed infection were 72.8 %, 84.7 % and 85.6 %, respectively. Josamycin and pristinamycin were 81.5 % effective on samples with mixed infection. The sensitivity rates of samples with mixed infection to tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were 32 %, 69.6 %, 8.9 % and 18.5 %, respectively. Sub-Saharan Africa needs to use antibiotics rationally, as falling to do so would compromise the management of infectious diseases.

  2. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection: Role of a Surface Protein in the Attachment Organelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P. C.; Cole, R. M.; Huang, Y. S.; Graham, J. A.; Gardner, D. E.; Collier, A. M.; Clyde, W. A.

    1982-04-01

    Attachment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae to host cells by means of a specialized terminus initiates infection. Monoclonal antibodies to a surface protein (P1) inhibit this process, and react with a region of the tip covered with peplomer-like particles. Since antibodies against the P1 protein are generated by natural and experimental infection and by immunization, the substance may be an important determinant of protective immunity.

  3. Mycoplasma pneumonia associated with rhabdomyolysis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Gupta, A; Goyal, V; Guleria, R; Kumar, A

    2005-01-01

    A 25-year-old housewife who presented with Mycoplasma pneumonia who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and required assisted ventilation. During her hospital stay, she developed acute renal failure because of rhabdomyolysis and was put on haemodialysis. She also had difficulty in weaning from ventilator because of acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN) variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome. The patient was treated with antibiotics and corticosteroids. The patient recovered from both the complications gradually.

  4. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 12

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10523. (5) Use sterile deionized distilled water to reconstitute penicillin. (6) Sterile serum should be... samples (ml)—5.0 (1:2000) Mycoplasma Broth Base (g)—22.5 Aqueous penicillin (units)—500,000 Sterile serum... Aqueous penicillin (units)—400,000 NAD (ml)—12.5 Cysteine hydrochloride (ml)—12.5 (1) Rotate flask...

  5. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10523. (5) Use sterile deionized distilled water to reconstitute penicillin. (6) Sterile serum should be... samples (ml)—5.0 (1:2000) Mycoplasma Broth Base (g)—22.5 Aqueous penicillin (units)—500,000 Sterile serum... Aqueous penicillin (units)—400,000 NAD (ml)—12.5 Cysteine hydrochloride (ml)—12.5 (1) Rotate flask...

  6. 9 CFR 147.15 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the bacteriological examination of mycoplasma reactors. 11

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10523. (5) Use sterile deionized distilled water to reconstitute penicillin. (6) Sterile serum should be... samples (ml)—5.0 (1:2000) Mycoplasma Broth Base (g)—22.5 Aqueous penicillin (units)—500,000 Sterile serum... Aqueous penicillin (units)—400,000 NAD (ml)—12.5 Cysteine hydrochloride (ml)—12.5 (1) Rotate flask...

  7. Arthritis of mice induced by Mycoplasma arthritidis. Humoral antibody and lymphocyte responses of CBA mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, B C; Golightly-Rowland, L; Ward, J R

    1976-01-01

    Peak arthritis occurred 7 days after intravenous injection of CBA mice with Mycoplasma arthritidis and persisted in some animals for 84 days. A marked leucocytosis was apparent for the first 21 days. Complement-fixing antibodies reached a peak 14 days after injection of the organisms and persisted at high levels for 84 days. Metabolic-inhibiting and mycoplasmacidal antibodies were present but at much lower titres. PMID:1275576

  8. False and mycoplasma-contaminated leukemia-lymphoma cell lines: time for a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Hans G; Dirks, Wilhelm G; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Uphoff, Cord C

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia-lymphoma cell lines are important research tools in a variety of fields. To represent adequate model systems it is of utmost importance that cell lines faithfully model the primary tumor material and are not cross-contaminated with unrelated cell material (or contaminated with mycoplasma). As it has been previously reported that cross-contaminated cell lines represent a significant problem, it is of interest to know whether any improvement in the prevalence of such "false cell lines" had occurred since we called the alert in 1999. A retrospective review of our data archives covered 848 cell lines received from 1990 to 2014 from 290 laboratories in 23 countries spanning the spectrum of leukemia-lymphoma entities. Two variables were considered: authenticity and freedom from mycoplasma infection. Regarding provenance, we separately considered primary sources (original investigators having established the cell lines or reference repositories) and secondary sources. The percentages of mycoplasma-contaminated cell lines decreased significantly over the 25-year timespan. Among primary sourced material: mycoplasma-contamination fell from 23% to 0%; among secondary sourced: from 48% to 21%. The corresponding figures for cross-contamination declined from 15% to 6%, while among material obtained from secondary sources prevalence remained remarkably high, throughout the time periods at 14-18%. Taken together, our data indicate that using non-authenticated cell lines from secondary sources carries a risk of about 1:6 for obtaining a false cell line. The use of authentic leukemia-lymphoma cell lines holds important translational value for their model character and the reproducibility of the laboratory data in the clinical arena.

  9. Role of E-selectin for diagnosing myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ming-Hong; Lin, Chun-Wang; Sun, Yan-Na; Zeng, Xiang-Lin; Wen, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds Effects of myocardial injury on E-selectin remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Methods In this prospective and blinded clinical study, plasma E-selectin, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha concentrations were measured in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP group, n = 138). The control group comprised 120 healthy children. The definition of cardiac injury was based on cardiac troponin I or CK-MB (with or possibly without abnormal electrocardiogram evidence). Diagnostic value of E-selectin for myocardial injury was determined by analysing receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Among the 138 mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia patients, 40 patients were identified with myocardial injury, while 98 patients were identified without myocardial injury. Plasma E-selectin concentrations were: 40.22 ± 4.80 ng/mL, in patients with myocardial injury; 18.55 ± 2.16 ng/mL, in patients without myocardial injury and 12.39 ± 3.27 ng/mL, in healthy children. For the 40 patients identified with myocardial injury, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value for plasma E-selectin concentrations was 0.945 (95% CI: 0.899-0.991), and optimal diagnostic cut-off value was 29.93 ng/mL (positive likelihood ratio = 72.5). Conclusion E-selectin was shown to be an effective index for myocardial injury in paediatric patients with mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, and its role in other causes of myocardial injury warrants further investigation.

  10. Nationwide Surveillance of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Mika; Akaike, Hiroto; Kato, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Yoko; Saito, Aki; Kondo, Eisuke; Teranishi, Hideto; Wakabayashi, Tokio; Ogita, Satoko; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Kozo; Nakano, Takashi; Terada, Kihei; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2013-01-01

    We conducted nationwide surveillance to investigate regional differences in macrolide-resistant (MR) Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains in Japan. The prevalence of MR M. pneumoniae in pediatric patients gradually increased between 2008 and 2012. Although regional differences were observed, high levels of MR genes were detected in all seven surveillance areas throughout Japan and ranged in prevalence from 50% to 93%. These regional differences were closely related to the previous administration of macrolides. PMID:23716043

  11. Mapping of a Mycoplasma-Neutralizing Epitope on the Mycoplasmal p37 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Won-Tae; Lee, Hyun Min; Choi, Hong Seo; Jo, Yu Ra; Lee, Yangsoon; Jeong, Jaemin; Choi, Dongho; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Shick; Jang, Young-Joo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that the mycoplasmal membrane protein p37 enhances cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Previously, we generated 6 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the mycoplasmal protein p37 and showed the presence of mycoplasma-infected circulating tumor cells in the blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients by using CA27, one of the six MAbs. When mycoplasmas were incubated with cancer cells in the presence of CA27, mycoplasma infection was completely inhibited, suggesting that CA27 is a neutralizing antibody inhibiting mycoplasma infection. To examine the neutralizing epitope of CA27, we generated a series of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused p37 deletion mutant proteins in which p37 was partly deleted. To express p37-coding sequences in E.coli, mycoplasmal TGA codons were substituted with TGG in the p37 deletion mutant genes. GST-fused p37 deletion mutant proteins were then screened to identify the epitope targeted by CA27. Western blots showed that CA27 bound to the residues 216–246 on the middle part of the p37 protein while it did not bind to the residues 183–219 and 216–240. Fine mapping showed that CA27 was able to bind to the residues 226–246, but its binding activity was relatively weakened as compared to that to the residues 216–246, suggesting that the residues 226–246 is essential for optimal binding activity of CA27. Interestingly, the treatment of the purified GST-tagged epitopes with urea showed that CA27 binding to the epitope was sodium dodecyl sulfate-resistant but urea-sensitive. The same 226–246 residues were also recognized by two other anti-p37 MAbs, suggesting that the epitope is immunodominant. The identification of the novel neutralizing epitope may provide new insight into the interaction between the p37 protein and host receptors. PMID:28036384

  12. Protective effects of oral microencapsulated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccine prepared by co-spray drying method.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; Weng, C N; Liao, C W; Yeh, K S; Pan, M J

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae oral vaccine was investigated in microsphere dosage form. A co-spray drying process was used to apply an encapsulating material, Eudragit L30 D-55, to microspheres containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens. The microspheres were generally effective (>93%) with protein release at pH 7.4, but almost none were released at pH 1.2, for 3 hr in an in vitro dissolution test. An SPF-swine model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the microspheres as an oral vaccine, and the related immune responses. The serum's systemic IgG against M. hyopneumoniae was evoked by ELISA analysis, after a 2nd immunization of all pigs. The vaccinated groups' mean lesion score was significantly lower after the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae challenge than that of the nonvaccinated/challenged groups (P<0.05). This study strongly suggests that the oral microspheres vaccine prepared by a co-spray drying method can provide effective protection against M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

  13. Depletion of CG-Specific Methylation in Mycoplasma hyorhinis Genomic DNA after Host Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Andrei V; Reyes, Leticia; Peterson, Scott; Strongin, Alex Y

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to the environment requires pathogenic bacteria to alter their gene expression in order to increase long-term survival in the host. Here, we present the first experimental evidence that bacterial DNA methylation affects the intracellular survival of pathogenic Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Using bisulfite sequencing, we identified that the M. hyorhinis DNA methylation landscape was distinct in free-living M. hyorhinis relative to the internalized bacteria surviving in the infected human cells. We determined that genomic GATC sites were consistently highly methylated in the bacterial chromosome suggesting that the bacterial GATC-specific 5-methylcytosine DNA methyltransferase was fully functional both pre- and post-infection. In contrast, only the low CG methylation pattern was observed in the mycoplasma genome in the infective bacteria that invaded and then survived in the host cells. In turn, two distinct populations, with either high or low CG methylation, were detected in the M. hyorhinis cultures continually grown in the rich medium independently of host cells. We also identified that M. hyorhinis efficiently evaded endosomal degradation and uses exocytosis to exit infected human cells enabling re-infection of additional cells. The well-orchestrated changes in the chromosome methylation landscape play a major regulatory role in the mycoplasma life cycle.

  14. Transient cold agglutinins associated with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Pinkos, Alyssa C; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Monaghan, Kelly N; Sample, Saundra H; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-12-01

    This report details a case of reversible cold agglutinins in a dog with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia. An 11-month-old female spayed Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented for lethargy and cough. Thoracic radiographs revealed an alveolar pattern present bilaterally in the cranioventral lung lobes. Septic neutrophilic inflammation with suspected Mycoplasma sp. organisms was noted on cytologic examination of a trans-tracheal wash, and the dog was treated empirically with IV ampicillin/sulbactam and enrofloxacin pending culture results. Red blood cell agglutination was noted unexpectedly on several blood film reviews during hospitalization; however, the dog never developed clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis. Cold agglutinins were demonstrated based on the results of a saline dilution and cold agglutinin test that showed agglutination at 4°C but not at room temperature (21°C) or 37°C. Based on a positive culture for M cynos, the dog was treated for 8 weeks with oral enrofloxacin. After clinical and radiographic resolution of the pneumonia, repeated saline dilution and cold agglutinin tests of peripheral blood were negative at all temperatures. Reversible, asymptomatic cold agglutinins are common in human patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, but this is the first reported case in a dog.

  15. Synthesis of Recombinant P48 of Mycoplasma agalactiae by Site Directed Mutagenesis and its Immunological Characterization.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Singh, Satparkash; Kathiresan, S; Kumar, Ramesh; Bhanot, Vandna; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2017-01-02

    Contagious agalactia caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae is an economically important disease of sheep and goats and has been prevalent worldwide including India. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the membrane protein P48 of M. agalactiae for specific diagnosis of disease. For this, p48 gene of the organism was amplified by PCR and subjected to site directed mutagenesis to convert three TGA codons to TGG's and, subsequently, cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pPRO EX HTb. Purified recombinant P48 protein reacted to anti-P48 serum in western blotting, which confirmed its immunogenic nature. Furthermore, the immune-blotting of the cell lysates from various Indian isolates of M. agalactiae against anti-P48 serum resulted in a single band at ∼ 48 kDa among all isolates, indicating the conserved nature of P48 antigen in M. agalactiae. Also, the cross reactivity of P48 antigen among various Mycoplasma spp. was checked by western blotting which revealed reactivity only with M. agalactiae and M. bovis. Hence, this antigen could be exploited to differentiate M. agalactiae from other pathogenic Mycoplasma species except M. bovis. However, the inability of P48 to distinguish M. agalactiae from M. bovis does not downgrade the significance of P48 as the two species are usually host specific.

  16. Genetic loci of Mycoplasma agalactiae involved in systemic spreading during experimental intramammary infection of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shivanand; Zimmermann, Martina; Flöck, Martina; Brunthaler, Rene; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2016-10-20

    Mycoplasmas are amongst the most successful pathogens of both humans and animals yet the molecular basis of mycoplasma pathogenesis is poorly understood. This is partly due to the lack of classical virulence factors and little similarity to common bacterial pathogenic determinants. Using Mycoplasma agalactiae as a model we initiated research in this direction by screening a transposon mutant library in the natural sheep host using a negative selection method. Having successfully identified putative factors involved in the colonization of local infection and lymphogenic sites, the current study assessed mutants unable to spread systemically in sheep after experimental intramammary infection. Analysis of distant body sites for complete absence of mutants via SSM PCR revealed that additional set of genes, such as pdhB, oppC, oppB, gtsB, MAG1890, MAG5520 and MAG3650 are required for systemic spreading apart from those that were necessary for initial colonization. Additional in vitro studies with the mutants absent at these systemic sites confirmed the potential role of some of the respective gene products concerning their interaction with host cells. Mutants of pdhB, oppC and MAG4460 exhibited significantly slower growth in the presence of HeLa cells in MEM medium. This first attempt to identify genes exclusively required for systemic spreading provides a basis for further in-depth research to understand the exact mechanism of chronicity and persistence of M. agalactiae.

  17. Persistence of Mycoplasma bovis infection in the mammary glands of lactating cows inoculated experimentally.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W; Markey, B; McCormack, R; Egan, J; Ball, H; Sachse, K

    2005-06-11

    To study the course of clinical mycoplasma mastitis and investigate its potential for persistence, 10(8) colony-forming units (cfu) of an Irish isolate of Mycoplasma bovis was inoculated aseptically into the right fore teat canal of three lactating cows. M bovis rapidly colonised the infected quarters and grew exponentially to more than 10(10) cfu/ml within the first three days, and spread to other quarters of each of the three cows within five to 10 days. After periods of between 24 and 72 hours the infected quarters became distended and sensitive to touch, and their secretions changed from containing visible particles, to a seropurulent exudate, to an aqueous suspension of fine particles which formed a sediment after a sample was collected. M bovis-specific antibody levels increased to varying degrees in all three cows. Subsequently, the concentrations of mycoplasma decreased to less than 10(7) cfu/ml in two of the cows, but remained at more than 10(8) cfu/ml to the end of the lactation of the other cow. Apparently normal milk was secreted by one of the cows within a month of the challenge, and by the other two cows at the start of their next lactation. However, in two of the cows subclinical M bovis infection persisted through the dry periods and into their next lactations.

  18. Cytokines as the good predictors of refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Mei, Shufen; Zhou, Yunlian; Huang, Meixia; Dong, Guijuan; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive immune response against pathogens may play an important role in refracory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (RMPP). The aim of this study was to elucidate the associations between cytokines and the prediction of RMPP in school-aged patients. Retrospective analysis was performed on school-aged children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) hospitalized in our hospital between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2015. The clinical charcteristics, including the cytokines in serum between the RMPP group and the general Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (GMPP) group were compared and the predictive values of RMPP were explored. Of total 180 patients, 115 patients were in the GMPP group, 65 were in the RMPP group. We found the levels of cytokines, including nterleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in RMPP group were significantly higher than those in GMPP group (P < 0.01). In ROC curve analysis, IL-10 and IFN-γ were useful for differentiating patients with RMPP from those with GMPP. Logistic regression analysis showed that the IL-10 ≥ 3.65 pg/ml and IFN-γ ≥ 29.05 pg/ml were significant predictors regarding to RMPP. Additionally, a positive correlation between serum IL-10 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Conclusions: IL-10 and IFN-γ could be used as the good predictors of RMPP in school-aged children. PMID:27833154

  19. Pulse-field electrophoresis indicates full-length Mycoplasma chromosomes range widely in size.

    PubMed Central

    Neimark, H C; Lange, C S

    1990-01-01

    Full-size linear chromosomes were prepared from mycoplasmas by using gamma-irradiation to introduce one (on average) double-strand break in their circular chromosomes. Chromosome sizes were estimated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) from the mobilities of these full-length molecules relative to DNA size references. Sizes estimated for Ureaplasma urealyticum T960 and 16 Mycoplasma species ranged from 684 kbp (M. hominis) to 1315 kbp (M. iowae). Using this sample, we found no correlation between the mobility of the full-size linear chromosomes and their G + C content. Sizes for A. laidlawii and A. hippikon were within the range expected from renaturation kinetics. PFGE size estimates are in good agreement with sizes determined by other methods, including electron microscopy, an ordered clone library, and summation of restriction fragments. Our estimates also agree with those from renaturation kinetics for both the largest and some of the smallest chromosomes, but in the intermediate size range, renaturation kinetics consistently provides lower values than PFGE or electron microscopy. Our PFGE estimates show that mycoplasma chromosomes span a continual range of sizes, with several intermediate values falling between the previously recognized large and small chromosome size clusters. Images PMID:2216718

  20. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  1. Mycoplasma and herpesvirus PCR detection in tortoises with rhinitis-stomatitis complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Salinas, María; Francino, Olga; Sánchez, Armand; Altet, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Chelonid herpesvirus (ChHV) and mycoplasmal infections cause similar clinical signs in terrestrial tortoises and may be the most important causative agents of rhinitis-stomatitis complex, a common disease in captive tortoises worldwide. Currently, diagnosis of ChHV and Mycoplasma spp. infections is most often based on serologic testing. However, serologic results only detect past exposure, and the specificity of these tests can be reduced due to antigenic cross-reactions with other pathogens. Molecular-based techniques could help to define the causative agent and to better manage infected tortoises. Using polymerase chain reaction, we analyzed 63 tortoises (59 spur-thighed tortoise, Testudo graeca; three Greek tortoise, Testudo ibera; and one Russian tortoise, Agryonemys horsfieldii) with clinical signs of rhinitis-stomatitis complex to identify the causative agent. Molecular evidence of ChHV type I (24%), type II (3%), and Mycoplasma agassizii (6%) infections, as well as coinfection of Mycoplasma-ChHV and both types of ChHV, were detected. Both ChHV and M. agassizii are considered pathogenic in captive tortoises and both are a threat to wild populations. However, neither agent was detected from most of the symptomatic tortoises we evaluated, indicating that other agents could be involved in the rhinitis-stomatitis complex.

  2. Survey on association between Mycoplasma hominis endocervical infection and spontaneous abortion using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Farhadifar, Fariba; Khodabandehloo, Mazaher; Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Rouhi, Samaneh; Ahmadi, Amjad; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Roshani, Daem; Soofizadeh, Nasrin; Rezzaii, Masoomeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma infections are suggested as etiology of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of Mycoplasma hominis (M. hominis) infection and spontaneous abortion among pregnant women. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study that was conducted from August 2012 to January 2013, totally, 109 women were included with spontaneous abortion with gestational ages of 10-20 weeks (Cases), and 109 women with normal pregnancy with gestational ages between 20-37 weeks (Controls) in Sanandaj, Iran. Using specific primers and extracted DNA from endocervical swabs, a PCR test was conducted for detection of M. hominis infection in women. For comparison of qualitative and quantitative variables, independent Fisher tests were used and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The total frequency of M. hominis infection was 6 (2.75%) in women. The frequency of M. hominis infection was 2 (1.83%) in the case group (spontaneous abortion) and 4 (3.66%) in the control group, respectively. In both case and control groups, no association was seen between M.hominis infection and spontaneous abortion (OR=0. 49, CI 95%: 0.08-2.73, p=0. 683). Conclusion: M. hominis was positive in the genital tract of some pregnant women, but it was not associated with spontaneous abortion. However, to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes in women, foetus and neonate, routine screening and treatment for the genital Mycoplasma is recommended. PMID:27294216

  3. Short communication: In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma agalactiae strains isolated from dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Paterna, A; Sánchez, A; Gómez-Martín, A; Corrales, J C; De la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Amores, J

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the susceptibility to several antimicrobials of 28 isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae obtained from goats in a region (southeastern Spain) where contagious agalactia is endemic. For each isolate, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against 12 antimicrobials of the quinolone, macrolide, aminoglycoside, and tetracycline families was determined. The antimicrobials with the lowest MIC were enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tylosin, and doxycycline, all with MIC90 (concentration at which growth of 90% of the isolates is inhibited) <1 µg/mL. Norfloxacin (a quinolone) showed a wide MIC range (0.1-12.8 µg/mL), suggesting a resistance mechanism toward this antimicrobial that was not elicited by enrofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (the other quinolones tested). Erythromycin showed the highest MIC90 such that its use against Mycoplasma agalactiae is not recommended. Finally, Mycoplasma agalactiae isolates obtained from goat herds with clinical symptoms of contagious agalactia featured higher MIC90 and MIC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the isolates is inhibited) values for many of the antimicrobials compared with isolates from asymptomatic animals. The relationship between the extensive use of antimicrobials in herds with clinical contagious agalactia and variations in MIC requires further study.

  4. Reconstitution of an active arginine deiminase pathway in Mycoplasma pneumoniae M129.

    PubMed

    Rechnitzer, Hagai; Rottem, Shlomo; Herrmann, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Some species of the genus Mycoplasma code for the arginine deiminase pathway (ADI), which enables these bacteria to produce ATP from arginine by the successive reaction of three enzymes: arginine deiminase (ArcA), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (ArcB), and carbamate kinase (ArcC). It so far appears that independently isolated strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae encode an almost identical truncated version of the ADI pathway in which the proteins ArcA and ArcB have lost their original enzymatic activities due to the deletion of significant regions of these proteins. To study the consequences of a functional ADI pathway, M. pneumoniae M129 was successfully transformed with the cloned functional arcA, arcB, and arcC genes from Mycoplasma fermentans. Enzymatic tests showed that while the M. pneumoniae ArcAB and ArcABC transformants possess functional arginine deiminase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, and carbamate kinase, they were unable to grow on arginine as the sole energy source. Nevertheless, infection of a lung epithelial cell line, A549, with the M. pneumoniae transformants showed that almost 100% of the infected host cells were nonviable, while most of the lung cells infected with nontransformed M. pneumoniae were viable under the same experimental conditions.

  5. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T Cells Dampen Inflammatory Disease in Murine Mycoplasma Pneumonia and Promote IL-17 and IFN-γ Responses

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Adam N.; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasmas cause respiratory diseases characterized by persistent infection and chronic airway inflammation. Mycoplasma lung disease is immunopathologic, with CD4+ Th cells determining both disease severity and resistance to infection. Th2 cell responses promote immunopathology, while Th1 cells confer resistance to infection. However, regulatory CD4+ T cells may also have a role in the pathogenesis of mycoplasma respiratory diseases. We hypothesized Treg cells control the severity of the inflammatory lesions and may also promote persistence of infection. To examine this, BALB/c mice were depleted of CD25+ cells, and had increased disease severity due to Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. Increases in mycoplasma antibody responses and lymphocyte infiltration into lungs also occurred after CD25+ cell depletion. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells promoted IFN-γ and IL-17 mycoplasma-specific CD4+ T cell responses in vitro and in vivo, while dampening IL-13+ Th responses. Neither IL-10 nor TGF-ß expression was detected in CD4+CD25+ T cells from lymph nodes. Thus, a regulatory T cell population plays an important role in controlling damaging immune responses in mycoplasma respiratory disease but does not contribute to persistence of infection. It appears that a regulatory T cell population preferentially dampens Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory responses to mycoplasma through a mechanism independent of IL-10 or TGF-ß characteristic of “classic” Treg cells. PMID:27175511

  6. [Effect of the Stellamune Mycoplasma vaccine on growth, energy conversion, death, and medication use in fattening pigs on a pig farm chronically infected with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Bouwkamp, F T; Elbers, A R; Hunneman, W A; Klaassen, C H

    2000-07-15

    The effect of Stellamune Mycoplasma vaccine, administered to piglets aged 2-15 days and then 13-15 days later, on daily weight gain, energy conversion, and use of medication was examined in fattening pigs on a chronically Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infected pig farm. Half of the piglets were vaccinated and the other half acted as controls. In the study design, half of the pens in the fattening unit were allocated to vaccinated pigs; the other half to non-vaccinated pigs, pen was the experimental unit. In the fattening pens sows and castrated boars were separated. The study consisted of a total of 37 pens with vaccinated, and 37 pens with non-vaccinated pigs in 12 different compartments within the pig herd. In the finishing period, mean growth performance and mean energy conversion (EV/kg) of vaccinated animals was 65 grams/day higher and 0.07 EV/kg lower than in control pigs. Furthermore, the incidence of individual curative medication against respiratory problems was more than 4 times higher in control pigs than in vaccinated pigs. There was a tendency for a higher number of group medications against respiratory problems in control pigs than in vaccinated pigs. It is concluded that, in this herd, vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae was successful from an economic point of view.

  7. Acute phase response to Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection in FIV-infected and non-FIV-infected cats.

    PubMed

    Korman, R M; Cerón, J J; Knowles, T G; Barker, E N; Eckersall, P D; Tasker, S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenicity of Haemoplasma spp. in cats varies with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) causing subclinical infection while Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) often induces haemolytic anaemia. The aims of this study were to characterise the acute phase response (APR) of the cat to experimental infection with Mhf or CMhm, and to determine whether chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection influences this response. The acute phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) concentrations were measured pre-infection and every 7-14 days up to day 100 post-infection (pi) in cats infected with either Mhf or CMhm. Half of each group of cats (6/12) were chronically and subclinically infected with FIV. Marbofloxacin treatment was given on days 16-44 pi to half of the Mhf-infected cats, and on days 49-77 pi to half of the CMhm-infected cats. FIV-infected animals had significantly lower AGP concentrations, and significantly greater Hp concentrations than non-FIV-infected cats when infected with CMhm and Mhf, respectively. Both CMhm and Mhf infection were associated with significant increases in SAA concentrations, while AGP concentrations were only significantly increased by Mhf infection. Mhf-infected cats had significantly greater SAA concentrations than CMhm-infected animals. Both Mhf and CMhm infections were associated with an APR, with Mhf infection inducing a greater response. Chronic FIV infection appeared to modify the APR, which varied with the infecting Haemoplasma species.

  8. Diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by detection and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bölske, G; Mattsson, J G; Bascuñana, C R; Bergström, K; Wesonga, H; Johansson, K E

    1996-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), one of the most serious and dramatic diseases of goats, is caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae). This organism is very difficult to isolate and to correctly identify. In a previous report we described a method for the rapid detection and identification of M. capripneumoniae. This method is based on a PCR system by which a segment of the 16S rRNA gene from all mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster can be amplified. The PCR product is then analyzed by restriction enzyme cleavage for the identification of M. capripneumoniae DNA. This system has now been further evaluated with respect to specificity and diagnostic efficacy for the identification and direct detection of the organism in clinical material. Identification by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified DNA from mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster was verified for 55 strains, among which were 15 strains of M. capripneumoniae. The PCR was applied to clinical samples from the nose, ear, pharynx, pleural fluid, and lung tissue containing M. capripneumoniae or other mycoplasmas. As expected, mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides cluster could be detected by the PCR. Restriction enzyme analysis of the PCR products could then be applied for the identification of M. capripneumoniae. Clinical samples and cultures containing M. capripneumoniae were dried on filter paper, to try an easier sample transport method, and were tested by PCR. M. capripneumoniae DNA could be detected in the dried specimens, but the sensitivity of the PCR test was reduced. PMID:8815084

  9. Performance evaluation of two microbial transport media designed for preservation and transport of Chlamydiae, Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sara L; Madhusudhan, Kunapuli T; Agans, Krystle; Dearen, Karen; Knight, Jennifer; Brasel, Trevor; Karamchi, Mehdi; Sherwood, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    The ability of a non-propagating transport device (test device) to maintain the viability of clinically relevant bacteria was compared with a similar commercial device (predicate device) to establish performance equivalence. Test bacteria, namely Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Ureaplasma urealyticum, were inoculated into the test [Puritan Medical Products Universal Transport System (UniTranz-RT(TM))] and predicate (BD Universal Viral Transport System) devices, and incubated at 4 °C and room temperature for up to 72 h. Bacterial viability was assessed at selected time points post-incubation using shell vial assays followed by immunofluorescence staining (for Chlamydia) or by standard culture techniques (for Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma). Results indicated that the Chlamydia strains were equally stable in both test and predicate devices through 72 h storage, at both test temperatures. Quantifiable levels of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma were recovered from the test and predicate devices throughout the storage period. Low-temperature storage improved bacterial viability when compared with room temperature storage. In addition, the predicate device demonstrated slightly improved performance versus the test device in the context of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma following 72 h storage. The overall results of the study confirmed the full performance of UniTranz-RT(TM) as a microbial transport medium and established equal performance with the predicate device.

  10. Molecular methods to detect Mycoplasma spp. And Testudinid herpesvirus 2 in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and implications for disease management.

    PubMed

    Braun, Josephine; Schrenzel, Mark; Witte, Carmel; Gokool, Larisa; Burchell, Jennifer; Rideout, Bruce A

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Mycoplasmas are an important cause of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and have been a main focus in attempts to mitigate disease-based population declines. Infection risk can vary with an animal's population of origin, making screening tests popular tools for determining infection status in individuals and populations. To provide additional methods for investigating URTD we developed quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays specific for agents causing clinical signs of URTD: Mycoplasma agassizii, Mycoplasma testudineum, and Testudinid herpesvirus 2 (TeHV2) and tested necropsied desert tortoises housed at the Desert Tortoise Conservation Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, as well as wild desert tortoises (n=3), during 2010. Findings were compared with M. agassizii enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) data. Based on qPCR, the prevalence of M. agassizii was 75% (33/44) and the prevalence of TeHV2 was 48% (20/42) in the evaluated population. Both agents were also present in the wild tortoises. Mycoplasma testudineum was not detected. The M. agassizii ELISA and qPCR results did not always agree. More tortoises were positive for M. agassizii by nasal mucosa testing than by nasal flush. Our findings suggest that mycoplasmas are not the only agents of concern and that a single M. agassizii ELISA or nasal flush qPCR alone failed to identify all potentially infected animals in a population. Caution should be exercised in using these tests for disposition decisions.

  11. Bacterial Load in Daily Urine Samples of Patients Infected with Mycoplasma genitalium, Mutation Analysis, and Response to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nordbø, S. A.; Pukstad, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Increasing macrolide resistant strains of Mycoplasma genitalium is a challenge, and to differentiate between treatment failure and reinfection a timely test of cure (TOC) is warranted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the best time for TOC after five days' treatment of Mycoplasma genitalium infection with azithromycin. Methods. Nineteen patients with positive PCR for Mycoplasma genitalium in urine provided urine samples daily for 2 weeks and on days 21, 28, and 35. Samples were tested by a commercial qPCR and by sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene. Results. Eight patients with a wild type of Mycoplasma genitalium responded successfully within four days after treatment initiation. Eleven patients had a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. These samples exhibited high variations in bacterial load, and some patients tested negative at several time points during the observation period. Conclusions. Day-to-day fluctuations in the mutation samples allow for false negative TOC during the first 5 weeks after start of treatment. Due to increasing macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma genitalium, pretreatment mutation analysis is recommended. When a wild type is verified, TOC performed one week after initiation of treatment is suggested. PMID:27829780

  12. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodríguez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Oré, Verónica; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. Methods A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician. Results Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675) of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675). The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010. Conclusions Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens. PMID:28129377

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from multiple provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    KONG, Ling-Cong; GAO, Duo; JIA, Bo-Yan; WANG, Zi; GAO, Yun-Hang; PEI, Zhi-Hua; LIU, Shu-Ming; XIN, Jiu-Qing; MA, Hong-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has spread widely throughout the world via animal movement and has become an important pathogen of bovine respiratory disease. However, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials for Mycoplasma bovis have not been studied in China. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Mycoplasma bovis isolated from young cattle with respiratory infection in China. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in 32/45 bovine respiratory infection outbreaks at beef farms in 8 provinces in China. The isolates were susceptible or had medium sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and doxycycline, but were frequently resistant to macrolides (13/32, 41%). An A2058G (Escherichia coli Numbering) mutation located in the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA was observed in strains that were resistant to macrolides. This single mutations at the rrnA operon in domain V of 23S rRNA may play an important role in the resistance of Mycoplasma bovis strains to macrolides. PMID:26346744

  14. Semi-automated relative quantification of cell culture contamination with mycoplasma by Photoshop-based image analysis on immunofluorescence preparations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Yerneni, Lakshmana K

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination in cell culture is a serious setback for the cell-culturist. The experiments undertaken using contaminated cell cultures are known to yield unreliable or false results due to various morphological, biochemical and genetic effects. Earlier surveys revealed incidences of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures to range from 15 to 80%. Out of a vast array of methods for detecting mycoplasma in cell culture, the cytological methods directly demonstrate the contaminating organism present in association with the cultured cells. In this investigation, we report the adoption of a cytological immunofluorescence assay (IFA), in an attempt to obtain a semi-automated relative quantification of contamination by employing the user-friendly Photoshop-based image analysis. The study performed on 77 cell cultures randomly collected from various laboratories revealed mycoplasma contamination in 18 cell cultures simultaneously by IFA and Hoechst DNA fluorochrome staining methods. It was observed that the Photoshop-based image analysis on IFA stained slides was very valuable as a sensitive tool in providing quantitative assessment on the extent of contamination both per se and in comparison to cellularity of cell cultures. The technique could be useful in estimating the efficacy of anti-mycoplasma agents during decontaminating measures.

  15. Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov., isolated from the upper respiratory tract of Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis).

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pérez, A; Ramírez, A S; Rosales, R S; Calabuig, P; Poveda, C; Rosselló-Móra, R; Nicholas, R A J; Poveda, J B

    2012-06-01

    Six strains with the typical characteristics of mycoplasmas were isolated from the tracheae of six Canarian Egyptian vultures (Neophron percnopterus majorensis). The results of biochemical, serological and molecular genetic studies showed that the isolates were nearly identical and that they could be considered as representing a novel species of the genus Mycoplasma. Colonies possessed the typical fried-egg appearance and electron micrographs revealed a pleomorphic cellular morphology with the lack of a cell wall. The isolates hydrolysed arginine and required sterol for growth but did not ferment glucose or hydrolyse urea. We propose that the isolates be assigned to a novel species,Mycoplasma neophronis sp. nov. The type strain is G.A.(T) ( = DSM 24097(T) = ATCC BAA-2157(T)). The antiserum of strain G.A.(T) has been deposited in the Mollicutes collection at Purdue University (Indiana, USA).

  16. Identification, characterization, and application of a recombinant antigen for the serological investigation of feline hemotropic Mycoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Jäckel, Christian; Museux, Kristina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    In felids, three hemotropic mycoplasma species (hemoplasmas) have been described: Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis." In particular, M. haemofelis may cause severe, potentially life-threatening hemolytic anemia. No routine serological assays for feline hemoplasma infections are available. Thus, the goal of our project was to identify and characterize an M. haemofelis antigen (DnaK) that subsequently could be applied as a recombinant antigen in a serological assay. The gene sequence of this protein was determined using consensus primers and blood samples from two naturally M. haemofelis-infected Swiss pet cats, an experimentally M. haemofelis-infected specific-pathogen-free cat, and a naturally M. haemofelis-infected Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). The M. haemofelis DnaK gene sequence showed the highest identity to an analogous protein of a porcine hemoplasma (72%). M. haemofelis DnaK was expressed recombinantly in an Escherichia coli DnaK knockout strain and purified using Ni affinity, size-exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. It then was biochemically and functionally characterized and showed characteristics typical for DnaKs (secondary structure profile, thermal denaturation, ATPase activity, and DnaK complementation). Moreover, its immunogenicity was assessed using serum samples from experimentally hemoplasma-infected cats. In Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, it was recognized by sera from cats infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," respectively, but not from uninfected cats. This is the first description of a full-length purified recombinant feline hemoplasma antigen that can readily be applied in future pathogenesis studies and may have potential for application in a diagnostic serological test.

  17. Survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, haemotropic mycoplasmas and other arthropod-borne pathogens in cats from Albania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Albania is a country on the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Mediterranean climate is favourable for the stable development of many arthropod species, which are incriminated as vectors for various agents. Recently, several papers have reported on epidemiological aspects of parasitic diseases including vector-borne disease agents of dogs with zoonotic characteristics in Albania. However, data on the epidemiology of feline parasitic and bacterial agents in Albania is scarce. Methods Serum and EDTA-blood samples collected from 146 domestic cats from Tirana during 2008 through 2010 were examined for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania infantum, and Anaplasma spp. with IFAT, for infection with L. infantum, A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp. and haemotropic mycoplasmas with conventional PCR and real-time PCR and for Dirofilaria immitis with antigen ELISA. Additionally blood smear microscopy was carried out for detection of blood-borne pathogens. Results Antibodies to T. gondii (titre ≥1:100) were demonstrated in 91 cats (62.3%). Antibodies to N. caninum (titre ≥1:100), L. infantum (titre ≥1:64) and Anaplasma spp. (titre ≥1:100) were found in the serum of 15 (10.3%), 1 (0.7%) or 3 (2.1%) cats, respectively. DNA of haemotropic mycoplasmas was detected in the blood of 45 cats (30.8%), namely Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (21.9%), Mycoplasma haemofelis (10.3%), and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis (5.5%), with ten cats harbouring co-infections of two mycoplasmas each; blood from one cat was PCR positive for Bartonella henselae. No DNA of Leishmania spp. and A. phagocytophilum or circulating D. immitis antigen was detected in any cat sample. The overall prevalence of haemotropic mycoplasmas was significantly higher in male compared to female cats (40.6% vs. 24.1%, p = 0.0444); and age was associated positively with the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii (p = 0.0008) and the percentage of haemotropic

  18. Effects of Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccination on serum a1-acid glycoprotein concentrations in commercial layer chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increases in circulating acute phase protein (APP) levels, as an integral component of the acute phase response, occur in reaction to systemic infections in animals. However, no previous research has been conducted to monitor possible changes in APP levels of birds in response to pre-lay vaccinatio...

  19. Novel hemotrophic mycoplasma identified in naturally infected California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; Norris, Tenaya; Rios, Carlos; Davidson, Maureen K; Messick, Joanne B; Gulland, Frances M; Chizhikov, Vladimir E

    2011-04-21

    The hemoplasmas are the trivial name for a group of erythrocyte-parasitizing, non-cultivable in vitro bacteria of the genus Mycoplasma that have been described in several mammalian hosts worldwide. This study is the first report of hemoplasmas in marine mammals. EDTA anticoagulated whole blood samples from 137 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) and 20 northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) admitted to the Marine Mammal Center (Sausalito, CA; www.marinemammalcenter.org) or live captured in Oregon were collected during 2008. Hemoplasma-specific genomic DNA was detected in blood samples from 12.4% California sea lions tested using PCR. Hemoplasma PCR positive blood specimens also were tested in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using the hemoplasma-specific primers for the 16S and 23S rRNA genes. The RT-PCR showed the presence the hemoplasmal rRNA, strongly suggesting the presence of potentially viable hemoplasmas in the bloodstream of the animals. BLAST search and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequences of the hemoplasma from California sea lions revealed that the organism is a novel hemoplasma species with only 92.1% of its nucleotide similarity to the 16S rRNA gene of the previously described hemoplasma species of alpacas, Candidatus Mycoplasma haemolamae. Thus, due to low level of genetic similarity of the hemoplasma to other described hemoplasmas and the mammalian host in which the hemoplasma was detected we propose that this novel hemoplasma species has been given the provisional name Candidatus Mycoplasma haemozalophi sp. nov.

  20. In vitro susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae and M. hyorhinis to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, H; Sonmez, N; Morozumi, T; Mitani, K; Ito, N; Shiono, H; Yamamoto, K

    1996-11-01

    Fifty-four Japanese strains of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae isolated from porkers during 1980 to 1995, and 107 Japanese strains of M. hyorhinis isolated from piglets with respiratory disease during 1991 to 1994 were investigated for the in vitro activities of 13 antimicrobial agents [josamycin, tylosin, spiramycin, kitasamycin, erythromycin, lincomycin (LCM), kanamycin (KM), chloramphenicol (CP), thiamphenicol (TP), tiamulin (TML), oxytetracycline (OTC), chlortetracycline (CTC), and enrofloxacin (ERFX)] by the agar dilution method. Of the drugs tested TML showed the highest activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.013 to 0.1 microgram/ m/ (MIC90; 0.05 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 0.2 to 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 0.39 microgram/ml) against strains of M. hyorhinis. ERFX, LCM, most of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and tetracyclines also showed low MICs against both mycoplasma species. The susceptibility of KM, CP and TP to the mycoplasmas was considered to be of a secondary grade. Two of 54 strains of M. hyosynoviae, and 11 of 107 strains of M. hyorhinis showed resistance to all 14- and 16-membered macrolide antibiotics tested. Tetracyclines (OTC and CTC) showed a relatively broad MIC distribution from 0.1 to 6.25 micrograms/ml against the M. hyosynoviae strains tested. All of the strains isolated during 1980 to 1984 were susceptible at the concentration of 0.78 microgram/ml or less (MIC90; 0.78 microgram/ml) to OTC and 1.56 micrograms/ml or less (MIC90; 1.56 micrograms/ml) to CTC, while the susceptibility of strains isolated recently, during 1994 to 1995, was more than 0.78 microgram/ml (MIC90; 3.13 micrograms/ml) to OTC, and more than 1.56 micrograms/ml (MIC90; 6.25 micrograms/ml) to CTC.