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Sample records for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein

  1. The myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein directly binds nerve growth factor to modulate central axon circuitry.

    PubMed

    von Büdingen, H-Christian; Mei, Feng; Greenfield, Ariele; Jahn, Sarah; Shen, Yun-An A; Reid, Hugh H; McKemy, David D; Chan, Jonah R

    2015-09-14

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a central nervous system myelin-specific molecule expressed on the outer lamellae of myelin. To date, the exact function of MOG has remained unknown, with MOG knockout mice displaying normal myelin ultrastructure and no apparent specific phenotype. In this paper, we identify nerve growth factor (NGF) as a binding partner for MOG and demonstrate that this interaction is capable of sequestering NGF from TrkA-expressing neurons to modulate axon growth and survival. Deletion of MOG results in aberrant sprouting of nociceptive neurons in the spinal cord. Binding of NGF to MOG may offer widespread implications into mechanisms that underlie pain pathways.

  2. A Missense Mutation in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein as a Cause of Familial Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Hyun; Bartesaghi, Luca; Kutalik, Zoltán; Vicário, José L.; de Andrés, Clara; Pfister, Corinne; Lammers, Gert J.; Guex, Nicolas; Chrast, Roman; Tafti, Mehdi; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Familial narcolepsy accounts for less than 10% of all narcolepsy cases. However, documented multiplex families are very rare and causative mutations have not been identified to date. To identify a causative mutation in familial narcolepsy, we performed linkage analysis in the largest ever reported family, which has 12 affected members, and sequenced coding regions of the genome (exome sequencing) of three affected members with narcolepsy and cataplexy. We successfully mapped a candidate locus on chromosomal region 6p22.1 (LOD score = 3.85) by linkage analysis. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation in the second exon of MOG within the linkage region. A c.398C>G mutation was present in all affected family members but absent in unaffected members and 775 unrelated control subjects. Transient expression of mutant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in mouse oligodendrocytes showed abnormal subcellular localization, suggesting an altered function of the mutant MOG. MOG has recently been linked to various neuropsychiatric disorders and is considered as a key autoantigen in multiple sclerosis and in its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis. Our finding of a pathogenic MOG mutation highlights a major role for myelin and oligodendrocytes in narcolepsy and further emphasizes glial involvement in neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral disorders. PMID:21907016

  3. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Structure and polymorphism of the mouse myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Daubas, P.; Pham-Dinh, D.; Dautigny, A.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized genomic clones containing the mouse myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) gene. It spans a region of 12.5 kb and consists of eight exons. Its exon-intron structure differs from that of classical MHC-class I genes, with which it is linked in the mouse genome. Nucleotide sequencing of the 5{prime} flanking region revelas that it contains several putative protein-binding sites, some of them in common with other myelin gene promoters. One intragenic polymorphism has been identified: it consists of a GA repeat, defining at least three alleles in mouse inbred strains, and is easily detectable using the polymerase chain reaction method.

  5. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B.; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E.; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H. T.; Housley, Gary D.; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  6. The human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) gene: Complete nucleotide sequence and structural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Paule Roth, M.; Malfroy, L.; Offer, C.; Sevin, J.; Enault, G.; Borot, N.; Pontarotti, P.; Coppin, H.

    1995-07-20

    Human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a myelin component of the central nervous system, is a candidate target antigen for autoimmune-mediated demyelination. We have isolated and sequenced part of a cosmid clone that contains the entire human MOG gene. The primary nuclear transcript, extending from the putative start of transcription to the site of poly(A) addition, is 15,561 nucleotides in length. The human MOG gene contains 8 exons, separated by 7 introns; canonical intron/exon boundary sites are observed at each junction. The introns vary in size from 242 to 6484 bp and contain numerous repetitive DNA elements, including 14 Alu sequences within 3 introns. Another Alu element is located in the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the gene. Alu sequences were classified with respect to subfamily assignment. Seven hundred sixty-three nucleotides 5{prime} of the transcription start and 1214 nucleotides 3{prime} of the poly(A) addition sites were also sequenced. The 5{prime}-flanking region revealed the presence of several consensus sequences that could be relevant in the transcription of the MOG gene, in particular binding sites in common with other myelin gene promoters. Two polymorphic intragenic dinucleotide (CA){sub n} and tetranucleotide (TAAA){sub n} repeats were identified and may provide genetic marker tools for association and linkage studies. 50 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Disparate MHC class II haplotypes in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein- and myelin basic protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Muhallab, Saad; Dahlman, Ingrid; Wallström, Erik

    2005-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) regulates multiple sclerosis (MS) and its model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We created four new intra-MHC recombinant rat strains, between the MHC haplotypes RT1(n) (BN) and RT1(l) (LEW) on the LEW background, to define disease regulation and localization within the MHC. Immunization with recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (a.a.1-125; MOG)/IFA induced EAE in strains expressing the MHC class II allele RT1.B(n), whereas strains expressing the RT1.B(l) were resistant. In myelin basic protein peptide (MBP(GP)63-88)/CFA-induced EAE, RT1.B(l) expressing strains were susceptible whereas strains expressing the RT1.B(n) were resistant. High levels of antigen-specific IFN-gamma secreting lymphoid cells and antigen-specific serum IgG antibodies were only recorded in rats with an MHC class II allele that permitted MOG- or MBP-EAE, respectively. Genetically, we localized the MHC regulation of the investigated EAE models to the central part of the MHC, containing the MHC class II (RT1.B/D) and the centromeric parts of the MHC class III. No influences were evident from the classical MHC class I (RT1.A), the telomeric parts of the MHC class III or the non-classical MHC class I (RT1.C/E/M) in contrast to previous reports. The MHC class II haplotype-specific regulation of EAE induced with two different CNS antigens demonstrates a strikingly specific MHC-association even within the same target organ. PMID:15748954

  8. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies are associated with a non-MS course in children

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Deiva, Kumaran; Hemingway, Cheryl; Nytrova, Petra; Woodhall, Mark; Palace, Jacqueline; Wassmer, Evangeline; Tardieu, Marc; Vincent, Angela; Waters, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Abs) were predictive of a demyelination phenotype in children presenting with acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). Method: Sixty-five children with a first episode of ADS (12 acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 24 optic neuritis, 18 transverse myelitis, 11 other clinically isolated syndrome) were identified from 2 national demyelination programs in the United Kingdom and France. Acute serum samples were tested for MOG-Abs by cell-based assay. Antibodies were used to predict diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) at 1 year. Results: Twenty-three of 65 (35%) children had MOG-Abs. Antibody-positive and antibody-negative patients were not clinically different at presentation, but identification of MOG-Abs predicted a non-MS course at 1-year follow-up: only 2/23 (9%) MOG-Ab–positive patients were diagnosed with MS compared to 16/42 (38%) MOG-Ab–negative patients (p = 0.019, Fisher exact test). Antibody positivity at outset was a useful predictor for a non-MS disease course, with a positive predictive value of 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72–99), negative predictive value of 38% (95% CI 24–54), positive likelihood ratio of 4.02 (CI 1.0–15.4), and odds ratio of 6.5 (CI 1.3–31.3). Conclusions: MOG-Abs are found at presentation in 35% of patients with childhood ADS, across a range of demyelinating disorders. Antibody positivity can be useful in predicting a non-MS disease course at onset. PMID:25798445

  9. Myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a member of a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily encoded within the major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Dautigny, A. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N. ); Nussbaum, J.H.; Roussel, G. ); Pontarotti, P. ); Mather, I.H. ); Artzt, K. ); Lindahl, K.F. )

    1993-09-01

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is found on the surface of myelinating oligodendrocytes and external lamellae of myelin sheaths in the central nervous system, and it is target antigen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis. The authors have isolated bovine, mouse, and rat MOG cDNA clones and shown that the developmental pattern of MOG expression in the rat central nervous system coincides with the late stages of myelination. The amino-terminal, extracellular domain of MOG has characteristics of an immunoglobulin variable domain and is 46% and 41% identical with the amino terminus of bovine butyrophilin (expressed in the lactating mammary gland) and B-G antigens of the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), respectively; these proteins thus form a subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The homology between MOG and B-G extends beyond their structure and genetic mapping to their ability to induce strong antibody responses and has implications for the role of MOG in pathological, autoimmune conditions. The authors colocalized the MOG and BT genes to the human MHC on chromosome 6p21.3-p22. The mouse MOG gene was mapped to the homologous band C of chromosome 17, within the M region of the mouse MHC. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  10. The oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein belongs to a distinct family of proteins and contains the HNK-1 carbohydrate

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The complete primary structure of the human oligodendrocyte-myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), a glycophospholipid-linked membrane protein of oligodendrocytes and central nervous system myelin, has been determined. The deduced amino acid sequence predicts a polypeptide of 433 amino acids which includes a 17-amino acid leader sequence. OMgp consists of four domains: (a) a short cysteine-rich motif at the NH2 terminus; (b) a series of tandem leucine-rich repeats (LRs) present in several other proteins where they may play roles in adhesion; (c) a serine/threonine-rich region that contains probable attachment sites for O-linked carbohydrates; and (d) a hydrophobic COOH-terminal segment that is likely to be cleaved concomitant with the attachment of lipid during biosynthesis of OMgp. OMgp shares the first three of its four domains with the platelet glycoprotein Ib, which is responsible for the initial adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium during hemostasis. Together with glycoprotein Ib and several other proteins, OMgp belongs to a family of proteins that contain both an NH2-terminal cysteine-rich motif and an adjacent series of LRs. In addition, we report that a subpopulation of OMgp molecules contains the HNK-1 carbohydrate, which has been shown to mediate interactions among cells in the central nervous system. PMID:1688857

  11. Antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Reddel, Stephen W.; Henderson, Andrew; Parratt, John D.E.; Barnett, Michael; Gatt, Prudence N.; Merheb, Vera; Kumaran, Raani-Yogeeta Anusuiya; Pathmanandavel, Karrnan; Sinmaz, Nese; Ghadiri, Mahtab; Yiannikas, Con; Vucic, Steve; Stewart, Graeme; Bleasel, Andrew F.; Booth, David; Fung, Victor S.C.; Dale, Russell C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We examined a cohort of adults with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody–negative neuromyelitis optica/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMO/NMOSD) for antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Methods: We performed a flow cytometry cell-based assay using live human lentivirus–transduced cells expressing full-length surface MOG. Serum was tested in 23 AQP4 antibody–negative NMO/NMOSD patients with bilateral and/or recurrent optic neuritis (BON, n = 11), longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM, n = 10), and sequential BON and LETM (n = 2), as well as in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 76) and controls (n = 52). Results: MOG antibodies were detected in 9/23 AQP4 antibody–negative patients with NMO/NMOSD, compared to 1/76 patients with MS and 0/52 controls (p < 0.001). MOG antibodies were detected in 8/11 patients with BON, 0/10 patients with LETM, and 1/2 patients with sequential BON and LETM. Six of 9 MOG antibody–positive patients had a relapsing course. MOG antibody–positive patients had prominent optic disc swelling and were more likely to have a rapid response to steroid therapy and relapse on steroid cessation than MOG antibody–negative patients (p = 0.034 and p = 0.029, respectively). While 8/9 MOG antibody–positive patients had good follow-up visual acuity, one experienced sustained visual impairment, 3 had retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, and one had residual spinal disability. Conclusions: MOG antibodies have a strong association with BON and may be a useful clinical biomarker. MOG antibody–associated BON is a relapsing disorder that is frequently steroid responsive and often steroid dependent. Failure to recognize the disorder early and institute immunotherapy promptly may be associated with sustained impairment. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that MOG antibodies are associated with AQP4 antibody–negative BON (sensitivity 69%, 95% confidence interval [CI

  12. Molecular dynamics at the receptor level of immunodominant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 epitope implicated in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yannakakis, Mary Patricia; Tzoupis, Haralambos; Michailidou, Elena; Mantzourani, Efthimia; Simal, Carmen; Tselios, Theodore

    2016-07-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease whereby myelin is destroyed by the immune system. The disease is triggered by the stimulation of encephalitogenic T-cells via the formation of a trimolecular complex between the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), an immunodominant epitope of myelin proteins and T-cell Receptor (TCR). Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG) is located on the external surface of myelin and has been implicated in MS induction. The immunodominant 35-55 epitope of MOG is widely used for in vivo biological evaluation and immunological studies that are related with chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE, animal model of MS), inflammatory diseases and MS. In this report, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore the interactions of MOG35-55 at the receptor level. A detailed mapping of the developed interactions during the creation of the trimolecular complex is reported. This is the first attempt to gain an understanding of the molecular recognition of the MOG35-55 epitope by the HLA and TCR receptors. During the formation of the trimolecular complex, the residues Arg(41) and Arg(46) of MOG35-55 have been confirmed to serve as TCR anchors while Tyr(40) interacts with HLA. The present structural findings indicate that the Arg at positions 41 and 46 is a key residue for the stimulation of the encephalitogenic T-cells. PMID:27388119

  13. Anti-myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Antibodies in a Patient with Recurrent Optic Neuritis Involving the Cerebral White Matter and Brainstem.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tadashi; Yasui, Kenichi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujihara, Kazuo; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a case of recurrent optic neuritis involving the cerebral white matter and brainstem in a patient positive for anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies. The patient had an initial attack at 24 years of age. Optic neuritis recurred over 14 years, and she was admitted to our neurology unit at 38 years of age. She showed bilateral optic neuritis, high-intensity lesions in the cerebral white matter and brainstem on T2 MRI with contrast enhancement, and elevated serum anti-MOG antibodies. Immunotherapy improved the MRI lesions. Recurrent optic neuritis in patients with anti-MOG antibodies may thus involve the cerebral white matter and brainstem. PMID:27181546

  14. Changes in different parameters, lymphocyte proliferation and hematopoietic progenitor colony formation in EAE mice treated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Korablev, Alexey; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Alshevskaja, Alina A; Sennikov, Sergei V; Buneva, Valentina N; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Popova, Nelly A; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is an antigen of the myelin sheath, which may trigger immune cell responses and the production of auto-antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we used MOG(35-55) -induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, to assess the production of catalytically active immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies or abzymes which have been shown to be present in sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases. Here, we show that IgGs from the sera of control C57BL/6 mice are catalytically inactive. During development of EAE, a specific reorganization of the immune system of mice occurred leading to a condition which was associated with the generation of catalytically active IgGs hydrolysing DNA, myelin basic protein (MBP) and MOG which was associated with increased proteinuria, changes in differentiation of mice bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and an increase in proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow, spleen and thymus as well as a significant suppression of cell apoptosis in these organs. The strongest alterations were found in the early disease phase (18-24 days after immunization) and were less pronounced in later EAE stages (40 days after EAE induction). We conclude that a significant increase in DNase and proteolytic activities of antibodies may be considered the earliest statistically significant marker of MOG-induced EAE in mice. The possible differences in immune system reorganizations during preclinical phases of the disease, acute and late EAE, leading to production of different auto-antibodies and abzymes as well other changes are discussed. PMID:26493273

  15. Changes in different parameters, lymphocyte proliferation and hematopoietic progenitor colony formation in EAE mice treated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Korablev, Alexey; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Alshevskaja, Alina A; Sennikov, Sergei V; Buneva, Valentina N; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Popova, Nelly A; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is an antigen of the myelin sheath, which may trigger immune cell responses and the production of auto-antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we used MOG(35-55) -induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, to assess the production of catalytically active immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies or abzymes which have been shown to be present in sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases. Here, we show that IgGs from the sera of control C57BL/6 mice are catalytically inactive. During development of EAE, a specific reorganization of the immune system of mice occurred leading to a condition which was associated with the generation of catalytically active IgGs hydrolysing DNA, myelin basic protein (MBP) and MOG which was associated with increased proteinuria, changes in differentiation of mice bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and an increase in proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow, spleen and thymus as well as a significant suppression of cell apoptosis in these organs. The strongest alterations were found in the early disease phase (18-24 days after immunization) and were less pronounced in later EAE stages (40 days after EAE induction). We conclude that a significant increase in DNase and proteolytic activities of antibodies may be considered the earliest statistically significant marker of MOG-induced EAE in mice. The possible differences in immune system reorganizations during preclinical phases of the disease, acute and late EAE, leading to production of different auto-antibodies and abzymes as well other changes are discussed.

  16. Oligodendrocytes: Myelination and Axonal Support.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mikael; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2015-06-22

    Myelinated nerve fibers have evolved to enable fast and efficient transduction of electrical signals in the nervous system. To act as an electric insulator, the myelin sheath is formed as a multilamellar membrane structure by the spiral wrapping and subsequent compaction of the oligodendroglial plasma membrane around central nervous system (CNS) axons. Current evidence indicates that the myelin sheath is more than an inert insulating membrane structure. Oligodendrocytes are metabolically active and functionally connected to the subjacent axon via cytoplasmic-rich myelinic channels for movement of macromolecules to and from the internodal periaxonal space under the myelin sheath. This review summarizes our current understanding of how myelin is generated and also the role of oligodendrocytes in supporting the long-term integrity of myelinated axons.

  17. A Switch in Pathogenic Mechanism in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein-Induced EAE in GILT-Free Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Cheryl M.; Marta, Cecilia B.; Maric, Maja; Pfeiffer, Steven E.; Cresswell, Peter; Ruddle, Nancy H.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is an enzyme located in the Lamp-2 positive compartments of antigen presenting cells. GILT−/− mice are phenotypically normal but their T cells exhibit reduced proliferation to several exogenously administered antigens that include cysteine residues and disulfide bonds. We undertook the present studies to determine if GILT−/− mice would process exogenously administered myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), which contains disulfide bonds, to generate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to the endogenous protein. One possibility was that MOG35–55 peptide would induce EAE, but that MOG protein would not. GILT−/− mice were relatively resistant to MOG35–55–induced EAE but slightly more susceptible to rat MOG protein-induced EAE than wild-type (WT) mice. Even though MOG35–55 was immunogenic in GILT−/− mice, GILT antigen presenting cells could not generate MOG35–55 from MOG protein in vitro, suggesting that the endogenous MOG protein was not processed to the MOG35–55 peptide in vivo. Immunization of GILT−/− mice with rat MOG protein resulted in a switch in pathogenic mechanism from that seen in WT mice; the CNS infiltrate included large numbers of plasma cells; GILT−/− T cells proliferated to peptides other than MOG35–55. In contrast to WT rat MOG-immunized mice, rat MOG-immunized GILT−/− mice generated antibodies that transferred EAE to MOG35–55 primed GILT−/− mice and these antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes (OLs). These studies, demonstrating the key role of a processing enzyme in autoimmunity, indicate that subtle phenotypic changes have profound influences on pathogenic mechanisms, and are directly applicable to the out-bred human population. PMID:22586035

  18. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific T and B cells cooperate to induce a Devic-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Bettelli, Estelle; Baeten, Dominique; Jäger, Anneli; Sobel, Raymond A; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2006-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous inflammatory/demyelinating disease of the CNS. In the MS variant Devic disease, lesions are predominantly found in the optic nerves and spinal cord but not the brain. The immunological bases of the different forms of MS are unknown. We previously generated myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific (MOG-specific) TCR transgenic mice (TCRMOG mice; also referred to as 2D2 mice) and reported that a large proportion of these mice develop spontaneous isolated optic neuritis. We have now crossed the TCRMOG mice with MOG-specific Ig heavy-chain knock-in mice (IgHMOG mice; also referred to as Th mice), in which one-third of the B cells are specific for MOG. In these mice, MOG-specific B cells are very efficient in presenting MOG to the transgenic T cells and undergo class switching to IgG1 in the presence of the transgenic T cells. Sixty percent of TCRMOG x IgHMOG mice spontaneously developed a severe form of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Histological examination of the CNS revealed a selective distribution of meningeal and parenchymal inflammatory lesions in the spinal cord and optic nerves. Thus, CNS antigen-specific T and B cells cooperate to induce a distinct clinicopathologic EAE pattern that closely replicates human Devic disease. PMID:16955141

  19. Novel pathogenic epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Delarasse, Cecile; Smith, Paul; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a minor protein of the central nervous system myelin, is recognized as a potential target in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The extracellular domain of MOG is commonly used in a wide range of mouse strains and other animals to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune animal model of multiple sclerosis, because it is a target for antibody-mediated attack. Previous studies, using selected peptides, have indicated that MOG(35-55) peptide is an encephalitogenic epitope in C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice. A more systematic analysis of both T-cell and B-cell responses following immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either recombinant extracellular mouse MOG protein (1-116) or with overlapping peptides spanning the whole sequence of MOG, before assessment of responses to 15 mer and 23 mer peptides was undertaken. The studies identified T-cell responses within the MOG(35-55) (extracellular domain) but also two new immunogenic and encephalitogenic T-cell epitopes within residues MOG(113-127), MOG(120-134) (localized in the transmembrane region) and MOG(183-197) (in the second hydrophobic MOG domain). In addition, residue MOG(113-127) was found to be a B-cell epitope, suggesting that this may be a useful adjunct for the induction of EAE as well as for immunological studies in C57BL/6 mice, which are increasingly being used to study immune function through the use of transgenic and gene knockout technology.

  20. Characterization of the M2 autoantigen of central nervous system (CNS) myelin as a glycoproteins(s) also expressed on oligodendrocyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Lebar, R.; Lubetzki, C.; Vincent, C.; Lombrail, P.; Boutry, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Guinea pigs immunized with homologous brain tissue develop an acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and their sera contain demyelinating antibodies. These antibodies were used to characterize the target: the unidentified autoantigen M2. Using both the Dot immunobinding technique and autoradiography of immunoprecipitates formed with radiolabelled guinea-pig myelin and analyzed in SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis, M2 was found to be a component of CNS myelin and not peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin. In the Dot technique anti-M2 serum did not react with myelin basic protein (BP), proteolipid and galactocerebroside (GC). On electrophoresis, in reducing and non reducing conditions, M2 appeared as two CNS myelin protein bands at the 27,000 and 54,000 molecular weight levels, distinct from the CNS myelin major protein bands of proteolipid protein and BP. Affinity chromatography of CNS myelin on wheat germ agglutinin Sepharose showed that M2 bands were of glycoprotein nature. The same M2 bands were formed with guinea pig antibodies and rat, rabbit or bovine CNS myelin. The same type of anti-M2 antibodies were induced in rabbits immunized with homologous CNS tissue. As a component of myelin, M2 was present in white matter tracts of CNS tissue sections tested by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, M2 was expressed on rat oligodendrocyte membrane in one day and 8 day in vitro cultures.

  1. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein induces incomplete tolerance of CD4(+) T cells specific for both a myelin and a neuronal self-antigen in mice.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Liliana E; Axisa, Pierre-Paul; Aloulou, Meryem; Perals, Corine; Ramadan, Abdulraouf; Rufas, Pierre; Kyewski, Bruno; Derbinski, Jens; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Mars, Lennart T; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-09-01

    T-cell polyspecificity, predicting that individual T cells recognize a continuum of related ligands, implies that multiple antigens can tolerize T cells specific for a given self-antigen. We previously showed in C57BL/6 mice that part of the CD4(+) T-cell repertoire specific for myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) 35-55 also recognizes the neuronal antigen neurofilament medium (NF-M) 15-35. Such bi-specific CD4(+) T cells are frequent and produce inflammatory cytokines after stimulation. Since T cells recognizing two self-antigens would be expected to be tolerized more efficiently, this finding prompted us to study how polyspecificity impacts tolerance. We found that similar to MOG, NF-M is expressed in the thymus by medullary thymic epithelial cells, a tolerogenic population. Nevertheless, the frequency, phenotype, and capacity to transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) of MOG35-55 -reactive CD4(+) T cells were increased in MOG-deficient but not in NF-M-deficient mice. We found that presentation of NF-M15-35 by I-A(b) on dendritic cells is of short duration, suggesting unstable MHC class II binding. Consistently, introducing an MHC-anchoring residue into NF-M15-35 (NF-M15-35 T20Y) increased its immunogenicity, activating a repertoire able to induce EAE. Our results show that in C57BL/6 mice bi-specific encephalitogenic T cells manage to escape tolerization due to inefficient exposure to two self-antigens. PMID:27334749

  2. Increased interleukin-6 correlates with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in pediatric monophasic demyelinating diseases and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Horellou, Philippe; Wang, Min; Keo, Vixra; Chrétien, Pascale; Serguera, Ché; Waters, Patrick; Deiva, Kumaran

    2015-12-15

    Acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) in children evolve either as a monophasic disease diagnosed as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM), transverse myelitis (TM) or optic neuritis (ON), or a multiphasic one with several relapses most often leading to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). These neuroinflammatory disorders are increasingly associated with autoantibodies against proteins such as aquaporin-4 in rare instances, and more frequently against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Recently, in adult NMO patients, C5a levels were shown to be elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acute exacerbation. We investigated the CSF levels of anaphylatoxins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and plasma MOG antibodies in onset samples from children with ADS. Thirty four children presenting with a first episode of ADS, 17 with monophasic ADS (9 with ADEM, 4 with TM and 4 with ON) and 17 with MS, who had paired blood and CSF samples at onset were included and compared to 12 patients with other non-inflammatory neurological disorders (OND). Cytokines and anaphylatoxins in CSF were measured by Cytometric Bead Array immunoassay. MOG antibody titers in plasma were tested by flow cytometry using a stable cell line expressing full-length human MOG. We found a significant increase in C5a levels in the CSF of patients with monophasic ADS (n=17) compared to OND (n=12, p=0.0036) and to MS (n=17, p=0.0371). The C5a levels in MS were higher than in OND without reaching significance (p=0.2). CSF IL-6 levels were significantly increased in monophasic ADS compared to OND (p=0.0027) and to MS (p=0.0046). MOG antibody plasma levels were significantly higher in monophasic ADS (p<0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, in MS compared to OND (p=0.0023). Plasma MOG antibodies and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly correlated (r=0.51, p=0.018). CSF C5a and IL-6 levels are increased in monophasic ADS but not in MS when compared to OND, suggesting

  3. Immune modulation by a tolerogenic myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)10–60 containing fusion protein in the marmoset experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model

    PubMed Central

    Kap, Y S; van Driel, N; Arends, R; Rouwendal, G; Verolin, M; Blezer, E; Lycke, N; ‘t Hart, B A

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease, mostly target general cell populations or immune molecules, which may lead to a compromised immune system. A more directed strategy would be to re-enforce tolerance of the autoaggressive T cells that drive tissue inflammation and injury. In this study, we have investigated whether the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice and marmosets can be altered by a potent tolerizing fusion protein. In addition, a multi-parameter immunological analysis was performed in marmosets to assess whether the treatment induces modulation of EAE-associated cellular and humoral immune reactions. The fusion protein, CTA1R9K-hMOG10–60-DD, contains a mutated cholera toxin A1 subunit (CTA1R9K), a dimer of the Ig binding D region of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (DD), and the human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (hMOG) sequence 10–60. We observed that intranasal application of CTA1R9K-hMOG10–60-DD seems to skew the immune response against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) towards a regulatory function. We show a reduced number of circulating macrophages, reduced MOG-induced expansion of mononuclear cells in peripheral blood, reduced MOG-induced production of interleukin (IL)-17A in spleen, increased MOG-induced production of IL-4 and IL-10 and an increased percentage of cells expressing programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4). Nevertheless, the treatment did not detectably change the EAE course and pathology. Thus, despite a detectable effect on relevant immune parameters, the fusion protein failed to influence the clinical and pathological outcome of disease. This result warrants further development and improvement of this specifically targeted tolerance inducing therapy. PMID:25393803

  4. Rational design and synthesis of altered peptide ligands based on human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 epitope: inhibition of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tselios, Theodore; Aggelidakis, Mihalis; Tapeinou, Anthi; Tseveleki, Vivian; Kanistras, Ioannis; Gatos, Dimitrios; Matsoukas, John

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the etiology of MS remains unclear, there is evidence T-cell recognition of immunodominant epitopes of myelin proteins, such as the 35-55 epitope of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), plays a pathogenic role in the induction of chronic EAE. Cyclization of peptides is of great interest since the limited stability of linear peptides restricts their potential use as therapeutic agents. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a number of linear and cyclic peptides by mutating crucial T cell receptor (TCR) contact residues of the human MOG35-55 epitope. In particular, we have designed and synthesized cyclic altered peptide ligands (APLs) by mutating Arg41 with Ala or Arg41 and Arg46 with Ala. The peptides were synthesized in solid phase on 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl) using the Fmoc/t-Bu methodology. The purity of final products was verified by RP-HPLC and their identification was achieved by ESI-MS. It was found that the substitutions of Arg at positions 41 and 46 with Ala results in peptide analogues that reduce the severity of MOG-induced EAE clinical symptoms in C57BL/6 mice when co-administered with mouse MOG35-55 peptide at the time of immunization.

  5. Rational design and synthesis of altered peptide ligands based on human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 epitope: inhibition of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tselios, Theodore; Aggelidakis, Mihalis; Tapeinou, Anthi; Tseveleki, Vivian; Kanistras, Ioannis; Gatos, Dimitrios; Matsoukas, John

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the etiology of MS remains unclear, there is evidence T-cell recognition of immunodominant epitopes of myelin proteins, such as the 35-55 epitope of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), plays a pathogenic role in the induction of chronic EAE. Cyclization of peptides is of great interest since the limited stability of linear peptides restricts their potential use as therapeutic agents. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a number of linear and cyclic peptides by mutating crucial T cell receptor (TCR) contact residues of the human MOG35-55 epitope. In particular, we have designed and synthesized cyclic altered peptide ligands (APLs) by mutating Arg41 with Ala or Arg41 and Arg46 with Ala. The peptides were synthesized in solid phase on 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl) using the Fmoc/t-Bu methodology. The purity of final products was verified by RP-HPLC and their identification was achieved by ESI-MS. It was found that the substitutions of Arg at positions 41 and 46 with Ala results in peptide analogues that reduce the severity of MOG-induced EAE clinical symptoms in C57BL/6 mice when co-administered with mouse MOG35-55 peptide at the time of immunization. PMID:25375337

  6. A case of recurrent optic neuritis associated with cerebral and spinal cord lesions and autoantibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein relapsed after fingolimod therapy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Teiichiro; Nakajima, Hideki; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Keiko; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Tsujino, Akira

    2016-04-28

    A previously healthy 16-year-old girl developed sudden eye pain and visual loss in her right eye. On day 7 from onset her right visual acuity had decreased to light perception, and she underwent 5 courses of intravenous methylprednisolone therapy (IVMP, 1 g/day for 3 consecutive days per week). Her eye pain and her visual acuity had improved immediately. Eleven months later, follow-up MRI revealed three T2-hyperintense plaques involving subcortical white matter in the left occipital lobe, right frontal lobe, right thalamus, and thoracic spinal cord. We suspected the diagnosis as multiple sclerosis and treated with fingolimod. She developed recurrent optic neuritis (ON) on day 19 from fingolimod therapy, and we stopped fingolimod. For two years from onset she was admitted five times due to recurrences of ON and appearance of white matter lesion and myelitis. At 22 months, anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies revealed to be positive in her sera from the onset to the present. Our case report suggests that fingolimod might not be effective in anti-MOG antibody-related disorders together with anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibody-positive group. PMID:27010093

  7. Epitope mapping of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis: microwave-assisted synthesis of the peptide antigens and ELISA screening.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Giulia; Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Nuti, Francesca; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Larregola, Maud; Aharoni, Rina; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathologic auto-antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in multiple sclerosis is a highly controversial matter. As the use of animal models may enable to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human disorder, numerous studies on multiple sclerosis are carried out using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In particular, the most extensively used EAE model is obtained by immunizing C57BL/6 mice with the immunodominant peptide MOG(35-55). In this scenario, we analyzed the anti-MOG antibody response in this model using the recombinant refolded extracellular domain of the protein, MOG(1-117). To assess the presence of a B-cell intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism, we tested also five synthetic peptides mapping the 1-117 sequence of MOG, including MOG(35-55). For this purpose, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and on-column refolded MOG(1-117), and we applied an optimized microwave-assisted solid-phase synthetic strategy to obtain the designed peptide sequences. Subsequently, we set up a solid-phase immunoenzymatic assay testing both naïve and EAE mice sera and using MOG protein and peptides as antigenic probes. The results obtained disclose an intense IgG antibody response against both the recombinant protein and the immunizing peptide, while no response was observed against the other synthetic fragments, thus excluding the presence of an intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism. Furthermore, as the properly refolded recombinant probe is able to bind antibodies with greater efficiency compared with MOG(35-55), we hypothesize the presence of both linear and conformational epitopes on MOG(35-55) sequence. PMID:26663200

  8. Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Nonhuman Primate B Cells Converts Destructive into Productive Processing of the Pathogenic CD8 T Cell Epitope in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Jagessar, S. Anwar; Holtman, Inge R.; Hofman, Sam; Morandi, Elena; Heijmans, Nicole; Laman, Jon D.; Gran, Bruno; Faber, Bart W.; van Kasteren, Sander I.; Eggen, Bart J. L.

    2016-01-01

    EBV is the major infectious environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Patient studies do not allow manipulation in vivo. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models in the common marmoset and rhesus monkey to model the association of EBV and MS. We report that B cells infected with EBV-related lymphocryptovirus (LCV) are requisite APCs for MHC-E–restricted autoaggressive effector memory CTLs specific for the immunodominant epitope 40-48 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). These T cells drive the EAE pathogenesis to irreversible neurologic deficit. The aim of this study was to determine why LCV infection is important for this pathogenic role of B cells. Transcriptome comparison of LCV-infected B cells and CD20+ spleen cells from rhesus monkeys shows increased expression of genes encoding elements of the Ag cross-presentation machinery (i.e., of proteasome maturation protein and immunoproteasome subunits) and enhanced expression of MHC-E and of costimulatory molecules (CD70 and CD80, but not CD86). It was also shown that altered expression of endolysosomal proteases (cathepsins) mitigates the fast endolysosomal degradation of the MOG40–48 core epitope. Finally, LCV infection also induced expression of LC3-II+ cytosolic structures resembling autophagosomes, which seem to form an intracellular compartment where the MOG40–48 epitope is protected against proteolytic degradation by the endolysosomal serine protease cathepsin G. In conclusion, LCV infection induces a variety of changes in B cells that underlies the conversion of destructive processing of the immunodominant MOG40–48 epitope into productive processing and cross-presentation to strongly autoaggressive CTLs. PMID:27412414

  9. Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Nonhuman Primate B Cells Converts Destructive into Productive Processing of the Pathogenic CD8 T Cell Epitope in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Holtman, Inge R; Hofman, Sam; Morandi, Elena; Heijmans, Nicole; Laman, Jon D; Gran, Bruno; Faber, Bart W; van Kasteren, Sander I; Eggen, Bart J L; 't Hart, Bert A

    2016-08-15

    EBV is the major infectious environmental risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Patient studies do not allow manipulation in vivo. We used the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models in the common marmoset and rhesus monkey to model the association of EBV and MS. We report that B cells infected with EBV-related lymphocryptovirus (LCV) are requisite APCs for MHC-E-restricted autoaggressive effector memory CTLs specific for the immunodominant epitope 40-48 of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). These T cells drive the EAE pathogenesis to irreversible neurologic deficit. The aim of this study was to determine why LCV infection is important for this pathogenic role of B cells. Transcriptome comparison of LCV-infected B cells and CD20(+) spleen cells from rhesus monkeys shows increased expression of genes encoding elements of the Ag cross-presentation machinery (i.e., of proteasome maturation protein and immunoproteasome subunits) and enhanced expression of MHC-E and of costimulatory molecules (CD70 and CD80, but not CD86). It was also shown that altered expression of endolysosomal proteases (cathepsins) mitigates the fast endolysosomal degradation of the MOG40-48 core epitope. Finally, LCV infection also induced expression of LC3-II(+) cytosolic structures resembling autophagosomes, which seem to form an intracellular compartment where the MOG40-48 epitope is protected against proteolytic degradation by the endolysosomal serine protease cathepsin G. In conclusion, LCV infection induces a variety of changes in B cells that underlies the conversion of destructive processing of the immunodominant MOG40-48 epitope into productive processing and cross-presentation to strongly autoaggressive CTLs. PMID:27412414

  10. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is ameliorated in interleukin-32 alpha transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Gu, Sun Mi; Yun, Hyung Mun; Son, Dong Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Lee, Moon Soon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), also known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminate, is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord and brain are damaged. IL-32α is known as a critical molecule in the pathophysiology of immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pulmonary disease, and cancers. However, the role of IL-32α on spinal cord injuries and demyelination is poorly understood. Recently, we reported that the release of proinflammatory cytokines were reduced in IL-32α-overexpressing transgenic mice. In this study, we investigated whether IL-32α plays a role on MS using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental mouse model of MS, in human IL-32α Tg mice. The Tg mice were immunized with MOG35-55 suspended in CFA emulsion followed by pertussis toxin, and then EAE paralysis of mice was scored. We observed that the paralytic severity and neuropathology of EAE in IL-32α Tg mice were significantly decreased compared with that of non-Tg mice. The immune cells infiltration, astrocytes/microglials activation, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) levels in spinal cord were suppressed in IL-32α Tg mice. Furthermore, NG2 and O4 were decreased in IL-32α Tg mice, indicating that spinal cord damaging was suppressed. In addition, in vitro assay also revealed that IL-32α has a preventive role against Con A stimulation which is evidenced by decrease in T cell proliferation and inflammatory cytokine levels in IL-32α overexpressed Jurkat cell. Taken together, our findings suggested that IL-32α may play a protective role in EAE by suppressing neuroinflammation in spinal cord. PMID:26564962

  11. Recombinant Escherichia coli produces tailor-made biopolyester granules for applications in fluorescence activated cell sorting: functional display of the mouse interleukin-2 and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, B Thomas; Brockelbank, Jane A; Rehm, Bernd HA

    2007-01-01

    Background Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) is a powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative detection of biomolecules used widely in both basic research and clinical diagnostic applications. Beads displaying a specific antigen are used to bind antibodies which are then fluorescently labelled using secondary antibodies. As the individual suspension bead passes through the sensing region of the FACS machine, fluorescent signals are acquired and analysed. Currently, antigens are tediously purified and chemically cross-linked to preformed beads. Purification and coupling of proteins often renders them inactive and they will not be displayed in its native configuration. As an alternative, we genetically engineered Escherichia coli to produce biopolyester (polyhdroxyalkanoate=PHA) granules displaying diagnostically relevant antigens in their native conformation and suitable for FACS analysis. Results Hybrid genes were constructed, which encode either the mouse interleukin-2 (IL2) or the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) fused via an enterokinase site providing linker region to the C terminus of the PHA granule associated protein PhaP, respectively. The hybrid genes were expressed in PHA-accumulating recombinant E. coli. MOG and IL2 fusion proteins were abundantly attached to PHA granules and were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis and N terminal sequencing. A more abundant second fusion protein of either MOG or IL2 resulted from an additional N terminal fusion, which did surprisingly not interfere with attachment to PHA granule. PHA granules displaying either IL2 or MOG were used for FACS using monoclonal anti-IL2 or anti-MOG antibodies conjugated to a fluorescent dye. FACS analysis showed significant and specific binding of respective antibodies. Enterokinase treatment of IL2 displaying PHA granules enabled removal of IL2 as monitored by FACS analysis. Mice were immunized with either MOG or OVA (ovalbumin) and the respective sera were

  12. Phase separation of myelin proteins in triton X-114: differential behavior of myelin basic protein in purified myelin and in cultured oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bürgisser, P; Matthieu, J M

    1989-01-01

    Rabbit central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin, as well as nonmyelinating pig oligodendrocytes in culture, were extracted at 0-4 degrees C with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114. The solubilized proteins were partitioned into the detergent-rich and detergent-depleted (aqueous) phases that form upon heating to 37 degrees C. The proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and P0 extracted from myelin were found exclusively in the detergent phase which is characteristic of the intrinsic membrane proteins. This was also the case for Wolfgram protein (WP), although this protein lacks transmembrane domains. A small fraction of the MAG and MOG extracted from oligodendrocytes partitioned into the aqueous phase, suggesting an altered conformation outside myelin or a different state of glycosylation. P2 and myelin basic protein (MBP) showed distinct patterns of behavior. P2 was found mainly in the aqueous phase giving strong support to its theoretically predicted conformation. Eighty-nine percent of the MBP extracted from CNS myelin and 81% of the pure MBP partitioned into the detergent phase. Surprisingly, most of the MBP extracted from the oligodendrocytes was recovered in the aqueous phase. We speculate that, in these cells, a hydrophilic protein might bind to the MBP in a specific manner, thereby preventing it from binding inappropriately to cellular components before its insertion into myelin.

  13. Somatodendritic Expression of JAM2 Inhibits Oligodendrocyte Myelination.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Stephanie A; Mei, Feng; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Osso, Lindsay A; Leshkowitz, Dena; Shen, Yun-An A; Kay, Jeremy N; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Lyons, David A; Peles, Elior; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-08-17

    Myelination occurs selectively around neuronal axons to increase the efficiency and velocity of action potentials. While oligodendrocytes are capable of myelinating permissive structures in the absence of molecular cues, structurally permissive neuronal somata and dendrites remain unmyelinated. Utilizing a purified spinal cord neuron-oligodendrocyte myelinating co-culture system, we demonstrate that disruption of dynamic neuron-oligodendrocyte signaling by chemical cross-linking results in aberrant myelination of the somatodendritic compartment of neurons. We hypothesize that an inhibitory somatodendritic cue is necessary to prevent non-axonal myelination. Using next-generation sequencing and candidate profiling, we identify neuronal junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitory myelin-guidance molecule. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the somatodendritic compartment directly inhibits myelination and suggest a model in which broadly indiscriminate myelination is tailored by inhibitory signaling to meet local myelination requirements.

  14. Antibodies to Aquaporin 4, Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein, and the Glycine Receptor α1 Subunit in Patients With Isolated Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Sepulveda, Maria; Rostásy, Kevin; Höftberger, Romana; Graus, Francesc; Harvey, Robert J.; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In patients with isolated optic neuritis (ON), the presence of antibodies to aquaporin 4 (AQP4) has diagnostic and prognostic value. In the same clinical setting, the significance of antibodies to myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) or the glycine receptor α1 subunit (GlyR) is unclear. OBJECTIVES To investigate the frequency of antibodies to AQP4, MOG, and GlyR in patients with unilateral or bilateral, severe, or recurrent isolated ON and to determine their clinical and prognostic correlates. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective case-control study from November 1, 2005, through May 30, 2014 with the detection of autoantibodies in a neuroimmunology referral center. We included 51 patients with ON but without clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings outside the optic nerves and 142 controls (30 healthy individuals, 48 patients with neuromyelitis optica, and 64 patients with multiple sclerosis). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinicoimmunologic analysis. We determined the presence of antibodies to AQP4, MOG, and GlyR using cell-based assays. RESULTS The median age of the patients at the onset of ON symptoms was 28 (range, 5–65) years; 36 patients (71%) were female. Antibodies were identified in 23 patients (45%), including MOG in 10 patients, AQP4 in 6 patients, and GlyR in 7 patients (concurrent with MOG in 3 and concurrent with AQP4 in 1). Patients with AQP4 antibodies (median visual score, 3.5 [range, 1–9]) had a worse visual outcome than patients with MOG antibodies alone (median visual score, 0 [range, 0–5]; P = .007), patients with seronegative findings (n = 28) (median visual score, 1.0 [range, 0–14]; P = .08), and patients with GlyR antibodies alone (n = 3) (median visual score, 0 [range, 0–2]; P = .10). The median age of the 7 patients with GlyR antibodies was 27 (range, 11–38) years; 5 (71%) of these were female. Among the 3 patients with GlyR antibodies alone, 1 patient had monophasic ON, 1 had recurrent isolated

  15. Involvement of MeCP2 in Regulation of Myelin-Related Gene Expression in Cultured Rat Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kedarlal; Singh, Juhi; Pillai, Prakash P; Frost, Emma E

    2015-10-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a multifunctional protein which binds to methylated CpG, mutation of which cause a neurodevelopmental disorder, Rett syndrome. MeCP2 can function as both transcriptional activator and repressor of target gene. MeCP2 regulate gene expression in both neuron and glial cells in central nervous system (CNS). Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of CNS, are required for normal functioning of neurons and are regulated by several transcription factors during their differentiation. In current study, we focused on the role of MeCP2 as transcription regulator of myelin genes in cultured rat oligodendrocytes. We have observed expression of MeCP2 at all stages of oligodendrocyte development. MeCP2 knockdown in cultured oligodendrocytes by small interference RNA (siRNA) has shown increase in myelin genes (myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein (MOBP)), neurotrophin (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)), and transcriptional regulator (YY1) transcripts level, which are involved in regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Further, we also found that protein levels of MBP, PLP, DM-20, and BDNF also significantly upregulated in MeCP2 knockdown oligodendrocytes. Our study suggests that the MeCP2 acts as a negative regulator of myelin protein expression.

  16. Alterations in hippocampal myelin and oligodendrocyte precursor cells during epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuanyuan; Hu, Qiao; Zhang, Qian; Hong, Siqi; Tang, Xiaoju; Cheng, Li; Jiang, Li

    2015-11-19

    Recent reports have described damage to myelinated fibers in the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and animal models. However, only limited data are available on the dynamic changes that occur in myelinated fibers, oligodendrocytes (which are myelin-forming cells), and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), which are a reservoir of new oligodendrocytes, in the hippocampus throughout epileptogenesis. The current study was designed to examine this issue using a rat model of lithium-pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Electroencephalography (EEG), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis showed that the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes in the rat hippocampus began during the acute stage of epileptogenesis, and the severity of this loss increased throughout epileptogenesis. Accompanying this loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes, OPCs in the rat hippocampus became activated and their populations increased during several phases of epileptogenesis (the acute, latent and chronic phases). The transcription factors olig1 and olig2, which play crucial roles in regulating OPC proliferation, differentiation and remyelination, were up-regulated during the early phases (the acute and latent phases) followed by a sharp decline in their expression during the chronic and late chronic phases. This study is the first to confirm the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes during lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptogenesis accompanied by a transient increase in the number of OPCs. Prevention of the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes may provide a novel treatment strategy for epilepsy.

  17. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bechler, Marie E; Byrne, Lauren; Ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-09-21

    Since Río-Hortega's description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length, as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis--that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo.

  18. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    PubMed

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease.

  19. Myelin inhibits oligodendroglial maturation and regulates oligodendrocytic transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Plemel, Jason R; Manesh, Sohrab B; Sparling, Joseph S; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2013-09-01

    Myelin loss is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) and promoting central nervous system myelin repair has become a major therapeutic target. Despite the presence of oligodendrocytes precursors cells (OPCs) in chronic lesions of MS, remyelination often fails. The mechanism underlying this failure of remyelination remains unknown, but it is hypothesized that environmental cues act to inhibit the maturation/differentiation of oligodendroglia, preventing remyelination. The rate of CNS remyelination is correlated to the speed of phagocytosis of myelin debris, which is present following demyelination and trauma. Thus, myelin debris could inhibit CNS remyelination. Here, we demonstrate that OPCs cultured on myelin were robustly inhibited in their maturation, as characterized by the decreased expression of immature and mature oligodendrocytes markers, the impaired production of myelin gene products, as well as their stalled morphological complexity relative to OPCs cultured on a control substrate. OPCs in contact with myelin stopped proliferating and decreased the expression of OPC markers to a comparable degree as cells grown on a control substrate. The expression of two transcription factors known to prevent OPC differentiation and maturation were increased in cells that were in contact with myelin: inhibitor of differentiation family (ID) members 2 and 4. Overexpression of ID2 and ID4 in OPCs was previously reported to decrease the percentage of cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers. However, knockdown of ID2 and/or ID4 in OPCs did not increase oligodendroglial maturation on or off of myelin, suggesting that contact with myelin regulates additional regulatory elements.

  20. Synaptic vesicle release regulates myelin sheath number of individual oligodendrocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mensch, Sigrid; Baraban, Marion; Almeida, Rafael; Czopka, Tim; Ausborn, Jessica; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Lyons, David A

    2015-05-01

    The myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes markedly affects CNS function, but how this is regulated by neuronal activity in vivo is not known. We found that blocking synaptic vesicle release impaired CNS myelination by reducing the number of myelin sheaths made by individual oligodendrocytes during their short period of formation. We also found that stimulating neuronal activity increased myelin sheath formation by individual oligodendrocytes. These data indicate that neuronal activity regulates the myelinating capacity of single oligodendrocytes.

  1. Clozapine promotes glycolysis and myelin lipid synthesis in cultured oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Johann; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Schiltz, Kolja; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Westphal, Sabine; Isermann, Berend; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Turck, Christoph W.; Bogerts, Bernhard; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Horvath, Tamas L.; Schild, Lorenz; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2014-01-01

    Clozapine displays stronger systemic metabolic side effects than haloperidol and it has been hypothesized that therapeutic antipsychotic and adverse metabolic effects of these drugs are related. Considering that cerebral disconnectivity through oligodendrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in schizophrenia, it is important to determine the effect of these drugs on oligodendrocyte energy metabolism and myelin lipid production. Effects of clozapine and haloperidol on glucose and myelin lipid metabolism were evaluated and compared in cultured OLN-93 oligodendrocytes. First, glycolytic activity was assessed by measurement of extra- and intracellular glucose and lactate levels. Next, the expression of glucose (GLUT) and monocarboxylate (MCT) transporters was determined after 6 and 24 h. And finally mitochondrial respiration, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, free fatty acids, and expression of the myelin lipid galactocerebroside were analyzed. Both drugs altered oligodendrocyte glucose metabolism, but in opposite directions. Clozapine improved the glucose uptake, production and release of lactate, without altering GLUT and MCT. In contrast, haloperidol led to higher extracellular levels of glucose and lower levels of lactate, suggesting reduced glycolysis. Antipsychotics did not alter significantly the number of functionally intact mitochondria, but clozapine enhanced the efficacy of oxidative phosphorylation and expression of galactocerebroside. Our findings support the superior impact of clozapine on white matter integrity in schizophrenia as previously observed, suggesting that this drug improves the energy supply and myelin lipid synthesis in oligodendrocytes. Characterizing the underlying signal transduction pathways may pave the way for novel oligodendrocyte-directed schizophrenia therapies. PMID:25477781

  2. Astrocytic TIMP-1 Promotes Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Enhances CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Craig S.; Milner, Richard; Nishiyama, Akiko; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Serwanski, David R.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Miller, Robert H.; Crocker, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is an extracellular protein and endogenous regulator of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) secreted by astrocytes in response to CNS myelin injury. We have previously reported that adult TIMP-1KO mice exhibit poor myelin repair following demyelinating injury. This observation led us to hypothesize a role for TIMP-1 in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Herein, we demonstrate that compact myelin formation is significantly delayed in TIMP-1KO mice which coincided with dramatically reduced numbers of white matter astrocytes in the developing CNS. Analysis of differentiation in CNS progenitor cells (neurosphere) cultures from TIMP-1KO mice revealed a specific deficit of NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Application of rmTIMP-1 to TIMP-1KO neurosphere cultures evoked a dose-dependent increase in NG2+ cell numbers, while treatment with GM6001, a potent broad spectrum MMP inhibitor did not. Similarly, administration of recombinant murine TIMP-1 (rmTIMP-1) to A2B5+ immunopanned oligodendrocyte progenitors significantly increased the number of differentiated O1+ oligodendrocytes, while antisera to TIMP-1 reduced oligodendrocyte numbers. We also determined that A2B5+ oligodendrocyte progenitors grown in conditioned media derived from TIMP-1KO primary glial cultures resulted in reduced differentiation of mature O1+ oligodendrocytes. Finally, we report that addition of rmTIMP-1 to primary glial cultures resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative response of astrocytes. Together, these findings describe a previously uncharacterized role for TIMP-1 in the regulation of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during development and provide a novel function for TIMP-1 on myelination in the developing CNS. PMID:21508247

  3. Localisation of N-acetylaspartate in oligodendrocytes/myelin.

    PubMed

    Nordengen, Kaja; Heuser, Christoph; Rinholm, Johanne Egge; Matalon, Reuben; Gundersen, Vidar

    2015-03-01

    The role of N-acetylaspartate in the brain is unclear. Here we used specific antibodies against N-acetylaspartate and immunocytochemistry of carbodiimide-fixed adult rodent brain to show that, besides staining of neuronal cell bodies in the grey matter, N-acetylaspartate labelling was present in oligodendrocytes/myelin in white matter tracts. Immunoelectron microscopy of the rat hippocampus showed that N-acetylaspartate was concentrated in the myelin. Also neuronal cell bodies and axons contained significant amounts of N-acetylaspartate, while synaptic elements and astrocytes were low in N-acetylaspartate. Mitochondria in axons and neuronal cell bodies contained higher levels of N-acetylaspartate compared to the cytosol, compatible with synthesis of N-acetylaspartate in mitochondria. In aspartoacylase knockout mice, in which catabolism of N-acetylaspartate is blocked, the levels of N-acetylaspartate were largely increased in oligodendrocytes/myelin. In these mice, the highest myelin concentration of N-acetylaspartate was found in the cerebellum, a region showing overt dysmyelination. In organotypic cortical slice cultures there was no evidence for N-acetylaspartate-induced myelin toxicity, supporting the notion that myelin damage is induced by the lack of N-acetylaspartate for lipid production. Our findings also implicate that N-acetylaspartate signals on magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflect not only vital neurons but also vital oligodendrocytes/myelin.

  4. Erythropoietin (EPO) increases myelin gene expression in CG4 oligodendrocyte cells through the classical EPO receptor.

    PubMed

    Cervellini, Ilaria; Annenkov, Alexander; Brenton, Thomas; Chernajovsky, Yuti; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mengozzi, Manuela

    2013-08-28

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has protective effects in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, including in animal models of multiple sclerosis, where EPO decreases disease severity. EPO also promotes neurogenesis and is protective in models of toxic demyelination. In this study, we asked whether EPO could promote neurorepair by also inducing remyelination. In addition, we investigated whether the effect of EPO could be mediated by the classical erythropoietic EPO receptor (EPOR), since it is still questioned if EPOR is functional in nonhematopoietic cells. Using CG4 cells, a line of rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells, we found that EPO increases the expression of myelin genes (myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG] and myelin basic protein [MBP]). EPO had no effect in wild-type CG4 cells, which do not express EPOR, whereas it increased MOG and MBP expression in cells engineered to overexpress EPOR (CG4-EPOR). This was reflected in a marked increase in MOG protein levels, as detected by Western blot. In these cells, EPO induced by 10-fold the early growth response gene 2 (Egr2), which is required for peripheral myelination. However, Egr2 silencing with a siRNA did not reverse the effect of EPO, indicating that EPO acts through other pathways. In conclusion, EPO induces the expression of myelin genes in oligodendrocytes and this effect requires the presence of EPOR. This study demonstrates that EPOR can mediate neuroreparative effects.

  5. Cdon, a cell surface protein, mediates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Chun; Almazan, Guillermina

    2016-06-01

    During central nervous system development, oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) establish multiple branched processes and axonal contacts to initiate myelination. A complete understanding of the molecular signals implicated in cell surface interaction to initiate myelination/remyelination is currently lacking. The objective of our study was to assess whether Cdon, a cell surface protein that was shown to participate in muscle and neuron cell development, is involved in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous Cdon protein is expressed in OLPs, increasing in the early differentiation stages and decreasing in mature OLGs. Immunocytochemistry of endogenous Cdon showed localization on both OLG cell membranes and cellular processes exhibiting puncta- or varicosity-like structures. Cdon knockdown with siRNA decreased protein levels by 62% as well as two myelin-specific proteins, MBP and MAG. Conversely, overexpression of full-length rat Cdon increased myelin proteins in OLGs. The complexity of OLGs branching and contact point numbers with axons were also increased in Cdon overexpressing cells growing alone or in coculture with dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs). Furthermore, myelination of DRGNs was decreased when OLPs were transfected with Cdon siRNA. Altogether, our results suggest that Cdon participates in OLG differentiation and myelination, most likely in the initial stages of development.

  6. Unconventional myosin ID is expressed in myelinating oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Reiji; Ishibashi, Tomoko; Baba, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Yoshihide

    2014-10-01

    Myelin is a dynamic multilamellar structure that ensheathes axons and is crucial for normal neuronal function. In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced by oligodendrocytes that wrap many layers of plasma membrane around axons. The dynamic membrane trafficking system, which relies on motor proteins, is required for myelin formation and maintenance. Previously, we found that myosin ID (Myo1d), a class I myosin, is enriched in the rat CNS myelin fraction. Myo1d is an unconventional myosin and has been shown to be involved in membrane trafficking in the recycling pathway in an epithelial cell line. Western blotting revealed that Myo1d expression begins early in myelinogenesis and continues to increase into adulthood. The localization of Myo1d in CNS myelin has not been reported, and the function of Myo1d in vivo remains unknown. To demonstrate the expression of Myo1d in CNS myelin and to begin to explore the function of Myo1d in myelination, we produced a new antibody against Myo1d that has a high titer and specificity for rat Myo1d. By using this antibody, we demonstrated that Myo1d is expressed in rat CNS myelin and is especially abundant in abaxonal and adaxonal regions (the outer and inner cytoplasm-containing loops, respectively), but that expression is low in peripheral nervous system myelin. In culture, Myo1d was expressed in mature rat oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, an increase in expression of Myo1d during maturation of CNS white matter (cerebellum and corpus callosum) was demonstrated by histological analysis. These results suggest that Myo1d may be involved in the formation and/or maintenance of CNS myelin.

  7. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes. PMID:26961174

  8. G protein-coupled receptor 37 is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun-Jeong; Vainshtein, Anna; Maik-Rachline, Galia; Peles, Elior

    2016-01-01

    While the formation of myelin by oligodendrocytes is critical for the function of the central nervous system, the molecular mechanism controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we identify G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) as an inhibitor of late-stage oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. GPR37 is enriched in oligodendrocytes and its expression increases during their differentiation into myelin forming cells. Genetic deletion of Gpr37 does not affect the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, but results in precocious oligodendrocyte differentiation and hypermyelination. The inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation by GPR37 is mediated by suppression of an exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC)-dependent activation of Raf-MAPK-ERK1/2 module and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2. Our data suggest that GPR37 regulates central nervous system myelination by controlling the transition from early-differentiated to mature oligodendrocytes.

  9. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  10. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  11. ERK1/ERK2 MAPK signaling is required to increase myelin thickness independent of oligodendrocyte differentiation and initiation of myelination.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Akihiro; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L; Furusho, Miki; Miller, Robert H; Bansal, Rashmi

    2012-06-27

    Wrapping of the myelin sheath around axons by oligodendrocytes is critical for the rapid conduction of electrical signals required for the normal functioning of the CNS. Myelination is a multistep process where oligodendrocytes progress through a well coordinated differentiation program regulated by multiple extracellular growth and differentiation signals. The intracellular transduction of the extracellular signals that regulate myelination is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a critical role for two important signaling molecules, extracelluar signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases, in the control of CNS myelin thickness. We generated and analyzed two lines of mice lacking both ERK1/ERK2 function specifically in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells. In the absence of ERK1/ERK2 signaling NG2⁺ oligodendrocyte progenitor cells proliferated and differentiated on schedule. Mutant oligodendrocytes also ensheathed axons normally and made a few wraps of compact myelin. However, the subsequent increase in myelination that correlated myelin thickness in proportion to the axon caliber failed to occur. Furthermore, although the numbers of differentiated oligodendrocytes in the adult mutants were unchanged, they showed an inability to upregulate the transcription of major myelin genes that normally occurs during active myelination. Similarly, in vitro ERK1/ERK2-deficient oligodendrocytes differentiated normally but failed to form typical myelin-like membrane sheets. None of these effects were observed in single ERK1 or ERK2 mutants. These studies suggest that the predominant role of ERK1/ERK2 signaling in vivo is in promoting rapid myelin growth to increase its thickness, subsequent to oligodendrocyte differentiation and the initiation of myelination.

  12. Extracellular cues influencing oligodendrocyte differentiation and (re)myelination.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Natalie A; Fuss, Babette

    2016-09-01

    There is an increasing number of neurologic disorders found to be associated with loss and/or dysfunction of the CNS myelin sheath, ranging from the classic demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis, through CNS injury, to neuropsychiatric diseases. The disabling burden of these diseases has sparked a growing interest in gaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the differentiation of the myelinating cells of the CNS, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), and the process of (re)myelination. In this context, the importance of the extracellular milieu is becoming increasingly recognized. Under pathological conditions, changes in inhibitory as well as permissive/promotional cues are thought to lead to an overall extracellular environment that is obstructive for the regeneration of the myelin sheath. Given the general view that remyelination is, even though limited in human, a natural response to demyelination, targeting pathologically 'dysregulated' extracellular cues and their downstream pathways is regarded as a promising approach toward the enhancement of remyelination by endogenous (or if necessary transplanted) OLG progenitor cells. In this review, we will introduce the extracellular cues that have been implicated in the modulation of (re)myelination. These cues can be soluble, part of the extracellular matrix (ECM) or mediators of cell-cell interactions. Their inhibitory and permissive/promotional roles with regard to remyelination as well as their potential for therapeutic intervention will be discussed.

  13. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Samantha F; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Bonin, Sawyer R; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  14. A zinc finger protein that regulates oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Harwin; Talbot, William S

    2015-12-01

    Precise control of oligodendrocyte migration and development is crucial for myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS), but important questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms controlling these processes. In a zebrafish screen for myelination mutants, we identified a mutation in zinc finger protein 16-like (znf16l). znf16l mutant larvae have reduced myelin basic protein (mbp) expression and reduced CNS myelin. Marker, time-lapse and ultrastructural studies indicated that oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination are disrupted in znf16l mutants. Transgenic studies indicated that znf16l acts autonomously in oligodendrocytes. Expression of Zfp488 from mouse rescued mbp expression in znf16l mutants, indicating that these homologs have overlapping functions. Our results defined the function of a new zinc finger protein with specific function in oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination in the developing CNS.

  15. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). PMID:26546966

  16. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only).

  17. Autophagy promotes oligodendrocyte survival and function following dysmyelination in a long-lived myelin mutant.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chelsey M; Mayer, Joshua A; Duncan, Ian D

    2013-05-01

    The Long-Evans shaker (les) rat has a mutation in myelin basic protein that results in severe CNS dysmyelination and subsequent demyelination during development. During this time, les oligodendrocytes accumulate cytoplasmic vesicles, including lysosomes and membrane-bound organelles. However, the mechanism and functional relevance behind these oligodendrocyte abnormalities in les have not been investigated. Using high-magnification electron microscopy, we identified the accumulations in les oligodendrocytes as early and late autophagosomes. Additionally, immunohistochemistry and Western blots showed an increase in autophagy markers in les. However, autophagy did not precede the death of les oligodendrocytes. Instead, upregulating autophagy promoted membrane extensions in les oligodendrocytes in vitro. Furthermore, upregulating autophagy in les rats via intermittent fasting increased the proportion of myelinated axons as well as myelin sheath thickness in les and control rats. Overall, this study provides insight into the abnormalities described in les as well as identifying a novel mechanism that promotes the survival and function of oligodendrocytes.

  18. Progressive disorganization of paranodal junctions and compact myelin due to loss of DCC expression by oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bull, Sarah-Jane; Bin, Jenea M; Beaumont, Eric; Boutet, Alexandre; Krimpenfort, Paul; Sadikot, Abbas F; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2014-07-16

    Paranodal axoglial junctions are critical for maintaining the segregation of axonal domains along myelinated axons; however, the proteins required to organize and maintain this structure are not fully understood. Netrin-1 and its receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC) are proteins enriched at paranodes that are expressed by neurons and oligodendrocytes. To identify the specific function of DCC expressed by oligodendrocytes in vivo, we selectively eliminated DCC from mature myelinating oligodendrocytes using an inducible cre regulated by the proteolipid protein promoter. We demonstrate that DCC deletion results in progressive disruption of the organization of axonal domains, myelin ultrastructure, and myelin protein composition. Conditional DCC knock-out mice develop balance and coordination deficits and exhibit decreased conduction velocity. We conclude that DCC expression by oligodendrocytes is required for the maintenance and stability of myelin in vivo, which is essential for proper signal conduction in the CNS.

  19. Altered Oligodendrocyte Maturation and Myelin Maintenance: The Role of Antiretrovirals in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brigid K; Monnerie, Hubert; Mannell, Maggie V; Gannon, Patrick J; Espinoza, Cagla Akay; Erickson, Michelle A; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Gelman, Benjamin B; Briand, Lisa A; Pierce, R Christopher; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L; Grinspan, Judith B

    2015-11-01

    Despite effective viral suppression through combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), approximately half of HIV-positive individuals have HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Studies of antiretroviral-treated patients have revealed persistent white matter abnormalities including diffuse myelin pallor, diminished white matter tracts, and decreased myelin protein mRNAs. Loss of myelin can contribute to neurocognitive dysfunction because the myelin membrane generated by oligodendrocytes is essential for rapid signal transduction and axonal maintenance. We hypothesized that myelin changes in HAND are partly due to effects of antiretroviral drugs on oligodendrocyte survival and/or maturation. We showed that primary mouse oligodendrocyte precursor cell cultures treated with therapeutic concentrations of HIV protease inhibitors ritonavir or lopinavir displayed dose-dependent decreases in oligodendrocyte maturation; however, this effect was rapidly reversed after drug removal. Conversely, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor zidovudine had no effect. Furthermore, in vivo ritonavir administration to adult mice reduced frontal cortex myelin protein levels. Finally, prefrontal cortex tissue from HIV-positive individuals with HAND on cART showed a significant decrease in myelin basic protein compared with untreated HIV-positive individuals with HAND or HIV-negative controls. These findings demonstrate that antiretrovirals can impact myelin integrity and have implications for myelination in juvenile HIV patients and myelin maintenance in adults on lifelong therapy.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes regulates myelin sheath thickness.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Bansal, Rashmi

    2012-05-01

    Formation of the CNS white matter is developmentally tightly regulated, but the molecules and mechanisms of myelination control in the postnatal CNS are poorly understood. Here, we show that myelin growth is controlled by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, originally identified as a proliferative signal for oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in vitro. We created two lines of mice lacking both FGF receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells but found that in these mice OPC proliferation and differentiation were unaffected. In addition, axonal ensheathment and the initiation of myelination were on time. However, the rapid growth of CNS myelin, normally occurring in the second postnatal week, was strongly inhibited. Throughout adulthood, the myelin sheath remained disproportionately thin relative to the axon caliber. In adult mice, mutant oligodendrocytes were normal in number, whereas the transcription of major myelin genes was reduced. This FGF receptor-mediated stimulation of mature oligodendrocytes could also be modeled in vitro, demonstrating that enhanced expansion of oligodendroglial processes requires signaling by extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 and -2 (Erk1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In vivo, Erk1/2-MAPK activity was reduced in the hypomyelinated CNS of Fgfr1/Fgfr2 mutant mice. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized function of FGF receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes that contributes to the regulation of myelin sheath thickness and that uncouples the initiation of ensheathment from the later phase of continued myelin growth.

  1. Adrenomedullin promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes under pathological conditions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maki, Takakuni; Takahashi, Yoko; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Liang, Anna C; Ihara, Masafumi; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2015-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes, which are the main cell type in cerebral white matter, are generated from their precursor cells (oligodendrocyte precursor cells: OPCs). However, the differentiation from OPCs to oligodendrocytes is disturbed under stressed conditions. Therefore, drugs that can improve oligodendrocyte regeneration may be effective for white matter-related diseases. Here we show that a vasoactive peptide adrenomedullin (AM) promotes the in vitro differentiation of OPCs under pathological conditions. Primary OPCs were prepared from neonatal rat brains, and differentiated into myelin-basic-protein expressing oligodendrocytes over time. This in vitro OPC differentiation was inhibited by prolonged chemical hypoxic stress induced by non-lethal CoCl(2) treatment. However, AM promoted the OPC differentiation under the hypoxic stress conditions, and the AM receptor antagonist AM(22-52) canceled the AM-induced OPC differentiation. In addition, AM treatment increased the phosphorylation level of Akt in OPC cultures, and correspondingly, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 blocked the AM-induced OPC differentiation. Taken together, AM treatment rescued OPC maturation under pathological conditions via an AM-receptor-PI3K/Akt pathway. Oligodendrocytes play critical roles in white matter by forming myelin sheath. Therefore, AM signaling may be a promising therapeutic target to boost oligodendrocyte regeneration in CNS disorders.

  2. Oligodendrocyte, Astrocyte, and Microglia Crosstalk in Myelin Development, Damage, and Repair.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Helena S; Portugal, Camila C; Socodato, Renato; Relvas, João B

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system. Myelination of axons allows rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses and contributes to axonal integrity. Devastating neurological deficits caused by demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, illustrate well the importance of the process. In this review, we focus on the positive and negative interactions between oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia during developmental myelination and remyelination. Even though many lines of evidence support a crucial role for glia crosstalk during these processes, the nature of such interactions is often neglected when designing therapeutics for repair of demyelinated lesions. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying glial cell communication and how they influence oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination is fundamental to uncover novel therapeutic strategies for myelin repair. PMID:27551677

  3. Oligodendrocyte, Astrocyte, and Microglia Crosstalk in Myelin Development, Damage, and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Helena S.; Portugal, Camila C.; Socodato, Renato; Relvas, João B.

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system. Myelination of axons allows rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses and contributes to axonal integrity. Devastating neurological deficits caused by demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, illustrate well the importance of the process. In this review, we focus on the positive and negative interactions between oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia during developmental myelination and remyelination. Even though many lines of evidence support a crucial role for glia crosstalk during these processes, the nature of such interactions is often neglected when designing therapeutics for repair of demyelinated lesions. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying glial cell communication and how they influence oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination is fundamental to uncover novel therapeutic strategies for myelin repair. PMID:27551677

  4. Apoptosis of Oligodendrocytes during Early Development Delays Myelination and Impairs Subsequent Responses to Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Caprariello, Andrew V.; Batt, Courtney E.; Zippe, Ingrid; Romito-DiGiacomo, Rita R.; Karl, Molly

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian development, myelin-forming oligodendrocytes are generated and axons ensheathed according to a tightly regulated sequence of events. Excess premyelinating oligodendrocytes are eliminated by apoptosis and the timing of the onset of myelination in any specific CNS region is highly reproducible. Although the developing CNS recovers more effectively than the adult CNS from similar insults, it is unknown whether early loss of oligodendrocyte lineage cells leads to long-term functional deficits. To directly assess whether the loss of oligodendrocytes during early postnatal spinal cord development impacted oligodendrogenesis, myelination, and remyelination, transgenic mouse lines were generated in which a modified caspase-9 molecule allowed spatial and temporal control of the apoptotic pathway specifically in mature, myelin basic protein expressing oligodendrocytes (MBP-iCP9). Activating apoptosis in MBP+ cells of the developing spinal cord during the first postnatal week inhibited myelination. This inhibition was transient, and the levels of myelination largely returned to normal after 2 weeks. Despite robust developmental plasticity, MBP-iCP9-induced oligodendrocyte apoptosis compromised the rate and extent of adult remyelination. Remyelination failure correlated with a truncated proliferative response of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, suggesting that depleting the oligodendrocyte pool during critical developmental periods compromises the regenerative response to subsequent demyelinating lesions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This manuscript demonstrates that early insults leading to oligodendrocyte apoptosis result in the impairment of recovery from demyelinating diseases in the adult. These studies begin to provide an initial understanding of the potential failure of recovery in insults, such as periventricular leukomalacia and multiple sclerosis. PMID:26468203

  5. Neurotransplantation of magnetically labeled oligodendrocyte progenitors: Magnetic resonance tracking of cell migration and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Zhang, S.-C.; van Gelderen, P.; Herynek, V.; Jordan, E. K.; Duncan, I. D.; Frank, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Demyelination is a common pathological finding in human neurological diseases and frequently persists as a result of failure of endogenous repair. Transplanted oligodendrocytes and their precursor cells can (re)myelinate axons, raising the possibility of therapeutic intervention. The migratory capacity of transplanted cells is of key importance in determining the extent of (re)myelination and can, at present, be evaluated only by using invasive and irreversible procedures. We have exploited the transferrin receptor as an efficient intracellular delivery device for magnetic nanoparticles, and transplanted tagged oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the spinal cord of myelin-deficient rats. Cell migration could be easily detected by using three-dimensional magnetic resonance microscopy, with a close correlation between the areas of contrast enhancement and the achieved extent of myelination. The present results demonstrate that magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors is feasible; this technique has the potential to be easily extended to other neurotransplantation studies involving different precursor cell types. PMID:10611372

  6. Neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-A establishes spatial segregation and extent of oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Chong, S Y Christin; Rosenberg, Sheila S; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Shen, Yun-An A; Hahn, Angela T; McGee, Aaron W; Xu, Xiaomei; Zheng, Binhai; Zhang, Li I; Rowitch, David H; Franklin, Robin J M; Lu, Q Richard; Chan, Jonah R

    2012-01-24

    A requisite component of nervous system development is the achievement of cellular recognition and spatial segregation through competition-based refinement mechanisms. Competition for available axon space by myelinating oligodendrocytes ensures that all relevant CNS axons are myelinated properly. To ascertain the nature of this competition, we generated a transgenic mouse with sparsely labeled oligodendrocytes and establish that individual oligodendrocytes occupying similar axon tracts can greatly vary the number and lengths of their myelin internodes. Here we show that intercellular interactions between competing oligodendroglia influence the number and length of myelin internodes, referred to as myelinogenic potential, and identify the amino-terminal region of Nogo-A, expressed by oligodendroglia, as necessary and sufficient to inhibit this process. Exuberant and expansive myelination/remyelination is detected in the absence of Nogo during development and after demyelination, suggesting that spatial segregation and myelin extent is limited by microenvironmental inhibition. We demonstrate a unique physiological role for Nogo-A in the precise myelination of the developing CNS. Maximizing the myelinogenic potential of oligodendrocytes may offer an effective strategy for repair in future therapies for demyelination.

  7. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    PubMed

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons.

  8. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 is required for the normal development of oligodendrocytes and myelin formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Fucheng; Herrup, Karl; Bibb, James A; Lu, Richard; Miller, Robert H

    2013-06-15

    The development of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the vertebrate CNS, is regulated by a cohort of growth factors and transcription factors. Less is known about the signaling pathways that integrate extracellular signals with intracellular transcriptional regulators to control oligodendrocyte development. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its co-activators play critical roles in the regulation of neuronal differentiation, cortical lamination, neuronal cell migration and axon outgrowth. Here we demonstrate a previously unrecognized function of Cdk5 in regulating oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination. During late embryonic development Cdk5 null animals displayed a reduction in the number of MBP+ cells in the spinal cord, but no difference in the number of OPCs. To determine whether the reduction of oligodendrocytes reflected a cell-intrinsic loss of Cdk5, it was selectively deleted from Olig1+ oligodendrocyte lineage cells. In Olig1(Cre/+); Cdk5(fl/fl) conditional mutants, reduced levels of expression of MBP and PLP mRNA were observed throughout the CNS and ultrastructural analyses demonstrated a significant reduction in the proportion of myelinated axons in the optic nerve and spinal cord. Pharmacological inhibition or RNAi knockdown of Cdk5 in vitro resulted in the reduction in oligodendrocyte maturation, but had no effect on OPC cell proliferation. Conversely, over-expression of Cdk5 promoted oligodendrocyte maturation and enhanced process outgrowth. Consistent with this data, Cdk5(-/-) oligodendrocytes developed significantly fewer primary processes and branches than control cells. Together, these findings suggest that Cdk5 function as a signaling integrator to regulate oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination.

  9. Oligodendrocyte Development and Myelination in Neurodevelopment: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Barateiro, Andreia; Brites, Dora; Fernandes, Adelaide

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system that constitute about 5 to 10% of the total glial population. These cells are responsible for myelin sheath production, which is essential not only for the rapid and efficient conduction of the electrical impulses along the axons, but also for preserving axonal integrity. Oligodendrocytes arise from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate just before and after birth, under a highly-regulated program. Both oligodendrocytes and their precursors are very susceptible to injury by several mechanisms, including excitotoxic damage, oxidative stress and inflammatory events. In this review, we will cover not only several important aspects of oligodendrocyte development and regulatory mechanisms involved in this process, but also some of the most important pathways of injury associated to oligodendrogenesis. Moreover, we will also address some neurological disorders along life journey that present impairment in oligodendrocyte function and in myelination during neurodevelopment, such as periventricular leukomalacia, hypoxia/ischemia and hyperbilirubinemia that in turn can potentiate the emergence of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases like schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26635271

  10. TACE/ADAM17 is essential for oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Crawford, Howard C; Klingener, Michael; Sun, Bingru; Karelis, Jason; Raines, Elaine W; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-09-01

    Several studies have elucidated the significance of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase proteins (ADAMs) in PNS myelination, but there is no evidence if they also play a role in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Our study identifies ADAM17, also called tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), as a novel key modulator of oligodendrocyte (OL) development and CNS myelination. Genetic deletion of TACE in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPs) induces premature cell cycle exit and reduces OL cell survival during postnatal myelination of the subcortical white matter (SCWM). These cellular and molecular changes lead to deficits in SCWM myelination and motor behavior. Mechanistically, TACE regulates oligodendrogenesis by modulating the shedding of EGFR ligands TGFα and HB-EGF and, consequently, EGFR signaling activation in OL lineage cells. Constitutive TACE depletion in OPs in vivo leads to similar alterations in CNS myelination and motor behavior as to what is observed in the EGFR hypofunctional mouse line EgfrWa2. EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs restores OL survival and development. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in oligodendrogenesis, and demonstrates how this molecule modulates EGFR signaling activation to regulate postnatal CNS myelination.

  11. TACE/ADAM17 Is Essential for Oligodendrocyte Development and CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Palazuelos, Javier; Crawford, Howard C.; Klingener, Michael; Sun, Bingru; Karelis, Jason; Raines, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have elucidated the significance of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase proteins (ADAMs) in PNS myelination, but there is no evidence if they also play a role in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Our study identifies ADAM17, also called tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE), as a novel key modulator of oligodendrocyte (OL) development and CNS myelination. Genetic deletion of TACE in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPs) induces premature cell cycle exit and reduces OL cell survival during postnatal myelination of the subcortical white matter (SCWM). These cellular and molecular changes lead to deficits in SCWM myelination and motor behavior. Mechanistically, TACE regulates oligodendrogenesis by modulating the shedding of EGFR ligands TGFα and HB-EGF and, consequently, EGFR signaling activation in OL lineage cells. Constitutive TACE depletion in OPs in vivo leads to similar alterations in CNS myelination and motor behavior as to what is observed in the EGFR hypofunctional mouse line EgfrWa2. EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs restores OL survival and development. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in oligodendrogenesis, and demonstrates how this molecule modulates EGFR signaling activation to regulate postnatal CNS myelination. PMID:25186737

  12. Fyn is an intermediate kinase that BDNF utilizes to promote oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Haley; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Gonsalvez, David; Ferner, Anita; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Murray, Simon S; Xiao, Junhua

    2016-02-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, promotes central nervous system myelination during development; however the mechanisms mediating this effect remain unknown. Here we show that Fyn phosphorylation is modulated by BDNF in vivo. Concordant with this, we find that BDNF stimulates Fyn phosphorylation in myelinating cocultures, an effect dependent on oligodendroglial expression of TrkB. Importantly, PP2, a pharmacological inhibitor of Src family kinases, not only abrogated the promyelinating influence of BDNF in vitro, but also attenuated BDNF-induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in oligodendrocytes. Over-expression of Fyn in oligodendrocytes significantly promotes phosphorylation of Erk1/2, and promotes myelination to the extent that exogenous BDNF exerts no additive effect in vitro. In contrast, expression of a kinase-dead mutant of Fyn in oligodendrocytes significantly inhibited BDNF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and abrogated the promyelinating effect of BDNF. Analysis of white matter tracts in vivo revealed that phosphorylated Fyn primarily colocalized with mature oligodendrocytes, and was rarely observed in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, a profile that closely parallels the detection of phosphorylated Erk1/2 in the developing central nervous system. Taken together, these data identify that Fyn kinase exerts a key role in mediating the promyelinating influence of BDNF. Here we identify a pathway in which BDNF activation of oligodendroglial TrkB receptors stimulates the phosphorylation of Fyn, a necessary step required to potentiate the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, which in turn regulates oligodendrocyte myelination.

  13. Golli myelin basic proteins stimulate oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in remyelinating adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paez, Pablo M; Cheli, Veronica T; Ghiani, Cristina A; Spreuer, Vilma; Handley, Vance W; Campagnoni, Anthony T

    2012-07-01

    Golli myelin basic proteins are necessary for normal myelination, acting via voltage and store-dependent Ca(2+) entry at multiple steps during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) development. To date nothing is known regarding the role of golli proteins in demyelination or remyelination events. Here the effects of golli ablation and overexpression in myelin loss and recovery were examined using the cuprizone (CPZ) model of demyelination/remyelination. We found severe demyelination in the corpus callosum (CC) of golli-overexpressing mice (JOE) during the CPZ treatment, which was accompanied by an increased number of reactive astrocytes and activation of microglia/macrophages. During demyelination of JOE brains, a significant increase in the number of proliferating OPCs was found in the CC as well as in the subventricular zone, and our data indicate that these progenitors matured and fully remyelinated the CC of JOE animals after CPZ withdrawal. In contrast, in the absence of golli (golli-KO mice) delayed myelin loss associated with a smaller immune response, and a lower number of OPCs was found in these mice during the CPZ treatment. Furthermore, incomplete remyelination was observed after CPZ removal in large areas of the CC of golli-KO mice, reflecting irregular recovery of the oligodendrocyte population and subsequent myelin sheath formation. Our findings demonstrate that golli proteins sensitize mature oligodendrocytes to CPZ-induced demyelination, while at the same time stimulate the proliferation/recruitment of OPCs during demyelination, resulting in accelerated remyelination.

  14. Developmental expression and function analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D in oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Tan, Z; Zhao, S; Huang, H; Zhao, X; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Shields, C B; Uetani, N; Qiu, M

    2015-11-12

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are extensively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and have distinct spatial and temporal patterns in different cell types during development. Previous studies have demonstrated possible roles for RPTPs in axon outgrowth, guidance, and synaptogenesis. In the present study, our results revealed that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D (PTPRD) was initially expressed in mature neurons in embryonic CNS, and later in oligodendroglial cells at postnatal stages when oligodendrocytes undergo active axonal myelination process. In PTPRD mutants, oligodendrocyte differentiation was normal and a transient myelination delay occurred at early postnatal stages, indicating the contribution of PTPRD to the initiation of axonal myelination. Our results also showed that the remyelination process was not affected in the absence of PTPRD function after a cuprizone-induced demyelination in adult animals.

  15. Production and use of lentivirus to selectively transduce primary oligodendrocyte precursor cells for in vitro myelination assays.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Haley M; Ferner, Anita H; Giuffrida, Lauren; Murray, Simon S; Xiao, Junhua

    2015-01-12

    Myelination is a complex process that involves both neurons and the myelin forming glial cells, oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We use an in vitro myelination assay, an established model for studying CNS myelination in vitro. To do this, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are added to the purified primary rodent dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to form myelinating co-cultures. In order to specifically interrogate the roles that particular proteins expressed by oligodendrocytes exert upon myelination we have developed protocols that selectively transduce OPCs using the lentivirus overexpressing wild type, constitutively active or dominant negative proteins before being seeded onto the DRG neurons. This allows us to specifically interrogate the roles of these oligodendroglial proteins in regulating myelination. The protocols can also be applied in the study of other cell types, thus providing an approach that allows selective manipulation of proteins expressed by a desired cell type, such as oligodendrocytes for the targeted study of signaling and compensation mechanisms. In conclusion, combining the in vitro myelination assay with lentiviral infected OPCs provides a strategic tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms involved in myelination.

  16. Transcriptional expression of myelin basic protein in oligodendrocytes depends on functional syntaxin 4: a potential correlation with autocrine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bijlard, Marjolein; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C; Nomden, Anita; Tyagi, Sanjay; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2015-02-01

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes is essential for saltatory nerve conduction. To form myelin membranes, a coordinated synthesis and subsequent polarized transport of myelin components are necessary. Here, we show that as part of the mechanism to establish membrane polarity, oligodendrocytes exploit a polarized distribution of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) machinery components syntaxins 3 and 4, localizing to the cell body and the myelin membrane, respectively. Our data further reveal that the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a myelin-specific protein that is synthesized "on site" after transport of its mRNA, depends on the correct functioning of the SNARE machinery, which is not required for mRNA granule assembly and transport per se. Thus, downregulation and overexpression of syntaxin 4 but not syntaxin 3 in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells but not immature oligodendrocytes impeded MBP mRNA transcription, thereby preventing MBP protein synthesis. The expression and localization of another myelin-specific protein, proteolipid protein (PLP), was unaltered. Strikingly, conditioned medium obtained from developing oligodendrocytes was able to rescue the block of MBP mRNA transcription in syntaxin 4-downregulated cells. These findings indicate that the initiation of the biosynthesis of MBP mRNA relies on a syntaxin 4-dependent mechanism, which likely involves activation of an autocrine signaling pathway.

  17. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  18. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 alters oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Beatriz; Riquelme, Raquel; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Jiménez, Antonio Jesús; de Diego, Isabel; Gómez-Conde, Ana Isabel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Aguirre, José Ángel; Chun, Jerold; Pedraza, Carmen; Santín, Luis Javier; Fernández, Oscar; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intercellular signaling lipid that regulates multiple cellular functions, acting through specific G-protein coupled receptors (LPA(1-6)). Our previous studies using viable Malaga variant maLPA1-null mice demonstrated the requirement of the LPA1 receptor for normal proliferation, differentiation, and survival of the neuronal precursors. In the cerebral cortex LPA1 is expressed extensively in differentiating oligodendrocytes, in parallel with myelination. Although exogenous LPA-induced effects have been investigated in myelinating cells, the in vivo contribution of LPA1 to normal myelination remains to be demonstrated. This study identified a relevant in vivo role for LPA1 as a regulator of cortical myelination. Immunochemical analysis in adult maLPA1-null mice demonstrated a reduction in the steady-state levels of the myelin proteins MBP, PLP/DM20, and CNPase in the cerebral cortex. The myelin defects were confirmed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Stereological analysis limited the defects to adult differentiating oligodendrocytes, without variation in the NG2+ precursor cells. Finally, a possible mechanism involving oligodendrocyte survival was demonstrated by the impaired intracellular transport of the PLP/DM20 myelin protein which was accompanied by cellular loss, suggesting stress-induced apoptosis. These findings describe a previously uncharacterized in vivo functional role for LPA1 in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the CNS, underlining the importance of the maLPA1-null mouse as a model for the study of demyelinating diseases.

  19. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been implicated to play critical roles in early neural development. Recent reports have suggested that perinatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) resulted in cortical network miswiring, abnormal social behavior, callosal myelin malformation, as well as oligodendrocyte (OL) pathology in rats. To gain further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SSRIs-induced OL and myelin abnormalities, we investigated the effect of 5-HT exposure on OL development, cell death, and myelination in cell culture models. First, we showed that 5-HT receptor 1A and 2A subtypes were expressed in OL lineages, using immunocytochemistry, Western blot, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. We then assessed the effect of serotonin exposure on the lineage development, expression of myelin proteins, cell death, and myelination, in purified OL and neuron-OL myelination cultures. For pure OL cultures, our results showed that 5-HT exposure led to disturbance of OL development, as indicated by aberrant process outgrowth and reduced myelin proteins expression. At higher doses, such exposure triggered a development-dependent cell death, as immature OLs exhibited increasing susceptibility to 5-HT treatment compared to OL progenitor cells (OPC). We showed further that 5-HT-induced immature OL death was mediated at least partially via 5-HT2A receptor, since cell death could be mimicked by 5-HT2A receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride, but atten-uated by pre-treatment with 5-HT2A receptor antagonist ritanserin. Utilizing a neuron-OL myelination co-culture model, our data showed that 5-HT exposure significantly reduced the number of myelinated internodes. In contrast to cell injury observed in pure OL cultures, 5-HT exposure did not lead to OL death or reduced OL density in neuron-OL co-cultures. However, abnormal

  20. Myelin basic protein gene contains separate enhancers for oligodendrocyte and Schwann cell expression

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The DNA sequence between position +36 and -1907 of the murine myelin basic protein gene contains the enhancer and promoter elements necessary for abundant and cell specific expression in transgenic mice. Surprisingly, the pattern of expression promoted by this DNA fragment is a subset of that exhibited by the endogenous myelin basic protein (MBP) gene. Fusion genes prepared with this promoter/enhancer and a Lac Z reporter gene are expressed only in oligodendrocytes and not in Schwann cells, whereas the endogenous MBP gene is expressed in both cell types. The level of transgene expression measured by nuclear run- on experiments is very substantial and rivals that of the endogenous MBP gene. Furthermore, this 1.9-kb DNA fragment directs transcription on the same (or very similar) developmental schedule as the endogenous gene. These results indicate that the MBP promoter/enhancer sequences are at least tripartite: a core promoter, the oligodendrocyte enhancer elements, and a third component that either expands the specificity of the oligodendrocyte enhancer to include Schwann cells or acts independently to specifically stimulate transcription in Schwann cells. PMID:1383235

  1. Protective Effect of Electroacupuncture on Neural Myelin Sheaths is Mediated via Promotion of Oligodendrocyte Proliferation and Inhibition of Oligodendrocyte Death After Compressed Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siqin; Tang, Chenglin; Sun, Shanquan; Cao, Wenfu; Qi, Wei; Xu, Jin; Huang, Juan; Lu, Weitian; Liu, Qian; Gong, Biao; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used worldwide to treat demyelinating diseases, but its therapeutic mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, a custom-designed model of compressed spinal cord injury (CSCI) was used to induce demyelination. Zusanli (ST36) and Taixi (KI3) acupoints of adult rats were stimulated by EA to demonstrate its protective effect. At 14 days after EA, both locomotor skills and ultrastructural features of myelin sheath were significantly improved. Phenotypes of proliferating cells were identified by double immunolabeling of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine with antibodies to cell markers: NG2 [oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) marker], 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) (oligodendrocyte marker), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (astrocyte marker). EA enhanced the proliferation of OPCs and CNPase, as well as the differentiation of OPCs by promoting Olig2 (the basic helix-loop-helix protein) and attenuating Id2 (the inhibitor of DNA binding 2). EA could also improve myelin basic protein (MBP) and protect existing oligodendrocytes from apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-12 (a representative of endoplasmic reticulum stress) and cytochrome c (an apoptotic factor and hallmark of mitochondria). Therefore, our results indicate that the protective effect of EA on neural myelin sheaths is mediated via promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation and inhibition of oligodendrocyte death after CSCI.

  2. miR-23 regulation of lamin B1 is crucial for oligodendrocyte development and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Ting; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Duplication of the gene encoding lamin B1 (LMNB1) with increased mRNA and protein levels has been shown to cause severe myelin loss in the brains of adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy patients. Similar to many neurodegenerative disorders, patients with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy are phenotypically normal until adulthood and the defect is specific to the central nervous system despite the ubiquitous expression pattern of lamin B1. We set out to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying this demyelinating phenotype. Increased lamin B1 expression results in disturbances of inner nuclear membrane proteins, chromatin organization and nuclear pore transport in vitro. It also leads to premature arrest of oligodendrocyte differentiation, which might be caused by reduced transcription of myelin genes and by mislocalization of myelin proteins. We identified the microRNA miR-23 as a negative regulator of lamin B1 that can ameliorate the consequences of excessive lamin B1 at the cellular level. Our results indicate that regulation of lamin B1 is important for myelin maintenance and that miR-23 contributes to this process, at least in part, by downregulating lamin B1, therefore establishing novel functions of lamin B1 and miR-23 in the regulation of oligodendroglia development and myelin formation in vitro. PMID:19259393

  3. Oligodendrocyte-encoded HIF function couples postnatal myelination and white matter angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Tracy J; Silbereis, John C; Griveau, Amelie; Chang, Sandra M; Daneman, Richard; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zahed, Hengameh; Maltepe, Emin; Rowitch, David H

    2014-07-17

    Myelin sheaths provide critical functional and trophic support for axons in white matter tracts of the brain. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) have extraordinary metabolic requirements during development as they differentiate to produce multiple myelin segments, implying that they must first secure adequate access to blood supply. However, mechanisms that coordinate myelination and angiogenesis are unclear. Here, we show that oxygen tension, mediated by OPC-encoded hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) function, is an essential regulator of postnatal myelination. Constitutive HIF1/2α stabilization resulted in OPC maturation arrest through autocrine activation of canonical Wnt7a/7b. Surprisingly, such OPCs also show paracrine activity that induces excessive postnatal white matter angiogenesis in vivo and directly stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Conversely, OPC-specific HIF1/2α loss of function leads to insufficient angiogenesis in corpus callosum and catastrophic axon loss. These findings indicate that OPC-intrinsic HIF signaling couples postnatal white matter angiogenesis, axon integrity, and the onset of myelination in mammalian forebrain.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates the response of myelinating oligodendrocytes to the immune cytokine interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2005-05-23

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is believed to contribute to immune-mediated demyelinating disorders by targeting the myelin-producing oligodendrocyte, a cell known to be highly sensitive to the disruption of protein synthesis and to the perturbation of the secretory pathway. We found that apoptosis induced by IFN-gamma in cultured rat oligodendrocytes was associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress also accompanied oligodendrocyte apoptosis and hypomyelination in transgenic mice that inappropriately expressed IFN-gamma in the central nervous system (CNS). Compared with a wild-type genetic background, the enforced expression of IFN-gamma in mice that were heterozygous for a loss of function mutation in pancreatic ER kinase (PERK) dramatically reduced animal survival, promoted CNS hypomyelination, and enhanced oligodendrocyte loss. PERK encodes an ER stress-inducible kinase that phosphorylates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha and specifically maintains client protein homeostasis in the stressed ER. Therefore, the hypersensitivity of PERK+/- mice to IFN-gamma implicates ER stress in demyelinating disorders that are induced by CNS inflammation. PMID:15911877

  5. Downregulation of the microtubule associated protein tau impairs process outgrowth and myelin basic protein mRNA transport in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Seiberlich, Veronika; Bauer, Nina G; Schwarz, Lisa; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin forming cells of the CNS, are characterized by their numerous membranous extensions, which enwrap neuronal axons and form myelin sheaths. During differentiation oligodendrocytes pass different morphological stages, downregulate the expression of the proteoglycan NG2, and acquire major myelin specific proteins, such as myelin basic proteins (MBP) and proteolipid protein. MBP mRNA is transported in RNA granules along the microtubules (MTs) to the periphery and translated locally. MTs participate in the elaboration and stabilization of the myelin forming extensions and are essential for cellular sorting processes. Their dynamic properties are regulated by microtubule associated proteins (MAPs). The MAP tau is present in oligodendrocytes and involved in the regulation and stabilization of the MT network. To further elucidate the functional significance of tau in oligodendrocytes, we have downregulated tau by siRNA technology and studied the effects on cell differentiation and neuron-glia contact formation. The data show that tau knockdown impairs process outgrowth and leads to a decrease in MBP expression. Furthermore, MBP mRNA transport to distant cellular extensions is impaired and cells remain in the NG2 stage. In myelinating cocultures with dorsal root ganglion neurons, oligodendrocyte precursor cells after tau miR RNA lentiviral knockdown develop into NG2 positive cells with very long and thin processes, contacting axons loosely, but fail to form internodes. This demonstrates that tau is important for MBP mRNA transport and involved in process formation. The disturbance of the balance of tau leads to abnormalities in oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuron-glia contact formation and the early myelination process.

  6. Differential roles of astrocyte and microglia in supporting oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yi; Fan, Lir-Wan; Tien, Lu-Tai; Dai, Xuemei; Zheng, Baoying; Cai, Zhengwei; Lin, Rick C S; Bhatt, Abhay

    2013-09-01

    Oligodendrocyte (OL) development relies on many extracellular cues, most of which are secreted cytokines from neighboring neural cells. Although it is generally accepted that both astrocytes and microglia are beneficial for OL development, there is a lack of understanding regarding whether astrocytes and microglia play similar or distinct roles. The current study examined the effects of astrocytes and microglia on OL developmental phenotypes including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination in vitro. Our data reveal that, although both astrocytes- and microglia-conditioned medium (ACDM and MCDM, respectively) protect OL progenitor cells (OPCs) against growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis, ACDM is significantly more effective than MCDM in supporting long-term OL survival. In contrast, MCDM preferentially promotes OL differentiation and myelination. These differential effects of ACDM and MCDM on OL development are highlighted by distinct pattern of cytokine/growth factors in the conditioned medium, which correlates with differentially activated intracellular signaling pathways in OPCs upon exposure to the conditioned medium.

  7. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 alters oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Díaz, Beatriz; Riquelme, Raquel; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Jiménez, Antonio Jesús; de Diego, Isabel; Gómez-Conde, Ana Isabel; Matas-Rico, Elisa; Aguirre, José Ángel; Chun, Jerold; Pedraza, Carmen; Santín, Luis Javier; Fernández, Oscar; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an intercellular signaling lipid that regulates multiple cellular functions, acting through specific G-protein coupled receptors (LPA(1-6)). Our previous studies using viable Malaga variant maLPA1-null mice demonstrated the requirement of the LPA1 receptor for normal proliferation, differentiation, and survival of the neuronal precursors. In the cerebral cortex LPA1 is expressed extensively in differentiating oligodendrocytes, in parallel with myelination. Although exogenous LPA-induced effects have been investigated in myelinating cells, the in vivo contribution of LPA1 to normal myelination remains to be demonstrated. This study identified a relevant in vivo role for LPA1 as a regulator of cortical myelination. Immunochemical analysis in adult maLPA1-null mice demonstrated a reduction in the steady-state levels of the myelin proteins MBP, PLP/DM20, and CNPase in the cerebral cortex. The myelin defects were confirmed using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Stereological analysis limited the defects to adult differentiating oligodendrocytes, without variation in the NG2+ precursor cells. Finally, a possible mechanism involving oligodendrocyte survival was demonstrated by the impaired intracellular transport of the PLP/DM20 myelin protein which was accompanied by cellular loss, suggesting stress-induced apoptosis. These findings describe a previously uncharacterized in vivo functional role for LPA1 in the regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the CNS, underlining the importance of the maLPA1-null mouse as a model for the study of demyelinating diseases. PMID:25226845

  8. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    PubMed

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination.

  9. Nanofibers Support Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Growth and Function as a Neuron-Free Model for Myelination Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Ceylan, Muhammet; Shrestha, Bikesh; Wang, Haibo; Lu, Q.Richard; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nanofiber-based scaffolds may simultaneously provide immediate contact guidance for neural regeneration and act as a vehicle for therapeutic cell delivery to enhance axonal myelination. Additionally, nanofibers can serve as a neuron-free model to study myelination of oligodendrocytes. In this study, we fabricated nanofibers using a polycaprolactone and gelatin co-polymer. The ratio of the gelatin component in the fibers was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The addition of gelatin to the polycaprolactone (PCL) for nanofiber fabrication decreased the contact angle of the electrospun fibers. We showed that both polycaprolactone nanofibers as well as polycaprolactone and gelatin co-polymer nanofibers can support oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) growth and differentiation. OPCs maintained their phenotype and viability on nanofibers and were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. The differentiated oligodendrocytes extend their processes along the nanofibers and ensheathed the nanofibers. Oligodendrocytes formed significantly more myelinated segments on the PCL and gelatin co3polymer nanofibers than those on PCL nanofibers alone. PMID:24304204

  10. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35−/− mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The development of oligodendrocytes and myelination is essential for normal CNS function and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is critical for oligodendrocyte maturation, but how Cdk5 activity is controlled is unclear. Here we show that the coactivators of Cdk5, p35 and p39, regulate distinct stages of oligodendrocyte development and myelination. Loss of p35 perturbs oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation, whereas loss of p39 delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Loss of both completely inhibits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Disruption of oligodendrocyte development was more pronounced in p35−/−;p39

  11. The Activators of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 p35 and p39 Are Essential for Oligodendrocyte Maturation, Process Formation, and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fucheng; Zhang, Jessie; Burke, Kathryn; Miller, Robert H; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation in the CNS is poorly defined. Multiple signals influence the rate and extent of CNS myelination, including the noncanonical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) whose functions are regulated by its activators p35 and p39. Here we show that selective loss of either p35 or p39 perturbed specific aspects of oligodendrocyte development, whereas loss of both p35 and p39 completely inhibited the development of mature oligodendrocytes and myelination. In the absence of p35, oligodendrocyte differentiation was delayed, process outgrowth was truncated in vitro, and the patterning and extent of myelination were perturbed in the CNS of p35(-/-) mice. In the absence of p39, oligodendrocyte maturation was transiently affected both in vitro and in vivo. However, loss of both p35 and p39 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells completely inhibited oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and myelination both in vitro and after transplantation into shiverer slice cultures. Loss of p35 and p39 had a more profound effect on oligodendrocyte development than simply the loss of Cdk5 and could not be rescued by Cdk5 overexpression. These data suggest p35 and p39 have specific and overlapping roles in oligodendrocyte development, some of which may be independent of Cdk5 activation.

  12. PTEN inhibitor bisperoxovanadium protects oligodendrocytes and myelin and prevents neuronal atrophy in adult rats following cervical hemicontusive spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Chandler L.; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) damages axons and motor neurons responsible for ipsilateral forelimb function and causes demyelination and oligodendrocyte death. Inhibition of the phosphatase and tensin homologue, PTEN, promotes neural cell survival, neuroprotection and regeneration in vivo and in vitro. PTEN inhibition can also promote oligodendrocyte-mediated myelination of axons in vitro likely through Akt activation. We recently demonstrated that acute treatment with phosphatase PTEN inhibitor, bisperoxovanadium (bpV)-pic reduced tissue damage, neuron death, and promoted functional recovery after cervical hemi-contusion SCI. Evidence suggests bpV can promote myelin stability; however, bpV effects on myelination and oligodendrocytes in contusive SCI models are unclear. We hypothesized that bpV could increase myelin around the injury site through sparing or remyelination, and that bpV treatment may promote increased numbers of oligodendrocytes. Using histological and immunofluorescence labeling, we found that bpV treatment promoted significant spared white matter (30%; p < 0.01) and Luxol Fast Blue (LFB)+ myelin area rostral (Veh: 0.56 ± 0.01 vs. bpV: 0.64 ± 0.02; p < 0.05) and at the epicenter (Veh: 0.4175 ± 0.03 vs. bpV: 0.5400 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). VLF oligodendrocytes were also significantly greater with bpV therapy (109 ± 5.3 vs. Veh: 77 ± 2.7/mm2; p < 0.01). In addition, bpV increased mean motor neuron soma area versus vehicle-treatment (1.0 ± 0.02 vs. Veh: 0.77 ± 0.02) relative to Sham neuron size. This study provides key insight into additional cell and tissue effects that could contribute to bpV-mediated functional recovery observed after contusive cervical SCI. PMID:24582904

  13. Myelin repair in vivo is increased by targeting oligodendrocyte precursor cells with nanoparticles encapsulating leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Rittchen, Sonja; Boyd, Amanda; Burns, Alasdair; Park, Jason; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Metcalfe, Su; Williams, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Many nerve axons are insulated by a myelin sheath and their demyelination not only prevents saltatory electrical signal conduction along the axons but also removes their metabolic support leading to irreversible neurodegeneration, which currently is untreatable. There is much interest in potential therapeutics that promote remyelination and here we explore use of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a cytokine known to play a key regulatory role in self-tolerant immunity and recently identified as a pro-myelination factor. In this study, we tested a nanoparticle-based strategy for targeted delivery of LIF to oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) to promote their differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes able to repair myelin. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based nanoparticles of ∼120 nm diameter were constructed with LIF as cargo (LIF-NP) with surface antibodies against NG-2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, expressed on OPC. In vitro, NG2-targeted LIF-NP bound to OPCs, activated pSTAT-3 signalling and induced OPC differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. In vivo, using a model of focal CNS demyelination, we show that NG2-targeted LIF-NP increased myelin repair, both at the level of increased number of myelinated axons, and increased thickness of myelin per axon. Potency was high: a single NP dose delivering picomolar quantities of LIF is sufficient to increase remyelination. Impact statement Nanotherapy-based delivery of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) directly to OPCs proved to be highly potent in promoting myelin repair in vivo: this delivery strategy introduces a novel approach to delivering drugs or biologics targeted to myelin repair in diseases such as MS. PMID:25934281

  14. Myelin repair in vivo is increased by targeting oligodendrocyte precursor cells with nanoparticles encapsulating leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Rittchen, Sonja; Boyd, Amanda; Burns, Alasdair; Park, Jason; Fahmy, Tarek M; Metcalfe, Su; Williams, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Many nerve axons are insulated by a myelin sheath and their demyelination not only prevents saltatory electrical signal conduction along the axons but also removes their metabolic support leading to irreversible neurodegeneration, which currently is untreatable. There is much interest in potential therapeutics that promote remyelination and here we explore use of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a cytokine known to play a key regulatory role in self-tolerant immunity and recently identified as a pro-myelination factor. In this study, we tested a nanoparticle-based strategy for targeted delivery of LIF to oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) to promote their differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes able to repair myelin. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based nanoparticles of ∼120 nm diameter were constructed with LIF as cargo (LIF-NP) with surface antibodies against NG-2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, expressed on OPC. In vitro, NG2-targeted LIF-NP bound to OPCs, activated pSTAT-3 signalling and induced OPC differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes. In vivo, using a model of focal CNS demyelination, we show that NG2-targeted LIF-NP increased myelin repair, both at the level of increased number of myelinated axons, and increased thickness of myelin per axon. Potency was high: a single NP dose delivering picomolar quantities of LIF is sufficient to increase remyelination. Impact statement Nanotherapy-based delivery of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) directly to OPCs proved to be highly potent in promoting myelin repair in vivo: this delivery strategy introduces a novel approach to delivering drugs or biologics targeted to myelin repair in diseases such as MS.

  15. Down Syndrome Developmental Brain Transcriptome Reveals Defective Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Kang, Hyo Jung; Tyler, William A; Silbereis, John C; Cheng, Feng; Zhu, Ying; Pletikos, Mihovil; Jankovic-Rapan, Lucija; Cramer, Nathan P; Galdzicki, Zygmunt; Goodliffe, Joseph; Peters, Alan; Sethares, Claire; Delalle, Ivana; Golden, Jeffrey A; Haydar, Tarik F; Sestan, Nenad

    2016-03-16

    Trisomy 21, or Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of developmental delay and intellectual disability. To gain insight into the underlying molecular and cellular pathogenesis, we conducted a multi-region transcriptome analysis of DS and euploid control brains spanning from mid-fetal development to adulthood. We found genome-wide alterations in the expression of a large number of genes, many of which exhibited temporal and spatial specificity and were associated with distinct biological processes. In particular, we uncovered co-dysregulation of genes associated with oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that were validated via cross-species comparison to Ts65Dn trisomy mice. Furthermore, we show that hypomyelination present in Ts65Dn mice is in part due to cell-autonomous effects of trisomy on oligodendrocyte differentiation and results in slower neocortical action potential transmission. Together, these results identify defects in white matter development and function in DS, and they provide a transcriptional framework for further investigating DS neuropathogenesis. PMID:26924435

  16. Myelinating satellite oligodendrocytes are integrated in a glial syncytium constraining neuronal high-frequency activity

    PubMed Central

    Battefeld, Arne; Klooster, Jan; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite oligodendrocytes (s-OLs) are closely apposed to the soma of neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons but their properties and functional roles remain unresolved. Here we show that s-OLs form compact myelin and action potentials of the host neuron evoke precisely timed Ba2+-sensitive K+ inward rectifying (Kir) currents in the s-OL. Unexpectedly, the glial K+ inward current does not require oligodendrocytic Kir4.1. Action potential-evoked Kir currents are in part mediated by gap–junction coupling with neighbouring OLs and astrocytes that form a syncytium around the pyramidal cell body. Computational modelling predicts that glial Kir constrains the perisomatic [K+]o increase most importantly during high-frequency action potentials. Consistent with these predictions neurons with s-OLs showed a reduced probability for action potential burst firing during [K+]o elevations. These data suggest that s-OLs are integrated into a glial syncytium for the millisecond rapid K+ uptake limiting activity-dependent [K+]o increase in the perisomatic neuron domain. PMID:27161034

  17. NMDA receptor signaling in oligodendrocyte progenitors is not required for oligodendrogenesis and myelination

    PubMed Central

    De Biase, L. M.; Kang, S. H.; Baxi, E. G.; Fukaya, M.; Pucak, M. L.; Mishina, M.; Calabresi, P. A.; Bergles, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) express NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and form synapses with glutamatergic neurons throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Although glutamate influences the proliferation and maturation of these progenitors in vitro, the role of NMDAR signaling in oligodendrogenesis and myelination in vivo is not known. Here, we investigated the consequences of genetically deleting the obligatory NMDAR subunit NR1 from OPCs and their oligodendrocyte progeny in the CNS of developing and mature mice. NMDAR-deficient OPCs proliferated normally, achieved appropriate densities in gray and white matter, and differentiated to form major white matter tracts without delay. OPCs also retained their characteristic physiological and morphological properties in the absence of NMDAR signaling, and were able to form synapses with glutamatergic axons. However, expression of calcium permeable AMPA receptors was enhanced in NMDAR-deficient OPCs. These results suggest that NMDAR signaling is not used to control OPC development, but to regulate AMPAR-dependent signaling with surrounding axons, pointing to additional functions for these ubiquitous glial cells. PMID:21880926

  18. Myelin-specific proteins: a structurally diverse group of membrane-interacting molecules.

    PubMed

    Han, Huijong; Myllykoski, Matti; Ruskamo, Salla; Wang, Chaozhan; Kursula, Petri

    2013-01-01

    The myelin sheath is a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, which has unique biochemical properties. Myelin carries a set of specific high-abundance proteins, the structure and function of which are still poorly understood. The proteins of the myelin sheath are involved in a number of neurological diseases, including autoimmune diseases and inherited neuropathies. In this review, we briefly discuss the structural properties and functions of selected myelin-specific proteins (P0, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, myelin-associated glycoprotein, myelin basic protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein, P2, proteolipid protein, peripheral myelin protein of 22 kDa, 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, and periaxin); such properties include, for example, interactions with lipid bilayers and the presence of large intrinsically disordered regions in some myelin proteins. A detailed understanding of myelin protein structure and function at the molecular level will be required to fully grasp their physiological roles in the myelin sheath.

  19. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and expression of myelin - Related mRNA in ventral prefrontal white matter in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; Mahajan, Gouri; Maciag, Dorota; Sathyanesan, Monica; Iyo, Abiye H; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Kyle, Patrick B; Woolverton, William L; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Stockmeier, Craig A; Newton, Samuel S

    2015-06-01

    White matter disturbance in the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been noted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, the cellular and molecular pathology of prefrontal white matter in MDD and potential influence of antidepressant medications is not fully understood. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and myelin-related mRNA and protein expression was examined in the white matter of the vPFC in MDD. Sections of deep and gyral white matter from the vPFC were collected from 20 subjects with MDD and 16 control subjects. Density and size of CNPase-immunoreactive (-IR) oligodendrocytes were estimated using 3-dimensional cell counting. While neither density nor soma size of oligodendrocytes was significantly affected in deep white matter, soma size was significantly decreased in the gyral white matter in MDD. In rhesus monkeys treated chronically with fluoxetine there was no significant effect on oligodendrocyte morphometry. Using quantitative RT-PCR to measure oligodendrocyte-related mRNA for CNPase, PLP1, MBP, MOG, MOBP, Olig1 and Olig2, in MDD there was a significantly reduced expression of PLP1 mRNA (which positively correlated with smaller sizes) and increased expression of mRNA for CNPase, OLIG1 and MOG. The expression of CNPase protein was significantly decreased in MDD. Altered expression of four myelin genes and CNPase protein suggests a mechanism for the degeneration of cortical axons and dysfunctional maturation of oligodendrocytes in MDD. The change in oligodendrocyte morphology in gyral white matter may parallel altered axonal integrity as revealed by DTI.

  20. Oligodendrocyte Morphometry and Expression of Myelin – Related mRNA in Ventral Prefrontal White Matter in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; Mahajan, Gouri; Maciag, Dorota; Sathyanesan, Monica; Iyo, Abiye H.; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Kyle, Patrick B.; Woolverton, William L.; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier; Stockmeier, Craig A.; Newton, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    White matter disturbance in the ventral prefrontal cortex (vPFC) in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been noted with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, the cellular and molecular pathology of prefrontal white matter in MDD and potential influence of antidepressant medications is not fully understood. Oligodendrocyte morphometry and myelin-related mRNA and protein expression was examined in the white matter of the vPFC in MDD. Sections of deep and gyral white matter from the vPFC were collected from 20 subjects with MDD and 16 control subjects. Density and size of CNPase-immunoreactive (−IR) oligodendrocytes were estimated using 3-dimensional cell counting. While neither density nor soma size of oligodendrocytes was significantly affected in deep white matter, soma size was significantly decreased in the gyral white matter in MDD. In rhesus monkeys treated chronically with fluoxetine there was no significant effect on oligodendrocyte morphometry. Using quantitative RTPCR to measure oligodendrocyte-related mRNA for CNPase, PLP1, MBP, MOG, MOBP, Olig1 and Olig2, in MDD there was a significantly reduced expression of PLP1 mRNA (which positively correlated with smaller sizes) and increased expression of mRNA for CNPase, OLIG1 and MOG. The expression of CNPase protein was significantly decreased in MDD. Altered expression of four myelin genes and CNPase protein suggests a mechanism for the degeneration of cortical axons and dysfunctional maturation of oligodendrocytes in MDD. The change in oligodendrocyte morphology in gyral white matter may parallel altered axonal integrity as revealed by DTI. PMID:25930075

  1. Major isoform of zebrafish P0 is a 23.5 kDa myelin glycoprotein expressed in selected white matter tracts of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bai, Qing; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna B; Burton, Edward A

    2011-06-01

    The zebrafish mpz gene, encoding the ortholog of mammalian myelin protein zero, is expressed in oligodendrocytes of the zebrafish central nervous system (CNS). The putative gene product, P0, has been implicated in promoting axonal regeneration in addition to its proposed structural functions in compact myelin. We raised novel zebrafish P0-specific antibodies and established that P0 is a 23.5 kDa glycoprotein containing a 3 kDa N-linked carbohydrate moiety. P0 was localized to myelin sheaths surrounding axons, but was not detected in the cell bodies or proximal processes of oligodendrocytes. Many white matter tracts in the adult zebrafish CNS were robustly immunoreactive for P0, including afferent visual and olfactory pathways, commissural and longitudinal tracts of the brain, and selected ascending and descending tracts of the spinal cord. P0 was first detected during development in premyelinating oligodendrocytes of the ventral hindbrain at 48 hours postfertilization (hpf). By 72 hpf, short segments of longitudinally oriented P0-immunoreactive myelinating axons were seen in the hindbrain; expression in the spinal cord, optic pathways, hindbrain commissures, midbrain, and peripheral nervous system followed. The mpz transcript was found to be alternatively spliced, giving rise to P0 isoforms with alternative C-termini. The 23.5 kDa isoform was most abundant in the CNS, but other isoforms predominated in the myelin sheath surrounding the Mauthner axon. These data provide a detailed account of P0 expression and demonstrate novel P0 isoforms, which may have discrete functional properties. The restriction of P0 immunoreactivity to myelin sheaths indicates that the protein is subject to stringent intracellular compartmentalization, which likely occurs through posttranslational mechanisms.

  2. How big is the myelinating orchestra? Cellular diversity within the oligodendrocyte lineage: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Fossati, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Since monumental studies from scientists like His, Ramón y Cajal, Lorente de Nó and many others have put down roots for modern neuroscience, the scientific community has spent a considerable amount of time, and money, investigating any possible aspect of the evolution, development and function of neurons. Today, the complexity and diversity of myriads of neuronal populations, and their progenitors, is still focus of extensive studies in hundreds of laboratories around the world. However, our prevalent neuron-centric perspective has dampened the efforts in understanding glial cells, even though their active participation in the brain physiology and pathophysiology has been increasingly recognized over the years. Among all glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes (OLs) are a particularly specialized type of cells that provide fundamental support to neuronal activity by producing the myelin sheath. Despite their functional relevance, the developmental mechanisms regulating the generation of OLs are still poorly understood. In particular, it is still not known whether these cells share the same degree of heterogeneity of their neuronal companions and whether multiple subtypes exist within the lineage. Here, we will review and discuss current knowledge about OL development and function in the brain and spinal cord. We will try to address some specific questions: do multiple OL subtypes exist in the CNS? What is the evidence for their existence and those against them? What are the functional features that define an oligodendrocyte? We will end our journey by reviewing recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards OLs. This exciting field is still at its earliest days, but it is quickly evolving with improved protocols to generate functional OLs from different spatial origins. As stem cells constitute now an unprecedented source of human OLs, we believe that they will become an increasingly valuable tool for deciphering

  3. Oligodendrocyte precursor cell-intrinsic effect of Rheb1 controls differentiation and mediates mTORC1-dependent myelination in brain.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jiang, Wanxiang; Wang, Jianqing; Li, Zhongping; Zhang, Junyan; Bu, Jicheng; Zou, Jia; Zhou, Liang; Yu, Shouyang; Cui, Yiyuan; Yang, Weiwei; Luo, Liping; Lu, Qing R; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Mina; Worley, Paul F; Xiao, Bo

    2014-11-19

    Rheb1 is an immediate early gene that functions to activate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) selectively in complex 1 (mTORC1). We have demonstrated previously that Rheb1 is essential for myelination in the CNS using a Nestin-Cre driver line that deletes Rheb1 in all neural cell lineages, and recent studies using oligodendrocyte-specific CNP-Cre have suggested a preferential role for mTORC1 is myelination in the spinal cord. Here, we examine the role of Rheb1/mTORC1 in mouse oligodendrocyte lineage using separate Cre drivers for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) including Olig1-Cre and Olig2-Cre as well as differentiated and mature oligodendrocytes including CNP-Cre and Tmem10-Cre. Deletion of Rheb1 in OPCs impairs their differentiation to mature oligodendrocytes. This is accompanied by reduced OPC cell-cycle exit suggesting a requirement for Rheb1 in OPC differentiation. The effect of Rheb1 on OPC differentiation is mediated by mTor since Olig1-Cre deletion of mTor phenocopies Olig1-Cre Rheb1 deletion. Deletion of Rheb1 in mature oligodendrocytes, in contrast, does not disrupt developmental myelination or myelin maintenance. Loss of Rheb1 in OPCs or neural progenitors does not affect astrocyte formation in gray and white matter, as indicated by the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1L1. We conclude that OPC-intrinsic mTORC1 activity mediated by Rheb1 is critical for differentiation of OPCs to mature oligodendrocytes, but that mature oligodendrocytes do not require Rheb1 to make myelin or maintain it in the adult brain. These studies reveal mechanisms that may be relevant for both developmental myelination and impaired remyelination in myelin disease.

  4. Nf1 Loss and Ras Hyperactivation in Oligodendrocytes Induce NOS-Driven Defects in Myelin and Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Debra A.; Rizvi, Tilat A.; Titus-Mitchell, Haley; Oberst, Rachel; Ciraolo, Georgianne M.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Robinson, Andrew P.; Miller, Stephen D.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Ratner, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and Costello syndrome Rasopathy have behavioral deficits. In NF1 patients, these may correlate with white matter enlargement and aberrant myelin. To model these features, we induced Nf1 loss or HRas hyperactivation in mouse oligodendrocytes. Enlarged brain white matter tracts correlated with myelin decompaction, downregulation of claudin-11, and mislocalization of connexin-32. Surprisingly, non-cell-autonomous defects in perivascular astrocytes and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) developed, implicating a soluble mediator. Nitric oxide (NO) can disrupt tight junctions and gap junctions, and NO and NO synthases (NOS1–NOS3) were upregulated in mutant white matter. Treating mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine corrected cellular phenotypes. CNP-HRasG12V mice also displayed locomotor hyperactivity, which could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that Nf1/Ras regulates oligodendrocyte NOS and that dysregulated NO signaling in oligodendrocytes can alter the surrounding vasculature. The data suggest that anti-oxidants may improve some behavioral deficits in Rasopathy patients. PMID:24035394

  5. Regulation of PERK–eIF2α signalling by tuberous sclerosis complex-1 controls homoeostasis and survival of myelinating oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Minqing; Liu, Lei; He, Xuelian; Wang, Haibo; Lin, Wensheng; Wang, Huimin; Yoon, Sung O.; Wood, Teresa L.; Lu, Q. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex-1 or 2 (TSC1/2) mutations cause white matter abnormalities, including myelin deficits in the CNS; however, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. TSC1/2 negatively regulate the function of mTOR, which is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we report that, unexpectedly, constitutive activation of mTOR signalling by Tsc1 deletion in the oligodendrocyte lineage results in severe myelination defects and oligodendrocyte cell death in mice, despite an initial increase of oligodendrocyte precursors during early development. Expression profiling analysis reveals that Tsc1 ablation induces prominent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses by activating a PERK–eIF2α signalling axis and Fas–JNK apoptotic pathways. Enhancement of the phospho-eIF2α adaptation pathway by inhibition of Gadd34-PP1 phosphatase with guanabenz protects oligodendrocytes and partially rescues myelination defects in Tsc1 mutants. Thus, TSC1-mTOR signalling acts as an important checkpoint for maintaining oligodendrocyte homoeostasis, pointing to a previously uncharacterized ER stress mechanism that contributes to hypomyelination in tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27416896

  6. Regulation of PERK-eIF2α signalling by tuberous sclerosis complex-1 controls homoeostasis and survival of myelinating oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Minqing; Liu, Lei; He, Xuelian; Wang, Haibo; Lin, Wensheng; Wang, Huimin; Yoon, Sung O; Wood, Teresa L; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-07-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex-1 or 2 (TSC1/2) mutations cause white matter abnormalities, including myelin deficits in the CNS; however, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. TSC1/2 negatively regulate the function of mTOR, which is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we report that, unexpectedly, constitutive activation of mTOR signalling by Tsc1 deletion in the oligodendrocyte lineage results in severe myelination defects and oligodendrocyte cell death in mice, despite an initial increase of oligodendrocyte precursors during early development. Expression profiling analysis reveals that Tsc1 ablation induces prominent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses by activating a PERK-eIF2α signalling axis and Fas-JNK apoptotic pathways. Enhancement of the phospho-eIF2α adaptation pathway by inhibition of Gadd34-PP1 phosphatase with guanabenz protects oligodendrocytes and partially rescues myelination defects in Tsc1 mutants. Thus, TSC1-mTOR signalling acts as an important checkpoint for maintaining oligodendrocyte homoeostasis, pointing to a previously uncharacterized ER stress mechanism that contributes to hypomyelination in tuberous sclerosis.

  7. Regulation of PERK-eIF2α signalling by tuberous sclerosis complex-1 controls homoeostasis and survival of myelinating oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Minqing; Liu, Lei; He, Xuelian; Wang, Haibo; Lin, Wensheng; Wang, Huimin; Yoon, Sung O; Wood, Teresa L; Lu, Q Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex-1 or 2 (TSC1/2) mutations cause white matter abnormalities, including myelin deficits in the CNS; however, underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. TSC1/2 negatively regulate the function of mTOR, which is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we report that, unexpectedly, constitutive activation of mTOR signalling by Tsc1 deletion in the oligodendrocyte lineage results in severe myelination defects and oligodendrocyte cell death in mice, despite an initial increase of oligodendrocyte precursors during early development. Expression profiling analysis reveals that Tsc1 ablation induces prominent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses by activating a PERK-eIF2α signalling axis and Fas-JNK apoptotic pathways. Enhancement of the phospho-eIF2α adaptation pathway by inhibition of Gadd34-PP1 phosphatase with guanabenz protects oligodendrocytes and partially rescues myelination defects in Tsc1 mutants. Thus, TSC1-mTOR signalling acts as an important checkpoint for maintaining oligodendrocyte homoeostasis, pointing to a previously uncharacterized ER stress mechanism that contributes to hypomyelination in tuberous sclerosis. PMID:27416896

  8. CXXC5 plays a role as a transcription activator for myelin genes on oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Hong, Jiso; Kim, Daesoo; Lee, Hyojung; Cheong, Eunji; Lee, Yangsin; Roth, Jürgen; Kim, Dong Goo; Min, Do Sik; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2016-03-01

    Myelination in corpus callosum plays important role for normal brain functions by transferring neurological information between various brain regions. However, the factors controlling expression of myelin genes in myelination are poorly understood. Here, CXXC5, a recently identified protein with CXXC-type zinc finger DNA binding motif, was characterized as a transcriptional activator of major myelin genes. We identified expression of CXXC5 expression was increased by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. CXXC5 specifically expressed in the white matter induced expression of myelin genes through the direct binding of CXXC DNA-binding motif of CXXC5 on the MBP promoter. During the differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) of CXXC5(-/-) mice, the expressions of myelin genes were simultaneously reduced. The CXXC5(-/-) mice exhibited severely reduction of myelin genes expression in corpus callosum as well as abnormalities in myelin structure. The disrupted structural integrity of myelin in the CXXC5(-/-) mice resulted in reduced electrical conduction amplitudes at corpus callosum. These findings indicate that the regulation of myelin genes expression by CXXC5 is important for forming myelin structure involved with axonal electrical signal transfer in the corpus callosum.

  9. Transplanted transgenically marked oligodendrocytes survive, migrate and myelinate in the normal mouse brain as they do in the shiverer mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, F; Duhamel-Clerin, E; Gansmüller, A; Baron-Van Evercooren, A; Villarroya, H; Gumpel, M

    1994-05-01

    The dye Hoechst 33342 was combined with an immunodetectable transgene product (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, CAT) expressed in differentiated oligodendrocytes to trace their fate after transplantation in the normal and the shiverer mouse brain. In the shiverer brain, the technique allowed us to visualize grafted cells inside myelin basic protein-positive myelin patches. Most of these cells were CAT-positive/Hoechst 33342-negative, reinforcing our hypothesis that cell division probably follows migration of grafted oligodendrocytes. Correlation of their morphology and distribution with their location in the host CNS suggested a local effect on the cell division and morphogenesis of the grafted material. When compared with transplantation of fragments of normal newborn donor tissue into the newborn shiverer brain, no difference could be seen between the behaviour of normal and transgenic oligodendrocytes. In the normal brain, transgenic oligodendrocytes survived at least 150 days and successfully myelinated the host axons. The timing of differentiation of grafted cells was similar in both types of recipient brains. Migration occurred rostrally and caudally. Although migrating cells could be observed along the meninges and the blood vessels, migration occurred preferentially along white matter tracts. The extent of migration was influenced by the site of implantation, and grafted cells could be found up to 6 mm from the grafting point. No differences in the timing of differentiation or the pattern or extent of migration could thus be demonstrated when transgenic oligodendrocytes were transplanted in the normal or the shiverer brain. This validates our previous studies using the newborn shiverer mouse as recipient.

  10. Differential regulation of oligodendrocyte markers by glucocorticoids: Post-transcriptional regulation of both proteolipid protein and myelin basic protein and transcriptional regulation of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Cole, R.; Chiappelli, F.; De Vellis, J. )

    1989-09-01

    During neonatal development glucocorticoids potentiate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelinogenesis by regulating the expression of myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The actual locus at which hydrocortisone exerts its developmental influence on glial physiology is, however, not well understood. Gycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is glucocorticoid-inducible in oligodendrocytes at all stages of development both in vivo and in vitro. In newborn rat cerebral cultures, between 9 and 15 days in vitro, a 2- to 3-fold increase in myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein mRNA levels occurs in oligodendrocytes within 12 hr of hydrocortisone treatment. Immunostaining demonstrates that this increase in mRNAs is followed by a 2- to 3-fold increase in the protein levels within 24 hr. In vitro transcription assays performed with oligodendrocyte nuclei show an 11-fold increase in the transcriptional activity of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase in response to hydrocortisone but no increase in transcription of myelin basic protein or proteolipid protein. These results indicate that during early myelinogeneis, glucocorticoids influence the expression of key oligodendroglial markers by different processes: The expression of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas the expression of myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein is modulated via a different, yet uncharacterized, mechanism involving post-transcriptional regulation.

  11. Binding partners for the myelin-associated glycoprotein of N2A neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Kelm, S

    1999-02-01

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has been proposed to be important for the integrity of myelinated axons. For a better understanding of the interactions involved in the binding of MAG to neuronal axons, we performed this study to identify the binding partners for MAG on neuronal cells. Experiments with glycosylation inhibitors revealed that sialylated N-glycans of glycoproteins represent the major binding sites for MAG on the neuroblastoma cell line N2A. From extracts of [3H]glucosamine-labelled N2A cells several glycoproteins with molecular weights between 20 and 230 kDa were affinity-precipitated using immobilised MAG. The interactions of these proteins with MAG were sialic acid-dependent and specific for MAG. PMID:10037148

  12. Connexin-47 and connexin-32 in gap junctions of oligodendrocyte somata, myelin sheaths, paranodal loops and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures: implications for ionic homeostasis and potassium siphoning.

    PubMed

    Kamasawa, N; Sik, A; Morita, M; Yasumura, T; Davidson, K G V; Nagy, J I; Rash, J E

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions and co-associations of the gap junction-forming proteins connexin 47 and connexin 32 were investigated in oligodendrocytes of adult mouse and rat CNS. By confocal immunofluorescence light microscopy, abundant connexin 47 was co-localized with astrocytic connexin 43 on oligodendrocyte somata, and along myelinated fibers, whereas connexin 32 without connexin 47 was co-localized with contactin-associated protein (caspr) in paranodes. By thin-section transmission electron microscopy, connexin 47 immunolabeling was on the oligodendrocyte side of gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocytes. By freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling, large gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocyte processes contained much more connexin 47 than connexin 32. Along surfaces of internodal myelin, connexin 47 was several times as abundant as connexin 32, and in the smallest gap junctions, often occurred without connexin 32. In contrast, connexin 32 was localized without connexin 47 in newly-described autologous gap junctions in Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and between paranodal loops bordering nodes of Ranvier. Thus, connexin 47 in adult rodent CNS is the most abundant connexin in most heterologous oligodendrocyte-to-astrocyte gap junctions, whereas connexin 32 is the predominant if not sole connexin in autologous ("reflexive") oligodendrocyte gap junctions. These results clarify the locations and connexin compositions of heterologous and autologous oligodendrocyte gap junctions, identify autologous gap junctions at paranodes as potential sites for modulating paranodal electrical properties, and reveal connexin 47-containing and connexin 32-containing gap junctions as conduits for long-distance intracellular and intercellular movement of ions and associated osmotic water. The autologous gap junctions may regulate paranodal electrical properties during saltatory conduction. Acting in series and in parallel, autologous and

  13. Characterization of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in the mouse cerebral cortex: a confocal microscopy approach to demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Strippoli, Maurizio; Errede, Mariella; Benagiano, Vincenzo; Roncali, Luisa; Ambrosi, Glauco; Virgintino, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The identification of stem cells resident in the adult central nervous system has redirected the focus of research into demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, mainly affecting the brain white matter. This immunocytochemical and morphometrical study was carried out by confocal microscopy in the adult mouse cerebral cortex, with the aim of analysing, in the brain grey matter, the characteristics of the oligodendrocyte lineage cells, whose capability to remyelinate is still controversial. The observations demonstrated the presence in all the cortex layers of glial restricted progenitors, reactive to A2B5 marker, oligodendrocyte precursor cells, expressing the NG2 proteoglycan, and pre-oligodendrocytes and pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes, reactive to the specific marker O4. NG2 expressing cells constitute the major immature population of the cortex, since not only oligodendrocyte precursor cells and pre-oligodendrocytes but also a part of the glial restrict progenitors express the NG2 proteoglycan. Together with the population of these immature cells, a larger population of mature oligodendrocytes was revealed by the classical oligodendrocyte and myelin markers, 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The results indicate that oligodendrocyte precursors committed to differentiate into myelin forming oligodendrocytes are present through all layers of the adult cortex and that their phenotypic features exactly recall those of the oligodendroglial lineage cells during development.

  14. Myelin-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte precursor differentiation can be overcome by pharmacological modulation of Fyn-RhoA and protein kinase C signalling

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Alexandra S.; Syed, Yasir A.; Kang, Sung Ung; Mitteregger, Dieter; Vig, Raluca; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Altmann, Friedrich; Lubec, Gert

    2009-01-01

    Failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation contributes significantly to failed myelin sheath regeneration (remyelination) in chronic demyelinating diseases. Although the reasons for this failure are not completely understood, several lines of evidence point to factors present following demyelination that specifically inhibit differentiation of cells capable of generating remyelinating oligodendrocytes. We have previously demonstrated that myelin debris generated by demyelination inhibits remyelination by inhibiting OPC differentiation and that the inhibitory effects are associated with myelin proteins. In the present study, we narrow down the spectrum of potential protein candidates by proteomic analysis of inhibitory protein fractions prepared by CM and HighQ column chromatography followed by BN/SDS/SDS–PAGE gel separation using Nano-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry. We show that the inhibitory effects on OPC differentiation mediated by myelin are regulated by Fyn-RhoA-ROCK signalling as well as by modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) signalling. We demonstrate that pharmacological or siRNA-mediated inhibition of RhoA-ROCK-II and/or PKC signalling can induce OPC differentiation in the presence of myelin. Our results, which provide a mechanistic link between myelin, a mediator of OPC differentiation inhibition associated with demyelinating pathologies and specific signalling pathways amenable to pharmacological manipulation, are therefore of significant potential value for future strategies aimed at enhancing CNS remyelination. PMID:19208690

  15. TGFβ signaling regulates the timing of CNS myelination by modulating oligodendrocyte progenitor cell cycle exit through SMAD3/4/FoxO1/Sp1.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Klingener, Michael; Aguirre, Adan

    2014-06-01

    Research on myelination has focused on identifying molecules capable of inducing oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation in an effort to develop strategies that promote functional myelin regeneration in demyelinating disorders. Here, we show that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is crucial for allowing oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cell cycle withdrawal, and therefore, for oligodendrogenesis and postnatal CNS myelination. Enhanced oligodendrogenesis and subcortical white matter (SCWM) myelination was detected after TGFβ gain of function, while TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) deletion in OPs prevents their development into mature myelinating OLs, leading to SCWM hypomyelination in mice. TGFβ signaling modulates OP cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation through the transcriptional modulation of c-myc and p21 gene expression, mediated by the interaction of SMAD3/4 with Sp1 and FoxO1 transcription factors. Our study is the first to demonstrate an autonomous and crucial role of TGFβ signaling in OL development and CNS myelination, and may provide new avenues in the treatment of demyelinating diseases.

  16. TGFβ Signaling Regulates the Timing of CNS Myelination by Modulating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Cycle Exit through SMAD3/4/FoxO1/Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Palazuelos, Javier; Klingener, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Research on myelination has focused on identifying molecules capable of inducing oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation in an effort to develop strategies that promote functional myelin regeneration in demyelinating disorders. Here, we show that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is crucial for allowing oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cell cycle withdrawal, and therefore, for oligodendrogenesis and postnatal CNS myelination. Enhanced oligodendrogenesis and subcortical white matter (SCWM) myelination was detected after TGFβ gain of function, while TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) deletion in OPs prevents their development into mature myelinating OLs, leading to SCWM hypomyelination in mice. TGFβ signaling modulates OP cell cycle withdrawal and differentiation through the transcriptional modulation of c-myc and p21 gene expression, mediated by the interaction of SMAD3/4 with Sp1 and FoxO1 transcription factors. Our study is the first to demonstrate an autonomous and crucial role of TGFβ signaling in OL development and CNS myelination, and may provide new avenues in the treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:24899714

  17. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M.; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J. P.; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J.; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Peles, Elior

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  18. Fibronectin is a binding partner for the myelin-associated glycoprotein (siglec-4a).

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Brossmer, R; Ihrig, P; Schauer, R; Kelm, S

    2001-06-22

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) mediates cell-cell interactions between myelinating glial cells and neurons. Here we describe the extracellular matrix glycoprotein fibronectin as a binding partner of MAG. It has been identified by affinity precipitation with MAG-Fc from NG108-15 cells and by microsequencing of two peptides derived from a 210-kDa protein band. Western blot analysis showed that fibronectin is also present in MAG binding partners isolated from N(2)A (murine neuroblastoma) cells, rat brain and rat spinal cord. Different fibronectin isoforms have been isolated from brains of young and adult rats, indicating that the expression of MAG binding fibronectin changes during development. PMID:11423128

  19. Expression of proteolipid protein gene in spinal cord stem cells and early oligodendrocyte progenitor cells is dispensable for normal cell migration and myelination.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Saul, Katherine E; Culp, Cecilia M; Vesely, Elisa M; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-01-22

    Plp1 gene expression occurs very early in development, well before the onset of myelination, creating a conundrum with regard to the function of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), one of the major proteins in compact myelin. Using PLP-EGFP mice to investigate Plp1 promoter activity, we found that, at very early time points, PLP-EGFP was expressed in Sox2+ undifferentiated precursors in the spinal cord ventricular zone (VZ), as well as in the progenitors of both neuronal and glial lineages. As development progressed, most PLP-EGFP-expressing cells gave rise to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). The expression of PLP-EGFP in the spinal cord was quite dynamic during development. PLP-EGFP was highly expressed as cells delaminated from the VZ. Expression was downregulated as cells moved laterally through the cord, and then robustly upregulated as OPCs differentiated into mature myelinating oligodendrocytes. The presence of PLP-EGFP expression in OPCs raises the question of its role in this migratory population. We crossed PLP-EGFP reporter mice into a Plp1-null background to investigate the role of PLP in early OPC development. In the absence of PLP, normal numbers of OPCs were generated and their distribution throughout the spinal cord was unaffected. However, the orientation and length of OPC processes during migration was abnormal in Plp1-null mice, suggesting that PLP plays a role either in the structural integrity of OPC processes or in their response to extracellular cues that orient process outgrowth.

  20. IKAP/hELP1 deficiency in the cerebrum of familial dysautonomia patients results in down regulation of genes involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation and in myelination.

    PubMed

    Cheishvili, David; Maayan, Channa; Smith, Yoav; Ast, Gil; Razin, Aharon

    2007-09-01

    The gene affected in the congenital neuropathy familial dysautonomia (FD) is IKBKAP that codes for the IKAP/hELP1 protein. Several different functions have been suggested for this protein, but none of them have been verified in vivo or shown to have some link with the FD phenotype. In an attempt to elucidate the involvement of IKAP/hELP1 in brain function, we searched for IKAP/hELP1 target genes associated with neuronal function. In a microarray expression analysis using RNA extracted from the cerebrum of two FD patients as well as sex and age matched controls, no genes were found to be upregulated in the FD cerebrum. However, 25 genes were downregulated more than 2-fold in the cerebrum of both the male FD child and female FD mature woman. Thirteen of them are known to be involved in oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation. The down regulation of all these genes was verified by real-time PCR. Four of these genes were also confirmed to be downregulated at the protein level. These results are statistically significant and have high biological relevance, since seven of the downregulated genes in the cerebrum of the FD patients were shown by others to be upregulated during oligodendrocyte differentiation in vitro. Our results therefore suggest that IKAP/hELP1 may play a role in oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation.

  1. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1990-06-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process.

  2. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process. PMID:1693653

  3. Role of IL-33 and ST2 signalling pathway in multiple sclerosis: expression by oligodendrocytes and inhibition of myelination in central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Allan, Debbie; Fairlie-Clarke, Karen J; Elliott, Christina; Schuh, Cornelia; Barnett, Susan C; Lassmann, Hans; Linnington, Christopher; Jiang, Hui-Rong

    2016-07-26

    Recent research findings have provided convincing evidence indicating a role for Interleukin-33 (IL-33) signalling pathway in a number of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease. However, the exact function of IL-33 molecule within the CNS under normal and pathological conditions is currently unknown. In this study, we have mapped cellular expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2 by immunohistochemistry in the brain tissues of MS patients and appropriate controls; and investigated the functional significance of these findings in vitro using a myelinating culture system. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 is expressed by neurons, astrocytes and microglia as well as oligodendrocytes, while ST2 is expressed in the lesions by oligodendrocytes and within and around axons. Furthermore, the expression levels and patterns of IL-33 and ST2 in the lesions of acute and chronic MS patient brain samples are enhanced compared with the healthy brain tissues. Finally, our data using rat myelinating co-cultures suggest that IL-33 may play an important role in MS development by inhibiting CNS myelination.

  4. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alvaro I.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA) and tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on structure of mPFC neurons and levels of myelin associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons and these changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels that occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produces hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC. PMID:25732140

  5. Protracted abstinence from chronic ethanol exposure alters the structure of neurons and expression of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Navarro, A I; Mandyam, C D

    2015-05-01

    In rodents, chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure (CIE) produces alcohol dependence, alters the structure and activity of pyramidal neurons and decreases the number of oligodendroglial progenitors in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In this study, adult Wistar rats were exposed to seven weeks of CIE and were withdrawn from CIE for 21 days (protracted abstinence; PA). Tissue enriched in the mPFC was processed for Western blot analysis and Golgi-Cox staining to investigate the long-lasting effects of CIE on the structure of mPFC neurons and the levels of myelin-associated proteins. PA increased dendritic arborization within apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. These changes occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 2B (NR2B) at Tyr-1472. PA increased myelin basic protein (MBP) levels which occurred concurrently with hypophosphorylation of the premyelinating oligodendrocyte bHLH transcription factor Olig2 in the mPFC. Given that PA is associated with increased sensitivity to stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, and stress alters oligodendrocyte expression as a function of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation, the levels of total GR and phosphorylated GR were also evaluated. PA produced hypophosphorylation of the GR at Ser-232 without affecting expression of total protein. These findings demonstrate persistent and compensatory effects of ethanol in the mPFC long after cessation of CIE, including enhanced myelin production and impaired GR function. Collectively, these results suggest a novel relationship between oligodendrocytes and GR in the mPFC, in which stress may alter frontal cortex function in alcohol dependent subjects by promoting hypermyelination, thereby altering the cellular composition and white matter structure in the mPFC.

  6. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreERT;ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26656646

  7. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination.

    PubMed

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreER(T);ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  8. Lysophosphatidic acid can support the formation of membranous structures and an increase in MBP mRNA levels in differentiating oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nogaroli, Luciana; Yuelling, Larra M.; Dennis, Jameel; Gorse, Karen; Payne, Shawn G.; Fuss, Babette

    2009-01-01

    During development, differentiating oligodendrocytes progress in distinct maturation steps from premyelinating to myelinating cells. Such maturing oligodendrocytes express both receptors mediating signaling via extracellular lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and the major enzyme generating extracellular LPA, namely phosphodiesterase-Iα/autotaxin (PD-Iα/ATX). However, the biological role of extracellular LPA during the maturation of differentiating oligodendrocytes is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that application of exogenous LPA induced an increase in the area occupied by the oligodendrocytes’ process network, but only when PD-Iα/ATX expression was down-regulated. This increase in network area was caused primarily by the formation of membranous structures. In addition, LPA increased the number of cells positive for myelin basic protein (MBP). This effect was associated by an increase in the mRNA levels coding for MBP but not myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Taken together, these data suggest that LPA may play a crucial role in regulating the later stages of oligodendrocyte maturation. PMID:18594965

  9. Inducible Expression of a Truncated Form of Tau in Oligodendrocytes Elicits Gait Abnormalities and a Decrease in Myelin: Implications for Selective CNS Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton protein Tau present in oligodendrocytes (OLGs) promotes cellular process outgrowth and myelination; whereas abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau has been shown to be present in the most debilitating form of multiple sclerosis and in selective dementias. This research examined the functional consequences of expressing a truncated form of Tau in OLGs during the second postnatal life. In particular, this truncated form of Tau (∆Tau) retains the Fyn-binding domain but lacks the microtubule-binding domain. Similar to hyperphosphorylated Tau, ∆Tau cannot bind the cytoskeleton and is missorted. The Cre/loxP recombination system was used to generate transgenic (TG) founder lines, which contain a Floxed LacZ-STOP cassette to prevent expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-∆Tau. The founder lines were then crossed with a Tamoxifen (TM)-inducible proteolipid protein (PLP)-dependent Cre driver line. Myelin PLP is the major myelin protein in the central nervous system (CNS). TM was given at postnatal day (p) 12 for 3 days, and CNS tissues were collected at p22. Only TG mice with both EGFP-∆Tau and Cre manifested an overt phenotype of loss of balance and stumbles starting around p18. CNS tissues obtained from TM-treated EGFP-∆Tau/Cre double transgenic mice had recombined PCR products, GFP, and diminished brain myelin. GFP was expressed in OLGs, but not in neurons or astrocytes. On the contrary, TM-treated TG mice with only one of the two transgenes, i.e., Cre or Tau, did not have recombinant PCR products, GFP, diminished myelin, or abnormal phenotype. Thus, this inducible model shows for the first time that a non-microtubule-associated Tau protein in OLGs elicits both myelin decrease and gait abnormalities, similar to the occurrence in selective demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Effect of OLIG1 on the development of oligodendrocytes and myelination in a neonatal rat PVL model induced by hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tongfei; Xue, Xindong; Fu, Jianhua

    2015-04-01

    OLIG1 is an oligodendrocyte (OL) transcription factor, which can contribute to the proliferation and differentiation of OLs, and the maturation of myelin. The aim of this study was to clarify the role of OLIG1 in neonatal Sprague Dawley rats with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), induced by hypoxia‑ischemia (HI). Newborn rats in the HI group were subjected to ligation of the right carotid artery, followed by 8% oxygen delivery for 2 h, while rats in the normoxia group were only subjected to isolation of the right carotid artery, without exposure to hypoxia. Samples of brain tissue from rats in both groups were collected at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. In the HI group, observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed OLs with a damaged nuclear membrane, cellular atrophy, deformation and necrosis, and cells in myelin with a high number of small vacuoles. A double‑label immunofluorescence assay revealed the translocation of OLIG1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, while western blot and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays showed that there is a significant decrease, followed by an increase, in the gene and protein expression levels of OLIG1 and myelin basic protein (MBP). Despite the increase at the late stages of HI, the final levels of these proteins remained lower than the corresponding levels in the normoxia group. In conclusion, the decreased protein expression of OLIG1 following HI plays an important role in inhibiting the development and maturation of OLs and myelin. Although OLIG1 may, via its nuclear translocation, promote the growth and development of myelin to a certain extent, this factor fails to fully repair injured myelin.

  11. Glycan specificity of myelin-associated glycoprotein and sialoadhesin deduced from interactions with synthetic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Bovin, N; Hasegawa, A; Ishida, H; Kiso, M; Kelm, S

    1998-12-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and sialoadhesin (Sn) bind to sialylated glycans on cell surfaces and are thought to be involved in cell-cell interactions. In order to investigate how the interactions of these proteins are influenced by the glycan structure, we compared the inhibitory potencies of different synthetic monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent polyacrylamide derivatives. Using oligosaccharides with modifications in the sialic acid, galactose or N-acetylglucosamine moieties, we could demonstrate that both MAG and Sn bind with high preference to alpha2,3-linked sialic acid and interact at least with the three terminal monosaccharide units. For MAG, contacts with even more distant monosaccharides are likely, since pentasaccharides are bound better than trisaccharides. Also, an additional sialic acid at position six of the third-terminal monosaccharide unit enhances binding to MAG, whereas it does not influence binding to Sn significantly. Modifications of the sialic acid glycerol side chain demonstrated that the hydroxy groups at positions 8 and 9 are required for binding to both proteins. Surprisingly, MAG binds 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid significantly better than N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas Sn prefers the latter structure. These results indicate that the interactions of MAG and Sn are mainly with sialic acid and that additional contacts with the subterminal galactose and N-acetylglucosamine residues also contribute to the binding strength, although to a lesser degree. PMID:9874234

  12. Ncx3 gene ablation impairs oligodendrocyte precursor response and increases susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Casamassa, Antonella; La Rocca, Claudia; Sokolow, Sophie; Herchuelz, Andre; Matarese, Giuseppe; Annunziato, Lucio; Boscia, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    The Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger NCX3, recently identified as a myelin membrane component, is involved in the regulation of [Ca(2+) ]i during oligodendrocyte maturation. Here NCX3 involvement was studied in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Western blotting and quantitative colocalization studies performed in wild-type ncx3(+/+) mice at different stages of EAE disease showed that NCX3 protein was intensely upregulated during the chronic stage, where it was intensely coexpressed with the oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) marker NG2 and the premyelinating marker CNPase. Moreover, MOG35-55 -immunized mice lacking the ncx3 gene displayed not only a reduced diameter of axons and an intact myelin ring number but also a dramatic decrease in OPC and pre-myelinating cells in the white matter of the spinal cord when compared with ncx3(+/+) . Accordingly, ncx3(-/-) and ncx3(+/-) mutants developed early onset of EAE and more severe clinical symptoms. Interestingly, cytofluorimetric analysis revealed that during the peak stage of the disease, the number of immune T-cell subsets in ncx3(-/-) mice, was not statistically different from that measured in ncx3(+/+) . Our findings demonstrate that knocking-out NCX3 impairs oligodendrocyte response and worsens clinical symptoms in EAE without altering the immune T-cell population. GLIA 2016;64:1124-1137. PMID:27120265

  13. Identification of three microsatellites at the human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) locus, a gene potentially involved in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, N.; Dolbois, L.; Coppin, H.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding MOG is located on the short arm of chromosome 6, less than 120 kb telomeric to HLA-F. We have cloned the MOG gene from a cosmid library. Using tandemly repeated dinucleotides, we probed the genomic region containing the human MOG gene in order to identify and localize polymorphic markers: three microsatellites were characterized in that region. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based technique, we studied length variability for these three markers among 173 healthy individuals and 167 multiple sclerosis patients. Heterozygosity varied from 50% to 60% according to the marker. Pairwise studies showed significant linkage disequilibrium between some alleles. Multiple sclerosis patients and controls were not shown to have statistically significant differences in the MOG region. Further studies on the coding regions are in progress in order to exclude any involvement of the MOG gene in multiple sclerosis.

  14. How to make an oligodendrocyte.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Steven A; Kuypers, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes produce myelin, an insulating sheath required for the saltatory conduction of electrical impulses along axons. Oligodendrocyte loss results in demyelination, which leads to impaired neurological function in a broad array of diseases ranging from pediatric leukodystrophies and cerebral palsy, to multiple sclerosis and white matter stroke. Accordingly, replacing lost oligodendrocytes, whether by transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) or by mobilizing endogenous progenitors, holds great promise as a therapeutic strategy for the diseases of central white matter. In this Primer, we describe the molecular events regulating oligodendrocyte development and how our understanding of this process has led to the establishment of methods for producing OPCs and oligodendrocytes from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as directly from somatic cells. In addition, we will discuss the safety of engrafted stem cell-derived OPCs, as well as approaches by which to modulate their differentiation and myelinogenesis in vivo following transplantation.

  15. Accumulation of reactivity to MBP sensitizes TRAIL mediated oligodendrocyte apoptosis in adult sub cortical white matter in a model for human multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sajad; Ali, Farrah; Chauhan, Deepika; Arora, Rajesh; Khan, Haider A

    2016-04-01

    Reactivity to myelin associated proteins is the hallmark of human multiple sclerosis (M.S) and its experimental counterparts. However, the nature of such reactivity has not been described fully. Herein, we report that myelin basic protein (MBP) reactivity accumulates in a rat model for M.S. over a period of time and sensitizes TRAIL mediated progressive oligodendrocyte apoptosis. We used active immunization by Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG, 50 μg) to study chronic remitting relapsing encephalomyelitis in rats. A time point analysis of the progressive disease revealed cumulative accumulation of anti myelin basic protein antibodies during the disease progression with minimal change in the anti-MOG antibodies. Increased reactivity to MBP was studied to sensitize TNF related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and other proinflammatory cytokines in a cumulative fashion leading to the Caspase dependent apoptosis of oligodendrocytes and myelin loss. In a rescue experiment, we could limit the demyelination and prevent disease progression by neutralizing the effector, TRAIL in an early stage of the disease. This is the first study to identify the accumulation of MBP antibodies in MOG induced EAE which possibly leads to TRAIL sensitized oligodendrocyte apoptosis in the white mater of EAE rats. This finding stresses on the need to study MBP antibody titers in M.S. patients and therefore might serve as an alternate marker for progressive demyelination. PMID:26477945

  16. The cell biology of CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Ethan G; Appel, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Myelination of axons in the central nervous system results from the remarkable ability of oligodendrocytes to wrap multiple axons with highly specialized membrane. Because myelin membrane grows as it ensheaths axons, cytoskeletal rearrangements that enable ensheathment must be coordinated with myelin production. Because the myelin sheaths of a single oligodendrocyte can differ in thickness and length, mechanisms that coordinate axon ensheathment with myelin growth likely operate within individual oligodendrocyte processes. Recent studies have revealed new information about how assembly and disassembly of actin filaments helps drive the leading edge of nascent myelin membrane around and along axons. Concurrently, other investigations have begun to uncover evidence of communication between axons and oligodendrocytes that can regulate myelin formation.

  17. Factorially designed crystallization trials of the full-length P0 myelin membrane glycoprotein. I. Precipitation diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedzik, Jan; Kotake, Yoshiko; Uyemura, Keiichi; Ataka, Mitsuo

    2003-01-01

    P0 glycoprotein is the abundant membrane protein of myelin of the peripheral nervous system. We report now the statistical design of the crystallization experiments; based on our belief that important information regarding supersaturation of protein or its solubility nature, as well as metastable state, nucleation or precipitation, are hidden in the trials in which no crystals grow. It is possible to work out this information when the whole set of experiments is designed in such a way as to allow statistical analyses. We selected seven factors, which we believe to be important for crystallization: protein concentration, pH of buffer, nature of precipitant, concentration of precipitant, nature of detergent, additives and temperature. The experimental matrix and detailed work sheet to make 148 solutions having random but balanced combination of these levels were calculated using the program DESIGN. A visual evaluation of crystallization drops was performed using light microscopy. We were able to plot the precipitation boundary diagram. Based on this diagram we have eliminated factors (and levels) that were driving the protein into precipitation. It is known that the precipitation boundary is related to the solubility curves for protein crystals, in the neighborhood of which nucleation and further crystallization is most likely to occur. These conditions are currently being refined to identify important factors (or its levels) that can be crucial in obtaining large and well diffracting crystals. Full-length P0 protein has never been crystallized for structural determination.

  18. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Alka A.; Patel, Himatkumar V.; Fromholt, Susan E.; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A.; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering. PMID:12060784

  19. Very large G protein-coupled receptor 1 regulates myelin-associated glycoprotein via Gαs/Gαq-mediated protein kinases A/C

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Daesung; Lin, Shu-Ting; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    VLGR1 (very large G protein-coupled receptor 1), also known as MASS1 (monogenic audiogenic seizure susceptible 1), is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that contains a large extracellular N terminus with 35 calcium-binding domains. A truncating mutation in the Mass1 gene causes autosomal recessive, sound-induced seizures in the Frings mouse. However, the function of MASS1 and the mechanism underlying Frings mouse epilepsy are not known. Here, we found that MASS1 protein is enriched in the myelinated regions of the superior and inferior colliculi, critical areas for the initiation and propagation of audiogenic seizures. Using a panel of myelin antibodies, we discovered that myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) expression is dramatically decreased in Frings mice. MASS1 inhibits the ubiquitylation of MAG, thus enhancing the stability of this protein, and the calcium-binding domains of MASS1 are essential for this regulation. Furthermore, MASS1 interacts with Gαs/Gαq and activates PKA and PKC in response to extracellular calcium. Suppression of signaling by MASS1 RNAi or a specific inhibitor abrogates MAG up-regulation. We postulate that MASS1 senses extracellular calcium and activates cytosolic PKA/PKC pathways to regulate myelination by means of MAG protein stability in myelin-forming cells of the auditory pathway. Further work is required to determine whether MAG dysregulation is a cause or consequence of audiogenic epilepsy and whether there are other pathways regulated by MASS1. PMID:24191038

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate donepezil-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Ogata, Toru; Uchida, Ryuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Takishima, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Failure of myelin development and oligodendrocyte loss results in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that donepezil, an acetlycholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells without affecting proliferation or cell viability. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase, and MOG, in addition to transcription factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil. Furthermore, luciferase assays confirmed that both MAG and MBP promoters display increased activity upon donepezil-induced oligodendrocytes differentiation, suggesting that donepezil increases myelin gene expression mainly through enhanced transcription. We also found that the increase in the number of oligodendrocytes observed following donepezil treatment was significantly inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine, but not by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. Moreover, donepezil-induced myelin-related gene expression was suppressed by mecamylamine at both the mRNA and protein level. These results suggest that donepezil stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin-related gene expression via nAChRs in neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We show that donepezil, a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase and MOG in addition to transcripton factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil

  1. Novel molecular insights into the critical role of sulfatide in myelin maintenance/function.

    PubMed

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Chunyan; Chen, Linyuan; Ahmar, Sareen; Higuera, Juan Diego; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Han, Xianlin

    2016-10-01

    Cerebroside sulfotransferase (CST) catalyzes the production of sulfatide, a major class of myelin-specific lipids. CST knockout (CST(-/-) ) mice in which sulfatide is completely depleted are born healthy, but display myelin abnormalities and progressive tremors starting at 4-6 weeks of age. Although these phenotypes suggest that sulfatide plays a critical role in myelin maintenance/function, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We analyzed the major CNS myelin proteins and the major lipids enriched in the myelin in a spatiotemporal manner. We found a one-third reduction of the major compact myelin proteins (myelin basic protein, myelin basic protein, and proteolipid protein, PLP) and an equivalent post-developmental loss of myelin lipids, providing the molecular basis behind the thinner myelin sheaths. Our lipidomics data demonstrated that the observed global reduction of myelin lipid content was not because of an increase of lipid degradation but rather to the reduction of their synthesis by oligodendrocytes. We also showed that sulfatide depletion leads to region-specific effects on non-compact myelin, dramatically affecting the paranode (neurofascin 155) and the major inner tongue myelin protein (myelin-associated glycoprotein). Moreover, we demonstrated that sulfatide promotes the interaction between adjacent PLP extracellular domains, evidenced by a progressive decline of high molecular weight PLP complexes in CST(-/-) mice, providing an explanation at a molecular level regarding the uncompacted myelin sheaths. Finally, we proposed that the dramatic losses of neurofascin 155 and PLP interactions are responsible for the progressive tremors and eventual ataxia. In summary, we unraveled novel molecular insights into the critical role of sulfatide in myelin maintenance/function. Cerebroside sulfotransferase (CST) catalyzes the production of sulfatide, a major class of myelin-specific lipids. CST knockout (CST(-/-) ) mice in which sulfatide is

  2. In vitro myelin formation using embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerman, Bilal E.; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Mei, Arianna; Georges, Shereen; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.; Jappelli, Roberto; Chandross, Karen J.; August, Paul; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination in the central nervous system is the process by which oligodendrocytes form myelin sheaths around the axons of neurons. Myelination enables neurons to transmit information more quickly and more efficiently and allows for more complex brain functions; yet, remarkably, the underlying mechanism by which myelination occurs is still not fully understood. A reliable in vitro assay is essential to dissect oligodendrocyte and myelin biology. Hence, we developed a protocol to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells and established a myelin formation assay with embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in microfluidic devices. Myelin formation was quantified using a custom semi-automated method that is suitable for larger scale analysis. Finally, early myelination was followed in real time over several days and the results have led us to propose a new model for myelin formation. PMID:26015546

  3. In vitro myelin formation using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kerman, Bilal E; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Mei, Arianna; Georges, Shereen; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Jappelli, Roberto; Chandross, Karen J; August, Paul; Gage, Fred H

    2015-06-15

    Myelination in the central nervous system is the process by which oligodendrocytes form myelin sheaths around the axons of neurons. Myelination enables neurons to transmit information more quickly and more efficiently and allows for more complex brain functions; yet, remarkably, the underlying mechanism by which myelination occurs is still not fully understood. A reliable in vitro assay is essential to dissect oligodendrocyte and myelin biology. Hence, we developed a protocol to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes from mouse embryonic stem cells and established a myelin formation assay with embryonic stem cell-derived neurons in microfluidic devices. Myelin formation was quantified using a custom semi-automated method that is suitable for larger scale analysis. Finally, early myelination was followed in real time over several days and the results have led us to propose a new model for myelin formation.

  4. α-Synuclein-induced myelination deficit defines a novel interventional target for multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ettle, Benjamin; Kerman, Bilal E; Valera, Elvira; Gillmann, Clarissa; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Reiprich, Simone; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André; Wegner, Michael; Bäuerle, Tobias; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Masliah, Eliezer; Gage, Fred H; Winkler, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare atypical parkinsonian disorder characterized by a rapidly progressing clinical course and at present without any efficient therapy. Neuropathologically, myelin loss and neurodegeneration are associated with α-synuclein accumulation in oligodendrocytes, but underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the impact of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein on the formation of myelin sheaths to define a potential interventional target for MSA. Post-mortem analyses of MSA patients and controls were performed to quantify myelin and oligodendrocyte numbers. As pre-clinical models, we used transgenic MSA mice, a myelinating stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte-neuron co-culture, and primary oligodendrocytes to determine functional consequences of oligodendrocytic α-synuclein overexpression on myelination. We detected myelin loss accompanied by preserved or even increased numbers of oligodendrocytes in post-mortem MSA brains or transgenic mouse forebrains, respectively, indicating an oligodendrocytic dysfunction in myelin formation. Corroborating this observation, overexpression of α-synuclein in primary and stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes severely impaired myelin formation, defining a novel α-synuclein-linked pathomechanism in MSA. We used the pro-myelinating activity of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist benztropine to analyze the reversibility of the myelination deficit. Transcriptome profiling of primary pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes demonstrated that benztropine readjusts myelination-related processes such as cholesterol and membrane biogenesis, being compromised by oligodendrocytic α-synuclein. Additionally, benztropine restored the α-synuclein-induced myelination deficit of stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes. Strikingly, benztropine also ameliorated the myelin deficit in transgenic MSA mice, resulting in a prevention of neuronal cell loss. In conclusion, this study defines the

  5. Spatiotemporal gradient of oligodendrocyte differentiation in chick optic tectum requires brain integrity and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Galileo, Deni S

    2003-01-01

    The development of oligodendrocytes in the chicken optic tectum (OT) was studied in vivo and in vitro by analyzing expression of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) with a monoclonal antibody. MAG(+) cells first appeared in the anterior OT on embryonic day (E) 12, were present throughout the anterior half on E15, and eventually filled the tectum on E17. This spatiotemporal appearance of MAG(+) oligodendrocytes resembled two streams of cells entering the OT along the afferent and efferent axonal layers. However, experiments determined that this appearance of MAG immunoreactivity was the result of a gradient of oligodendrocyte differentiation and was not cell migration. First, retroviral vector labeling of OT progenitors in vivo on E3 resulted in labeled oligodendrocytes in late embryos. In addition, pieces of OT from as early as E3 kept in culture for a week developed numerous MAG(+) oligodendrocytes. Pieces of both anterior and posterior E7 OT developed MAG(+) oligodendrocytes after 3 days in culture, well ahead of their normal schedule in vivo. BrdU incorporation studies revealed that these cells were not born in culture, but merely differentiated. Monolayer cultures made from dissociated E10 or later OT cells developed MAG(+) oligodendrocytes, but monolayers made from E7 OT cells did not. These experiments demonstrate that oligodendrocyte progenitors were present in the OT as early as E3, that they could differentiate precociously, and that their normal progressive differentiation in situ must be due to removal of inhibitory constraints rather than the onset of inductive factors. Also, certain cell-cell interactions occur between E7 and E10, which cannot be disrupted if oligodendrocyte differentiation is to occur.

  6. The history of myelin.

    PubMed

    Boullerne, Anne Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Andreas Vesalius is attributed the discovery of white matter in the 16th century but van Leeuwenhoek is arguably the first to have observed myelinated fibers in 1717. A globular myelin theory followed, claiming all elements of the nervous system except for Fontana's primitive cylinder with outer sheath in 1781. Remak's axon revolution in 1836 relegated myelin to the unknown. Ehrenberg described nerve tubes with double borders in 1833, and Schwann with nuclei in 1839, but the medullary sheath acquired its name of myelin, coined by Virchow, only in 1854. Thanks to Schultze's osmium specific staining in 1865, myelin designates the structure known today. The origin of myelin though was baffling. Only after Ranvier discovered a periodic segmentation, which came to us as nodes of Ranvier, did he venture suggesting in 1872 that the nerve internode was a fatty cell secreting myelin in cytoplasm. Ranvier's hypothesis was met with high skepticism, because nobody could see the cytoplasm, and the term Schwann cell very slowly emerged into the vocabulary with von Lenhossék in 1895. When Cajal finally admitted the concept of Schwann cell internode in 1912, he still firmly believed myelin was secreted by the axon. Del Río-Hortega re-discovered oligodendrocytes in 1919 (after Robertson in 1899) and named them oligodendroglia in 1921, thereby antagonizing Cajal for discovering a second cell type in his invisible third element. Penfield had to come to del Río-Hortega's rescue in 1924 for oligodendrocytes to be accepted. They jointly hypothesized myelin could be made by oligodendrocytes, considered the central equivalent of Schwann cells. Meanwhile myelin birefringence properties observed by Klebs in 1865 then Schmidt in 1924 confirmed its high fatty content, ascertained by biochemistry by Thudichum in 1884. The 20th century saw X-ray diffraction developed by Schmitt, who discovered in 1935 the crystal-like organization of this most peculiar structure, and devised the g

  7. Nfasc155H and MAG are specifically susceptible to detergent extraction in the absence of the myelin sphingolipid sulfatide.

    PubMed

    Pomicter, A D; Deloyht, J M; Hackett, A R; Purdie, N; Sato-Bigbee, C; Henderson, S C; Dupree, J L

    2013-12-01

    Mice incapable of synthesizing the myelin lipid sulfatide form paranodes that deteriorate with age. Similar instability also occurs in mice that lack contactin, contactin-associated protein or neurofascin155 (Nfasc155), the proteins that cluster in the paranode and form the junctional complex that mediates myelin-axon adhesion. In contrast to these proteins, sulfatide has not been shown to be enriched in the paranode nor has a sulfatide paranodal binding partner been identified; thus, it remains unclear how the absence of sulfatide results in compromised paranode integrity. Using an in situ extraction procedure, it has been reported that the absence of the myelin sphingolipids, galactocerebroside and sulfatide, increased the susceptibility of Nfasc155 to detergent extraction. Here, employing a similar approach, we demonstrate that in the presence of galactocerebroside but in the absence of sulfatide Nfasc155 is susceptible to detergent extraction. Furthermore, we use this in situ approach to show that stable association of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) with the myelin membrane is sulfatide dependent while the membrane associations of myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, myelin basic protein and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase are sulfatide independent. These findings indicate that myelin proteins maintain their membrane associations by different mechanisms. Moreover, the myelin proteins that cluster in the paranode and require sulfatide mediate myelin-axon adhesion. Additionally, the apparent dependency on sulfatide for maintaining Nfasc155 and MAG associations is intriguing since the fatty acid composition of sulfatide is altered and paranodal ultrastructure is compromised in multiple sclerosis. Thus, our findings present a potential link between sulfatide perturbation and myelin deterioration in multiple sclerosis.

  8. Oligodendrocytes in HIV-associated pain pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuqiang; Shu, Jianhong; Liang, Zongsuo; Yuan, Subo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the contributions of microglia and astrocytes to chronic pain pathogenesis have been a focal point of investigation in recent years, the potential role of oligodendrocytes, another major type of glial cells in the CNS that generates myelin, remains largely unknown. Results We report here that cell markers of the oligodendrocyte lineage, including NG2, PDGFRα, and Olig2, are significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horn of HIV patients who developed chronic pain. The levels of myelin proteins myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein are also aberrant in the spinal dorsal horn of “pain-positive” HIV patients. Similarly, the oligodendrocyte and myelin markers are up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn of a mouse model of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain. Surprisingly, the expression of gp120-induced mechanical allodynia appears intact up to 4 h after myelin basic protein is knocked down or knocked out. Conclusion These findings suggest that oligodendrocytes are reactive during the pathogenesis of HIV-associated pain. However, interfering with myelination does not alter the induction of gp120-induced pain. PMID:27306410

  9. Structural features of the Nogo receptor signaling complexes at the neuron/myelin interface.

    PubMed

    Saha, Nayanendu; Kolev, Momchil; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2014-10-01

    Upon spinal cord injury, the central nervous system axons are unable to regenerate, partially due to the repulsive action of myelin inhibitors, such as the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), Nogo-A and the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). These inhibitors bind and signal through a single receptor/co-receptor complex that comprises of NgR1/LINGO-1 and either p75 or TROY, triggering intracellular downstream signaling that impedes the re-growth of axons. Structure-function analysis of myelin inhibitors and their neuronal receptors, particularly the NgRs, have provided novel information regarding the molecular details of the inhibitor/receptor/co-receptor interactions. Structural and biochemical studies have revealed the architecture of many of these proteins and identified the molecular regions important for assembly of the inhibitory signaling complexes. It was also recently shown that gangliosides, such as GT1b, mediate receptor/co-receptor binding. In this review, we highlight these studies and summarize our current understanding of the multi-protein cell-surface complexes mediating inhibitory signaling events at the neuron/myelin interface.

  10. Optogenetic stimulation of myelination (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, In Hong; Lee, Hae Ung; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2016-03-01

    Myelination is governed by axon-glia interaction which is modulated by neural activity. Currently, the effects of subcellular activation of neurons which induce neural activity upon myelination are not well understood. To identify if subcellular neuronal stimulation can enhance myelination, we developed a novel system for focal stimulation of neural activity with optogenetic in a compartmentalized microfluidic platform. In our systems, stimulation for neurons in restricted subcellular parts, such as cell bodies and axons promoted oligodendrocyte differentiation and the myelination of axons the just as much as whole cell activation of neurons did. The number of premature O4 positive oligodendrocytes was reduced and the numbers of mature and myelin basic protein-positive oligodendrocytes was increased both by subcellular optogenetic stimulation.

  11. Molecular Basis of the interactions of the Nogo-66 Receptor and its homologue NgR2 with Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein: Development of NgROMNI-Fc a Novel Antagonist of CNS Myelin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Robak, Laurie A.; Venkatesh, Karthik; Lee, Hakjoo; Raiker, Stephen J.; Duan, Yuntao; Lee-Osbourne, Jane; Hofer, Thomas; Mage, Rose G.; Rader, Christoph; Giger, Roman J.

    2009-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a sialic acid binding Ig-family lectin that functions in neuronal growth inhibition and stabilization of axon-glia interactions. The ectodomain of MAG is comprised of five Ig-like domains and employs neuronal cell-type specific mechanisms to signal growth inhibition. We show that the first three Ig-like domains of MAG bind with high-affinity and in a sialic acid dependent manner to the Nogo-66 receptor-1 (NgR1) and its homologue NgR2. Domains Ig3-Ig5 of MAG are sufficient to inhibit neurite outgrowth but fail to associate with NgR1 or NgR2. Nogo receptors are sialoglycoproteins comprised of 8.5 canonical leucine-rich repeats (LRR) flanked by LRR N-terminal (NT) and C-terminal (CT)-cap domains. The LRR cluster is connected through a stalk region to a membrane lipid anchor. The CT-cap domain and stalk region of NgR2, but not NgR1, are sufficient for MAG binding, and when expressed in neurons, exhibit constitutive growth inhibitory activity. The LRR cluster of NgR1 supports binding of Nogo-66, OMgp and MAG. Deletion of disulfide loop Cys309-Cys336 of NgR1 selectively increases its affinity for Nogo-66 and OMgp. A chimeric Nogo receptor variant (NgROMNI) in which Cys309-Cys336 is deleted and followed by a 13 amino acid MAG binding motif of the NgR2 stalk, shows superior binding of OMgp, Nogo-66, and MAG compared to wild-type NgR1 or NgR2. Soluble NgROMNI (NgROMNI-Fc) binds strongly to membrane bound inhibitors and promotes neurite outgrowth on both MAG and CNS myelin substrates. Thus, NgROMNI-Fc may offer therapeutic opportunities following nervous system injury or disease where myelin inhibits neuronal regeneration. PMID:19420245

  12. Signaling through ERK1/2 controls myelin thickness during myelin repair in the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L; Schott, Alexandra; Karl, Molly; Krasno, Janet; Miller, Robert H

    2013-11-20

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the CNS, exquisitely tailor the thickness of individual myelin sheaths to the diameter of their target axons to maximize the speed of action potential propagation, thus ensuring proper neuronal connectivity and function. Following demyelinating injuries to the adult CNS, newly formed oligodendrocytes frequently generate new myelin sheaths. Following episodes of demyelination such as those that occur in patients with multiple sclerosis, however, the matching of myelin thickness to axon diameter fails leaving remyelinated axons with thin myelin sheaths potentially compromising function and leaving axons vulnerable to damage. How oligodendrocytes determine the appropriate thickness of myelin for an axon of defined size during repair is unknown and identifying the signals that regulate myelin thickness has obvious therapeutic implications. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in oligodendrocyte lineage cells results in accelerated myelin repair after injury, and is sufficient for the generation of thick myelin sheaths around remyelinated axons in the adult mouse spinal cord. Our findings suggest a model where ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling acts as a myelin thickness rheostat that instructs oligodendrocytes to generate axon-appropriate quantities of myelin.

  13. Early axonal damage and progressive myelin pathology define the kinetics of CNS histopathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Stormanns, Eva R; Bader, Jonas; Arnhold, Stefan; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2013-10-01

    Studies of MS histopathology are largely dependent on suitable animal models. While light microscopic analysis gives an overview of tissue pathology, it falls short in evaluating detailed changes in nerve fiber morphology. The ultrastructural data presented here and obtained from studies of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG):35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice delineate that axonal damage and myelin pathology follow different kinetics in the disease course. While myelin pathology accumulated with disease progression, axonal damage coincided with the initial clinical disease symptoms and remained stable over time. This pattern applied both to irreversible axolysis and early axonal pathology. Notably, these histopathological patterns were reflected by the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), suggesting that the NAWM is also in an active neurodegenerative state. The data underline the need for neuroprotection in MS and suggest the MOG model as a highly valuable tool for the assessment of different therapeutic strategies.

  14. Age-related decline of myelin proteins is highly correlated with activation of astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Fu, Han; Chen, Jun

    2013-11-01

    It has been shown that aging can greatly influence the integrity and ultrastructure of white matter and the myelin sheath; however, studies regarding the effects of aging on the expression of myelin proteins are still limited. In the present study, immunohistochemical mapping was used to investigate the overall expression of myelin basic protein (Mbp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats in postnatal months 2, 5, 18 and 26. Astrocyte and microglia activation was also detected by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) staining and western blotting. A significant decline of Mbp and Mog was identified as a universal alteration in the CNS of aged rats. Aging also induced significant astrocyte and microglial activation. Correlation analysis indicated a negative correlation between the reduction of age‑related myelin proteins and glial activation in aging. This correlation of myelin breakdown and glial activation in aging may reveal new evidence in connecting the inflammation and myelin breakdown mechanism of age‑related neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Impaired adult myelination in the prefrontal cortex of socially isolated mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Dietz, Karen; DeLoyht, Jacqueline M; Pedre, Xiomara; Kelkar, Dipti; Kaur, Jasbir; Vialou, Vincent; Lobo, Mary Kay; Dietz, David M; Nestler, Eric J; Dupree, Jeffrey; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Protracted social isolation of adult mice induced behavioral, transcriptional and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and impaired adult myelination. Social re-integration was sufficient to normalize behavioral and transcriptional changes. Short periods of isolation affected chromatin and myelin, but did not induce behavioral changes. Thus, myelinating oligodendrocytes in the adult PFC respond to social interaction with chromatin changes, suggesting that myelination acts as a form of adult plasticity. PMID:23143512

  16. A Phenotypic Culture System for the Molecular Analysis of CNS Myelination in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Hedvika; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Love, Rachal; Hickman, James J.; Lambert, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Studies of central nervous system myelination lack defined in vitro models which would effectively dissect molecular mechanisms of myelination that contain cells of the correct phenotype. Here we describe a co-culture of purified motoneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, isolated from rat embryonic spinal cord using a combination of immunopanning techniques. This model illustrates differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into fully functional mature oligodendrocytes that myelinate axons. It also illustrates a contribution of axons to the rate of oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin gene expression. The defined conditions used allow molecular analysis of distinct stages of myelination and precise manipulation of inductive cues affecting axonal–oligodendrocyte interactions. This phenotypic in vitro myelination model can provide valuable insight into our understanding of demyelinating disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and traumatic diseases such as spinal cord injury where demyelination represents a contributing factor to the pathology of the disorder. PMID:25064806

  17. A phenotypic culture system for the molecular analysis of CNS myelination in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Davis, Hedvika; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Love, Rachal; Hickman, James J; Lambert, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Studies of central nervous system myelination lack defined in vitro models which would effectively dissect molecular mechanisms of myelination that contain cells of the correct phenotype. Here we describe a co-culture of purified motoneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, isolated from rat embryonic spinal cord using a combination of immunopanning techniques. This model illustrates differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors into fully functional mature oligodendrocytes that myelinate axons. It also illustrates a contribution of axons to the rate of oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin gene expression. The defined conditions used allow molecular analysis of distinct stages of myelination and precise manipulation of inductive cues affecting axonal-oligodendrocyte interactions. This phenotypic in vitro myelination model can provide valuable insight into our understanding of demyelinating disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and traumatic diseases such as spinal cord injury where demyelination represents a contributing factor to the pathology of the disorder.

  18. Oligodendrocyte Development in the Absence of Their Target Axons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, David

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin around axons of the central nervous system, enabling saltatory conduction. Recent work has established that axons can regulate certain aspects of oligodendrocyte development and myelination, yet remarkably oligodendrocytes in culture retain the ability to differentiate in the absence of axons and elaborate myelin sheaths around synthetic axon-like substrates. It remains unclear the extent to which the life-course of oligodendrocytes requires the presence of, or signals derived from axons in vivo. In particular, it is unclear whether the specific axons fated for myelination regulate the oligodendrocyte population in a living organism, and if so, which precise steps of oligodendrocyte-cell lineage progression are regulated by target axons. Here, we use live-imaging of zebrafish larvae carrying transgenic reporters that label oligodendrocyte-lineage cells to investigate which aspects of oligodendrocyte development, from specification to differentiation, are affected when we manipulate the target axonal environment. To drastically reduce the number of axons targeted for myelination, we use a previously identified kinesin-binding protein (kbp) mutant, in which the first myelinated axons in the spinal cord, reticulospinal axons, do not fully grow in length, creating a region in the posterior spinal cord where most initial targets for myelination are absent. We find that a 73% reduction of reticulospinal axon surface in the posterior spinal cord of kbp mutants results in a 27% reduction in the number of oligodendrocytes. By time-lapse analysis of transgenic OPC reporters, we find that the reduction in oligodendrocyte number is explained by a reduction in OPC proliferation and survival. Interestingly, OPC specification and migration are unaltered in the near absence of normal axonal targets. Finally, we find that timely differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes does not depend at all on the presence of target axons. Together, our data

  19. PI(3,5)P2 biosynthesis regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Yevgeniya A; Lenk, Guy M; Lin, Jing-Ping; Lee, Seung Joon; Twiss, Jeffery L; Vaccari, Ilaria; Bolino, Alessandra; Havton, Leif A; Min, Sang H; Abrams, Charles S; Shrager, Peter; Meisler, Miriam H; Giger, Roman J

    2016-01-01

    Proper development of the CNS axon-glia unit requires bi-directional communication between axons and oligodendrocytes (OLs). We show that the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2] is required in neurons and in OLs for normal CNS myelination. In mice, mutations of Fig4, Pikfyve or Vac14, encoding key components of the PI(3,5)P2 biosynthetic complex, each lead to impaired OL maturation, severe CNS hypomyelination and delayed propagation of compound action potentials. Primary OLs deficient in Fig4 accumulate large LAMP1+ and Rab7+ vesicular structures and exhibit reduced membrane sheet expansion. PI(3,5)P2 deficiency leads to accumulation of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) in LAMP1+perinuclear vesicles that fail to migrate to the nascent myelin sheet. Live-cell imaging of OLs after genetic or pharmacological inhibition of PI(3,5)P2 synthesis revealed impaired trafficking of plasma membrane-derived MAG through the endolysosomal system in primary cells and brain tissue. Collectively, our studies identify PI(3,5)P2 as a key regulator of myelin membrane trafficking and myelinogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13023.001 PMID:27008179

  20. PI(3,5)P2 biosynthesis regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mironova, Yevgeniya A; Lenk, Guy M; Lin, Jing-Ping; Lee, Seung Joon; Twiss, Jeffery L; Vaccari, Ilaria; Bolino, Alessandra; Havton, Leif A; Min, Sang H; Abrams, Charles S; Shrager, Peter; Meisler, Miriam H; Giger, Roman J

    2016-01-01

    Proper development of the CNS axon-glia unit requires bi-directional communication between axons and oligodendrocytes (OLs). We show that the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2] is required in neurons and in OLs for normal CNS myelination. In mice, mutations of Fig4, Pikfyve or Vac14, encoding key components of the PI(3,5)P2 biosynthetic complex, each lead to impaired OL maturation, severe CNS hypomyelination and delayed propagation of compound action potentials. Primary OLs deficient in Fig4 accumulate large LAMP1(+) and Rab7(+) vesicular structures and exhibit reduced membrane sheet expansion. PI(3,5)P2 deficiency leads to accumulation of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) in LAMP1(+)perinuclear vesicles that fail to migrate to the nascent myelin sheet. Live-cell imaging of OLs after genetic or pharmacological inhibition of PI(3,5)P2 synthesis revealed impaired trafficking of plasma membrane-derived MAG through the endolysosomal system in primary cells and brain tissue. Collectively, our studies identify PI(3,5)P2 as a key regulator of myelin membrane trafficking and myelinogenesis. PMID:27008179

  1. Comparative Effects of Human Neural Stem Cells and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells on the Neurobehavioral Disorders of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Dae-Kwon; Park, Dongsun; Lee, Sun Hee; Yang, Goeun; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Shin, Kyungha; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Kim, Gonhyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Seung U.

    2016-01-01

    Since multiple sclerosis (MS) is featured with widespread demyelination caused by autoimmune response, we investigated the recovery effects of F3.olig2 progenitors, established by transducing human neural stem cells (F3 NSCs) with Olig2 transcription factor, in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein- (MOG-) induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model mice. Six days after EAE induction, F3 or F3.olig2 cells (1 × 106/mouse) were intravenously transplanted. MOG-injected mice displayed severe neurobehavioral deficits which were remarkably attenuated and restored by cell transplantation, in which F3.olig2 cells were superior to its parental F3 cells. Transplanted cells migrated to the injured spinal cord, matured to oligodendrocytes, and produced myelin basic proteins (MBP). The F3.olig2 cells expressed growth and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). In addition, the transplanted cells markedly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced cytokine levels in the spinal cord and lymph nodes, and protected host myelins. The results indicate that F3.olig2 cells restore neurobehavioral symptoms of EAE mice by regulating autoimmune inflammatory responses as well as by stimulating remyelination and that F3.olig2 progenitors could be a candidate for the cell therapy of demyelinating diseases including MS. PMID:27429621

  2. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility.

  3. The transcriptome of mouse central nervous system myelin

    PubMed Central

    Thakurela, Sudhir; Garding, Angela; Jung, Ramona B.; Müller, Christina; Goebbels, Sandra; White, Robin; Werner, Hauke B.; Tiwari, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in the CNS is facilitated by insulation of axons with myelin, a specialized oligodendroglial compartment distant from the cell body. Myelin is turned over and adapted throughout life; however, the molecular and cellular basis of myelin dynamics remains elusive. Here we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) of myelin biochemically purified from mouse brains at various ages and find a surprisingly large pool of transcripts enriched in myelin. Further computational analysis showed that the myelin transcriptome is closely related to the myelin proteome but clearly distinct from the transcriptomes of oligodendrocytes and brain tissues, suggesting a highly selective incorporation of mRNAs into the myelin compartment. The mRNA-pool in myelin displays maturation-dependent dynamic changes of composition, abundance, and functional associations; however ageing-dependent changes after 6 months were minor. We suggest that this transcript pool enables myelin turnover and the local adaptation of individual pre-existing myelin sheaths. PMID:27173133

  4. The transcriptome of mouse central nervous system myelin.

    PubMed

    Thakurela, Sudhir; Garding, Angela; Jung, Ramona B; Müller, Christina; Goebbels, Sandra; White, Robin; Werner, Hauke B; Tiwari, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in the CNS is facilitated by insulation of axons with myelin, a specialized oligodendroglial compartment distant from the cell body. Myelin is turned over and adapted throughout life; however, the molecular and cellular basis of myelin dynamics remains elusive. Here we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) of myelin biochemically purified from mouse brains at various ages and find a surprisingly large pool of transcripts enriched in myelin. Further computational analysis showed that the myelin transcriptome is closely related to the myelin proteome but clearly distinct from the transcriptomes of oligodendrocytes and brain tissues, suggesting a highly selective incorporation of mRNAs into the myelin compartment. The mRNA-pool in myelin displays maturation-dependent dynamic changes of composition, abundance, and functional associations; however ageing-dependent changes after 6 months were minor. We suggest that this transcript pool enables myelin turnover and the local adaptation of individual pre-existing myelin sheaths. PMID:27173133

  5. Targeting Non-classical Myelin Epitopes to Treat Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jintao; Baylink, David J.; Li, Chih-Huang; Watts, Douglas M.; Xu, Yi; Qin, Xuezhong; Walter, Michael H.; Tang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Qa-1 epitopes, the peptides that bind to non-classical major histocompatibility complex Ib Qa-1 molecules and are recognized by Qa-1-restricted CD8+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, have been identified in pathogenic autoimmune cells that attack myelin sheath in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model for multiple sclerosis [MS]). Additionally, immunization with such epitopes ameliorates the EAE. However, identification of such epitopes requires knowledge of the pathogenic autoimmune cells which are largely unknown in MS patients. Hence, we asked whether the CD8+ Treg cells could directly target the myelin sheath to ameliorate EAE. To address this question, we analyzed Qa-1 epitopes in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG that is a protein in myelin sheath). Here, we report identification of a MOG-specific Qa-1 epitope. Immunization with this epitope suppressed ongoing EAE, which was abrogated by CD8+ T cell depletion. Additionally, the epitope immunization activated the epitope-specific CD8+ T cells which specifically accumulated in the CNS-draining cervical lymph nodes. Finally, CD8+ T cells primed by the epitope immunization transferred EAE suppression. Hence, this study reveals a novel regulatory mechanism mediated by the CD8+ Treg cells. We propose that immunization with myelin-specific HLA-E epitopes (human homologues of Qa-1 epitopes) is a promising therapy for MS. PMID:27796368

  6. Age-dependent B cell Autoimmunity to a Myelin Surface Antigen in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katherine A.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M.; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J.; Tavakoli, Norma P.; de Seze, Jerome; Khoury, Samia J.; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A.; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface antigens in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. While antibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum antibodies that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Antibodies to two other myelin surface antigens were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG antibodies as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG antibodies, compared to 14.7% of patients in the 10–18 year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface antigen is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS. PMID:19687098

  7. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas.

  8. Clemastine Enhances Myelination in the Prefrontal Cortex and Rescues Behavioral Changes in Socially Isolated Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Gacias, Mar; Frawley, Rebecca; Sikder, Tamjeed; Naik, Payal; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-01-20

    Altered myelin structure and oligodendrocyte function have been shown to correlate with cognitive and motor dysfunction and deficits in social behavior. We and others have previously demonstrated that social isolation in mice induced behavioral, transcriptional, and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation could be beneficial in reversing such changes remains unexplored. To test this hypothesis, we orally administered clemastine, an antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro, for 2 weeks in adult mice following social isolation. Clemastine successfully reversed social avoidance behavior in mice undergoing prolonged social isolation. Impaired myelination was rescued by oral clemastine treatment, and was associated with enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and epigenetic changes. Clemastine induced higher levels of repressive histone methylation (H3K9me3), a marker for heterochromatin, in oligodendrocytes, but not neurons, of the PFC. This was consistent with the capability of clemastine in elevating H3K9 histone methyltransferases activity in cultured primary mouse oligodendrocytes, an effect that could be antagonized by cotreatment with muscarine. Our data suggest that promoting adult myelination is a potential strategy for reversing depressive-like social behavior. Significance statement: Oligodendrocyte development and myelination are highly dynamic processes influenced by experience and neuronal activity. However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation is beneficial to treat depressive-like behavior has been unexplored. Mice undergoing prolonged social isolation display impaired myelination in the prefrontal cortex. Clemastine, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance myelination under

  9. Clemastine Enhances Myelination in the Prefrontal Cortex and Rescues Behavioral Changes in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Gacias, Mar; Frawley, Rebecca; Sikder, Tamjeed; Naik, Payal; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Altered myelin structure and oligodendrocyte function have been shown to correlate with cognitive and motor dysfunction and deficits in social behavior. We and others have previously demonstrated that social isolation in mice induced behavioral, transcriptional, and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation could be beneficial in reversing such changes remains unexplored. To test this hypothesis, we orally administered clemastine, an antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro, for 2 weeks in adult mice following social isolation. Clemastine successfully reversed social avoidance behavior in mice undergoing prolonged social isolation. Impaired myelination was rescued by oral clemastine treatment, and was associated with enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and epigenetic changes. Clemastine induced higher levels of repressive histone methylation (H3K9me3), a marker for heterochromatin, in oligodendrocytes, but not neurons, of the PFC. This was consistent with the capability of clemastine in elevating H3K9 histone methyltransferases activity in cultured primary mouse oligodendrocytes, an effect that could be antagonized by cotreatment with muscarine. Our data suggest that promoting adult myelination is a potential strategy for reversing depressive-like social behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oligodendrocyte development and myelination are highly dynamic processes influenced by experience and neuronal activity. However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation is beneficial to treat depressive-like behavior has been unexplored. Mice undergoing prolonged social isolation display impaired myelination in the prefrontal cortex. Clemastine, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance myelination under

  10. The adhesion GPCR Gpr56 regulates oligodendrocyte development via interactions with Gα12/13 and RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Sarah D.; Garcia, Cynthia; Piao, Xianhua; Gutmann, David H.; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    In the vertebrate central nervous system, myelinating oligodendrocytes are postmitotic and derive from proliferative oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The molecular mechanisms that govern oligodendrocyte development are incompletely understood, but recent studies implicate the adhesion class of G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) as important regulators of myelination. Here, we use zebrafish and mouse models to dissect the function of the aGPCR Gpr56 in oligodendrocyte development. We show that gpr56 is expressed during early stages of oligodendrocyte development. Additionally, we observe a significant reduction of mature oligodendrocyte number and of myelinated axons in gpr56 zebrafish mutants. This reduction results from decreased OPC proliferation, rather than increased cell death or altered neural precursor differentiation potential. Finally, we show that these functions are mediated by Gα12/13 proteins and Rho activation. Together, our data establish Gpr56 as a regulator of oligodendrocyte development. PMID:25607772

  11. Mechanostimulation Promotes Nuclear and Epigenetic Changes in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Marylens; Patzig, Julia; Mayoral, Sonia R.; Costa, Kevin D.; Chan, Jonah R.

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitors respond to biophysical or mechanical signals, and it has been reported that mechanostimulation modulates cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Here we report the effect of three mechanical stimuli on mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and identify the molecular components of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex (i.e., SYNE1) as transducers of mechanical signals to the nucleus, where they modulate the deposition of repressive histone marks and heterochromatin formation. The expression levels of LINC components increased during progenitor differentiation and silencing the Syne1 gene resulted in aberrant histone marks deposition, chromatin reorganization and impaired myelination. We conclude that spatial constraints, via the actin cytoskeleton and LINC complex, mediate nuclear changes in oligodendrocyte progenitors that favor a default pathway of differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is recognized that oligodendrocyte progenitors are mechanosensitive cells. However, the molecular mechanisms translating mechanical stimuli into oligodendrocyte differentiation remain elusive. This study identifies components of the mechanotransduction pathway in the oligodendrocyte lineage. PMID:26791211

  12. Gain of Olig2 function in oligodendrocyte progenitors promotes remyelination.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Amélie; Deboux, Cyrille; Bachelin, Corinne; Frah, Magali; Kerninon, Christophe; Seilhean, Danielle; Weider, Matthias; Wegner, Michael; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2 is a key determinant for the specification of neural precursor cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. However, the functional role of Olig2 in oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation remains elusive both during developmental myelination and under demyelinating conditions of the adult central nervous system. To decipher Olig2 functions, we generated transgenic mice (TetOlig2:Sox10(rtTA/+)) overexpressing Olig2 in Sox10(+) oligodendroglial cells in a doxycycline inducible manner. We show that Olig2 overexpression increases the generation of differentiated oligodendrocytes, leading to precocious myelination of the central nervous system. Unexpectedly, we found that gain of Olig2 function in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells enhances their migration rate. To determine whether Olig2 overexpression in adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration for myelin repair, we induced lysophosphatidylcholine demyelination in the corpus callosum of TetOlig2:Sox10(rtTA/+) and control mice. We found that Olig2 overexpression enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and remyelination. To assess the relevance of these findings in demyelinating diseases, we also examined OLIG2 expression in multiple sclerosis lesions. We demonstrate that OLIG2 displays a differential expression pattern in multiple sclerosis lesions that correlates with lesion activity. Strikingly, OLIG2 was predominantly detected in NOGO-A(+) (now known as RTN4-A) maturing oligodendrocytes, which prevailed in active lesion borders, rather than chronic silent and shadow plaques. Taken together, our data provide proof of principle indicating that OLIG2 overexpression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells might be a possible therapeutic mechanism for enhancing myelin repair.

  13. Gain of Olig2 function in oligodendrocyte progenitors promotes remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Amélie; Deboux, Cyrille; Bachelin, Corinne; Frah, Magali; Kerninon, Christophe; Seilhean, Danielle; Weider, Matthias; Wegner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2 is a key determinant for the specification of neural precursor cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. However, the functional role of Olig2 in oligodendrocyte migration and differentiation remains elusive both during developmental myelination and under demyelinating conditions of the adult central nervous system. To decipher Olig2 functions, we generated transgenic mice (TetOlig2:Sox10rtTA/+) overexpressing Olig2 in Sox10+ oligodendroglial cells in a doxycycline inducible manner. We show that Olig2 overexpression increases the generation of differentiated oligodendrocytes, leading to precocious myelination of the central nervous system. Unexpectedly, we found that gain of Olig2 function in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells enhances their migration rate. To determine whether Olig2 overexpression in adult oligodendrocyte progenitor cells promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration for myelin repair, we induced lysophosphatidylcholine demyelination in the corpus callosum of TetOlig2:Sox10rtTA/+ and control mice. We found that Olig2 overexpression enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation and remyelination. To assess the relevance of these findings in demyelinating diseases, we also examined OLIG2 expression in multiple sclerosis lesions. We demonstrate that OLIG2 displays a differential expression pattern in multiple sclerosis lesions that correlates with lesion activity. Strikingly, OLIG2 was predominantly detected in NOGO-A+ (now known as RTN4-A) maturing oligodendrocytes, which prevailed in active lesion borders, rather than chronic silent and shadow plaques. Taken together, our data provide proof of principle indicating that OLIG2 overexpression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells might be a possible therapeutic mechanism for enhancing myelin repair. PMID:25564492

  14. Dimethyl fumarate modulates antioxidant and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Taraboletti, Alexandra; Shriver, Leah P

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with inflammatory brain disorders and therapies that upregulate antioxidant pathways may be neuroprotective in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Dimethyl fumarate, a small molecule therapeutic for multiple sclerosis, activates cellular antioxidant signaling pathways and may promote myelin preservation. However, it is still unclear what mechanisms may underlie this neuroprotection and whether dimethyl fumarate affects oligodendrocyte responses to oxidative stress. Here, we examine metabolic alterations in oligodendrocytes treated with dimethyl fumarate by using a global metabolomic platform that employs both hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and shotgun lipidomics. Prolonged treatment of oligodendrocytes with dimethyl fumarate induces changes in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutathione, and lipids, indicating that this compound can directly impact oligodendrocyte metabolism. These metabolic alterations are also associated with protection from oxidant challenge. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which dimethyl fumarate could preserve myelin integrity in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:25967672

  15. Prolonged Subdural Infusion of Kynurenic Acid Is Associated with Dose-Dependent Myelin Damage in the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kwiecien, Jacek M.; Rola, Radoslaw; Klapec, Michal; Stanisz, Greg J.; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Oakden, Wendy; Janik, Rafal; Coote, Margaret; Frey, Benicio N.; Turski, Waldemar A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is the end stage metabolite of tryptophan produced mainly by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). It has neuroprotective activities but can be elevated in the neuropsychiatric disorders. Toxic effects of KYNA in the CNS are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the subdural KYNA infusion on the spinal cord in adult rats. Methods A total of 42 healthy adult rats were randomly assigned into six groups and were infused for 7 days with PBS (control) or 0.0002 pmol/min, 0.01 nmol/min, 0.1 nmol/min, 1 nmol/min, and 10 nmol/min of KYNA per 7 days. The effect of KYNA on spinal cord was determined using histological and electron microscopy examination. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was measured in the blood serum to assess a degree of myelin damage. Result In all rats continuous long-lasting subdural KYNA infusion was associated with myelin damage and myelin loss that was increasingly widespread in a dose-depended fashion in peripheral, sub-pial areas. Damage to myelin sheaths was uniquely related to the separation of lamellae at the intraperiod line. The damaged myelin sheaths and areas with complete loss of myelin were associated with limited loss of scattered axons while vast majority of axons in affected areas were morphologically intact. The myelin loss-causing effect of KYNA occurred with no necrosis of oligodendrocytes, with locally severe astrogliosis and no cellular inflammatory response. Additionally, subdural KYNA infusion increased blood MOG concentration. Moreover, the rats infused with the highest doses of KYNA (1 and 10 nmol/min) demonstrated adverse neurological signs including weakness and quadriplegia. Conclusions We suggest, that subdural infusion of high dose of KYNA can be used as an experimental tool for the study of mechanisms of myelin damage and regeneration. On the other hand, the administration of low, physiologically relevant doses of KYNA may help to discover the role

  16. Persistent Macrophage/Microglial Activation and Myelin Disruption after Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Whitmire, Jason K.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Chertboonmuang, Parntip; Soloway, Paul D.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Campbell, Iain L.

    2006-01-01

    Increased leukocyte trafficking into the parenchyma during inflammatory responses in the central nervous system (CNS) is facilitated by the extracellular proteolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinases that are regulated, in part, by the endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), TIMP-1 gene expression is induced in astrocytes surrounding inflammatory lesions in the CNS. The physiological importance of this temporal and spatial relationship is not clear. Herein, we have addressed the functional role of TIMP-1 in a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced model of EAE using TIMP-1-deficient (TIMP-1−/−) C57BL/6 mice. Although CD4+ T-cell immune responses to myelin in wild-type (WT) and TIMP-1−/− mice were similar, analysis of CNS tissues from TIMP-1−/− mice after EAE revealed more severe myelin pathology than that of WT mice. This disruption of myelin was associated with both increased lymphocyte infiltration and microglial/macrophage accumulation in the brain parenchyma. These findings suggest that induction of TIMP-1 by astrocytes during EAE in WT mice represents an inherent cytoprotective response that mitigates CNS myelin injury through the regulation of both immune cell infiltration and microglial activation. PMID:17148673

  17. Temporal and spatial expression of major myelin proteins in the human fetal spinal cord during the second trimester

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenheim, K.M.; Bodhireddy, S.R.; Rashbaum, W.K.; Lyman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    Immunohistochemical identification of myelin basic protein (MBP) is a sensitive method for assessing myelination in the human fetal central nervous system (CNS). However, the temporospatial relationship of expression of two other major myelin proteins, proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) to that of MBP during fetal development has not been assessed in human tissues. Vibratome sections of cervical, thoracic and lumbosacral levels from 37 normal spinal cords of {le} 10 to 24 gestational week (GW) fetuses were analyzed using immunohistochemical methods. Using light microscopy, MBP was the first oligodendrocyte marker detected, present by 10 GW at more rostral levels. PLP and MAG were detected rostrally between 12 to 14 GW. All myelin proteins were expressed in anterior to posterior and rostral to caudal gradients. By the late second trimester, expression of MBP, PLP and MAG was noted in all locations in the spinal white matter except for the corticospinal tract. Expression of MAG was particularly marked in the posterior root entry zone and propriospinal tracts. The results suggest that PLP and MAG are expressed later than MBP but follow similar spatial gradients. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Subtype-specific oligodendrocyte dynamics in organotypic culture.

    PubMed

    Haber, Michael; Vautrin, Sandrine; Fry, Elizabeth J; Murai, Keith K

    2009-07-01

    The morphogenesis of oligodendrocytes is essential for central nervous system myelin formation and the rapid propagation of axon potentials through saltatory conduction. However, the discrete cellular events involved in the three-dimensional maturation of oligodendrocytes remain to be fully described. To address this, we followed the developmental stages of oligodendrocytes in mouse organotypic hippocampal slice cultures for 7-60 days using viral-mediated gene delivery of membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. Using static and time-lapse confocal imaging, we find that postmigratory NG2-expressing cells exhibit slow anatomical reorganization over the course of hours. This is in direct contrast to oligodendrocytes that take on a promyelinating and transitional phenotype, which display a more complex morphology and undergo dramatic actin-dependent structural remodeling over just minutes. More mature myelinating oligodendrocytes, which have pruned most of their processes, still retain some local remodeling behavior at developing internodes, but in general, revert to a relatively stable state. Our findings provide a detailed characterization of cellular events that help shape oligodendrocyte morphology and likely participate in neuron-glial cell interactions and the process of myelination.

  19. Myelin architecture: zippering membranes tightly together.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Mostafa; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael

    2014-04-01

    Rapid nerve conduction requires the coating of axons by a tightly packed multilayered myelin membrane. In the central nervous system, myelin is formed from cellular processes that extend from oligodendrocytes and wrap in a spiral fashion around an axon, resulting in the close apposition of adjacent myelin membrane bilayers. In this review, we discuss the physical principles underlying the zippering of the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes at the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflet. We propose that the interaction of the myelin basic protein with the cytoplasmic leaflet of the myelin bilayer triggers its polymerization into a fibrous network that drives membrane zippering and protein extrusion. In contrast, the adhesion of the extracellular surfaces of myelin requires the down-regulation of repulsive components of the glycocalyx, in order to uncover weak and unspecific attractive forces that bring the extracellular surfaces into close contact. Unveiling the mechanisms of myelin membrane assembly at the cytoplasmic and extracelluar sites may help to understand how the myelin bilayers are disrupted and destabilized in the different demyelinating diseases.

  20. On the resemblance of synapse formation and CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R G; Lyons, D A

    2014-09-12

    The myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS) is essential for nervous system formation, function and health. CNS myelination continues well into adulthood, but not all axons become myelinated. Unlike the peripheral nervous system, where we know of numerous axon-glial signals required for myelination, we have a poor understanding of the nature or identity of such molecules that regulate which axons are myelinated in the CNS. Recent studies have started to elucidate cell behavior during myelination in vivo and indicate that the choice of which axons are myelinated is made prior to myelin sheath generation. Here we propose that interactions between axons and the exploratory processes of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) lead to myelination and may be similar to those between dendrites and axons that prefigure and lead to synapse formation. Indeed axons and OPCs form synapses with striking resemblance to those of neurons, suggesting a similar mode of formation. We discuss families of molecules with specific functions at different stages of synapse formation and address studies that implicate the same factors during axon-OPC synapse formation and myelination. We also address the possibility that the function of such synapses might directly regulate the myelinating behavior of oligodendrocyte processes in vivo. In the future it may be of benefit to consider these similarities when taking a candidate-based approach to dissect mechanisms of CNS myelination.

  1. Reduced myelin basic protein and actin-related gene expression in visual cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Paul R; Eastwood, Sharon L; Harrison, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Most brain gene expression studies of schizophrenia have been conducted in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. The extent to which alterations occur in other cortical regions is not well established. We investigated primary visual cortex (Brodmann area 17) from the Stanley Neuropathology Consortium collection of tissue from 60 subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, or controls. We first carried out a preliminary array screen of pooled RNA, and then used RT-PCR to quantify five mRNAs which the array identified as differentially expressed in schizophrenia (myelin basic protein [MBP], myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein [MOG], β-actin [ACTB], thymosin β-10 [TB10], and superior cervical ganglion-10 [SCG10]). Reduced mRNA levels were confirmed by RT-PCR for MBP, ACTB and TB10. The MBP reduction was limited to transcripts containing exon 2. ACTB and TB10 mRNAs were also decreased in bipolar disorder. None of the transcripts were altered in subjects with major depression. Reduced MBP mRNA in schizophrenia replicates findings in other brain regions and is consistent with oligodendrocyte involvement in the disorder. The decreases in expression of ACTB, and the actin-binding protein gene TB10, suggest changes in cytoskeletal organisation. The findings confirm that the primary visual cortex shows molecular alterations in schizophrenia and extend the evidence for a widespread, rather than focal, cortical pathophysiology.

  2. Functional organization of an Mbp enhancer exposes striking transcriptional regulatory diversity within myelinating glia.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Nancy; Dib, Samar; Finsen, Bente; Denarier, Eric; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Drouin, Régen; Kokoeva, Maia; Hudson, Thomas J; Siminovitch, Kathy; Friedman, Hana C; Peterson, Alan C

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, large caliber axons are ensheathed by myelin, a glial specialization supporting axon integrity and conferring accelerated and energy-efficient action potential conduction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is required for normal myelin elaboration with maximal mbp transcription in oligodendrocytes requiring the upstream M3 enhancer. To further characterize the mechanism regulating mbp transcription, we defined M3 structure/function relationships by evaluating its evolutionary conservation, DNA footprints and the developmental programing conferred in mice by M3 derivatives. Multiple M3 regulatory element combinations were found to drive expression in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells with a minimal 129 bp sequence conferring expression in oligodendrocytes throughout myelin elaboration, maintenance and repair. Unexpectedly, M3 derivatives conferred markedly different spatial and temporal expression programs thus illuminating striking transcriptional heterogeneity within post-mitotic oligodendrocytes. Finally, one M3 derivative engaged only during primary myelination, not during adult remyelination, demonstrating that transcriptional regulation in the two states is not equivalent. PMID:26507463

  3. Linking White and Grey Matter in Schizophrenia: Oligodendrocyte and Neuron Pathology in the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Höistad, Malin; Segal, Devorah; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Hof, Patrick R.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal circuitry relies to a large extent on the presence of functional myelin produced in the brain by oligodendrocytes. Schizophrenia has been proposed to arise partly from altered brain connectivity. Brain imaging and neuropathologic studies have revealed changes in white matter and reduction in myelin content in patients with schizophrenia. In particular, alterations in the directionality and alignment of axons have been documented in schizophrenia. Moreover, the expression levels of several myelin-related genes are decreased in postmortem brains obtained from patients with schizophrenia. These findings have led to the formulation of the oligodendrocyte/myelin dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia. In this review, we present a brief overview of the neuropathologic findings obtained on white matter and oligodendrocyte status observed in schizophrenia patients, and relate these changes to the processes of brain maturation and myelination. We also review recent data on oligodendrocyte/myelin genes, and present some recent mouse models of myelin deficiencies. The use of transgenic and mutant animal models offers a unique opportunity to analyze oligodendrocyte and neuronal changes that may have a clinical impact. Lastly, we present some recent morphological findings supporting possible causal involvement of white and grey matter abnormalities, in the aim of determining the morphologic characteristics of the circuits whose alteration leads to the cortical dysfunction that possibly underlies the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:19636386

  4. Towards resolving the transcription factor network controlling myelin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L.; Denarier, Eric; Friedman, Hana C.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Peterson, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced from spirally-wrapped oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of inherited or acquired myelin abnormalities in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, it plays a critical role in nervous system function. Myelin sheath production coincides with rapid up-regulation of numerous genes. The complexity of their subsequent expression patterns, along with recently recognized heterogeneity within the oligodendrocyte lineage, suggest that the regulatory networks controlling such genes drive multiple context-specific transcriptional programs. Conferring this nuanced level of control likely involves a large repertoire of interacting transcription factors (TFs). Here, we combined novel strategies of computational sequence analyses with in vivo functional analysis to establish a TF network model of coordinate myelin-associated gene transcription. Notably, the network model captures regulatory DNA elements and TFs known to regulate oligodendrocyte myelin gene transcription and/or oligodendrocyte development, thereby validating our approach. Further, it links to numerous TFs with previously unsuspected roles in CNS myelination and suggests collaborative relationships amongst both known and novel TFs, thus providing deeper insight into the myelin gene transcriptional network. PMID:21729871

  5. Insights into mechanisms of central nervous system myelination using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Czopka, Tim

    2016-03-01

    Myelin is the multi-layered membrane that surrounds most axons and is produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to its important role in enabling rapid nerve conduction, it has become clear in recent years that myelin plays additional vital roles in CNS function. Myelinating oligodendrocytes provide metabolic support to axons and active myelination is even involved in regulating forms of learning and memory formation. However, there are still large gaps in our understanding of how myelination by oligodendrocytes is regulated. The small tropical zebrafish has become an increasingly popular model organism to investigate many aspects of nervous system formation, function, and regeneration. This is mainly due to two approaches for which the zebrafish is an ideally suited vertebrate model--(1) in vivo live cell imaging using vital dyes and genetically encoded reporters, and (2) gene and target discovery using unbiased screens. This review summarizes how the use of zebrafish has helped understand mechanisms of oligodendrocyte behavior and myelination in vivo and discusses the potential use of zebrafish to shed light on important future questions relating to myelination in the context of CNS development, function and repair.

  6. Laminin alters Fyn regulatory mechanisms and promotes oligodendrocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Relucio, Jenne; Tzvetanova, Iva D.; Ao, Wei; Lindquist, Sabine; Colognato, Holly

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LAMA2, the gene for the extracellular matrix protein laminin-α2, cause a severe muscular dystrophy termed MDC1A. MDC1A patients have accompanying CNS neural dysplasias and white matter abnormalities for which the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that in laminin-deficient mice oligodendrocyte development was delayed such that oligodendrocyte progenitors accumulated inappropriately in adult brains. Conversely, laminin substrates were found to promote the transition of oligodendrocyte progenitors to newly-formed oligodendrocytes. Laminin-enhanced differentiation was Src Family Kinase –dependent and resulted in the activation of the Src Family Kinase Fyn. In laminin-deficient brains, however, increased Fyn repression was accompanied by elevated levels of the Src Family Kinase negative regulatory proteins, C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and its transmembrane adaptor, Csk-binding protein (Cbp). These findings indicate that laminin deficiencies delay oligodendrocyte maturation by causing dysregulation of signaling pathways critical for oligodendrocyte development, and suggest that a normal role for CNS laminin is to promote the development of oligodendrocyte progenitors into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes via modulation of Fyn regulatory molecules. PMID:19776266

  7. Motor skill learning requires active central myelination.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Ian A; Ohayon, David; Li, Huiliang; de Faria, Joana Paes; Emery, Ben; Tohyama, Koujiro; Richardson, William D

    2014-10-17

    Myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) are formed continuously in the healthy adult brain. In this work, we study the function of these late-forming cells and the myelin they produce. Learning a new motor skill (such as juggling) alters the structure of the brain's white matter, which contains many OLs, suggesting that late-born OLs might contribute to motor learning. Consistent with this idea, we show that production of newly formed OLs is briefly accelerated in mice that learn a new skill (running on a "complex wheel" with irregularly spaced rungs). By genetically manipulating the transcription factor myelin regulatory factor in OL precursors, we blocked production of new OLs during adulthood without affecting preexisting OLs or myelin. This prevented the mice from mastering the complex wheel. Thus, generation of new OLs and myelin is important for learning motor skills. PMID:25324381

  8. Functional delay of myelination of auditory delay lines in the nucleus laminaris of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Min; Carr, Catherine E

    2007-12-01

    In the barn owl, maps of interaural time difference (ITD) are created in the nucleus laminaris (NL) by interdigitating axons that act as delay lines. Adult delay line axons are myelinated, and this myelination is timely, coinciding with the attainment of adult head size, and stable ITD cues. The proximal portions of the axons become myelinated in late embryonic life, but the delay line portions of the axon in NL remain unmyelinated until the first postnatal week. Myelination of the delay lines peaks at the third week posthatch, and myelinating oligodendrocyte density approaches adult levels by one month, when the head reaches its adult width. Migration of oligodendrocyte progenitors into NL and the subsequent onset of myelination may be restricted by a glial barrier in late embryonic stages and the first posthatch week, since the loss of tenascin-C immunoreactivity in NL is correlated with oligodendrocyte progenitor migration into NL.

  9. Neuronal activity promotes oligodendrogenesis and adaptive myelination in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Erin M; Purger, David; Mount, Christopher W; Goldstein, Andrea K; Lin, Grant L; Wood, Lauren S; Inema, Ingrid; Miller, Sarah E; Bieri, Gregor; Zuchero, J Bradley; Barres, Ben A; Woo, Pamelyn J; Vogel, Hannes; Monje, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Myelination of the central nervous system requires the generation of functionally mature oligodendrocytes from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Electrically active neurons may influence OPC function and selectively instruct myelination of an active neural circuit. In this work, we use optogenetic stimulation of the premotor cortex in awake, behaving mice to demonstrate that neuronal activity elicits a mitogenic response of neural progenitor cells and OPCs, promotes oligodendrogenesis, and increases myelination within the deep layers of the premotor cortex and subcortical white matter. We further show that this neuronal activity-regulated oligodendrogenesis and myelination is associated with improved motor function of the corresponding limb. Oligodendrogenesis and myelination appear necessary for the observed functional improvement, as epigenetic blockade of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin changes prevents the activity-regulated behavioral improvement.

  10. Microenvironmental regulation of oligodendrocyte replacement and remyelination in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2016-07-01

    Myelin is a proteolipid sheath enwrapping axons in the nervous system that facilitates signal transduction along the axons. In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes are specialized glial cells responsible for myelin formation and maintenance. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), oligodendroglia cell death and myelin damage (demyelination) cause chronic axonal damage and irreparable loss of sensory and motor functions. Accumulating evidence shows that replacement of damaged oligodendrocytes and renewal of myelin (remyelination) are promising approaches to prevent axonal degeneration and restore function following SCI. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are two main resident cell populations in the spinal cord with innate capacities to foster endogenous oligodendrocyte replacement and remyelination. However, due to the hostile microenvironment of SCI, the regenerative capacity of these endogenous precursor cells is conspicuously restricted. Activated resident glia, along with infiltrating immune cells, are among the key modulators of secondary injury mechanisms that create a milieu impermissible to oligodendrocyte differentiation and remyelination. Recent studies have uncovered inhibitory roles for astrocyte-associated molecules such as matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), and a plethora of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic factors produced by activated microglia/macrophages. The quality of axonal remyelination is additionally challenged by dysregulation of the supportive growth factors required for maturation of new oligodendrocytes and axo-oligodendrocyte signalling. Careful understanding of factors that modulate the activity of endogenous precursor cells in the injury microenvironment is a key step in developing efficient repair strategies for remyelination and functional recovery following SCI. PMID:26857216

  11. Differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors is impaired in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mauney, Sarah A; Pietersen, Charmaine Y; Sonntag, Kai-C; Woo, Tsung-Ung W

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiology of schizophrenia involves disturbances of information processing across brain regions, possibly reflecting, at least in part, a disruption in the underlying axonal connectivity. This disruption is thought to be a consequence of the pathology of myelin ensheathment, the integrity of which is tightly regulated by oligodendrocytes. In order to gain insight into the possible neurobiological mechanisms of myelin deficit, we determined the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profile of laser captured cells that were immunoreactive for 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), a marker for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in addition to differentiating and myelinating oligodendrocytes, in the white matter of the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia subjects. Our findings pointed to the hypothesis that OPC differentiation might be impaired in schizophrenia. To address this hypothesis, we quantified cells that were immunoreactive for neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), a selective marker for OPCs, and those that were immunoreactive for oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2 (OLIG2), an oligodendrocyte lineage marker that is expressed by OPCs and maturing oligodendrocytes. We found that the density of NG2-immunoreactive cells was unaltered, but the density of OLIG2-immunoreactive cells was significantly decreased in subjects with schizophrenia, consistent with the notion that OPC differentiation impairment may contribute to oligodendrocyte disturbances and thereby myelin deficits in schizophrenia.

  12. Olig1 function is required for oligodendrocyte differentiation in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinxiang; Bercury, Kathryn K; Ahrendsen, Jared T; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-03-11

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination are tightly regulated processes orchestrated by a complex transcriptional network. Two bHLH transcription factors in this network, Olig1 and Olig2, are expressed exclusively by oligodendrocytes after late embryonic development. Although the role of Olig2 in the lineage is well established, the role of Olig1 is still unclear. The current studies analyzed the function of Olig1 in oligodendrocyte differentiation and developmental myelination in brain. Both oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment and oligodendrocyte differentiation were impaired in the corpus callosum of Olig1-null mice, resulting in hypomyelination throughout adulthood in the brain. As seen in previous studies with this mouse line, although there was an early myelination deficit in the spinal cord, essentially full recovery with normal spinal cord myelination was seen. Intriguingly, this regional difference may be partially attributed to compensatory upregulation of Olig2 protein expression in the spinal cord after Olig1 deletion, which is not seen in brain. The current study demonstrates a unique role for Olig1 in promoting oligodendrocyte progenitor cell commitment, differentiation, and subsequent myelination primarily in brain, but not spinal cord.

  13. Axon-to-Glia Interaction Regulates GABAA Receptor Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Alberdi, Elena; Canedo-Antelo, Manuel; Chara, Juan Carlos; Palomino, Aitor; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Myelination requires oligodendrocyte-neuron communication, and both neurotransmitters and contact interactions are essential for this process. Oligodendrocytes are endowed with neurotransmitter receptors whose expression levels and properties may change during myelination. However, only scant information is available about the extent and timing of these changes or how they are regulated by oligodendrocyte-neuron interactions. Here, we used electrophysiology to study the expression of ionotropic GABA, glutamate, and ATP receptors in oligodendrocytes derived from the optic nerve and forebrain cultured either alone or in the presence of dorsal root ganglion neurons. We observed that oligodendrocytes from both regions responded to these transmitters at 1 day in culture. After the first day in culture, however, GABA sensitivity diminished drastically to less than 10%, while that of glutamate and ATP remained constant. In contrast, the GABA response amplitude was sustained and remained stable in oligodendrocytes cocultured with dorsal root ganglion neurons. Immunochemistry and pharmacological properties of the responses indicated that they were mediated by distinctive GABAA receptors and that in coculture with neurons, the oligodendrocytes bearing the receptors were those in direct contact with axons. These results reveal that GABAA receptor regulation in oligodendrocytes is driven by axonal cues and that GABA signaling may play a role in myelination and/or during axon-glia recognition.

  14. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum), which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27455335

  15. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum), which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27455335

  16. Oligodendrocyte pathophysiology: a new view of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Segal, Devorah; Koschnick, Jessica R; Slegers, Linda H A; Hof, Patrick R

    2007-08-01

    A recent focus of schizophrenia research is disruption of white-matter integrity as a key facet of this complex disorder. This was spurred, partly, by new imaging modalities, magnetic transfer imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, which showed differences in white-matter integrity and tract coherence in persons with schizophrenia compared to controls. Oligodendrocytes, in particular, have been the subject of increased study after gene microarray analyses revealed that six myelin-related genes specific to oligodendrocytes have decreased expression levels in schizophrenia. Oligodendrocytes have also been shown to be decreased in number in the superior frontal gyrus of subjects with schizophrenia. The MAG knockout mouse, missing a myelin-related gene linked to schizophrenia, may prove to be a useful animal model for the dysmyelination observed in the human disease. Studies currently ongoing on this model have found changes in dendritic branching patterns of pyramidal cells in layer III of the prefrontal cortex. Further characterization of the pathology in these mice is underway.

  17. Assessing white matter ischemic damage in dementia patients by measurement of myelin proteins.

    PubMed

    Barker, Rachel; Wellington, Dannielle; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2013-07-01

    White matter ischemia is difficult to quantify histologically. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is highly susceptible to ischemia, being expressed only adaxonally, far from the oligodendrocyte cell body. Myelin-basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) are expressed throughout the myelin sheath. We compared MAG, MBP, and PLP levels in parietal white matter homogenates from 17 vascular dementia (VaD), 49 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 33 control brains, after assessing the post-mortem stability of these proteins. Small vessel disease (SVD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) severity had been assessed in paraffin sections. The concentration of MAG remained stable post-mortem, declined with increasing SVD, and was significantly lower in VaD than controls. The concentration of MBP fell progressively post-mortem, limiting its diagnostic utility in this context. Proteolipid protein was stable post-mortem and increased significantly with SVD severity. The MAG/PLP ratio declined significantly with SVD and CAA severity. The MAG and PLP levels and MAG/PLP did not differ significantly between AD and control brains. We validated the utility of MAG and MAG/PLP measurements on analysis of 74 frontal white matter samples from an Oxford cohort in which SVD had previously been scored. MAG concentration and the MAG/PLP ratio are useful post-mortem measures of ante-mortem white matter ischemia.

  18. Neurotoxocarosis alters myelin protein gene transcription and expression.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Lea; Beyerbach, Martin; Lühder, Fred; Beineke, Andreas; Strube, Christina

    2015-06-01

    Neurotoxocarosis is an infection of the central nervous system caused by migrating larvae of the common dog and cat roundworms (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), which are zoonotic agents. As these parasites are prevalent worldwide and neuropathological and molecular investigations on neurotoxocarosis are scare, this study aims to characterise nerve fibre demyelination associated with neurotoxocarosis on a molecular level. Transcription of eight myelin-associated genes (Cnp, Mag, Mbp, Mog, Mrf-1, Nogo-A, Plp1, Olig2) was determined in the mouse model during six time points of the chronic phase of infection using qRT-PCR. Expression of selected proteins was analysed by Western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Additionally, demyelination and neuronal damage were investigated histologically. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between transcription rates of T. canis-infected and uninfected control mice were detected for all analysed genes while T. cati affected five of eight investigated genes. Interestingly, 2', 3 ´-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) were upregulated in both T. canis- and T. cati-infected mice preceding demyelination. Later, CNPase expression was additionally enhanced. As expected, myelin basic protein (Mbp) was downregulated in cerebra and cerebella of T. canis-infected mice when severe demyelination was present 120 days post infectionem (dpi). The transcriptional pattern observed in the present study appears to reflect direct traumatic and hypoxic effects of larval migration as well as secondary processes including host immune reactions, demyelination and attempts to remyelinate damaged areas. PMID:25773181

  19. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  20. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  1. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  2. Myelin-associated glycoprotein modulates apoptosis of motoneurons during early postnatal development via NgR/p75NTR receptor-mediated activation of RhoA signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Palandri, A; Salvador, V R; Wojnacki, J; Vivinetto, A L; Schnaar, R L; Lopez, P H H

    2015-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a minor constituent of nervous system myelin, selectively expressed on the periaxonal myelin wrap. By engaging multiple axonal receptors, including Nogo-receptors (NgRs), MAG exerts a nurturing and protective effect the axons it ensheaths. Pharmacological activation of NgRs has a modulatory role on p75NTR-dependent postnatal apoptosis of motoneurons (MNs). However, it is not clear whether this reflects a physiological role of NgRs in MN development. NgRs are part of a multimeric receptor complex, which includes p75NTR, Lingo-1 and gangliosides. Upon ligand binding, this multimeric complex activates RhoA/ROCK signaling in a p75NTR-dependent manner. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible modulatory role of MAG on MN apoptosis during postnatal development. A time course study showed that Mag-null mice suffer a loss of MNs during the first postnatal week. Also, these mice exhibited increased susceptibility in an animal model of p75NTR-dependent MN apoptosis induced by nerve-crush injury, which was prevented by treatment with a soluble form of MAG (MAG-Fc). The protective role of MAG was confirmed in in vitro models of p75NTR-dependent MN apoptosis using the MN1 cell line and primary cultures. Lentiviral expression of shRNA sequences targeting NgRs on these cells abolished protection by MAG-Fc. Analysis of RhoA activity using a FRET-based RhoA biosensor showed that MAG-Fc activates RhoA. Pharmacological inhibition of p75NTR/RhoA/ROCK pathway, or overexpression of a p75NTR mutant unable to activate RhoA, completely blocked MAG-Fc protection against apoptosis. The role of RhoA/ROCK signaling was further confirmed in the nerve-crush model, where pretreatment with ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 blocked the pro-survival effect of MAG-Fc. These findings identify a new protective role of MAG as a modulator of apoptosis of MNs during postnatal development by a mechanism involving the p75NTR/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. Also, our results

  3. Systematic Review of Pharmacological Properties of the Oligodendrocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Carla; Bertalot, Thomas; Zusso, Morena; Skaper, Stephen D.; Giusti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature—multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination) indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of OPCs. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, and cannabinoids. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor) interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca2+ signaling, and the balance between Ca2+ influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes (OLs). Moreover, Ca2+ signaling in OPCs can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as well as cell death in mature mouse OLs. There is also evidence

  4. Review: Glial lineages and myelination in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    COMPSTON, ALASTAIR; ZAJICEK, JOHN; SUSSMAN, JON; WEBB, ANNA; HALL, GILLIAN; MUIR, DAVID; SHAW, CHRISTOPHER; WOOD, ANDREW; SCOLDING, NEIL

    1997-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, derived from stem cell precursors which arise in subventricular zones of the developing central nervous system, have as their specialist role the synthesis and maintenance of myelin. Astrocytes contribute to the cellular architecture of the central nervous system and act as a source of growth factors and cytokines; microglia are bone-marrow derived macrophages which function as primary immunocompetent cells in the central nervous system. Myelination depends on the establishment of stable relationships between each differentiated oligodendrocyte and short segments of several neighbouring axons. There is growing evidence, especially from studies of glial cell implantation, that oligodendrocyte precursors persist in the adult nervous system and provide a limited capacity for the restoration of structure and function in myelinated pathways damaged by injury or disease. PMID:9061442

  5. Convergent functional genomics of oligodendrocyte differentiation identifies multiple autoinhibitory signaling circuits.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Rosanna Pescini; Joubert, Lara; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Foucault, Isabelle; Jorand-Lebrun, Catherine; Lamarine, Marc; Peixoto, Hélène; Vignaud, Chloé; Frémaux, Christèle; Jomotte, Thérèse; Françon, Bernard; Alliod, Chantal; Bernasconi, Lilia; Abderrahim, Hadi; Perrin, Dominique; Bombrun, Agnes; Zanoguera, Francisca; Rommel, Christian; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2009-03-01

    Inadequate remyelination of brain white matter lesions has been associated with a failure of oligodendrocyte precursors to differentiate into mature, myelin-producing cells. In order to better understand which genes play a critical role in oligodendrocyte differentiation, we performed time-dependent, genome-wide gene expression studies of mouse Oli-neu cells as they differentiate into process-forming and myelin basic protein-producing cells, following treatment with three different agents. Our data indicate that different inducers activate distinct pathways that ultimately converge into the completely differentiated state, where regulated gene sets overlap maximally. In order to also gain insight into the functional role of genes that are regulated in this process, we silenced 88 of these genes using small interfering RNA and identified multiple repressors of spontaneous differentiation of Oli-neu, most of which were confirmed in rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors cells. Among these repressors were CNP, a well-known myelin constituent, and three phosphatases, each known to negatively control mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. We show that a novel inhibitor for one of the identified genes, dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP10/MKP5, was also capable of inducing oligodendrocyte differentiation in primary oligodendrocyte precursors. Oligodendrocytic differentiation feedback loops may therefore yield pharmacological targets to treat disease related to dysfunctional myelin deposition.

  6. Convergent Functional Genomics of Oligodendrocyte Differentiation Identifies Multiple Autoinhibitory Signaling Circuits▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pescini Gobert, Rosanna; Joubert, Lara; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Foucault, Isabelle; Jorand-Lebrun, Catherine; Lamarine, Marc; Peixoto, Hélène; Vignaud, Chloé; Frémaux, Christèle; Jomotte, Thérèse; Françon, Bernard; Alliod, Chantal; Bernasconi, Lilia; Abderrahim, Hadi; Perrin, Dominique; Bombrun, Agnes; Zanoguera, Francisca; Rommel, Christian; van Huijsduijnen, Rob Hooft

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate remyelination of brain white matter lesions has been associated with a failure of oligodendrocyte precursors to differentiate into mature, myelin-producing cells. In order to better understand which genes play a critical role in oligodendrocyte differentiation, we performed time-dependent, genome-wide gene expression studies of mouse Oli-neu cells as they differentiate into process-forming and myelin basic protein-producing cells, following treatment with three different agents. Our data indicate that different inducers activate distinct pathways that ultimately converge into the completely differentiated state, where regulated gene sets overlap maximally. In order to also gain insight into the functional role of genes that are regulated in this process, we silenced 88 of these genes using small interfering RNA and identified multiple repressors of spontaneous differentiation of Oli-neu, most of which were confirmed in rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors cells. Among these repressors were CNP, a well-known myelin constituent, and three phosphatases, each known to negatively control mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. We show that a novel inhibitor for one of the identified genes, dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP10/MKP5, was also capable of inducing oligodendrocyte differentiation in primary oligodendrocyte precursors. Oligodendrocytic differentiation feedback loops may therefore yield pharmacological targets to treat disease related to dysfunctional myelin deposition. PMID:19139271

  7. Simvastatin induces cell death in a mouse cerebellar slice culture (CSC) model of developmental myelination

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhongmin; Reeves, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Statins (inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase) have shown promise in treating multiple sclerosis (MS). However, their effect on oligodendrocyte remyelination of demyelinated axons has not been clarified. Since developmental myelination shares many features with the remyelination process, we investigated the effect of lipophilic simvastatin on developmental myelination in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures (CSC). In this study, we first characterized developmental myelination in CSC from postnatal day (P)5 and P10 mice that express enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells. We then examined the effect of simvastain on three developmental myelination stages: early myelination (P5 CSC, 2DIV), late myelination (P10 CSC, 2DIV) and full myelination (P10 CSC, 10DIV). We found that treatment with simvastatin (0.1 μM) for 6 days decreased the survival of Purkinje cells and oligodendrocytes drastically during the early myelination stage, while moderately during the late and full myelination stages. Oligodendrocytes are more resistant than Purkinje cells. The toxic effect of simvastatin could be rescued by the product of HMG-CoA reductase mevalonate but not low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Additionally, this toxic effect is independent of isoprenylation since farnesyl pyrophosphate (Fpp) but not geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGpp) provided partial rescue. Our findings therefore suggest that inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is detrimental to neuronal tissue. PMID:18929563

  8. Zebrafish as a Model to Investigate CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Marnie A.; Macklin, Wendy B.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems. PMID:25263121

  9. Zebrafish as a model to investigate CNS myelination.

    PubMed

    Preston, Marnie A; Macklin, Wendy B

    2015-02-01

    Myelin plays a critical role in proper neuronal function by providing trophic and metabolic support to axons and facilitating energy-efficient saltatory conduction. Myelination is influenced by numerous molecules including growth factors, hormones, transmembrane receptors and extracellular molecules, which activate signaling cascades that drive cellular maturation. Key signaling molecules and downstream signaling cascades controlling myelination have been identified in cell culture systems. However, in vitro systems are not able to faithfully replicate the complex in vivo signaling environment that occurs during development or following injury. Currently, it remains time-consuming and expensive to investigate myelination in vivo in rodents, the most widely used model for studying mammalian myelination. As such, there is a need for alternative in vivo myelination models, particularly ones that can test molecular mechanisms without removing oligodendrocyte lineage cells from their native signaling environment or disrupting intercellular interactions with other cell types present during myelination. Here, we review the ever-increasing role of zebrafish in studies uncovering novel mechanisms controlling vertebrate myelination. These innovative studies range from observations of the behavior of single cells during in vivo myelination as well as mutagenesis- and pharmacology-based screens in whole animals. Additionally, we discuss recent efforts to develop novel models of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death in adult zebrafish for the study of cellular behavior in real time during repair and regeneration of damaged nervous systems.

  10. Oligodendrocyte Regeneration and CNS Remyelination Require TACE/ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Klingener, Michael; Raines, Elaine W.; Crawford, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular network that supports oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration under demyelinating conditions has been a primary goal for regenerative medicine in demyelinating disorders. We recently described an essential function for TACE/ADAM17 in regulating oligodendrogenesis during postnatal myelination, but it is unknown whether this protein also plays a role in OL regeneration and remyelination under demyelinating conditions. By using genetic mouse models to achieve selective gain- or loss-of-function of TACE or EGFR in OL lineage cells in vivo, we found that TACE is critical for EGFR activation in OLs following demyelination, and therefore, for sustaining OL regeneration and CNS remyelination. TACE deficiency in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells following demyelination disturbs OL lineage cell expansion and survival, leading to a delay in the remyelination process. EGFR overexpression in TACE deficient OLs in vivo restores OL development and postnatal CNS myelination, but also OL regeneration and CNS remyelination following demyelination. Our study reveals an essential function of TACE in supporting OL regeneration and CNS remyelination that may contribute to the design of new strategies for therapeutic intervention in demyelinating disorders by promoting oligodendrocyte regeneration and myelin repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oligodendrocyte (OL) regeneration has emerged as a promising new approach for the treatment of demyelinating disorders. By using genetic mouse models to selectively delete TACE expression in oligodendrocyte progenitors cells (OPs), we found that TACE/ADAM17 is required for supporting OL regeneration following demyelination. TACE genetic depletion in OPs abrogates EGFR activation in OL lineage cells, and perturbs cell expansion and survival, blunting the process of CNS remyelination. Moreover, EGFR overexpression in TACE-deficient OPs in vivo overcomes the defects in OL development during postnatal development but also OL

  11. Tim-2 is the receptor for H-ferritin on oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Todorich, Bozho; Zhang, Xuesheng; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Seaman, William E; Connor, James R

    2008-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes stain more strongly for iron than any other cell in the CNS, and they require iron for the production of myelin. For most cell types transferrin is the major iron delivery protein, yet neither transferrin receptor protein nor mRNA are detectable in mature oligodendrocytes. Thus an alternative iron delivery mechanism must exist. Given the significant long term consequences of developmental iron deficiency and the iron requirements for normal myelination, identification of the iron delivery mechanism for oligodendrocytes is important. Previously we have reported that oligodendrocytes bind H-ferritin and that H-ferritin binds to white matter tracts in vivo. Recently, T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein-2 (Tim-2) was shown to bind and internalize H-ferritin. In the present study we show that Tim-2 is expressed on oligodendrocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Further, the onset of saturable H-ferritin binding in CG4 oligodendrocyte cell line is accompanied by Tim-2 expression. Application of a blocking antibody to the extracellular domain of Tim-2 significantly reduces H-ferritin binding to the differentiated CG4 cells and primary oligodendrocytes. Tim-2 expression on CG4 cells is responsive to iron; decreasing with iron loading and increasing with iron chelation. Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence that Tim-2 is the H-ferritin receptor on oligodendrocytes suggesting it is the primary mechanism for iron acquisition by these cells.

  12. Multiple sclerosis. Oligodendrocyte survival and proliferation in an active established lesion.

    PubMed

    Raine, C S; Scheinberg, L; Waltz, J M

    1981-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes have been studied ultrastructurally in relationship to areas of active demyelination in multiple sclerosis. The tissue came from a central nervous system plaque sampled at biopsy during a neurosurgical procedure to correct severe intention tremor in a case of chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Cells interpreted as oligodendrocytes were abundant within the demyelinated zone, were easily identifiable, and sometimes occurred as nests of cells suggestive of proliferation. Oligodendrocytes were also common within areas of active demyelination where numerous macrophages displayed active phagocytosis of myelin. These oligodendrocytes were paler and perhaps represented residual, surviving cells. In the relatively normal white matter adjacent to the plaque, increased numbers of oligodendrocytes occurred in association with remyelination. In the demyelinated zone, the astrocyte:macrophage:oligodendrocyte ratio was 1:2.25:4.5; within the region of ongoing demyelination, 1:4:4; and in the adjacent white matter, 1:0.1:2.1. On the basis of an apparent proliferation and survival of oligodendrocytes, the findings support the notions that there is no selective depletion of oligodendrocytes either during or shortly following central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis, and that the myelin sheath is the primary target. PMID:7321526

  13. Schwann cell myelination of the myelin deficient rat spinal cord following X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, I.D.; Hammang, J.P.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The myelin-deficient (md) rat is an X-linked myelin mutant that has an abnormality of oligodendrocytes and a severe paucity of myelin throughout the CNS. This lack of myelin makes it an ideal model in which to study the cellular interactions that occur when foreign myelinating cells are induced in the milieu of this nonmyelinated CNS. In this study, Schwann cells were induced in the lumbosacral spinal cord by exposing it to radiation, a technique demonstrated repeatedly in other nonmutant strains of rats. Md rats and their age-matched littermates were irradiated (3,000 to 4,000 R) at 3 days of age and perfused 16-22 days later after pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine. In the md rat, Schwann cell invasion progressed from the area of the spinal cord-nerve root junction and extended into the dorsal columns and adjacent gray matter. Autoradiographic evidence revealed that many of these cells incorporated 3H-thymidine, indicating that they were undergoing proliferation. Ultrastructural observations showed that there was an integration of these intraspinal Schwann cells with the cells normally occurring in this environment, i.e., oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The extent of migration and division of Schwann cells, as well as their interactions with glial cells, were similar to those seen in the nonmutant irradiated littermates. These studies provide conclusive evidence that md rat axons are normal with respect to their ability to provide trophic and mitogenic signals to myelinating cells.

  14. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate. PMID:24040667

  15. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate.

  16. Injury and differentiation following inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV in rat oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Iryna; Campbell, Graham; Rist, Julia; Zambonin, Jessica; Rorbach, Joanna; Wydro, Mateusz M; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage cells are susceptible to a variety of insults including hypoxia, excitotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species. Demyelination is a well-recognized feature of several CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis, white matter strokes, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and disorders due to mitochondrial DNA mutations. Although mitochondria have been implicated in the demise of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, the consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects have not been examined. We determine the in vitro impact of established inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes as well as on differentiation capacity of OPCs from P0 rat. Injury to mature oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition was significantly greater than to OPCs, judged by cell detachment and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, although viability of cells that remained attached was not compromised. Active mitochondria were abundant in processes of differentiated oligodendrocytes and MMP was significantly greater in differentiated oligodendrocytes than OPCs. MMP dissipated following complex IV inhibition in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, complex IV inhibition impaired process formation within oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Injury to and impaired process formation of oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition has potentially important implications for the pathogenesis and repair of CNS myelin disorders. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20665559

  17. Reorganization of Lipid Diffusion by Myelin Basic Protein as Revealed by STED Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Steshenko, Olena; Andrade, Débora M; Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Schneider, Falk; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W; Simons, Mikael; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane that ensheathes axonal fibers in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing fast propagation of nerve action potentials. It contains densely packed lipids, lacks an actin-based cytocortex, and requires myelin basic protein (MBP) as its major structural component. This protein is the basic constituent of the proteinaceous meshwork that is localized between adjacent cytoplasmic membranes of the myelin sheath. Yet, it is not clear how MBP influences the organization and dynamics of the lipid constituents of myelin. Here, we used optical stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the characteristics of diffusion of different fluorescent lipid analogs in myelin membrane sheets of cultured oligodendrocytes and in micrometer-sized domains that were induced by MBP in live epithelial PtK2 cells. Lipid diffusion was significantly faster and less anomalous both in oligodendrocytes and inside the MBP-rich domains of PtK2 cells compared with undisturbed live PtK2 cells. Our data show that MBP reorganizes lipid diffusion, possibly by preventing the buildup of an actin-based cytocortex and by preventing most membrane proteins from entering the myelin sheath region. Yet, in contrast to myelin sheets in oligodendrocytes, the MBP-induced domains in epithelial PtK2 cells demonstrate no change in lipid order, indicating that segregation of long-chain lipids into myelin sheets is a process specific to oligodendrocytes. PMID:27276262

  18. Reorganization of Lipid Diffusion by Myelin Basic Protein as Revealed by STED Nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Steshenko, Olena; Andrade, Débora M; Honigmann, Alf; Mueller, Veronika; Schneider, Falk; Sezgin, Erdinc; Hell, Stefan W; Simons, Mikael; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Myelin is a multilayered membrane that ensheathes axonal fibers in the vertebrate nervous system, allowing fast propagation of nerve action potentials. It contains densely packed lipids, lacks an actin-based cytocortex, and requires myelin basic protein (MBP) as its major structural component. This protein is the basic constituent of the proteinaceous meshwork that is localized between adjacent cytoplasmic membranes of the myelin sheath. Yet, it is not clear how MBP influences the organization and dynamics of the lipid constituents of myelin. Here, we used optical stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy in combination with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the characteristics of diffusion of different fluorescent lipid analogs in myelin membrane sheets of cultured oligodendrocytes and in micrometer-sized domains that were induced by MBP in live epithelial PtK2 cells. Lipid diffusion was significantly faster and less anomalous both in oligodendrocytes and inside the MBP-rich domains of PtK2 cells compared with undisturbed live PtK2 cells. Our data show that MBP reorganizes lipid diffusion, possibly by preventing the buildup of an actin-based cytocortex and by preventing most membrane proteins from entering the myelin sheath region. Yet, in contrast to myelin sheets in oligodendrocytes, the MBP-induced domains in epithelial PtK2 cells demonstrate no change in lipid order, indicating that segregation of long-chain lipids into myelin sheets is a process specific to oligodendrocytes.

  19. Anti-muscarinic adjunct therapy accelerates functional human oligodendrocyte repair.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U; O'Bara, Melanie A; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J; Sim, Fraser J

    2015-02-25

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a(+)O4(+) cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors.

  20. Anti-Muscarinic Adjunct Therapy Accelerates Functional Human Oligodendrocyte Repair

    PubMed Central

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U.; O'Bara, Melanie A.; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M.; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H.; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C.; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a+O4+ cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors. PMID:25716865

  1. Remyelination by oligodendrocytes stimulated by antiserum to spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Lennon, V A; Benveniste, E N; Merrill, J E

    1987-01-01

    The new synthesis of myelin and the proliferation of oligodendrocytes was stimulated by serum from syngeneic mice immunized with homogenized spinal cord (SCH). Treatment with this antiserum produced a 10-fold increase in the area of remyelination in spinal cords that had become demyelinated previously as a result of infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. Inflammation was decreased in regions of white matter that showed remyelination. Oligodendrocytes exposed to anti-SCH in vitro incorporated three to five times more [3H]thymidine than resting cells did and expressed more myelin basic protein in their cytoplasm, suggesting stimulation of myelinogenesis. Thus, there is a factor present in anti-SCH antiserum that stimulates central nervous system-type remyelination. This finding may provide clues for the therapy of patients with demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

  2. Epigenetic Modulation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation to Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Douvaras, Panagiotis; Rusielewicz, Tomasz; Kim, Kwi Hye; Haines, Jeffery D.; Casaccia, Patrizia; Fossati, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells provide an invaluable tool for generating human, disease-relevant cells. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by myelin damage. Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS); they differentiate from progenitor cells, and their membranes ensheath axons, providing trophic support and allowing fast conduction velocity. The current understanding of oligodendrocyte biology was founded by rodent studies, where the establishment of repressive epigenetic marks on histone proteins, followed by activation of myelin genes, leads to lineage progression. To assess whether this epigenetic regulation is conserved across species, we differentiated human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to oligodendrocytes and asked whether similar histone marks and relative enzymatic activities could be detected. The transcriptional levels of enzymes responsible for methylation and acetylation of histone marks were analyzed during oligodendrocyte differentiation, and the post-translational modifications on histones were detected using immunofluorescence. These studies showed that also in human cells, differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage is characterized by the acquisition of multiple repressive histone marks, including deacetylation of lysine residues on histone H3 and trimethylation of residues K9 and K27. These data suggest that the epigenetic modulation of oligodendrocyte identity is highly conserved across species. PMID:27110779

  3. Olig2 targets chromatin remodelers to enhancers to initiate oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Chen, Ying; Kim, Bongwoo; Wang, Haibo; Zhao, Chuntao; He, Xuelian; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wei; Wu, Lai Man N; Mao, Meng; Chan, Jonah R; Wu, Jiang; Lu, Q Richard

    2013-01-17

    Establishment of oligodendrocyte identity is crucial for subsequent events of myelination in the CNS. Here, we demonstrate that activation of ATP-dependent SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling enzyme Smarca4/Brg1 at the differentiation onset is necessary and sufficient to initiate and promote oligodendrocyte lineage progression and maturation. Genome-wide multistage studies by ChIP-seq reveal that oligodendrocyte-lineage determination factor Olig2 functions as a prepatterning factor to direct Smarca4/Brg1 to oligodendrocyte-specific enhancers. Recruitment of Smarca4/Brg1 to distinct subsets of myelination regulatory genes is developmentally regulated. Functional analyses of Smarca4/Brg1 and Olig2 co-occupancy relative to chromatin epigenetic marking uncover stage-specific cis-regulatory elements that predict sets of transcriptional regulators controlling oligodendrocyte differentiation. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of the functional specificity and activity of a Smarca4/Brg1-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex by Olig2, coupled with transcriptionally linked chromatin modifications, is critical to precisely initiate and establish the transcriptional program that promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and subsequent myelination of the CNS.

  4. Disturbed macro-connectivity in schizophrenia linked to oligodendrocyte dysfunction: from structural findings to molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cassoli, Juliana Silva; Guest, Paul C; Malchow, Berend; Schmitt, Andrea; Falkai, Peter; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with multi-factorial characteristics. A number of findings have shown disrupted synaptic connectivity in schizophrenia patients and emerging evidence suggests that this results from dysfunctional oligodendrocytes, the cells responsible for myelinating axons in white matter to promote neuronal conduction. The exact cause of this is not known, although recent imaging and molecular profiling studies of schizophrenia patients have identified changes in white matter tracts connecting multiple brain regions with effects on protein signaling networks involved in the myelination process. Further understanding of oligodendrocyte dysfunction in schizophrenia could lead to identification of novel drug targets for this devastating disease. PMID:27336040

  5. Evolution of the CNS myelin gene regulatory program.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiliang; Richardson, William D

    2016-06-15

    Myelin is a specialized subcellular structure that evolved uniquely in vertebrates. A myelinated axon conducts action potentials many times faster than an unmyelinated axon of the same diameter; for the same conduction speed, the unmyelinated axon would need a much larger diameter and volume than its myelinated counterpart. Hence myelin speeds information transfer and saves space, allowing the evolution of a powerful yet portable brain. Myelination in the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by a gene regulatory program that features a number of master transcriptional regulators including Olig1, Olig2 and Myrf. Olig family genes evolved from a single ancestral gene in non-chordates. Olig2, which executes multiple functions with regard to oligodendrocyte identity and development in vertebrates, might have evolved functional versatility through post-translational modification, especially phosphorylation, as illustrated by its evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine phospho-acceptor sites and its accumulation of serine residues during more recent stages of vertebrate evolution. Olig1, derived from a duplicated copy of Olig2 in early bony fish, is involved in oligodendrocyte development and is critical to remyelination in bony vertebrates, but is lost in birds. The origin of Myrf orthologs might be the result of DNA integration between an invading phage or bacterium and an early protist, producing a fusion protein capable of self-cleavage and DNA binding. Myrf seems to have adopted new functions in early vertebrates - initiation of the CNS myelination program as well as the maintenance of mature oligodendrocyte identity and myelin structure - by developing new ways to interact with DNA motifs specific to myelin genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution.

  6. Chemical inducers and transcriptional markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Lara; Foucault, Isabelle; Sagot, Yves; Bernasconi, Lilia; Duval, François; Alliod, Chantal; Frossard, Marie-José; Pescini Gobert, Rosanna; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Nichols, Anthony; Pouly, Sandrine; Rommel, Christian; Roach, Arthur; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes generate and maintain myelin, which is essential for axonal function and protection of the mammalian central nervous system. To advance our molecular understanding of differentiation by these cells, we screened libraries of pharmacologically active compounds and identified inducers of differentiation of Oli-neu, a stable cell line of mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs). We identified four broad classes of inducers, namely, forskolin/cAMP (protein kinase A activators), steroids (glucocorticoids and retinoic acid), ErbB2 inhibitors, and nucleoside analogs, and confirmed the activity of these compounds on rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors and mixed cortical cultures. We also analyzed transcriptional responses in the chemically induced mouse and rat OPC differentiation processes and compared these with earlier studies. We confirm the view that ErbB2 is a natural signaling component that is required for OPC proliferation, whereas ErbB2 inhibition or genetic knockdown results in OPC differentiation.

  7. Myelin management by the 18.5-kDa and 21.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harauz, George; Boggs, Joan M

    2013-05-01

    The classic myelin basic protein (MBP) splice isoforms range in nominal molecular mass from 14 to 21.5 kDa, and arise from the gene in the oligodendrocyte lineage (Golli) in maturing oligodendrocytes. The 18.5-kDa isoform that predominates in adult myelin adheres the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocyte membranes together, and forms a two-dimensional molecular sieve restricting protein diffusion into compact myelin. However, this protein has additional roles including cytoskeletal assembly and membrane extension, binding to SH3-domains, participation in Fyn-mediated signaling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. Of the diverse post-translational modifications of this isoform, phosphorylation is the most dynamic, and modulates 18.5-kDa MBP's protein-membrane and protein-protein interactions, indicative of a rich repertoire of functions. In developing and mature myelin, phosphorylation can result in microdomain or even nuclear targeting of the protein, supporting the conclusion that 18.5-kDa MBP has significant roles beyond membrane adhesion. The full-length, early-developmental 21.5-kDa splice isoform is predominantly karyophilic due to a non-traditional P-Y nuclear localization signal, with effects such as promotion of oligodendrocyte proliferation. We discuss in vitro and recent in vivo evidence for multifunctionality of these classic basic proteins of myelin, and argue for a systematic evaluation of the temporal and spatial distributions of these protein isoforms, and their modified variants, during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  8. Anti-reovirus receptor antibody accelerates expression of the optic nerve oligodendrocyte developmental program.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J A; Williams, W V; Geller, H M; Greene, M I

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showed that the cell-surface receptor for reovirus serotype 3 (Reo3R) appears at an early stage of oligodendrocyte differentiation and that anti-Reo3R antibodies and Reo3R-binding peptides induce galactocerebroside expression by developing oligodendrocytes. In the present studies, anti-Reo3R antibodies are shown to stimulate additional features of the program of oligodendrocyte development, including the loss of the A2B5 marker and expression of myelin basic protein. In anti-Reo3R antibody-treated cultures, galactocerebroside was expressed by cells having the morphology of immature oligodendrocyte precursors. Reo3R binding did not appear directly to inhibit or stimulate proliferation of glial progenitor cells or to affect their lineage commitment. Cell-surface structures utilized as a receptor by reovirus type 3 appear to play a role in the regulation of the initiation or rate of execution of the oligodendrocyte developmental program. Images PMID:1705032

  9. Differential clustering of Caspr by oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Eisenbach, Menahem; Kartvelishvily, Elena; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Watkins, Trent; Sorensen, Annette; Thomson, Christine; Ranscht, Barbara; Barnett, Susan C; Brophy, Peter; Peles, Elior

    2009-11-15

    Formation of the paranodal axoglial junction (PNJ) requires the presence of three cell adhesion molecules: the 155-kDa isoform of neurofascin (NF155) on the glial membrane and a complex of Caspr and contactin found on the axolemma. Here we report that the clustering of Caspr along myelinated axons during development differs fundamentally between the central (CNS) and peripheral (PNS) nervous systems. In cultures of Schwann cells (SC) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, membrane accumulation of Caspr was detected only after myelination. In contrast, in oligodendrocytes (OL)/DRG neurons cocultures, Caspr was clustered upon initial glial cell contact already before myelination had begun. Premyelination clustering of Caspr was detected in cultures of oligodendrocytes and retinal ganglion cells, motor neurons, and DRG neurons as well as in mixed cell cultures of rat forebrain and spinal cords. Cocultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells isolated from contactin- or neurofascin-deficient mice with wild-type DRG neurons showed that clustering of Caspr at initial contact sites between OL processes and the axon requires glial expression of NF155 but not of contactin. These results demonstrate that the expression of membrane proteins along the axolemma is determined by the type of the contacting glial cells and is not an intrinsic characteristic of the axon. PMID:19565653

  10. Making myelin basic protein -from mRNA transport to localized translation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christina; Bauer, Nina M; Schäfer, Isabelle; White, Robin

    2013-09-27

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of most vertebrates, oligodendrocytes enwrap neuronal axons with extensions of their plasma membrane to form the myelin sheath. Several proteins are characteristically found in myelin of which myelin basic protein (MBP) is the second most abundant one after proteolipid protein. The lack of functional MBP in rodents results in a severe hypomyelinated phenotype in the CNS demonstrating its importance for myelin synthesis. Mbp mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and is translated locally at the axon-glial contact site. Axonal properties such as diameter or electrical activity influence the degree of myelination. As oligodendrocytes can myelinate many axonal segments with varying properties, localized MBP translation represents an important part of a rapid and axon-tailored synthesis machinery. MBP's ability to compact cellular membranes may be problematic for the integrity of intracellular membranous organelles and can also explain why MBP is transported in oligodendrocytes in the form of an mRNA rather than as a protein. Here we review the recent findings regarding intracellular transport and signaling mechanisms leading to localized translation of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes. More detailed insights into the MBP synthesis pathway are important for a better understanding of the myelination process and may foster the development of remyelination therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  11. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    PubMed Central

    White, Robin; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialized glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarization followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasizing the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during central nervous system (CNS) myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of proteolipid protein (PLP) transport by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases. PMID:24431989

  12. MicroRNA and Transcriptional Crosstalk in Myelinating Glia

    PubMed Central

    Svaren, John

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have addressed the important role of microRNA in regulation of differentiation of myelinating glia. While Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes in the peripheral and central nervous systems, respectively, exhibit significant morphological and regulatory differences, some aspects of transcriptional and microRNA regulation are shared between these two cell types. This review focuses on the intersection of microRNAs with transcriptional regulation in Schwann cell and oligodendrocyte differentiation. In particular, several microRNAs have been shown to modulate expression of critical transcription factors, and in turn, the regulation of microRNA expression is enmeshed within transcriptional networks that coordinate both coding gene and noncoding RNA profiles of myelinating cells. These hubs of regulation control both myelin gene expression as well as the cell cycle transitions of Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes as they terminally differentiate. In addition, some studies have begin to highlight the combinatorial effects of different microRNAs that establish the narrow range of gene regulation required for efficient and stable myelin formation. Overall, the integration of microRNA and transcriptional aspects will help elucidate mechanistic control of the myelination process. PMID:24979526

  13. Remodeling myelination: implications for mechanisms of neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Redmond, Stephanie A; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-02-01

    One of the most significant paradigm shifts in membrane remodeling is the emerging view that membrane transformation is not exclusively controlled by cytoskeletal rearrangement, but also by biophysical constraints, adhesive forces, membrane curvature and compaction. One of the most exquisite examples of membrane remodeling is myelination. The advent of myelin was instrumental in advancing the nervous system during vertebrate evolution. With more rapid and efficient communication between neurons, faster and more complex computations could be performed in a given time and space. Our knowledge of how myelin-forming oligodendrocytes select and wrap axons has been limited by insufficient spatial and temporal resolution. By virtue of recent technological advances, progress has clarified longstanding controversies in the field. Here we review insights into myelination, from target selection to axon wrapping and membrane compaction, and discuss how understanding these processes has unexpectedly opened new avenues of insight into myelination-centered mechanisms of neural plasticity.

  14. Contactin-1 regulates myelination and nodal/paranodal domain organization in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Çolakoğlu, Gülsen; Bergstrom-Tyrberg, Ulrika; Berglund, Erik O.; Ranscht, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Myelin, a multilayered membrane sheath formed by oligodendrocytes around axons in the CNS, enables rapid nerve impulse conduction and sustains neuronal health. The signals exchanged between axons and oligodendrocytes in myelin remain to be fully elucidated. Here we provide genetic evidence for multiple and critical functions of Contactin-1 in central myelin. We document dynamic Contactin-1 expression on oligodendrocytes in vivo, and progressive accumulation at nodes of Ranvier and paranodes during postnatal mouse development. Nodal and paranodal expression stabilized in mature myelin, but overall membranous expression diminished. Contactin-1–deficiency disrupted paranodal junction formation as evidenced by loss of Caspr, mislocalized potassium Kv1.2 channels, and abnormal myelin terminal loops. Reduced numbers and impaired maturation of sodium channel clusters accompanied this phenotype. Histological, electron microscopic, and biochemical analyses uncovered significant hypomyelination in Contactin-1–deficient central nerves, with up to 60% myelin loss. Oligodendrocytes were present in normal numbers, albeit a minor population of neuronal/glial antigen 2-positive (NG2+) progenitors lagged in maturation by postnatal day 18, when the mouse null mutation was lethal. Major contributing factors to hypomyelination were defects in the generation and organization of myelin membranes, as judged by electron microscopy and quantitative analysis of oligodendrocyte processes labeled by GFP transgenically expressed from the proteolipid protein promoter. These data reveal that Contactin-1 regulates both myelin formation and organization of nodal and paranodal domains in the CNS. These multiple roles distinguish central Contactin-1 functions from its specific role at paranodes in the periphery, and emphasize mechanistic differences in central and peripheral myelination. PMID:24385581

  15. Knockdown of Unconventional Myosin ID Expression Induced Morphological Change in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Reiji; Ishibashi, Tomoko; Baba, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Myelin is a special multilamellar structure involved in various functions in the nervous system. In the central nervous system, the oligodendrocyte (OL) produces myelin and has a unique morphology. OLs have a dynamic membrane sorting system associated with cytoskeletal organization, which aids in the production of myelin. Recently, it was reported that the assembly and disassembly of actin filaments is crucial for myelination. However, the partner myosin molecule which associates with actin filaments during the myelination process has not yet been identified. One candidate myosin is unconventional myosin ID (Myo1d) which is distributed throughout central nervous system myelin; however, its function is still unclear. We report here that Myo1d is expressed during later stages of OL differentiation, together with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP). In addition, Myo1d is distributed at the leading edge of the myelin-like membrane in cultured OL, colocalizing mainly with actin filaments, 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and partially with PLP. Myo1d-knockdown with specific siRNA induces significant morphological changes such as the retraction of processes and degeneration of myelin-like membrane, and finally apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of Myo1d by siRNA results in the impairment of intracellular PLP transport. Together, these results suggest that Myo1d may contribute to membrane dynamics either in wrapping or transporting of myelin membrane proteins during formation and maintenance of myelin. PMID:27655972

  16. cFLIP is critical for oligodendrocyte protection from inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, D C; Campbell, A; O'Banion, K M; Noble, M; Mayer-Pröschel, M

    2015-09-01

    Neuroinflammation associated with degenerative central nervous system disease and injury frequently results in oligodendrocyte death. While promoting oligodendrocyte viability is a major therapeutic goal, little is known about protective signaling strategies. We report that in highly purified rat oligodendrocytes, interferon gamma (IFNγ) activates a signaling pathway that protects these cells from tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-induced cytotoxicity. IFNγ protection requires Jak (Janus kinase) activation, components of the integrated stress response and NF-κB activation. Although NF-κB activation also occurred transiently in the absence of IFNγ and presence of TNFα, this activation was not sufficient to prevent induction of the TNFα-responsive cell death pathway. Genetic inhibition of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus abrogated IFNγ-mediated protection and did not change the cell death induced by TNFα, suggesting that NF-κB activation via IFNγ induces a different set of responses than activation of NF-κB via TNFα. A promising candidate is the NF-κB target cFLIP (cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein), which is protease-deficient caspase homolog that inhibits caspase-3 activation. We show that IFNγ-mediated protection led to upregulation of cFLIP. Overexpression of cFLIP was sufficient for oligodendrocyte protection from TNFα and short hairpin RNA knockdown of cFLIP-abrogated IFNγ -mediated protection. To determine the relevance of our in vitro finding to the more complex in vivo situation, we determined the impact on oligodendrocyte death of regional cFLIP loss of function in a murine model of neuroinflammation. Our data show that downregulation of cFLIP during inflammation leads to death of oligodendrocytes and decrease of myelin in vivo. Taken together, we show that IFNγ-mediated induction of cFLIP expression provides a new mechanism by which this cytokine can protect oligodendrocytes from TNF

  17. Motor training compensates for cerebellar dysfunctions caused by oligodendrocyte ablation.

    PubMed

    Collin, Ludovic; Usiello, Alessandro; Erbs, Eric; Mathis, Carole; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-01-01

    The role played by oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, during brain development has not been fully explored. We have addressed this question by inducing a temporal and reversible ablation of OLs on postnatal CNS development. OL ablation in newborn mice leads to a profound alteration in the structure of the cerebellar cortex, which can be progressively rescued by newly generated cells, leading to a delayed myelination. Nevertheless, the temporal shift of the OL proliferation and myelinating program cannot completely compensate for developmental defects, resulting in impaired motor functions in the adult. Strikingly, we show that, despite these abnormalities, epigenetic factors, such as motor training, are able to fully rescue cerebellar-directed motor skills. PMID:14694200

  18. Motor training compensates for cerebellar dysfunctions caused by oligodendrocyte ablation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Ludovic; Usiello, Alessandro; Erbs, Eric; Mathis, Carole; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2004-01-01

    The role played by oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, during brain development has not been fully explored. We have addressed this question by inducing a temporal and reversible ablation of OLs on postnatal CNS development. OL ablation in newborn mice leads to a profound alteration in the structure of the cerebellar cortex, which can be progressively rescued by newly generated cells, leading to a delayed myelination. Nevertheless, the temporal shift of the OL proliferation and myelinating program cannot completely compensate for developmental defects, resulting in impaired motor functions in the adult. Strikingly, we show that, despite these abnormalities, epigenetic factors, such as motor training, are able to fully rescue cerebellar-directed motor skills. PMID:14694200

  19. Protection of p27(Kip1) mRNA by quaking RNA binding proteins promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Larocque, Daniel; Galarneau, André; Liu, Hsueh-Ning; Scott, Michelle; Almazan, Guillermina; Richard, Stéphane

    2005-01-01

    The quaking (Qk) locus expresses a family of RNA binding proteins, and the expression of several alternatively spliced isoforms coincides with the development of oligodendrocytes and the onset of myelination. Quaking viable (Qk(v)) mice harboring an autosomal recessive mutation in this locus have uncompacted myelin in the central nervous system owing to the inability of oligodendrocytes to properly mature. Here we show that the expression of two QKI isoforms, absent from oligodendrocytes of Qk(v) mice, induces cell cycle arrest of primary rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and differentiation into oligodendrocytes. Injection of retroviruses expressing QKI into the telencephalon of mouse embryos induced differentiation and migration of multipotential neural progenitor cells into mature oligodendrocytes localized in the corpus callosum. The mRNA encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-inhibitor p27(Kip1) was bound and stabilized by QKI, leading to an increased accumulation of p27(Kip1) protein in oligodendrocytes. Our findings demonstrate that QKI is upstream of p27(Kip1) during oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  20. The potential for oligodendrocyte proliferation during demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Prayoonwiwat, N; Rodriguez, M

    1993-01-01

    The potential for oligodendrocytes to proliferate in response to central nervous system injury was examined. We used intracerebral infection of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, a model for multiple sclerosis, which results in chronic demyelinating disease of SJL/J mice. Proliferating cells in spinal cord sections of adult mice were identified using simultaneous immunohistochemistry and in situ autoradiography ([3H]-thymidine incorporation). Seven different cell-specific markers were used to characterize proliferating cells as oligodendrocytes (myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, galactocerebroside, CNPase), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglia/macrophages (Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4) or T-lymphocytes (CD3). The average number of proliferating cells per area of spinal cord white matter was 11/mm2 in normal young adult mice compared to 61/mm2 in chronically infected mice. Most proliferating cells in normal spinal cord were not identified with these markers and were presumed to be progenitor glial cells. However, in spinal cord white matter of mice infected with Theiler's virus for approximately 4 months, 88% of proliferating cells were identified. Approximately one-third of all proliferating cells were in the oligodendrocyte lineage and expressed markers observed late in myelin differentiation. In demyelinated areas as compared to normal white matter, there was an 80- to 211-fold increase in the number of proliferating oligodendrocytes expressing myelin basic protein or proteolipid protein, respectively. The remainder of the proliferating cells in areas of demyelination were astrocytes, microglial cells and T-cells. These experiments support the hypothesis that factors within a demyelinating lesion promote the proliferation and differentiation of cells within the oligodendroglial lineage.

  1. Remyelination reporter reveals prolonged refinement of spontaneously regenerated myelin

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Berit E.; Sellers, Drew L.; Lovelett, Emilie A.; Cheung, Willy; Aalami, Sheida P.; Zapertov, Nikolai; Maris, Don O.; Horner, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases and trauma often cause demyelination, resulting in the disruption of axonal function and integrity. Endogenous remyelination promotes recovery, but the process is not well understood because no method exists to definitively distinguish regenerated from preexisting myelin. To date, remyelinated segments have been defined as anything abnormally short and thin, without empirical data to corroborate these morphological assumptions. To definitively identify regenerated myelin, we used a transgenic mouse with an inducible membrane-bound reporter and targeted Cre recombinase expression to a subset of glial progenitor cells after spinal cord injury, yielding remarkably clear visualization of spontaneously regenerated myelin in vivo. Early after injury, the mean length of sheaths regenerated by Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes (OLs) was significantly shorter than control, uninjured myelin, confirming past assumptions. However, OL-regenerated sheaths elongated progressively over 6 mo to approach control values. Moreover, OL-regenerated myelin thickness was not significantly different from control myelin at most time points after injury. Thus, many newly formed OL sheaths were neither thinner nor shorter than control myelin, vitiating accepted dogmas of what constitutes regenerated myelin. We conclude that remyelination, once thought to be static, is dynamic and elongates independently of axonal growth, in contrast to stretch-based mechanisms proposed in development. Further, without clear identification, past assessments have underestimated the extent and quality of regenerated myelin. PMID:23431182

  2. Insulin-like growth factor I/somatomedin C: a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    McMorris, F.A.; Smith, T.M.; DeSalvo, S.; Furlanetto, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Cell cultures established from cerebrum of 1-day-old rats were used to investigate hormonal regulation of the development of oligodendrocytes, which synthesize myelin in the central nervous system. The number of oligodendrocytes that developed was preferentially increased by insulin, or by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), also known as somatomedin C. High concentrations of insulin were required for substantial induction of oligodendrocyte development, whereas only 3.3 ng of IGF-I per ml was needed for a 2-fold increase in oligodendrocyte numbers. At an IGF-I concentration of 100 ng/ml, oligodendrocyte numbers were increased 6-fold in cultures grown in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum, or up to 60-fold in cultures maintained in serum-free medium. IGF-I produced less than a 2-fold increase in the number of nonoligodendroglial cells in the same cultures. Type I IGF receptors were identified on oligodendrocytes and on a putative oligodendrocyte precursor cell population identified by using mouse monoclonal antibody A2B5. Radioligand binding assays were done. These results indicate that IGF-I is a potent inducer of oligodendrocyte development and suggest a possible mechanism based on IGF deficiency for the hypomyelination that results from early postnatal malnutrition.

  3. Liver X receptors alpha and beta promote myelination and remyelination in the cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Meffre, Delphine; Shackleford, Ghjuvan’Ghjacumu; Hichor, Mehdi; Gorgievski, Victor; Tzavara, Eleni T.; Trousson, Amalia; Ghoumari, Abdel M.; Deboux, Cyrille; Nait Oumesmar, Brahim; Liere, Philippe; Schumacher, Michael; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Charbonnier, Frédéric; Grenier, Julien; Massaad, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new pathways governing myelination provides innovative avenues for remyelination. Liver X receptors (LXRs) α and β are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols that originated from the oxidation of cholesterol. They are crucial for cholesterol homeostasis, a major lipid constituent of myelin sheaths that are formed by oligodendrocytes. However, the role of LXRs in myelin generation and maintenance is poorly understood. Here, we show that LXRs are involved in myelination and remyelination processes. LXRs and their ligands are present in oligodendrocytes. We found that mice invalidated for LXRs exhibit altered motor coordination and spatial learning, thinner myelin sheaths, and reduced myelin gene expression. Conversely, activation of LXRs by either 25-hydroxycholesterol or synthetic TO901317 stimulates myelin gene expression at the promoter, mRNA, and protein levels, directly implicating LXRα/β in the transcriptional control of myelin gene expression. Interestingly, activation of LXRs also promotes oligodendroglial cell maturation and remyelination after lysolecithin-induced demyelination of organotypic cerebellar slice cultures. Together, our findings represent a conceptual advance in the transcriptional control of myelin gene expression and strongly support a new role of LXRs as positive modulators in central (re)myelination processes. PMID:26023184

  4. Liver X receptors alpha and beta promote myelination and remyelination in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Meffre, Delphine; Shackleford, Ghjuvan'Ghjacumu; Hichor, Mehdi; Gorgievski, Victor; Tzavara, Eleni T; Trousson, Amalia; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Deboux, Cyrille; Nait Oumesmar, Brahim; Liere, Philippe; Schumacher, Michael; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile; Charbonnier, Frédéric; Grenier, Julien; Massaad, Charbel

    2015-06-16

    The identification of new pathways governing myelination provides innovative avenues for remyelination. Liver X receptors (LXRs) α and β are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols that originated from the oxidation of cholesterol. They are crucial for cholesterol homeostasis, a major lipid constituent of myelin sheaths that are formed by oligodendrocytes. However, the role of LXRs in myelin generation and maintenance is poorly understood. Here, we show that LXRs are involved in myelination and remyelination processes. LXRs and their ligands are present in oligodendrocytes. We found that mice invalidated for LXRs exhibit altered motor coordination and spatial learning, thinner myelin sheaths, and reduced myelin gene expression. Conversely, activation of LXRs by either 25-hydroxycholesterol or synthetic TO901317 stimulates myelin gene expression at the promoter, mRNA, and protein levels, directly implicating LXRα/β in the transcriptional control of myelin gene expression. Interestingly, activation of LXRs also promotes oligodendroglial cell maturation and remyelination after lysolecithin-induced demyelination of organotypic cerebellar slice cultures. Together, our findings represent a conceptual advance in the transcriptional control of myelin gene expression and strongly support a new role of LXRs as positive modulators in central (re)myelination processes.

  5. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Oligodendrocyte differentiation from adult multipotent stem cells is modulated by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, F; Urra, O; Alberdi, E; Matute, C

    2012-02-02

    We used multipotent stem cells (MSCs) derived from the young rat subventricular zone (SVZ) to study the effects of glutamate in oligodendrocyte maturation. Glutamate stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation from SVZ-derived MSCs through the activation of specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits. The effect of glutamate and NMDA on oligodendrocyte differentiation was evident in both the number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and their morphology. In addition, the levels of NMDAR1 and NMDAR2A protein increased during differentiation, whereas NMDAR2B and NMDAR3 protein levels decreased, suggesting differential expression of NMDA receptor subunits during maturation. Microfluorimetry showed that the activation of NMDA receptors during oligodendrocyte differentiation elevated cytosolic calcium levels and promoted myelination in cocultures with neurons. Moreover, we observed that stimulation of MSCs by NMDA receptors induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were negatively modulated by the NADPH inhibitor apocynin, and that the levels of ROS correlated with the degree of differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that ROS generated by NADPH oxidase by the activation of NMDA receptors promotes the maturation of oligodendrocytes and favors myelination.

  7. Oligodendrocyte differentiation from adult multipotent stem cells is modulated by glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, F; Urra, O; Alberdi, E; Matute, C

    2012-01-01

    We used multipotent stem cells (MSCs) derived from the young rat subventricular zone (SVZ) to study the effects of glutamate in oligodendrocyte maturation. Glutamate stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation from SVZ-derived MSCs through the activation of specific N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits. The effect of glutamate and NMDA on oligodendrocyte differentiation was evident in both the number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and their morphology. In addition, the levels of NMDAR1 and NMDAR2A protein increased during differentiation, whereas NMDAR2B and NMDAR3 protein levels decreased, suggesting differential expression of NMDA receptor subunits during maturation. Microfluorimetry showed that the activation of NMDA receptors during oligodendrocyte differentiation elevated cytosolic calcium levels and promoted myelination in cocultures with neurons. Moreover, we observed that stimulation of MSCs by NMDA receptors induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were negatively modulated by the NADPH inhibitor apocynin, and that the levels of ROS correlated with the degree of differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that ROS generated by NADPH oxidase by the activation of NMDA receptors promotes the maturation of oligodendrocytes and favors myelination. PMID:22297298

  8. Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection of Glial Progenitors Interferes with Oligodendrocyte Differentiation: Implications for Neurovirulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Dunphy, Jaclyn M.; Pedraza, Carlos E.; Lynch, Connor R.; Cardona, Sandra M.; Macklin, Wendy B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) are capable of inducing fatal progressive spongiform motor neuron disease in mice that is largely mediated by viral Env glycoprotein expression within central nervous system (CNS) glia. While the etiologic mechanisms and the glial subtypes involved remain unresolved, infection of NG2 glia was recently observed to correlate spatially and temporally with altered neuronal physiology and spongiogenesis. Since one role of NG2 cells is to serve as oligodendrocyte (OL) progenitor cells (OPCs), we examined here whether their infection by neurovirulent (FrCasE) or nonneurovirulent (Fr57E) ecotropic MLVs influenced their viability and/or differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that OPCs, but not OLs, are major CNS targets of both FrCasE and Fr57E. We also show that MLV infection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture did not affect survival, proliferation, or OPC progenitor marker expression but suppressed certain glial differentiation markers. Assessment of glial differentiation in vivo using transplanted transgenic NPCs showed that, while MLVs did not affect cellular engraftment or survival, they did inhibit OL differentiation, irrespective of MLV neurovirulence. In addition, in chimeric brains, where FrCasE-infected NPC transplants caused neurodegeneration, the transplanted NPCs proliferated. These results suggest that MLV infection is not directly cytotoxic to OPCs but rather acts to interfere with OL differentiation. Since both FrCasE and Fr57E viruses restrict OL differentiation but only FrCasE induces overt neurodegeneration, restriction of OL maturation alone cannot account for neuropathogenesis. Instead neurodegeneration may involve a two-hit scenario where interference with OPC differentiation combined with glial Env-induced neuronal hyperexcitability precipitates disease. IMPORTANCE A variety of human and animal retroviruses are capable of causing central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration manifested as motor

  9. Characterization of the shark myelin Po protein.

    PubMed

    Rotenstein, L; Herath, K; Gould, R M; de Bellard, M E

    2008-01-01

    Myelin, the insulating sheath made by extensive plasma membrane wrapping, is dependent on the presence of highly adhesive molecules that keep the two sides of the membrane in tight contact. The Po glycoprotein (Po) is the major component of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelin of mammals. The exact role that Po protein has played in the evolution of myelin is still unclear, but several phylogenetic observations suggest that it is a crucial component in the development of myelin as a multi-lamellar membrane structure. Sharks, which appeared in the fossil record about 400 million years ago, are the first fully myelinated organisms. In this study we investigated the expression pattern of shark myelin Po to suggest a way it might have played a role in the evolution of myelin in the central nervous system. We found that sharks have more than two isoforms (32, 28 and 25 kD), and that some of these might not be fully functional because they lack the domains known for Po homophilic adhesion.

  10. Inducible site-specific recombination in myelinating cells.

    PubMed

    Doerflinger, Nathalie H; Macklin, Wendy B; Popko, Brian

    2003-01-01

    To explore the function of genes expressed by myelinating cells we have developed a model system that allows for the inducible ablation of predetermined genes in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. The Cre/loxP recombination system provides the opportunity to generate tissue-specific somatic mutations in mice. We have used a fusion protein between the Cre recombinase and a mutated ligand-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor (CreER(T)) to obtain inducible, site-specific recombination. CreER(T) expression was placed under the transcriptional control of the regulatory sequences of the myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is abundantly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in Schwann cells. The CreER(T) fusion protein translocated to the nucleus and mediated the recombination of a LacZ reporter transgene in myelinating cells of PLP/CreER(T) mice injected with the synthetic steroid tamoxifen. In untreated animals CreER(T) remained cytoplasmic, and there was no evidence of recombination. The PLP/ CreER(T) animals should be very useful in elucidating and distinguishing a particular gene's function in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath and in analyzing mature oligodendrocyte function in pathological conditions. PMID:12481300

  11. Promoting myelin repair and return of function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingya; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Asp, Linnea; Dutta, Dipankar J; Navrazhina, Kristina; Pham, Trinh; Mariani, John N; Argaw, Azeb Tadesse; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V; John, Gareth R

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Conduction block in demyelinated axons underlies early neurological symptoms, but axonal transection and neuronal loss are believed to be responsible for more permanent chronic deficits. Several therapies are approved for treatment of relapsing-remitting MS, all of which are immunoregulatory and clinically proven to reduce the rate of lesion formation and exacerbation. However, existing approaches are only partially effective in preventing the onset of disability in MS patients, and novel treatments to protect myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and enhance myelin repair may improve long-term outcomes. Studies in vivo in genetically modified mice have assisted in the characterization of mechanisms underlying the generation of neuropathology in MS patients, and have identified potential avenues for oligodendrocyte protection and myelin repair. However, no treatments are yet approved that target these areas directly, and in addition, the relationship between demyelination and axonal transection in the lesions of the disease remains unclear. Here, we review translational research targeting oligodendrocyte protection and myelin repair in models of autoimmune demyelination, and their potential relevance as therapies in MS. PMID:21864535

  12. Proteomics of the corpus callosum unravel pivotal players in the dysfunction of cell signaling, structure, and myelination in schizophrenia brains.

    PubMed

    Saia-Cereda, Verônica M; Cassoli, Juliana S; Schmitt, Andrea; Falkai, Peter; Nascimento, Juliana M; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia is an incurable and debilitating mental disorder that may affect up to 1% of the world population. Morphological, electrophysiological, and neurophysiological studies suggest that the corpus callosum (CC), which is the largest portion of white matter in the human brain and responsible for inter-hemispheric communication, is altered in schizophrenia patients. Here, we employed mass spectrometry-based proteomics to investigate the molecular underpinnings of schizophrenia. Brain tissue samples were collected postmortem from nine schizophrenia patients and seven controls at the University of Heidelberg, Germany. Because the CC has a signaling role, we collected cytoplasmic (soluble) proteins and submitted them to nano-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nano LC-MS/MS). Proteomes were quantified by label-free spectral counting. We identified 5678 unique peptides that corresponded to 1636 proteins belonging to 1512 protein families. Of those proteins, 65 differed significantly in expression: 28 were upregulated and 37 downregulated. Our data increased significantly the knowledge derived from an earlier proteomic study of the CC. Among the differentially expressed proteins are those associated with cell growth and maintenance, such as neurofilaments and tubulins; cell communication and signaling, such as 14-3-3 proteins; and oligodendrocyte function, such as myelin basic protein and myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Additionally, 30 of the differentially expressed proteins were found previously in other proteomic studies in postmortem brains; this overlap in findings validates the present study and indicates that these proteins may be markers consistently associated with schizophrenia. Our findings increase the understanding of schizophrenia pathophysiology and may serve as a foundation for further treatment strategies.

  13. SNX27, a protein involved in down syndrome, regulates GPR17 trafficking and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Veronica; Ulivi, Alessandro Francesco; Boccazzi, Marta; Valenza, Fabiola; Fratangeli, Alessandra; Passafaro, Maria; Lecca, Davide; Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Bartesaghi, Renata; Abbracchio, Maria P; Ceruti, Stefania; Rosa, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) plays crucial roles in myelination. It is highly expressed during transition of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to immature oligodendrocytes, but, after this stage, it must be down-regulated to allow generation of mature myelinating cells. After endocytosis, GPR17 is sorted into lysosomes for degradation or recycled to the plasma membrane. Balance between degradation and recycling is important for modulation of receptor levels at the cell surface and thus for the silencing/activation of GPR17-signaling pathways that, in turn, affect oligodendrocyte differentiation. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of these processes are still partially unknown and their characterization will allow a better understanding of myelination and provide cues to interpret the consequences of GPR17 dysfunction in diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the endocytic trafficking of GPR17 is mediated by the interaction of a type I PDZ-binding motif located at the C-terminus of the receptor and SNX27, a recently identified protein of the endosome-associated retromer complex and whose functions in oligodendrocytes have never been studied. SNX27 knock-down significantly reduces GPR17 plasma membrane recycling in differentiating oligodendrocytes while accelerating cells' terminal maturation. Interestingly, trisomy-linked down-regulation of SNX27 expression in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a model of Down syndrome, correlates with a decrease in GPR17(+) cells and an increase in mature oligodendrocytes, which, however, fail in reaching full maturation, eventually leading to hypomyelination. Our data demonstrate that SNX27 modulates GPR17 plasma membrane recycling and stability, and that disruption of the SNX27/GPR17 interaction might contribute to pathological oligodendrocyte differentiation defects. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1437-1460.

  14. SNX27, a protein involved in down syndrome, regulates GPR17 trafficking and oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Veronica; Ulivi, Alessandro Francesco; Boccazzi, Marta; Valenza, Fabiola; Fratangeli, Alessandra; Passafaro, Maria; Lecca, Davide; Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Bartesaghi, Renata; Abbracchio, Maria P; Ceruti, Stefania; Rosa, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) plays crucial roles in myelination. It is highly expressed during transition of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to immature oligodendrocytes, but, after this stage, it must be down-regulated to allow generation of mature myelinating cells. After endocytosis, GPR17 is sorted into lysosomes for degradation or recycled to the plasma membrane. Balance between degradation and recycling is important for modulation of receptor levels at the cell surface and thus for the silencing/activation of GPR17-signaling pathways that, in turn, affect oligodendrocyte differentiation. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of these processes are still partially unknown and their characterization will allow a better understanding of myelination and provide cues to interpret the consequences of GPR17 dysfunction in diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the endocytic trafficking of GPR17 is mediated by the interaction of a type I PDZ-binding motif located at the C-terminus of the receptor and SNX27, a recently identified protein of the endosome-associated retromer complex and whose functions in oligodendrocytes have never been studied. SNX27 knock-down significantly reduces GPR17 plasma membrane recycling in differentiating oligodendrocytes while accelerating cells' terminal maturation. Interestingly, trisomy-linked down-regulation of SNX27 expression in the brain of Ts65Dn mice, a model of Down syndrome, correlates with a decrease in GPR17(+) cells and an increase in mature oligodendrocytes, which, however, fail in reaching full maturation, eventually leading to hypomyelination. Our data demonstrate that SNX27 modulates GPR17 plasma membrane recycling and stability, and that disruption of the SNX27/GPR17 interaction might contribute to pathological oligodendrocyte differentiation defects. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1437-1460. PMID:27270750

  15. Neuronal activity regulates remyelination via glutamate signalling to oligodendrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Evans, Kimberley A.; Volbracht, Katrin; James, Rachel; Sitnikov, Sergey; Lundgaard, Iben; James, Fiona; Lao-Peregrin, Cristina; Reynolds, Richard; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T

    2015-01-01

    Myelin regeneration can occur spontaneously in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanisms and causes of its frequent failure remain incompletely understood. Here we show, using an in-vivo remyelination model, that demyelinated axons are electrically active and generate de novo synapses with recruited oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which, early after lesion induction, sense neuronal activity by expressing AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid)/kainate receptors. Blocking neuronal activity, axonal vesicular release or AMPA receptors in demyelinated lesions results in reduced remyelination. In the absence of neuronal activity there is a ∼6-fold increase in OPC number within the lesions and a reduced proportion of differentiated oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that neuronal activity and release of glutamate instruct OPCs to differentiate into new myelinating oligodendrocytes that recover lost function. Co-localization of OPCs with the presynaptic protein VGluT2 in MS lesions implies that this mechanism may provide novel targets to therapeutically enhance remyelination. PMID:26439639

  16. Axo-Glia Interaction Preceding CNS Myelination Is Regulated by Bidirectional Eph-Ephrin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Linneberg, Cecilie; Harboe, Mette; Laursen, Lisbeth S

    2015-01-01

    In the central nervous system, myelination of axons is required to ensure fast saltatory conduction and for survival of neurons. However, not all axons are myelinated, and the molecular mechanisms involved in guiding the oligodendrocyte processes toward the axons to be myelinated are not well understood. Only a few negative or positive guidance clues that are involved in regulating axo-glia interaction prior to myelination have been identified. One example is laminin, known to be required for early axo-glia interaction, which functions through α6β1 integrin. Here, we identify the Eph-ephrin family of guidance receptors as novel regulators of the initial axo-glia interaction, preceding myelination. We demonstrate that so-called forward and reverse signaling, mediated by members of both Eph and ephrin subfamilies, has distinct and opposing effects on processes extension and myelin sheet formation. EphA forward signaling inhibits oligodendrocyte process extension and myelin sheet formation, and blocking of bidirectional signaling through this receptor enhances myelination. Similarly, EphB forward signaling also reduces myelin membrane formation, but in contrast to EphA forward signaling, this occurs in an integrin-dependent manner, which can be reversed by overexpression of a constitutive active β1-integrin. Furthermore, ephrin-B reverse signaling induced by EphA4 or EphB1 enhances myelin sheet formation. Combined, this suggests that the Eph-ephrin receptors are important mediators of bidirectional signaling between axons and oligodendrocytes. It further implies that balancing Eph-ephrin forward and reverse signaling is important in the selection process of axons to be myelinated.

  17. Spatiotemporal ablation of CXCR2 on oligodendrocyte lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Lisa C.; Prager, Briana; Benson, Bryan; Hu, BingQing; Shi, Samuel; Love, Anna; Zhang, CunJin; Yu, Meigen; Cotleur, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual CXCR2 expression on CNS cells in Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− chimeric animals slowed remyelination after both experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and cuprizone-induced demyelination. Methods: We generated Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T) mice enabling an inducible, conditional deletion of Cxcr2 on oligodendrocyte lineage cells of the CNS. Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T) mice were evaluated in 2 demyelination/remyelination models: cuprizone-feeding and in vitro lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) treatment of cerebellar slice cultures. Results: Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T)+ (termed Cxcr2-cKO) mice showed better myelin repair 4 days after LPC-induced demyelination of cerebellar slice cultures. Cxcr2-cKOs also displayed enhanced hippocampal remyelination after a 2-week recovery from 6-week cuprizone feeding. Conclusion: Using 2 independent demyelination/remyelination models, our data document enhanced myelin repair in Cxcr2-cKO mice, consistent with the data obtained from radiation chimerism studies of germline CXCR2. Further experiments are appropriate to explore how CXCR2 function in the oligodendrocyte lineage accelerates myelin repair. PMID:26668819

  18. Subcortical ischemic vascular disease: Roles of oligodendrocyte function in experimental models of subcortical white-matter injury.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Akihiro; Liang, Anna C; Maki, Takakuni; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are one of the major cell types in cerebral white matter. Under normal conditions, they form myelin sheaths that encircle axons to support fast nerve conduction. Under conditions of cerebral ischemia, oligodendrocytes tend to die, resulting in white-matter dysfunction. Repair of white matter involves the ability of oligodendrocyte precursors to proliferate and mature. However, replacement of lost oligodendrocytes may not be the only mechanism for white-matter recovery. Emerging data now suggest that coordinated signaling between neural, glial, and vascular cells in the entire neurovascular unit may be required. In this mini-review, we discuss how oligodendrocyte lineage cells participate in signaling and crosstalk with other cell types to underlie function and recovery in various experimental models of subcortical white-matter injury.

  19. Corticosteroids reverse cytokine-induced block of survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from rats

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Stefan A; Versmold, Beatrix; Marx, Romy; Stahlhofen, Sabine; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Heumann, Rolf; Berger, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a frequent complication of preterm delivery. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) released from astrocytes and microglia activated by infection or ischemia have previously been shown to impair survival and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitors and could thus be considered as potential factors contributing to the generation of this disease. The first goal of the present study was to investigate whether exposure of oligodendrocyte precursors to these cytokines arrests the maturation of ion currents in parallel to its effects on myelin proteins and morphological maturation. Secondly, in the search for agents, that can protect differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells from cytokine-induced damage we investigated effects of coapplications of corticosteroids with proinflammatory cytokines on the subsequent survival and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Methods To exclude influences from factors released from other cell types purified cultures of oligodendrocyte precursors were exposed to cytokines and/or steroids and allowed to differentiate for further 6 days in culture. Changes in membrane surface were investigated with capacitance recordings and Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy. Na+- and K+- currents were investigated using whole cell patch clamp recordings. The expression of myelin specific proteins was investigated using western blots and the precursor cells were identified using immunostaining with A2B5 antibodies. Results Surviving IFN-γ and TNF-α treated cells continued to maintain voltage-activated Na+- and K+ currents characteristic for the immature cells after 6 days in differentiation medium. Corticosterone, dihydrocorticosterone and, most prominently dexamethasone, counteracted the deleterious effects of IFN-γ and TNF-α on cell survival, A2B5-immunostaining and expression of myelin basic protein. The most potent

  20. Axonal selection and myelin sheath generation in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Simons, Mikael; Lyons, David A

    2013-08-01

    The formation of myelin in the central nervous system is a multi-step process that involves coordinated cell-cell interactions and dramatic changes in plasma membrane architecture. First, oligodendrocytes send our numerous highly ramified processes to sample the axonal environment and decide which axon(s) to select for myelination. After this decision is made and individual axon to oligodendrocyte contact has been established, the exploratory process of the oligodendrocyte is converted into a flat sheath that spreads and winds along and around its associated axon to generate a multilayered membrane stack. By compaction of the opposing extracellular layers of membrane and extrusion of almost all cytoplasm from the intracellular domain of the sheath, the characteristic membrane-rich multi-lamellar structure of myelin is formed. Here we highlight recent advances in identifying biophysical and signalling based mechanisms that are involved in axonal selection and myelin sheath generation by oligodendrocytes. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying these events is a prerequisite for the design of novel myelin repair strategies in demyelinating and dysmyelinating diseases.

  1. Oligodendrocyte precursors migrate along vasculature in the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Niu, Jianqin; Munji, Roeben; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chang, Junlei; Zhang, Haijing; Tien, An-Chi; Kuo, Calvin J; Chan, Jonah R; Daneman, Richard; Fancy, Stephen P J

    2016-01-22

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system and develop from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that must first migrate extensively during brain and spinal cord development. We show that OPCs require the vasculature as a physical substrate for migration. We observed that OPCs of the embryonic mouse brain and spinal cord, as well as the human cortex, emerge from progenitor domains and associate with the abluminal endothelial surface of nearby blood vessels. Migrating OPCs crawl along and jump between vessels. OPC migration in vivo was disrupted in mice with defective vascular architecture but was normal in mice lacking pericytes. Thus, physical interactions with the vascular endothelium are required for OPC migration. We identify Wnt-Cxcr4 (chemokine receptor 4) signaling in regulation of OPC-endothelial interactions and propose that this signaling coordinates OPC migration with differentiation. PMID:26798014

  2. Oligodendrocyte precursors migrate along vasculature in the developing nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hui-Hsin; Niu, Jianqin; Munji, Roeben; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chang, Junlei; Zhang, Haijing; Tien, An-Chi; Kuo, Calvin J; Chan, Jonah R; Daneman, Richard; Fancy, Stephen P J

    2016-01-22

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system and develop from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that must first migrate extensively during brain and spinal cord development. We show that OPCs require the vasculature as a physical substrate for migration. We observed that OPCs of the embryonic mouse brain and spinal cord, as well as the human cortex, emerge from progenitor domains and associate with the abluminal endothelial surface of nearby blood vessels. Migrating OPCs crawl along and jump between vessels. OPC migration in vivo was disrupted in mice with defective vascular architecture but was normal in mice lacking pericytes. Thus, physical interactions with the vascular endothelium are required for OPC migration. We identify Wnt-Cxcr4 (chemokine receptor 4) signaling in regulation of OPC-endothelial interactions and propose that this signaling coordinates OPC migration with differentiation.

  3. Lesioned corticospinal tract axons regenerate in myelin-free rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Savio, T.; Schwab, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS) of higher vertebrates lesioned axons seemed unable to regenerate and reach their former target regions due to influences of the CNS microenvironment. Evidence from in vitro and biochemical experiments has demonstrated the presence of inhibitory substrate components in CNS tissue, in particular in white matter. These CNS components, which strongly inhibit neurite growth, were identified as minor membrane proteins of defined molecular mass (35 and 250 kDa) in oligodendrocyte membranes and CNS myelin. Oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation can be prevented by x-irradiation of newborn rats. Here we show that in myelin-free spinal cords cortico-spinal tract fibers transected at 2 weeks of age show reelongation of many millimeters within 2-3 weeks after the lesion. In normally myelinated controls, regenerative sprouts grew less than 1.7 mm caudal to the lesion.

  4. Lesioned corticospinal tract axons regenerate in myelin-free rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Savio, T; Schwab, M E

    1990-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS) of higher vertebrates lesioned axons seemed unable to regenerate and reach their former target regions due to influences of the CNS microenvironment. Evidence from in vitro and biochemical experiments has demonstrated the presence of inhibitory substrate components in CNS tissue, in particular in white matter. These CNS components, which strongly inhibit neurite growth, were identified as minor membrane proteins of defined molecular mass (35 and 250 kDa) in oligodendrocyte membranes and CNS myelin. Oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation can be prevented by x-irradiation of newborn rats. Here we show that in myelin-free spinal cords cortico-spinal tract fibers transected at 2 weeks of age show reelongation of many millimeters within 2-3 weeks after the lesion. In normally myelinated controls, regenerative sprouts grew less than 1.7 mm caudal to the lesion. Images PMID:2349222

  5. Selective and compartmentalized myelin expression of HspB5.

    PubMed

    Quraishe, S; Wyttenbach, A; Matinyarare, N; Perry, V H; Fern, R; O'Connor, V

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we reveal myelin-specific expression and targeting of mRNA and biochemical pools of HspB5 in the mouse CNS. Our observations are based on in situ hybridization, electron microscopy and co-localization with 2',3'-Cyclic-Nucleotide 3'-Phosphodiesterase (CNPase), reinforcing this myelin-selective expression. HspB5 mRNA might be targeted to these structures based on its presence in discrete clusters resembling RNA granules and the presence of a putative RNA transport signal. Further, sub-cellular fractionation of myelin membranes reveals a distinct sub-compartment-specific association and detergent solubility of HspB5. This is akin to other abundant myelin proteins and is consistent with HspB5's association with cytoskeletal/membrane assemblies. Oligodendrocytes have a pivotal role in supporting axonal function via generating and segregating the ensheathing myelin. This specialization places extreme structural and metabolic demands on this glial cell type. Our observations place HspB5 in oligodendrocytes which may require selective and specific chaperone capabilities to maintain normal function and neuronal support.

  6. miRNAs As Emerging Regulators of Oligodendrocyte Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Dylan A.; Moore, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic demyelination is a hallmark of neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and several leukodystrophies. In the central nervous system (CNS), remyelination is a regenerative process that is often inadequate during these pathological states. In the MS context, in situ evidence suggests that remyelination is mediated by populations of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that proliferate, migrate, and differentiate into mature, myelin-producing oligodendrocytes at sites of demyelinated lesions. The molecular programming of OPCs into mature oligodendrocytes is governed by a myriad of complex intracellular signaling pathways that modulate this process. Recent research has demonstrated the importance of specific and short non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), in regulating OPC differentiation and remyelination. Fortunately, it may be possible to take advantage of numerous developmental studies (both human and rodent) that have previously characterized miRNA expression profiles from the early neural progenitor cell to the late myelin-producing oligodendrocyte. Here we review much of the work to date and discuss the impact of miRNAs on OPC and oligodendrocyte biology. Additionally, we consider the potential for miRNA-mediated therapy in the context of remyelination and brain repair. PMID:27379236

  7. In vitro transdifferentiation of human cultured CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocyte precursors using thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Katari; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Vengamma, Bhuma; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mouleshwara; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2015-02-19

    The extent of myelination on the axon promotes transmission of impulses in the neural network, any disturbances in this process results in the neurodegenerative condition. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursors that supports in the regeneration of axons through myelination is an important step in the restoration of damaged neurons. Therefore, in the present study, the differentiation of human CD34+ stem cells into oligodendrocytes was carried out. The pure human CD34+ culture developed from the stem cells obtained from a peripheral blood of a donor were subjected to oligodendrocyte differentiation medium (ODM). The ODM at a concentration of 40ng/ml thyroxine, 40ng/ml 3,3',5-tri-iodo-thyronine showed distinct morphological changes from day 6 to 9 with cells exhibiting conspicuous stellate morphology and extensive foot processes. The real-time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of Olig2, CNPase, PDGFRα and PLP1/DM20 in the differentiated cells confirming the formed cells are oligodendrocyte precursors. The expression of these genes increased from days 6 to 9 corresponding to the morphological changes observed with almost no expression of GFAP+ cells. The distinct CNPase activity was observed in these differentiated cells compared to normal CD34+ stem cells correlating with results of real-time PCR conclusively explains the development of oligodendrocytes from human CD34+ stem cells.

  8. Oligodendrocyte Regeneration after Neonatal Hypoxia Requires FoxO1-Mediated p27Kip1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jablonska, Beata; Scafidi, Joseph; Aguirre, Adan; Vaccarino, Flora; Nguyen, Vien; Borok, Erzsebet; Horvath, Tamas L.; Rowitch, David H.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) caused by hypoxia is associated with permanent neurodevelopmental disabilities in preterm infants. The cellular and molecular mechanisms producing DWMI are poorly defined. Using a mouse model of neonatal hypoxia, we demonstrate a biphasic effect on oligodendrocyte development, resulting in hypomyelination. Oligodendrocyte death and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation during the week after hypoxia were followed by delayed oligodendrocyte differentiation and abnormal myelination, as demonstrated by electron microscopy. Cdk2 activation was essential for the regenerative OPC response after hypoxia and was accompanied by reduced FoxO1-dependent p27 Kip1 expression. p27 Kip1 was also reduced in OPCs in human infant white matter lesions after hypoxia. The negative effects of hypoxia on oligodendrogenesis and myelination were more pronounced in p27 Kip1-null mice; conversely, overexpression of FoxO1 or p27 Kip1 in OPCs after hypoxia promoted oligodendrogenesis. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that neonatal hypoxia affects the Foxo1/p27 Kip1 pathway during white matter development. We also show that molecular manipulation of this pathway enhances oligodendrocyte regeneration during a critical developmental time window after DWMI. Thus, FoxO1 and p27 Kip1 may serve as promising target molecules for promoting timely oligodendrogenesis in neonatal DWMI. PMID:23077062

  9. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS.

  10. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  11. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  12. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  13. Oligodendrocyte Lineage and Subventricular Zone Response to Traumatic Axonal Injury in the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Genevieve M.; Mierzwa, Amanda J.; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Tang, *Haiying; Wang, Yong; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Selwyn, Reed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury frequently causes traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in white matter tracts. Experimental TAI in the corpus callosum of adult mice was used to examine the effects on oligodendrocyte lineage cells and myelin in conjunction with neuroimaging. The injury targeted the corpus callosum over the subventricular zone, a source of neural stem/progenitor cells. Traumatic axonal injury was produced in the rostral body of the corpus callosum by impact onto the skull at the bregma. During the first week after injury, magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging showed that axial diffusivity decreased in the corpus callosum and that corresponding regions exhibited significant axon damage accompanied by hypertrophic microglia and reactive astrocytes. Oligodendrocyte progenitor proliferation increased in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum. Oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum shifted toward upregulation of myelin gene transcription. Plp/CreERT:R26IAP reporter mice showed normal reporter labeling of myelin sheaths 0 to 2 days after injury but labeling was increased between 2 and 7 days after injury. Electron microscopy revealed axon degeneration, demyelination, and redundant myelin figures. These findings expand the cell types and responses to white matter injuries that inform diffusion tensor imaging evaluation and identify pivotal white matter changes after TAI that may affect axon vulnerability vs. recovery after brain injury. PMID:24226267

  14. MicroRNA: Key regulators of oligodendrocyte development and pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, John-Mark K; Anderson, Rebecca C; McDermott, Kieran W

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs that function through binding to messenger RNA (mRNA) targets and downregulating gene expression. miRNAs have been shown to regulate many cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, development and apoptosis. Recently, evidence has grown which shows the involvement of miRs in oligodendrocyte (OL) specification and development. In particular, miRs-138, -219, -338, and -9 have been classified as key regulators of OL development, acting at various points in the OL lineage and influencing precursor cell transit into mature myelinating OLs. Many studies have emerged which link miRNAs with OL and myelin pathology in various central nervous system (CNS) diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS), ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury, and adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD).

  15. Ablation of Cx47 in transgenic mice leads to the loss of MUPP1, ZONAB and multiple connexins at oligodendrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinbo; Penes, M; Odermatt, B; Willecke, K; Nagy, J I

    2008-10-01

    Oligodendrocytes in CNS are linked to astrocytes by heterotypic gap junctions composed of Cx32 and Cx47 in oligodendrocytes and Cx30 and Cx43 in astrocytes. These gap junctions also harbour regulatory proteins, including ZO-1 and ZONAB. Here, we investigated the localization of multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) at these gap junctions and examined accessory proteins and connexins associated with oligodendrocytes in Cx47-knockout mice. In every CNS region tested, punctate immunolabelling for MUPP1 was found on all oligodendrocyte somata in wild-type mice. These MUPP1-positive puncta were colocalized with punctate labelling for oligodendrocytic Cx32 or Cx47, and with astrocytic Cx30 or Cx43 at oligodendrocyte-astrocyte (O/A) gap junctions, but were not found at astrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions. In Cx47-knockout mice, immunolabelling of MUPP1 and ZONAB was absent on oligodendrocytes, whereas some ZO-1-positive puncta remained. In Cx32-knockout mice, MUPP1 and ZONAB persisted at O/A gap junctions. The absence of Cx47 in Cx47-knockout mice was accompanied by a total loss of punctate labelling for Cx30, Cx32 and Cx43 on oligodendrocyte somata, and by a dramatic increase in immunolabelling for Cx32 along myelinated fibers. These results demonstrate MUPP1 at O/A gap junctions and Cx47-dependent targeting of connexins to the plasma membranes of oligodendrocyte somata. Further, it appears that deficits in myelination reported in Cx47-knockout mice may arise not only from a loss of Cx47 but also from the accompanied loss of gap junctions and their regulatory proteins at oligodendrocyte somata, and that loss of Cx47 may be partly compensated for by elevated levels of Cx32 along myelinated fibers. PMID:18973575

  16. Ablation of Cx47 in transgenic mice leads to the loss of MUPP1, ZONAB and multiple connexins at oligodendrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinbo; Penes, M.; Odermatt, B.; Willecke, K.; Nagy, J.I.

    2009-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes in CNS are linked to astrocytes by heterotypic gap junctions composed of Cx32 and Cx47 in oligodendrocytes and Cx30 and Cx43 in astrocytes. These gap junctions also harbour regulatory proteins, including ZO-1 and ZONAB. Here, we investigated the localization of multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) at these gap junctions and examined accessory proteins and connexins associated with oligodendrocytes in Cx47 knockout mice. In every CNS region tested, punctate immunolabelling for MUPP1 was found on all oligodendrocyte somata in wild-type mice. These MUPP1-positive puncta were co-localized with punctate labelling for oligodendrocytic Cx32 or Cx47, and with astrocytic Cx30 or Cx43 at oligodendrocyte-astrocyte (O/A) gap junctions, but were not found at astrocyte-astrocyte gap junctions. In Cx47 knockout mice, immunolabelling of MUPP1 and ZONAB was absent on oligodendrocytes, whereas some ZO-1-positive puncta remained. In Cx32 knockout mice, MUPP1 and ZONAB persisted at O/A gap junctions. The absence of Cx47 in Cx47 knockout mice was accompanied by a total loss of punctate labelling for Cx30, Cx32 and Cx43 on oligodendrocyte somata, and by a dramatic increase of immunolabelling for Cx32 along myelinated fibers. These results demonstrate MUPP1 at O/A gap junctions and Cx47-dependent targeting of connexins to the plasma membranes of oligodendrocyte somata. Further, it appears that deficits in myelination reported in Cx47 knockout mice may arise not only from a loss of Cx47, but also from the accompanied loss of gap junctions and their regulatory proteins at oligodendrocyte somata, and that loss of Cx47 may be partly compensated by elevated levels of Cx32 along myelinated fibers. PMID:18973575

  17. Individual Neuronal Subtypes Exhibit Diversity in CNS Myelination Mediated by Synaptic Vesicle Release.

    PubMed

    Koudelka, Sigrid; Voas, Matthew G; Almeida, Rafael G; Baraban, Marion; Soetaert, Jan; Meyer, Martin P; Talbot, William S; Lyons, David A

    2016-06-01

    Regulation of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS has important consequences for higher-order nervous system function (e.g., [1-4]), and there is growing consensus that neuronal activity regulates CNS myelination (e.g., [5-9]) through local axon-oligodendrocyte synaptic-vesicle-release-mediated signaling [10-12]. Recent analyses have indicated that myelination along axons of distinct neuronal subtypes can differ [13, 14], but it is not known whether regulation of myelination by activity is common to all neuronal subtypes or only some. This limits insight into how specific neurons regulate their own conduction. Here, we use a novel fluorescent fusion protein reporter to study myelination along the axons of distinct neuronal subtypes over time in zebrafish. We find that the axons of reticulospinal and commissural primary ascending (CoPA) neurons are among the first myelinated in the zebrafish CNS. To investigate how activity regulates myelination by different neuronal subtypes, we express tetanus toxin (TeNT) in individual reticulospinal or CoPA neurons to prevent synaptic vesicle release. We find that the axons of individual tetanus toxin expressing reticulospinal neurons have fewer myelin sheaths than controls and that their myelin sheaths are 50% shorter than controls. In stark contrast, myelination along tetanus-toxin-expressing CoPA neuron axons is entirely normal. These results indicate that while some neuronal subtypes modulate myelination by synaptic vesicle release to a striking degree in vivo, others do not. These data have implications for our understanding of how different neurons regulate myelination and thus their own function within specific neuronal circuits.

  18. Formation of compact myelin is required for maturation of the axonal cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, S. T.; Witt, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, L. L.; de Waegh, S. M.; Readhead, C.; Tu, P. H.; Lee, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    Although traditional roles ascribed to myelinating glial cells are structural and supportive, the importance of compact myelin for proper functioning of the nervous system can be inferred from mutations in myelin proteins and neuropathologies associated with loss of myelin. Myelinating Schwann cells are known to affect local properties of peripheral axons (de Waegh et al., 1992), but little is known about effects of oligodendrocytes on CNS axons. The shiverer mutant mouse has a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene that eliminates compact myelin in the CNS. In shiverer mice, both local axonal features like phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and neuronal perikaryon functions like cytoskeletal gene expression are altered. This leads to changes in the organization and composition of the axonal cytoskeleton in shiverer unmyelinated axons relative to age-matched wild-type myelinated fibers, although connectivity and patterns of neuronal activity are comparable. Remarkably, transgenic shiverer mice with thin myelin sheaths display an intermediate phenotype indicating that CNS neurons are sensitive to myelin sheath thickness. These results indicate that formation of a normal compact myelin sheath is required for normal maturation of the neuronal cytoskeleton in large CNS neurons.

  19. Effect of leptin administration on myelination in ob/ob mouse cerebrum after birth.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryuju; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Udagawa, Jun; Hioki, Kyoji; Otani, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    Brain weight and size are known to be reduced in adult leptin-deficient Lep/Lep (OB) mice when compared with the wild-type (+/+) mice (C57BL/6: B6). We here analyzed leptin's effects on myelination by examining morphometrically the myelin sheath (MS) in the cerebrum of postnatal day (P) 14 and P28 OB that had received leptin 1 nmol/capita/day from P7 to P14 or P28 (OB+lep), in comparison with OB and B6. We examined myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA levels and the differentiation of oligodendrocytes by comparing the number of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) and the mature oligodendrocytes in the cerebrum between OB, OB+lep, and B6 on P14 and P28. MBP-mRNA expression was lower in OB than in B6 on P14 and P28. On P14, it was higher in OB+lep than in OB but was still lower than in B6, whereas on P28 it was even higher in OB+lep than in B6. On P28, the radii of myelinated axons were larger in OB than in B6 and OB+lep. The MS on P28 was significantly thinner in OB than in B6, but there was no significant difference between OB and OB+lep. There were significantly fewer mature oligodendrocytes in OB and OB+lep than in B6 on P28, whereas on P14 there were significantly fewer OPCs in OB and OB+lep than in B6. Our results suggested that leptin regulates the myelination of oligodendrocytes and that the replenishment of leptin in OB recovered myelination but did not affect the differentiation of OPCs from P7 to P28.

  20. Impaired oligodendrocyte maturation in preterm infants: Potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, Erik; Heijnen, Cobi J; Benders, Manon J; van Bel, Frank; Fleiss, Bobbi; Gressens, Pierre; Nijboer, Cora H

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is an evolving challenge in neonatal health care. Despite declining mortality rates among extremely premature neonates, morbidity rates remain very high. Currently, perinatal diffuse white matter injury (WMI) is the most commonly observed type of brain injury in preterm infants and has become an important research area. Diffuse WMI is associated with impaired cognitive, sensory and psychological functioning and is increasingly being recognized as a risk factor for autism-spectrum disorders, ADHD, and other psychological disturbances. No treatment options are currently available for diffuse WMI and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are far from being completely understood. Preterm birth is associated with maternal inflammation, perinatal infections and disrupted oxygen supply which can affect the cerebral microenvironment by causing activation of microglia, astrogliosis, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. This intricate interplay of events negatively influences oligodendrocyte development, causing arrested oligodendrocyte maturation or oligodendrocyte cell death, which ultimately results in myelination failure in the developing white matter. This review discusses the current state in perinatal WMI research, ranging from a clinical perspective to basic molecular pathophysiology. The complex regulation of oligodendrocyte development in healthy and pathological conditions is described, with a specific focus on signaling cascades that may play a role in WMI. Furthermore, emerging concepts in the field of WMI and issues regarding currently available animal models are put forward. Novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying impeded oligodendrocyte maturation in diffuse WMI may aid the development of novel treatment options which are desperately needed to improve the quality-of-life of preterm neonates. PMID:26655283

  1. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 in cultured brain slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation☆

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hong; Han, Weijuan; Yang, Lijun; Chang, Yanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expressed in oligodendrocytes may trigger the repair of neuronal myelin impairment, and play a crucial role in myelin repair. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor, is of great significance in premature infants with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. There is little evidence of direct regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. In this study, brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Then, slices were transfected with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α or oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. The expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 were significantly up-regulated in rat brains prior to transfection, as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Eight hours after transfection of slices with hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression was upregulated, and reached a peak 24 hours after transfection. Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 transfection induced no significant differences in hypoxia-inducible factor 1α levels in rat brain tissues with oxygen-glucose deprivation. These experimental findings indicate that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α can regulate oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expression in hypoxic brain tissue, thus repairing the neural impairment. PMID:25206673

  2. Elevated in vivo levels of a single transcription factor directly convert satellite glia into oligodendrocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Weider, Matthias; Wegener, Amélie; Schmitt, Christian; Küspert, Melanie; Hillgärtner, Simone; Bösl, Michael R; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system and ensure rapid saltatory conduction. Shortage or loss of these cells leads to severe malfunctions as observed in human leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis, and their replenishment by reprogramming or cell conversion strategies is an important research aim. Using a transgenic approach we increased levels of the transcription factor Sox10 throughout the mouse embryo and thereby prompted Fabp7-positive glial cells in dorsal root ganglia of the peripheral nervous system to convert into cells with oligodendrocyte characteristics including myelin gene expression. These rarely studied and poorly characterized satellite glia did not go through a classic oligodendrocyte precursor cell stage. Instead, Sox10 directly induced key elements of the regulatory network of differentiating oligodendrocytes, including Olig2, Olig1, Nkx2.2 and Myrf. An upstream enhancer mediated the direct induction of the Olig2 gene. Unlike Sox10, Olig2 was not capable of generating oligodendrocyte-like cells in dorsal root ganglia. Our findings provide proof-of-concept that Sox10 can convert conducive cells into oligodendrocyte-like cells in vivo and delineates options for future therapeutic strategies.

  3. CD200 restrains macrophage attack on oligodendrocyte precursors via toll-like receptor 4 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Pham, Loc-Duyen D; Seo, Ji Hae; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David; van Leyen, Klaus; Waeber, Christian; Kim, Kyu-Won; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous barriers to white matter repair after central nervous system injury and the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we propose the hypothesis that inflammatory macrophages in damaged white matter attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling thus interfering with this endogenous progenitor recovery mechanism. Primary cell culture experiments demonstrate that peritoneal macrophages can attack and digest oligodendrocyte precursor cells via toll-like receptor 4 signaling, and this phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells can be inhibited by using CD200-Fc to downregulate toll-like receptor 4. In an in vivo model of white matter ischemia induced by endothelin-1, treatment with CD200-Fc suppressed toll-like receptor 4 expression in peripherally circulating macrophages, thus restraining macrophage phagocytosis of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and leading to improved myelination. Taken together, these findings suggest that deleterious macrophage effects may occur after white matter ischemia, whereby macrophages attack oligodendrocyte precursor cells and interfere with endogenous recovery responses. Targeting this pathway with CD200 may offer a novel therapeutic approach to amplify endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cell-mediated repair of white matter damage in mammalian brain.

  4. Oligodendrocyte-microglia cross-talk in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peferoen, Laura; Kipp, Markus; van der Valk, Paul; van Noort, Johannes M; Amor, Sandra

    2014-03-01

    Communication between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) is exemplified by cross-talk between glia and neurons shown to be essential for maintaining homeostasis. While microglia are actively modulated by neurons in the healthy brain, little is known about the cross-talk between oligodendrocytes and microglia. Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells in the CNS, are essential for the propagation of action potentials along axons, and additionally serve to support neurons by producing neurotrophic factors. In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, oligodendrocytes are thought to be the victims. Here, we review evidence that oligodendrocytes also have strong immune functions, express a wide variety of innate immune receptors, and produce and respond to chemokines and cytokines that modulate immune responses in the CNS. We also review evidence that during stress events in the brain, oligodendrocytes can trigger a cascade of protective and regenerative responses, in addition to responses that elicit progressive neurodegeneration. Knowledge of the cross-talk between microglia and oligodendrocytes may continue to uncover novel pathways of immune regulation in the brain that could be further exploited to control neuroinflammation and degeneration.

  5. Inhibitors of myelination: ECM changes, CSPGs and PTPs.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-01-01

    After inflammation-induced demyelination, such as in the disease multiple sclerosis, endogenous remyelination often fails. However, in animal models of demyelination induced with toxins, remyelination can be quite robust. A significant difference between inflammation-induced and toxin-induced demyelination is the response of local cells within the lesion, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia/macrophages, and NG2+ cells, which respond to inflammatory stimuli with increased extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production and deposition. Here, we summarize current knowledge of ECM changes in demyelinating lesions, as well as oligodendrocyte responses to aberrant ECM proteins and CSPGs after various types of demyelinating insults. The discovery that CSPGs act through the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPσ) and the Rho-ROCK pathway to inhibit oligodendrocyte process extension and myelination, but not oligodendrocyte differentiation (Pendleton et al., Experimental Neurology (2013) vol. 247, pp. 113-121), highlights the need to better understand the ECM changes that accompany demyelination and their influence on oligodendrocytes and effective remyelination.

  6. Protein translation components are colocalized in granules in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Barbarese, E; Koppel, D E; Deutscher, M P; Smith, C L; Ainger, K; Morgan, F; Carson, J H

    1995-08-01

    The intracellular distribution of various components of the protein translational machinery was visualized in mouse oligodendrocytes in culture using high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence in conjunction with dual channel confocal laser scanning microscopy. Arginyl-tRNA synthetase, elongation factor 1a, ribosomal RNA, and myelin basic protein mRNA were all co-localized in granules in the processes, veins and membrane sheets of the cell. Colocalization was evaluated by dual channel cross correlation analysis to determine the correlation index (% colocalization) and correlation distance (granule radius), and by single granule ratiometric analysis to determine the distribution of the different components in individual granules. Most granules contained synthetase, elongation factor, ribosomal RNA and myelin basic protein mRNA. These results indicate that several different components of the protein synthetic machinery, including aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, elongation factors, ribosomes and mRNAs, are colocalized in granules in oligodendrocytes. We propose that these granules are supramolecular complexes containing all of the necessary macromolecular components for protein translation and that they represent a heretofore undescribed subcellular organization of the protein synthetic machinery. This spatial organization may increase the efficiency of protein synthesis and may also provide a vehicle for transport and localization of specific mRNAs within the cell.

  7. Apcdd1 stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation after white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Laug, Dylan; Zhu, Wenyi; Patel, Jay M; Ung, Kevin; Arenkiel, Benjamin R; Fancy, Stephen P J; Mohila, Carrie; Deneen, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    Wnt signaling plays an essential role in developmental and regenerative myelination of the CNS, therefore it is critical to understand how the factors associated with the various regulatory layers of this complex pathway contribute to these processes. Recently, Apcdd1 was identified as a negative regulator of proximal Wnt signaling, however its role in oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and reymelination in the CNS remain undefined. Analysis of Apcdd1 expression revealed dynamic expression during OL development, where its expression is upregulated during differentiation. Functional studies using ex vivo and in vitro OL systems revealed that Apcdd1 promotes OL differentiation, suppresses Wnt signaling, and associates with β-catenin. Application of these findings to white matter injury (WMI) models revealed that Apcdd1 similarly promotes OL differentiation after gliotoxic injury in vivo and acute hypoxia ex vivo. Examination of Apcdd1 expression in white matter lesions from neonatal WMI and adult multiple sclerosis revealed its expression in subsets of oligodendrocyte (OL) precursors. These studies describe, for the first time, the role of Apcdd1 in OLs after WMI and reveal that negative regulators of the proximal Wnt pathway can influence regenerative myelination, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for modulating Wnt signaling and stimulating repair after WMI.

  8. Oligodendrocyte Responses to Buprenorphine Uncover Novel and Opposing Roles of μ-Opioid- and Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptors in Cell Development: Implications for Drug Addiction Treatment During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Eschenroeder, Andrew C.; Vestal-Laborde, Allison A.; Sanchez, Emilse S.; Robinson, Susan E.; Sato-Bigbee, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    While the classical function of myelin is the facilitation of saltatory conduction, this membrane and the oligodendrocytes, the cells that make myelin in the central nervous system (CNS), are now recognized as important regulators of plasticity and remodeling in the developing brain. As such, oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination are among the most vulnerable processes along CNS development. We have shown previously that rat brain myelination is significantly altered by buprenorphine, an opioid analogue currently used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. Perinatal exposure to low levels of this drug induced accelerated and increased expression of myelin basic proteins (MBPs), cellular and myelin components that are markers of mature oligodendrocytes. In contrast, supra-therapeutic drug doses delayed MBP brain expression and resulted in a decreased number of myelinated axons. We have now found that this biphasic-dose response to buprenorphine can be attributed to the participation of both the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP receptor) in the oligodendrocytes. This is particularly intriguing because the NOP receptor/nociceptin system has been primarily linked to behavior and pain regulation, but a role in CNS development or myelination has not been described before. Our findings suggest that balance between signaling mediated by (a) MOR activation and (b) a novel, yet unidentified pathway that includes the NOP receptor, plays a crucial role in the timing of oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin synthesis. Moreover, exposure to opioids could disrupt the normal interplay between these two systems altering the developmental pattern of brain myelination. PMID:22002899

  9. Tamoxifen promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barratt, H E; Budnick, H C; Parra, R; Lolley, R J; Perry, C N; Nesic, O

    2016-04-01

    The most promising therapeutic approach to finding the cure for devastating demyelinating conditions is the identification of clinically safe pharmacological agents that can promote differentiation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Here we show that the breast cancer medication tamoxifen (TMX), with well-documented clinical safety and confirmed beneficial effects in various models of demyelinating conditions, stimulates differentiation of rat glial progenitors to mature oligodendrocytes in vitro. Clinically applicable doses of TMX significantly increased both the number of CNPase-positive oligodendrocytes and protein levels of myelin basic protein, measured with Western blots. Furthermore, we also found that OPC differentiation was stimulated, not only by the pro-drug TMX-citrate (TMXC), but also by two main TMX metabolites, 4-hydroxy-TMX and endoxifen. Differentiating effects of TMXC and its metabolites were completely abolished in the presence of estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI182780. In contrast to TMXC and 4-hydroxy-TMX, endoxifen also induced astrogliogenesis, but independent of the ER activation. In sum, we showed that the TMX prodrug and its two main metabolites (4-hydroxy-TMX and endoxifen) promote ER-dependent oligodendrogenesis in vitro, not reported before. Given that differentiating effects of TMX were achieved with clinically safe doses, TMX is likely one of the most promising FDA-approved drugs for the possible treatment of demyelinating diseases. PMID:26820594

  10. Channeling of developing rat corticospinal tract axons by myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, M.E.; Schnell, L. )

    1991-03-01

    CNS myelin contains 2 membrane proteins that are potent inhibitors of neurite growth (NI-35 and NI-250). Because myelin formation starts at different times in different regions and tracts of the CNS, this inhibitory property of myelin could serve boundary and guidance functions for late-growing fiber tracts. In the rat, the corticospinal tract (CST) grows into and down the spinal cord during the first 10 postnatal days, in close proximity to the sensory tracts fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Immunofluorescence for myelin constituents showed that, in the rostral half of the spinal cord, the myelinating tissue of these ascending tracts surrounds the growing, myelin-free CST in a channellike fashion. Elimination of oligodendrocytes by x-irradiation of the newborn rats, or application of antibody IN-1, which neutralizes the inhibitory substrate property of CNS myelin, resulted in significant anatomical aberration of CST fibers. In particular, the tract was larger in cross-section, and aberrant CST fibers and fascicles intermixed with the neighboring sensory ascending tracts. These results assign an important channeling and guard-rail function to the oligodendrocyte-associated neurite growth inhibitors for the developing CST in the rat spinal cord.

  11. Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    El-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. PMID:25092805

  12. Progesterone and Nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    el-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and anti-inflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II+ mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin. PMID:25092805

  13. Disposition of axonal caspr with respect to glial cell membranes: Implications for the process of myelination.

    PubMed

    Pedraza, Liliana; Huang, Jeffrey K; Colman, David

    2009-11-15

    Neurofascin-155 (NF155) and caspr are transmembrane proteins found at discrete locations early during development of the nervous system. NF155 is present in the oligodendrocyte cell body and processes, whereas caspr is on the axonal surface. In mature nerves, these proteins are clustered at paranodes, flanking the node of Ranvier. To understand how NF155 and caspr become localized to the paranodal regions of myelinated nerves, we have studied their distribution over time in myelinating cultures. Our observations indicate that these two proteins are recruited to the cell surface at the contact zone between axons and oligodendrocytes, where they trans-interact. This association explains the early pattern of caspr distribution, a helical coil that winds around the axon, resembling the turns of the myelin sheath. Caspr, an axonal membrane protein, therefore seems to move in register with the overlying myelinating cell via its interactions with myelin proteins. We suggest that NF155 is the glial cell membrane protein responsible for caspr distribution. The pair act as interacting partners on either side of the axoglial contact area. Most likely, there are other proteins on the axonal surface whose distribution is equally influenced by interaction with the nascent myelin sheath. The fact that caspr follows the movement of the spiraling membrane has a direct affect on the interpretation of the way in which myelin is formed. PMID:19170162

  14. Progesterone and nestorone promote myelin regeneration in chronic demyelinating lesions of corpus callosum and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    El-Etr, Martine; Rame, Marion; Boucher, Celine; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Kumar, Narender; Liere, Philippe; Pianos, Antoine; Schumacher, Michael; Sitruk-Ware, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis affects mainly women and consists in intermittent or chronic damages to the myelin sheaths, focal inflammation, and axonal degeneration. Current therapies are limited to immunomodulators and antiinflammatory drugs, but there is no efficient treatment for stimulating the endogenous capacity of myelin repair. Progesterone and synthetic progestins have been shown in animal models of demyelination to attenuate myelin loss, reduce clinical symptoms severity, modulate inflammatory responses and partially reverse the age-dependent decline in remyelination. Moreover, progesterone has been demonstrated to promote myelin formation in organotypic cultures of cerebellar slices. In the present study, we show that progesterone and the synthetic 19-nor-progesterone derivative Nestorone® promote the repair of severe chronic demyelinating lesions induced by feeding cuprizone to female mice for up to 12 weeks. Progesterone and Nestorone increase the density of NG2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and CA II(+) mature oligodendrocytes and enhance the formation of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-immunoreactive myelin. However, while demyelination in response to cuprizone was less marked in corpus callosum than in cerebral cortex, remyelination appeared earlier in the former. The remyelinating effect of progesterone was progesterone receptor (PR)-dependent, as it was absent in PR-knockout mice. Progesterone and Nestorone also decreased (but did not suppress) neuroinflammatory responses, specifically astrocyte and microglial cell activation. Therefore, some progestogens are promising therapeutic candidates for promoting the regeneration of myelin.

  15. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah; Sim, Ju Hee; Won, You Jin; Hwang, Chang Ho; Yoo, Jong Yoon; Hong, Hea Nam

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  16. Involvement of nitric oxide on kainate-induced toxicity in oligodendrocyte precursors.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Palma, Laura; Pehar, Mariana; Cassina, Patricia; Peluffo, Hugo; Castellanos, Raquel; Anesetti, Gabriel; Beckman, Joseph S; Barbeito, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The vulnerability of oligodendrocytes to excitatory amino acids may account for the pathology of white matter occurring following hypoxia/ischemia or autoimmune attack. Here, we examined the vulnerability of immature oligodendrocytes (positively labeled by galactocerobroside-C and not expressing myelin basic protein) from neonatal rat spinal cord to kainate, an agonist of excitatory amino acid receptors that induces long-lasting inward currents in immature oligodendrocytes. In particular, we studied whether kainate toxicity was linked to the endogenous production of nitric oxide. We found cultured oligodendrocytes to be highly sensitive to 24-48 h exposure to 0.5-1 mM kainate. The toxin induced striking morphological changes in oligodendrocytes, characterized by the disruption of the process network around the cell body and the growth of one or two long, thick and non-branched processes. A longer exposure to kainate resulted in massive death of oligodendrocytes, which was prevented by 6,7, dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) (30 micro M), the antagonist of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic/kainate receptors. Remarkably, we found that those oligodendrocytes displaying bipolar morphology following kainate exposure, also expressed the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, suggesting that peroxynitrite could be formed by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Moreover, kainate toxicity was significantly prevented by addition of the NOS inhibitor nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), further suggesting that nitric oxide-derived oxidants contribute to excitotoxic mechanisms in immature oligodendrocytes.

  17. Characterization of cultured rat oligodendrocytes proliferating in a serum-free, chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Saneto, R.P.; de Vellis, J.

    1985-05-01

    A serumless, chemically defined medium has been developed for the culture of oligodendrocytes isolated from primary neonatal rat cerebral cultures. Combined together, insulin, transferrin, and fibroblast growth factor synergistically induced an essentially homogeneous population (95-98%) of cells expressing glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity to undergo cell division. Proliferating cells were characterized by several criteria: (i) ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy identified the cell type as an oligodendrocyte; (ii) biochemical assays showed expression of three oligodendrocyte biochemical markers, induction of both glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, and presence of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; and (iii) immunocytochemical staining showed cultures to be 95-98% positive for glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, 90% for myelin basic protein, 60-70% for galactocerebroside, and 70% for A2B5.

  18. Perinatal chronic hypoxia induces cortical inflammation, hypomyelination, and peripheral myelin-specific T cell autoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Sterling B; Kong, Xiagmei; Venkataraman, Ramgopal; Savedra, Allen Michael; Kernie, Steven G; Stowe, Ann M; Raman, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    pCH is an important risk factor for brain injury and long-term morbidity in children, occurring during the developmental stages of neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and myelination. We show that a rodent model of pCH results in an early decrease in mature myelin. Although pCH does increase progenitor oligodendrocytes in the developing brain, BrdU labeling revealed a loss in dividing progenitor oligodendrocytes, indicating a defect in mature cell replacement and myelinogenesis. Mice continued to exhibited hypomyelination, concomitant with long-term impairment of motor function, weeks after cessation of pCH. The implication of a novel neuroimmunologic interplay, pCH also induced a significant egress of infiltrating CD4 T cells into the developing brain. This pCH-mediated neuroinflammation included oligodendrocyte-directed autoimmunity, with an increase in peripheral myelin-specific CD4 T cells. Thus, both the loss of available, mature, myelin-producing glial cells and an active increase in autoreactive, myelin-specific CD4 T cell infiltration into pCH brains may contribute to early pCH-induced hypomyelination in the developing CNS. The elucidation of potential mechanisms of hypoxia-driven autoimmunity will expand our understanding of the neuroimmune axis during perinatal CNS disease states that may contribute to long-term functional disability.

  19. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y; Rhee, Jeong S; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A T; Lyons, David A; Simons, Mikael

    2015-07-27

    During CNS development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multilamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic, and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as an essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading.

  20. Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells in Chronic Demyelination of Multiple Sclerosis Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Alison Ruth; Carroll, William M

    2015-09-01

    Reports that chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis brain and spinal cord lesions contained immature oligodendrocyte lineage cells have generated major interest aimed at the potential for promotion of endogenous repair. Despite the prominence of the optic nerve as a lesion site and its importance in clinical disease assessment, no detailed studies of multiple sclerosis-affected optic nerve exist. This study aims to provide insight into the cellular pathology of chronic demyelination in multiple sclerosis through direct morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of optic nerve in conjunction with observations from an experimental cat optic nerve model of successful remyelination. Myelin staining was followed by immunohistochemistry to differentially label neuroglia. Digitally immortalized sections were then analyzed to generate quantification data and antigenic phenotypes including maturational stages within the oligodendrocyte lineage. It was found that some chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis optic nerve lesions contained oligodendroglial cells and that heterogeneity existed in the presence of myelin sheaths, oligodendrocyte maturational stages and extent of axonal investment. The findings advance our understanding of oligodendrocyte activity in chronically demyelinated human optic nerve and may have implications for studies aimed at enhancement of endogenous repair in multiple sclerosis.

  1. Fluoxetine prevents oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Y; Kang, So R; Yune, Tae Y

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans.

  2. Fluoxetine Prevents Oligodendrocyte Cell Death by Inhibiting Microglia Activation after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Y.; Kang, So R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans. PMID:25366938

  3. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Regulates Genes during Proliferation and Differentiation in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Jeffery D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Richard, Stephane; Almazan, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is important for oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and myelination. However, the precise cellular mechanisms by which p38 regulates OLG differentiation remain largely unknown. To determine whether p38 functions in part through transcriptional events in regulating OLG identity, we performed microarray analysis on differentiating oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLPs) treated with a p38 inhibitor. Consistent with a role in OLG differentiation, pharmacological inhibition of p38 down-regulated the transcription of genes that are involved in myelin biogenesis, transcriptional control and cell cycle. Proliferation assays showed that OLPs treated with the p38 inhibitor retained a proliferative capacity which could be induced upon application of mitogens demonstrating that after two days of p38-inhibition OLGs remained poised to continue mitosis. Together, our results suggest that the p38 pathway regulates gene transcription which can coordinate OLG differentiation. Our microarray dataset will provide a useful resource for future studies investigating the molecular mechanisms by which p38 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. PMID:26714323

  4. Aorta-derived mesoangioblasts differentiate into the oligodendrocytes by inhibition of the Rho kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Kamath, Anant; Frye, Janie; Iwamoto, Gary A; Chun, Ju Lan; Berry, Suzanne E

    2012-05-01

    Mesoangioblasts are vessel-derived stem cells that differentiate into mesodermal derivatives. We have isolated postnatal aorta-derived mesoangioblasts (ADMs) that differentiate into smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle, and adipocytes, and regenerate damaged skeletal muscle in a murine model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We report that the marker profile of ADM is similar to that of mesoangioblasts isolated from embryonic dorsal aorta, postnatal bone marrow, and heart, but distinct from mesoangioblasts derived from skeletal muscle. We also demonstrate that ADM differentiate into myelinating glial cells. ADM localize to peripheral nerve bundles in regenerating muscles and exhibit morphology and marker expression of mature Schwann cells, and myelinate axons. In vitro, ADM spontaneously express markers of oligodendrocyte progenitors, including the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan NG2, nestin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor α, the A2B5 antigen, thyroid hormone nuclear receptor α, and O4. Pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK) initiated process extension by ADM, and when combined with insulin-like growth factor 1, PDGF, and thyroid hormone, enhanced ADM expression of oligodendrocyte precursor markers and maturation into the oligodendrocyte lineage. ADM injected into the right lateral ventricle of the brain migrate to the corpus callosum, and cerebellar white matter, where they express components of myelin. Because ADM differentiate or mature into cell types of both mesodermal and ectodermal origin, they may be useful for treatment of a variety of degenerative diseases, or repair and regeneration of multiple cell types in severely damaged tissue. PMID:21793703

  5. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Schwann Cell Myelination Requires Timely and Precise Targeting of P0 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, X.; Kidd, G.J.; Wrabetz, L.; Feltri, M.L.; Messing, A.; Trapp, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report investigated mechanisms responsible for failed Schwann cell myelination in mice that overexpress P0 (P0tg), the major structural protein of PNS myelin. Quantitative ultrastructural immunocytochemistry established that P0 protein was mistargeted to abaxonal, periaxonal, and mesaxon membranes in P0tg Schwann cells with arrested myelination. The extracellular leaflets of P0-containing mesaxon membranes were closely apposed with periodicities of compact myelin. The myelin-associated glycoprotein was appropriately sorted in the Golgi apparatus and targeted to periaxonal membranes. In adult mice, occasional Schwann cells myelinated axons possibly with the aid of endocytic removal of mistargeted P0. These results indicate that P0 gene multiplication causes P0 mistargeting to mesaxon membranes, and through obligate P0 homophilic adhesion, renders these dynamic membranes inert and halts myelination. PMID:10704450

  7. Axonal activity-dependent myelination in development: Insights for myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Xing, Yao Lulu; Merson, Tobias D

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in transgenic tools have allowed us to peek into the earliest stages of vertebrate development to study axon-glial communication in the control of peri-natal myelination. The emerging role of neuronal activity in regulating oligodendrocyte progenitor cell behavior during developmental myelination has opened up an exciting possibility-a role for neuronal activity in the early stages of remyelination. Recent work from our laboratory and others has also shown that contrary to previously established dogma in the field, complete remyelination up to pre-demyelination levels can be achieved in mouse models of MS by oligodendrogenic neural precursor cells that derive from the adult subventricular zone. These cells are electrically active and can be depolarized, suggesting that neuronal activity may have a modulatory role in their development and remyelination potential. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the development of axon-glia communication and apply those same concepts to remyelination, with an emphasis on the particular roles of different sources of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

  8. Modulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation by combined biochemical and mechanical cues

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Tânia; Paes de Faria, Joana; Bippes, Christian A.; Maia, João; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Relvas, João B.; Grãos, Mário

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play a key role during oligodendrogenesis. While fibronectin (FN) is involved in the maintenance and proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), merosin (MN) promotes differentiation into oligodendrocytes (OLs). Mechanical properties of the ECM also seem to affect OL differentiation, hence this study aimed to clarify the impact of combined biophysical and biochemical elements during oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation using synthetic elastic polymeric ECM-like substrates. CG-4 cells presented OPC- or OL-like morphology in response to brain-compliant substrates functionalised with FN or MN, respectively. The expression of the differentiation and maturation markers myelin basic protein — MBP — and proteolipid protein — PLP — (respectively) by primary rat oligodendrocytes was enhanced in presence of MN, but only on brain-compliant conditions, considering the distribution (MBP) or amount (PLP) of the protein. It was also observed that maturation of OLs was attained earlier (by assessing PLP expression) by cells differentiated on MN-functionalised brain-compliant substrates than on standard culture conditions. Moreover, the combination of MN and substrate compliance enhanced the maturation and morphological complexity of OLs. Considering the distinct degrees of stiffness tested ranging within those of the central nervous system, our results indicate that 6.5 kPa is the most suitable rigidity for oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:26879561

  9. Myelin Avoids the JAM.

    PubMed

    Follis, Rose M; Carter, Bruce D

    2016-08-17

    In this issue of Neuron, Redmond et al. (2016) identify junction adhesion molecule 2 (JAM2) as an inhibitor of somatodendritic myelination in spinal cord neurons, thereby elucidating how myelin forms on axons but avoids dendrites and cell bodies. PMID:27537479

  10. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Kiselyov, Kirill I; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1(-/-) brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1(-/-) and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  11. Dual-specific Phosphatase-6 (Dusp6) and ERK Mediate AMPA Receptor-induced Oligodendrocyte Death*

    PubMed Central

    Domercq, Maria; Alberdi, Elena; Sánchez-Gómez, Maria Victoria; Ariz, Usue; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are highly vulnerable to glutamate excitotoxicity, a mechanism involved in tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Thus, understanding oligodendrocyte death at the molecular level is important to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease. Here, using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR, we observed that dual-specific phosphatase-6 (Dusp6), an extracellular regulated kinase-specific phosphatase, is up-regulated in oligodendrocyte cultures as well as in optic nerves after AMPA receptor activation. In turn, Dusp6 is overexpressed in optic nerves from multiple sclerosis patients before the appearance of evident damage in this structure. We further analyzed the role of Dusp6 and ERK signaling in excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and observed that AMPA receptor activation induces a rapid increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Blocking Dusp6 expression, which enhances ERK1/2 phosphorylation, significantly diminished AMPA receptor-induced oligodendrocyte death. In contrast, MAPK/ERK pathway inhibition with UO126 significantly potentiates excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and increases cytochrome c release, mitochondrial depolarization, and mitochondrial calcium overload produced by AMPA receptor stimulation. Upstream analysis demonstrated that MAPK/ERK signaling alters AMPA receptor properties. Indeed, Dusp6 overexpression as well as incubation with UO126 produced an increase in AMPA receptor-induced inward currents and cytosolic calcium overload. Together, these data suggest that levels of phosphorylated ERK, controlled by Dusp6 phosphatase, regulate glutamate receptor permeability and oligodendroglial excitotoxicity. Therefore, targeting Dusp6 may be a useful strategy to prevent oligodendrocyte death in multiple sclerosis and other diseases involving CNS white matter. PMID:21300799

  12. Myelin repair and functional recovery mediated by neural cell transplantation in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lianhua; Hecker, Jordan; Kerstetter, Amber; Miller, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular therapies are becoming a major focus for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), therefore it is important to identify the most effective cell types that promote myelin repair. Several components contribute to the relative benefits of specific cell types including the overall efficacy of the cell therapy, the reproducibility of treatment, the mechanisms of action of distinct cell types and the ease of isolation and generation of therapeutic populations. A range of distinct cell populations promote functional recovery in animal models of MS including neural stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells derived from different tissues. Each of these cell populations has advantages and disadvantages and likely works through distinct mechanisms. The relevance of such mechanisms to myelin repair in the adult central nervous system is unclear since the therapeutic cells are generally derived from developing animals. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a population of neural cells from the adult spinal cord that are characterized by the expression of the cell surface glycoprotein NG2. In functional studies, injection of adult NG2+ cells into mice with ongoing MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) enhanced remyelination in the CNS while the number of CD3+ T cells in areas of spinal cord demyelination was reduced approximately three-fold. In vivo studies indicated that in EAE, NG2+ cells stimulated endogenous repair while in vitro they responded to signals in areas of induced inflammation by differentiating into oligodendrocytes. These results suggested that adult NG2+ cells represent a useful cell population for promoting neural repair in a variety of different conditions including demyelinating diseases such as MS. PMID:23471865

  13. Delayed myelination in an intrauterine growth retardation model is mediated by oxidative stress upregulating bone morphogenetic protein 4.

    PubMed

    Reid, Mary V; Murray, Kaitlin A; Marsh, Eric D; Golden, Jeffrey A; Simmons, Rebecca A; Grinspan, Judith B

    2012-07-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is associated with neurological deficits including cerebral palsy and cognitive and behavioral disabilities. The pathogenesis involves oxidative stress that leads to periventricular white matter injury with a paucity of mature oligodendrocytes and hypomyelination. The molecular mechanisms underlying this damage remain poorly understood. We used a rat model of IUGR created by bilateral ligation of the uterine artery at embryonic Day 19 that results in fetal growth retardation and oxidative stress in the developing brain. The IUGR rat pups showed significant delays in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that resolved by 8 weeks. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation, was elevated in IUGR brains at postnatal time points and returned to near normal by adulthood. Despite the apparent recovery, behavioral deficiencies were found in 8-week-old female animals, suggesting that the early transient myelination defects have permanent effects. In support of these in vivo data, oligodendrocyte precursor cells cultured from postnatal IUGR rats retained increased BMP4 expression and impaired differentiation that was reversed with the BMP inhibitor noggin. Oxidants in oligodendrocyte cultures increased BMP expression, which decreased differentiation; however, abrogating BMP signaling with noggin in vitro and in BMP-deficient mice prevented these effects. Together, these findings suggest that IUGR results in delayed myelination through the generation of oxidative stress that leads to BMP4 upregulation. PMID:22710965

  14. Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway inhibits timely myelination and remyelination in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Baranzini, Sergio E; Zhao, Chao; Yuk, Dong-In; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Kaing, Sovann; Sanai, Nader; Franklin, Robin J M; Rowitch, David H

    2009-07-01

    The progressive loss of CNS myelin in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed to result from the combined effects of damage to oligodendrocytes and failure of remyelination. A common feature of demyelinated lesions is the presence of oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs) blocked at a premyelinating stage. However, the mechanistic basis for inhibition of myelin repair is incompletely understood. To identify novel regulators of OLP differentiation, potentially dysregulated during repair, we performed a genome-wide screen of 1040 transcription factor-encoding genes expressed in remyelinating rodent lesions. We report that approximately 50 transcription factor-encoding genes show dynamic expression during repair and that expression of the Wnt pathway mediator Tcf4 (aka Tcf7l2) within OLPs is specific to lesioned-but not normal-adult white matter. We report that beta-catenin signaling is active during oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in vivo. Moreover, we observed similar regulation of Tcf4 in the developing human CNS and lesions of MS. Data mining revealed elevated levels of Wnt pathway mRNA transcripts and proteins within MS lesions, indicating activation of the pathway in this pathological context. We show that dysregulation of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling in OLPs results in profound delay of both developmental myelination and remyelination, based on (1) conditional activation of beta-catenin in the oligodendrocyte lineage in vivo and (2) findings from APC(Min) mice, which lack one functional copy of the endogenous Wnt pathway inhibitor APC. Together, our findings indicate that dysregulated Wnt-beta-catenin signaling inhibits myelination/remyelination in the mammalian CNS. Evidence of Wnt pathway activity in human MS lesions suggests that its dysregulation might contribute to inefficient myelin repair in human neurological disorders.

  15. EGF induces the progeny of subventricular zone type B cells to migrate and differentiate into oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Romero-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    New neurons and oligodendrocytes are continuously produced in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mammalian brains. Under normal conditions, the SVZ primary precursors (type B1 cells) generate type C cells, the majority of which differentiate into neurons, with a small sub-population giving rise to oligodendrocytes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling induces dramatic proliferation and migration of SVZ progenitors, a process that could have therapeutic applications. However, the fate of cells derived from adult neural stem cells after EGF stimulation remains unknown. Here, we specifically labeled SVZ B1 cells and followed their progeny after a 7-day intraventricular infusion of EGF. Cells derived from SVZ B1 cells invaded the parenchyma around the SVZ into striatum, septum, corpus callosum, and fimbria-fornix. The majority of these B1-derived cells gave rise to cells in the oligodendrocyte lineage including local NG2+ progenitors, pre-myelinating and myelinating oligodendrocytes. SVZ B1 cells also gave rise to a population of highly branched S100β+/GFAP+ cells in the striatum and septum, but no neuronal differentiation was observed. Interestingly, when demyelination was induced in the corpus callosum by a local injection of lysolecithin, increased number of cells derived from SVZ B1 cells and stimulated to migrate and proliferate by EGF infusion, differentiated into oligodendrocytes at the lesion site. This work indicates that EGF infusion can greatly expand the number of progenitors derived from the SVZ primary progenitors, which migrate and differentiate into oligodendroglial cells. This expanded population could be used for the repair of white matter lesions. PMID:19544429

  16. Preliminary Evidence of Increased Hippocampal Myelin Content in Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Linda L.; Tosun, Duygu; Woodward, Steven H.; Kaufer, Daniela; Neylan, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest the formation of myelin in the central nervous system by oligodendrocytes is a continuous process that can be modified with experience. For example, a recent study showed that immobilization stress increased oligodendrogensis in the dentate gyrus of adult rat hippocampus. Because changes in myelination represents an adaptive form of brain plasticity that has a greater reach in the adult brain than other forms of plasticity (e.g., neurogenesis), the objective of this “proof of concept” study was to examine whether there are differences in myelination in the hippocampi of humans with and without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We used the ratio of T1-weighted/T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) intensity to estimate the degree of hippocampal myelination in 19 male veterans with PTSD and 19 matched trauma-exposed male veterans without PTSD (mean age: 43 ± 12 years). We found that veterans with PTSD had significantly more hippocampal myelin than trauma-exposed controls. There was also found a positive correlation between estimates of hippocampal myelination and PTSD and depressive symptom severity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine hippocampal myelination in humans with PTSD. These results provide preliminary evidence for stress-induced hippocampal myelin formation as a potential mechanism underlying the brain abnormalities associated with vulnerability to stress. PMID:26696852

  17. Negative regulation of miRNA-9 on oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lijun; Cui, Hong; Cao, Ting

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays a key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and myelin repair. miRNA-9 is involved in the occurrence of many related neurological disorders. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that miRNA-9 complementarily, but incompletely, bound oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1, but whether miRNA-9 regulates oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 remains poorly understood. Whole brain slices of 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and divided into four groups: control group; oxygen-glucose deprivation group (treatment with 8% O2 + 92% N2 and sugar-free medium for 60 minutes); transfection control group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with control plasmid) and miRNA-9 transfection group (after oxygen and glucose deprivation for 60 minutes, transfected with miRNA-9 plasmid). From the third day of transfection, and with increasing culture days, oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression increased in each group, peaked at 14 days, and then decreased at 21 days. Real-time quantitative PCR results, however, demonstrated that oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 expression was lower in the miRNA-9 transfection group than that in the transfection control group at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after transfection. Results suggested that miRNA-9 possibly negatively regulated oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 in brain tissues during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. PMID:25206848

  18. The multifaceted role of astrocytes in regulating myelination.

    PubMed

    Kıray, Hülya; Lindsay, Susan L; Hosseinzadeh, Sara; Barnett, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are the major glial cell of the central nervous system (CNS), providing both metabolic and physical support to other neural cells. After injury, astrocytes become reactive and express a continuum of phenotypes which may be supportive or inhibitory to CNS repair. This review will focus on the ability of astrocytes to influence myelination in the context of specific secreted factors, cytokines and other neural cell targets within the CNS. In particular, we focus on how astrocytes provide energy and cholesterol to neurons, influence synaptogenesis, affect oligodendrocyte biology and instigate cross-talk between the many cellular components of the CNS.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells facilitates recovery of chronically demyelinated lesions but is redundant in acute lesions.

    PubMed

    Furusho, Miki; Roulois, Aude J; Franklin, Robin J M; Bansal, Rashmi

    2015-10-01

    Remyelination is a potent regenerative process in demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, the effective therapeutic promotion of which will fill an unmet clinical need. The development of proregenerative therapies requires the identification of key regulatory targets that are likely to be involved in the integration of multiple signaling mechanisms. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling system, which comprises multiple ligands and receptors, potentially provides one such target. Since the FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) interactions are complex and regulate multiple diverse functions of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, it is difficult to predict their overall therapeutic potential in the regeneration of oligodendrocytes and myelin. Therefore, to assess the integrated effects of FGFR signaling on this process, we simultaneously inactivated both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in oligodendrocytes and their precursors using two Cre-driver mouse lines. Acute and chronic cuprizone-induced or lysolecithin-induced demyelination was established in Fgfr1/Fgfr2 double knockout mice (dKO). We found that in the acute cuprizone model, there was normal differentiation of oligodendrocytes and recovery of myelin in the corpus callosum of both control and dKO mice. Similarly, in the spinal cord, lysolecithin-induced demyelinated lesions regenerated similarly in the dKO and control mice. In contrast, in the chronic cuprizone model, fewer differentiated oligodendrocytes and less efficient myelin recovery were observed in the dKO compared to control mice. These data suggest that while cell-autonomous FGF signaling is redundant during recovery of acute demyelinated lesions, it facilitates regenerative processes in chronic demyelination. Thus, FGF-based therapies have potential value in stimulating oligodendrocyte and myelin regeneration in late-stage disease.

  20. Slit2 regulates the dispersal of oligodendrocyte precursor cells via Fyn/RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiujie; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jiazhen; Yuan, Yimin; Gao, Xiaofei; Su, Zhida; He, Cheng

    2012-05-18

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are a unique type of glia that are responsible for the myelination of the central nervous system. OPC migration is important for myelin formation during central nervous system development and repair. However, the precise extracellular and intracellular mechanisms that regulate OPC migration remain elusive. Slits were reported to regulate neurodevelopmental processes such as migration, adhesion, axon guidance, and elongation through binding to roundabout receptors (Robos). However, the potential roles of Slits/Robos in oligodendrocytes remain unknown. In this study, Slit2 was found to be involved in regulating the dispersal of OPCs through the association between Robo1 and Fyn. Initially, we examined the expression of Robos in OPCs both in vitro and in vivo. Subsequently, the Boyden chamber assay showed that Slit2 could inhibit OPC migration. RoboN, a specific inhibitor of Robos, could significantly attenuate this effect. The effects were confirmed through the explant migration assay. Furthermore, treating OPCs with Slit2 protein deactivated Fyn and increased the level of activated RhoA-GTP. Finally, Fyn was found to form complexes with Robo1, but this association was decreased after Slit2 stimulation. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that Slit2 regulates the dispersal of oligodendrocyte precursor cells through Fyn and RhoA signaling.

  1. Bisphenol-A impairs myelination potential during development in the hippocampus of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is the functional implication of oligodendrocytes (OLs), which is involved in insulation of axons and promoting rapid propagation of action potential in the brain. OLs are derived from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which proliferate, differentiate, and migrate throughout the central nervous system. Defects in myelination process lead to the onset of several neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Exposure to synthetic xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) causes cognitive dysfunction, impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, and causes onset of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the effects of BPA on OPC proliferation, differentiation and myelination, and associated cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in the hippocampus of the rat brain are still largely unknown. We found that BPA significantly decreased bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell proliferation and number and size of oligospheres. We observed reduced co-localization of BrdU with myelination markers CNPase and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α), suggesting impaired proliferation and differentiation of OPCs by BPA in culture. We studied the effects of BPA exposure during prenatal and postnatal periods on cellular and molecular alteration(s) in the myelination process in the hippocampus region of the rat brain at postnatal day 21 and 90. BPA exposure both in vitro and in vivo altered proliferation and differentiation potential of OPCs and decreased the expression of genes and levels of proteins that are involved in myelination. Ultrastructural electron microscopy analysis revealed that BPA exposure caused decompaction of myelinated axons and altered g-ratio at both the developmental periods as compared to control. These results suggest that BPA exposure both during prenatal and postnatal periods alters myelination in the hippocampus of the rat brain leading to cognitive deficits.

  2. Myelin basic protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein.

  3. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells are accurate sensors of local K+ in mature gray matter.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Paloma P; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; Levavasseur, Françoise; Angulo, María Cecilia

    2013-02-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are the major source of myelinating oligodendrocytes during development. These progenitors are highly abundant at birth and persist in the adult where they are distributed throughout the brain. The large abundance of OPCs after completion of myelination challenges their unique role as progenitors in the healthy adult brain. Here we show that adult OPCs of the barrel cortex sense fine extracellular K(+) increases generated by neuronal activity, a property commonly assigned to differentiated astrocytes rather than to progenitors. Biophysical, pharmacological, and single-cell RT-PCR analyses demonstrate that this ability of OPCs establishes itself progressively through the postnatal upregulation of Kir4.1 K(+) channels. In animals with advanced cortical myelination, extracellular stimulation of layer V axons induces slow K(+) currents in OPCs, which amplitude correlates with presynaptic action potential rate. Moreover, using paired recordings, we demonstrate that the discharge of a single neuron can be detected by nearby adult OPCs, indicating that these cells are strategically located to detect local changes in extracellular K(+) concentration during physiological neuronal activity. These results identify a novel unitary neuron-OPC connection, which transmission does not rely on neurotransmitter release and appears late in development. Beyond their abundance in the mature brain, the postnatal emergence of a physiological response of OPCs to neuronal network activity supports the view that in the adult these cells are not progenitors only.

  4. MyelStones: the executive roles of myelin basic protein in myelin assembly and destabilization in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bamm, Vladimir V; Harauz, George

    2015-11-15

    The classic isoforms of myelin basic protein (MBP, 14-21.5 kDa) are essential to formation of the multilamellar myelin sheath of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The predominant 18.5-kDa isoform links together the cytosolic surfaces of oligodendrocytes, but additionally participates in cytoskeletal turnover and membrane extension, Fyn-mediated signalling pathways, sequestration of phosphoinositides and maintenance of calcium homoeostasis. All MBP isoforms are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) that interact via molecular recognition fragments (MoRFs), which thereby undergo local disorder-to-order transitions. Their conformations and associations are modulated by environment and by a dynamic barcode of post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation by mitogen-activated and other protein kinases and deimination [a hallmark of demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The MBPs are thus to myelin what basic histones are to chromatin. Originally thought to be merely structural proteins forming an inert spool, histones are now known to be dynamic entities involved in epigenetic regulation and diseases such as cancer. Analogously, the MBPs are not mere adhesives of compact myelin, but active participants in oligodendrocyte proliferation and in membrane process extension and stabilization during myelinogenesis. A central segment of these proteins is pivotal in membrane-anchoring and SH3 domain (Src homology 3) interaction. We discuss in the present review advances in our understanding of conformational conversions of this classic basic protein upon membrane association, including new thermodynamic analyses of transitions into different structural ensembles and how a shift in the pattern of its post-translational modifications is associated with the pathogenesis and potentially onset of demyelination in MS.

  5. Overcoming remyelination failure in multiple sclerosis and other myelin disorders.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Kotter, Mark R; Harrington, Emily P; Huang, Jeffrey K; Zhao, Chao; Rowitch, David H; Franklin, Robin J M

    2010-09-01

    Protecting axons from degeneration represents a major unmet need in the treatment of myelin disorders and especially the currently untreatable secondary progressive stages of multiple sclerosis (MS). Several lines of evidence indicate that ensuring myelin sheaths are restored to demyelinated axons, the regenerative process of remyelination, represents one of the most effective means of achieving axonal protection. Remyelination can occur as a highly effective spontaneous regenerative process following demyelination. However, for reasons that have not been fully understood, this process is often incomplete or fails in MS. Recognizing the reasons for remyelination failure and hence identifying therapeutic targets will depend on detailed histopathological studies of myelin disorders and a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating remyelination. Pathology studies have revealed that chronically demyelinated lesions in MS often fail to repair because of a failure of differentiation of the precursor cell responsible for remyelination rather than a failure of their recruitment. In this article we review three mechanisms by which differentiation of precursor cells into remyelinating oligodendrocytes are regulated-the Notch pathway, the Wnt pathway and the pathways activated by inhibitor of differentiation in myelin debris-and indicate how these might be pharmacologically targeted to overcome remyelination failure.

  6. Pluripotent stem cell-derived radial glia-like cells as stable intermediate for efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorris, Raphaela; Fischer, Julia; Erwes, Kim Lina; Kesavan, Jaideep; Peterson, Daniel A; Alexander, Michael; Nöthen, Markus M; Peitz, Michael; Quandel, Tamara; Karus, Michael; Brüstle, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent an attractive tool for the in vitro generation of various neural cell types. However, the developmentally early NPCs emerging during hPSC differentiation typically show a strong propensity for neuronal differentiation, with more limited potential for generating astrocytes and, in particular, for generating oligodendrocytes. This phenomenon corresponds well to the consecutive and protracted generation of neurons and GLIA during normal human development. To obtain a more gliogenic NPC type, we combined growth factor-mediated expansion with pre-exposure to the differentiation-inducing agent retinoic acid and subsequent immunoisolation of CD133-positive cells. This protocol yields an adherent and self-renewing population of hindbrain/spinal cord radial glia (RG)-like neural precursor cells (RGL-NPCs) expressing typical neural stem cell markers such as nestin, ASCL1, SOX2, and PAX6 as well as RG markers BLBP, GLAST, vimentin, and GFAP. While RGL-NPCs maintain the ability for tripotential differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, they exhibit greatly enhanced propensity for oligodendrocyte generation. Under defined differentiation conditions promoting the expression of the major oligodendrocyte fate-determinants OLIG1/2, NKX6.2, NKX2.2, and SOX10, RGL-NPCs efficiently convert into NG2-positive oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs) and are subsequently capable of in vivo myelination. Representing a stable intermediate between PSCs and OPCs, RGL-NPCs expedite the generation of PSC-derived oligodendrocytes with O4-, 4860-, and myelin basic protein (MBP)-positive cells that already appear within 7 weeks following growth factor withdrawal-induced differentiation. Thus, RGL-NPCs may serve as robust tool for time-efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jamie L.; van der Pol, Susanne M. A.; Baron, Wia; McCord, Joe M.; de Vries, Helga E.; van Horssen, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Here, we investigated the efficacy of sulforaphane (SFN), monomethyl fumarate (MMF) and Protandim to induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme expression, and protect oligodendrocytes against ROS-induced cell death and ROS-and TNF-mediated inhibition of OPC differentiation. OLN-93 cells and primary rat oligodendrocytes were treated with SFN, MMF or Protandim resulting in significant induction of Nrf2-driven (antioxidant) proteins heme oygenase-1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH): quinone oxidoreductase-1 and p62/SQSTM1, as analysed by Western blotting. After incubation with the compounds, oligodendrocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Protandim most potently promoted oligodendrocyte cell survival as measured by live/death viability assay. Moreover, OPCs were treated with Protandim or vehicle control prior to exposing them to TNF or hydrogen peroxide for five days, which inhibited OPC differentiation. Protandim significantly promoted OPC differentiation under influence of ROS, but not TNF. Protandim, a combination of five herbal ingredients, potently induces antioxidants in oligodendrocytes and is able to protect oligodendrocytes against oxidative stress by preventing ROS-induced cell death and promoting OPC differentiation. PMID:27618111

  8. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jamie L; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Baron, Wia; McCord, Joe M; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Here, we investigated the efficacy of sulforaphane (SFN), monomethyl fumarate (MMF) and Protandim to induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme expression, and protect oligodendrocytes against ROS-induced cell death and ROS-and TNF-mediated inhibition of OPC differentiation. OLN-93 cells and primary rat oligodendrocytes were treated with SFN, MMF or Protandim resulting in significant induction of Nrf2-driven (antioxidant) proteins heme oygenase-1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH): quinone oxidoreductase-1 and p62/SQSTM1, as analysed by Western blotting. After incubation with the compounds, oligodendrocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Protandim most potently promoted oligodendrocyte cell survival as measured by live/death viability assay. Moreover, OPCs were treated with Protandim or vehicle control prior to exposing them to TNF or hydrogen peroxide for five days, which inhibited OPC differentiation. Protandim significantly promoted OPC differentiation under influence of ROS, but not TNF. Protandim, a combination of five herbal ingredients, potently induces antioxidants in oligodendrocytes and is able to protect oligodendrocytes against oxidative stress by preventing ROS-induced cell death and promoting OPC differentiation. PMID:27618111

  9. Induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured rat oligodendrocytes by murine coronavirus is mediated during cell entry and does not require virus replication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Cai, Yingyun; Zhang, Xuming

    2003-11-01

    Murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) causes demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in rats and mice. Apoptotic oligodendrocytes have been detected in the vicinity of the CNS demyelinating lesions in these animals. However, whether MHV can directly induce oligodendrocyte apoptosis has not been documented. Here, we established a rat oligodendrocyte culture that is morphologically and phenotypically indistinguishable from the primary rat oligodendrocytes. Using this culture, we showed that mature rat oligodendrocytes were permissive to MHV infection but did not support productive virus replication. Significantly, oligodendrocytes infected with both live and ultraviolet light-inactivated viruses underwent apoptosis to a similar extent, which was readily detectable at 24 h postinfection as revealed by apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation, indicating that MHV-induced apoptosis is mediated during the early stages of the virus life cycle and does not require virus replication. Prior treatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agents NH(4)Cl and chloroquine as well as the vacuolar proton pump-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1, all of which block the acidification of the endosome, prevented oligodendrocytes from succumbing to apoptosis induced by MHV mutant OBLV60, which enters cells via endocytosis, indicating that fusion between the viral envelope and cell membranes triggers the apoptotic cascade. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk blocked MHV-induced apoptosis, suggesting an involvement of the caspase-dependent pathway. Our results, thus, for the first time provide unequivocal evidence that infection of oligodendrocytes with MHV directly results in apoptosis. This finding provides an explanation for the destruction of oligodendrocytes and the damage of myelin sheath in MHV-infected CNS and suggests that oligodendrocyte apoptosis may be one of the underlying mechanisms for the pathogenesis of MHV-induced demyelinating diseases in animals.

  10. Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells in Spinal Cord Injury: A Review and Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Leung, Gilberto K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition to individuals, families, and society. Oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination contribute as major pathological processes of secondary damages after injury. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), a subpopulation that accounts for 5 to 8% of cells within the central nervous system, are potential sources of oligodendrocyte replacement after SCI. OPCs react rapidly to injuries, proliferate at a high rate, and can differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes. However, posttraumatic endogenous remyelination is rarely complete, and a better understanding of OPCs' characteristics and their manipulations is critical to the development of novel therapies. In this review, we summarize known characteristics of OPCs and relevant regulative factors in both health and demyelinating disorders including SCI. More importantly, we highlight current evidence on post-SCI OPCs transplantation as a potential treatment option as well as the impediments against regeneration. Our aim is to shed lights on important knowledge gaps and to provoke thoughts for further researches and the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:26491661

  11. Uncompacted myelin lamellae in peripheral nerve biopsy.

    PubMed

    Vital, Claude; Vital, Anne; Bouillot, Sandrine; Favereaux, Alexandre; Lagueny, Alain; Ferrer, Xavier; Brechenmacher, Christiane; Petry, Klaus G

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the authors have studied 49 peripheral nerve biopsies presenting uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML). Based on the ultrastructural pattern of UML they propose a 3-category classification. The first category includes cases displaying regular UML, which was observed in 43 cases; it was more frequent in 9 cases with polyneuropathy organomegaly endocrinopathy m-protein skin changes (POEMS) syndrome as well as in 1 case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B with a novel point mutation in the P0 gene. The second category consists of cases showing irregular UML, observed in 4 cases with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity. This group included 1 benign case and 3 B-cell malignant lymphomas. The third category is complex UML, which was present in 2 unrelated patients with an Arg 98 His missense mutation in the P0 protein gene. Irregular and complex UML are respectively related to MAG and P0, which play a crucial role in myelin lamellae compaction and adhesion.

  12. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C.; Sherman, Diane L.; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L.; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J.; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS. PMID:27070899

  13. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C; Sherman, Diane L; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS. PMID:27070899

  14. Kif13b Regulates PNS and CNS Myelination through the Dlg1 Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Roberta; Guerrero-Valero, Marta; Alberizzi, Valeria; Previtali, Stefano C; Sherman, Diane L; Palmisano, Marilena; Huganir, Richard L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Cuenda, Ana; Feltri, Maria Laura; Brophy, Peter J; Bolino, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Microtubule-based kinesin motors have many cellular functions, including the transport of a variety of cargos. However, unconventional roles have recently emerged, and kinesins have also been reported to act as scaffolding proteins and signaling molecules. In this work, we further extend the notion of unconventional functions for kinesin motor proteins, and we propose that Kif13b kinesin acts as a signaling molecule regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) myelination. In this process, positive and negative signals must be tightly coordinated in time and space to orchestrate myelin biogenesis. Here, we report that in Schwann cells Kif13b positively regulates myelination by promoting p38γ mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Discs large 1 (Dlg1), a known brake on myelination, which downregulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (AKT) pathway. Interestingly, Kif13b also negatively regulates Dlg1 stability in oligodendrocytes, in which Dlg1, in contrast to Schwann cells, enhances AKT activation and promotes myelination. Thus, our data indicate that Kif13b is a negative regulator of CNS myelination. In summary, we propose a novel function for the Kif13b kinesin in glial cells as a key component of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which controls myelination in both PNS and CNS.

  15. Retinoid X receptor activation reverses age-related deficiencies in myelin debris phagocytosis and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Natrajan, Muktha S; de la Fuente, Alerie G; Crawford, Abbe H; Linehan, Eimear; Nuñez, Vanessa; Johnson, Kory R; Wu, Tianxia; Fitzgerald, Denise C; Ricote, Mercedes; Bielekova, Bibiana; Franklin, Robin J M

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency of central nervous system remyelination declines with age. This is in part due to an age-associated decline in the phagocytic removal of myelin debris, which contains inhibitors of oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation. In this study, we show that expression of genes involved in the retinoid X receptor pathway are decreased with ageing in both myelin-phagocytosing human monocytes and mouse macrophages using a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches. Disruption of retinoid X receptor function in young macrophages, using the antagonist HX531, mimics ageing by reducing myelin debris uptake. Macrophage-specific RXRα (Rxra) knockout mice revealed that loss of function in young mice caused delayed myelin debris uptake and slowed remyelination after experimentally-induced demyelination. Alternatively, retinoid X receptor agonists partially restored myelin debris phagocytosis in aged macrophages. The agonist bexarotene, when used in concentrations achievable in human subjects, caused a reversion of the gene expression profile in multiple sclerosis patient monocytes to a more youthful profile and enhanced myelin debris phagocytosis by patient cells. These results reveal the retinoid X receptor pathway as a positive regulator of myelin debris clearance and a key player in the age-related decline in remyelination that may be targeted by available or newly-developed therapeutics.

  16. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches.

  17. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  18. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  19. [Normal myelination patterns].

    PubMed

    González Alenda, F J; Pérez-Romero, M; Sánchez, I; Frutos, R; Fraile, E; Romero, J; Carrasco, E G

    1991-12-01

    The MR images obtained of brain during the process of myelination taking place from birth to 2 years of age are analyzed. Basically, the study focuses on the changes in signal intensity experienced by the elements of the brain in the different sequences, consisting in an increase (T1 weighted sequence) or decrease (T2 sequences) in the signal. The chronological evolution of these changes is compared with the classic myelination pattern, described prior to the development of MR, based on necropsies. Also assessed were the progressive changes in the signals of the gray and white matter, reflecting their hydric contents, throughout the period of maturation of the brain structures. It is concluded that MR imaging is presently the diagnostic method of choice in the monitoring of myelination. MR spectroscopy studies offer important perspectives for assessment and follow up of this process from the metabolic point of view.

  20. Proton-gated Ca(2+)-permeable TRP channels damage myelin in conditions mimicking ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Nicola B; Kolodziejczyk, Karolina; Kougioumtzidou, Eleni; Attwell, David

    2016-01-28

    The myelin sheaths wrapped around axons by oligodendrocytes are crucial for brain function. In ischaemia myelin is damaged in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, abolishing action potential propagation. This has been attributed to glutamate release activating Ca(2+)-permeable N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Surprisingly, we now show that NMDA does not raise the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in mature oligodendrocytes and that, although ischaemia evokes a glutamate-triggered membrane current, this is generated by a rise of extracellular [K(+)] and decrease of membrane K(+) conductance. Nevertheless, ischaemia raises oligodendrocyte [Ca(2+)]i, [Mg(2+)]i and [H(+)]i, and buffering intracellular pH reduces the [Ca(2+)]i and [Mg(2+)]i increases, showing that these are evoked by the rise of [H(+)]i. The H(+)-gated [Ca(2+)]i elevation is mediated by channels with characteristics of TRPA1, being inhibited by ruthenium red, isopentenyl pyrophosphate, HC-030031, A967079 or TRPA1 knockout. TRPA1 block reduces myelin damage in ischaemia. These data suggest that TRPA1-containing ion channels could be a therapeutic target in white matter ischaemia.

  1. Presence of proteolipid protein in coelacanth brain myelin demonstrates tetrapod affinities and questions a chondrichthyan association.

    PubMed

    Waehneldt, T V; Malotka, J

    1989-06-01

    The protein and glycoprotein compositions of CNS myelin from the living coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An unglycosylated component of 25 kilodaltons showed substantially stronger immunoblot reactivity with antibodies against mammalian proteolipid protein (PLP) than lungfish glycosylated PLP. DM-20 (intermediate protein) was not detectable in either fish. The presence of unglycosylated PLP in CNS myelin of the actinistian coelacanth contradicts an association with cartilaginous fishes but supports tetrapod affinities closer than those of lungfish.

  2. An elevated level of circulating galanin promotes developmental expression of myelin basic protein in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lyubetska, H; Zhang, L; Kong, J; Vrontakis, M

    2015-01-22

    Myelinogenesis is a scheduled process that is regulated by the intrinsic properties of the cell and extracellular signals. Galanin (GAL) is a bioactive neuropeptide that is widely distributed throughout the nervous system. Chronic increase in circulating GAL levels protects the demyelination processes. Furthermore, GAL is synthesized in myelin-producing glial cells, such as oligodendrocytes and its expression level is at its highest between postnatal days 10 and 40. In the present study, we use our GAL transgenic mouse model to examine the effects of GAL on postnatal myelinogenesis in the CNS. Although we observed no difference in the proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells, we found that GAL has a strong pro-myelinating effect. The transgenic mice at postnatal day 10 appeared to undergo myelinogenesis at an accelerated rate, as demonstrated by the increase in myelin basic protein (MBP) synthesis. The immunohistochemical results are consistent with our preliminary findings that suggest that GAL is a regulator of myelination and may be one of the myelination promoters. This finding is especially important for studies focusing on endogenous molecules for treating myelin-related diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and other leukodystrophies.

  3. IκB kinase 2 determines oligodendrocyte loss by non-cell-autonomous activation of NF-κB in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Raasch, Jenni; Zeller, Nicolas; van Loo, Geert; Merkler, Doron; Mildner, Alexander; Erny, Daniel; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Bethea, John R.; Waisman, Ari; Knust, Markus; Del Turco, Domenico; Deller, Thomas; Blank, Thomas; Priller, Josef; Brück, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The IκB kinase complex induces nuclear factor kappa B activation and has recently been recognized as a key player of autoimmunity in the central nervous system. Notably, IκB kinase/nuclear factor kappa B signalling regulates peripheral myelin formation by Schwann cells, however, its role in myelin formation in the central nervous system during health and disease is largely unknown. Surprisingly, we found that brain-specific IκB kinase 2 expression is dispensable for proper myelin assembly and repair in the central nervous system, but instead plays a fundamental role for the loss of myelin in the cuprizone model. During toxic demyelination, inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation by conditional ablation of IκB kinase 2 resulted in strong preservation of central nervous system myelin, reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators and a significantly attenuated glial response. Importantly, IκB kinase 2 depletion in astrocytes, but not in oligodendrocytes, was sufficient to protect mice from myelin loss. Our results reveal a crucial role of glial cell-specific IκB kinase 2/nuclear factor kappa B signalling for oligodendrocyte damage during toxic demyelination. Thus, therapies targeting IκB kinase 2 function in non-neuronal cells may represent a promising strategy for the treatment of distinct demyelinating central nervous system diseases. PMID:21310728

  4. On the Occurrence of Hypomyelination in a Transgenic Mouse Model: A Consequence of the Myelin Basic Protein Promoter?

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Stefanie; Arezzo, Joseph; Dutta, Dipankar J.; John, Gareth R.; Raine, Cedric S.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system hypomyelination is a feature common to a number of transgenic (Tg) mouse lines that express a variety of unrelated exogenous (i.e. non-CNS) transgenes. In this report we document hypomyelination structurally by immunocytochemistry and functionally in the Tg line MBP-JE, which overexpresses the chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1) within oligodendrocytes targeted by a myelin basic protein (MBP) promoter. Analysis of hypomyelinated optic nerves of Tg mice revealed progressive decrease in oligodendrocyte numbers with age (p < 0.01). Although molecular mechanisms underlying hypomyelination in this and other Tg models remain largely unknown, we present preliminary findings on oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) cultures in which, although OPC expressed CCR2, the receptor for CCL2, treatment with CCL2 had no significant effect on OPC proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. We suggest that hypomyelination in the MBP-JE model might not be due to CCL2 expression but rather the result of transcriptional dysfunction related to random insertion of the MBP promoter that disrupts myelinogenesis and leads to oligodendrocytes demise. Because an MBP promoter is a common denominator in most Tg lines displaying hypomyelination, we hypothesize that use of myelin gene sequences in the regulator region of transgenic constructs might underlie this perturbation of myelination in such models. PMID:22082665

  5. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  6. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  7. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  8. Analysis of the direct injury effector of oligodendroglia cells or myelin sheath in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model induced by the MOG35-55 peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Li, Xiaoyong; Feng, Meina; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Zhendong

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and mononuclear macrophages in the pathogenic processes of experimental animals. To construct a chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) model, an artificially synthesized myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35‑55 peptide was used to induce C57BL/6 mice. Subsequently, the experimental animals were investigated at the level of their nervous function, and histopathological, immunohistochemical and fluorescence immunohistochemical experiments were performed at different time points following immunization. The expression of immune molecules and cytokines associated with the activation of the mononuclear macrophages and CTL during the different stages was assessed by western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As a result, the MOG35‑55 peptide was identified as being successful at inducing C57BL/6 mice for the development of the EAE model. A modest level of mononuclear macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration was observed in the central nervous system (CNS), although no infiltration of neutrophils was observed. A sporadic flaky deletion of the myelin sheath was also identified. The activation and proliferation of mononuclear macrophages, including microglia cells, was clearly demonstrated. Furthermore, the expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and interleukin‑12 in the brain, which is associated with the activation and proliferation of mononuclear macrophages, increased over the duration of the experiment compared with less pronounced changes in the expression levels of interferon (IFN)‑γ, Fas and perforin in the CNS, which are associated with the function of CTL. The secretion of IFN‑γ in the spleen increased during the morbidity peak, however, any noticeable activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells was absent. These results demonstrated that the induced

  9. Glial metabotropic glutamate receptor-4 increases maturation and survival of oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Simona Federica; Merlo, Sara; Chisari, Mariangela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Sortino, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    Group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors mediate important neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Stimulation of mGlu4 receptor reduces neuroinflammation in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) whereas mGlu4 knockout mice display exacerbated EAE clinical scores. We now show that mGlu4 receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia in culture. Oligodendrocytes express mGlu4 receptors only at early stages of maturation (O4 positive), but not when more differentiated (myelin basic protein, MBP positive). Treatment of immature oligodendrocytes with the mGlu4 receptor agonist L-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4; 50 μM for 48 h) accelerates differentiation with enhanced branching and earlier appearance of MBP staining. Oligodendrocyte death induced by exposure to 1 mM kainic acid for 24 h is significantly reduced by a 30-min pretreatment with L-AP4 (50 μM), an effect observed only in the presence of astrocytes, mimicked by the specific mGlu4 receptor positive allosteric modulator N-Phenyl-7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxamide (PHCCC) (30 μM) and prevented by pretreatment with the mGlu4 receptor antagonist, cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG) (100 μM). In astrocytes, mGlu4 receptor is the most expressed among group III mGlu receptors, as by Quantitative real time PCR (QRT-PCR), and its silencing prevents protective effects. Protection is also observed when conditioned medium (CM) from L-AP4-pretreated astrocytes is transferred to oligodendrocytes challenged with kainic acid. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) mediates the increased oligodendrocyte survival as the effect of L-AP4 is mimicked by addition of 10 ng/ml TGF-β and prevented by incubation with a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody. In contrast, despite the expression of mGlu4 receptor in resting and activated microglia, CM from L-AP4-stimulated microglia does not modify kainate-induced oligodendrocyte toxicity. Our

  10. The in vivo and in vitro induction of anterior chamber associated immune deviation to myelin antigens in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Elkhatib, Walid F; Ashour, Hossam M

    2014-11-01

    Introduction of antigens into the anterior chamber (AC) of the eye generates a specific systemic form of tolerance that is termed AC-associated immune deviation (ACAID). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of the human CNS demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We investigated whether the encephalitogenic antigens myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55) or myelin basic protein (MBP) induce ACAID in the EAE-prone C57BL/6 mice. We hypothesized that injection of MOG35-55/MBP induces antigen-specific tolerance whether via the AC route, the adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID antigen presenting cells (APCs), or the adoptive transfer of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID T regulatory cells (Tregs). ACAID is characterized by the specific impairment of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. Thus, DTH assays were used to test for ACAID following the AC injection of MOG35-55/MBP, or the intravenous injection of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID APCs. The functional local adoptive transfer (LAT) assays were used to examine the putative regulatory functions of in vitro generated MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific Tregs. This report is the first to demonstrate the in vivo and in vitro induction of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID-mediated tolerance in C57BL/6 mice. These findings highlight the need for novel immunotherapeutic strategies for MS and optic neuritis.

  11. Indian hedgehog B function is required for the specification of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the zebrafish CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ah-Young; Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Eunmi; Kim, Dohyun; Jeong, Inyoung; Cha, Young Ryun; Bae, Young-ki; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jehee; Park, Hae-Chul

    2013-01-23

    A subset of ventral spinal cord precursors, known as pMN precursor cells, initially generate motor neurons and then oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which migrate and differentiate as myelinating oligodendrocytes in the developing neural tube. The switch between motor neuron and oligodendrocyte production by the pMN neural precursors is an important step in building a functional nervous system. However, the precise mechanism that orchestrates the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes within the common population of pMN precursors is still unclear. The current study demonstrates that Indian Hedgehog b (Ihhb), previously known as Echidna Hedgehog, begins to be expressed in the floor plate cells of the ventral spinal cord at the time of OPC specification in zebrafish embryos. Ihhb loss-of-function analysis revealed that Ihhb function is required for OPC specification from pMN precursors by negatively regulating the proliferation of neural precursors. Finally, results showed that Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) could not replace Ihhb function in OPC specification, suggesting that Ihhb and Shh play separate roles in OPC specification. Altogether, data from the present study suggested a novel mechanism, mediated by Ihhb, for the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from pMN precursors in the ventral spinal cord of zebrafish embryos.

  12. Indian hedgehog B function is required for the specification of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the zebrafish CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ah-Young; Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Eunmi; Kim, Dohyun; Jeong, Inyoung; Cha, Young Ryun; Bae, Young-ki; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jehee; Park, Hae-Chul

    2013-01-23

    A subset of ventral spinal cord precursors, known as pMN precursor cells, initially generate motor neurons and then oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which migrate and differentiate as myelinating oligodendrocytes in the developing neural tube. The switch between motor neuron and oligodendrocyte production by the pMN neural precursors is an important step in building a functional nervous system. However, the precise mechanism that orchestrates the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes within the common population of pMN precursors is still unclear. The current study demonstrates that Indian Hedgehog b (Ihhb), previously known as Echidna Hedgehog, begins to be expressed in the floor plate cells of the ventral spinal cord at the time of OPC specification in zebrafish embryos. Ihhb loss-of-function analysis revealed that Ihhb function is required for OPC specification from pMN precursors by negatively regulating the proliferation of neural precursors. Finally, results showed that Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) could not replace Ihhb function in OPC specification, suggesting that Ihhb and Shh play separate roles in OPC specification. Altogether, data from the present study suggested a novel mechanism, mediated by Ihhb, for the sequential generation of motor neurons and oligodendrocytes from pMN precursors in the ventral spinal cord of zebrafish embryos. PMID:23345245

  13. Decreased Oligodendrocyte and Neuron Number in Anterior Hippocampal Areas and the Entire Hippocampus in Schizophrenia: A Stereological Postmortem Study.

    PubMed

    Falkai, Peter; Malchow, Berend; Wetzestein, Katharina; Nowastowski, Verena; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Kraus, Theo; Hasan, Alkomiet; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schmitz, Christoph; Schmitt, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The hippocampus is involved in cognition as well as emotion, with deficits in both domains consistently described in schizophrenia. Moreover, the whole volumes of both the anterior and posterior region have been reported to be decreased in schizophrenia patients. While fewer oligodendrocyte numbers in the left and right cornu ammonis CA4 subregion of the posterior part of the hippocampus have been reported, the aim of this stereological study was to investigate cell numbers in either the dentate gyrus (DG) or subregions of the anterior hippocampus. In this design-based stereological study of the anterior part of the hippocampus comparing 10 patients with schizophrenia to 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were examined. Patients showed a decreased number of oligodendrocytes in the left CA4, fewer neurons in the left DG and smaller volumes in both the left CA4 and DG, which correlated with oligodendrocyte and neuron numbers, respectively. When exploring the total hippocampus, keeping previously published own results from the posterior part of the same brains in mind, both decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in the left CA4 and reduced volume remained significant. The decreased oligodendrocyte number speaks for a deficit in myelination and connectivity in schizophrenia which may originate from disturbed maturational processes. The reduced neuron number of the DG in the anterior hippocampus may well point to a reduced capacity of this region to produce new neurons up to adulthood. Both mechanisms may be involved in cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia patients. PMID:27460617

  14. Molecular anatomy and genetics of myelin proteins in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Snipes, G J; Suter, U

    1995-01-01

    Myelin contains a number of proteins, the major examples of which are protein zero (Po), P2 protein, peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), myelin basic proteins (MBPs), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and the recently described connexin 32 (Cx32). This list is probably still incomplete. The localisation and possible functions of these proteins are reviewed. In the past few years a number of inherited demyelinating neuropathies in mice and the human have been shown to be due to mutations affecting the genes PMP22, Po and Cx32 so that it has become possible to characterise the molecular pathology of the majority of these disorders. This has provided important insights into the relationships between the structure of myelin and the function of its constituent proteins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7559122

  15. Oligodendrocytes Are Targets of HIV-1 Tat: NMDA and AMPA Receptor-Mediated Effects on Survival and Development

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shiping; Fuss, Babette; Fitting, Sylvia; Hahn, Yun Kyung; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2015-01-01

    Myelin pallor in HIV+ individuals can occur very early during the disease process. While myelin damage might partly originate from HIV-induced vascular changes, the timing suggests that myelin and/or oligodendrocytes (OLs) may be directly affected. Histological (Golgi–Kopsch, electron microscopy) and biochemical studies have revealed an increased occurrence of abnormal OL/myelin morphology and dysregulated myelin protein expression in transgenic mice expressing the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein. This suggests that viral proteins by themselves might cause OL injury. Since Tat interacts with NMDARs, we hypothesized that activation of NMDARs and subsequent disruption of cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) homeostasis might be one cause of white matter injury after HIV infection. In culture, HIV-1 Tat caused concentration-dependent death of immature OLs, while more mature OLs remained alive but had reduced myelin-like membranes. Tat also induced [Ca2+]i increases and Thr-287 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II β (CaMKIIβ) in OLs. Tat-induced [Ca2+]i was attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist MK801, and also by the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist CNQX. Importantly, both MK801 and CNQX blocked Tat-induced death of immature OLs, but only MK801 reversed Tat effects on myelin-like membranes. These results suggest that OLs can be direct targets of HIV proteins released from infected cells. Although viability and membrane production are both affected by glutamatergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, and possibly the ensuing CaMKIIβ activation, the roles of AMPARs and NMDARs appear to be different and dependent on the stage of OL differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Over 33 million individuals are currently infected by HIV. Among these individuals, ∼60% develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Myelin damage and white matter injury have been frequently reported in HIV patients but not extensively studied. Clinical studies

  16. Lipid membrane association of myelin proteins and peptide segments studied by oriented and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muruganandam, Gopinath; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2013-12-01

    Myelin-specific proteins are either integral or peripheral membrane proteins that, in complex with lipids, constitute a multilayered proteolipid membrane system, the myelin sheath. The myelin sheath surrounds the axons of nerves and enables rapid conduction of axonal impulses. Myelin proteins interact intimately with the lipid bilayer and play crucial roles in the assembly, function, and stability of the myelin sheath. Although myelin proteins have been investigated for decades, their structural properties upon membrane surface binding are still largely unknown. In this study, we have used simplified model systems consisting of synthetic peptides and membrane mimics, such as detergent micelles and/or lipid vesicles, to probe the conformation of peptides using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Additionally, oriented circular dichroism spectroscopy (OCD) was employed to examine the orientation of myelin peptides in macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers. Various representative peptides from the myelin basic protein (MBP), P0, myelin/oligodencrocyte glycoprotein, and connexin32 (cx32) were studied. A helical peptide from the central immunodominant epitope of MBP showed a highly tilted orientation with respect to the membrane surface, whereas the N-terminal cytoplasmic segment of cx32 folded into a helical structure that was only slightly tilted. The folding of full-length myelin basic protein was, furthermore, studied in a bicelle environment. Our results provide information on the conformation and membrane alignment of important membrane-binding peptides in a membrane-mimicking environment, giving novel insights into the mechanisms of membrane binding and stacking by myelin proteins.

  17. The Autotaxin–Lysophosphatidic Acid Axis Modulates Histone Acetylation and Gene Expression during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Lister, James A.

    2015-01-01

    During development, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, undergo a stepwise progression during which OLG progenitors, specified from neural stem/progenitor cells, differentiate into fully mature myelinating OLGs. This progression along the OLG lineage is characterized by well synchronized changes in morphology and gene expression patterns. The latter have been found to be particularly critical during the early stages of the lineage, and they have been well described to be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, especially by the activity of the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. The data presented here identify the extracellular factor autotaxin (ATX) as a novel upstream signal modulating HDAC1/2 activity and gene expression in cells of the OLG lineage. Using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system as well as rodent primary OLG cultures, this functional property of ATX was found to be mediated by its lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which has been well characterized to generate the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). More specifically, the lysoPLD activity of ATX was found to modulate HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during a time window coinciding with the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG. In contrast, HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during the transition from neural stem/progenitor to OLG progenitor appeared unaffected by ATX and its lysoPLD activity. Thus, together, our data suggest that an ATX–LPA–HDAC1/2 axis regulates OLG differentiation specifically during the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG and via a molecular mechanism that is evolutionarily conserved from at least zebrafish to rodent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation of the axon insulating and supporting myelin sheath by differentiating oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in the CNS is considered an essential step during vertebrate development. In addition, loss and/or dysfunction of the myelin sheath has

  18. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin: II. Determination of surface charge from biochemical data.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H; Kirschner, D A

    1988-01-01

    In our accompanying paper (Inouye and Kirschner, 1988) we calculated the surface charge density at the extracellular surfaces in peripheral and central nervous system (PNS; CNS) myelins from observations on the dependency of the width of the extracellular space on pH and ionic strength. Here, we have determined the surface charge density of the membrane surfaces in myelin from its chemical composition and the localization of some of its molecular components. We then analyzed the attractive and repulsive forces between the apposed surfaces and calculated equilibrium periods for comparison with the measured values. The biochemical model accounts for the observed isoelectric range of the myelin period and, with the surface charge reduced (possibly by divalent cation binding or a space charge approximation), the model also accounts for the dependency of period on pH above the isoelectric range. At the extracellular (and cytoplasmic) surfaces the contribution of lipid (with pI approximately 2) to the net surface charge is about the same in both PNS and CNS myelin, whereas the contribution of protein depends on which ones are exposed at the two surfaces. The protein conformation and localization modulate the surface charge of the lipid, resulting in positively-charged cytoplasmic surfaces (pI approximately 9) and negatively-charged extracellular surfaces (pI approximately 2-4). The net negative charge at the extracellular surface is due in CNS myelin to lipid, and in PNS myelin to both lipid and (PO) glycoprotein. The net positive charge at the cytoplasmic surface is due in CNS myelin mostly to basic protein, and in PNS myelin to PO glycoprotein and basic protein. The invariance of the cytoplasmic packing may be due to specific short-range interactions. Our models demonstrate how the particular myelin proteins and their localization and conformation can account for the differences in inter-membrane interactions in CNS and PNS myelins. PMID:3345333

  19. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    PubMed Central

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  20. The Orphan G Protein-coupled Receptor GPR17 Negatively Regulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation via Gαi/o and Its Downstream Effector Molecules.

    PubMed

    Simon, Katharina; Hennen, Stephanie; Merten, Nicole; Blättermann, Stefanie; Gillard, Michel; Kostenis, Evi; Gomeza, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have recognized G protein-coupled receptors as important regulators of oligodendrocyte development. GPR17, in particular, is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as oligodendroglial maturation inhibitor because its stimulation arrests primary mouse oligodendrocytes at a less differentiated stage. However, the intracellular signaling effectors transducing its activation remain poorly understood. Here, we use Oli-neu cells, an immortalized cell line derived from primary murine oligodendrocytes, and primary rat oligodendrocyte cultures as model systems to identify molecular targets that link cell surface GPR17 to oligodendrocyte maturation blockade. We demonstrate that stimulation of GPR17 by the small molecule agonist MDL29,951 (2-carboxy-4,6-dichloro-1H-indole-3-propionic acid) decreases myelin basic protein expression levels mainly by triggering the Gαi/o signaling pathway, which in turn leads to reduced activity of the downstream cascade adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). In addition, we show that GPR17 activation also diminishes myelin basic protein abundance by lessening stimulation of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC), thus uncovering a previously unrecognized role for EPAC to regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Together, our data establish PKA and EPAC as key downstream effectors of GPR17 that inhibit oligodendrocyte maturation. We envisage that treatments augmenting PKA and/or EPAC activity represent a beneficial approach for therapeutic enhancement of remyelination in those demyelinating diseases where GPR17 is highly expressed, such as multiple sclerosis.

  1. MAG, myelin and overcoming growth inhibition in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    McKerracher, Lisa; Rosen, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    While neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) have the capacity to regenerate their axons after injury, they fail to do so, in part because regeneration is limited by growth inhibitory proteins present in CNS myelin. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) was the first myelin-derived growth inhibitory protein identified, and its inhibitory activity was initially elucidated in 1994 independently by the Filbin lab and the McKerracher lab using cell-based and biochemical techniques, respectively. Since that time we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning the numerous growth inhibitory proteins that are present in myelin, and we also have dissected many of the neuronal signaling pathways that act as stop signs for axon regeneration. Here we give an overview of the early research efforts that led to the identification of myelin-derived growth inhibitory proteins, and the importance of this family of proteins for understanding neurotrauma and CNS diseases. We further provide an update on how this knowledge has been translated towards current clinical studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26441514

  2. Systematic and differential myelination of axon collaterals in the mammalian auditory brainstem.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Armin H; Rubel, Edwin W

    2016-04-01

    A brainstem circuit for encoding the spatial location of sounds involves neurons in the cochlear nucleus that project to medial superior olivary (MSO) neurons on both sides of the brain via a single bifurcating axon. Neurons in MSO act as coincidence detectors, responding optimally when signals from the two ears arrive within a few microseconds. To achieve this, transmission of signals along the contralateral collateral must be faster than transmission of the same signals along the ipsilateral collateral. We demonstrate that this is achieved by differential regulation of myelination and axon caliber along the ipsilateral and contralateral branches of single axons; ipsilateral axon branches have shorter internode lengths and smaller caliber than contralateral branches. The myelination difference is established prior to the onset of hearing. We conclude that this differential myelination and axon caliber requires local interactions between axon collaterals and surrounding oligodendrocytes on the two sides of the brainstem.

  3. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring.

  4. Intracellular signaling pathway regulation of myelination and remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Gaesser, Jenna M; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2016-09-01

    The restoration of myelin sheaths on demyelinated axons remains a major obstacle in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently approved therapies work by modulating the immune system to reduce the number and rate of lesion formation but are only partially effective since they are not able to restore lost myelin. In the healthy CNS, myelin continues to be generated throughout life and spontaneous remyelination occurs readily in response to insults. In patients with MS, however, remyelination eventually fails, at least in part as a result of a failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation and the subsequent production of new myelin. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that drive the process of myelin sheath formation is therefore important in order to speed the development of novel therapeutics designed to target remyelination. Here we review data supporting critical roles for three highly conserved intracellular signaling pathways: Wnt/β-catenin, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and ERK/MAPK in the regulation of OPC differentiation and myelination both during development and in remyelination. Potential points of crosstalk between the three pathways and important areas for future research are also discussed.

  5. Identification of the Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-related Protein-1 Interactome in Central Nervous System Myelin Suggests a Role in the Clearance of Necrotic Cell Debris*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Arandjelovic, Sanja; Stiles, Travis L.; Schlobach, Ryan K.; Mowen, Kerri A.; Gonias, Steven L.; Gaultier, Alban

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), fast neuronal signals are facilitated by the oligodendrocyte-produced myelin sheath. Oligodendrocyte turnover or injury generates myelin debris that is usually promptly cleared by phagocytic cells. Failure to remove dying oligodendrocytes leads to accumulation of degraded myelin, which, if recognized by the immune system, may contribute to the development of autoimmunity in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We recently identified low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) as a novel phagocytic receptor for myelin debris. Here, we report characterization of the LRP1 interactome in CNS myelin. Fusion proteins were designed corresponding to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of LRP1. LRP1 partners were isolated by affinity purification and characterized by mass spectrometry. We report that LRP1 binds intracellular proteins via its extracellular domain and functions as a receptor for necrotic cells. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-2 and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase are novel LRP1 ligands identified in our screen, which interact with full-length LRP1. Furthermore, the extracellular domain of LRP1 is a target of peptidyl arginine deiminase-2-mediated deimination in vitro. We propose that LRP1 functions as a receptor for endocytosis of intracellular components released during cellular damage and necrosis. PMID:23264627

  6. Alzheimer’s disease as homeostatic responses to age-related myelin breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Bartzokis, George

    2011-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis (AH) of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) posits that the fundamental cause of AD is the accumulation of the peptide amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain. This hypothesis has been supported by observations that genetic defects in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin increase Aβ production and cause familial AD (FAD). The AH is widely accepted but does not account for important phenomena including recent failures of clinical trials to impact dementia in humans even after successfully reducing Aβ deposits. Herein, the AH is viewed from the broader overarching perspective of the myelin model of the human brain that focuses on functioning brain circuits and encompasses white matter and myelin in addition to neurons and synapses. The model proposes that the recently evolved and extensive myelination of the human brain underlies both our unique abilities and susceptibility to highly prevalent age-related neuropsychiatric disorders such as late onset AD (LOAD). It regards oligodendrocytes and the myelin they produce as being both critical for circuit function and uniquely vulnerable to damage. This perspective reframes key observations such as axonal transport disruptions, formation of axonal swellings/sphenoids and neuritic plaques, and proteinaceous deposits such as Aβ and tau as by-products of homeostatic myelin repair processes. It delineates empirically testable mechanisms of action for genes underlying FAD and LOAD and provides “upstream” treatment targets. Such interventions could potentially treat multiple degenerative brain disorders by mitigating the effects of aging and associated changes in iron, cholesterol, and free radicals on oligodendrocytes and their myelin. PMID:19775776

  7. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  8. Myelin Under Stress

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Maurizio; Feltri, M. Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The capacity to fold proteins properly is fundamental for cell survival. Secreted and transmembrane proteins are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that has the ability to discriminate between native and non-native proteins, in a process called protein quality control. When folding is not properly achieved, misfolded proteins can accumulate. The terminally misfolded proteins are typically retro-translocated into the cytoplasm for degradation by the proteasome, in a process known as endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation. However, if the degradation is insufficient, accumulation of abnormal proteins in the ER activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), a complex set of new signals aimed to further reduce the load of abnormal protein in the ER. Massive synthesis of myelin lipids and proteins is necessary to support myelinogenesis. Not surprisingly, therefore, ER stress (including the UPR), the proteasome and autophagy (lysosomes), have been implicated in myelin disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and vanishing white matter disease in the central nervous system and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies in the peripheral nervous system. Here we will discuss recent evidence supporting an important role for ER stress in myelin disorders. PMID:19330777

  9. TIP30 inhibits oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation via cytoplasmic sequestration of Olig1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Xiao, Lin; Li, Cui; Liu, Xiuyun; Liu, Mingdong; Shao, Qi; Wang, Dan; Huang, Aijun; He, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is a prerequisite for both developmental myelination and adult remyelination in the central nervous system. The molecular mechanisms underlying OPC differentiation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the thirty-kDa HIV-1 Tat interacting protein (TIP30) is a negative regulator in oligodendrocyte development. The TIP30(-/-) mice displayed an increased myelin protein level at postnatal day 14 and 21. By using a primary OPC culture system, we demonstrated that overexpression of TIP30 dramatically inhibited the stage progression of differentiating OPCs, while knockdown of TIP30 enhanced the differentiation of oligodendroglial cells remarkably. Moreover, overexpression of TIP30 was found to sequester the transcription factor Olig1 in the cytoplasm and weaken its nuclear translocation due to the interaction between TIP30 and Olig1, whereas knockdown of TIP30 led to more Olig1 localized in the nucleus in the initiation stage during OPC differentiation. In the cuprizone-induced demyelination model, there was a dramatic increase in NG2-expressing cells with nuclear location of Olig1 in the corpus callosum during remyelination. In contrast, within chronic demyelinated lesions in multiple sclerosis, TIP30 was abnormally expressed in NG2-expressing cells, and few nuclear Olig1 was observed in these cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that TIP30 plays a negative regulatory role in oligodendroglial differentiation.

  10. Neuroactive steroids and peripheral myelin proteins.

    PubMed

    Magnaghi, V; Cavarretta, I; Galbiati, M; Martini, L; Melcangi, R C

    2001-11-01

    The present review summarizes observations obtained in our laboratories which underline the importance of neuroactive steroids (i.e., progesterone (PROG), dihydroprogesterone (5alpha-DH PROG), tetrahydroprogesterone (3alpha, 5alpha-TH PROG), testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5alpha-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol (3alpha-diol)) in the control of the gene expression of myelin proteins (i.e. glycoprotein Po (Po) and the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22)) in the peripheral nervous system. Utilizing different in vivo (aged and adult male rats) and in vitro (Schwann cell cultures) experimental models, we have observed that neuroactive steroids are able to stimulate the mRNA levels of Po and PMP22. The effects of these neuroactive steroids, which are able to interact with classical (progesterone receptor, PR, and androgen receptor, AR) and non-classical (GABA(A) receptor) steroid receptors is further supported by our demonstration in sciatic nerve and/or Schwann cells of the presence of these receptors. On the basis of the observations obtained in the Schwann cells cultures, we suggest that the stimulatory effect of neuroactive steroids on Po is acting through PR, while that on PMP22 needs the GABA(A) receptor. The present findings might be of importance for the utilization of specific receptor ligands as new therapeutical approaches for the rebuilding of the peripheral myelin, particularly in those situations in which the synthesis of Po and PMP22 is altered (i.e. demyelinating diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A and type 1B, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and the Déjérine-Sottas syndrome, aging, and after peripheral injury). PMID:11744100

  11. CXCR4 Signaling Regulates Remyelination by Endogenous Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells in a Viral Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    CARBAJAL, KEVIN S.; MIRANDA, JUAN L.; TSUKAMOTO, MICHELLE R.; LANE, THOMAS E.

    2016-01-01

    Following intracranial infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV), susceptible mice will develop widespread myelin destruction that results in pathological and clinical outcomes similar to those seen in humans with the demyelinating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Partial remyelination and clinical recovery occurs during the chronic phase following control of viral replication yet the signaling mechanisms regulating these events remain enigmatic. Here we report the kinetics of proliferation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the spinal cord following JHMV-induced demyelination and that CXCR4 signaling contributes to the maturation state of OPCs. Following treatment with AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, mice recovering from widespread demyelination exhibit a significant (P < 0.01) increase in the number of OPCs and fewer (P < 0.05) mature oligodendrocytes compared with HBSS-treated animals. These results suggest that CXCR4 signaling is required for OPCs to mature and contribute to remyelination in response to JHMV-induced demyelination. To assess if this effect is reversible and has potential therapeutic benefit, we pulsed mice with AMD3100 and then allowed them to recover. This treatment strategy resulted in increased numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, enhanced remyelination, and improved clinical outcome. These findings highlight the possibility to manipulate OPCs in order to increase the pool of remyelination-competent cells that can participate in recovery. PMID:21830237

  12. Activated immune response in an inherited leukodystrophy disease caused by the loss of oligodendrocyte gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Wasseff, Sameh K; Scherer, Steven S

    2015-10-01

    Oligodendrocyte:oligodendrocyte (O:O) gap junction (GJ) coupling is a widespread and essential feature of the CNS, and is mediated by connexin47 (Cx47) and Cx32. Loss of function mutations affecting Cx47 results in a severe leukodystrophy, Pelizeus-Merzbacher-like disease (also known as Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy 2), which can be reproduced in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Here we report the gene expression profile of the cerebellum--an affected brain region--in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Of the 43,174 mRNA probes examined, we find decreased expression of 23 probes (corresponding to 23 genes) and increased expression of 545 probes (corresponding to 348 genes). Many of the genes with reduced expression map to oligodendrocytes, and two of them (Fa2h and Ugt8a) are involved in the synthesis of myelin lipids. Many of the genes with increased expression map to lymphocytes and microglia, and involved in leukotrienes/prostaglandins synthesis and chemokines/cytokines interactions and signaling pathways. In accord, immunostaining showed T- and B-cells in the cerebella of mutant mice as well as activated microglia and astrocytes. Thus, in addition to the loss of GJ coupling, there is a prominent immune response in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32.

  13. Multiple splice isoforms of proteolipid M6B in neurons and oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Dimou, L; Klugmann, M; Pfeiffer, S; Nave, K A

    2001-12-01

    Proteolipids are abundant integral membrane proteins, initially described as structural proteins of CNS myelin. More recently, two neuronal proteins related to proteolipid protein (PLP), termed M6A and M6B, were identified, suggesting a common function of proteolipids in oligodendrocytes and neurons. We have analyzed the X-linked M6B gene and discovered an unexpected complexity of protein isoforms. Two promoters and alternative exons yield at least eight M6B proteins and polypeptides, differentially expressed in neurons and oligodendrocytes. Six isoforms are tetraspan membrane proteins that differ by highly conserved amino- and carboxy-terminal domains, termed alpha, beta, psi, and omega. In MDCK cells, the beta-domain of M6B stabilizes tetraspan proteolipids at the cell surface, whereas non-beta isoforms are more abundant in intracellular compartments. Cotransfection experiments suggest a physical interaction of M6B and mutant PLP, when retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, that may also contribute to oligodendrocyte dysfunction in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. PMID:11749036

  14. Activated Immune Response in an Inherited Leukodystrophy Disease Caused by the Loss of Oligodendrocyte Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wasseff, Sameh K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte:oligodendrocyte (O:O) gap junction (GJ) coupling is a widespread and essential feature of the CNS, and is mediated by connexin47 (Cx47) and Cx32. Loss of function mutations affecting Cx47 results in a severe leukodystrophy, Pelizeus-Merzbacher-like disease (also known as Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy 2), which can be reproduced in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Here we report the gene expression profile of the cerebellum – an affected brain region – in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. Of the 43,174 mRNA probes examined, we find decreased expression of 23 probes (corresponding to 23 genes) and increased expression of 545 probes (corresponding to 348 genes). Many of the genes with reduced expression map to oligodendrocytes, and two of them (Fa2h and Ugt8a) are involved in the synthesis of myelin lipids. Many of the genes with increased expression map to microglia and lymphocytes, and to leukotriene/prostaglandin synthesis and chemokine/cytokine pathways. In accord, immunostaining showed activated microglia and astrocytes, as well as T- and B-cells in the cerebella of mutant mice. Thus, in addition to the loss of GJ coupling, there is a prominent immune response in mice lacking both Cx47 and Cx32. PMID:26051537

  15. Co-ultramicronized Palmitoylethanolamide/Luteolin Promotes the Maturation of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barbierato, Massimo; Facci, Laura; Marinelli, Carla; Zusso, Morena; Argentini, Carla; Skaper, Stephen D.; Giusti, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes have limited ability to repair the damage to themselves or to other nerve cells, as seen in demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. An important strategy may be to replace the lost oligodendrocytes and/or promote the maturation of undifferentiated oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Recent studies show that a composite of co-ultramicronized N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and luteolin (co-ultramicronized PEA/luteolin, 10:1 by mass) is efficacious in improving outcome in experimental models of spinal cord and traumatic brain injuries. Here, we examined the ability of co-ultramicronized PEA/luteolin to promote progression of OPCs into a more differentiated phenotype. OPCs derived from newborn rat cortex were placed in culture and treated the following day with 10 μM co-ultramicronized PEA/luteolin. Cells were collected 1, 4 and 8 days later and analyzed for expression of myelin basic protein (MBP). qPCR and Western blot analyses revealed a time-dependent increase in expression of both mRNA for MBP and MBP content, along with an increased expression of genes involved in lipid biogenesis. Ultramicronized PEA or luteolin, either singly or in simple combination, were ineffective. Further, co-ultramicronized PEA/luteolin promoted morphological development of OPCs and total protein content without affecting proliferation. Co-ultramicronized PEA/luteolin may represent a novel pharmacological strategy to promote OPC maturation. PMID:26578323

  16. Electroacupuncture ameliorates memory impairments by enhancing oligodendrocyte regeneration in a mouse model of prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sung Min; Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Ha Neui; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We modeled prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion in mice using bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS) and electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation was applied at two acupoints, Baihui (GV20) and Dazhui (GV14). In behavioral tests of memory, BCAS produced impairments in spatial and short-term memory in mice that were attenuated by therapeutic EA stimulation. Therapeutic use of EA in BCAS also enhanced oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), in association with white matter improvements in the corpus callosum (CC). In PCR analyses of growth factor gene expression, significant positive changes in 3 genes were observed following EA stimulation in BCAS, and here we highlight alterations in neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5). We confirmed EA-mediated positive changes in the expression of NT4/5 and its receptor, tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB). Treatment of naïve and BCAS + EA animals with a selective TrkB antagonist, ANA-12, produced losses of myelin and cognitive function that were ameliorated by EA therapy. Moreover, following BCAS we observed an EA-dependent increase in phospho-activated CREB (a downstream mediator of NT4/5-TrkB signaling) in OPCs and OLs of the CC. Our results suggest that EA stimulation promotes the recovery of memory function following white matter injury via a mechanism that promotes oligodendrocyte regeneration and involves NT4/5-TrkB signaling. PMID:27350403

  17. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  18. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  19. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  6. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  7. Early Intervention for Spinal Cord Injury with Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Oligodendrocyte Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    All, Angelo H.; Gharibani, Payam; Gupta, Siddharth; Bazley, Faith A.; Pashai, Nikta; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Shah, Sandeep; Resar, Linda M.; Cheng, Linzhao; Gearhart, John D.; Kerr, Candace L.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are at the forefront of research in regenerative medicine and are envisaged as a source for personalized tissue repair and cell replacement therapy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) can be derived from iPS cells generated using either an episomal, non-integrating plasmid approach or standard integrating retroviruses that survive and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes after early transplantation into the injured spinal cord. The efficiency of OP differentiation in all 3 lines tested ranged from 40% to 60% of total cells, comparable to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. iPS cell lines derived using episomal vectors or retroviruses generated a similar number of early neural progenitors and glial progenitors while the episomal plasmid-derived iPS line generated more OPs expressing late markers O1 and RIP. Moreover, we discovered that iPS-derived OPs (iPS-OPs) engrafted 24 hours following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats survived for approximately two months and that more than 70% of the transplanted cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin associated proteins. Transplanted OPs resulted in a significant increase in the number of myelinated axons in animals that received a transplantation 24 h after injury. In addition, nearly a 5-fold reduction in cavity size and reduced glial scarring was seen in iPS-treated groups compared to the control group, which was injected with heat-killed iPS-OPs. Although further investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms involved, these results provide evidence that patient-specific, iPS-derived OPs can survive for three months and improve behavioral assessment (BBB) after acute transplantation into SCI. This is significant as determining the time in which stem cells are injected after SCI may influence their survival and differentiation capacity. PMID:25635918

  8. Proteolipid protein modulates preservation of peripheral axons and premature death when myelin protein zero is lacking.

    PubMed

    Patzig, Julia; Kusch, Kathrin; Fledrich, Robert; Eichel, Maria A; Lüders, Katja A; Möbius, Wiebke; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Martini, Rudolf; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Protein zero (P0) is the major structural component of peripheral myelin. Lack of this adhesion protein from Schwann cells causes a severe dysmyelinating neuropathy with secondary axonal degeneration in humans with the neuropathy Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and in the corresponding mouse model (P0(null)-mice). In the mammalian CNS, the tetraspan-membrane protein PLP is the major structural myelin constituent and required for the long-term preservation of myelinated axons, which fails in hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG type-2) and the relevant mouse model (Plp(null)-mice). The Plp-gene is also expressed in Schwann cells but PLP is of very low abundance in normal peripheral myelin; its function has thus remained enigmatic. Here we show that the abundance of PLP but not of other tetraspan myelin proteins is strongly increased in compact peripheral myelin of P0(null)-mice. To determine the functional relevance of PLP expression in the absence of P0, we generated P0(null)*Plp(null)-double-mutant mice. Compared with either single-mutant, P0(null)*Plp(null)-mice display impaired nerve conduction, reduced motor functions, and premature death. At the morphological level, axonal segments were frequently non-myelinated but in a one-to-one relationship with a hypertrophic Schwann cell. Importantly, axonal numbers were reduced in the vital phrenic nerve of P0(null)*Plp(null)-mice. In the absence of P0, thus, PLP also contributes to myelination by Schwann cells and to the preservation of peripheral axons. These data provide a link between the Schwann cell-dependent support of peripheral axons and the oligodendrocyte-dependent support of central axons. PMID:26393339

  9. Proteolipid protein modulates preservation of peripheral axons and premature death when myelin protein zero is lacking.

    PubMed

    Patzig, Julia; Kusch, Kathrin; Fledrich, Robert; Eichel, Maria A; Lüders, Katja A; Möbius, Wiebke; Sereda, Michael W; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Martini, Rudolf; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Protein zero (P0) is the major structural component of peripheral myelin. Lack of this adhesion protein from Schwann cells causes a severe dysmyelinating neuropathy with secondary axonal degeneration in humans with the neuropathy Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) and in the corresponding mouse model (P0(null)-mice). In the mammalian CNS, the tetraspan-membrane protein PLP is the major structural myelin constituent and required for the long-term preservation of myelinated axons, which fails in hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG type-2) and the relevant mouse model (Plp(null)-mice). The Plp-gene is also expressed in Schwann cells but PLP is of very low abundance in normal peripheral myelin; its function has thus remained enigmatic. Here we show that the abundance of PLP but not of other tetraspan myelin proteins is strongly increased in compact peripheral myelin of P0(null)-mice. To determine the functional relevance of PLP expression in the absence of P0, we generated P0(null)*Plp(null)-double-mutant mice. Compared with either single-mutant, P0(null)*Plp(null)-mice display impaired nerve conduction, reduced motor functions, and premature death. At the morphological level, axonal segments were frequently non-myelinated but in a one-to-one relationship with a hypertrophic Schwann cell. Importantly, axonal numbers were reduced in the vital phrenic nerve of P0(null)*Plp(null)-mice. In the absence of P0, thus, PLP also contributes to myelination by Schwann cells and to the preservation of peripheral axons. These data provide a link between the Schwann cell-dependent support of peripheral axons and the oligodendrocyte-dependent support of central axons.

  10. Gestational nicotine exposure modifies myelin gene expression in the brains of adolescent rats with sex differences.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Wang, J; Dwyer, J B; Gautier, N M; Wang, S; Leslie, F M; Li, M D

    2013-04-16

    Myelination defects in the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with various psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. As these disorders are often observed in individuals prenatally exposed to cigarette smoking, we tested the hypothesis that such exposure impairs central myelination in adolescence, an important period of brain development and the peak age of onset of psychiatric disorders. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg kg(-1) per day; gestational nicotine (GN)) or gestational saline via osmotic mini pumps from gestational days 4-18. Both male and female offsprings were killed on postnatal day 35 or 36, and three limbic brain regions, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens, were removed for measurement of gene expression and determination of morphological changes using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) array, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. GN altered myelin gene expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, with striking sex differences. Aberrant expression of myelin-related transcription and trophic factors was seen in GN animals, which correlated highly with the alterations in the myelin gene expression. These correlations suggest that these factors contribute to GN-induced alterations in myelin gene expression and also indicate abnormal function of oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelin-producing cells in the CNS. It is unlikely that these changes are attributable solely to an alteration in the number of OLGs, as the cell number was changed only in the PFC of GN males. Together, our findings suggest that abnormal brain myelination underlies various psychiatric disorders and drug abuse associated with prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke.

  11. Contact-mediated inhibition between oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and motor exit point glia establishes the spinal cord transition zone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cody J; Morris, Angela D; Welsh, Taylor G; Kucenas, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Rapid conduction of action potentials along motor axons requires that oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells myelinate distinct central and peripheral nervous system (CNS and PNS) domains along the same axon. Despite the importance of this arrangement for nervous system function, the mechanisms that establish and maintain this precise glial segregation at the motor exit point (MEP) transition zone are unknown. Using in vivo time-lapse imaging in zebrafish, we observed that prior to myelination, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) extend processes into the periphery via the MEP and immediately upon contact with spinal motor root glia retract back into the spinal cord. Characterization of the peripheral cell responsible for repelling OPC processes revealed that it was a novel, CNS-derived population of glia we propose calling MEP glia. Ablation of MEP glia resulted in the absence of myelinating glia along spinal motor root axons and an immediate breach of the MEP by OPCs. Taken together, our results identify a novel population of CNS-derived peripheral glia located at the MEP that selectively restrict the migration of OPCs into the periphery via contact-mediated inhibition.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor signalling in multiple sclerosis: inhibition of myelination and induction of pro-inflammatory environment by FGF9.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Maren; Thümmler, Katja; Arthur, Ariel; Brunner, Sarah; Elliott, Christina; McElroy, Daniel; Mohan, Hema; Williams, Anna; Edgar, Julia M; Schuh, Cornelia; Stadelmann, Christine; Barnett, Susan C; Lassmann, Hans; Mücklisch, Steve; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Meinl, Edgar; Linington, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Remyelination failure plays an important role in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We now report actively demyelinating lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with increased glial expression of fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), which we demonstrate inhibits myelination and remyelination in vitro. This inhibitory activity is associated with the appearance of multi-branched 'pre-myelinating' MBP+ / PLP+ oligodendrocytes that interact with axons but fail to assemble myelin sheaths; an oligodendrocyte phenotype described previously in chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions. This inhibitory activity is not due to a direct effect of FGF9 on cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage but is mediated by factors secreted by astrocytes. Transcriptional profiling and functional validation studies demonstrate that these include effects dependent on increased expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-sensitive proteases, enzymes more commonly associated with extracellular matrix remodelling. Further, we found that FGF9 induces expression of Ccl2 and Ccl7, two pro-inflammatory chemokines that contribute to recruitment of microglia and macrophages into multiple sclerosis lesions. These data indicate glial expression of FGF9 can initiate a complex astrocyte-dependent response that contributes to two distinct pathogenic pathways involved in the development of multiple sclerosis lesions. Namely, induction of a pro-inflammatory environment and failure of remyelination; a combination of effects predicted to exacerbate axonal injury and loss in patients.

  13. Mechanisms of oligodendrocyte regeneration from ventricular-subventricular zone-derived progenitor cells in white matter diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Liang, Anna C.; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Lo, Eng H.; Arai, Ken

    2013-01-01

    White matter dysfunction is an important part of many CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and vascular dementia. Within injured areas, myelin loss and oligodendrocyte death may trigger endogenous attempts at regeneration. However, during disease progression, remyelination failure may eventually occur due to impaired survival/proliferation, migration/recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) are the main sources of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), which can give rise to neurons as well as OPCs. Under normal conditions in the adult brain, the V-SVZ progenitors generate a large number of neurons with a small number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells. However, after demyelination, the fate of V-SVZ-derived progenitor cells shifts from neurons to OPCs, and these newly generated OPCs migrate to the demyelinating lesions to ease white matter damage. In this mini-review, we will summarize the recent studies on extrinsic (e.g., vasculature, extracellular matrix (ECM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) and intrinsic (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers) factors, which mediate oligodendrocyte generation from the V-SVZ progenitor cells. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the fate of V-SVZ progenitor cells may lead to new therapeutic approaches for ameliorating white matter dysfunction and damage in CNS disorders. PMID:24421755

  14. Oligodendrocytes exhibit selective expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling genes and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 independent inhibition of interferon-gamma-induced toxicity in response to leukemia inhibitory factor.

    PubMed

    Emery, B; Butzkueven, H; Snell, C; Binder, M; Kilpatrick, T J

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in the death of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS. Previous studies have indicated that the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor prevents the cytotoxic effects of interferon-gamma on oligodendrocytes in vitro, and the death of oligodendrocytes in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Members of a recently characterized family of proteins, the suppressors of cytokine signaling, have been demonstrated to mediate negative cross-talk between cytokines, with induction of suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins by one cytokine inhibiting the activity of a second. Here, we assess whether induction of members of the suppressors of cytokine signaling family could explain the antagonistic biological effects of leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma upon oligodendrocytes. It is found that leukemia inhibitory factor rapidly and strongly induces the expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling-3 in cultured rat oligodendrocytes, whereas interferon-gamma weakly induces the expression of both suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 and 3. Pre-treatment of oligodendrocytes with leukemia inhibitory factor does not prevent the subsequent phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 by interferon-gamma indicating that the leukemia inhibitory factor inhibition of interferon-gamma toxicity in oligodendrocytes is mediated by a suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 independent mechanism.

  15. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  16. Myelin repair is accelerated by inactivating CXCR2 on non-hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, LiPing; Darnall, Lindsey; Hu, Taofang; Choi, Karen; Ransohoff, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and remyelination in MS ultimately fails. Although strategies to promote myelin repair are eagerly sought, mechanisms underlying remyelination in vivo have been elusive. CXCR2 is expressed on neutrophils and oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the central nervous system (CNS). CXCR2 positive neutrophils facilitate inflammatory demyelination in demyelination models such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and cuprizone intoxication. Systemic injection of a small molecule CXCR2 antagonist at the onset of EAE decreased demyelinated lesions. These results left the cellular target of the CXCR2 antagonist uncertain, and did not clarify whether CXCR2 blockade prevented demyelination or promoted remyelination. Here, we show that the actions of CXCR2 on non-hematopoietic cells unexpectedly delay myelin repair. Bone marrow chimeric mice (Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− and Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2+/+) were subjected to two distinct models of myelin injury. In all cases, myelin repair was more efficient in Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− animals. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in demyelinated lesions of Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− mice proliferated earlier and more vigorously than in tissues from Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2+/+ animals. In vitro demyelinated CNS slice cultures also showed better myelin repair when CXCR2 was blocked with neutralizing antibodies, or was genetically deleted. Our results suggest that CXCR2 inactivation permits optimal spatiotemporal positioning of OPCs in demyelinating lesions to receive local proliferative and differentiating signals. Given that CXCR2 exerts dual functions which promote demyelination and decrease remyelination by actions towards hematopoietic cells and non-hematopoietic cells respectively, our findings identify CXCR2 as a promising drug target for clinical demyelinating disorders. PMID:20610741

  17. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) interacts with the Notch1 intracellular domain and contributes to the activity of Notch signaling in myelin-reactive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Juryńczyk, Maciej; Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Domowicz, Małgorzata; Mycko, Marcin P; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2015-10-15

    Notch receptors (Notch1-4) are involved in the differentiation of CD4 T cells and the development of autoimmunity. Mechanisms regulating Notch signaling in CD4 T cells are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated potential crosstalk between Notch pathway molecules and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), the major intracellular chaperone involved in the protein transport during immune responses and other stress conditions. Using Hsp70(-/-) mice we found that Hsp70 is critical for up-regulation of NICD1 and induction of Notch target genes in Jagged1- and Delta-like1-stimulated CD4 T cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of wild-type CD4 T cells stimulated with either Jagged1 or Delta-like1 showed a direct interaction between NICD1 and Hsp70. Both molecules co-localized within the nucleus of CD4 T cells stimulated with Notch ligands. Molecular interaction and nuclear colocalization of NICD1 and Hsp70 were also detected in CD4 T cells reactive against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55, which showed Hsp70-dependent up-regulation of both NICD1 and Notch target genes. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that Hsp70 interacts with NICD1 and contributes to the activity of Notch signaling in CD4 T cells. Interaction between Hsp70 and NICD1 may represent a novel mechanism regulating Notch signaling in activated CD4 T cells.

  18. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhe; Ding, Lu; Qiu, Wen-feng; Wu, Hong-fu; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. PMID:27127491

  19. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Göttle, Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS) that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS. PMID:26151843

  20. The Transcriptional Activator Krüppel-like Factor-6 Is Required for CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, John N.; Zhang, Jingya; Liu, Jia; Sawai, Setsu; Chapouly, Candice; Horng, Sam; Kramer, Elisabeth G.; Loo, Hannah; Burlant, Natalie; Nudelman, German; Lee, Young-Min; Braun, David A.; Lu, Q. Richard; Narla, Goutham; Raine, Cedric S.; Friedman, Scott L.; Casaccia, Patrizia; John, Gareth R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors of the gp130 family promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and viability, and myelination, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Here, we show that these effects are coordinated, in part, by the transcriptional activator Krüppel-like factor-6 (Klf6). Klf6 is rapidly induced in oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLP) by gp130 factors, and promotes differentiation. Conversely, in mice with lineage-selective Klf6 inactivation, OLP undergo maturation arrest followed by apoptosis, and CNS myelination fails. Overlapping transcriptional and chromatin occupancy analyses place Klf6 at the nexus of a novel gp130-Klf-importin axis, which promotes differentiation and viability in part via control of nuclear trafficking. Klf6 acts as a gp130-sensitive transactivator of the nuclear import factor importin-α5 (Impα5), and interfering with this mechanism interrupts step-wise differentiation. Underscoring the significance of this axis in vivo, mice with conditional inactivation of gp130 signaling display defective Klf6 and Impα5 expression, OLP maturation arrest and apoptosis, and failure of CNS myelination. PMID:27213272

  1. The Transcriptional Activator Krüppel-like Factor-6 Is Required for CNS Myelination.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Benjamin M; Asp, Linnéa; Mariani, John N; Zhang, Jingya; Liu, Jia; Sawai, Setsu; Chapouly, Candice; Horng, Sam; Kramer, Elisabeth G; Mitiku, Nesanet; Loo, Hannah; Burlant, Natalie; Pedre, Xiomara; Hara, Yuko; Nudelman, German; Zaslavsky, Elena; Lee, Young-Min; Braun, David A; Lu, Q Richard; Narla, Goutham; Raine, Cedric S; Friedman, Scott L; Casaccia, Patrizia; John, Gareth R

    2016-05-01

    Growth factors of the gp130 family promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and viability, and myelination, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. Here, we show that these effects are coordinated, in part, by the transcriptional activator Krüppel-like factor-6 (Klf6). Klf6 is rapidly induced in oligodendrocyte progenitors (OLP) by gp130 factors, and promotes differentiation. Conversely, in mice with lineage-selective Klf6 inactivation, OLP undergo maturation arrest followed by apoptosis, and CNS myelination fails. Overlapping transcriptional and chromatin occupancy analyses place Klf6 at the nexus of a novel gp130-Klf-importin axis, which promotes differentiation and viability in part via control of nuclear trafficking. Klf6 acts as a gp130-sensitive transactivator of the nuclear import factor importin-α5 (Impα5), and interfering with this mechanism interrupts step-wise differentiation. Underscoring the significance of this axis in vivo, mice with conditional inactivation of gp130 signaling display defective Klf6 and Impα5 expression, OLP maturation arrest and apoptosis, and failure of CNS myelination.

  2. Myelination-related genes are associated with decreased white matter integrity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chavarria-Siles, Ivan; White, Tonya; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Goudriaan, Andrea; Lips, Esther; Ehrlich, Stefan; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D; Gollub, Randy L; Magnotta, Vincent A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Posthuma, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    Disruptions in white matter (WM) tract structures have been implicated consistently in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Global WM integrity--as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA)--is highly heritable and may provide a good endophenotype for genetic studies of schizophrenia. WM abnormalities in schizophrenia are not localized to one specific brain region but instead reflect global low-level decreases in FA coupled with focal abnormalities. In this study, we sought to investigate whether functional gene sets associated with schizophrenia are also associated with WM integrity. We analyzed FA and genetic data from the Mind Research Network Clinical Imaging Consortium to study the effect of multiple oligodendrocyte gene sets on schizophrenia and WM integrity using a functional gene set analysis in 77 subjects with schizophrenia and 104 healthy controls. We found that a gene set involved in myelination was significantly associated with schizophrenia and FA. This gene set includes 17 genes that are expressed in oligodendrocytes and one neuronal gene (NRG1) that is known to regulate myelination. None of the genes within the gene set were associated with schizophrenia or FA individually, suggesting that no single gene was driving the association of the gene set. Our findings support the hypothesis that multiple genetic variants in myelination-related genes contribute to the observed correlation between schizophrenia and decreased WM integrity as measured by FA.

  3. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Göttle, Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-07-03

    A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS) that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS.

  4. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R.; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y.; Rhee, Jeong S.; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A.T.; Lyons, David A.; Simons, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Summary During central nervous system development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multi-lamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/Cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading. PMID:26166299

  5. Myelin basic protein accumulation is impaired in a model of protein deficiency during development.

    PubMed

    Montanha-Rojas, E A; Ferreira, A A; Tenório, F; Barradas, P C

    2005-02-01

    During the development of the central nervous system (CNS) there is a great possibility of permanent effects in consequence of environmental disturbances. Nutritional deficiency is one of the factors that impair the normal CNS formation. In general, the protein deficiency evokes, beyond the damages in the maturation of nervous system, several consequences in body growth, biochemical maturation, motor function and the major cognitive functions. These effects were observed in undernourished children all over the world. Even in a restricted period, the malnutrition status may evoke permanent impairments in feeding behavior and in metabolism. Rats submitted to malnutrition during development, showed a marked decrease in the number of myelinated fibers. This condition may reflect a failure in the beginning of the wrapping of axons by oligodendroglial processes and/or a delay in the myelin synthesis. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intracellular oligodendrocyte protein that is directly related to the formation of the myelin sheath. In this study we verified the temporal pattern of MBP expression, by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses, in a model of protein malnutrition induced during the first half of the lactation period. We showed that MBP expression was impaired in our malnutrition model and that some of the effects were maintained in adulthood, with possible consequences in the maturation of myelin sheath.

  6. Changes in NG2 cells and oligodendrocytes in a new model of intraspinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sahinkaya, F. Rezan; Milich, Lindsay; McTigue, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) evokes rapid deleterious and reparative glial reactions. Understanding the triggers for these responses is necessary for designing strategies to maximize repair. This study examined lesion formation and glial responses to vascular disruption and hemorrhage, a prominent feature of acute SCI. The specific role of hemorrhage is difficult to evaluate in trauma-induced lesions, because mechanical injury initiates many downstream responses. To isolate vascular disruption from trauma-induced effects, we created a novel and reproducible model of collagenase-induced intraspinal hemorrhage (ISH) and compared glial reactions between unilateral ISH and a hemi-contusion injury. Similar to contusion injuries, ISH lesions caused loss of myelin and axons and became filled with iron-laden macrophages. We hypothesized that intraspinal hemorrhage would also initiate reparative cellular responses including NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation and oligodendrocyte genesis. Indeed, ISH induced OPC proliferation within 1d post-injury (dpi), which continued throughout the first week and resulted in a sustained elevation of NG2+ OPCs. ISH also caused oligodendrocyte loss within 4h that was sustained through 3d post-ISH. However, oligodendrogenesis, as determined by bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU) positive oligodendrocytes, restored oligodendrocyte numbers by 7dpi, revealing that proliferating OPCs differentiated into new oligodendrocytes after ISH. The signaling molecules pERK1/2 and pSTAT3 were robustly increased acutely after ISH, with pSTAT3 being expressed in a portion of OPCs, suggesting that activators of this signaling cascade may initiate OPC responses. Aside from subtle differences in timing of OPC responses, changes in ISH tissue closely mimicked those in hemi-contusion tissue. These results are important for elucidating the contribution of hemorrhage to lesion formation and endogenous cell-mediated repair, and will provide the foundation for

  7. DTI and Myelin Plasticity in Bipolar Disorder: Integrating Neuroimaging and Neuropathological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Bellani, Marcella; Boschello, Filippo; Delvecchio, Giuseppe; Dusi, Nicola; Altamura, Carlo Alfredo; Ruggeri, Mirella; Brambilla, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a major psychiatric illness with a chronic recurrent course, ranked among the worldwide leading disabling diseases. Its pathophysiology is still not completely understood and findings are still inconclusive, though a great interest on the topic has been constantly raised by magnetic resonance imaging, genetic and neuropathological studies. In recent years, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) investigations have prompted interest in the key role of white matter (WM) abnormalities in BD. In this report, we summarize and comment recent findings from DTI studies in BD, reporting fractional anisotropy as putative measure of WM integrity, as well as recent data from neuropathological studies focusing on oligodendrocyte involvement in WM alterations in BD. DTI research indicates that BD is most commonly associated with a WM disruption within the fronto-limbic network, which may be accompanied by other WM changes spread throughout temporal and parietal regions. Neuropathological studies, mainly focused on the fronto-limbic network, have repeatedly shown a loss in cortical and subcortical oligodendrocyte cell count, although an increased subcortical oligodendrocyte density has been also documented suggesting a putative role in remyelination processes for oligodendrocytes in BD. According to our review, a greater integration between DTI and morphological findings is needed in order to elucidate processes affecting WM, either glial loss or myelin plasticity, on the basis of a more targeted research in BD. PMID:26973545

  8. Topographic Cue from Electrospun Scaffolds Regulate Myelin-Related Gene Expressions in Schwann Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Janani; Kuppuswamy, Ashok Ayyappa; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2015-03-01

    Matured Schwann cells play a vital role in promoting regeneration and restoration of functional peripheral nervous tissue. In the present study, two dimensional film, three dimensional random and longitudinally aligned electrospun fibers of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) were used to evaluate the effect of topography on expressions of myelin related genes. The aligned nanofibrous scaffold demonstrated significant increase in Schwann cell adhesion using after 3, 6 and 12 hours of culture compared to the film and random fibers. Cell morphology, degree of orientation and elongation factor evaluated using a scanning electron microscope revealed that cells on aligned scaffold have spindle morphology, whereas cells on random and two dimensional films favor spherical morphology confirming the effect of topography. Significant increase in elongation factor was observed in aligned scaffold as compared to film and random fibers (p < 0.05). The gene expression analysis revealed that aligned scaffold significantly up-regulated the expression of early myelination markers: myelin-associated glycoprotein and myelin protein zero, cell adhesion molecule: neural cadherin, extracellular matrix molecule: neurocan, as well the down-regulation of non-myelinating Schwann cell marker: neural cell adhesion molecule when compared to random and film (p < 0.05). The gene expression patterns of aligned fibers favor myelination of Schwann cells when compared to film and random fibers. Thus, our results demonstrate that the aligned topography of the scaffold promotes maturation of Schwann cells and thereby its myelination to maintain its functionality. PMID:26307833

  9. Staufen Recruitment into Stress Granules Does Not Affect Early mRNA Transport in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, María G.; Tosar, Leandro J. Martinez; Loschi, Mariela; Pasquini, Juana M.; Correale, Jorge; Kindler, Stefan; Boccaccio, Graciela L.

    2005-01-01

    Staufen is a conserved double-stranded RNA-binding protein required for mRNA localization in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. The mammalian homologues Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 have been implicated in dendritic RNA targeting in neurons. Here we show that in rodent oligodendrocytes, these two proteins are present in two independent sets of RNA granules located at the distal myelinating processes. A third kind of RNA granules lacks Staufen and contains major myelin mRNAs. Myelin Staufen granules associate with microfilaments and microtubules, and their subcellular distribution is affected by polysome-disrupting drugs. Under oxidative stress, both Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are recruited into stress granules (SGs), which are stress-induced organelles containing transiently silenced messengers. Staufen SGs contain the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), the RNA-binding proteins HuR and TIAR, and small but not large ribosomal subunits. Staufen recruitment into perinuclear SGs is paralleled by a similar change in the overall localization of polyadenylated RNA. Under the same conditions, the distribution of recently transcribed and exported mRNAs is not affected. Our results indicate that Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are novel and ubiquitous SG components and suggest that Staufen RNPs are involved in repositioning of most polysomal mRNAs, but not of recently synthesized transcripts, during the stress response. PMID:15525674

  10. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Caitlin R.; Balsor, Justin L.; Jones, David G.; Murphy, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, myelin is viewed as insulation around axons, however, more recent studies have shown it also plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism, and neuroimmune signaling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T-cells. Furthermore, Golli-MBP has been called a “molecular link” between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex specifically, myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan. Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging. Golli-MBP has early developmental changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, and gradually increases into aging. There are three stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition, the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging. PMID:25964736

  11. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Siu, Caitlin R; Balsor, Justin L; Jones, David G; Murphy, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, myelin is viewed as insulation around axons, however, more recent studies have shown it also plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism, and neuroimmune signaling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T-cells. Furthermore, Golli-MBP has been called a "molecular link" between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex specifically, myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan. Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging. Golli-MBP has early developmental changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, and gradually increases into aging. There are three stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition, the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  12. Schwann cells but not olfactory ensheathing cells inhibit CNS myelination via the secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Lamond, Rebecca; Barnett, Susan C

    2013-11-20

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy to promote CNS repair and has been studied for several decades with a focus on glial cells. Promising candidates include Schwann cells (SCs) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs). Both cell types are thought to be neural crest derived and share many properties in common, although OECs appear to be a better candidate for transplantation by evoking less astrogliosis. Using CNS mixed myelinating rat cultures plated on to a monolayer of astrocytes, we demonstrated that SCs, but not OECs, secrete a heat labile factor(s) that inhibits oligodendrocyte myelination. Comparative qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that SCs expressed higher levels of mRNA and protein for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) than OECs. Anti-CTGF reversed the SCM-mediated effects on myelination. Both SCM and CTGF inhibited the differentiation of purified rat oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Furthermore, pretreatment of astrocyte monolayers with SCM inhibited CNS myelination and led to transcriptional changes in the astrocyte, corresponding to upregulation of bone morphogenic protein 4 mRNA and CTGF mRNA (inhibitors of OPC differentiation) and the downregulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA (promoter of OPC differentiation). CTGF pretreatment of astrocytes increased their expression of CTGF, suggesting that this inhibitory factor can be positively regulated in astrocytes. These data provide evidence for the advantages of using OECs, and not mature SCs, for transplant-mediated repair and provide more evidence that they are a distinct and unique glial cell type.

  13. Perturbation of myelin basic protein (Mbp) splice variant expression in developing rat cerebellum following perinatal exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Bhaja K; Pelletier, Guillaume

    2012-09-18

    Myelin sheaths surrounding axons are essential for saltatory conduction of nerve impulse in the central nervous system. A major protein constituent of myelin sheaths is produced by the myelin basic protein (Mbp) gene, whose expression in oligodendrocytes is conserved across vertebrates. In rat, five Mbp splice variants resulting from alternative splicing of exons 2, 5 and/or 6 are characterized. We developed a PCR-based strategy to quantify individual Mbp splice variants and characterized a sixth Mbp splice variant lacking only exon 5. This newly identified splice variant is predominantly expressed in developing rat brain and has orthologs in mouse and human. Many neurotoxic chemicals can perturb myelination and Mbp gene expression. Regulation of Mbp gene expression at the post-transcriptional level was assessed following perinatal exposure to neurotoxic methylmercury (2 mg/kg b.w./day). Similar reductions in total and individual Mbp splice variant mRNA levels suggest that methylmercury-induced perturbation in Mbp gene expression occurred as a consequence of decreased oligodendrocyte cell population in absence of a significant impact on its post-transcriptional regulation.

  14. The Wnt effector transcription factor 7-like 2 positively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation in a manner independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth; Lang, Jordan; Maeda, Yoshiko; Pleasure, David; Angus-Hill, Melinda; Xu, Jie; Horiuchi, Makoto; Deng, Wenbin; Guo, Fuzheng

    2015-03-25

    Genetic or pharmacological activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibits oligodendrocyte differentiation. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7l2), also known as TCF4, is a Wnt effector induced transiently in the oligodendroglial lineage. A well accepted dogma is that TCF7l2 inhibits oligodendrocyte differentiation through activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We report that TCF7l2 is upregulated transiently in postmitotic, newly differentiated oligodendrocytes. Using in vivo gene conditional ablation, we found surprisingly that TCF7l2 positively regulates neonatal and postnatal mouse oligodendrocyte differentiation during developmental myelination and remyelination in a manner independent of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We also reveal a novel role of TCF7l2 in repressing a bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway that is known to inhibit oligodendrocyte differentiation. Thus, our study provides novel data justifying therapeutic attempts to enhance, rather than inhibit, TCF7l2 signaling to overcome arrested oligodendroglial differentiation in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases.

  15. Increased expression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 identifies reactive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells responding to demyelination in the adult CNS.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Franklin, Robin J M

    2004-11-01

    Within the adult CNS, a quiescent population of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) become activated in response to demyelination and give rise to remyelinating oligodendrocytes. During development, OPC differentiation is controlled by several transcription factors including Olig1 and Olig2, and Nkx2.2. We hypothesized that these genes may serve similar functions in activated adult OPCs allowing them to become remyelinating oligodendrocytes and tested this hypothesis by examining their expression during the remyelination of a toxin-induced rodent model of demyelination. During the acute phase of demyelination, OPCs within the lesion increased their expression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2, two transcription factors that in combination are critical for oligodendrocyte differentiation during developmental myelination. This activation was not associated with increases in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression, which does not appear essential for CNS remyelination. Consistent with a role in the activation and differentiation of OPCs, these increases were delayed in old adult animals where the rate of remyelination is slowed. Our data suggest the hypothesis that increased expression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 plays a critically important role in the differentiation of adult OPCs into remyelinating oligodendrocytes and that these genes may present novel targets for therapeutic manipulation in cases where remyelination is impaired.

  16. The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase is a key regulator of myelination and remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, S-H; Biswas, S; Selvaraj, V; Liu, X-B; Sohn, J; Jiang, P; Chen, C; Chmilewsky, F; Marzban, H; Horiuchi, M; Pleasure, D E; Deng, W

    2015-05-07

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is one of the serine/threonine kinases regulating a variety of biological processes, including cell-type specification, differentiation and migration. Previous in vitro studies using pharmacological inhibitors suggested that p38 MAPK is essential for oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and myelination. To investigate the specific roles of p38α MAPK in OL development and myelination in vivo, we generated p38α conditional knockout (CKO) mice under the PLP and nerve/glial antigen 2 (NG2) gene promoters, as these genes are specifically expressed in OL progenitor cells (OPCs). Our data revealed that myelin synthesis was completely inhibited in OLs differentiated from primary OPC cultures derived from the NG2 Cre-p38α CKO mouse brains. Although an in vivo myelination defect was not obvious after gross examination of these mice, electron microscopic analysis showed that the ultrastructure of myelin bundles was severely impaired. Moreover, the onset of myelination in the corpus callosum was delayed in the knockout mice compared with p38α fl/fl control mice. A delay in OL differentiation in the central nervous system was observed with concomitant downregulation in the expression of OPC- and OL-specific genes such as Olig1 and Zfp488 during early postnatal development. OPC proliferation was not affected during this time. These data indicate that p38α is a positive regulator of OL differentiation and myelination. Unexpectedly, we observed an opposite effect of p38α on remyelination in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model. The p38α CKO mice exhibited better remyelination capability compared with p38α fl/fl mice following demyelination. The opposing roles of p38α in myelination and remyelination could be due to a strong anti-inflammatory effect of p38α or a dual reciprocal regulatory action of p38α on myelin formation during development and on remyelination after demyelination.

  17. Myelinating glia differentiation is regulated by extracellular matrix elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Urbanski, Mateusz M.; Kingsbury, Lyle; Moussouros, Daniel; Kassim, Imran; Mehjabeen, Saraf; Paknejad, Navid; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living tissues have a significant impact on cell differentiation, but remain unexplored in the context of myelin formation and repair. In the PNS, the extracellular matrix (ECM) incorporates a basal lamina significantly denser than the loosely organized CNS matrix. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II (NMII) enhances central but impairs peripheral myelination and NMII has been implicated in cellular responses to changes in the elasticity of the ECM. To directly evaluate whether mechanotransduction plays a role in glial cell differentiation, we cultured Schwann cells (SC) and oligodendrocytes (OL) on matrices of variable elastic modulus, mimicking either their native environment or conditions found in injured tissue. We found that a rigid, lesion-like matrix inhibited branching and differentiation of OL in NMII-dependent manner. By contrast, SC developed normally in both soft and stiffer matrices. Although SC differentiation was not significantly affected by changes in matrix stiffness alone, we found that expression of Krox-20 was potentiated on rigid matrices at high laminin concentration. These findings are relevant to the design of biomaterials to promote healing and regeneration in both CNS and PNS, via transplantation of glial progenitors or the implantation of tissue scaffolds. PMID:27646171

  18. Myelinating glia differentiation is regulated by extracellular matrix elasticity.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, Mateusz M; Kingsbury, Lyle; Moussouros, Daniel; Kassim, Imran; Mehjabeen, Saraf; Paknejad, Navid; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living tissues have a significant impact on cell differentiation, but remain unexplored in the context of myelin formation and repair. In the PNS, the extracellular matrix (ECM) incorporates a basal lamina significantly denser than the loosely organized CNS matrix. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II (NMII) enhances central but impairs peripheral myelination and NMII has been implicated in cellular responses to changes in the elasticity of the ECM. To directly evaluate whether mechanotransduction plays a role in glial cell differentiation, we cultured Schwann cells (SC) and oligodendrocytes (OL) on matrices of variable elastic modulus, mimicking either their native environment or conditions found in injured tissue. We found that a rigid, lesion-like matrix inhibited branching and differentiation of OL in NMII-dependent manner. By contrast, SC developed normally in both soft and stiffer matrices. Although SC differentiation was not significantly affected by changes in matrix stiffness alone, we found that expression of Krox-20 was potentiated on rigid matrices at high laminin concentration. These findings are relevant to the design of biomaterials to promote healing and regeneration in both CNS and PNS, via transplantation of glial progenitors or the implantation of tissue scaffolds. PMID:27646171

  19. Distribution of monocarboxylate transporters in the peripheral nervous system suggests putative roles in lactate shuttling and myelination.

    PubMed

    Domènech-Estévez, Enric; Baloui, Hasna; Repond, Cendrine; Rosafio, Katia; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Tricaud, Nicolas; Pellerin, Luc; Chrast, Roman

    2015-03-11

    Lactate, a product of glycolysis, has been shown to play a key role in the metabolic support of neurons/axons in the CNS by both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Despite such importance in the CNS, little is known about MCT expression and lactate function in the PNS. Here we show that mouse MCT1, MCT2, and MCT4 are expressed in the PNS. While DRG neurons express MCT1, myelinating Schwann cells (SCs) coexpress MCT1 and MCT4 in a domain-specific fashion, mainly in regions of noncompact myelin. Interestingly, SC-specific downregulation of MCT1 expression in rat neuron/SC cocultures led to increased myelination, while its downregulation in neurons resulted in a decreased amount of neurofilament. Finally, pure rat SCs grown in the presence of lactate exhibited an increase in the level of expression of the main myelin regulator gene Krox20/Egr2 and the myelin gene P0. These data indicate that lactate homeostasis participates in the regulation of the SC myelination program and reveal that similar to CNS, PNS axon-glial metabolic interactions are most likely mediated by MCTs. PMID:25762662

  20. Cholesterol in myelin biogenesis and hypomyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Saher, Gesine; Stumpf, Sina Kristin

    2015-08-01

    The largest pool of free cholesterol in mammals resides in myelin membranes. Myelin facilitates rapid saltatory impulse propagation by electrical insulation of axons. This function is achieved by ensheathing axons with a tightly compacted stack of membranes. Cholesterol influences myelination at many steps, from the differentiation of myelinating glial cells, over the process of myelin membrane biogenesis, to the functionality of mature myelin. Cholesterol emerged as the only integral myelin component that is essential and rate-limiting for the development of myelin in the central and peripheral nervous system. Moreover, disorders that interfere with sterol synthesis or intracellular trafficking of cholesterol and other lipids cause hypomyelination and neurodegeneration. This review summarizes recent results on the roles of cholesterol in CNS myelin biogenesis in normal development and under different pathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  1. Integrin-linked kinase regulates oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton, growth cone, and adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Michalski, John-Paul; Cummings, Sarah E; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a focal adhesion protein, brokers the link between cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular environment. Here, we demonstrate a role for ILK in laminin-2-mediated adhesion in primary murine oligodendrocytes (OLs) - with ILK loss leading to severe defects in process branching and outgrowth. These defects were partially recovered when the ILK-depleted OLs were instead grown on the non-integrin-activating substrate poly-l-lysine. Intriguingly, ILK loss on the neutral poly-l-lysine substrate led to swelling at the tips of OL processes, which we identified as enlarged growth cones. Employing the bloated ILK-depleted growth cones as template, we demonstrate the appearance of distinct cytoskeletal domains within OL growth cones bearing classic neuronal growth cone architecture. Further, microtubule organization was severely perturbed following ILK loss, with centripetal microtubule looping and failure to bundle occurring in a laminin-2-independent manner. Together, our work highlights differences in specific aspects of OL biology as driven by laminin-2-dependent or independent ILK governed mechanisms. We also reinforce the idea of OLs as growth cone bearing cells and describe the neuronal-like cytoskeleton therein. Finally, we demonstrate a role for ILK in OL growth cone maturation through microtubule regulation, the loss of which translates to decreased process length and myelin production capacity. We describe herein how different substrates fundamentally alter the oligodendrocyte's response to loss of integrin-linked kinase (ILK). On laminin-2 (Ln-2), ILK-depleted oligodendrocytes appear stunted and malformed, while on the non-integrin-activating substrate PLL branching and membrane formation are restored. We also reinforce the idea of oligodendrocytes as growth cone-bearing cells, detailing the growth cone's cytoskeletal architecture. Strikingly, loss of ILK on poly-l-lysine leads to growth cone swelling, the structure's size and

  2. Electrical stimulation promotes the survival of oligodendrocytes in mixed cortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Gary, Devin S; Malone, Misti; Capestany, Paul; Houdayer, Thierry; McDonald, John W

    2012-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte (OLG) death plays a major role in white matter dysfunction and demyelination following injury to the CNS. Axonal contact, communication, and neuronal activity appear to promote OLG survival and function in cell culture and during development. The application of electrical stimulation to mixed neural cultures has been shown to promote OLG differentiation and the formation of myelin in vitro. Here we show that OLG viability can be significantly enhanced in mixed cortical cultures by applying biphasic pulses of electrical stimulation (ESTIM). Enhanced survival via ESTIM requires the presence of neurons and is suppressed by inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. Additionally, contact between the axon and OLG is necessary for ESTIM to promote OLG survival. This report suggests that patterned neuronal activity could repress delayed progression of white matter injury and promote CNS repair in neurological conditions that involve white matter damage.

  3. IL-17A activates ERK1/2 and enhances differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Jane M; Robinson, Andrew P; Rosler, Elen S; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Persons, Rachael E; Dugas, Jason C; Miller, Stephen D

    2015-05-01

    Inflammatory signals present in demyelinated multiple sclerosis lesions affect the reparative remyelination process conducted by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-6 have differing effects on the viability and growth of OPCs, however the effects of IL-17A are largely unknown. Primary murine OPCs were stimulated with IL-17A and their viability, proliferation, and maturation were assessed in culture. IL-17A-stimulated OPCs exited the cell cycle and differentiated with no loss in viability. Expression of the myelin-specific protein, proteolipid protein, increased in a cerebellar slice culture assay in the presence of IL-17A. Downstream, IL-17A activated ERK1/2 within 15 min and induced chemokine expression in 2 days. These results demonstrate that IL-17A exposure stimulates OPCs to mature and participate in the inflammatory response.

  4. Efficient Generation of Viral and Integration-Free Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Blanchi, Bruno; Biancotti, Juan Carlos; Kumar, Shalini; Hirose, Megumi; Mandefro, Berhan; Talavera-Adame, Dodanim; Benvenisty, Nissim; de Vellis, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Here we document three highly reproducible protocols: (1) a culture system for the derivation of human oligodendrocytes (OLs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS) and their further maturation-our protocol generates viral- and integration-free OLs that efficiently commit and move forward in the OL lineage, recapitulating all the steps known to occur during in vivo development; (2) a method for the isolation, propagation and maintenance of neural stem cells (NSCs); and (3) a protocol for the production, isolation, and maintenance of OLs from perinatal rodent and human brain-derived NSCs. Our unique culture systems rely on a series of chemically defined media, specifically designed and carefully characterized for each developmental stage of OL as they advance from OL progenitors to mature, myelinating cells. We are confident that these protocols bring our field a step closer to efficient autologous cell replacement therapies and disease modeling. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532816

  5. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Ludovic; Doretto, Sandrine; Malerba, Monica; Ruat, Martial; Borrelli, Emiliana . E-mail: borrelli@uci.edu

    2007-08-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program.

  6. Myelin regeneration: a recapitulation of development?

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Chan, Jonah R; Baranzini, Sergio E; Franklin, Robin J M; Rowitch, David H

    2011-01-01

    The developmental process of myelination and the adult regenerative process of remyelination share the common objective of investing nerve axons with myelin sheaths. A central question in myelin biology is the extent to which the mechanisms of these two processes are conserved, a concept encapsulated in the recapitulation hypothesis of remyelination. This question also has relevance for translating myelin biology into a better understanding of and eventual treatments for human myelin disorders. Here we review the current evidence for the recapitulation hypothesis and discuss recent findings in the development and regeneration of myelin in the context of human neurological disease.

  7. LINGO-1 antibody ameliorates myelin impairment and spatial memory deficits in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Ren, Qing-Guo; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-09-18

    More than 50% of multiple sclerosis patients develop cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and there is no effective treatment. LINGO-1 (LRR and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein 1) has been identified as an inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, we assessed cognitive function at early and late stages of EAE, determined brain expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and investigated whether the LINGO-1 antibody could restore deficits in learning and memory and ameliorate any loss of MBP. We found that deficits in learning and memory occurred in late EAE and identified decreased expression of MBP in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and fimbria-fornix. Moreover, the LINGO-1 antibody significantly improved learning and memory in EAE and partially restored MBP in PHC. Furthermore, the LINGO-1 antibody activated the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway regulating myelin growth. Our results suggest that demyelination in the PHC and fimbria-fornix might contribute to cognitive deficits and the LINGO-1 antibody could ameliorate these deficits by promoting myelin growth in the PHC. Our research demonstrates that LINGO-1 antagonism may be an effective approach to the treatment of the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis patients.

  8. LINGO-1 antibody ameliorates myelin impairment and spatial memory deficits in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Ren, Qing-Guo; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    More than 50% of multiple sclerosis patients develop cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and there is no effective treatment. LINGO-1 (LRR and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein 1) has been identified as an inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, we assessed cognitive function at early and late stages of EAE, determined brain expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and investigated whether the LINGO-1 antibody could restore deficits in learning and memory and ameliorate any loss of MBP. We found that deficits in learning and memory occurred in late EAE and identified decreased expression of MBP in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and fimbria-fornix. Moreover, the LINGO-1 antibody significantly improved learning and memory in EAE and partially restored MBP in PHC. Furthermore, the LINGO-1 antibody activated the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway regulating myelin growth. Our results suggest that demyelination in the PHC and fimbria-fornix might contribute to cognitive deficits and the LINGO-1 antibody could ameliorate these deficits by promoting myelin growth in the PHC. Our research demonstrates that LINGO-1 antagonism may be an effective approach to the treatment of the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:26383267

  9. TLR3 Agonist Poly-IC Induces IL-33 and Promotes Myelin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Chandramohan; Yao, Song-Yi; Sriram, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired remyelination of demyelinated axons is a major cause of neurological disability. In inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), although remyelination does happen, it is often incomplete, resulting in poor clinical recovery. Poly-IC a known TLR3 agonist and IL-33, a cytokine which is induced by poly-IC are known to influence recovery and promote repair in experimental models of CNS demyelination. Methodology and Principal Findings We examined the effect of addition of poly-IC and IL-33 on the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) cultured in vitro. Both Poly-IC and IL-33 induced transcription of myelin genes and the differentiation of OPC to mature myelin forming cells. Poly-IC induced IL-33 in OPC and addition of IL-33 to in vitro cultures, amplified further, IL-33 expression suggesting an autocrine regulation of IL-33. Poly-IC and IL-33 also induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, a signaling molecule involved in myelination. Following the induction of gliotoxic injury with lysolecithin to the corpus callosum (CC), treatment of animals with poly-IC resulted in greater recruitment of OPC and increased staining for myelin in areas of demyelination. Also, poly-IC treated animals showed greater expression of IL-33 and higher expression of M2 phenotype macrophages in the CC. Conclusion/Significance Our studies suggest that poly-IC and IL-33 play a role in myelin repair by enhancing expression of myelin genes and are therefore attractive therapeutic agents for use as remyelinating agents in human demyelinating disease. PMID:27022724

  10. Neuronal expression of pathological tau accelerates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Zhao, Chao; Compston, Alastair; Pluchino, Stefano; Franklin, Robin J M; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2016-03-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation is an important therapeutic target to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously reported hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau in MS lesions, suggesting its involvement in axonal degeneration. However, the influence of pathological tau-induced axonal damage on the potential for remyelination is unknown. Therefore, we investigated OPC differentiation in human P301S tau (P301S-htau) transgenic mice, both in vitro and in vivo following focal demyelination. In 2-month-old P301S-htau mice, which show hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons, we found atrophic axons in the spinal cord in the absence of prominent axonal degeneration. These signs of early axonal damage were associated with microgliosis and an upregulation of IL-1β and TNFα. Following in vivo focal white matter demyelination we found that OPCs differentiated more efficiently in P301S-htau mice than wild type (Wt) mice. We also found an increased level of myelin basic protein within the lesions, which however did not translate into increased remyelination due to higher susceptibility of P301S-htau axons to demyelination-induced degeneration compared to Wt axons. In vitro experiments confirmed higher differentiation capacity of OPCs from P301S-htau mice compared with Wt mice-derived OPCs. Because the OPCs from P301S-htau mice do not ectopically express the transgene, and when isolated from newborn mice behave like Wt mice-derived OPCs, we infer that their enhanced differentiation capacity must have been acquired through microenvironmental priming. Our data suggest the intriguing concept that damaged axons may signal to OPCs and promote their differentiation in the attempt at rescue by remyelination.

  11. Neuronal expression of pathological tau accelerates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Zhao, Chao; Compston, Alastair; Pluchino, Stefano; Franklin, Robin J M; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2016-03-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation is an important therapeutic target to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously reported hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau in MS lesions, suggesting its involvement in axonal degeneration. However, the influence of pathological tau-induced axonal damage on the potential for remyelination is unknown. Therefore, we investigated OPC differentiation in human P301S tau (P301S-htau) transgenic mice, both in vitro and in vivo following focal demyelination. In 2-month-old P301S-htau mice, which show hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons, we found atrophic axons in the spinal cord in the absence of prominent axonal degeneration. These signs of early axonal damage were associated with microgliosis and an upregulation of IL-1β and TNFα. Following in vivo focal white matter demyelination we found that OPCs differentiated more efficiently in P301S-htau mice than wild type (Wt) mice. We also found an increased level of myelin basic protein within the lesions, which however did not translate into increased remyelination due to higher susceptibility of P301S-htau axons to demyelination-induced degeneration compared to Wt axons. In vitro experiments confirmed higher differentiation capacity of OPCs from P301S-htau mice compared with Wt mice-derived OPCs. Because the OPCs from P301S-htau mice do not ectopically express the transgene, and when isolated from newborn mice behave like Wt mice-derived OPCs, we infer that their enhanced differentiation capacity must have been acquired through microenvironmental priming. Our data suggest the intriguing concept that damaged axons may signal to OPCs and promote their differentiation in the attempt at rescue by remyelination. PMID:26576485

  12. Muscarinic receptor subtypes as potential targets to modulate oligodendrocyte progenitor survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Federica; Bernardo, Antonietta; Magnaghi, Valerio; Minghetti, Luisa; Tata, Ada Maria

    2012-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major neurotransmitter but also an important signaling molecule in neuron-glia interactions. Expression of ACh receptors has been reported in several glial cell populations, including oligodendrocytes (OLs). Nonetheless, the characterization of muscarinic receptors in these cells, as well as the description of the cholinergic effects at different stages of OL development, is still incomplete. In this study, we characterized the pattern of expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) and mature OLs, at both mRNA and protein levels. We found that muscarinic receptor expression is developmentally regulated. M1, M3, and M4 receptors were the main subtypes expressed in OPC, whereas all receptor subtypes were expressed at low levels in mature OLs. Exposure of OPC to muscarine enhanced cell proliferation, an effect mainly due to M1, M3, and M4 receptor subtypes as demonstrated by pharmacological competition with selective antagonists. Conversely, M2 receptor activation impaired OPC survival. In line with the mitogenic activity, muscarinic receptor activation increased the expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α. Muscarine stimulation increased CX32 and myelin basic protein expression, left unaffected that of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), and decreased member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ErbB3/ErbB4 receptor expression indicating a predominant role of muscarinic receptors in OPC. These findings suggest that ACh may contribute to the maintenance of an immature proliferating progenitor pool and impair the progression toward mature stage. This hypothesis is further supported by increased expression of Notch-1 in OL on muscarinic activation.

  13. Membrane structure in isolated and intact myelins.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H; Karthigasan, J; Kirschner, D A

    1989-01-01

    The biochemical composition of myelin and the topology of its constituent lipids and proteins are typically studied using membranes that have been isolated from whole, intact tissue using procedures involving hypotonic shock and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. To what extent, however, are the structure and intermembrane interactions of isolated myelin similar to those of intact myelin? We have previously reported that intact and isolated myelins do not always show identical myelin periods, indicating a difference in membrane-membrane interactions. The present study addresses the possibility that this is due to altered membrane structure. Because x-ray scattering from isolated myelin sometimes consists of overlapping Bragg reflections or is continuous, we developed nonlinear least squares procedures for analyzing the total intensity distribution after film scaling, background subtraction, and Lorentz correction. We calculated electron density profiles of isolated myelin for comparison with membrane profiles from intact myelin. The change in the width of the extracellular space and the relative invariance of the cytoplasmic space as a function of pH and ionic strength that we previously found for intact nerve was largely paralleled by isolated myelin. There were two exceptions: isolated CNS myelin was resistant to swelling under all conditions, and isolated PNS myelin in hypotonic saline showed indefinite swelling at the extracellular apposition. However, electron density profiles of isolated myelins, calculated to 30 A resolution, did not show any major change in structure compared with intact myelin that could account for the differences in interactions. PMID:2752082

  14. Abnormal expression of TIP30 and arrested nucleocytoplasmic transport within oligodendrocyte precursor cells in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Jin; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Nawa, Mikiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) persist near the demyelinated axons arising in MS but inefficiently differentiate into oligodendrocytes and remyelinate these axons. The pathogenesis of differentiation failure remains elusive. We initially hypothesized that injured axons fail to present Contactin, a positive ligand for the oligodendroglial Notch1 receptor to induce myelination, and thus tracked axoglial Contactin/Notch1 signaling in situ, using immunohistochemistry in brain tissue from MS patients containing chronic demyelinated lesions. Instead, we found that Contactin was saturated on demyelinated axons, Notch1-positive OPCs accumulated in Contactin-positive lesions, and the receptor was engaged, as demonstrated by cleavage to Notch1-intracellular domain (NICD). However, nuclear translocalization of NICD, required for myelinogenesis, was virtually absent in these cells. NICD and related proteins carrying nuclear localization signals were associated with the nuclear transporter Importin but were trapped in the cytoplasm. Abnormal expression of TIP30, a direct inhibitor of Importin, was observed in these OPCs. Overexpression of TIP30 in a rat OPC cell line resulted in cytoplasmic entrapment of NICD and arrest of differentiation upon stimulation with Contactin-Fc. Our results suggest that extracellular inhibitory factors as well as an intrinsic nucleocytoplasmic transport blockade within OPCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of remyelination failure in MS. PMID:19104151

  15. Cytolysis of oligodendrocytes is mediated by killer (K) cells but not by natural killer (NK) cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, J; Kim, S U; Kastrukoff, L F

    1991-03-01

    The cytotoxic activity of killer (K) cells against enriched cultures of bovine oligodendrocytes (BOL) was investigated in multiple sclerosis (MS) and controls. Human K cells mediated cytotoxicity to primary cultures of BOL in the presence of anti-BOL antiserum in all study groups, while BOL were resistant to human natural killer (NK) cells. Cytotoxic activity was significantly reduced in MS when compared to age-matched normal controls but not when compared to other neurologic disease (OND) patients. K cell-mediated lysis of BOL could also be induced with anti-galactocerebroside antibody but not with other antibodies including those specific for OL antigens (myelin basic protein, proteolipid apoprotein, and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). Enrichment of the effector population indicated that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to BOL was mediated by large granular lymphocytes, and the effector population was further characterized by flow cytometry. The effector cells mediating ADCC could be inhibited by protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and by K562 cells in cold competition assay. These observations indicate that oligodendrocytes are resistant to NK cells but are susceptible to cytolysis mediated by K cells. This may represent a potentially important immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of MS.

  16. Pío del Río Hortega and the discovery of the oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Matute, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Pío del Río Hortega (1882–1945) discovered microglia and oligodendrocytes (OLGs), and after Ramón y Cajal, was the most prominent figure of the Spanish school of neurology. He began his scientific career with Nicolás Achúcarro from whom he learned the use of metallic impregnation techniques suitable to study non-neuronal cells. Later on, he joined Cajal’s laboratory. and Subsequently, he created his own group, where he continued to develop other innovative modifications of silver staining methods that revolutionized the study of glial cells a century ago. He was also interested in neuropathology and became a leading authority on Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors. In parallel to this clinical activity, del Río Hortega rendered the first systematic description of a major polymorphism present in a subtype of macroglial cells that he named as oligodendroglia and later OLGs. He established their ectodermal origin and suggested that they built the myelin sheath of CNS axons, just as Schwann cells did in the periphery. Notably, he also suggested the trophic role of OLGs for neuronal functionality, an idea that has been substantiated in the last few years. Del Río Hortega became internationally recognized and established an important neurohistological school with outstanding pupils from Spain and abroad, which nearly disappeared after his exile due to the Spanish civil war. Yet, the difficulty of metal impregnation methods and their variability in results, delayed for some decades the confirmation of his great insights into oligodendrocyte biology until the development of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This review aims at summarizing the pioneer and essential contributions of del Río Hortega to the current knowledge of oligodendrocyte structure and function, and to provide a hint of the scientific personality of this extraordinary and insufficiently recognized man. PMID:26217196

  17. Antibody-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Remyelination Promotes Axon Health in Progressive Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-10-01

    Demyelination underlies early neurological symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, axonal damage is considered critical for permanent chronic deficits. The precise mechanisms by which axonal injury occurs in MS are unclear; one hypothesis is the absence or failure of remyelination, suggesting that promoting remyelination may protect axons from death. This report provides direct evidence that promoting oligodendrocyte remyelination protects axons and maintains transport function. Persistent Theiler's virus infection of Swiss Jim Lambert (SJL)/J mice was used as a model of MS to assess the effects of remyelination on axonal injury following demyelination in the spinal cord. Remyelination was induced using an oligodendrocyte/myelin-specific recombinant human monoclonal IgM, rHIgM22. The antibody is endowed with strong anti-apoptotic and pro-proliferative effects on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We used (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at the brainstem to measure N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) as a surrogate of neuronal health and spinal cord integrity. We found increased brainstem NAA concentrations at 5 weeks post-treatment with rHIgM22, which remained stable out to 10 weeks. Detailed spinal cord morphology studies revealed enhanced remyelination in the rHIgM22-treated group but not in the isotype control antibody- or saline-treated groups. Importantly, we found rHIgM22-mediated remyelination protected small- and medium-caliber mid-thoracic spinal cord axons from damage despite similar demyelination and inflammation across all experimental groups. The most direct confirmation of remyelination-mediated protection of descending neurons was an improvement in retrograde transport. Treatment with rHIgM22 significantly increased the number of retrograde-labeled neurons in the brainstem, indicating that preserved axons are functionally competent. This is direct validation that remyelination preserves spinal cord axons and protects functional axon integrity

  18. Antioxidant Protection of NADPH-Depleted Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Is Dependent on Supply of Reduced Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Saraswat Ohri, Sujata; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway is the main source of NADPH, which by reducing oxidized glutathione, contributes to antioxidant defenses. Although oxidative stress plays a major role in white matter injury, significance of NADPH for oligodendrocyte survival has not been yet investigated. It is reported here that the NADPH antimetabolite 6-amino-NADP (6AN) was cytotoxic to cultured adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as OPC-derived oligodendrocytes. The 6AN-induced necrosis was preceded by increased production of superoxide, NADPH depletion, and lower supply of reduced glutathione. Moreover, survival of NADPH-depleted OPCs was improved by the antioxidant drug trolox. Such cells were also protected by physiological concentrations of the neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (10−8 M). The protection by dehydroepiandrosterone was associated with restoration of reduced glutathione, but not NADPH, and was sensitive to inhibition of glutathione synthesis. A similar protective mechanism was engaged by the cAMP activator forskolin or the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) ligand G1. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine reduced cytotoxicity of 6AN. Taken together, NADPH is critical for survival of OPCs by supporting their antioxidant defenses. Consequently, injury-associated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway may be detrimental for the myelination or remyelination potential of the white matter. Conversely, steroid hormones and cAMP activators may promote survival of NADPH-deprived OPCs by increasing a NADPH-independent supply of reduced glutathione. Therefore, maintenance of glutathione homeostasis appears as a critical effector mechanism for OPC protection against NADPH depletion and preservation of the regenerative potential of the injured white matter. PMID:27449129

  19. Pío del Río Hortega and the discovery of the oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Matute, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Pío del Río Hortega (1882-1945) discovered microglia and oligodendrocytes (OLGs), and after Ramón y Cajal, was the most prominent figure of the Spanish school of neurology. He began his scientific career with Nicolás Achúcarro from whom he learned the use of metallic impregnation techniques suitable to study non-neuronal cells. Later on, he joined Cajal's laboratory. and Subsequently, he created his own group, where he continued to develop other innovative modifications of silver staining methods that revolutionized the study of glial cells a century ago. He was also interested in neuropathology and became a leading authority on Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors. In parallel to this clinical activity, del Río Hortega rendered the first systematic description of a major polymorphism present in a subtype of macroglial cells that he named as oligodendroglia and later OLGs. He established their ectodermal origin and suggested that they built the myelin sheath of CNS axons, just as Schwann cells did in the periphery. Notably, he also suggested the trophic role of OLGs for neuronal functionality, an idea that has been substantiated in the last few years. Del Río Hortega became internationally recognized and established an important neurohistological school with outstanding pupils from Spain and abroad, which nearly disappeared after his exile due to the Spanish civil war. Yet, the difficulty of metal impregnation methods and their variability in results, delayed for some decades the confirmation of his great insights into oligodendrocyte biology until the development of electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This review aims at summarizing the pioneer and essential contributions of del Río Hortega to the current knowledge of oligodendrocyte structure and function, and to provide a hint of the scientific personality of this extraordinary and insufficiently recognized man. PMID:26217196

  20. Correction of brain oligodendrocytes by AAVrh.10 intracerebral gene therapy in metachromatic leukodystrophy mice.

    PubMed

    Piguet, Françoise; Sondhi, Dolan; Piraud, Monique; Fouquet, Françoise; Hackett, Neil R; Ahouansou, Ornella; Vanier, Marie-Thérèse; Bieche, Ivan; Aubourg, Patrick; Crystal, Ronald G; Cartier, Nathalie; Sevin, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of sulfatides in glial cells and neurons, the result of an inherited deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ARSA; EC 3.1.6.8) and myelin degeneration