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Sample records for myelinated nerve fiber

  1. Evaluation of dermal myelinated nerve fibers in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Myers, M Iliza; Artibee, Kay J; Hamilton, Audra D; Yan, Qing; Guo, Jiasong; Shi, Yaping; Wang, Lily; Li, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Skin biopsies have primarily been used to study the non-myelinated nerve fibers of the epidermis in a variety of neuropathies. In this study, we have expanded the skin biopsy technique to glabrous, non-hairy skin to evaluate myelinated nerve fibers in the most highly prevalent peripheral nerve disease, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Twenty patients with DPN (Type I, n = 9; Type II, n = 11) and 16 age-matched healthy controls (age 29-73) underwent skin biopsy of the index finger, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and composite neuropathy scoring. In patients with DPN, we found a statistically significant reduction of both mechanoreceptive Meissner corpuscles (MCs) and their afferent myelinated nerve fibers (p = 0.01). This myelinated nerve fiber loss was correlated with the decreased amplitudes of sensory/motor responses in NCS. This study supports the utilization of skin biopsy to quantitatively evaluate axonal loss of myelinated nerve fibers in patients with DPN.

  2. Acquired myelinated nerve fibers in association with optic disk drusen.

    PubMed

    Duval, Renaud; Hammamji, Karim; Aroichane, Maryam; Michaud, Jacques L; Ospina, Luis H

    2010-12-01

    Myelinated retinal nerve fibers are a well-recognized anomaly of the ocular fundus associated with many ocular and systemic conditions. Myelination is almost always congenital and stable, but progression has been documented in rare cases. Optic disk drusen are the result of a degenerative process at the optic nerve head and are often found incidentally on ophthalmologic examination. To our knowledge, optic disk drusen have only been reported once in association with acquired and progressive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. We present 2 such cases and consider the implications for the pathogenesis of myelinated nerve fibers.

  3. Evaluating dermal myelinated nerve fibers in skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M. Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C.; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on small, unmyelinated fibers in the skin, little research has investigated dermal myelinated fibers in comparison. Glabrous, non-hairy skin contains mechanoreceptors that afford a vantage point for observation of myelinated fibers that have previously been seen only with invasively obtained nerve biopsies. This review discusses current morphometric and molecular expression data of normative and pathogenic glabrous skin obtained by various processing and analysis methods for cutaneous myelinated fibers. Recent publications have shed light on the role of glabrous skin biopsy in identifying signs of peripheral neuropathy and as a potential biomarker of distal myelin and mechanoreceptor integrity. The clinical relevance of a better understanding of the role of dermal myelinated nerve terminations in peripheral neuropathy will be addressed in light of recent publications in the growing field of skin biopsy. PMID:23192899

  4. A role for nociceptive, myelinated nerve fibers in itch sensation.

    PubMed

    Ringkamp, Matthias; Schepers, Raf J; Shimada, Steven G; Johanek, Lisa M; Hartke, Timothy V; Borzan, Jasenka; Shim, Beom; LaMotte, Robert H; Meyer, Richard A

    2011-10-19

    Despite its clinical importance, the underlying neural mechanisms of itch sensation are poorly understood. In many diseases, pruritus is not effectively treated with antihistamines, indicating the involvement of nonhistaminergic mechanisms. To investigate the role of small myelinated afferents in nonhistaminergic itch, we tested, in psychophysical studies in humans, the effect of a differential nerve block on itch produced by intradermal insertion of spicules from the pods of a cowhage plant (Mucuna pruriens). Electrophysiological experiments in anesthetized monkey were used to investigate the responsiveness of cutaneous, nociceptive, myelinated afferents to different chemical stimuli (cowhage spicules, histamine, capsaicin). Our results provide several lines of evidence for an important role of myelinated fibers in cowhage-induced itch: (1) a selective conduction block in myelinated fibers substantially reduces itch in a subgroup of subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch, (2) the time course of itch sensation differs between subjects with A-fiber- versus C-fiber-dominated itch, (3) cowhage activates a subpopulation of myelinated and unmyelinated afferents in monkey, (4) the time course of the response to cowhage is different in myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, (5) the time of peak itch sensation for subjects with A-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for peak response in myelinated fibers, and (6) the time for peak itch sensation for subjects with C-fiber-dominated itch matches the time for the peak response in unmyelinated fibers. These findings demonstrate that activity in nociceptive, myelinated afferents contributes to cowhage-induced sensations, and that nonhistaminergic itch is mediated through activity in both unmyelinated and myelinated afferents.

  5. Generalized cable equation model for myelinated nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Einziger, Pinchas D; Livshitz, Leonid M; Mizrahi, Joseph

    2005-10-01

    Herein, the well-known cable equation for nonmyelinated axon model is extended analytically for myelinated axon formulation. The myelinated membrane conductivity is represented via the Fourier series expansion. The classical cable equation is thereby modified into a linear second order ordinary differential equation with periodic coefficients, known as Hill's equation. The general internal source response, expressed via repeated convolutions, uniformly converges provided that the entire periodic membrane is passive. The solution can be interpreted as an extended source response in an equivalent nonmyelinated axon (i.e., the response is governed by the classical cable equation). The extended source consists of the original source and a novel activation function, replacing the periodic membrane in the myelinated axon model. Hill's equation is explicitly integrated for the specific choice of piecewise constant membrane conductivity profile, thereby resulting in an explicit closed form expression for the transmembrane potential in terms of trigonometric functions. The Floquet's modes are recognized as the nerve fiber activation modes, which are conventionally associated with the nonlinear Hodgkin-Huxley formulation. They can also be incorporated in our linear model, provided that the periodic membrane point-wise passivity constraint is properly modified. Indeed, the modified condition, enforcing the periodic membrane passivity constraint on the average conductivity only leads, for the first time, to the inclusion of the nerve fiber activation modes in our novel model. The validity of the generalized transmission-line and cable equation models for a myelinated nerve fiber, is verified herein through a rigorous Green's function formulation and numerical simulations for transmembrane potential induced in three-dimensional myelinated cylindrical cell. It is shown that the dominant pole contribution of the exact modal expansion is the transmembrane potential solution of our

  6. Statistical physics approach to quantifying differences in myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, César H.; Santos, João R.; Corradini, Dario; Morrison, Will; Curme, Chester; Rosene, Douglas L.; Gabrielli, Andrea; da F. Costa, Luciano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method to quantify differences in myelinated nerve fibers. These differences range from morphologic characteristics of individual fibers to differences in macroscopic properties of collections of fibers. Our method uses statistical physics tools to improve on traditional measures, such as fiber size and packing density. As a case study, we analyze cross-sectional electron micrographs from the fornix of young and old rhesus monkeys using a semi-automatic detection algorithm to identify and characterize myelinated axons. We then apply a feature selection approach to identify the features that best distinguish between the young and old age groups, achieving a maximum accuracy of 94% when assigning samples to their age groups. This analysis shows that the best discrimination is obtained using the combination of two features: the fraction of occupied axon area and the effective local density. The latter is a modified calculation of axon density, which reflects how closely axons are packed. Our feature analysis approach can be applied to characterize differences that result from biological processes such as aging, damage from trauma or disease or developmental differences, as well as differences between anatomical regions such as the fornix and the cingulum bundle or corpus callosum.

  7. Retinal detachment in a patient with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muh-Shy; Ho, Tzyy-Chang; Chang, Ching-Chung; Hou, Ping-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We report extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers in a 42-year-old patient with retinal detachment. Fundus examination revealed a horseshoe-shaped tear near the temporal edge. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed and firm vitreo-retinal adhesion was noticed in the area of extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Following vitrectomy with silicone oil tamponade, the retina was reattached successfully. In conclusion, retinal detachment may develop in patients with extensive myelinated retinal nerve fibers. Vitrectomy may be performed to treat this condition.

  8. Aging process of myelinated nerve fibers in the human Lissauer tract.

    PubMed

    Motoura, Hiroyuki; Goto, Noboru; Goto, Jun; Ezure, Hiromitsu; Shibata, Masakazu

    2005-03-01

    We calculated numbers and axonal areas of myelinated nerve fibers in the Lissauer tract of the human lumbar spinal cord (L1) from the viewpoint of the aging process. We examined 20 human spinal cords from 13 males and 7 females, age ranging from 41 to 88 years old. We found that, although the number of nerve fibers showed no significant change in relation to the age of the subject, the axonal area of myelinated nerve fiber in the Lissauer tract did decrease with age.

  9. Structure and function of myelinated nerve fibers in the rabbit eye following ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenyi; Cringle, Stephen J; Su, Er-Ning; Yu, Paula K; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Sun, Xinghuai; Morgan, William; Yu, Dao-Yi

    2006-02-01

    The rabbit eye presents a valuable model to study the effects of vascular occlusion on the function and structure of myelinated nerve fibers. The rabbit eye has a band of myelinated nerve fibers within the intraocular compartment that are supplied by a narrow band of retinal vasculature. These vessels were transiently occluded ( approximately 8 hours) using laser photocoagulation and the transmission of electrical signals along the nerve fibers was assessed by recording the visual evoked response (VER). Morphological damage was assessed by histological techniques. The ischemic insult produced no permanent change in retinal function as assessed by electroretinography, but the VER was suppressed, indicating failure of nerve fiber transmission. Histologically, the visible damage to the region supported by the retinal vasculature worsened following reperfusion, showing evidence of demyelination and necrosis followed by macrophage responses and gliosis. This rabbit model of ischemia/reperfusion of the retinal vasculature offers a rare opportunity to reliably study the response of myelinated nerve fibers to ischemia/reperfusion insults and has demonstrated the susceptibility of myelinated nerve fibers to such insults.

  10. Effects of limited postnatal ethanol exposure on the development of myelin and nerve fibers in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D E

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to morphologically evaluate the effects of limited postnatal alcohol exposure on the development of myelin and axons in the rat optic nerve. Rat pups were artificially reared on Days 5-18 with a supplemented milk diet fed via a chronic gastrostomy tube. Experimental animals received 4% ethanol in their diet on Days 5-9, otherwise the experimental and control animals received identical diets in identical volumes. Optic nerve tissues were prepared for electron microscopy on Days 10, 16, 22, 29, and 90. The cross-sectional areas of optic nerves were smaller, there were fewer myelinated nerve fibers per unit area, and the progress of myelination was slowed on Day 10 in the ethanol-exposed animals. All of these effects were compensated for at later times. The ratio of myelin thickness to axon diameter was similar in experimental and control animals, indicating that the interaction between axon size and myelin formation was not affected by alcohol. The general distribution of axon sizes was unaffected by ethanol except at 10 days when the largest fibers were smaller. There was no evidence of alcohol-induced degeneration of axons, myelin, or glial structures. Thus, alcohol exposure during myelin development causes a delay in myelin acquisition that is later compensated for.

  11. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E.; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the “axon-SC” interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+—influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization. PMID:27455410

  12. ATP-induced lipid membrane reordering in the myelinated nerve fiber identified using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutuzov, N. P.; Brazhe, A. R.; Yusipovich, A. I.; Maksimov, G. V.; Dracheva, O. E.; Lyaskovskiy, V. L.; Bulygin, F. V.; Rubin, A. B.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate a successful application of Raman spectroscopy to the problem of lipid ordering with microscopic resolution in different regions of the myelinated nerve fiber. Simultaneous collection of Raman spectra of lipids and carotenoids has enabled us to characterize membrane fluidity and the degree of lipid ordering based on intensity ratios for the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm-1 bands. We show that the intensity profiles of the major Raman bands vary significantly between the three major regions of myelinated nerve fiber: internode, paranode and the node of Ranvier. Mapping Raman peak intensities over these areas suggested that the carotenoid molecules are localized in the myelin membranes of nerve cells. Paranodal membranes were sensitive to extracellular ATP. ATP solutions (7 mM) influenced the 1527/1160 and 2940/2885 cm-1 intensity ratios. Changes in both carotenoid and lipid Raman spectra were in accord and indicated an increase in lipid ordering degree and decrease in membrane fluidity under ATP administration. The collected data provide evidence for the existence of a regulatory purinergic signaling pathway in the peripheral nervous system.

  13. The extracellular potential of a myelinated nerve fiber in an unbounded medium and in nerve cuff models.

    PubMed Central

    Struijk, J J

    1997-01-01

    A model is presented for the calculation of single myelinated fiber action potentials in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in nerve cuff electrodes. The model consists of a fiber model, used to calculate the action currents at the nodes of Ranvier, and a cylindrically symmetrical volume conductor model in which the fiber's nodes are represented as point current sources. The extracellular action potentials were shown to remain unchanged if the fiber diameter and the volume conductor geometry are scaled by the same factor (principle of corresponding states), both in an unbounded homogeneous medium and in an inhomogeneous volume conductor. The influence of several cuff electrode parameters, among others, cuff length and cuff diameter, were studied, and the results were compared, where possible, with theoretical and experimental results as reported in the literature. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9168022

  14. Induction of paranodal myelin detachment and sodium channel loss in vivo by Campylobacter jejuni DNA-binding protein from starved cells (C-Dps) in myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hua; Minohara, Motozumi; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Li, Wei; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Umehara, Fujio; Goto, Yoshinobu; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsushita, Takuya; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Maejima, Takashi; Nabekura, Jun-ichi; Yamasaki, Ryo; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-15

    Iba-1-positive macrophages were observed. Thus, we consider that C-Dps damages myelinated nerve fibers, possibly through interference with paranodal sulfatide function, and may contribute to the axonal pathology seen in C. jejuni-related GBS.

  15. Modeling the action-potential-sensitive nonlinear-optical response of myelinated nerve fibers and short-term memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Goldman-Albus treatment of the action-potential dynamics is combined with a phenomenological description of molecular hyperpolarizabilities into a closed-form model of the action-potential-sensitive second-harmonic response of myelinated nerve fibers with nodes of Ranvier. This response is shown to be sensitive to nerve demyelination, thus enabling an optical diagnosis of various demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The model is applied to examine the nonlinear-optical response of a three-neuron reverberating circuit—the basic element of short-term memory.

  16. THE MAJORITY OF MYELINATED AND UNMYELINATED SENSORY NERVE FIBERS THAT INNERVATE BONE EXPRESS THE TROPOMYOSIN RECEPTOR KINASE A

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Taylor, Reid N.; Mantyh, William G.; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Although skeletal pain is a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, relatively little is known about the specific populations of nerve fibers that innervate the skeleton. Recent studies have reported that therapies blocking nerve growth factor (NGF) or its cognate receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) are efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. A potential factor to consider when assessing the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling in a pain state is the fraction of NGF-responsive TrkA+ nociceptors that innervate the tissue from which the pain is arising, as this innervation and the analgesic efficacy of targeting NGF-TrkA signaling may vary considerably from tissue to tissue. To explore this in the skeleton, tissue slices and whole mount preparations of the normal, adult mouse femur were analyzed using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Analysis of these preparations revealed that 80% of the unmyelinated/thinly myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also express TrkA. Similarly, the majority of myelinated sensory nerve fibers that express neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) which innervate the periosteum, mineralized bone and bone marrow also co-express TrkA. In the normal femur, the relative density of CGRP+, NF200+ and TrkA+ sensory nerve fibers per unit volume is: periosteum > bone marrow > mineralized bone > cartilage with the respective relative densities being 100: 2: 0.1: 0. The observation that the majority of sensory nerve fibers innervating the skeleton express TrkA+, may in part explain why therapies that block NGF/TrkA pathway are highly efficacious in attenuating skeletal pain. PMID:21277945

  17. Action currents, internodal potentials, and extracellular records of myelinated mammalian nerve fibers derived from node potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, W B; Loeb, G E

    1976-01-01

    The potential distribution within the internodal axon of mammalian nerve fibers is derived by applying known node potential waveforms to the ends of an equivalent circuit model of the internode. The complete spatial/temporal profile of action potentials synthesized from the internodal profiles is used to compute the node current waveforn, and the extracellular action potential around fibers captured within a tubular electrode. For amphibia, the results agreed with empirical values. For mammals, the amplitude of the node currents plotted against conduction velocity was fitted by a straight line. The extracellular potential waveform depended on the location of the nodes within the tube. For tubes of length from 2 to 8 internodes, extracellular wave amplitude (mammals) was about one-third of the product of peak node current and tube resistance (center to ends). The extracellular potentials developed by longitudinal and radial currents in an anisotropic medium (fiber bundle) are compared. PMID:1276389

  18. Modeling the Chronic Loss of Optic Nerve Axons and the Effects on the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Structure in Primary Disorder of Myelin

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Mayer, Joshua A.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Smith, Chelsey M.; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Duncan, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined whether the chronic lack of optic nerve myelination and subsequent axon loss is associated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) changes in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), and whether this models what occurs in multiple sclerosis (MS) and confers its use as a surrogate marker for axon degeneration. Methods Using an animal model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (shp) bilateral longitudinal measurements of the peripapillary RNFL (spectral-domain OCT), electroretinograms (ERG), and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were performed in affected and control animals from 5 months to 2 years and in individual animals at single time points. Light and electron microscopy of the optic nerve and retina and histomorphometric measurements of the RNFL were compared to OCT data. Results Of the shp animals, 17% had an average reduction of OCT RNFL thickness on the superior retinal quadrant compared to controls (P < 0.05). Electroretinograms showed normal photopic A- and B-waves but flash VEPs were disorganized in shp animals. Morphologically, the shp retinas and optic nerves revealed significant RNFL thinning (P < 0.001) without retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss, decrease total and relative retinal axonal area, and loss of optic nerve axons. There was strong positive correlation between OCT and morphometric RNFL thickness measurements (r = 0.878, P = 0.004). Conclusion The loss of optic nerve axons demonstrated in the shp model resulted in moderate thinning of the RNFL confirmed by OCT and histology. These results indicate that OCT-derived RNFL measurement can be a useful surrogate biomarker of optic nerve axon loss and potentially disease progression in demyelinating diseases. PMID:27654412

  19. Sensitivity of a frequency-selective electrode based on spatial spectral properties of the extracellular AP of myelinated nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Cathébras, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In the context of functional electrical stimulation, neural recording is one of the main issues. For instance, the control of the limbs in people with motor deficiencies needs information about the muscle lengths and speeds that can be extracted from electroneurograms (ENG) carried on afferent peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to propose an non-invasive and spatial-selective electrode (because specific informations are carried into different fascicles). To do so, we investigate the spatial properties of an extracellular action potential (AP). This properties are described qualitatively and quantitatively using analytical study on an inhomogeneous an anisotropic nerve model. Then, a spectral analysis on this spatial signal discriminates the different frequency components. Low spatial frequencies represent the global shape of the signal, whereas high frequencies are related to the type of fibers. We show that the latter is rapidly attenuated with the distance and thus, being a local phenomenon, can be used as a selective measurement. Finally, we propose a spatial filtering based on electrode design and an electronic architecture to extract this high frequencies.

  20. Transverse Magnetic Waves in Myelinated Nerves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    IN MYELINATED NERVES M. Mª Villapecellín-Cid1, L. Mª Roa2, and J. Reina-Tosina1 1Área de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería...y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería, University of Seville, Seville, Spain Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s

  1. Dynamic Modulation of Myelination in Response to Visual Stimuli Alters Optic Nerve Conduction Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Etxeberria, Ainhoa; Hokanson, Kenton C.; Dao, Dang Q.; Mayoral, Sonia R.; Mei, Feng; Redmond, Stephanie A.; Ullian, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin controls the time required for an action potential to travel from the neuronal soma to the axon terminal, defining the temporal manner in which information is processed within the CNS. The presence of myelin, the internodal length, and the thickness of the myelin sheath are powerful structural factors that control the velocity and fidelity of action potential transmission. Emerging evidence indicates that myelination is sensitive to environmental experience and neuronal activity. Activity-dependent modulation of myelination can dynamically alter action potential conduction properties but direct functional in vivo evidence and characterization of the underlying myelin changes is lacking. We demonstrate that in mice long-term monocular deprivation increases oligodendrogenesis in the retinogeniculate pathway but shortens myelin internode lengths without affecting other structural properties of myelinated fibers. We also demonstrate that genetically attenuating synaptic glutamate neurotransmission from retinal ganglion cells phenocopies the changes observed after monocular deprivation, suggesting that glutamate may constitute a signal for myelin length regulation. Importantly, we demonstrate that visual deprivation and shortened internodes are associated with a significant reduction in nerve conduction velocity in the optic nerve. Our results reveal the importance of sensory input in the building of myelinated fibers and suggest that this activity-dependent alteration of myelination is important for modifying the conductive properties of brain circuits in response to environmental experience. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oligodendrocyte precursor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes and are capable of ensheathing axons with myelin without molecular cues from neurons. However, this default myelination process can be modulated by changes in neuronal activity. Here, we show, for the first time, that experience-dependent activity modifies the length of myelin

  2. Uncompacted myelin lamellae in peripheral nerve biopsy.

    PubMed

    Vital, Claude; Vital, Anne; Bouillot, Sandrine; Favereaux, Alexandre; Lagueny, Alain; Ferrer, Xavier; Brechenmacher, Christiane; Petry, Klaus G

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the authors have studied 49 peripheral nerve biopsies presenting uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML). Based on the ultrastructural pattern of UML they propose a 3-category classification. The first category includes cases displaying regular UML, which was observed in 43 cases; it was more frequent in 9 cases with polyneuropathy organomegaly endocrinopathy m-protein skin changes (POEMS) syndrome as well as in 1 case of Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B with a novel point mutation in the P0 gene. The second category consists of cases showing irregular UML, observed in 4 cases with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) activity. This group included 1 benign case and 3 B-cell malignant lymphomas. The third category is complex UML, which was present in 2 unrelated patients with an Arg 98 His missense mutation in the P0 protein gene. Irregular and complex UML are respectively related to MAG and P0, which play a crucial role in myelin lamellae compaction and adhesion.

  3. Schwann cell autophagy, myelinophagy, initiates myelin clearance from injured nerves

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Jose A.; Carty, Lucy; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, Marta; Palomo-Irigoyen, Marta; Varela-Rey, Marta; Griffith, Megan; Hantke, Janina; Macias-Camara, Nuria; Azkargorta, Mikel; Aurrekoetxea, Igor; De Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez; Jefferies, Harold B.J.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Elortza, Félix; Aransay, Ana M.; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Baas, Frank; Mato, José M.; Mirsky, Rhona

    2015-01-01

    Although Schwann cell myelin breakdown is the universal outcome of a remarkably wide range of conditions that cause disease or injury to peripheral nerves, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that make Schwann cell–mediated myelin digestion possible have not been established. We report that Schwann cells degrade myelin after injury by a novel form of selective autophagy, myelinophagy. Autophagy was up-regulated by myelinating Schwann cells after nerve injury, myelin debris was present in autophagosomes, and pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy impaired myelin clearance. Myelinophagy was positively regulated by the Schwann cell JNK/c-Jun pathway, a central regulator of the Schwann cell reprogramming induced by nerve injury. We also present evidence that myelinophagy is defective in the injured central nervous system. These results reveal an important role for inductive autophagy during Wallerian degeneration, and point to potential mechanistic targets for accelerating myelin clearance and improving demyelinating disease. PMID:26150392

  4. Early myelin breakdown following sural nerve crush: a freeze-fracture study.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A M; Canavarro, S

    2000-12-01

    In this study we describe the early changes of the myelin sheath following surgical nerve crush. We used the freeze-fracture technique to better evaluate myelin alterations during an early stage of Wallerian degeneration. Rat sural nerves were experimentally crushed and animals were sacrificed by transcardiac perfusion 30 h after surgery. Segments of the nerves were processed for routine transmission electron microscopy and freeze-fracture techniques. Our results show that 30 h after the lesion there was asynchrony in the pattern of Wallerian degeneration, with different nerve fibers exhibiting variable degrees of axon disruption. This was observed by both techniques. Careful examination of several replicas revealed early changes in myelin membranes represented by vacuolization and splitting of consecutive lamellae, rearrangement of intramembranous particles and disappearance of paranodal transverse bands associated or not with retraction of paranodal myelin terminal loops from the axolemma. These alterations are compatible with a direct injury to the myelin sheath following nerve crush. The results are discussed in terms of a similar mechanism underlying both axon and myelin breakdown.

  5. Discrete impulses in ephaptically coupled nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Maïna, I; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2015-04-01

    We exclusively analyze the condition for modulated waves to emerge in two ephaptically coupled nerve fibers. Through the multiple scale expansion, it is shown that a set of coupled cable-like Hodgkin-Huxley equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The standard approach of linear stability analysis of a plane wave is used to predict regions of parameters where nonlinear structures can be observed. Instability features are shown to be importantly controlled not only by the ephaptic coupling parameter, but also by the discreteness parameter. Numerical simulations, to verify our analytical predictions, are performed, and we explore the longtime dynamics of slightly perturbed plane waves in the coupled nerve fibers. On initially exciting only one fiber, quasi-perfect interneuronal communication is discussed along with the possibility of recruiting damaged or non-myelinated nerve fibers, by myelinated ones, into conduction.

  6. Prenatal exposure to low levels of carbon monoxide alters sciatic nerve myelination in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Carratù, M R; Cagiano, R; Desantis, S; Labate, M; Tattoli, M; Trabace, L; Cuomo, V

    2000-08-25

    Prenatal exposure to low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO, 75 and 150 ppm from day 0 to day 20 of gestation), resulting in maternal blood HbCO concentrations equivalent to those maintained by human cigarette smokers, leads to subtle myelin alterations in the sciatic nerve of male rat offspring. The rapid growth spurt in pup body weight was related to the period of maximal increase in myelin sheath thickness in both control and CO-exposed animals. A significant reduction in myelin sheath thickness of sciatic nerve fibers, paralleled by changes in the frequency distribution, occurred in both 40- and 90-day-old rats exposed in utero to CO (75 and 150 ppm). Myelin deficit observed in 75 and 150 ppm CO-exposed animals showed up only after the major spurt in myelination but not early during development. The subtle myelin alterations observed in CO-exposed offspring were not accompanied by changes in developmental pattern of axon diameters and did not result in a gross impairment of motor activity. These results suggest that the myelination process is selectively targeted by a prenatal exposure model simulating the CO exposure observed in human cigarette smokers.

  7. Deciphering peripheral nerve myelination by using Schwann cell expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rakesh; Le, Nam; Mahoney, Heather; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2002-06-25

    Although mutations in multiple genes are associated with inherited demyelinating neuropathies, the molecular components and pathways crucial for myelination remain largely unknown. To approach this question, we performed genome-wide expression analysis in several paradigms where the status of peripheral nerve myelination is dynamically changing. Anchor gene correlation analysis, a form of microarray analysis that integrates functional information, using correlation-based clustering, with a statistically rigorous test, the Westfall and Young step-down algorithm, was applied to this data set. Biological pathways active in myelination, genes encoding proteins involved in myelin synthesis, and genes whose mutation results in myelination defects were identified. Many known genes and previously uncharacterized ESTs not heretofore associated with myelination were also identified. One of these ESTs, MASR (myelin-associated SUR4 protein), encodes a member of the SUR4 family of fatty acid desaturases, enzymes involved in elongation of very long chain fatty acids. Its specific localization in myelinating Schwann cells indicates a crucial role for MASR in normal myelin lipid synthesis.

  8. Aging and the myelinated fibers in prefrontal cortex and corpus callosum of the monkey.

    PubMed

    Peters, Alan; Sethares, Claire

    2002-01-14

    In the rhesus monkey, the myelin sheaths of nerve fibers in area 46 of prefrontal cortex and in splenium of the corpus callosum show age-related alterations in their structure. The alterations are of four basic types. Most common is splitting of the dense line of myelin sheaths to accommodate electron dense cytoplasm derived from the oligodendroglia. Less common are splits of the intraperiod line to form balloons or blisters that appear to contain fluid, the occurrence of sheaths with redundant myelin, and thick sheaths that are almost completely split so that one set of compact lamellae is surrounded by another set. But despite these alterations in the sheaths, few nerve fibers show axonal degeneration. To quantify the frequency of the age-related alterations in myelin, transversely sectioned nerve fibers from the splenium of the corpus callosum and from the vertical bundles of nerve fibers within area 46 were examined in electron photomicrographs. The material was taken from 19 monkeys, ranging between 5 and 35 years of age. It was found that the frequency of alterations in myelin sheaths from both locations correlates significantly with age. In area 46, the age-related alterations also significantly correlate (P < 0.001) with an overall assessment of impairment in cognition, i.e., the cognitive impairment index, displayed by individual monkeys. The correlation is also significant when only the old monkeys are considered as a group. A similar result was obtained previously in our examination of the effects of age on the myelin sheaths of nerve fibers in primary visual cortex (Peters et al. [2000] J Comp Neurol. 419:364-376). However, in the corpus callosum the myelin alterations correlate significantly with only one component of the cognitive impairment index, namely the delayed nonmatching to sample task with a 2-minute delay. It is proposed that age-related myelin alterations are ubiquitous and that the correlations between their frequency and impairments in

  9. The onset and rate of myelination in six peripheral and autonomic nerves of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, K; Friede, R L

    1988-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study was carried out of the numbers of myelinated fibres in 6 nerves of the rat for 7 age groups from birth to 73 weeks. The hypoglossal nerve and the mandibular branch of the facial nerve had short and early myelination periods, essentially complete by the second week. The glossopharyngeal nerve and the sympathetic rami communicantes myelinated late and over a protracted period. Myelination of the rami communicantes continued up to 20 weeks, followed by a marked loss of fibres in the 73 week animals. Intercostal and saphenous nerves had intermediary patterns. There was evidence of subpopulations myelinating at different times. Measurements of myelin sheath thickness showed variations of relative sheath thickness with age, between nerves and for subpopulations of nerves. Late myelination corresponded to relatively thin myelin sheaths. Statistical two-stage-density cluster analysis by computer was used for analysing complex fibre populations. The developmental changes of three subpopulations of the intercostal nerve are documented. Nerves also differed in their rates of axon growth. The increment in axon calibre was small and late for sympathetic fibres. Intercostal and facial nerve fibres had rapid axon growth with different growth rates for subpopulations. PMID:3248966

  10. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina.

    PubMed

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2'-, 3'-cyclic-nucleotide-3'-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology.

  11. Histochemical discrimination of fibers in regenerating rat infraorbital nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Sanger, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    In rat dorsal root ganglia, histochemical staining of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) yields a reciprocal pattern of activity: Sensory processes are CA positive and CE negative, whereas motor processes are CA negative and CE positive. In rat infraorbital nerve (a sensory peripheral nerve), we saw extensive CA staining of nearly 100% of the myelinated axons. Although CE reactivity in myelinated axons was extremely rare, we did observe CE staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers. Four weeks after transection of infraorbital nerves, CA-stained longitudinal sections of the proximal stump demonstrated 3 distinct morphological zones. A fraction of the viable axons retained CA activity to within 2 mm of the distal extent of the stump, and the stain is capable of resolving growth sprouts being regenerated from these fibers. Staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers in serial sections shows that CE activity was not retained as far distally as is the CA sensory staining.

  12. Short- and long-term effects of combined pre- and postnatal ethanol exposure (three trimester equivalency) on the development of myelin and axons in rat optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D E; Krueger, S K; Rydquist, J E

    1991-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a combined gestational and 10 day postnatal alcohol exposure (human three trimester equivalency) on the development of myelin and axons in rat optic nerve. Rats were exposed during gestation via liquid diet, then their artificially reared pups were further exposed for 10 postnatal days via an ethanol-containing diet fed by gastrostomy. Control animals from pair-fed dams were artificially reared for 10 days on pair-fed isocaloric diets. Anesthetized animals were perfused with fixative on gestational days (G) 15 and 20 and postnatal days (P) 5, 10, 15, 20, and 90, then optic nerve tissues prepared for electron microscopy. Optic nerve cross-sectional areas were generally less from G20 through P90 in ethanol exposed animals. Counts of the number of myelinated nerve fibers per unit area and of the numbers of fibers in different stages of myelin development revealed that alcohol exposure caused a delay in myelin acquisition at 10 and 15 days that was compensated for at 20 and 90 days. Myelin thickness as a function of axon diameter was decreased in the alcohol exposed animals from 10 through 90 days, indicating a permanent reduction in the relative thickness of myelin. These results show that alcohol exposure for all of gestation and 10 postnatal days in the rat (human three trimester equivalency) causes a permanent reduction in myelin thickness along with a delay in myelin acquisition in the optic nerve. Such alterations in developing and adult myelin could help to explain some of the neurological and visual dysfunctions associated with developmental alcohol exposures.

  13. Septin/anillin filaments scaffold central nervous system myelin to accelerate nerve conduction

    PubMed Central

    Patzig, Julia; Erwig, Michelle S; Tenzer, Stefan; Kusch, Kathrin; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Goebbels, Sandra; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Myelination of axons facilitates rapid impulse propagation in the nervous system. The axon/myelin-unit becomes impaired in myelin-related disorders and upon normal aging. However, the molecular cause of many pathological features, including the frequently observed myelin outfoldings, remained unknown. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we find that the presence of myelin outfoldings correlates with a loss of cytoskeletal septins in myelin. Regulated by phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-levels, myelin septins (SEPT2/SEPT4/SEPT7/SEPT8) and the PI(4,5)P2-adaptor anillin form previously unrecognized filaments that extend longitudinally along myelinated axons. By confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy, these filaments are localized to the non-compacted adaxonal myelin compartment. Genetic disruption of these filaments in Sept8-mutant mice causes myelin outfoldings as a very specific neuropathology. Septin filaments thus serve an important function in scaffolding the axon/myelin-unit, evidently a late stage of myelin maturation. We propose that pathological or aging-associated diminishment of the septin/anillin-scaffold causes myelin outfoldings that impair the normal nerve conduction velocity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17119.001 PMID:27504968

  14. Development of the optic nerve in Xenopus laevis. II. Gliogenesis, myelination and metamorphic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Cima, C; Grant, P

    1982-12-01

    We studied the time of origin, development and location of glial elements in the developing optic nerve of Xenopus with light and electron microscopy. The first cells acting as a primitive glia are ependymal cells lying dorsal to the chiasmatic optic nerve (CON) at Nieuwkoop & Faber (1956) NF stage 39. Later (stage 47/48), immature astrocyte cell bodies migrate from the periphery of the middle optic nerve (MON) into the central fibre mass along cytoplasmic processes extending from the outer glia limitans. Shortly thereafter, oligodendrocyte cell bodies appear in the centre of the fibre mass and myelination begins, first in the middle of the MON, spreading from the centre distally towards the chiasm and proximally to the retina. In late tadpoles myelinated fibres appear first in the CON then in the retinal optic nerve (RON) increasing markedly in juveniles and adults. Segment-specific patterns of glia and myelination appear during optic nerve development. During metamorphic climax, the optic nerve shortens (Cullen & Webster, 1979), a process involving myelin and axon remodelling primarily in the MON. Neither the profound changes during metamorphosis, nor the processes of gliogenesis and myelination significantly alter the underlying chronotopic ordering in the tadpole nerve. In juvenile and adult optic nerves, however, as myelination and gliogenesis increase, and as more axons mature and grow in diameter, the dorsoventral chronotopic arrangement of axons becomes less apparent.

  15. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  16. RADIOAUTOGRAPHIC STUDIES OF CHOLINE INCORPORATION INTO PERIPHERAL NERVE MYELIN

    PubMed Central

    Hendelman, Walter J.; Bunge, Richard P.

    1969-01-01

    This radioautographic study was designed to localize the cytological sites involved in the incorporation of a lipid precursor into the myelin and the myelin-related cell of the peripheral nervous system. Both myelinating and fully myelinated cultures of rat dorsal root ganglia were exposed to a 30-min pulse of tritiated choline and either fixed immediately or allowed 6 or 48 hr of chase incubation before fixation. After Epon embedding, light and electron microscopic radioautograms were prepared with Ilford L-4 emulsion. Analysis of the pattern of choline incorporation into myelinating cultures indicated that radioactivity appeared all along the length of the internode, without there being a preferential site of initial incorporation. Light microscopic radioautograms of cultures at varying states of maturity were compared in order to determine the relative degree of myelin labeling. This analysis indicated that the myelin-Schwann cell unit in the fully myelinated cultures incorporated choline as actively as did this unit in the myelinating cultures. Because of technical difficulties, it was not possible to determine the precise localization of the incorporated radioactivity within the compact myelin. These data are related to recent biochemical studies indicating that the mature myelin of the central nervous system does incorporate a significant amount of lipid precursor under the appropriate experimental conditions. These observations support the concept that a significant amount of myelin-related metabolic activity occurs in mature tissue; this activity is considered part of an essential and continuous process of myelin maintenance and repair. PMID:5782444

  17. Mechano- and thermosensitivity of regenerating cutaneous afferent nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid; Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia

    2009-06-01

    Crush lesion of a skin nerve is followed by sprouting of myelinated (A) and unmyelinated (C) afferent fibers into the distal nerve stump. Here, we investigate quantitatively both ongoing activity and activity evoked by mechanical or thermal stimulation of the nerve in 43 A- and 135 C-fibers after crush lesion of the sural nerve using neurophysiological recordings in anesthetized rats. The discharge patterns in the injured afferent nerve fibers and in intact (control) afferent nerve fibers were compared. (1) Almost all (98%) A-fibers were mechanosensitive, some of them exhibited additionally weak cold/heat sensitivity; 7% had ongoing activity. (2) Three patterns of physiologically evoked activity were present in the lesioned C-fibers: (a) C-fibers with type 1 cold sensitivity (low cold threshold, inhibition on heating, high level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%): almost all of them were mechanoinsensitive and 40% of them were additionally heat-sensitive; (b) C-fibers with type 2 cold sensitivity (high cold threshold, low level of ongoing and cold-evoked activity; 23%). All of them were excited by mechanical and/or heat stimuli; (c) cold-insensitive C-fibers (54%), which were heat- and/or mechanosensitive. (3) The proportions of C-fibers exhibiting these three patterns of discharge to physiological stimuli were almost identical in the population of injured C-fibers and in a population of 91 intact cutaneous C-fibers. 4. Ongoing activity was present in 56% of the lesioned C-fibers. Incidence and rate of ongoing activity were the same in the populations of lesioned and intact type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers. The incidence (but not rate) of ongoing activity was significantly higher in lesioned type 2 cold-sensitive and cold insensitive C-fibers than in the corresponding populations of intact C-fibers (42/93 fibers vs. 11/72 fibers).

  18. Myelinated fibers of the mouse spinal cord after a 30-day space flight.

    PubMed

    Povysheva, T V; Rezvyakov, P N; Shaimardanova, G F; Nikolskii, E E; Islamov, R R; Chelyshev, Yu A; Grygoryev, A I

    2016-07-01

    Myelinated fibers and myelin-forming cells in the spinal cord at the L3-L5 level were studied in C57BL/6N mice that had spent 30 days in space. Signs of destruction of myelin in different areas of white matter, reduction of the thickness of myelin sheath and axon diameter, decreased number of myelin-forming cells were detected in "flight" mice. The stay of mice in space during 30 days had a negative impact on the structure of myelinated fibers and caused reduced expression of the markers myelin-forming cells. These findings can complement the pathogenetic picture of the development of hypogravity motor syndrome.

  19. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures.

  20. Morphology of nerve fiber regeneration along a biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with fresh skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Varejão, Artur S P; Cabrita, António M; Meek, Marcel F; Fornaro, Michele; Geuna, Stefano; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G

    2003-01-01

    Previous morphological and morphometrical studies showed that fresh-skeletal-muscle-enriched vein segments are good conduits for leading peripheral nerve regeneration. In the present study, we investigated the morphological features of peripheral nerve fibers regenerated along a 10-mm-long biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide enriched with fresh skeletal muscle, comparing them to nerve fiber regeneration along 10-mm-long phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-enriched poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) tubes. Repaired nerves were analyzed at weeks 6 and 24 postoperatively. Structural and ultrastructural observation showed that good nerve fiber regeneration occurred in both PBS-enriched and fresh-skeletal-muscle-enriched nerve guides, and histomorphometrical analysis of regenerated myelinated fibers revealed no statistically significant differences between the two experimental groups at week 24 after surgery. The employment of fresh-muscle-enriched conduits for the repair of nerve defects is critically discussed in the light of these results.

  1. Direct determination of the lamellar structure of peripheral nerve myelin at low resolution (17 A).

    PubMed

    McIntosh, T J; Worthington, C R

    1974-05-01

    New X-ray diffraction data from normal nerve and nerve swollen in glycerol solutions have been recorded. Direct methods of structure analysis have been used in the interpretation of the X-ray data, and the phases of the first five orders of diffraction of peripheral nerve myelin have been uniquely determined. The direct methods include deconvolution of the autocorrelation function, sampling theorem reconstructions, and Fourier synthesis comparisons. Electron density profiles of normal and swollen nerve myelin at a resolution of 17 A together with an electron density scale in electrons per cubic angstrom are presented.

  2. Ectopic activity in cutaneous regenerating afferent nerve fibers following nerve lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Constantin, Cristina; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2003-11-01

    Spontaneous activity, and mechanical and thermal sensitivity were investigated in regenerating afferent nerve fibers within 4-21 days post sural nerve lesion (crush or transection and resuturing) in anaesthetized rats. About 33-40% of the myelinated (A) and 22-27% of the unmyelinated (C) fibers excited by electrical nerve stimulation exhibited at least one of these ectopic discharge properties. In total 177 A- and 169 C-fibers with ectopic activity were analysed. Most A-fibers (161/177) were mechanosensitive. Spontaneous activity (median 1 imp/s) was present in 23/177 and thermosensitivity in 14/177 A-fibers (13 of them being activated by heat stimuli). Almost all A-fibers (159/177) exhibited only one type of ectopic discharge property. Most C-fibers (94/169) were thermosensitive responding either to cold (n = 45) or to heat stimuli (n = 33) or to both (n = 16). Eighty-four of 169 C-fibers were spontaneously active (median 0.3 imp/s) and 75/169 C-fibers were mechanosensitive. Both the proportion and the discharge rate of spontaneously active C-fibers were significantly higher after crush than after section and resuturing of the nerve. About 60% of the C-fibers (101/169) had only one ectopic discharge property and 40% two or three. In conclusion, regenerating cutaneous afferent A- and C-fibers may develop mechano- and/or thermosensitivity as well as spontaneous activity. We suggest that spontaneous and evoked ectopic activity in regenerating cutaneous afferents are a function of the intrinsic functional properties of these neurons and of the interaction between the regenerating nerve fibers and non-neural cells during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve distal to the nerve lesion.

  3. Involvement of ADAM10 in axonal outgrowth and myelination of the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Jangouk, Parastoo; Dehmel, Thomas; Meyer Zu Hörste, Gerd; Ludwig, Andreas; Lehmann, Helmar C; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2009-12-01

    The disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) is a membrane-anchored metalloproteinase with both proteolytic and disintegrin characteristics. Here, we investigate the expression, regulation, and functional role of ADAM10 in axonal outgrowth and myelination of the peripheral nerve. Expression pattern analysis of 11 ADAM family members in co-cultures of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and Schwann cells (SCs) demonstrated the most pronounced mRNA expression for ADAM10. In further studies, ADAM10 was found to be consistently upregulated in DRG-SC co-cultures before the induction of myelination. Neurons as well as SCs widely expressed ADAM10 at the protein level. In neurons, the expression of ADAM10 was exclusively limited to the axons before the induction of myelination. Inhibition of ADAM10 activity by the hydroxamate-based inhibitors GI254023X and GW280264X resulted in a significant decrease in the mean axonal length. These data suggest that ADAM10 represents a prerequisite for myelination, although its activity is not required during the process of myelination itself as demonstrated by expression analysis of myelin protein zero (P0) and Sudan black staining. Hence, during the process of myelin formation, ADAM10 is highly upregulated and appears to be critically involved in axonal outgrowth that is a requirement for myelination in the peripheral nerve.

  4. Clinical syndromes associated with tomacula or myelin swellings in sural nerve biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Sander, S; Ouvrier, R; McLeod, J; Nicholson, G; Pollard, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features of clinical syndromes associated with tomacula or focal myelin swellings in sural nerve biospies and to discuss possible common aetiopathological pathways leading to their formation in this group of neuropathies.
METHODS—Fifty two patients with sural nerve biopsies reported to show tomacula or focal myelin swellings were reviewed, light and electron microscopy were performed, and tomacula were analysed on teased fibre studies. Molecular genetic studies were performed on those patients who were available for genetic testing.
RESULTS—Thirty seven patients were diagnosed with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), four with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I (HMSN I) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1), four with HMSN with myelin outfolding (CMT4B), three with IgM paraproteinemic neuropathy, three with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and one with HMSN III (CMT3).
CONCLUSIONS—Most of these syndromes were shown to be related to genetic or immunological defects of myelin components such as peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), myelin protein zero (P0), or myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG). These proteins share the HNK-1 epitope which has been implicated in cell adhesion processes. Impaired myelin maintenance may therefore contribute to the formation of tomacula and subsequent demyelination.

 PMID:10727485

  5. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brazhe, A. R.; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, E.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    The myelinated nerve fibre is formed by an axon and Schwann cells or oligodendrocytes that sheath the axon by winding around it in tight myelin layers. Repetitive stimulation of a fibre is known to result in accumulation of extracellular potassium ions, especially between the axon and the myelin. Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from no block (less than 100 Hz) to a complete block (greater than 500 Hz). The transitional patterns include intermittent periodic block with interleaved spiking and non-spiking intervals of different relative duration as well as an unstable regime with chaotic switching between the spiking and non-spiking states. Intermittent conduction blocks are accompanied by oscillations of extracellular potassium. The mechanism of conductance block based on myelin restructuring complements the already known and modelled block via hyperpolarization mediated by the axonal sodium pump and potassium depolarization. PMID:22419976

  6. Brain gangliosides: functional ligands for myelin stability and the control of nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vyas, A A; Schnaar, R L

    2001-07-01

    Gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids which are the predominant glycans on vertebrate nerve cell surfaces, are emerging as components of membrane rafts, where they can mediate important physiological functions. Myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG), a minor constituent of myelin, is a sialic acid binding lectin with two established physiological functions: it is involved in myelin-axon stability and cytoarchitecture, and controls nerve regeneration. MAG is found selectively on the myelin membranes directly apposed to the axon surface, where it has been proposed to mediate myelin-axon interactions. Although the nerve cell surface ligands for MAG remain to be established, evidence supports a functional role for sialylated glycoconjugates. Here we review recent studies that reflect on the role of gangliosides, sialylated glycosphingolipids, as functional MAG ligands. MAG binds to gangliosides with the terminal sequence 'NeuAc alpha 3Gal beta 3GalNAc' which is found on the major nerve gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Gangliosides lacking that terminus (e.g., GM1 or GD1b), or having any biochemical modification of the terminal NeuAc residue fail to support MAG binding. Genetically engineered mice lacking the GalNAc transferase required for biosynthesis of the 'NeuAc alpha 3Gal beta 3GalNAc' terminus have grossly impaired myelination and progressive neurodegeneration. Notably the MAG level in these animals is dysregulated. Furthermore, removal of NeuAc residues from nerve cells reverses MAG-mediated inhibition of neuritogenesis, and neurons from mice lacking the 'NeuAc alpha 3 Gal beta 3GalNAc' terminus have an attenuated response to MAG. Cross-linking nerve cell surface gangliosides can mimic MAG-mediated inhibition of nerve regeneration. Taken together these observations implicate gangliosides as functional MAG ligands.

  7. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Diabetic Neuropathy by Direct Modulation of Both Angiogenesis and Myelination in Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji Woong; Choi, Dabin; Lee, Min Young; Huh, Yang Hoon; Yoon, Young-sup

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that diabetic neuropathy (DN) is pathophysiologically related to both impaired angiogenesis and a deficiency of neurotrophic factors in the nerves. It is widely known that vascular and neural growths are intimately associated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in ischemic diseases and have neuroprotective effects, particularly on Schwann cells. Accordingly, we investigated whether DN could be improved by local transplantation of MSCs by augmenting angiogenesis and neural regeneration such as remyelination. In sciatic nerves of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) and capillary density were reduced, and axonal atrophy and demyelination were observed. After injection of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) into hindlimb muscles, NCVs were restored to near-normal levels. Histological examination demonstrated that injected MSCs were preferentially and durably engrafted in the sciatic nerves, and a portion of the engrafted MSCs were distinctively localized close to vasa nervora of sciatic nerves. Furthermore, vasa nervora increased in density, and the ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in nerves was observed to be restored. Real-time RT-PCR experiments showed that gene expression of multiple factors involved in angiogenesis, neural function, and myelination were increased in the MSC-injected nerves. These findings suggest that MSC transplantation improved DN through direct peripheral nerve angiogenesis, neurotrophic effects, and restoration of myelination.

  8. Incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin proteins in nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.G.; Baughman, S.; Scheidler, D.M.

    1981-02-01

    The simultaneous incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (1-/sup 14/C)leucine into normal rat sciatic nerve was examined using an in vitro incubation model. A linear rate of protein precursor uptake was found in purified myelin protein over 1/2-6 hr of incubation utilizing a supplemented medium containing amino acids. This model was then used to examine myelin protein synthesis in nerves undergoing degeneration at 1-4 days following a crush injury. Data showed a statistically significant decrease in the ratio of fucose to leucine at 2, 3, and 4 days of degeneration, which was the consequence of a significant increase in leucine uptake. These results, plus substantial protein recovery in axotomized nerves, are indicative of active synthesis of proteins that purify with myelin during early Wallerian degeneration.

  9. The action of local anesthetics on myelin structure and nerve conduction in toad sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Morán, O; Padrón, R; Borgo, M; Vonasek, E; Márquez, G; Luzzati, V

    1997-06-01

    X-ray scattering and electrophysiological experiments were performed on toad sciatic nerves in the presence of local anesthetics. In vitro experiments were performed on dissected nerves superfused with Ringer's solutions containing procaine, lidocaine, tetracaine, or dibucaine. In vivo experiments were performed on nerves dissected from animals anesthesized by targeted injections of tetracaine-containing solutions. In all cases the anesthetics were found to have the same effects on the x-ray scattering spectra: the intensity ratio of the even-order to the odd-order reflections increases and the lattice parameter increases. These changes are reversible upon removal of the anesthetic. The magnitude of the structural changes varies with the duration of the superfusion and with the nature and concentration of the anesthetic molecule. A striking quantitative correlation was observed between the structural effects and the potency of the anesthetic. Electron density profiles, which hardly showed any structural alteration of the unit membrane, clearly indicated that the anesthetics have the effect of moving the pairs of membranes apart by increasing the thickness of the cytoplasmic space. Electrophysiological measurements performed on the very samples used in the x-ray scattering experiments showed that the amplitude of the compound action potential is affected earlier than the structure of myelin (as revealed by the x-ray scattering experiments), whereas conduction velocity closely follows the structural alterations.

  10. Myelination changes in the rat optic nerve after prenatal exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Melo, Pedro; Moreno, Vicente Zanón; Vázquez, Sheila Pons; Pinazo-Durán, Maria Dolores; Tavares, Maria Amélia

    2006-08-23

    The use of psychostimulants during adolescence and early adult life has increased in recent years. It is known that these substances affect the sensory systems, and the optic nerve has been shown to be a target tissue. This work was conducted to evaluate the effects of prenatal exposure to methamphetamine (MA) on the developmental pattern of the rat optic nerve. Pregnant female rats were given 5 mg/kg body weight/day MA, s.c., in 0.9% saline from gestational days 8 to 22. The control group was injected with an isovolumetric dose of 0.9% saline. Animal model parameters, such as gestational body weight evolution, food intake and pups parameters were registered. The offspring were sacrificed at postnatal days (PND) 7, 14 and 21. Morphometric analyses were performed at light and electron microscopic levels on optic nerve cross sections; parameters measured included optic nerve diameter and area, axonal density, total number of axons and myelin thickness. Myelin basic protein (MBP) was measured by western blotting in optic nerve samples at PND14 and PND21. The animal model parameters, such as maternal and pup weight, showed no significant differences between MA and control groups. Optic nerve diameter was smaller at PND7 in the male MA group and in both male and female MA groups at PND21. The mean cross-sectional area was smaller at PND14 in the male MA group and in both male and female groups at PND21. The total number of myelinated axons did not vary between groups at any of the studied ages. The myelin thickness of the axons in MA-treated females was thinner when compared with the respective control group at PND21. No other differences were found concerning myelin thickness. There was a reduction of MBP protein expression in MA-injected females at PND14 and PND21. The combined results suggest that prenatal exposure to MA affects the myelination process.

  11. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results.

  12. Exploring the role of nerve growth factor in multiple sclerosis: implications in myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Acosta, C M R; Cortes, C; MacPhee, H; Namaka, M P

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease resulting from targeted destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. MS is suggested to be an autoimmune disease involving the pathogenic activation of CD4(+) T cells by a foreign antigen in the peripheral blood. The activated CD4(+) T cells liberate inflammatory cytokines that facilitate the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) promoting their passage into the CNS. Inside the CNS, CD4(+) T cells become re-activated by myelin proteins sharing a similar structure to the foreign antigen that initially triggered the immune response. The CD4(+) T cells continue to liberate inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), which activates macrophages and antibodies responsible for the phagocytosis of myelin. Acute CNS lesions can be re-myelinated, however, the repair of chronic demyelinating lesions is limited, leading to permanent neurological deficits. Although current MS treatments reduce severity and slow disease progression, they do not directly repair damaged myelin. Henceforth, recent treatment strategies have focused on neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) for myelin repair. NGF promotes axonal regeneration, survival, protection and differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OGs) and facilitates migration and proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) to the sites of myelin damage. NGF also directly regulates key structural proteins that comprise myelin. Interestingly, NGF also induces the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), another integral neurotrophin involved in myelination. The intricate signaling between neurotrophins and cytokines that governs myelin repair supports the role of NGF as a leading therapeutic candidate in white matter disorders, such as MS.

  13. Axonal Transport and Morphology: How Myelination gets Nerves into Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Peter; Zhao, Peng; Monsma, Paula; Brown, Tony

    2011-03-01

    The local caliber of mature axons is largely determined by neurofilament (NF) content. The axoskeleton, mainly consisting of NFs, however, is dynamic. NFs are assembled in the cell body and are transported by molecular motors on microtubule tracks along the axon at a slow rate of fractions of mm per day. We combine live cell fluorescent imaging techniques to access NF transport in myelinated and non-myelinated segments of axons with computational modeling of the active NF flow to show that a), myelination locally slows NF transport rates by regulating duty ratios and b), that the predicted increase in axon caliber agrees well with experiments. This study, for the first time, links NF kinetics directly to axonal morphology, providing a novel conceptual framework for the physical understanding of processes leading to the formation of axonal structures such as the ``Nodes of Ranvier'' as well as abnormal axonal swellings associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NSF grants # IOS-0818412(PJ) and IOS-0818653 (AB).

  14. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  15. Raman spectroscopy of nerve fibers. A study of membrane lipids under steady state conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Pézolet, M; Georgescauld, D

    1985-01-01

    The molecular structures of different nerve fibers kept in good physiological conditions were studied by laser Raman spectroscopy. For myelinated nerves like the rat sciatic nerve, the Raman spectrum is dominated by bands due to the lipid component of the myelin sheath. The temperature dependence of these bands does not reveal any thermotropic phase transition between 0 and 40 degrees C. There is, however, with temperature, a linear increase in the intermolecular disorder that is accompanied by an increase in the number of gauche bonds of the phospholipid acyl chains. For unmyelinated nerves such as the lobster leg nerve, the C-H stretching region of the Raman spectrum is covered by bands arising from the protein component of the axoplasm. However, for the garfish olfactory nerve that has a high density of excitable membranes, phospholipid bands are observed and can be used as intrinsic structural probes of the excitable membranes. The relative intensity of these bands is also temperature dependent. PMID:3978206

  16. The Permeability of the Sodium Channel to Metal Cations in Myelinated Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil

    1972-01-01

    The relative permeability of sodium channels to eight metal cations is studied in myelinated nerve fibers. Ionic currents under voltage-clamp conditions are measured in Na-free solutions containing the test ion. Measured reversal potentials and the Goldman equation are used to calculate the permeability sequence: Na+ ≈ Li+ > Tl+ > K+. The ratio PK/PNa is 1/12. The permeabilities to Rb+, Cs+, Ca++, and Mg++ are too small to measure. The permeability ratios agree with observations on the squid giant axon and show that the reversal potential ENa differs significantly from the Nernst potential for Na+ in normal axons. Opening and closing rates for sodium channels are relatively insensitive to the ionic composition of the bathing medium, implying that gating is a structural property of the channel rather than a result of the movement or accumulation of particular ions around the channel. A previously proposed pore model of the channel accommodates the permeant metal cations in a partly hydrated form. The observed sequence of permeabilities follows the order expected for binding to a high field strength anion in Eisenman's theory of ion exchange equilibria. PMID:5025743

  17. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  18. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions. PMID:27904499

  19. Vitamin D3 potentiates myelination and recovery after facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Montava, Marion; Garcia, Stéphane; Mancini, Julien; Jammes, Yves; Courageot, Joël; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre; Feron, François

    2015-10-01

    Roles of vitamin D on the immune and nervous systems are increasingly recognized. Two previous studies demonstrated that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) or cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) induced functional recovery and increased myelination in a rat model of peroneal nerve transection. The current report assessed whether cholecalciferol was efficient in repairing transected rabbit facial nerves. Animals were randomized into two groups of rabbits with an unilateral facial nerve surgery: the vitamin D group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vitamin D3 (200 IU/kg/day), from day 1 post-surgery; the control group included animals receiving a weekly oral bolus of vehicle (triglycerides). Contralateral unsectioned facial nerves from all experimental animals were used as controls for the histological study. The facial functional index was measured every week while the inner diameter of myelin sheath and the G ratio were quantified at the end of the 3 month experiment. The current report indicates that cholecalciferol significantly increases functional recovery and myelination, after 12 weeks of treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the therapeutic benefit of vitamin D supplementation in an animal model of facial paralysis. It paves further the way for clinical trials based on the administration of this steroid in individuals with injured facial nerves.

  20. Laser interference microscopy: a novel approach to the visualization of structural changes in myelin during the propagation of nerve impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusipovich, A. I.; Cherkashin, A. A.; Verdiyan, E. E.; Sogomonyan, I. A.; Maksimov, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    We used 3D phase images obtained by laser interference microscopy (LIM) for ex vivo evaluation of changes in the structure of myelin during repetitive stimulation. In this work we propose a simple model of myelinated nerve fiber (mNF), which describes phase images as a result of different geometry and membrane-to-cytoplasm ratio in various regions, particularly, the internode and paranodal-nodal-paranodal region, including the node of Ranvier. Application of this model provides clear interpretation of the phase images and also demonstrates that repetitive action potentials are accompanied by structural changes in myelin in the internode and cytoplasmic modification in the node of Ranvier. The first 20 min of stimulation did not induce significant changes in the measured parameters, but then the optical path difference at the periphery of mNF and at the node of Ranvier declined reversibly. We believe that our model is also applicable to other modifications of interference and non-interference imaging.

  1. Myelin-phagocytosing macrophages in isolated sciatic and optic nerves reveal a unique reactive phenotype.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Denise; Hilbert, Sören; Strassenburg, Silke; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Brück, Wolfgang

    2008-02-01

    Macrophages are key effectors in demyelinating diseases of the central and peripheral nervous system by phagocytosing myelin and releasing immunoregulatory mediators. Here, we report on a distinct, a priori anti-inflammatory reaction of macrophages phagocytosing myelin upon contact with damaged nerve tissue. Macrophages rapidly invaded peripheral (sciatic) and central (optic) nerve tissues in vitro, readily incorporated myelin and expressed high levels of phagocytosis-associated molecules (e.g., Fc and scavenger receptors). In contrast, factors involved in antigen presentation (MHC class-II, CD80, CD86) revealed only a restricted expression. In parallel, a highly ordered appearance of cytokines and chemokines was detected. IL-10, IL-6, CCL22, and CXCL1 were immediately but transiently induced, whereas CCL2, CCL11, and TGFbeta revealed more persisting levels. Such a profile would attract neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, and Th2 cells as well as bias for a Th2-supporting environment. Importantly, proinflammatory/Th1-supporting factors, such as TNFalpha, IL-12p70, CCL3, and CCL5, were not induced. Still the simultaneous presence of TGFbeta and IL-6 could assist Th17 development, further depending on yet not present IL-23. The release pattern was clearly distinct from reactive phenotypes induced in isolated macrophages and microglia upon treatment with IL-4, IL-13, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, IFNgamma, or purified myelin. Nerve-exposed macrophages thus commit to a unique functional orientation.

  2. Spatial pattern of nerve fiber abnormality indicative of pathologic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, P. J.; Karnes, J.; O'Brien, P.; Nukada, H.; Lais, A.; Low, P.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of the number, density, and size distribution of myelinated fibers at selected levels of roots, spinal tracts, and sampled levels of peripheral nerves may be used in the detection and characterization of alterations of motor, sensory, and autonomic neurons and their axons with development, aging and disease. Use of imaging techniques, now available, increases the reliability, versatility, and speed of such analysis. In this study, the authors evaluated the spatial pattern of fibers in sampled frames and contour areas of transverse sections of nerve fascicles, utilizing, the coefficient of variation and index of dispersion (ID), the latter extensively employed by plant ecologists. The ID was used for recognization of increased, normal, or decreased variability of density within fascicles, between fascicles, and between nerves in health and in various experimental neuropathies. In addition, various morphometric measurements were made in transverse sections at defined levels along the hind limb nerves of rats in acute and chronic ischemia, after rhizotomy and in galactose neuropathy. These stereomorphometric studies, emphasizing the number, size, shape, and spatial pattern of fibers, revealed differences among experimental neuropathies and may be found to be helpful in the characterization and prediction of pathologic mechanisms in neuropathies of unknown cause. Specifically, these approaches could be used for study of whether fiber loss in human diabetic neuropathy is multifocal and determination of the levels of such losses. PMID:6333825

  3. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuday, Eric C; Olree, Kenneth S; Horch, Kenneth W

    2006-01-01

    Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG) and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation. PMID:16863593

  4. Cholecalciferol (Vitamin D3) Improves Myelination and Recovery after Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chabas, Jean-Francois; Stephan, Delphine; Marqueste, Tanguy; Garcia, Stephane; Lavaut, Marie-Noelle; Nguyen, Catherine; Legre, Regis; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated i) that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii) that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i) to assess which form – ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol – and which dose were the most efficient and ii) to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle), and compared to unlesioned rats (Control). Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day), cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i) the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii) the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii) neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral nerve or

  5. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff electrodes. The timing of laminectomy was based on the presence of regenerating fibres along the nerve within the tibial cuff. Stimulation of unlesioned tibial nerves (n = 6) evoked the largest motor response in S1 ventral root and the largest sensory response in L7 dorsal root. Growth rates were compared by mapping the regenerating nerve fibres within the tibial nerve cuff to all ventral or dorsal roots and, regardless of the lesion type, the fastest growth was similar in sensory and motor fibres. Maturation was assessed as recovery of the maximum motor and sensory conduction velocities (CVs) within the tibial nerve cuff. Throughout the observation period the CV was approximately 14% faster in regenerated sensory fibres than in motor fibres in accordance with the difference observed in control nerves. Recovery of amplitude was only partial after section, whereas the root distribution pattern was restored. Our data suggest that the fastest growth and maturation rates that can be achieved during regeneration are similar for motor and sensory myelinated fibres.

  6. Similarities in the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of the recurrent laryngeal nerve can explain the symmetry in the vocal fold mobility?

    PubMed

    de Campos, Deivis; Xavier, Léder Leal; Goulart, Guilherme Reghelin; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Malysz, Tais; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate in this paper that although there are statistical differences for all morphometric data [axon length, axon diameter, myelinated fiber diameter and degree of the myelination (g-Ratio)] between the fibers of recurrent laryngeal nerve right and left, the surface area/volume ratio in the fibers of both nerves is exactly the same (1/1.7). Thereby, this paper presents the hypothesis that this similarity between the nerves can actually trigger a considerable synchrony in mobility of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx that control of the vocal folds.

  7. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate produces copper accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and myelin injury in rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Elizabeth G; Valentine, Holly L; Milatovic, Dejan M; Valentine, William M

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of the dithiocarbamate, disulfiram, to produce a peripheral neuropathy in humans and experimental animals and have also provided evidence that N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) is a proximate toxic species of disulfiram. The ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in the brain suggests that it may also elevate levels of copper in peripheral nerve, possibly leading to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation from redox cycling of copper. The study presented here investigates the potential of DEDC to promote copper accumulation and lipid peroxidation in peripheral nerve. Rats were administered either DEDC or deionized water by ip osmotic pumps and fed a normal diet or diet containing elevated copper, and the levels of metals, isoprostanes, and the severity of lesions in peripheral nerve and brain were assessed by ICP-AES/AAS, GC/MS, and light microscopy, respectively. Copper was the only metal that demonstrated any significant compound-related elevations relative to controls, and total copper was increased in both brain and peripheral nerve in animals administered DEDC on both diets. In contrast, lesions and elevated F2-isoprostanes were significantly increased only in peripheral nerve for the rats administered DEDC on both diets. Autometallography staining of peripheral nerve was consistent with increased metal content along the myelin sheath, but in brain, focal densities were observed, and a periportal distribution occurred in liver. These data are consistent with the peripheral nervous system being more sensitive to DEDC-mediated demyelination and demonstrate the ability of DEDC to elevate copper levels in peripheral nerve. Additionally lipid peroxidation appears to either be a contributing event in the development of demyelination, possibly through an increase of redox active copper, or a consequence of the myelin injury.

  8. Endometriosis-associated nerve fibers and pain

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Melissa G.; Lebovic, Dan I.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and diagnosis of endometriosis remain elusive targets. Patient and medical-related factors add to delays in the detection and treatment. Recently, investigators have revealed specific nerve fibers present in endometriotic tissue, with existing parallels between density and pain severity. The aim of this review is to compile a comprehensive review of existing literature on endometriosis-related nerve fiber detection, and the effects of medical therapy on these neural fibers. We performed a systematic literature-based review using Medline and PubMed of nerve fibers detected in eutopic endometrium, endometriotic lesions, and the peritoneum. Various arrangements of significant medical terms and phrases consisting of endometriosis, pelvic pain, nerve fiber detection/density in endometriosis, and diagnoses methodology, including treatment and detection were applied in the search. Subsequent references used were cross-matched with existing sources to compile all additional similar reports. Similar nerve fibers were detected within lesions, endometrium, and myometrium, though at varying degrees of density. Hormonal therapy is widely used to treat endometriosis and was shown to be related to a reduction in fiber density. A direct result of specific nerve fiber detection within eutopic endometrial layers points to the use of a minimally invasive endometrial biopsy technique in reducing delay in diagnosis and subsequent possible preservation of fertility. PMID:19657753

  9. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka A; Patel, Himatkumar V; Fromholt, Susan E; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2002-06-11

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering.

  10. Endogenous glucocorticoids improve myelination via Schwann cells after peripheral nerve injury: An in vivo study using a crush injury model.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Shinsuke; Nishi, Mayumi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Oda, Ryo; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-06-01

    Glucocorticoids improve the symptoms of peripheral nerve disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and peripheral neuropathy. The effects of glucocorticoids are mainly anti-inflammatory, but the mechanisms of their effects in peripheral nerve disorders remain unclear. Schwann cells of the peripheral nerves express glucocorticoid receptors (GR), and glucocorticoids enhance the rate of myelin formation in vitro. Therefore, it is possible that the clinical improvement of peripheral nerve disorders by glucocorticoids is due, at least in part, to the modulation of myelination. In this study, an adrenalectomy (ADX) was performed, and followed by a daily injection of either low dose (1 mg/kg) or high dose (10 mg/kg) corticosterone (CORT). We then simulated a crush injury of the sciatic nerves. A sham ADX operation, followed by a simulated crush injury, was conducted as a control. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nuclei of in vivo Schwann cells expressed GR and that glucocorticoids impacted the GR immunoreactivity of the Schwann cells. The mRNA and protein expression of myelin basic protein was significantly lower in the animals given ADX with vehicle than in the sham operation group. However, the expression was restored in the low-dose CORT replacement group. Morphological analyses showed that the ADX with vehicle group had a significantly lower myelin thickness than did the low-dose CORT replacement group and the sham operation group. These results suggest that endogenous glucocorticoids have an important role in myelination through the GR in Schwann cells after an in vivo peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Thermally Drawn Fibers as Nerve Guidance Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Ryan A.; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Poorheravi, Negin Abdolrahim; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth. PMID:26717246

  12. Thermally drawn fibers as nerve guidance scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Koppes, Ryan A; Park, Seongjun; Hood, Tiffany; Jia, Xiaoting; Abdolrahim Poorheravi, Negin; Achyuta, Anilkumar Harapanahalli; Fink, Yoel; Anikeeva, Polina

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic neural scaffolds hold promise to eventually replace nerve autografts for tissue repair following peripheral nerve injury. Despite substantial evidence for the influence of scaffold geometry and dimensions on the rate of axonal growth, systematic evaluation of these parameters remains a challenge due to limitations in materials processing. We have employed fiber drawing to engineer a wide spectrum of polymer-based neural scaffolds with varied geometries and core sizes. Using isolated whole dorsal root ganglia as an in vitro model system we have identified key features enhancing nerve growth within these fiber scaffolds. Our approach enabled straightforward integration of microscopic topography at the scale of nerve fascicles within the scaffold cores, which led to accelerated Schwann cell migration, as well as neurite growth and alignment. Our findings indicate that fiber drawing provides a scalable and versatile strategy for producing nerve guidance channels capable of controlling direction and accelerating the rate of axonal growth.

  13. The Bushbaby Optic Nerve: Fiber Count and Fiber Diameter Spectrum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Whei Data Entered) 20. ABSTRACT: The number, percent myelinated, density, and size distributions of optic nerve axons in the bushbaby, Galago...placed on Pelco, Inc. W’)O mesh grids. Tissue grids were stained for 10 minutes with saturated urin-yl aetate in 50) percent ethanol (Epstein and Holt...characteristically have lcig-ranging processes in the form of membrane-bound fascicles or bundles of neurofilaments about the size of an unmyelinated axon

  14. Changes in myelin sheath thickness and internode geometry in the rabbit phrenic nerve during growth.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Brzoska, J; Hartmann, U

    1985-01-01

    The rabbit phrenic nerve was studied at seven phases of growth from the newborn to the adult to determine the length of the nerve fibres, the length of the internodes, the fibre calibre, the geometric proportions of the internodes and the thickness of the myelin sheaths. The elongation of the internodes corresponded precisely to the elongation of the nerve, indicating a constant number of approximately 140 internodes per fibre, each internode elongating commensurate with body growth. Internode elongation was accompanied by increases in fibre calibre, but these parameters did not change in precise proportion. The internodes of thick fibres were relatively short for calibre, as defined by the length/diameter quotient. This trend of foreshortening changed during growth. Sheath thickness, defined by the quotient axon diameter/fibre diameter, was determined with a computer-assisted method. Fibres of young rabbits had relatively thin sheaths for axon calibre, compared with adult rabbits. The changes in sheath thickness corresponded to the changes in internode geometry. This was consistent with previous studies showing that elongation or foreshortening of an internode of a given calibre has a slight, but definite effect on the thickness of its myelin sheath. PMID:3870716

  15. Myocilin is involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-mediated oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2014-04-16

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed and secreted by optic nerve astrocytes. Differentiation of optic nerve oligodendrocytes is delayed in Myocilin-null mice. Optic nerves of Myocilin-null mice contain reduced levels of several myelin-associated proteins including myelin basic protein, myelin proteolipid protein, and 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase compared with those of wild-type littermates. This leads to reduced myelin sheath thickness of optic nerve axons in Myocilin-null mice compared with wild-type littermates, and this difference is more pronounced at early postnatal stages compared with adult mice. Myocilin also affects differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro. Its addition to primary cultures of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursors increases levels of tested markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and stimulates elongation of oligodendrocyte processes. Myocilin stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs through the NgR1/Lingo-1 receptor complex. Myocilin physically interacts with Lingo-1 and may be considered as a Lingo-1 ligand. Myocilin-induced elongation of oligodendrocyte processes may be mediated by activation of FYN and suppression of RhoA GTPase.

  16. Developmental impairment of compound action potential in the optic nerve of myelin mutant taiep rats.

    PubMed

    Roncagliolo, Manuel; Schlageter, Carol; León, Claudia; Couve, Eduardo; Bonansco, Christian; Eguibar, José R

    2006-01-05

    The taiep rat is a myelin mutant with an initial hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination of the CNS. The neurological correlates start with tremor, followed by ataxia, immobility episodes, epilepsy and paralysis. The optic nerve, an easily-isolable central tract fully myelinated by oligodendrocytes, is a suitable preparation to evaluate the developmental impairment of central myelin. We examined the ontogenic development of optic nerve compound action potentials (CAP) throughout the first 6 months of life of control and taiep rats. Control optic nerves (ON) develop CAPs characterized by three waves. Along the first month, the CAPs of taiep rats showed a delayed maturation, with lower amplitudes and longer latencies than controls; at P30, the conduction velocity has only a third of the normal value. Later, as demyelination proceeds, the conduction velocity of taiep ONs begins to decrease and CAPs undergo a gradual temporal dispersion. CAPs of control and taiep showed differences in their pharmacological sensitivity to TEA and 4-AP, two voltage dependent K+ channel-blockers. As compared with TEA, 4-AP induced a significant increase of the amplitudes and a remarkable broadening of CAPs. After P20, unlike controls, the greater sensitivity to 4-AP exhibited by taiep ONs correlates with the detachment and retraction of paranodal loops suggesting that potassium conductances could regulate the excitability as demyelination of CNS axons progresses. It is concluded that the taiep rat, a long-lived mutant, provides a useful model to study the consequences of partial demyelination and the mechanisms by which glial cells regulate the molecular organization and excitability of axonal membranes during development and disease.

  17. Nitrogen Substituent Polarity Influences Dithiocarbamate-Mediated Lipid Oxidation, Nerve Copper Accumulation, and Myelin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Holly L.; Viquez, Olga M.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate’s nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generate dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that are lipid and water soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined and the quantity of protein carbonyls measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provide evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active; and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative stress and myelin

  18. Nitrogen substituent polarity influences dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid oxidation, nerve copper accumulation, and myelin injury.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Holly L; Viquez, Olga M; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N; Valentine, William M

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate's nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes that it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generated dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that were lipid- and water-soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord, and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities, and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined, and the quantity of protein carbonyls was measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provided evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid-soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative

  19. Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; de Bruin, J

    1981-11-01

    Anatomy of the retinal nerve fiber layer in rabbit eyes is studied by light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that retinal striations noted ophthalmoscopically in these eyes represent individual fiber bundles, Axon bundles are compartmentalized within tissue tunnels comprised of elongated processes of glial cell origin.

  20. Electroactive biodegradable polyurethane significantly enhanced Schwann cells myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Shao, Yongpin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-05-01

    Myelination of Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for the success of peripheral nerve regeneration, and biomaterials that can promote SCs' neurotrophin secretion as scaffolds are beneficial for nerve repair. Here we present a biomaterials-approach, specifically, a highly tunable conductive biodegradable flexible polyurethane by polycondensation of poly(glycerol sebacate) and aniline pentamer, to significantly enhance SCs' myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering. SCs are cultured on these conductive polymer films, and the biocompatibility of these films and their ability to enhance myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion are successfully demonstrated. The mechanism of SCs' neurotrophin secretion on conductive films is demonstrated by investigating the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) level and SCs' myelination. Furthermore, the neurite growth and elongation of PC12 cells are induced by adding the neurotrophin medium suspension produced from SCs-laden conductive films. These data suggest that these conductive degradable polyurethanes that enhance SCs' myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion perform great potential for nerve regeneration applications.

  1. Myelin ultrastructure of sciatic nerve in rat experimental autoimmune neuritis model and its correlation with associated protein expression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-Jing; Wei, Yu-Jun; Ao, Qiang; Gong, Kai; Wang, Jian-Yong; Sun, Qiang-San; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Zun-Cheng; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    To explore the relationship of peripheral nerve ultrastructure and its associated protein expression in experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). EAN was established in Lewis rats using an emulsified mixture of P0 peptide 180-199, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and incomplete Freund’s adjuvant. Rats immunized with saline solution were used as a control group. Sciatic nerve ultrastructure and immunofluorescence histopathology were measured at the neuromuscular severity peak on day 18 post-induction. Cell-specific protein markers were used for immunofluorescence histopathology staining to characterize sciatic nerve cells: CD3 (T cell), Iba-1 (microglia), S100 (myelin), and neurofilament 200 (axon). The results showed that swelling of the myelin lamellae, vesicular disorganization, separation of the myelin lamellae, and an attenuation or disappearance of the axon were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the EAN group. CD3 and Iba-1 increased significantly in the structures characterized by separation or swelling of the myelin lamellae, and increased slightly in the structures characterized by vesicular of the myelin lamellae, S100 decreased in the structures characterized by vesicular disorganization or separation of the myelin lamellae. And neurofilament 200 decreased in the structures characterized by separation of the myelin lamellae. Furthermore, we found that Iba1 were positive in the myelin sheath, and overlapped with S100, which significantly indicated that Schwann cells played as macrophage-like cells during the disease progression of ENA. Our findings may be a significant supplement for the knowledge of EAN model, and may offer a novel sight on the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:26339349

  2. Altered hippocampal myelinated fiber integrity in a lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy: a histopathological and stereological investigation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuanzhen; Xiong, Jiajia; Hu, Jun; Kong, Min; Cheng, Li; Chen, Hengsheng; Li, Tingsong; Jiang, Li

    2013-07-19

    The damage of white matter, primarily myelinated fibers, in the central nervous system (CNS) of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients has been recently reported. However, limited data exist addressing the types of changes that occur to myelinated fibers inside the hippocampus as a result of TLE. The current study was designed to examine this issue in a lithium-pilocarpine rat model. Investigated by electroencephalography (EEG), Gallyas silver staining, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, and stereological methods, the results showed that hippocampal myelinated fibers of the epilepsy group were degenerated with significantly less myelin basic protein (MBP) expression relative to those of control group rats. Stereological analysis revealed that the total volumes of hippocampal formation, myelinated fibers, and myelin sheaths in the hippocampus of epilepsy group rats were decreased by 20.43%, 49.16%, and 52.60%, respectively. In addition, epilepsy group rats showed significantly greater mean diameters of myelinated fibers and axons, whereas the mean thickness of myelin sheaths was less, especially for small axons with diameters from 0.1 to 0.8µm, compared to control group rats. Finally, the total length of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of epilepsy group rats was significantly decreased by 56.92%, compared to that of the control group, with the decreased length most prominent for myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.4 to 0.8µm. This study is the first to provide experimental evidence that the integrity of hippocampal myelinated fibers is negatively affected by inducing epileptic seizures with pilocarpine, which may contribute to the abnormal propagation of epileptic discharge.

  3. Effects of a 4 month enriched environment on the hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lin; Xiu, Yun; Yang, Jun-Qing; Tang, Yong

    2012-07-17

    An enriched environment has been shown to enhance learning and memory and to induce morphological changes in the hippocampus. In the present study, 14-month (middle-aged) female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into enriched environment (EE) rats and standard environment (SE) rats. EE rats were reared in an enriched environment and SE rats were reared in a standard environment for 4 months. The spatial learning capacity was assessed with Morris water maze. The hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the rat hippocampus were quantitatively investigated with a transmission electronic microscope technique and stereological methods. The female rats housed in an enriched environment showed improved performance in the Morris water maze. There was no significant difference in the total volume of hippocampus between SE rats and EE rats. The total length and total volume of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of the female and male EE rats were significantly increased, respectively, when compared to the female and male SE rats. The increase of the total length of the myelinated nerve fibers in the hippocampus was mainly due to the increase of the myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.5 to 0.9 μm. Our results showed that a 4 month enriched environment had significant effects on the spatial learning capacity and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. The present study might provide an important theoretical basis for searching for an ethological strategy to delay the progress of brain aging in the future.

  4. Modelling the effects of electric fields on nerve fibres: influence of the myelin sheath.

    PubMed

    Richardson, A G; McIntyre, C C; Grill, W M

    2000-07-01

    The excitation and conduction properties of computer-based cable models of mammalian motor nerve fibres, incorporating three different myelin representations, are compared. The three myelin representations are a perfectly insulating single cable (model A), a finite impedance single cable (model B) and a finite impedance double cable (model C). Extracellular stimulation of the three models is used to study their strength-duration and current-distance (I-X) relationships, conduction velocity (CV) and action potential shape. All three models have a chronaxie time that is within the experimental range. Models B and C have increased threshold currents compared with model A, but each model has slope to the I-X relationship that matches experimental results. Model B has a CV that matches experimental data, whereas the CV of models A and C are above and below the experimental range, respectively. Model C is able to produce a depolarising afterpotential (DAP), whereas models A and B exhibit hyperpolarising afterpotentials. Models A and B are determined to be the preferred models when low-frequency stimulation (< approximately 25 Hz) is used, owing to their efficiency and accurate excitation and conduction properties. For high frequency stimulation (approximately 25 Hz and greater), model C, with its ability to produce a DAP, is necessary accurately to simulate excitation behaviour.

  5. The recovery heat production in non-myelinated garfish olfactory nerve fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, J V; Ritchie, J M

    1979-01-01

    1. The recovery heat production of the non-myelinated fibres of garfish olfactory nerve has been measured. 2. At about 20 degrees C the total recovery heat was 381 +/- 26 microcal g-1 impulse-1 at a stimulation frequency of 2 sec-1. 3. The time constant of decay of the recovery heat production after a brief period of stimulation was 78.7 +/- 3.1 sec at about 20 degrees C. 4. Changing the temperature (by +/- 5 degress C) had little effect on the total recovery heat produced. 5. However, lowering the temperature reduced both the rate of rise, and the maximum rate of recovery heat production whereas the time constant of decay was increased. Raising the temperature produced corresponding changes in the opposite direction. 6. the recovery heat production measured in the present experiments is consistent with the previously measured oxygen consumption in the same preparation. PMID:490341

  6. The use of fiber-reinforced scaffolds cocultured with Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells to repair rabbit sciatic nerve defect with vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyang; You, Yang; Zhang, Guoping; Zhao, Feng; Sha, Ziyi; Shen, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of biodegradable fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds with satisfactory mechanical properties for the repair of long-distance sciatic nerve defect in rabbits and effects of vascularized graft in early stage on the recovery of neurological function, Schwann cells and vascular endothelial cells were cocultured in the fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds. Experiment group which used prevascularized nerve complex for the repair of sciatic nerve defect and control group which only cultured with Schwann cells were set. The animals in both groups underwent electromyography to show the status of the neurological function recovery at 4, 8, and 16 weeks after the surgery. Sciatic nerve regeneration and myelination were observed under the light microscope and electron microscope. Myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and number of myelinated nerve fiber were quantitatively analyzed using image analysis system. The recovery of foot ulcer, the velocity of nerve conduction, the number of regenerating nerve fiber, and the recovery of ultrastructure were increased in the experimental group than those in the control group. Prevascularized tissue engineered fiber-reinforced 3D scaffolds for the repair of sciatic nerve defects in rabbits can effectively promote the recovery of neurological function.

  7. Order-disorder phenomena in myelinated nerve sheaths: V. Effects of temperature on rat sciatic and optic nerves, and structural differences between the two types of nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Luzzati, V; Vonasek, E; Mateu, E; Villegas, G M; Vargas, R

    1995-01-13

    We describe in this work X-ray scattering and electron microscope studies of rat sciatic and optic nerves as a function of temperature. The scattering experiments were analyzed as described in the previous papers of this series: a variety of parameters were determined, some of which characterize the lattice disorder, others the structure of the motif. The main results are the following. All the parameters determined by the X-ray scattering study vary with temperature and the temperature-dependence is specific for the type of nerve (sciatic or optic). Most of the disorder-related parameters display a minimum or a maximum in the vicinity of physiological temperature (38 degrees C in rat); this observation, strongly supported by the electron microscope study, shows that the degree of organization of myelin is highest near physiological temperature. The structure of the motif, as revealed by the electron density profile, is fairly different in the two types of nerves (in contrast with the assumption made by previous workers); the structure also varies with temperature and the temperature-induced alterations are nerve-type specific. In the two types of nerve the thickness of the lipid bilayer varies with temperature as expected for a lipid-containing system with hydrocarbon chains in the disordered conformation. In sciatic nerve the thickness of the (thinner) cytoplasmic polar layer, which is also the layer most affected by lattice disorder in this type of nerve, decreases dramatically with increasing temperature. In optic nerve, in which lattice disorder predominantly affects the extracellular layer, the thickness of both the cytoplasmic and the extracellular layer is barely affected by temperature.

  8. High concentration of phosphorus is a distinctive feature of myelin. An X-ray elemental microanalysis study using freeze-fracture scanning electron microscopy of rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria João; Águas, Artur P

    2015-07-01

    We have used rat sciatic nerves submitted to freezing and freeze-fracture to determine the elemental composition of small domains of the peripheral nerve studied at high resolution by scanning electron microscopy. We found that myelin of Schwann cells is unique in its high content in phosphorus (P) that was more than 10 times higher than P measured in any other cells. This high concentration in P makes myelin chemistry suitable of monitoring at the subcellular level using the herein described methodology.

  9. Mechanical Loading for Peripheral Nerve Stabilization and Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    sectioning of tissue for analysis in Milestone 1.4 1.4. Comparison of nerve outgrowth, cytoskeletal stability, organelle accumulation, and myelination ...stability, organelle accumulation, and myelination between 10 mm (no device), 10 mm (device), and 15 mm (device) groups at all four time points. The...mitochondrial or Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) staining in stump ending. d. Comparison of myelination : nerve fiber diameter and myelin diameter

  10. Innocuous, Not Noxious, Input Activates PKCγ Interneurons of the Spinal Dorsal Horn via Myelinated Afferent Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Joao M.; Skinner, Kate; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J.; Basbaum, Allan I.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase C γ (PKCγ), which is concentrated in interneurons of the inner part of lamina II of the dorsal horn, has been implicated in injury-induced allodynia, a condition wherein pain is produced by innocuous stimuli. Although it is generally assumed that these interneurons receive input from the nonpeptidergic, IB4-positive subset of nociceptors, the fact that PKCγ cells do not express Fos in response to noxious stimulation suggests otherwise. Here, we demonstrate that the terminal field of the nonpeptidergic population of nociceptors, in fact, lies dorsal to that of PKCγ interneurons. There was also no overlap between the PKCγ-expressing interneurons and the transganglionic tracer wheat germ agglutinin which, after sciatic nerve injection, labels all unmyelinated nociceptors. However, transganglionic transport of the β-subunit of cholera toxin, which marks the medium-diameter and large-diameter myelinated afferents that transmit non-noxious information, revealed extensive overlap with the layer of PKCγ interneurons. Furthermore, expression of a transneuronal tracer in myelinated afferents resulted in labeling of PKCγ interneurons. Light and electron microscopic double labeling further showed that the VGLUT1 subtype of vesicular glutamate transmitter, which is expressed in myelinated afferents, marks synapses that are presynaptic to the PKCγ interneurons. Finally, we demonstrate that a continuous non-noxious input, generated by walking on a rotarod, induces Fos in the PKCγ interneurons. These results establish that PKCγ interneurons are activated by myelinated afferents that respond to innocuous stimuli, which suggests that injury-induced mechanical allodynia is transmitted through a circuit that involves PKCγ interneurons and non-nociceptive, VGLUT1-expressing myelinated primary afferents. PMID:18685019

  11. Activation of peripheral nerve fibers by electrical stimulation in the sole of the foot

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) can be evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the sole of the foot. However, elicitation of NWRs is highly site dependent, and NWRs are especially difficult to elicit at the heel. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential peripheral mechanisms for any site dependent differences in reflex thresholds. Results The first part of the study investigated the neural innervation in different sites of the sole of the foot using two different staining techniques. 1) Staining for the Nav1.7 antigen (small nociceptive fibers) and 2) the Sihler whole nerve technique (myelinated part of the nerve). No differences in innervation densities were found across the sole of the foot using the two staining techniques: Nav1.7 immunochemistry (small nociceptive fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)) and the Sihler’s method (myelinated nerve fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)). However, the results indicate that there are no nociceptive intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) innervating the heel. Secondly, mathematical modeling was used to investigate to what degree differences in skin thicknesses affect the activation thresholds of Aδ and Aβ fibers in the sole of the foot. The modeling comprised finite element analysis of the volume conduction combined with a passive model of the activation of branching cutaneous nerve fibers. The model included three different sites in the sole of the foot (forefoot, arch and heel) and three different electrode sizes (diameters: 9.1, 12.9, and 18.3 mm). For each of the 9 combinations of site and electrode size, a total of 3000 Aβ fibers and 300 Aδ fibers was modeled. The computer simulation of the effects of skin thicknesses and innervation densities on thresholds of modeled Aδ and Aβ fibers did not reveal differences in pain and perception thresholds across the foot sole as have been observed experimentally. Instead a lack of IENFs at the heel decreased the electrical activation thresholds

  12. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  13. Evidence that contact with connective tissue matrix is required for normal interaction between Schwann cells and nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Explants of fetal rat sensory ganglia, cultured under conditions allowing axon and Schwann cell outgrowth in the absence of fibroblasts, occasionally develop nerve fascicles that are partially suspended in culture medium above the collagen substrate. In these suspended regions, fascicles are abnormal in that Schwann cells are decreased in number, are confined to occasional clusters along the fascicle, provide ensheathment for only a few axons at the fascicle periphery, and do not form myelin. When these fascicles are presented with a substrate of reconstituted rat-tail collagen, Schwann cell numbers increase, ensheathment of small nerve fibers occurs normally, and larger axons are myelinated. We conclude that, for normal development, Schwann cells require contact with extracellular matrix as well as axons. The Schwann cell abnormalities in suspended fascicles are similar to those observed in nerve roots of dystrophic mice. PMID:701366

  14. The oxygen consumption of mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres at rest and during activity

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the oxygen consumption of non-myelinated nerve fibres of rabbit desheathed cervical vagus nerves at rest and during activity. 2. The average resting oxygen consumption (Qr) was 0·0924 μmole/g. min at 21° C. Stimulation for 1-3 min at 3/sec caused an extra oxygen consumption (Qs) of 816 p-mole/g.shock. 3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased, to 10/sec and 30/sec, Qs fell. When the frequency was decreased, to 1/sec and 0·3/sec, Qs increased slightly. 4. When the temperature was decreased, Qr fell; when the temperature was increased, Qs also increased. Temperature similarly affected Qs with high frequencies of stimulation, but had relatively little effect on Qs at low frequencies of stimulation. 5. An isolated single shock seemed to produce an increase in oxygen consumption of about 1200 p-mole/g, and this value was largely independent of temperature. 6. When part of the sodium in the Locke solution was replaced by barium, Qr decreased (by 12%) whereas Qs increased (by 87%). 7. Veratrine (1 μg/ml.) increased both Qr (by 142%) and Qs (by 361%). 8. Acetylcholine (1·7 mM) increased Qr (by 32%). 9. When nerves were transferred to potassium-free solutions there was little change in Qr, and Qs fell slightly (by 8%). 10. When the potassium concentration in the Locke solution was increased 4-fold, Qr increased (by 27%). 11. Salicylate (1-10 mM) increased Qr (by 24%) and abolished Qs. 12. When the sodium of Locke solution was replaced by lithium, Qr decreased (by 19%) and Qs was abolished. 13. In sodium-Locke solution ouabain (100 μM) decreased Qr (by 26%) and abolished Qs. In lithium-Locke solution ouabain also decreased Qr (by 28%). 14. All or nearly all of the oxygen consumed at rest or during activity seemed to be used to pump potassium ions into, and sodium ions out of, the axoplasm. 15. The K/O2 ratio during pumping was about 5·0. PMID:6032203

  15. Quantitative studies of the regeneration of rat myelinated nerve fibres: variations in the number and size of regenerating fibres after repeated localized freezings.

    PubMed Central

    Mira, J C

    1979-01-01

    The number and size of myelinated nerve fibres were determined in the nerve to the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscles of rats whose left sciatic nerve was repeatedly frozen (one to five times at three weekly intervals). The contralateral nerve was used as a control. Results varied according to the number of freezings performed and, for a given number of freezings, according to the period of regeneration. When measurements were completed 1 month after the last of several localized freezings, the number of regenerating myelinated nerve fibres increased regularly up to the third freezing, reaching to about 220% of the control value, but no higher values were recorded after four or five freezings. The nerve fibre distribution was unimodal in all the nerves studied. The mean diameter of all myelinated fibres decreased with the number of freezings from 50% of the control value after the first to 36% after the fifth. When measurements were made 1, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months after the third and final freezing, the number of regenerating myelinated nerve fibres decreased by about 30% between the first and third month and then stabilized at 190% of the control value. Nerve fibre distribution became bimodal from the third month onwards, and the mean diameter of all myelinated fibres increased regularly. However, by the eighteenth month, the size of regenerated myelinated nerve fibres had only reached 70% of the normal contralateral value. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 PMID:511774

  16. Computerized enhancement of retinal nerve fiber layer.

    PubMed

    Peli, E; Hedges, T R; Schwartz, B

    1986-04-01

    We investigated a number of image processing techniques for enhancing the retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) in fundus photographs taken with red-free light. Wedge-type defects within the NFL were enhanced best by contrast enhancement algorithms such as histogram modification and extremum sharpening. Narrow, slitlike NFL defects can be enhanced by directional enhancement techniques. Normal NFL features were enhanced best by high-pass filtering techniques such as homomorphic filtering and adaptive enhancement. The enhanced normal NFL may be useful in the analysis of diffuse NFL loss. All of these successful enhancements of normal and defective features indicate that enhancing fundus photographs with digital image processing techniques should facilitate early detection of optic nerve damage from glaucoma and other diseases.

  17. Laminin gamma1 is critical for Schwann cell differentiation, axon myelination, and regeneration in the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-11-24

    Laminins are heterotrimeric extracellular matrix proteins that regulate cell viability and function. Laminin-2, composed of alpha2, beta1, and gamma1 chains, is a major matrix component of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). To investigate the role of laminin in the PNS, we used the Cre-loxP system to disrupt the laminin gamma1 gene in Schwann cells. These mice have dramatically reduced expression of laminin gamma1 in Schwann cells, which results in a similar reduction in laminin alpha2 and beta1 chains. These mice exhibit motor defects which lead to hind leg paralysis and tremor. During development, Schwann cells that lack laminin gamma1 were present in peripheral nerves, and proliferated and underwent apoptosis similar to control mice. However, they were unable to differentiate and synthesize myelin proteins, and therefore unable to sort and myelinate axons. In mutant mice, after sciatic nerve crush, the axons showed impaired regeneration. These experiments demonstrate that laminin is an essential component for axon myelination and regeneration in the PNS.

  18. Scaling factor relating conduction velocity and diameter for myelinated afferent nerve fibres in the cat hind limb.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, I A; Kalu, K U

    1979-01-01

    1. Compound action potentials were recorded from certain muscle and cutaneous nerves in normal and chronically de-efferentated hind limbs of cats during stimulation of the appropriate dorsal spinal roots, 2. The peaks for groups I, II and III in the compound action potential were correlated with the corresponding peaks in the fibre-diameter histograms of the same de-efferentated nerve after processing it for light microscopy. 3. The scaling factor (ratio of conduction velocity in m/sec to total diameter in micrometer) was not constant for all sizes of fibre nor did it increase progressively with fibre size. Evidence is presented that a logarithmic relation between conduction velocity and fibre diameter is not appropriate. 4. In muscle nerves the scaling factor for fibres fixed by glutaraldehyde perfusion and embedded in Epon was 5.7 for group I afferent fibres and 4.6 for myelinated fibres in both group II and group III. 5. In cutaneous nerves the scaling factor was 5.6 for large fibres (group I or Abeta) and 4.6 for small fibres (group III or Adelta). 6. The scaling factor for group I fibres is the same as was found previously for alpha-efferent fibres, and that for groups II and III is the same as for gamma-efferent fibres (Boyd & Davey, 1968). 7. The possibility that there is a clear discontinuity in scaling factor between fibres in groups I and alpha, and those in other functional groups, is discussed. 8. It is concluded that there must be some structural feature of alpha and group I fibres which differs from that of smaller myelinated fibres. It is likely that a difference in the relative thickness of the myelin sheath is involved and possibly also in the conductances responsible for generating the action potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:458657

  19. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness.

  20. Identifying motor and sensory myelinated axons in rabbit peripheral nerves by histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Sanger, James R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Yousif, N. John; Bain, James L. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) histochemical staining of rabbit spinal nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia demonstrated that among the reactive myeliated axons, with minor exceptions, sensory axons were CA positive and CE negative whereas motor axons were CA negative and CE positive. The high specificity was achieved by adjusting reaction conditions to stain subpopulations of myelinated axons selectively while leaving 50 percent or so unstained. Fixation with glutaraldehyde appeared necessary for achieving selectivity. Following sciatic nerve transection, the reciprocal staining pattern persisted in damaged axons and their regenerating processes which formed neuromas within the proximal nerve stump. Within the neuromas, CA-stained sensory processes were elaborated earlier and in greater numbers than CE-stained regenerating motor processes. The present results indicate that histochemical axon typing can be exploited to reveal heterogeneous responses of motor and sensory axons to injury.

  1. White matter atrophy and myelinated fiber disruption in a rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jing; Tang, Jing; Liang, Xin; Huang, Chun-Xia; Wang, San-Rong; Chen, Lin-Mu; Wang, Fei-Fei; Tan, Chuan-Xue; Chao, Feng-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Luo, Yan-Min; Xiao, Qian; Du, Lian; Xiao, Qian; Tang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Brain imaging and postmortem studies have indicated that white matter abnormalities may contribute to the pathology and pathogenesis of depression. However, until now, no study has quantitatively investigated white matter changes in depression in rats. The current study used the chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model of depression. Body weight and sucrose preference test (SPT) scores were assessed weekly. Upon successfully establishing the CUS animal model, all animals were tested using the SPT and the open field test (OFT). Then, transmission electron microscopy and unbiased stereological methods were used to investigate white matter changes in the rats. Compared with the control group, the body weight and sucrose preference of the CUS rats were significantly decreased (p < .001, p < .001, respectively). In the OFT, the total time spent and the total distance traveled in the inner area by the CUS rats were significantly lower than those of the control group (p = .002, p = .001, respectively). The stereological results revealed that white matter volume, the total volume, and the total length and mean diameter of myelinated fibers in the white matter of the CUS rats were significantly decreased compared to the control rats (p = .042, p = .038, p = .035, p = .019, respectively). The results of this study suggested that white matter atrophy and disruption of myelinated fibers in the white matter may contribute to the pathophysiology underlying depression, which might provide new targets for the development of novel therapeutic interventions for depression.

  2. Mutation analysis of the nerve specific promoter of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene in CMT1 disease and HNPP.

    PubMed

    Nelis, E; De Jonghe, P; De Vriendt, E; Patel, P I; Martin, J J; Van Broeckhoven, C

    1998-07-01

    We analysed the nerve specific promoter of the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene (PMP22) in a set of 15 unrelated patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease (CMT1) and 16 unrelated patients with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). In these patients no duplication/deletion nor a mutation in the coding region of the CMT1/ HNPP genes was detected. In one autosomal dominant CMT1 patient, we identified a base change in the non-coding exon 1A of PMP22 which, however, did not cosegregate with the disease in the family. This study indicates that mutations in the nerve specific PMP22 promoter and 5' untranslated exon will not be a common genetic cause of CMT1A and HNPP.

  3. Concentration of astrocytic filaments at the retinal optic nerve junction is coincident with the absence of intra-retinal myelination: comparative and developmental evidence.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Y; Chan-Ling, T

    2000-09-01

    The structure of the lamina cribrosa (LC) and astrocytic density were examined in various species with and without intra-retinal myelination. Sections of optic nerve from various species were stained with Milligan's trichrome or antibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin basic protein (MBP) and antibody O4. Marmoset, flying fox, cat, and sheep, which lack intraretinal myelination, were shown to possess a well-developed LC as well as a marked concentration of astrocytic filaments distal to the LC. Rat and mouse, which lack intraretinal myelination, lacked a well-developed LC but exhibited a marked concentration of astrocytic filaments in this region. Rabbit and chicken, which exhibit intraretinal myelination, lacked both a well-developed LC and a concentration of astrocytes at the retinal optic nerve junction (ROJ). A marked concentration of astrocytes at the ROJ of human fetuses was also apparent at 13 weeks of gestation, prior to myelination of the optic nerve; in contrast, the LC was not fully developed even at birth. This concentration of astrocytes was located distal to O4 and MBP immunoreactivity in human optic nerve, and coincided with the site of initial myelination of ganglion cell axons in marmoset and rat. Myelination proceeded from the chiasm towards the retinal end of the human optic nerve. Moreover, the outer limit of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) migration into the rabbit retina was restricted by the outer limit of astrocyte spread. These observations indicate that a concentration of astrocytic filaments at the ROJ is coincident with the absence of intraretinal myelination. Differential expression of tenascin-C by astrocytes at the ROJ appears to contribute to the molecular barrier to OPC migration (see Bartsch et al., 1994), while expression of the homedomain protein Vax 1 by glial cells at the optic nerve head appears to inhibit migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells into the optic nerve (see Bertuzzi et al., 1999). These

  4. Metanx Alleviates Multiple Manifestations of Peripheral Neuropathy and Increases Intraepidermal Nerve Fiber Density in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shevalye, Hanna; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Dyukova, Elena; Lupachyk, Sergey; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2012-01-01

    Metanx is a product containing l-methylfolate, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate, and methylcobalamin for management of endothelial dysfunction. Metanx ingredients counteract endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and oxidative stress in vascular endothelium and peripheral nerve. This study evaluates Metanx on diabetic peripheral neuropathy in ZDF rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. Metanx was administered to 15-week-old ZDF and ZDF lean rats at either 4.87 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ day−1 (a body weight–based equivalent of human dose) or 24.35 mg ⋅ kg−1 ⋅ day−1 by oral gavage two times a day for 4 weeks. Both doses alleviated hind limb digital sensory, but not sciatic motor, nerve conduction slowing and thermal and mechanical hypoalgesia in the absence of any reduction of hyperglycemia. Low-dose Metanx increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density but did not prevent morphometric changes in distal tibial nerve myelinated fibers. Metanx treatment counteracted endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, inducible nitric oxide synthase upregulation, and methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end product, nitrotyrosine, and nitrite/nitrate accumulation in the peripheral nerve. In conclusion, Metanx, at a body weight–based equivalent of human dose, increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density and improved multiple parameters of peripheral nerve function in ZDF rats. Clinical studies are needed to determine if Metanx finds use in management of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22751692

  5. Antibody responses to peptides of peripheral nerve myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, H R; Csurhes, P A; McCombe, P A

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibodies with reactivity to peripheral nerve myelin have previously been found in the serum, and bound to peripheral nerves of patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). Aim To investigate the presence of antibodies reactive to specific peptide sequences within the myelin proteins P0 and P2 in patients with GBS, in patients with CIDP, in healthy controls and in patients with other neuropathies (ON). Methods Blood was obtained from 48 patients with GBS, 36 with CIDP, 48 with ON and 38 controls. ELISA was used to detect antibody responses to peptides of the human peripheral myelin proteins P0 and P2. Blood samples were collected from patients with GBS in early, peak and recovery stages of GBS to analyse antibody levels throughout the course of the disease. Results Significantly increased total IgG levels were found in patients with GBS compared with other groups. A higher percentage of patients with GBS at the peak of disease had antibody reactivity to P214–25 compared with patients with CIDP and control groups. In patients with GBS and CIDP, the percentages of patients with antibody reactivity to P261–70, and peptides derived from P0, were comparable to the control groups. Although some individual patients with GBS had high titres of reactivity to the peptide antigens tested, most patients with GBS and CIDP had levels of antibody similar to controls. Conclusion Our data suggest that increased IgG levels and increased antibody reactivity to P2 14–25 in patients with GBS at the peak of disease may play a contributory role in the disease process in some patients with demyelinating forms of GBS. PMID:17158557

  6. Enriched environment increases myelinated fiber volume and length in brain white matter of 18-month female rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, De-shan; Tang, Yong

    2015-04-23

    Cognition and memory decline with normal aging, which could be partly attributed to the degeneration of brain white matter. Previous studies demonstrated that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) could protect cognition and memory from aging. However, if or how EE might affect the brain white matter has not been thoroughly investigated. In the current study, 24 middle-aged (14-month-old) female Sprague -Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned to EE or standard environment (SE) for 4 months. At the end of the environment intervention, the Morris water maze tests were performed. Then, 5 rats were randomly selected from each group for stereological assessment of the brain white matter and its myelinated fibers. The results revealed that middle-aged rats living in EE displayed better spatial learning than SE controls. The white matter volume was 124.6 ± 7.8mm(3) in EE rats, which was significantly enlarged compared with 84.8 ± 3.4mm(3) in SE rats. Likewise, the myelinated fiber volume was markedly increased from 56.6 ± 1.7 mm(3) in SE rats to 87.2 ± 9.0mm(3) in EE rats; so was the myelinated fiber length from 83.5 ± 6.6 km in SE rats to 119.0 ± 10.0 km in EE rats. Our data suggested that EE could protect brain white matter and its myelinated fibers of female rats at middle age.

  7. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  8. Conductance fluctuations from the inactivation process of sodium channels in myelinated nerve fibres*

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F.; Neumcke, B.; Nonner, W.; Stämpfli, R.

    1980-01-01

    1. Na currents and fluctuations of Na currents were studied under voltage clamp in the same myelinated nerve fibres of Rana esculenta at 13 °C. The results were used to test several kinetic models for the gating process of Na channels. 2. Long voltage pulses, depolarizing the membrane by 16-48 mV from a hyperpolarizing holding level of — 28 mV, were applied in 4 sec intervals. The d.c. and a.c. components of the membrane current were recorded during the last 328 msec of the 473 msec pulses. For each depolarization, ninety-six trials were made with the node in Ringer solution and, again, after adding 300 nm-tetrodotoxin (TTX) in that solution. 3. The TTX-sensitive d.c. component declined during the 328 msec records by 14-51% of its time average. The a.c. component was corrected for this trend by subtracting the first from the second of each pair of subsequent records. The TTX-sensitive part of its variance declined, on the average, in parallel to the current, as if the open probability rather than the conductance of the individual Na channels was reduced by a slow process. 4. Single-channel conductances, γ, were calculated on the assumption that Na channels have only one non-zero conductance and were corrected for the limited band width (5 kHz) of the a.c. records. Values of γ increased slightly (< 30% from 16 to 40 mV), and averaged 8·85 ± 0·7 pS (s.e. of mean, seventeen measurements on ten fibres). This small degree of change in γ suggests that deviations from the all-or-none gating are very small. 5. Power spectral densities of the fluctuations between 3 Hz and 5 kHz were calculated from the trend-free a.c. records and corrected for the TTX-insensitive noise component. Control calculations showed that the only effect of the nonstationarity in the Na current was to enhance the low-frequency points of such spectra by less than 10%. The spectra revealed at least two Lorentzian components with cut-off frequencies in the range expected from the activation and

  9. Shortened internodal length of dermal myelinated nerve fibres in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Katona, Istvan; Lewis, Richard A.; Masse, Stacey; Shy, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is the most common inherited neuropathy and is caused by duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 containing the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. This disease is characterized by uniform slowing of conduction velocities and secondary axonal loss, which are in contrast with non-uniform slowing of conduction velocities in acquired demyelinating disorders, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Mechanisms responsible for the slowed conduction velocities and axonal loss in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A are poorly understood, in part because of the difficulty in obtaining nerve samples from patients, due to the invasive nature of nerve biopsies. We have utilized glabrous skin biopsies, a minimally invasive procedure, to evaluate these issues systematically in patients with Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (n = 32), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 4) and healthy controls (n = 12). Morphology and molecular architecture of dermal myelinated nerve fibres were examined using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Internodal length was uniformly shortened in patients with Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, compared with those in normal controls (P < 0.0001). Segmental demyelination was absent in the Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A group, but identifiable in all patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Axonal loss was measurable using the density of Meissner corpuscles and associated with an accumulation of intra-axonal mitochondria. Our study demonstrates that skin biopsy can reveal pathological and molecular architectural changes that distinguish inherited from acquired demyelinating neuropathies. Uniformly shortened internodal length in Charcot–Marie-Tooth disease type 1A suggests a potential developmental defect of internodal lengthening. Intra-axonal accumulation of mitochondria provides new insights into the

  10. Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer in primate eyes.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-09-01

    Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer is studied in the eyes of three primate species. Measurements are made at various points throughout the fundus, including the peripapillary, arcuate, macular (area centralis), equatorial, and peripheral parts of the retina. Anatomic findings are compared with the clinical appearance of retinal light reflexes in these way. It is proposed that the nature of this light reflex is, in part, determined by the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  11. Gangliosides and Nogo receptors independently mediate myelin-associated glycoprotein inhibition of neurite outgrowth in different nerve cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Niraj R; Lopez, Pablo H H; Vyas, Alka A; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2007-09-21

    In the injured nervous system, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) on residual myelin binds to receptors on axons, inhibits axon outgrowth, and limits functional recovery. Conflicting reports identify gangliosides (GD1a and GT1b) and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Nogo receptors (NgRs) as exclusive axonal receptors for MAG. We used enzymes and pharmacological agents to distinguish the relative roles of gangliosides and NgRs in MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from three nerve cell types, dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs), cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), and hippocampal neurons. Primary rat neurons were cultured on control substrata and substrata adsorbed with full-length native MAG extracted from purified myelin. The receptors responsible for MAG inhibition of neurite outgrowth varied with nerve cell type. In DRGNs, most of the MAG inhibition was via NgRs, evidenced by reversal of inhibition by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), which cleaves glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors, or by NEP1-40, a peptide inhibitor of NgR. A smaller percentage of MAG inhibition of DRGN outgrowth was via gangliosides, evidenced by partial reversal by addition of sialidase to cleave GD1a and GT1b or by P4, an inhibitor of ganglioside biosynthesis. Combining either PI-PLC and sialidase or NEP1-40 and P4 was additive. In contrast to DRGNs, in CGNs MAG inhibition was exclusively via gangliosides, whereas inhibition of hippocampal neuron outgrowth was mostly reversed by sialidase or P4 and only modestly reversed by PI-PLC or NEP1-40 in a non-additive fashion. A soluble proteolytic fragment of native MAG, dMAG, also inhibited neurite outgrowth. In DRGNs, dMAG inhibition was exclusively NgR-dependent, whereas in CGNs it was exclusively ganglioside-dependent. An inhibitor of Rho kinase reversed MAG-mediated inhibition in all nerve cells, whereas a peptide inhibitor of the transducer p75(NTR) had cell-specific effects quantitatively similar to Ng

  12. Comparison of rabbit facial nerve regeneration in nerve growth factor-containing silicone tubes to that in autologous neural grafts.

    PubMed

    Spector, J G; Lee, P; Derby, A; Roufa, D G

    1995-11-01

    Previous reports suggest that nerve growth factor (NGF) enhanced nerve regeneration in rabbit facial nerves. We compared rabbit facial nerve regeneration in 10-mm silicone tubes prefilled with NGF or cytochrome C (Cyt C), bridging an 8-mm nerve gap, to regeneration of 8-mm autologous nerve grafts. Three weeks following implantation, NGF-treated regenerates exhibited a more mature fascicular organization and more extensive neovascularization than Cyt C-treated controls. Morphometric analysis at the middle of the tube of 3- and 5-week regenerates revealed no significant difference in the mean number of myelinated or unmyelinated axons between NGF- and Cyt C-treated implants. However, when the numbers of myelinated fibers in 5-week regenerates were compared to those in their respective preoperative controls, NGF-treated regenerates had recovered a significantly greater percentage of myelinated axons than Cyt C-treated implants (46% versus 18%, respectively). The number of regenerating myelinated axons in the autologous nerve grafts at 5 weeks was significantly greater than the number of myelinated axons in the silicone tubes. However, in the nerve grafts the majority of the axons were found in the extrafascicular connective tissue (66%). The majority of these myelinated fibers did not find their way into the distal nerve stump. Thus, although the number of regenerating myelinated axons within the nerve grafts is greater than that of axons within silicone tube implants, functional recovery of autologous nerve graft repairs may not be superior to that of intubational repairs.

  13. What Is the Optimal Value of the g-Ratio for Myelinated Fibers in the Rat CNS? A Theoretical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background The biological process underlying axonal myelination is complex and often prone to injury and disease. The ratio of the inner axonal diameter to the total outer diameter or g-ratio is widely utilized as a functional and structural index of optimal axonal myelination. Based on the speed of fiber conduction, Rushton was the first to derive a theoretical estimate of the optimal g-ratio of 0.6 [1]. This theoretical limit nicely explains the experimental data for myelinated axons obtained for some peripheral fibers but appears significantly lower than that found for CNS fibers. This is, however, hardly surprising given that in the CNS, axonal myelination must achieve multiple goals including reducing conduction delays, promoting conduction fidelity, lowering energy costs, and saving space. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we explore the notion that a balanced set-point can be achieved at a functional level as the micro-structure of individual axons becomes optimized, particularly for the central system where axons tend to be smaller and their myelin sheath thinner. We used an intuitive yet novel theoretical approach based on the fundamental biophysical properties describing axonal structure and function to show that an optimal g-ratio can be defined for the central nervous system (≈0.77). Furthermore, by reducing the influence of volume constraints on structural design by about 40%, this approach can also predict the g-ratio observed in some peripheral fibers (≈0.6). Conclusions/Significance These results support the notion of optimization theory in nervous system design and construction and may also help explain why the central and peripheral systems have evolved different g-ratios as a result of volume constraints. PMID:19915661

  14. Implications of olfactory lamina propria transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in rats with complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Lígia Aline; da Cunha Jaeger, Mariane; Ilha, Jocemar; de Souza, Marcelo Alves; Balbinot, Luciane Fachin; do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Marcuzzo, Simone; Achaval, Matilde

    2013-02-01

    Transplantation with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) has been adopted after several models of spinal cord injury (SCI) with the purpose of creating a favorable environment for the re-growth of injured axons. However, a consensus on the efficacy of this cellular transplantation has yet to be reached. In order to explore alternative parameters that could demonstrate the possible restorative properties of such grafts, the present study investigated the effects of olfactory lamina propria (OLP) transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in adult rats with complete spinal cord transection. The efficacy of OLP (graft containing OECs) and respiratory lamina propria (RLP, graft without OECs) was tested at different post-injury times (acutely, 2- and 4-week delayed), to establish the optimum period for transplantation. In the therapeutic windows used, OLP and RLP grafts produced no considerable improvements in withdrawal reflex responses or on the low-frequency dependent depression of H-reflex. Both lamina propria grafts produced comparable results for the myelinated fiber density and for the estimated total number of myelinated fibers at the lesion site, indicating that the delayed transplantation approach does not seem to limit the regenerative effects. However, animals transplanted with OLP 2 or 4 weeks after injury exhibit smaller myelin sheath thickness and myelinated fiber area and diameter at the lesion site compared to their respective RLP groups. Despite the ongoing clinical use of OECs, it is important to emphasize the need for more experimental studies to clarify the exact nature of the repair capacity of these grafts in the treatment of SCI.

  15. Polarization and Myelination in Myelinating Glia

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Myelinating glia, oligodendrocytes in central nervous system and Schwann cells in peripheral nervous system, form myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane system around axons enabling salutatory nerve impulse conduction and maintaining axonal integrity. Myelin sheath is a polarized structure localized in the axonal side and therefore is supposed to be formed based on the preceding polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, myelination process is closely associated with polarization of myelinating glia. However, cell polarization has been less extensively studied in myelinating glia than other cell types such as epithelial cells. The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide insights for the field of myelination research by applying the information obtained in polarity study in other cell types, especially epithelial cells, to cell polarization of myelinating glia. Thus, in this paper, the main aspects of cell polarization study in general are summarized. Then, they will be compared with polarization in oligodendrocytes. Finally, the achievements obtained in polarization study for epithelial cells, oligodendrocytes, and other types of cells will be translated into polarization/myelination process by Schwann cells. Then, based on this model, the perspectives in the study of Schwann cell polarization/myelination will be discussed. PMID:23326681

  16. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Rescue Optic Nerve Fibers in a Rat Glaucoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Khaw, Peng T.; Yin, Zheng Qin; Li, Daqing; Raisman, Geoffrey; Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) can reduce loss of optic nerve axons after raised intraocular pressure (IOP) in the rat. Methods: OECs cultured from the adult olfactory mucosa were transplanted into the region of the optic disc. The IOP was raised by injection of magnetic microspheres into the anterior chamber. Results: At 4 weeks after raising the IOP, the transplanted OECs had migrated into the dorsal area of the optic nerve head (ONH) where they surrounded the optic nerve fibers with a non-myelinated ensheathment. The mean amount of damage to the ONH astrocytic area in rats was 51.0% compared with 85.8% in those without OEC transplants (P < 0.02) and the mean loss of axons in the optic nerve was 51.0% compared with 80.3% in the absence of OECs (P < 0.01). Conclusions: OECs transplanted into the region of the ONH of the rat can reduce the loss of axons and the damage to ONH astrocytes caused by raised IOP. Translational Relevance: Confirmation of these preliminary experimental data, further understanding of possible mechanisms of axonal protection by OECs, and the longer-term time course of protection could provide a basis for future human clinical trials of autografted OECs, which would be available from autologous nasal epithelial biopsies. PMID:24049703

  17. Capsaicin Induces Degeneration of Cutaneous Autonomic Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of topical application of capsaicin on cutaneous autonomic nerves. Methods Thirty-two healthy subjects underwent occlusive application of 0.1% capsaicin cream (or placebo) for 48 hours. Subjects were followed for 6 months with serial assessments of sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function with simultaneous assessment of innervation through skin biopsies. Results There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function in capsaicin- treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Sensory function declined more rapidly than autonomic function; reaching a nadir by day 6 while autonomic function reached a nadir by day 16. There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory nerve fiber densities in capsaicin treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Intra-epidermal nerve fiber density declined maximally by 6 days while autonomic nerve fiber densities reached maximal degeneration by day 16. Conversely, autonomic nerves generally regenerated more rapidly than sensory nerves, requiring 40–50 days to return to baseline levels while sensory fibers required 140–150 days to return to baseline. Interpretation Topical capsaicin leads to degeneration of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor nerves accompanied by impairment of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor function. These results suggest the susceptibility and/or pathophysiologic mechanisms of nerve damage may differ between autonomic and sensory nerve fibers treated with capsaicin and enhances the capsaicin model for the study of disease modifying agents. The data suggest caution should be taken when topical capsaicin is applied to skin surfaces at risk for ulceration, particularly in neuropathic conditions characterized by sensory and autonomic impairment. PMID:21061393

  18. Direct determination of the lamellar structure of peripheral nerve myelin at moderate resolution (7A).

    PubMed

    Worthington, C R; McIntosh, T J

    1974-10-01

    Low-angle X-ray diffraction patterns have been recorded from normal nerve and nerve swollen in glycerol solutions. The new X-ray data have a resolution of 7 A. Direct methods of structure analysis which include deconvolution of the auto-correlation function and sampling theorem reconstructions have been used in the interpretation of the X-ray data. Phases have been assigned to the first 12 orders of diffraction from normal nerve. Fourier syntheses at a resolution of 7 A are described and an absolute electron density scale is derived. A possible molecular interpretation of the electron density profile is given.

  19. Molecular characterization of myelin protein zero in Xenopus laevis peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bo; Luo, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Cheng; Priest, Christina Marie; Chan, Shiu-Yung; O'Connor, Peter B.; Kirschner, Daniel A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2007-12-01

    Myelin protein zero (P0), a glycosylated single-pass transmembrane protein, is essential in the formation and maintenance of peripheral nervous system (PNS) compact myelin. P0 in Xenopus (xP0) exists primarily as a dimeric form that remains stable after various physical and chemical treatments. In exploring the nature of the interactions underlying the dimer stability, we found that xP0 dimer dissociated into monomer during continuous elution gel electrophoresis and conventional SDS-PAGE, indicating that the dimer is stabilized by non-covalent interactions. Furthermore, as some of the gel-purified monomer re-associated into dimer on SDS-PAGE gels, there is likely a dynamic equilibrium between xP0 dimer and monomer in vivo. Because the carbohydrate and fatty acyl moieties may be crucial for the adhesion role of P0, we used sensitive mass spectrometry approaches to elucidate the detailed N-glycosylation and S-acylation profiles of xP0. Asn92 was determined to be the single, fully-occupied glycosylation site of xP0, and a total of 12 glycans was detected that exhibited new structural features compared with those observed from P0 in other species: (1) the neutral glycans were composed mainly of high mannose and hybrid types; (2) 5 of 12 were acidic glycans, among which three were sialylated and the other two were sulfated; (3) none of the glycans had core fucosylation; and (4) no glucuronic acid, hence no HNK-1 epitope, was detected. The drastically different carbohydrate structures observed here support the concept of the species-specific variation in N-glycosylation of P0. Cys152 was found to be acylated with stearoyl (C18:0), whereas palmitoyl (C16:0) is the corresponding predominant fatty acyl group on P0 from higher vertebrates. We propose that the unique glycosylation and acylation patterns of Xenopus P0 may underlie its unusual dimerization behavior. Our results should shed light on the understanding of the phylogenetic development of P0's adhesion role in PNS

  20. Myelinated sensory and alpha motor axon regeneration in peripheral nerve neuromas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macias, M. Y.; Lehman, C. T.; Sanger, J. R.; Riley, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Histochemical staining for carbonic anhydrase and cholinesterase (CE) activities was used to analyze sensory and motor axon regeneration, respectively, during neuroma formation in transected and tube-encapsulated peripheral nerves. Median-ulnar and sciatic nerves in the rodent model permitted testing whether a 4 cm greater distance of the motor neuron soma from axotomy site or intrinsic differences between motor and sensory neurons influenced regeneration and neuroma formation 10, 30, and 90 days later. Ventral root radiculotomy confirmed that CE-stained axons were 97% alpha motor axons. Distance significantly delayed axon regeneration. When distance was negligible, sensory axons grew out sooner than motor axons, but motor axons regenerated to a greater quantity. These results indicate regeneration differences between axon subtypes and suggest more extensive branching of motor axons within the neuroma. Thus, both distance from injury site to soma and inherent motor and sensory differences should be considered in peripheral nerve repair strategies.

  1. Effect of optic nerve sheath fenestration for idiopathic intracranial hypertension on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Starks, Victoria; Gilliland, Grant; Vrcek, Ivan; Gilliland, Connor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether optic nerve sheath fenestration in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension was associated with improvement in visual field pattern deviation and optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer thickness.The records of 13 eyes of 11 patients who underwent optic nerve sheath fenestration were reviewed. The subjects were patients of a clinical practice in Dallas, Texas. Charts were reviewed for pre- and postoperative visual field pattern deviation (PD) and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL).PD and RNFL significantly improved after surgery. Average PD preoperatively was 8.51 DB and postoperatively was 4.80 DB (p = 0.0002). Average RNFL preoperatively was 113.63 and postoperatively was 102.70 (p = 0.01). The preoperative PD and RNFL did not correlate strongly.Our results demonstrate that PD and RNFL are improved after optic nerve sheath fenestration. The pre- and postoperative RNFL values were compared to the average RNFL value of healthy optic nerves obtained from the literature. Post-ONSF RNFL values were significantly closer to the normal value than preoperative. RNFL is an objective parameter for monitoring the optic nerve after optic nerve sheath fenestration. This study adds to the evidence that OCT RNFL may be an effective monitoring tool for patients with IIH and that it continues to be a useful parameter after ONSF.

  2. Autotaxin and lysophosphatidic acid1 receptor-mediated demyelination of dorsal root fibers by sciatic nerve injury and intrathecal lysophosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although neuropathic pain is frequently observed in demyelinating diseases such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis, the molecular basis for the relationship between demyelination and neuropathic pain behaviors is poorly understood. Previously, we found that lysophosphatidic acid receptor (LPA1) signaling initiates sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and demyelination. Results In the present study, we have demonstrated that sciatic nerve injury induces marked demyelination accompanied by myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) down-regulation and damage of Schwann cell partitioning of C-fiber-containing Remak bundles in the sciatic nerve and dorsal root, but not in the spinal nerve. Demyelination, MAG down-regulation and Remak bundle damage in the dorsal root were abolished in LPA1 receptor-deficient (Lpar1-/-) mice, but these alterations were not observed in sciatic nerve. However, LPA-induced demyelination in ex vivo experiments was observed in the sciatic nerve, spinal nerve and dorsal root, all which express LPA1 transcript and protein. Nerve injury-induced dorsal root demyelination was markedly attenuated in mice heterozygous for autotaxin (atx+/-), which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to LPA. Although the addition of LPC to ex vivo cultures of dorsal root fibers in the presence of recombinant ATX caused potent demyelination, it had no significant effect in the absence of ATX. On the other hand, intrathecal injection of LPC caused potent dorsal root demyelination, which was markedly attenuated or abolished in atx+/- or Lpar1-/- mice. Conclusions These results suggest that LPA, which is converted from LPC by ATX, activates LPA1 receptors and induces dorsal root demyelination following nerve injury, which causes neuropathic pain. PMID:21062487

  3. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  4. Distribution and fine structure of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Senba, E; Tohyama, M

    1989-07-03

    Distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRPI) nerve fibers and their fine structure were examined in the skin of rat foot pads using immunocytochemistry. The CGRPI fibers formed bundles in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Two types of single-stranded CGRPI fibers were seen to leave the fiber bundles: one was located along the blood vessels or around the eccrine sweat glands, while the other entered the epidermis directly or through the Meissner's corpuscles in the dermal papillae. CGRPI fibers in the epidermis were distributed widely and were occasionally associated with Merkel cells. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed that CGRPI fibers located around blood vessels, sweat glands, epidermal keratinocytes and Merkel cells, or in the Meissner's corpuscles did not form typical synaptic contacts with underlying cells, despite being varicose and filled with vesicles resembling synaptic ones. These findings suggested that the CGRP is released non-synaptically from these terminals to influence diffusely the organs surrounding the terminals. These cutaneous fibers seemed to originate from CGRPI neurons (both small type B cells and large type A cells) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), because injection of fast blue dye into the cutaneous nerve resulted in labeling of these CGRPI cells in the DRG and excision of the L3-L6 DRG resulted in the non-detection of cutaneous CGRPI fibers in the foot pads. Analysis of the composition of CGRPI fibers found in the rat skin has revealed that these are mostly unmyelinated. C-type fibers with some of them being thin myelinated fibers. This was true even of CGRPI fibers at the proximal end of peripheral neurites of the DRG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Specific Paucity of Unmyelinated C-Fibers in Cutaneous Peripheral Nerves of the African Naked-Mole Rat: Comparative Analysis Using Six Species of Bathyergidae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan S; Purfürst, Bettina; Grigoryan, Tamara; Park, Thomas J; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian peripheral nerves, unmyelinated C-fibers usually outnumber myelinated A-fibers. By using transmission electron microscopy, we recently showed that the saphenous nerve of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) has a C-fiber deficit manifested as a substantially lower C:A-fiber ratio compared with other mammals. Here we determined the uniqueness of this C-fiber deficit by performing a quantitative anatomical analysis of several peripheral nerves in five further members of the Bathyergidae mole-rat family: silvery (Heliophobius argenteocinereus), giant (Fukomys mechowii), Damaraland (Fukomys damarensis), Mashona (Fukomys darlingi), and Natal (Cryptomys hottentotus natalensis) mole-rats. In the largely cutaneous saphenous and sural nerves, the naked mole-rat had the lowest C:A-fiber ratio (∼1.5:1 compared with ∼3:1), whereas, in nerves innervating both skin and muscle (common peroneal and tibial) or just muscle (lateral/medial gastrocnemius), this pattern was mostly absent. We asked whether lack of hair follicles alone accounts for the C-fiber paucity by using as a model a mouse that loses virtually all its hair as a consequence of conditional deletion of the β-catenin gene in the skin. These β-catenin loss-of function mice (β-cat LOF mice) displayed only a mild decrease in C:A-fiber ratio compared with wild-type mice (4.42 compared with 3.81). We suggest that the selective cutaneous C-fiber deficit in the cutaneous nerves of naked mole-rats is unlikely to be due primarily to lack of skin hair follicles. Possible mechanisms contributing to this unique peripheral nerve anatomy are discussed. J. Comp. Neurol. 520:2785–2803, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22528859

  6. Effect of acclimation and fixation temperatures on the number of lamellae and periodicity of myelin in fibres of the optic nerve of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Matheson, D F; Roots, B I

    1988-01-01

    Previous findings from our laboratory have shown that the optic nerves of goldfish acclimated to different temperatures differ considerably in their glycerophospholipid composition. This paper describes changes in the morphology of the nerve with different acclimation and fixation temperatures. Optic nerves of 5 and 25 degrees C acclimated fish were excised and fixed at the temperature of acclimation, or at the reverse temperature, and the morphology observed by electron microscopy. Under all temperature conditions considered there is a statistically significant linear relationship between the radius of the axon and the number of myelin lamellae. However, the temperature of acclimation and fixation both influence the regression coefficients for this relationship, the higher the acclimation temperature the lower the coefficient and the higher the fixation temperature the higher the coefficient. The periodicity of the myelin also alters with these temperatures, being greater in the 25 degrees C fish than in the 5 degrees C ones. Myelin sheath thickness is also significantly greater in the 25 degrees C fish. These results are discussed in relation to observed changes in glycerophospholipid composition and conduction velocities.

  7. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  8. Regeneration of optic nerve fibers of adult mammals.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami

    2010-09-01

    The pathway from the retina to the brain in mammals provides a well-defined model system for investigation of not only surviving axotomy but also axonal regeneration of injured neurons. Here I introduce our recent works on axonal regeneration in the optic nerve (OpN) of adult cats. Fibers of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend beyond the crush site of OpN with injections of a macrophage stimulator (oxidized galectin-1) or a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-39983 or Y-27632) while axonal extension is blocked with injection of saline. Elongation of crushed optic fibers, however, is slowed after 2 weeks. Transplantation of peripheral nerve makes RGCs regenerate their transected axons into a graft but regenerated fibers extend only a few mm in the brain. Effectiveness of combination of the drugs and treatments has to be verified in future.

  9. Coding of signals in noise by amphibian auditory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Narins, P M

    1987-01-01

    Rate-level (R-L) functions derived for pure-tones and pure-tones in broadband noise were obtained for auditory nerve fibers in the treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui. Normalized R-L functions for low-frequency, low-threshold fibers exhibit a horizontal rightward shift in the presence of broadband background noise. The magnitude of this shift is directly proportional to the noise spectrum level, and inversely proportional to the fiber's threshold. R-L functions for mid- and high-frequency fibers also show a horizontal shift, but to a lesser degree, consistent with their elevated thresholds relative to the low-frequency fibers. The implications of these findings for the processing of biologically significant sounds in the high levels of background noise in the animal's natural habitat are considered.

  10. Adult skin-derived precursor Schwann cells exhibit superior myelination and regeneration supportive properties compared to chronically denervated nerve-derived Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjan; Sinha, Sarthak; Hagner, Andrew; Stykel, Morgan; Raharjo, Eko; Singh, Karun K; Midha, Rajiv; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Functional outcomes following delayed peripheral nerve repair are poor. Schwann cells (SCs) play key roles in supporting axonal regeneration and remyelination following nerve injury, thus understanding the impact of chronic denervation on SC function is critical toward developing therapies to enhance regeneration. To improve our understanding of SC function following acute versus chronic-denervation, we performed functional assays of SCs from adult rodent sciatic nerve with acute- (Day 5 post) or chronic-denervation (Day 56 post), versus embryonic nerves. We also compared Schwann cells derived from adult skin-derived precursors (aSKP-SCs) as an accessible, autologous alternative to supplement the distal (denervated) nerve. We found that acutely-injured SCs and aSKP-SCs exhibited superior proliferative capacity, promotion of neurite outgrowth and myelination of axons, both in vitro and following transplant into a sciatic nerve crush injury model, while chronically-denervated SCs were severely impaired. Acute injury caused re-activation of transcription factors associated with an immature and pro-myelinating SC state (Oct-6, cJun, Sox2, AP2α, cadherin-19), but was diminished with prolonged denervation in vivo and could not be rescued following expansion in vitro suggesting that this is a permanent deficiency. Interestingly, aSKP-SCs closely resembled acutely injured and embryonic SCs, exhibiting elevated expression of these same transcription factors. In summary, prolonged denervation resulted in SC deficiency in several functional parameters that may contribute to impaired regeneration. In contrast, aSKP-SCs closely resemble the regenerative attributes ascribed to acutely-denervated or embryonic SCs emphasizing their potential as an accessible and autologous source of glia cells to enhance nerve regeneration, particularly following delays to surgical repair.

  11. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Butera, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5-70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1-3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function.

  12. Colchicine reduces myelin thickness and axoplasm volume.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S E; Sloan, H E; Jones, L B; Oakley, B

    1983-06-16

    A Silastic cuff containing either colchicine (1% w/v) or no colchicine was placed around the lingual disorder tympani nerve of the Mongolian gerbil. After 3 days of exposure to colchicine, the mean period of the myelin sheaths was 23% less than the period observed in nerves treated with cuffs lacking colchicine, while the average number of lamellae was unaltered. At the same time colchicine reduced the volume of axoplasm by an average of 19%, an effect which was independent of fiber diameter.

  13. Selectivity of lingual nerve fibers to chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cell bodies of the lingual branch of the trigeminal nerve were localized in the trigeminal ganglion using extracellular recordings together with horseradish peroxidase labeling from the tongue. Individual lingual nerve fibers were characterized with regard to their conduction velocities, receptive fields, and response to thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimuli. Fibers were classified as C, A delta, A beta, cold, and warm. The chemical stimuli included NaCl, KCl, NH4Cl, CaCl2, menthol, nicotine, hexanol, and capsaicin. With increasing salt concentration the latency of the response decreased and the activity increased. The responses elicited by salts (to 2.5 M), but not nonpolar stimuli such as menthol, were reversibly inhibited by 3.5 mM of the tight junction blocker, LaCl3. These data suggest that salts diffuse into stratified squamous epithelia through tight junctions in the stratum corneum and stratum granulosum, whereupon they enter the extracellular space. 11 C fibers were identified and 5 were characterized as polymodal nociceptors. All of the C fibers were activated by one or more of the salts NaCl, KCl, or NH4Cl. Three C fibers were activated by nicotine (1 mM), but none were affected by CaCl2 (1 M), menthol (1 mM), or hexanol (50 mM). However, not all C fibers or even the subpopulation of polymodals were activated by the same salts or by nicotine. Thus, it appears that C fibers display differential responsiveness to chemical stimuli. A delta fibers also showed differential sensitivity to chemicals. Of the 35 characterized A delta mechanoreceptors, 8 responded to NaCl, 9 to KCl, 9 to NH4Cl, 0 to CaCl2, menthol, or hexanol, and 2 to nicotine. 8 of 9 of the cold fibers (characterized as A delta's) responded to menthol, none responded to nicotine, 8 of 16 were inhibited by hexanol, 9 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NH4Cl, 5 of 19 responded to 2.5 M KCl, and 1 of 19 responded to 2.5 M NaCl. In summary, lingual nerve fibers exhibit responsiveness to chemicals

  14. Long-term delivery of FGF-6 changes the fiber type and fatigability of muscle reinnervated from embryonic neurons transplanted into adult rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grumbles, Robert M; Casella, Gizelda T B; Rudinsky, Michelle J; Wood, Patrick M; Sesodia, Sanjay; Bent, Melissa; Thomas, Christine K

    2007-07-01

    Motoneuron death leads to muscle denervation and atrophy. Transplantation of embryonic neurons into peripheral nerves results in reinnervation and provides a strategy to rescue muscles from atrophy independent of neuron replacement in a damaged or diseased spinal cord. But the count of regenerating axons always exceeds the number of motor units in this model, so target-derived trophic factor levels may limit reinnervation. Our aim was to examine whether long-term infusion of fibroblast growth factor-6 (FGF-6) into denervated medial gastrocnemius muscles improved the function of muscles reinnervated from neurons transplanted into nerve of adult Fischer rats. Factor delivery (10 microg, 4 weeks) began after sciatic nerve transection. After a week of nerve degeneration, 1 million embryonic day 14-15 ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial stump as a neuron source. Ten weeks later, neurons that expressed motoneuron markers survived in the nerves. More myelinated axons were in nerves to saline-treated muscles than in FGF-6-treated muscles. However, each group showed comparable reductions in muscle fiber atrophy because of reinnervation. Mean reinnervated fiber area was 43%-51% of non-denervated fibers. Denervated fiber area averaged 11%. FGF-6-treated muscles were more fatigable than other reinnervated muscles but had stronger motor units and fewer type I fibers than did saline-treated muscles. FGF-6 thus influenced function by changing the type of fiber reinnervated by transplanted neurons. Deficits in FGF-6 may also contribute to the increase in type I fibers in muscles reinnervated from peripheral axons, suggesting that the effects of FGF-6 on fiber type are independent of the neuron source used for reinnervation.

  15. A dynamic X-ray diffraction study of anaesthesia action. Changes in myelin structure and electrical activity recorded simultaneously from frog sciatic nerves treated with n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Padrón, R; Mateu, L; Requena, J

    1980-11-04

    Changes induced in the structure and electrical activity of myelin were recorded simultaneously from frog sciatic nerves treated with n-alkanes. The results suggest that the effect of n-alkanes seems to be two-fold: (a) there is an initial reversible phase, in which a significant modification of the X-ray diffraction patterns, concomitant with the continuous fall of the action potential, is observed; (b) there is a final phase which is irreversible. This occurs some time after the complete abolition of the electrical activity. At this stage, further changes of the X-ray diffraction patterns are detected, the most significant of them being in the n-pentane-treated myelin, and consist of an increase in the membrane bilayer thickness.

  16. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor reverses inhibition by CNS myelin, promotes regeneration in the optic nerve, and suppresses expression of the TGFβ signaling protein Smad2

    PubMed Central

    Hannila, Sari S.; Siddiq, Mustafa M.; Carmel, Jason B.; Hou, Jianwei; Chaudhry, Nagarathnamma; Bradley, Peter M.J.; Hilaire, Melissa; Richman, Erica L.; Hart, Ronald P.; Filbin, Marie T.

    2013-01-01

    Following CNS injury, axonal regeneration is limited by myelin-associated inhibitors; however, this can be overcome through elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP, as occurs with conditioning lesions of the sciatic nerve. This study reports that expression of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is strongly upregulated in response to elevation of cyclic AMP. We also show that SLPI can overcome inhibition by CNS myelin and significantly enhance regeneration of transected retinal ganglion cell axons in rats. Furthermore, regeneration of dorsal column axons does not occur after a conditioning lesion in SLPI null mutant mice, indicating that expression of SLPI is required for the conditioning lesion effect. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SLPI localizes to the nuclei of neurons, binds to the Smad2 promoter, and reduces levels of Smad2 protein. Adenoviral overexpression of Smad2 also blocked SLPI-induced axonal regeneration. SLPI and Smad2 may therefore represent new targets for therapeutic intervention in CNS injury. PMID:23516280

  17. Electrochemical Skin Conductance Correlates with Skin Nerve Fiber Density

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) using reverse iontophoresis and chronoamperometry has been used to evaluate abnormal function of small fibers. How ESC correlates with loss of small fibers in skin is unclear. Methods: This was a prospective, blinded study. The primary outcome measure was the correlation between ESC at the feet and results of skin biopsies including epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) and sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) at the distal leg. ESC, ENFD, and SGNFD data were normalized by adjusting for weight. The secondary outcome measures were the correlation between ESC and the following variables: quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) and symptom scales (neuropathy, pain and autonomic). Results: Eighty-one patients (mean ± sd): age = 53.3 ± 17.3, men/women = 25/56 were enrolled in the study. ESC was reduced in subjects with abnormally low ENFD (ENFD normal/abnormal, ESC = 1.17 ± 0.27/0.87 ± 0.34 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0008) and abnormally low SGNFD (SGNFD normal/abnormal ESC = 1.09 ± 0.34/0.78 ± 0.3 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0003). ESC correlated with ENFD (ρ = 0.73, p = 0.0001) and SGNFD (ρ = 0.64, p = 0.0001). ESC did not correlate with symptom scales. Conclusion: ESC is diminished in subjects who have a reduced number of small fibers in the skin and the ESC reduction is proportional to ENFD and SGNFD. ESC can be useful in detecting loss of small nerve fibers. PMID:27605912

  18. Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Patients with Idiopathic Optic Perineuritis using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Ik Soo; Jung, Jae Ho; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Seo, Je Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Hee-Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess the effect of idiopathic Optic perineuritis on the retinal nerve fiber layer, and determine the ability of optical coherence tomography to evaluate retinal nerve fiber loss after idiopathic Optic perineuritis. Four patients were assessed in this study. In all cases, average retinal nerve fiber layer was significantly thinner in the affected eye in comparison with the normal reference value and with the value for the contralateral normal eye at 12 months after the onset of optic perineuritis. Our study revealed that retinal nerve fiber layer loss occurs in idiopathic optic nerve sheath inflammation. PMID:27928329

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    fiber count, nerve cross-sectional area, myelin thickness , axonal diameter, and fiber diameter. Figure 10: Transverse nerve section stained with...tetroxide, and embedded in resin. Five micrometer thick cross-sections were cut and stained with toluidine blue for examination using light microscopy...image-analysis system linked to morphometric software (Image-Pro Plus, Bethedsda, MD). Using binary image analysis, we will measure the myelinated

  20. Damage and repair of the peripheral myelin sheath and node of Ranvier after treatment with trypsin.

    PubMed

    Yu, R C; Bunge, R P

    1975-01-01

    Cultures of whole fetal rat sensory ganglia which had matured and myelinated in culture were treated for 1-3 h with a pulse of 0.2% trypsin. The tissue was observed during the period of treatment and during subsequent weeks using both light and electron microscopy. Within minutes after trypsin addition the matrix of the culture was altered and the nerve fascicles loosened. Progressive changes included the retraction of Schwann cell processes from the nodal region the detachment of the myelin-related paranodal Schwann cell loops from the axon, and lengthening of the nodal region as the axon was bared. The retraction of myelin from nodal stabilized several hours after trypsin withdrawal. Breakdown of the altered myelin segments was rare. There were no discernable changes in neurons or their processes after this exposure to trypsin. The partial repair which occured over a period of several weeks included the reattachment of paranodal Schwann cell loops to the axolemma and the insertion of new myelin segments where a substantial length of axolemma had been bared. The significance of these observations to the characterization of the Schwann cell-axolemmal junctions on myelinated nerve fibers is discussed. The dramatic degree of myelin change that can occur without concomitant myelin breakdown is particularly noted, as is the observation that these altered myelin segments are, in part, repaired.

  1. Pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat epiglottis and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Yujiro; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ishida, Hiroko; Oikawa, Miho; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2011-12-20

    The distribution of pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive (PACAP-IR) nerve fibers was studied in the rat epiglottis and pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant on the laryngeal side of the epiglottis and in the dorsal and lateral border region between naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were also detected in taste buds within the epiglottis and pharynx. In addition, many PACAP-IR nerve fibers were found around acinar cells and blood vessels. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that distribution of PACAP-IR nerve fibers was similar to that in CGRP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud. However, distributions of PACAP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibers innervating mucous glands and blood vessels were different. The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that PACAP and CGRP were co-expressed by vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons innervating the pharynx. These findings suggest that PACAP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud of the epiglottis and pharynx which originate from the vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory ganglia include nociceptors and chemoreceptors. The origin of PACAP-IR nerve fibers which innervate mucous glands and blood vessels may be the autonomic ganglion.

  2. Nerve guidance conduits from aligned nanofibers: improvement of nerve regeneration through longitudinal nanogrooves on a fiber surface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Ouyang, Yuanming; Niu, Haitao; He, Nanfei; Ke, Qinfei; Jin, Xiangyu; Li, Dawei; Fang, Jun; Liu, Wanjun; Fan, Cunyi; Lin, Tong

    2015-04-08

    A novel fibrous conduit consisting of well-aligned nanofibers with longitudinal nanogrooves on the fiber surface was prepared by electrospinning and was subjected to an in vivo nerve regeneration study on rats using a sciatic nerve injury model. For comparison, a fibrous conduit having a similar fiber alignment structure without surface groove and an autograft were also conducted in the same test. The electrophysiological, walking track, gastrocnemius muscle, triple-immunofluorescence, and immunohistological analyses indicated that grooved fibers effectively improved sciatic nerve regeneration. This is mainly attributed to the highly ordered secondary structure formed by surface grooves and an increase in the specific surface area. Fibrous conduits made of longitudinally aligned nanofibers with longitudinal nanogrooves on the fiber surface may offer a new nerve guidance conduit for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration.

  3. Central projections of auditory nerve fibers in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Carr, C E; Boudreau, R E

    1991-12-08

    The central projections of the auditory nerve were examined in the barn owl. Each auditory nerve fiber enters the brain and divides to terminate in both the cochlear nucleus angularis and the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis. This division parallels a functional division into intensity and time coding in the auditory system. The lateral branch of the auditory nerve innervates the nucleus angularis and gives rise to a major and a minor terminal field. The terminals range in size and shape from small boutons to large irregular boutons with thorn-like appendages. The medial branch of the auditory nerve conveys phase information to the cells of the nucleus magnocellularis via large axosomatic endings or end bulbs of Held. Each medial branch divides to form 3-6 end bulbs along the rostrocaudal orientation of a single tonotopic band, and each magnocellular neuron receives 1-4 end bulbs. The end bulb envelops the postsynaptic cell body and forms large numbers of synapses. The auditory nerve profiles contain round clear vesicles and form punctate asymmetric synapses on both somatic spines and the cell body.

  4. Reconstruction of nerve root sheaths for sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Zhendong; Wu, Haibo; Yen, Ruyu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Liu, Isabelle Yisha

    2013-11-01

    This study analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts with spinal nerve root fibers treated by reconstruction of the nerve root sheaths. The relationships between the cysts and spinal nerve root fibers were examined microscopically, the cysts were partially excised, and the defects were oversewn to reconstruct the nerve root sheaths. The Improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function. Thirty-eight patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 41.4 ± 15.57 years. The mean IJOA score was 18.8 ± 1.32 preoperatively and 19.6 ± 0.65 postoperatively, which was a significant difference (t=-3.77, P=0.001). These results indicate a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. The most significant improvement in neurological function was sensation (z=-2.86, P=0.004), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.31, P=0.02).

  5. Sex differences in morphometric aspects of the peripheral nerves and related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shogo; Inoue, Yuriko; Itoh, Masahiro; Otsuka, Naruhito

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The elucidation of the relationship between the morphology of the peripheral nerves and the diseases would be valuable in developing new medical treatments on the assumption that characteristics of the peripheral nerves in females are different from those in males. METHODS: We used 13 kinds of the peripheral nerve. The materials were obtained from 10 Japanese female and male cadavers. We performed a morphometric analysis of nerve fibers. We estimated the total number of myelinated axons, and calculated the average transverse area and average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the peripheral nerves. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in the total number, average transverse area, or average circularity ratio of myelinated axons between the female and male specimens except for the total number of myelinated axons in the vestibular nerve and the average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the vagus nerve. CONCLUSIONS: The lower number of myelinated axons in the female vestibular nerve may be one of the reasons why vestibular disorders have a female preponderance. Moreover, the higher average circularity ratio of myelinated axons in the male vagus nerve may be one reason why vagus nerve activity to modulate pain has a male preponderance. PMID:27589511

  6. [The dynamics of reparative regeneration of the rat skin nerve after various degree of its damage].

    PubMed

    Arkhipova, E G; Greten, A G; Krylov, V N

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of skin nerve regeneration was studied during 10-50 days after it was damaged by crushing in 163 outbred rats. Two series of experiments were conducted. In the first series, skin nerve (n. saphenus) was crushed by a hemostatic clamp in a region 2 mm long, while in second series it was crushed in a region of 4 mm length. The destructive processes in LIII and LIV spinal ganglia, the increase in the number of myelinated nerve fibers in the nerve region distal to the damaged area, the velocities of growth of damaged nerve fibers to the skin, were similar in both series during 10-50 days after the nerve was injured at different length. The velocity of myelination of regenerating nerve fibers in rats after 2 mm-long nerve injury was higher than that in animals after 4 mm-long nerve injury for a period of 30 days after the damage.

  7. The distribution of galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat pharynx.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Sato, Tadasu; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Galanin (GAL) consists of a chain of 29/30 amino acids which is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, the distribution of GAL-immunoreactive (-IR) nerve fibers was examined in the rat pharynx and its adjacent regions. GAL-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the epithelium and taste bud-like structure of the pharynx, epiglottis, soft palate and larynx. These nerve fibers were abundant in the laryngeal part of the pharynx, and were rare in other regions. Mucous glands were mostly devoid of GAL-IR nerve fibers. In the musculature of pharyngeal constrictor muscles, many GAL-IR nerve fibers were also located around small blood vessels. However, intrinsic laryngeal muscles contained only a few GAL-IR nerve fibers. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that the distribution pattern of GAL-IR nerve fibers was partly similar to that of calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR nerve fibers in the pharyngeal mucosa and muscles. The present findings suggest that the pharynx is one of main targets of GAL-containing nerves in the upper digestive and respiratory systems. These nerves may have sensory and autonomic origins.

  8. Nerve growth factor induces sensitization of nociceptors without evidence for increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Michael; Rukwied, Roman; Gromann, Alois; Turnquist, Brian; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Francke, Klaus; Albrecht, Philip; Rice, Frank; Hägglöf, Björn; Ringkamp, Matthias; Engelhardt, Maren; Schultz, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Obreja, Otilia

    2013-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in the long-term sensitization of nociceptive processing linked to chronic pain. Functional and structural ("sprouting") changes can contribute. Thus, humans report long-lasting hyperalgesia to mechanical and electrical stimulation after intradermal NGF injection and NGF-induced sprouting has been reported to underlie cancer bone pain and visceral pain. Using a human-like animal model we investigated the relationship between the structure and function of unmyelinated porcine nociceptors 3 weeks after intradermal NGF treatment. Axonal and sensory characteristics were studied by in vivo single-fiber electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry. C fibers recorded extracellularly were classified based on mechanical response and activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of conduction velocity. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities were assessed by immunohistochemistry in pigs and in human volunteers using the same NGF model. NGF increased conduction velocity and reduced ADS and propagation failure in mechano-insensitive nociceptors. The proportion of mechano-sensitive C nociceptors within NGF-treated skin areas increased from 45.1% (control) to 71% and their median mechanical thresholds decreased from 40 to 20 mN. After NGF application, the mechanical receptive fields of nociceptors increased from 25 to 43 mm(2). At the structural level, however, IENF density was not increased by NGF. In conclusion, intradermal NGF induces long-lasting axonal and mechanical sensitization in porcine C nociceptors that corresponds to hyperalgesia observed in humans. Sensitization is not accompanied by increased IENF density, suggesting that NGF-induced hyperalgesia might not depend on changes in nerve fiber density but could be linked to the recruitment of previously silent nociceptors.

  9. Reproducibility in Nerve Morphometry: Comparison between Methods and among Observers

    PubMed Central

    Bilego Neto, Antônio Paulo da Costa; Silveira, Fernando Braga Cassiano; Rodrigues da Silva, Greice Anne; Sanada, Luciana Sayuri; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the reproducibility of a semiautomated method (computerized with manual intervention) for nerve morphometry (counting and measuring myelinated fibers) between three observers with different levels of expertise and experience with the method. Comparisons between automatic (fully computerized) and semiautomated morphometric methods performed by the same computer software using the same nerve images were also performed. Sural nerves of normal adult rats were used. Automatic and semiautomated morphometry of the myelinated fibers were made through the computer software KS-400. Semiautomated morphometry was conducted by three independent observers on the same images, using the semiautomated method. Automatic morphometry overestimated the myelin sheath area, thus overestimating the myelinated fiber size and underestimating the axon size. Fiber distributions overestimation was of 0.5 μm. For the semiautomated morphometry, no differences were found between observers for myelinated fiber and axon size distributions. Overestimation of the myelin sheath size of normal fibers by the fully automatic method might have an impact when morphometry is used for diagnostic purposes. We suggest that not only semiautomated morphometry results can be compared between different centers in clinical trials but it can also be performed by more than one investigator in one single experiment, being a reliable and reproducible method. PMID:23841086

  10. Peptide Mimetic of the S100A4 Protein Modulates Peripheral Nerve Regeneration and Attenuates the Progression of Neuropathy in Myelin Protein P0 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Mihai; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Dmytriyeva, Oksana; Pankratova, Stanislava; Fugleholm, Kåre; Klingelhofer, Jorg; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir; Krarup, Christian; Kiryushko, Darya

    2013-01-01

    We recently found that S100A4, a member of the multifunctional S100 protein family, protects neurons in the injured brain and identified two sequence motifs in S100A4 mediating its neurotrophic effect. Synthetic peptides encompassing these motifs stimulated neuritogenesis and survival in vitro and mimicked the S100A4-induced neuroprotection in brain trauma. Here, we investigated a possible function of S100A4 and its mimetics in the pathologies of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We found that S100A4 was expressed in the injured PNS and that its peptide mimetic (H3) affected the regeneration and survival of myelinated axons. H3 accelerated electrophysiological, behavioral and morphological recovery after sciatic nerve crush while transiently delaying regeneration after sciatic nerve transection and repair. On the basis of the finding that both S100A4 and H3 increased neurite branching in vitro, these effects were attributed to the modulatory effect of H3 on initial axonal sprouting. In contrast to the modest effect of H3 on the time course of regeneration, H3 had a long-term neuroprotective effect in the myelin protein P0 null mice, a model of dysmyelinating neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease), where the peptide attenuated the deterioration of nerve conduction, demyelination and axonal loss. From these results, S100A4 mimetics emerge as a possible means to enhance axonal sprouting and survival, especially in the context of demyelinating neuropathies with secondary axonal loss, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 disease. Moreover, our data suggest that S100A4 is a neuroprotectant in PNS and that other S100 proteins, sharing high homology in the H3 motif, may have important functions in PNS pathologies. PMID:23508572

  11. Changes in the Distribution of Periodontal Nerve Fibers during Dentition Transition in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Miki, Koji; Honma, Shiho; Ebara, Satomi; Kumamoto, Kenzo; Murakami, Shinya; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament has a rich sensory nerve supply which originates from the trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. Although various types of mechanoreceptors have been reported in the periodontal ligament, the Ruffini ending is an essential one. It is unknown whether the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous teeth is identical to that in permanent teeth or not. Moreover, morphological changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers during resorption of deciduous teeth and eruption of successional permanent teeth in diphyodont animals have not been reported in detail. Therefore, in this study, we examined changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in the cat during changes in dentition (i.e., deciduous, mixed and permanent dentition) by immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5. During deciduous dentition, periodontal nerve fibers were concentrated at the apical portion, and sparsely distributed in the periodontal ligament of deciduous molars. During mixed dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of deciduous molars showed degenerative profiles during resorption. In permanent dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent premolars, the successors of deciduous molars, increased in number. Similar to permanent premolars, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent molars, having no predecessors, increased in number, and were densely present in the apical portion. The present results indicate that the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition is almost identical to that in permanent dentition although the number of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition was low. The sparse distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition agrees with clinical evidence that children are less sensitive to tooth stimulation than adults.

  12. Microvessel basement membrane reduplication is not associated with repeated nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baker, M K; Bourque, P; Dyck, P J

    1996-03-01

    To determine whether repeated nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration can induce reduplication of endoneurial microvessel basement membranes (BMs), typical of such conditions as diabetic polyneuropathy, electronmicrographs of endoneurial microvessels of rat peroneal and tibial nerves were studied in repeatedly crushed (10 x) sciatic nerves and compared to microvessels of sham-operated uncrushed nerves. On average, crushed nerves had 2.6, SE +/- 0.1 BMs, whereas control nerves had 2.7, SE +/- 0.1 (P > 0.05). Microvessel cellular components were significantly increased in both number and size in the crushed nerves. These nerves also demonstrated a trend to increased vessel numbers and density. These results are not in keeping with the hypothesis that BM reduplication of endoneurial microvessels is simply due to repeated fiber degeneration and regeneration.

  13. Ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence for single impulse initiation zones in vestibular macular nerve fibers of rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Chee, Oliver; Black, Samuel; Cutler, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Cupric ion-ferricyanide labeling methods and related ferrocyanide-stained tissues were used to locate the characterize, at the ultrastructural level, presumptive impulse initiation zones in the three types of vestibular macular nerve fibers. Large-diameter, M-type vestibular nerve fibers terminate in a calyx at the heminode, and labeling is coextensive with the base of the calyx. Intermediate, M/U-type nerve fibers have short, unmyelinated preterminal segments that sometimes bifurcate intamacularly, and small-diameter, U-type nerve fibers have long, unmyelinated preterminal axons and up to three branches. Preterminals of these nerve fibers display ultrastructural heterogeneity that is correlated with labeling patterns for sodium channels and/or associated polyanionic sites. They have a nodelike ultrastructure and label heavily from near the heminode to the base of the macula. Their intramacular branches, less organized ultrastructurally, label only slightly. Results indicate that vestibular nerve fibers have one impulse initiation zone, located near the heminode, that varies in length according to nerve fiber type. Structural heterogeneity may favor impulse conduction in the central direction, and length of the impulse initiation zone could influence nerve discharge patterns.

  14. Peptide therapy with pentadecapeptide BPC 157 in traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Gjurasin, Miroslav; Miklic, Pavle; Zupancic, Bozidar; Perovic, Darko; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Brcic, Luka; Kolenc, Danijela; Radic, Bozo; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    We focused on the healing of rat transected sciatic nerve and improvement made by stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg, 10ng/kg) applied shortly after injury (i) intraperitoneally/intragastrically/locally, at the site of anastomosis, or after (ii) non-anastomozed nerve tubing (7 mm nerve segment resected) directly into the tube. Improvement was shown clinically (autotomy), microscopically/morphometrically and functionally (EMG, one or two months post-injury, walking recovery (sciatic functional index (SFI)) at weekly intervals). BPC 157-rats exhibited faster axonal regeneration: histomorphometrically (improved presentation of neural fascicles, homogeneous regeneration pattern, increased density and size of regenerative fibers, existence of epineural and perineural regeneration, uniform target orientation of regenerative fibers, and higher proportion of neural vs. connective tissue, all fascicles in each nerve showed increased diameter of myelinated fibers, thickness of myelin sheet, number of myelinated fibers per area and myelinated fibers as a percentage of the nerve transected area and the increased blood vessels presentation), electrophysiologically (increased motor action potentials), functionally (improved SFI), the autotomy absent. Thus, BPC 157 markedly improved rat sciatic nerve healing.

  15. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  16. A Perturbation Based Decomposition of Compound-Evoked Potentials for Characterization of Nerve Fiber Size Distributions.

    PubMed

    Szlavik, Robert B

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of peripheral nerve fiber distributions, in terms of diameter or velocity, is of clinical significance because information associated with these distributions can be utilized in the differential diagnosis of peripheral neuropathies. Electro-diagnostic techniques can be applied to the investigation of peripheral neuropathies and can yield valuable diagnostic information while being minimally invasive. Nerve conduction velocity studies are single parameter tests that yield no detailed information regarding the characteristics of the population of nerve fibers that contribute to the compound-evoked potential. Decomposition of the compound-evoked potential, such that the velocity or diameter distribution of the contributing nerve fibers may be determined, is necessary if information regarding the population of contributing nerve fibers is to be ascertained from the electro-diagnostic study. In this work, a perturbation-based decomposition of compound-evoked potentials is proposed that facilitates determination of the fiber diameter distribution associated with the compound-evoked potential. The decomposition is based on representing the single fiber-evoked potential, associated with each diameter class, as being perturbed by contributions, of varying degree, from all the other diameter class single fiber-evoked potentials. The resultant estimator of the contributing nerve fiber diameter distribution is valid for relatively large separations in diameter classes. It is also useful in situations where the separation between diameter classes is small and the concomitant single fiber-evoked potentials are not orthogonal.

  17. Altered metabolic incorporation of fucose and leucine into PNS myelin of 25-week-old diabetic (C57BL/Ks (db/db)) mice: effects of untreated diabetes on nerve metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chez, M.G.; Peterson, R.G.

    1983-04-01

    Sciatic nerves of 25-week-old genetically diabetic (C57BL/Ks (db/db)) mice and their litter-mate controls were removed, and their metabolic incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose and (/sup 14/C)leucine into myelin was studied in vitro. Untreated diabetic animals showed significant increases (p less than 0.05) in the fucose/leucine incorporation into myelin when compared to values found for their litter-mates. These results correlated well with previous experiments performed on alloxan or streptozotocin-diabetic rats and thus show the in vitro incubation procedure to be a good indicator of altered metabolic conditions in peripheral nerves due to diabetes mellitus. The resulting ratio increases seen in diabetic animals is at variance with the decrease in ratios found in animals undergoing typical Wallerian degeneration. These results suggest that different metabolic processes operate in untreated diabetics than in normals or in those undergoing other degenerative nerve processes.

  18. Automatic morphometry of nerve histological sections.

    PubMed

    Romero, E; Cuisenaire, O; Denef, J F; Delbeke, J; Macq, B; Veraart, C

    2000-04-15

    A method for the automatic segmentation, recognition and measurement of neuronal myelinated fibers in nerve histological sections is presented. In this method, the fiber parameters i.e. perimeter, area, position of the fiber and myelin sheath thickness are automatically computed. Obliquity of the sections may be taken into account. First, the image is thresholded to provide a coarse classification between myelin and non-myelin pixels. Next, the resulting binary image is further simplified using connected morphological operators. By applying semantic rules to the zonal graph axon candidates are identified. Those are either isolated or still connected. Then, separation of connected fibers is performed by evaluating myelin sheath thickness around each candidate area with an Euclidean distance transformation. Finally, properties of each detected fiber are computed and false positives are removed. The accuracy of the method is assessed by evaluating missed detection, false positive ratio and comparing the results to the manual procedure with sampling. In the evaluated nerve surface, a 0.9% of false positives was found, along with 6.36% of missed detections. The resulting histograms show strong correlation with those obtained by manual measure. The noise introduced by this method is significantly lower than the intrinsic sampling variability. This automatic method constitutes an original tool for morphometrical analysis.

  19. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness profile in thyroid ophthalmopathy without optic nerve dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mugdha, Kumari; Kaur, Apjit; Sinha, Neha; Saxena, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness profile in patients of thyroid ophthalmopathy with no clinical signs of optic nerve dysfunction. METHODS A prospective, case-control, observational study conducted at a tertiary care centre. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients with eyelid retraction in association with any one of: biochemical thyroid dysfunction, exophthalmos, or extraocular muscle involvement; or thyroid dysfunction in association with either exophthalmos or extra-ocular muscle involvement; or a clinical activity score (CAS)>3/7. Two measurements of RNFL thickness were done for each eye, by Cirrus HD-optical coherence tomography 6mo apart. RESULTS Mean age of the sample was 38.75y (range 13-70y) with 18 males and 22 females. Average RNFL thickness at first visit was 92.06±12.44 µm, significantly lower than control group (101.28±6.64 µm) (P=0.0001). Thickness of inferior quadrant decreased from 118.2±21.27 µm to 115.0±22.27 µm after 6mo (P=0.02). There was no correlation between the change in CAS and RNFL thickness. CONCLUSION Decreased RNFL thickness is an important feature of thyroid orbitopathy, which is an inherent outcome of compressive optic neuropathy of any etiology. Subclinical RNFL damage continues in the absence of clinical activity of the disease. RNFL evaluation is essential in Grave's disease and active intervention may be warranted in the presence of significant damage. PMID:27990368

  20. A quantitative study of the facial nerve in mice prenatally exposed to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Suguru; Sasaki, Yasuo; Shiota, Kohei

    2003-03-01

    Pregnant ICR mice were given 20% ethanol intraperitoneally twice on day 13 of gestation and allowed to give birth to offspring. The offspring were killed at 56 days of age and the motor root of their facial nerve was examined histologically and morphometrically. The cross-sectional area of the facial nerve of mice prenatally exposed to ethanol was significantly smaller than that of the control mice. There was no significant difference in the total number of myelinated axons or the mean axonal diameter between control and ethanol-exposed mice, but the mean diameter of myelinated fibers (axon + myelin sheath) and the thickness of myelin sheath were significantly decreased in the treated group. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to ethanol disturbs myelination of the motor root of the facial nerve and may cause permanent neurological effects.

  1. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  2. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  3. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  4. Effects of metabolic syndrome on the ultrastructure of the femoral nerve in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Souza, Romeu; Gama, Eliane F; El-Razi Neto, Semaan; Maldonado, Diogo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the morphometry of the femoral nerve in aging rats with metabolic syndrome compared to controls. Systolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose were measured, and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in the femoral nerves were quantitatively assessed under electron microscopy. Aging rats exposed to a regimen of metabolic syndrome developed elevation of plasma glucose concentration, mild hypertension and polyneuropathy characterized by a decrease in myelin fiber area, axon diameter, myelin sheath thickness and myelin fiber loss in the femoral nerve. The histogram of size distribution for myelinated fibers and axons from the aging rats of the control group was bimodal. For aging MS animals, the histogram turned out to be unimodal. The ultrastructure of unmyelinated fibers and of Schwann cells in 18-month-old rats was well preserved. Granules of lipofuscin were seen in unmyelinated fiber axons of 18-month-old rats with MS. The damage percentage of the large myelinated fibers has increased significantly in 18-month-old and 18-month-old (MS) rats in relation to the controls. No significant difference was observed among the groups for the g-ratio. Comparing the three groups, the number of neurotubules and neurofilaments in myelinated fibers of 18-month-old rats with MS was significantly smaller than for the groups of 18-month-old and 14-month-old rats. The overall changes seen in the femoral nerve from aging rats seem minor compared to the changes in the aging rats with MS, suggesting that long-term MS accelerates the progressive modifications in peripheral nerves that develop in old age.

  5. Relationship between myelin sheath diameter and internodal length in axons of the anterior medullary velum of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Butt, A M; Berry, M

    1995-11-01

    Relations between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths were measured in whole mounts of osmium stained intact anterior medullary velum (AMV) from glutaraldehyde perfused adult rats. The AMV is a sheet of CNS tissue which roofs the IVth ventricle and contains fascicles of myelinated fibres which arise mainly from the nucleus of the IVth cranial nerve. These fibers displayed a broad range of myelin sheath external diameters and internodal lengths, from < 1-12 microns and 50-750 microns, respectively. Myelin sheath external diameter was a measurement of the axonal diameter plus the thickness of its myelin sheath, while internodal length was measured as the distance between consecutive nodes. There was a broadly linear relationship between myelin sheath diameters and internodal lengths, with the smaller diameter sheaths tending to have shorter internodes than the larger. However, the correlation was weak and for any given diameter myelin sheaths displayed considerable variation in their internodal lengths. The smallest diameter myelin sheaths, < 4 microns, consistently had shorter internodes than predicted by a linear regression and, in an analysis of consecutive internodes in single fibres, the slope was flattened in fibres with a diameter > 4 microns. Our results indicated that small and large calibre fibres may have different myelin sheath diameter-internodal length interrelations.

  6. Coding of stimulus location and intensity in populations of mechanosensitive nerve fibers of the raccoon: I. Single fiber response properties.

    PubMed

    Ray, R H; Doetsch, G S

    1990-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine and compare the receptive field (RF) characteristics and response properties of single mechanosensitive nerve fibers innervating the glabrous skin of the forepaw and hindpaw of the raccoon. The action potentials of 129 median nerve fibers and 61 posterior tibial nerve fibers were recorded in response to punctate mechanical stimuli varying in location and intensity. The stimuli were delivered to six standard test sites on digit 1 and the contiguous pads of each paw. Attempts were made to classify each fiber according to its rate of adaptation to sustained stimulation; the RF of each fiber was mapped using a standard series of stimulus intensities. The results indicated that the response properties of individual fibers were highly complex and depended on the location and intensity of stimulation. 1) The distributions of absolute threshold were not different for the median or tibial nerve fibers or for different classes of fibers based on adaptation rate. A distal to proximal increase in threshold was found for each paw, suggesting a corresponding gradient of sensitivity across the glabrous skin. 2) Threshold RF areas did not vary across either paw nor did they differ between the two paws. Suprathreshold RFs were quite large relative to expected tactile acuity and displayed complex features. 3) Response properties such as adaptation rate, on- and off-responses, were found to vary with both stimulus location and intensity. It was concluded that the responses of individual nerve fibers could not uniquely encode any stimulus parameter tested, and that the properties of single fibers could not account for apparent differences in tactile acuity across each paw or between the two paws.

  7. Automated Measurement of Nerve Fiber Density Using Line Intensity Scan Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanesan, Aaron; Ogura, Tatsuya; Lin, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of nerve fibers in peripheral and central nervous systems is important for the understanding of neuronal function, organization and pathological changes. However, current methods to quantify nerve fibers are resource-intensive and often provide an indirect measurement of nerve fiber density. Here, we describe an automated and efficient method for nerve fiber quantification, which we developed by making use of widely available software and analytical techniques, including Hessian-based feature extraction in NIH ImageJ and line intensity scan analysis. The combined use of these analytical tools through an automated routine enables reliable detection and quantification of nerve fibers from low magnification, non-uniformly labeled epifluorescence images. This allows for time-efficient determination of nerve density and also comparative analysis in large brain structures, such as hippocampus or between various regions of neural circuitry. Using this method, we have obtained accurate measurements of cholinergic fiber density in hippocampus and a large area of cortex in mouse brain sections immunolabeled with an antibody against the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). The density values are comparable among animals tested, showing a high degree of reproducibility. Because our method can be performed at relatively low cost and in large tissue sections where nerve fibers can be labeled by various antibodies or visualized by expression of reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein in transgenic mice, we expect our method to be broadly useful in both research and clinical investigation. To our knowledge, this is the first method to reliably quantify nerve fibers through a rapid and automated protocol. PMID:22613744

  8. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  9. Determination of electrode to nerve fiber distance and nerve conduction velocity through spectral analysis of the extracellular action potentials recorded from earthworm giant fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaoyu; Odoemene, Onyekachi; Yoshida, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Microneurography and the use of selective microelectrodes that can resolve single-unit nerve activity have become a tool to understand the coding within the nervous system and a clinical diagnostic tool to assess peripheral neural pathologies. Central to these techniques is the use of the differences in the shape of the extracellular action potential (AP) waveform to identify and discriminate units from one another. Theoretical modeling of the origins of these shape differences has shown that the position of the nerve fiber relative to the electrode and the conduction velocity of the unit contribute to these differences giving rise to the hypothesis that more information about the fiber and its relationship to the electrode could be extracted given further analysis of the AP waveform. This paper addresses this question by exploring the electrical coupling between the electrode and nerve fiber. Idealized models and the literature indicate that two parameters, the electrode-fiber distance and the unit conduction velocity, contribute to the amplitude of the extracellular AP detected by the electrode, which confounds the quantification of coupling using the spike amplitude alone. To resolve this, we develop a method that enables differential quantification of these two parameters using spectral analysis of the single-unit AP waveform and demonstrate that the two parameters could be effectively decoupled in an in vitro earthworm model. The method could open the way forward toward micro-scale in situ monitoring of the interaction of nerve fiber and neural interface.

  10. A polarization measurement method for the quantification of retardation in optic nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    The thickness measurement of the optic nerve fiber layer is one of the most important evaluations for carrying out glaucoma diagnosis. Because the optic nerve fiber layer has birefringence, the thickness can be measured by illuminating eye optics with circular polarized light and analyzing the elliptical rate of the detected polarized light reflected from the optic nerve fiber layer. In this method, the scattering light from the background and the retardation caused by the cornea disturbs the precise measurement. If the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization can be detected, we can eliminate numerically the influence of the background scattering and of the retardation caused by the cornea. Because the retardation process of the eye optics can be represented by a numerical equation using the retardation matrix of each component and also the nonpolarized background scattering light, it can be calculated by using the Stokes vector. We applied a polarization analysis system that can detect the Stokes vector onto the fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a micro phase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. With this simply constructed system, we can calculate the retardation caused only by the optic nerve fiber layer and it can predict the thickness of the optic nerve fiber layer. We report the method and the results graphically showing the retardation of the optic nerve fiber layer without the retardation of the cornea.

  11. Alpha-synuclein in cutaneous small nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Siepmann, Timo; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Despite progression in the development of pharmacological therapy, treatment of alpha synucleinopathies, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and some atypical parkinsonism syndromes, is still challenging. To date, our knowledge of the mechanisms whereby the pathological form of alpha-synuclein causes structural and functional damage to the nervous system is limited and, consequently, there is a lack of specific diagnostic tools to evaluate pathology in these patients and differentiate PD from other neurodegenerative proteinopathies. Recent studies indicated that alpha-synuclein deposition in cutaneous small nerve fibers assessed by skin biopsies might be a valid disease marker of PD and facilitate early differentiation of PD from atypical parkinsonism syndromes. This observation is relevant since early diagnosis may enable timely treatment and improve quality of life. However, challenges include the necessity of standardizing immunohistochemical analysis techniques and the identification of potential distinct patterns of intraneural alpha-synuclein deposition among synucleinopathies. In this perspective, we explore the scientific and clinical opportunities arising from alpha-synuclein assessment using skin biopsies. These include elucidation of the peripheral nervous system pathology of PD and other synucleinopathies, identification of novel targets to study response to neuroprotective treatment, and improvement of clinical management. Furthermore, we discuss future challenges in exploring the diagnostic value of skin biopsy assessment for alpha-synuclein deposition and implementing the technique in clinical practice. PMID:27822045

  12. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Amblyopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael X.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Tamkins, Susanna M.; Suh, Donny W.; Sala, Nicholas A.; Beck, Roy W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness of amblyopic and fellow eyes. We hypothesized that the RNFL of the amblyopic eye might be thinner. Design Prospective cross-sectional observational case series Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the peripapillary RNFL thickness of amblyopic and fellow eyes was performed in 37 patients age 7 to 12 years (mean 9.2 ± 1.5) with unilateral strabismic, anisometropic or combined mechanism amblyopia enrolled in a randomized treatment trial. Results Mean global RNFL thickness of the amblyopic and fellow eyes was 111.4 microns and 109.6 microns, respectively (mean difference = 1.8 microns thicker in the amblyopic eyes, 95% confidence interval -0.6 to +4.3 microns). The amblyopic eye was 8 or more microns thicker than the fellow eye in 9 patients (24%); the fellow eye was 8 or more microns thicker than the amblyopic eye in 2 patients (5%); and the difference was within test-retest variability (7 microns) in 26 patients (70%). Conclusions Our findings do not indicate that peripapillary RNFL thickness is thinner in eyes with moderate amblyopia compared with their fellow eyes. PMID:19327749

  13. Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Sobottka, Stephan B; Podlesek, Dino; Linn, Jennifer; Rieger, Bernhard; Juratli, Tareq A; Schackert, Gabriele; Kitzler, Hagen H

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE The depiction of cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is of great interest in skull base tumor surgery and DTI used with deterministic tracking methods has been reported previously. However, there are still no good methods usable for the elimination of noise from the resulting depictions. The authors have hypothesized that probabilistic tracking could lead to more accurate results, because it more efficiently extracts information from the underlying data. Moreover, the authors have adapted a previously described technique for noise elimination using gradual threshold increases to probabilistic tracking. To evaluate the utility of this new approach, a comparison is provided with this work between the gradual threshold increase method in probabilistic and deterministic tracking of CNs. METHODS Both tracking methods were used to depict CNs II, III, V, and the VII+VIII bundle. Depiction of 240 CNs was attempted with each of the above methods in 30 healthy subjects, which were obtained from 2 public databases: the Kirby repository (KR) and Human Connectome Project (HCP). Elimination of erroneous fibers was attempted by gradually increasing the respective thresholds (fractional anisotropy [FA] and probabilistic index of connectivity [PICo]). The results were compared with predefined ground truth images based on corresponding anatomical scans. Two label overlap measures (false-positive error and Dice similarity coefficient) were used to evaluate the success of both methods in depicting the CN. Moreover, the differences between these parameters obtained from the KR and HCP (with higher angular resolution) databases were evaluated. Additionally, visualization of 10 CNs in 5 clinical cases was attempted with both methods and evaluated by comparing the depictions with intraoperative findings. RESULTS Maximum Dice similarity coefficients were significantly higher with probabilistic tracking (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). The false

  14. Transfer of the extensor indicis proprius branch of posterior interosseous nerve to reconstruct ulnar nerve and median nerve injured proximally: an anatomical study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-ji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Jia-ju; Zhou, Ju-pu; Zuo, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Bing-bing

    2017-01-01

    Proximal or middle lesions of the ulnar or median nerves are responsible for extensive loss of hand motor function. This occurs even when the most meticulous microsurgical techniques or nerve grafts are used. Previous studies had proposed that nerve transfer was more effective than nerve grafting for nerve repair. Our hypothesis is that transfer of the posterior interosseous nerve, which contains mainly motor fibers, to the ulnar or median nerve can innervate the intrinsic muscles of hands. The present study sought to investigate the feasibility of reconstruction of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of median nerve by transferring the extensor indicis proprius branch of the posterior interosseous nerve obtained from adult cadavers. The results suggested that the extensor indicis proprius branch of the posterior interosseous nerve had approximately similar diameters and number of fascicles and myelinated nerve fibers to those of the deep branch of ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of the median nerve. These confirm the feasibility of extensor indicis proprius branch of posterior interosseous nerve transfer for reconstruction of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve and the thenar branch of median nerve. This procedure could be a novel and effective method for the functional recovery of the intrinsic muscles of hands after ulnar nerve or median nerve injury. PMID:28250760

  15. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration.

  16. Effects of dietary sphingomyelin on central nervous system myelination in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Kyoichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Takase, Mitsunori; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2003-04-01

    Human milk contains sphingomyelin (SM) as a major component of the phospholipid fraction. Galactosylceramide (cerebroside), a metabolite of sphingolipids, increases along with CNS myelination, and is generally considered a universal marker of myelination in all vertebrates. l-Cycloserine (LCS) is an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), a rate-limiting enzyme for sphingolipid biosynthesis that is reported to show increased activity with development of the rat CNS. The present study examined the effects of dietary SM on CNS myelination during development in LCS-treated rats. From 8 d after birth, Wistar rat pups received a daily s.c. injection (100 mg/kg) of LCS. From 17 d after birth, the animals were fed an 810 mg/100g of bovine SM-supplemented diet (SM-LCS group) or a nonsupplemented diet (LCS group). At 28 d after birth, the animals were killed and subjected to biochemical and morphometric analyses. The myelin dry weight, myelin total lipid content, and cerebroside content were significantly lower in the SM-LCS and LCS groups than in a group not treated with LCS (the non-LCS group). However, these levels were significantly higher in the SM-LCS group than in the LCS group. Morphometric analysis of the optic nerve revealed that the axon diameter, nerve fiber diameter, myelin thickness, and g value (used to compare the relative thickness of myelin sheaths around fibers of different diameter) were significantly lower in the LCS group than in the other groups, but were similar in the SM-LCS and non-LCS groups. These findings suggest that dietary SM contributes to CNS myelination in developing rats with experimental inhibition of SPT activity corrected].

  17. Sorting of regenerating rat sciatic nerve fibers with target-derived molecules.

    PubMed

    Jerregård, H; Nyberg, T; Hildebrand, C

    2001-06-01

    The functional outcome of microsurgical repair of divided nerves is disappointing since many regenerating axons fail to reach appropriate targets. Sorting of regenerating axons according to target tissue might be used to improve functional regeneration. The aim of the present study is to see if regenerating axons can be sorted into functionally different bundles with target-derived molecules. The proximal stump of the adult rat sciatic nerve was sutured into the inlet of a silicon Y-tube. The two branches of the Y-tube were filled with agarose primed with filtrates prepared from skin and muscle homogenates from the operated rat. The tibial and sural nerves were inserted in the two branches of the Y-tube. Six weeks later the sciatic nerve axons showed vigorous regeneration into both branches. Electron microscopic examination of regenerated nerve segments showed numerous myelinated and unmyelinated axons. The proportion of myelinated axons was significantly larger in the muscle-gel branch than in the skin-gel branch. Retrograde tracing from the nerve regenerates with Fast Blue and Fluoro-Ruby showed that ventral horn neurons at L4-L5 segmental levels were preferentially labeled from the muscle-gel branch. Neurons in corresponding dorsal root ganglia were labeled from both Y-tube branches (no significant numerical difference). A few neurons of both types contained both tracers. Measurements revealed that sensory neurons labeled from the muscle-gel branch were significantly larger (mean perikaryal area 870 microm(2)) than neurons labeled from the skin-gel branch (mean area 580 microm(2)). We conclude that regenerating motor and sensory axons can be sorted with target-derived molecules.

  18. Diagnostic Ability of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Deviation Map for Localized and Diffuse Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joong Won; Seong, Mincheol; Lee, Jung Wook; Hong, Eun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the diagnostic ability of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) deviation map for glaucoma with localized or diffuse RNFL defects. Methods. Eyes of 139 glaucoma patients and 165 healthy subjects were enrolled. All participants were imaged with Cirrus HD-OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA). A RNFL defect was defined as at least 10 contiguous red (<1% level) superpixels in RNFL deviation map. The area, location, and angular width of RNFL defects were automatically measured. We compared sensitivities, specificities, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of RNFL deviation map and circumpapillary RNFL thickness for localized and diffuse RNFL defects. Subgroup analysis was performed according to the severity of glaucoma. Results. For localized defects, the area of RNFL defects (AUC, 0.991; sensitivity, 97%; specificity, 90%) in deviation map showed a higher diagnostic performance (p = 0.002) than the best circumpapillary RNFL parameter (inferior RNFL thickness; AUC, 0.914; sensitivity, 79%; specificity, 92%). For diffuse defects, there was no significant difference between the RNFL deviation map and circumpapillary RNFL parameters. In mild glaucoma with localized defect, RNFL deviation map showed a better diagnostic performance than circumpapillary RNFL measurement. Conclusions. RNFL deviation map is a useful tool for evaluating glaucoma regardless of localized or diffuse defect type and has advantages over circumpapillary RNFL measurement for detecting localized RNFL defects. PMID:28168048

  19. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Shulman, S; Shorer, R; Wollman, J; Dotan, G; Paran, D

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus. Atrophy of the corpus callosum and hippocampus have been reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown impaired white matter integrity, suggesting that white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus may underlie the cognitive impairment as well as other neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as assessed by optical coherence tomography, has been suggested as a biomarker for white matter damage in neurologic disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Retinal nerve fiber layer thinning may occur early, even in patients with mild clinical symptoms. Aim The objective of this study was to assess the association of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, as a biomarker of white matter damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients, with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations, including cognitive impairment. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus underwent neuropsychological testing using a validated computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test. All 21 patients, as well as 11 healthy, age matched controls, underwent optical coherence tomography testing to assess retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Correlations between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and results in eight cognitive domains assessed by the computerized battery of tests as well as the Rey-Auditory verbal learning test were assessed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, with and without neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus, and compared to retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in healthy controls. Results No statistically significant correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus as compared to healthy

  20. Neura, nerves, nerve fibers, neurofibrils, microtubules: multidimensional routes of pain, pleasure, and voluntary action in images across the ages.

    PubMed

    Frixione, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Available records indicate that the human body has always been conceived, in different periods and cultures, as spanned by multiple channels for internal communication and coherent functioning as a unit-"meridians" in treatises of Chinese medicine, metu in Egyptian papyri, srotas in Ayurvedic Indian texts, and neura in the Western scientific heritage from ancient Greece. Unfortunately, the earliest extant figurative depictions of such pathways of general control, complementary to the blood vessels, are late medieval copies of old crude sketches that attempted to show the main anatomico-physiological systems. The scarcity of adequate illustrations was more than compensated in the Renaissance, when the efforts of both artists and anatomists for the first time produced basically correct renditions of the human nervous system and many other bodily structures. As attention was next focused on microscopic structure as a requisite to understand physiological mechanisms, during the Enlightenment the nerves were revealed to consist of numerous thin tubes or fibers aligned in parallel. Improved microscopy techniques in the nineteenth century led to discovering and delineating still finer fibrils coursing along the cores of the nerve fibers themselves. Electron microscopy, developed throughout the twentieth century, recognized some of these fibrils within nerve fibers as being also tubular. All the progressive stages in understanding nerve construction, at increasingly more detailed scales, have been accompanied by technological advances and by debate about the structure and function relationship. And every step has been a source of amazing imagery.

  1. FIBER-OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DIRECT DETERMINATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R823663)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fiber-optic enzyme biosensor for the direct measurement of organophosphate nerve
    agents was developed. The basic element of this biosensor is organophosphorus hydrolase
    immobilized on a nylon membrane and attached to the common end of a bifurcated optical fiber
    bundle....

  2. Effects of deuterium oxide on the rate and dissociation constants for saxitoxin and tetrodotoxin action. Voltage-clamp studies on frog myelinated nerve

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The actions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) in normal water and in deuterium oxide (D2O) have been studied in frog myelinated nerve. Substitution of D2O for H2O in normal Ringer's solution has no effect on the potency of TTX in blocking action potentials but increases the potency of STX by approximately 50%. Under voltage clamp, the steady-state inhibition of sodium currents by 1 nM STX is doubled in D2O as a result of a halving of the rate of dissociation of STX from the sodium channel; the rate of block by STX is not measurably changed by D2O. Neither steady-state inhibition nor the on- or off-rate constants of TTX are changed by D2O substitution. The isotopic effects on STX binding are observed less than 10 min after the toxin has been added to D2O, thus eliminating the possibility that slow-exchange (t 1/2 greater than 10 h) hydrogen-binding sites on STX are involved. The results are consistent with a hypothesis that attributes receptor-toxin stabilization to isotopic changes of hydrogen bonding; this interpretation suggests that hydrogen bonds contribute more to the binding of STX than to that of TTX at the sodium channel. PMID:6268735

  3. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Lindsea C.; May, Clive N.; Yao, Song T.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF. PMID:26483699

  4. The role of the renal afferent and efferent nerve fibers in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Booth, Lindsea C; May, Clive N; Yao, Song T

    2015-01-01

    Renal nerves contain afferent, sensory and efferent, sympathetic nerve fibers. In heart failure (HF) there is an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), which can lead to renal vasoconstriction, increased renin release and sodium retention. These changes are thought to contribute to renal dysfunction, which is predictive of poor outcome in patients with HF. In contrast, the role of the renal afferent nerves remains largely unexplored in HF. This is somewhat surprising as there are multiple triggers in HF that have the potential to increase afferent nerve activity, including increased venous pressure and reduced kidney perfusion. Some of the few studies investigating renal afferents in HF have suggested that at least the sympatho-inhibitory reno-renal reflex is blunted. In experimentally induced HF, renal denervation, both surgical and catheter-based, has been associated with some improvements in renal and cardiac function. It remains unknown whether the effects are due to removal of the efferent renal nerve fibers or afferent renal nerve fibers, or a combination of both. Here, we review the effects of HF on renal efferent and afferent nerve function and critically assess the latest evidence supporting renal denervation as a potential treatment in HF.

  5. Relationship Between Optic Nerve Appearance and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Explored with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Huang, Jiayan; Garrity, Sean T.; Carter, Stuart B.; Aleman, Wendy D.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Tamhankar, Madhura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between the appearance of the optic nerve and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Records from patients with spectral domain-OCT imaging in a neuro-ophthalmology practice were reviewed. Eyes with glaucoma/glaucoma suspicion, macular/optic nerve edema, pseudophakia, and with refractive errors > 6D were excluded. Optic nerve appearance by slit lamp biomicroscopy was related to the RNFL thickness by spectral domain-OCT and to visual field results. Results Ninety-one patients (176 eyes; mean age: 49 ± 15 years) were included. Eighty-three eyes (47%) showed optic nerve pallor; 89 eyes (50.6%) showed RNFL thinning (sectoral or average peripapillary). Average peripapillary RNFL thickness in eyes with pallor (mean ± SD = 76 ± 17 μm) was thinner compared to eyes without pallor (91 ± 14 μm, P < 0.001). Optic nerve pallor predicted RNFL thinning with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 75%. Optic nerve appearance predicted RNFL thinning (with a sensitivity and specificity of 81%) when RNFL had thinned by ∼ 40%. Most patients with pallor had RNFL thinning with (66%) or without (25%) visual field loss; the remainder had normal RNFL and fields (5%) or with visual field abnormalities (4%). Conclusions Optic nerve pallor as a predictor of RNFL thinning showed fair sensitivity and specificity, although it is optimally sensitive/specific only when substantial RNFL loss has occurred. Translational Relevance Finding an acceptable relationship between the optic nerve appearance by ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-OCT RNFL measures will help the clinician's interpretation of the information provided by this technology, which is gaining momentum in neuro-ophthalmic research. PMID:25374773

  6. Uncompacted Myelin Lamellae and Nodal Ion Channel Disruption in POEMS Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Rina; Koike, Haruki; Takahashi, Mie; Ohyama, Ken; Kawagashira, Yuichi; Iijima, Masahiro; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-01

    To elucidate the significance of uncompacted myelin lamellae (UML) and ion channel disruption at the nodes of Ranvier in the polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome, we evaluated sural nerve biopsy specimens from 33 patients with POEMS syndrome and from 7 control patients. Uncompacted myelin lamellae distribution was assessed by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. In the POEMS patient biopsies, UML were seen more frequently in small versus large myelinated fibers. Paranodes and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, where normal physiologic UM is located, were frequently associated with UM. Widening of the nodes of Ranvier (i.e. segmental demyelination) was not associated with UML. There was axonal hollowing with neurofilament condensation at Schmidt-Lanterman incisures with abnormal UML, suggesting axonal damage at those sites in the POEMS patient biopsies. Myelin sheath irregularity was conspicuous in large myelinated fibers and was associated with abnormally widened bizarrely shaped Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. Indirect immunofluorescent studies revealed abnormalities of sodium (pan sodium) and potassium (KCNQ2) channels, even at nonwidened nodes of Ranvier. Thus, UML was not apparently associated with segmental demyelination but seemed to be associated with axonal damage. These observations suggest that nodal ion channel disruption may be associated with functional deficits in POEMS syndrome patient nerves.

  7. Biomechanics of chiasmal compression: Sensitivity of the mechanical behaviors of nerve fibers to variations in material property and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Neely, Andrew J.; McIlwaine, Gawn G.; Lueck, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of bitemporal hemianopia is still unclear. Previous research suggested that the nerve fiber packing pattern may contribute to the selective damage of nasal (crossed) nerve fibers. Numerical models were built using finite element modeling to study the biomechanics of optic nerve fibers. The sensitivity of the mechanical behaviors of the nerve fibers to variations of five parameters in the nerve fiber model were investigated using design of experiments (DOE). Results show that the crossing angle is a very significant factor that affects a wide range of responses of the model. The strain difference between the crossed and the uncrossed nerve fibers may account for the phenomenon of bitemporal hemianopia. This work also highlights the need for more accurate material properties of the tissues in the model and an improved understanding of the microstructure of the optic chiasm.

  8. Effect of mutated defensin NP-1 on sciatic nerve regeneration after transection--A pivot study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chungui; Bai, Lili; Chen, Yuhong; Fan, Chengming; Hu, Zanmin; Xu, Hailin; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-03-23

    Defensins are small cationic peptides that constitute the first line of defense against pathogens and are involved in immune regulation. In this study, their role in peripheral nerve regeneration was investigated. Rat sciatic nerves were transected and the two nerve stumps were bridged by a chitin conduit with a gap of 5mm between the stumps. The animals were injected intramuscularly with mutated rabbit neutrophil peptide 1 (defensin mNP-1), the positive control nerve growth factor (NGF) or the negative control saline, for 7 consecutive days after repair. After 6 weeks, the sciatic functional index (SFI), MNCV (motor nerve conductive velocity) and morphological parameters including myelinated fiber amounts, fiber diameter, axon diameter, myelin thickness and G-ratio were measured. Compared to the SFI of saline group, the NGF and mNP-1 groups had an increase of 18.3% and 18.8%, respectively. The numbers of myelinated fibers in the distal nerve of NGF and mNP-1 groups were 1.45- and 1.32-fold higher than in the saline group. The MNCVs of NGF and mNP-1 groups were 7.3 and 4.4 times of that of saline group. Fiber diameter, axon diameter, myelin thickness and G-ratio in the NGF and mNP-1 groups were also significantly higher than those of saline group. Our results demonstrate that, like NGF, the defensin mNP-1 can promote regeneration after a peripheral nerve cut.

  9. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Gipponi, Stefano; Scaroni, Niccolò; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Forbice, Eliana; Rao, Renata; Liberini, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disorder and its pathogenesis remains still unclear. Several hypotheses about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine have been proposed, but the issue is still far from being fully clarified. Neurovascular system remains one of the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine and it could be possible that hypoperfusion might involve other areas besides brain, including the retina. This is, for example, of particular interest in a form of migraine, the retinal migraine, which has been associated with hypoperfusion and vasoconstriction of the retinal vasculature. Although vasoconstriction of cerebral and retinal blood vessels is a transient phenomenon, the chronic nature of the migraine might cause permanent structural abnormalities of the brain and also of the retina. On this basis, a few studies have evaluated whether retina is involved in migraine patients: Tan et al. have not found differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness between migraine patients and healthy subjects, while Martinez et al. have shown that RNFL in the temporal retinic quadrant of migraineurs is thinner than in normal people. The aim of our study was to analyze if there are differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between migraine patients and normal subjects by studying 24 consecutive migraine patients who presented at the Headache Center of our Neurological Department. Migraine diagnosis has been made according to the International Classification of Headache disorder (ICHD-II). Patients have been recruited according to strict inclusion criteria; then patients have undergone a complete ophthalmological examination at the Ophthalmological Department. All patients and controls who met the ophthalmological criteria have been examined with ocular coherence tomography spectral domain (OCT-SD) after pupillary dilation. OCT-SD is an optical system designed to acquire the retinal layer images simultaneously with fundus

  10. Retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing and analysis in human eye by polarization sensitive OCT.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Mitsuro; Pircher, Michael; Zotter, Stefan; Baumann, Bernhard; Roberts, Philipp; Makihira, Tomoyuki; Tomatsu, Nobuhiro; Sato, Makoto; Vass, Clemens; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2015-03-01

    We present a new semi-automatic processing method for retinal nerve fiber bundle tracing based on polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) data sets. The method for tracing is based on a nerve fiber orientation map that covers the fovea and optic nerve head (ONH) regions. In order to generate the orientation map, two types of information are used: optic axis orientation based on polarization data, and complementary information obtained from nerve fiber layer (NFL) local thickness variation to reveal fiber bundle structures around the fovea. The corresponding two orientation maps are fused into a combined fiber orientation map. En face maps of NFL retardation, thickness, and unit-depth-retardation (UDR, equivalent to birefringence) are transformed into "along-trace" maps by using the obtained traces of the nerve fiber bundles. The method is demonstrated in the eyes of healthy volunteers, and as an example of further analyses utilizing this method, maps illustrating the gradients of NFL retardation, thickness, and UDR are demonstrated.

  11. Methodology for computing white matter nerve fiber orientation in human histological slices

    PubMed Central

    Wisco, Jonathan J.; Hageman, Nathan; Schettler, Stephen P.; Wong, Anita; Vinters, Harry V.; Teng, Chia-Chi; Bangerter, Neal K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The gold standard for mapping nerve fiber orientation in white matter of the human brain is histological analysis through biopsy. Such mappings are a crucial step in validating non-invasive techniques for assessing nerve fiber orientation in the human brain by using diffusion MRI. However, the manual extraction of nerve fiber directions of histological slices is tedious, time consuming, and prone to human error. New Method The presented semi-automated algorithm first creates a binary-segmented mask of the nerve fibers in the histological image, and then extracts an estimate of average directionality of nerve fibers through a Fourier-domain analysis of the masked image. It also generates an uncertainty level for its estimate of average directionality. Results and Comparison with Existing Methods The average orientations of the semi-automatic method were first compared to a qualitative expert opinion based on visual inspection of nerve fibers. A weighted RMS difference between the expert estimate and the algorithmically-determined angle (weighted by expert's confidence in his estimate) was 15.4 degrees, dropping to 9.9 degrees when only cases with an expert confidence level of greater than 50% were included. The algorithmically-determined angles were then compared with angles extracted using a manual segmentation technique, yielding an RMS difference of 11.2 degrees. Conclusion The presented semi-automated method is in good agreement with both qualitative and quantitative manual expert-based approaches for estimating directionality of nerve fibers in white matter from images of stained histological slices of the human brain. PMID:26709015

  12. Cornea nerve fiber quantification and construction of phenotypes in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Oudejans, Linda; He, Xuan; Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert; Brines, Michael; van Velzen, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Cornea confocal microscopy (CCM) is a novel non-invasive method to detect small nerve fiber pathology. CCM generally correlates with outcomes of skin biopsies in patients with small fiber pathology. The aim of this study was to quantify the morphology of small nerve fibers of the cornea of patients with fibromyalgia in terms of density, length and branching and further phenotype these patients using standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST). Small fiber pathology was detected in the cornea of 51% of patients: nerve fiber length was significantly decreased in 44% of patients compared to age- and sex-matched reference values; nerve fiber density and branching were significantly decreased in 10% and 28% of patients. The combination of the CCM parameters and sensory tests for central sensitization, (cold pain threshold, mechanical pain threshold, mechanical pain sensitivity, allodynia and/or windup), yielded four phenotypes of fibromyalgia patients in a subgroup analysis: one group with normal cornea morphology without and with signs of central sensitization, and a group with abnormal cornea morphology parameters without and with signs of central sensitization. In conclusion, half of the tested fibromyalgia population demonstrates signs of small fiber pathology as measured by CCM. The four distinct phenotypes suggest possible differences in disease mechanisms and may require different treatment approaches. PMID:27006259

  13. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies. PMID:24395587

  14. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Multiple sclerosis and optic nerve: an analysis of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and color Doppler imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Akçam, H T; Capraz, I Y; Aktas, Z; Batur Caglayan, H Z; Ozhan Oktar, S; Hasanreisoglu, M; Irkec, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare both retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and orbital color Doppler ultrasonography parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) versus healthy controls. Methods This is an observational case–control study. Forty eyes from MS patients and twenty eyes from healthy volunteers were examined. Eyes were classified into three groups as group 1, eyes from MS patients with previous optic neuritis (n=20); group 2, eyes from MS patients without previous optic neuritis (n=20); and group 3, eyes from healthy controls (n=20). Following complete ophthalmologic examination and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurement for each group, blood flow velocities of posterior ciliary arteries, central retinal artery, ophthalmic artery, and superior ophthalmic vein were measured. Pourcelot index (resistive index), an indicator of peripheral vascular resistance, was also calculated. The statistical assessment was performed with the assistance of Pearson's Chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, Kruskal–Wallis test, and Spearman's correlation test. Results The studied eyes exposed similar values in terms of intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness, implying no evidence in favor of glaucoma. All nerve fiber layer thickness values, except superior nasal quadrants, in group 1 were found to be significantly thinner than groups 2 and 3. Blood flow velocity and mean resistivity index parameters were similar in all the groups. Conclusions In MS patients, especially with previous optic neuritis, diminished retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was observed. Contrary to several studies in the current literature, no evidence supporting potential vascular origin of ocular involvement in MS was found. PMID:25081285

  16. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  17. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy.

  18. Ultrastructural analysis of guided nerve regeneration using progesterone- and pregnenolone-loaded chitosan prostheses.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Delgado, M E; Gomez-Pinedo, U; Feria-Velasco, A; Huerta-Viera, M; Castañeda, S Castro; Toral, F A López-Dellamary; Parducz, A; Anda, S Luquín-De; Mora-Galindo, J; García-Estrada, J

    2005-07-01

    Recently, numerous guide chambers for the treatment of injured nerves made up of different biomaterials have been designed, capable of hosting living cells or carrying neurotrophic or neuroactive substances to be directly released to the injured tissue. In this study, chitosan prostheses containing neurosteroids (progesterone and pregnenolone) were used for bridging a 10-mm gap in the rabbit facial nerve. Gas chromatography was used to quantify neurosteroid content in the prostheses prior to and after subcutaneous implantation at different periods of up to 60 days. The regeneration of the nerve fibers were evaluated at 15 and 45 days after axotomy by means of ultrastructural morphometric analysis. Different nerve fibers regenerative patterns were seen depending the groups studied and the analyzed stages. At 15 days after axotomy, the newly regenerating tissue revealed Schwann cells holding nonmyelinated nerve fiber bundles in an incipient and organized regenerative pattern. At 45 days, the regenerating tissue showed myelinated nerve fibers of different sizes, shapes, and myelin sheath thickness. Although the regeneration of the nerve fibers under neurosteroid treatment showed statistically significant differences in comparison with vehicle regenerated tissue, progesterone-loaded chitosan prostheses produced the best guided nerve regeneration response. These findings indicate that chitosan prostheses allowed regeneration of nerve fibers in their lumen, and when containing neurosteroids produced a faster guided nerve regeneration acting as a long-lasting release delivery vehicle.

  19. The origin of the initial heat associated with a single impulse in mammalian non-myelinated nerve fibres

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, J. V.; Keynes, R. D.; Ritchie, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the temperature changes associated with the passage of a single impulse in rabbit desheated vagus nerves. 2. The initial changes consist of an evolution of positive heat followed by a reabsorption of most of it; i.e. there is a phase of positive and a phase of negative heat production. 3. The size of the positive heat, its time of onset, and the time of onset of the negative heat have been measured by an analogue method of analysis. In addition, these parameters, together with the size of the negative heat and the duration of both phases of initial heat, have been studied with the aid of a computer, and also by conventional heat block analysis. 4. At about 5° C the measured positive heat is 7·2 μcal/g. impulse. It starts as soon as the compound action potential reaches the thermopile and lasts for about 107 msec. 5. This positive heat decreases with increasing temperature, the ratio of heat at 4° C to that at 14° C being 1·86. 6. The measured negative heat at about 5° C is 4·9 μcal/g. impulse. It starts 102 msec after the onset of positive heat, and lasts for about 240 msec. 7. When the sodium of Locke solution is replaced by lithium the positive heat is reduced by 19%, but the negative heat is increased by 22%. 8. In potassium-free solutions the positive heat is hardly affected (increase of 5%), but the negative heat is more than doubled. As a result the nerve may become briefly colder than its initial temperature by about 2 μ° C. 9. The effect of sodium-deficient solutions on the positive heat is somewhat variable, but the negative heat is consistently diminished. 10. Replacement of the chloride of Locke solution by sulphate or nitrate has little effect on the positive heat. The negative heat is reduced in size by 26% and in duration by 22%. 11. Replacement of most of the sodium of Locke solution by barium reduces or abolishes the negative heat, and increases the measured size of the positive heat nearly threefold. 12

  20. Brain imaging signatures of the relationship between epidermal nerve fibers and heat pain perception.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2015-11-15

    Although the small-diameter primary afferent fibers in the skin promptly respond to nociceptive stimuli and convey sensory inputs to the central nervous system, the neural signatures that underpin the relationship between cutaneous afferent fibers and pain perception remain elusive. We combined skin biopsy at the lateral aspect of the distal leg, which is used to quantify cutaneous afferent fibers, with fMRI, which is used to assess brain responses and functional connectivity, to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensory nerves and the corresponding pain perception in the brain after applying heat pain stimulation to the dorsum of the right foot in healthy subjects. During painful stimulation, the degree of cutaneous innervation, as measured by epidermal nerve fiber density, was correlated with individual blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals of the posterior insular cortex and of the thalamus, periaqueductal gray, and rostral ventromedial medulla. Pain perception was associated with the activation of the anterior insular cortex and with the functional connectivity from the anterior insular cortex to the primary somatosensory cortex during painful stimulation. Most importantly, both epidermal nerve fiber density and activity in the posterior insular cortex showed a positive correlation with the strength of coupling under pain between the anterior insular cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex. Thus, our findings support the notion that the neural circuitry subserving pain perception interacts with the cerebral correlates of peripheral nociceptive fibers, which implicates an indirect role for skin nerves in human pain perception.

  1. [Morphometry of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of the rat].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Merchán, A; Maranillo, E; Brillas, A; Sañudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F J

    2006-12-01

    In mammals the recurrent laryngeal nerves are dissimilar in length between both sides. This asymmetry involves different time of arrival of the stimulus to the laryngeal musculature controlled by each nerve. Thus, several explanations have been addressed to elucidate the closest of the glottis at the same time despite the unlike length of the nerves. However, previous works on the topic lack of several important data. The present study compares, in two groups of 10 and 6 rats, the length and the composition of myelinated fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerves of both sides, by means of light microscopy and a computerized morphometric analysis. The results show a mean difference of 0,84 cm longer the left than the right recurrent laryngeal nerve. No statistical differences were observed in the number of myelinated fibers between both sides. However, the myelinated fibers of the right side were statistically bigger in diameter than the fibers of the left side. The data are discussed in the context of the mechanisms for the compensation of the dissimilar length of both recurrent laryngeal nerves.

  2. Morphologic Characterization of Nerves in Whole-Mount Airway Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J.; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Woodcock, Ashley A.; Smith, Jaclyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Neuroplasticity of bronchopulmonary afferent neurons that respond to mechanical and chemical stimuli may sensitize the cough reflex. Afferent drive in cough is carried by the vagus nerve, and vagal afferent nerve terminals have been well defined in animals. Yet, both unmyelinated C fibers and particularly the morphologically distinct, myelinated, nodose-derived mechanoreceptors described in animals are poorly characterized in humans. To date there are no distinctive molecular markers or detailed morphologies available for human bronchopulmonary afferent nerves. Objectives: Morphologic and neuromolecular characterization of the afferent nerves that are potentially involved in cough in humans. Methods: A whole-mount immunofluorescence approach, rarely used in human lung tissue, was used with antibodies specific to protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) and, for the first time in human lung tissue, 200-kD neurofilament subunit. Measurements and Main Results: We have developed a robust technique to visualize fibers consistent with autonomic and C fibers and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. A group of morphologically distinct, 200-kD neurofilament-immunopositive myelinated afferent fibers, a subpopulation of which did not express PGP9.5, was also identified. Conclusions: PGP9.5-immunonegative nerves are strikingly similar to myelinated airway afferents, the cough receptor, and smooth muscle–associated airway receptors described in rodents. These have never been described in humans. Full description of human airway nerves is critical to the translation of animal studies to the clinical setting. PMID:25906337

  3. The effects of testosterone deficiency on the structural integrity of the penile dorsal nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armagan, A; Hatsushi, K; Toselli, P

    2008-01-01

    Androgens play a vital role in erectile function and are known to have a neuroprotective role in the nervous system. This study investigated, in a rat model, the effects of testosterone deprivation and replacement on the morphology of the dorsal nerve of the rat penis at the light microscopy level. Two weeks after castration, male rats were infused with vehicle alone or 44 mug of testosterone for 2 weeks. Age-matched, sham-operated control animals were used for comparisons. Penile tissue samples were removed for histological analyses. The following parameters were assessed: (1) total myelin sheath thickness; (2) density of nerve fibers; and (3) axon cross-sectional area per nerve fiber. Castration resulted in a significant increase in axon cross-sectional area compared to that of the control and testosterone-treated animals (6.97+/-0.59 microm(2) per fiber in control animals to 14.32+/-0.44 microm(2) per fiber in castrated animals). Qualitatively, there were signs of nerve degeneration, particularly myelin sheath degeneration, in all sample groups. We did not observe statistically significant changes in myelin sheath thickness. There was a trend of reduced nerve density. Nerve degeneration was not quantified since this study was performed at the light microscopic level. This study suggests that testosterone has a neuroprotective role in the nerve fibers of the dorsal nerve and testosterone deficiency may lead to different forms of nerve degeneration resulting in anatomic alterations, thus contributing to erectile dysfunction.

  4. Myelin structure and composition of myelinated tissue in the African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Daniel A; Karthigesan, Jothie; Bizzozero, Oscar A; Kosaras, Bela; Inouye, Hideyo

    2008-05-01

    To analyze myelin structure and the composition of myelinated tissue in the African lungfish (Protopterus dolloi), we used a combination of ultrastructural and biochemical techniques. Electron microscopy showed typical multilamellar myelin: CNS sheaths abutted one another, and PNS sheaths were separated by endoneurial collagen. The radial component, prominent in CNS myelin of higher vertebrates, was suggested by the pattern of staining but was poorly organized. The lipid and myelin protein compositions of lungfish tissues more closely resembled those of teleost than those of higher vertebrates (frog, mouse). Of particular note, for example, lungfish glycolipids lacked hydroxy fatty acids. Native myelin periodicities from unfixed nerves were in the range of those for higher vertebrates rather than for teleost fish. Lungfish PNS myelin had wider inter-membrane spaces compared with other vertebrates, and lungfish CNS myelin had spaces that were closer in value to those in mammalian than to amphibian or teleost myelins. The membrane lipid bilayer was narrower in lungfish PNS myelin compared to other vertebrates, whereas in the CNS myelin the bilayer was in the typical range. Lungfish PNS myelin showed typical compaction and swelling responses to incubation in acidic or alkaline hypotonic saline. The CNS myelin, by contrast, did not compact in acidic saline but did swell in the alkaline solution. This lability was more similar to that for the higher vertebrates than for teleost.

  5. Fiber-optic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for the detection of toxic nerve agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anna M. C.; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Banerji, Soame; Masson, Jean-Francois; Booksh, Karl S.

    2004-03-01

    Analytical instruments capable of detecting nerve agents in battlefield conditions where speed, accuracy and ease of operation are a must in today's military. Fast detection and decontamination of nerve agents in very low concentrations is the primary focus of our research. The method presented here focuses on optimizing polymer stabilized sensing elements on the surface of SPR fiber-optic probes. A number of polymers & polymer supported metal complexes capable of reversibly binding to the species of interest & which have robust operation in hostile environments are incorporated with the fiber optic sensing elements. An optical technique, such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), better suited to rapid data collection without sample pretreatment is employed. The approach using polymer-based optical fibers with off-the-shelf SPR system components has been tested for the detection of Pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), a simulant for nerve agent Soman. Surface initiated polymeric sensors have higher sensitivity toward detecting PMP than bulk-polymerized sensors.

  6. Rat-derived processed nerve allografts support more axon regeneration in rat than human-derived processed nerve xenografts.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Kemp, Stephen W P; Liu, Edward H; Szynkaruk, Mark; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2014-04-01

    Processed nerve allografts are increasingly used as "off the shelf" nerve replacements for surgically bridging nerve gaps. Benchmarking the regenerative capacity of a commercially available human-derived nerve or xenograft in a rat nerve injury model would provide a convenient platform for future studies seeking to modify the processed nerve graft. Human and rat processed nerve grafts were used to bridge a 14 mm defect in a Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerve. Reversed autografts served as a positive control group. Twelve weeks following surgery, the distal nerve stumps were retrograde labeled and harvested for histology and histomorphometry. The cross-sectional areas of the human- and rat-derived processed nerve grafts were similar. Neuron counts and myelinated axon counts following use of the human-derived processed xenografts were decreased compared with those obtained from both the rat-derived processed nerve allografts and the autografts; the rat-derived processed nerve allografts were statistically equivalent to autografts. Measures of nerve fiber diameter and myelination revealed inferior axon regeneration maturity in both processed nerve grafts compared with autografts. Processed xenografts showed significantly reduced regeneration compared with autografts or processed allografts indicating that cross-species immunological reactions are important considerations in this rat model.

  7. The touch dome in human skin is supplied by different types of nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Christina M; Tschachler, Erwin

    2005-07-01

    Receptor end organs and free-nerve endings in the skin are the peripheral sentinels of the sensorial nervous system encoding for touch, temperature, and pain. Using a novel approach to analyze the outermost nerves of the skin, we visualized for the first time the distinct microanatomical structure of the touch dome of human hairy skin. The dermal nerve fibers of this slowly adapting type 1 mechanoreceptor were embedded in dermal protrusions that could be readily discerned by Laminin-5 staining. Concerning the nerves supplying the touch domes, we found, unexpectedly, that besides Abeta-fibers, Adelta- and C-fibers also were regularly present. The epidermis overlying the nerve convolutes showed a distinctive architecture of the rete ridges clearly demarcated from the surroundings and extending over 0.193 +/- 0.138 mm(2) (mean +/- standard deviation). Within this area, 756 +/- 386 Merkel cells/mm(2) (mean +/- standard deviation) were present compared with less than 50/mm(2) outside the touch dome, demonstrating for the first time a highly discontinuous distribution of these cells in nonglabrous skin. Our findings strongly suggest that the receptive qualities of human touch domes exceed mechanosensation, and that they may serve as multifunctional nerve end organs in human skin.

  8. CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE SENSORY NERVE FIBERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE GENERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF SKELETAL FRACTURE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Bloom, Aaron P.; Mantyh, William G.; Koewler, Nathan J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Delong, David; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although skeletal pain can have a marked impact on a patient’s functional status and quality of life, relatively little is known about the specific populations of peripheral nerve fibers that drive non-malignant bone pain. In the present report, neonatal male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with capsaicin or vehicle and femoral fracture was produced when the animals were young adults (15–16 weeks old). Capsaicin treatment, but not vehicle, resulted in a significant (>70%) depletion in the density of calcitonin-gene related peptide positive (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers, but not 200 kD neurofilament H positive (NF200+) sensory nerve fibers in the periosteum. The periosteum is a thin, cellular and fibrous tissue that tightly adheres to the outer surface of all but the articulated surface of bone and appears to play a pivotal role in driving fracture pain. In animals treated with capsaicin, but not vehicle, there was a 50% reduction in the severity, but no change in the time course, of fracture-induced skeletal pain related behaviors as measured by spontaneous flinching, guarding and weight bearing. These results suggest that both capsaicin-sensitive (primarily CGRP+ C-fibers) and capsaicin-insensitive (primarily NF200+ A-delta fibers) sensory nerve fibers participate in driving skeletal fracture pain. Skeletal pain can be a significant impediment to functional recovery following trauma-induced fracture, osteoporosis-induced fracture and orthopedic surgery procedures such as knee and hip replacement. Understanding the specific populations of sensory nerve fibers that need to be targeted to inhibit the generation and maintenance of skeletal pain may allow the development of more specific mechanism-based therapies that can effectively attenuate acute and chronic skeletal pain. PMID:19486928

  9. Stochastic information transfer from cochlear implant electrodes to auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao; Grayden, David B.; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2014-08-01

    Cochlear implants, also called bionic ears, are implanted neural prostheses that can restore lost human hearing function by direct electrical stimulation of auditory nerve fibers. Previously, an information-theoretic framework for numerically estimating the optimal number of electrodes in cochlear implants has been devised. This approach relies on a model of stochastic action potential generation and a discrete memoryless channel model of the interface between the array of electrodes and the auditory nerve fibers. Using these models, the stochastic information transfer from cochlear implant electrodes to auditory nerve fibers is estimated from the mutual information between channel inputs (the locations of electrodes) and channel outputs (the set of electrode-activated nerve fibers). Here we describe a revised model of the channel output in the framework that avoids the side effects caused by an "ambiguity state" in the original model and also makes fewer assumptions about perceptual processing in the brain. A detailed comparison of how different assumptions on fibers and current spread modes impact on the information transfer in the original model and in the revised model is presented. We also mathematically derive an upper bound on the mutual information in the revised model, which becomes tighter as the number of electrodes increases. We found that the revised model leads to a significantly larger maximum mutual information and corresponding number of electrodes compared with the original model and conclude that the assumptions made in this part of the modeling framework are crucial to the model's overall utility.

  10. Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martin, Elena; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Puebla-Guedea, Marta; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Roca, Miguel; Gutierrez-Ruiz, Fernando; Vilades, Elisa; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose M.; Pablo, Luis E.; Satue, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether fibromyalgia induces axonal damage in the optic nerve that can be detected using optical coherence tomography (OCT), as the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is atrophied in patients with fibromyalgia compared with controls. Methods Fibromyalgia patients (n = 116) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 144) were included in this observational and prospective cohort study. All subjects underwent visual acuity measurement and structural analysis of the RNFL using two OCT devices (Cirrus and Spectralis). Fibromyalgia patients were evaluated according to Giesecke’s fibromyalgia subgroups, the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ5D) scale. We compared the differences between fibromyalgia patients and controls, and analyzed the correlations between OCT measurements, disease duration, fibromyalgia subgroups, severity, and quality of life. The impact on quality of life in fibromyalgia subgroups and in patients with different disease severity was also analyzed. Results A significant decrease in the RNFL was detected in fibromyalgia patients compared with controls using the two OCT devices: Cirrus OCT ganglion cell layer analysis registered a significant decrease in the minimum thickness of the inner plexiform layer (74.99±16.63 vs 79.36±3.38 μm, respectively; p = 0.023), nasal inferior, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.040; 0.011 and 0.046 respectively). The Glaucoma application of the Spectralis OCT revealed thinning in the nasal, temporal inferior and temporal superior sectors (p = 0.009, 0.006, and 0.002 respectively) of fibromyalgia patients and the Axonal application in all sectors, except the nasal superior and temporal sectors. The odds ratio (OR) to estimate the size effect of FM in RNFL thickness was 1.39. RNFL atrophy was detected in patients with FIQ scores <60 (patients in early disease stages) compared with controls in the temporal inferior sector (78

  11. Degeneration of auditory nerve fibers in guinea pigs with severe sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Steven; Ramekers, Dyan; Smeets, Emma M; Hendriksen, Ferry G J; Klis, Sjaak F L; Versnel, Huib

    2017-03-01

    Damage to and loss of the organ of Corti leads to secondary degeneration of the spiral ganglion cell (SGC) somata of the auditory nerve. Extensively examined in animal models, this degeneration process of SGC somata following deafening is well known. However, degeneration of auditory nerve axons, which conduct auditory information towards the brainstem, and its relation to SGC soma degeneration are largely unknown. The consequences of degeneration of the axons are relevant for cochlear implantation, which is applied to a deafened system but depends on the condition of the auditory nerve. We investigated the time sequence of degeneration of myelinated type I axons in deafened guinea pigs. Auditory nerves in six normal-hearing and twelve deafened animals, two, six and fourteen weeks (for each group four) after deafening were histologically analyzed. We developed a semi-automated method for axon counting, which allowed for a relatively large sample size (20% of the total cross-sectional area of the auditory nerve). We observed a substantial loss of auditory nerve area (29%), reduction in axon number (59%) and decrease in axoplasm area (41%) fourteen weeks after deafening compared to normal-hearing controls. The correlation between axonal degeneration and that of the SGC somata in the same cochleas was high, although axonal structures appeared to persist longer than the somata, suggesting a slower degeneration process. In the first two weeks after induction of deafness, the axonal cross-sectional area decreased but the axon number did not. In conclusion, the data strongly suggest that each surviving SGC possesses an axon.

  12. Dithranol abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the nerve fibers of the rat orofacial skin.

    PubMed

    Orojan, Ivan; Szigeti, Csaba; Varszegi, Szilvia; Dobo, Endre; Gulya, Karoly

    2006-11-22

    Dithranol has been used to treat psoriasis for decades. Although its beneficial effect may involve the induction of cutaneous inflammation, and inflammation often leads to damages in nerve fibers, these alterations are not well documented. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dithranol on the immunohistochemical characteristics of the cutaneous nerve fibers in the rat skin. Epidermal nerve fiber staining was achieved with ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) immunohistochemistry in the orofacial skin of control rats, rats treated with (a) dithranol for 5 days, (b) corticosteroid for 5 days following dithranol treatment for 5 days, and (c) corticosteroid for 5 days. The results revealed a complete loss of UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the dithranol-treated animals. Topical application of corticosteroid onto the inflamed skin for 5 days reversed this effect: the UCH-L1 immunoreactivity was almost completely restored. Steroid treatment for 5 days did not change the appearance of the UCH-L1-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These findings were supported by Western blot analyses. We conclude that dithranol, incidentally similarly to psoriasis, causes inflammation and abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the rat orofacial skin in a corticosteroid-reversible manner. This phenomenon may be due to the ability of dithranol to cause oxidative damage to the UCH-L1 protein, and to the antioxidant activity of the corticosteroids countering this effect.

  13. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  14. The logistics of myelin biogenesis in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Snaidero, Nicolas; Simons, Mikael

    2017-02-07

    Rapid nerve conduction depends on myelin, but not all axons in the central nervous system (CNS) are myelinated to the same extent. Here, we review our current understanding of the biology of myelin biogenesis in the CNS. We focus on how the different steps of myelination are interconnected and how distinct patterns of myelin are generated. Possibly, a "basal" mode of myelination is laying the groundwork in areas devoted to basic homeostasis early in development, whereas a "targeted" mode generates myelin in regions controlling more complex tasks throughout adulthood. Such mechanisms may explain why myelination progresses in some areas according to a typical chronological and topographic sequence, while in other regions it is regulated by environmental stimuli contributing to interindividual variability of myelin structure. GLIA 2017.

  15. Central distribution of nociceptive intradental afferent nerve fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, C; Chiocchetti, R; Brunetti, O; Grandis, A; Lucchi, M L; Bortolami, R

    2006-08-01

    The central distribution of intradental afferent nerve fibers was investigated by combining electron microscopic observations with a selective method for inducing degeneration of the A delta- and C-type afferent fibers. Degenerating terminals were found on the proprioceptive mesencephalic trigeminal neurons and on dendrites in the neuropil of the trigeminal motor nucleus after application of capsaicin to the rat's lower incisor tooth pulp. The results give anatomical evidence of new sites of central projection of intradental A delta- and C-type fibers whereby the nociceptive information from the tooth pulp can affect jaw muscle activity.

  16. Internodal myelin volume and axon surface area. A relationship determining myelin thickness?

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Blakemore, W F; Murray, J A; Patterson, R C

    1982-08-01

    Internodes from normal, remyelinated and regenerated nerve fibres have been isolated from rat spinal roots and sciatic nerve. The internodes have been examined quantitatively by light and electron microscopy to determine their internodal length, myelin thickness, and the circumference and cross-sectional area of both the axons and fibre. Comparison of these measurements of the axon and myelin sheath has revealed a close relationship between the volume of myelin comprising the internode and the area over which the Schwann cell and axon are in close proximity, i.e. the surface area of the axolemma beneath the internodal myelin sheath. The same relationship described not only the internodes on normal nerve fibres, where internodal length is proportional to axon diameter, but also the short and thinly myelinated internodes formed in the adult animal on remyelinated and on regenerated axons. Examination of data presented by Berthold (1978) revealed that a closely similar relationship is also present in feline nerve fibres. In view of the constancy of the relationship between such different types of internode it is suggested that the regulation of myelin volume, and thereby of myelin thickness, may be mediated via the area of the axolemma or of the Schwann cell membrane beneath the myelin sheath.

  17. Three-dimensional morphological characterization of optic nerve fibers by atomic force microscopy and by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Melling, Mahmoud; Karimian-Teherani, Daniela; Mostler, Sascha; Hochmeister, Sonja

    2005-08-01

    A comparative study of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of the healthy human optic nerve was carried out to determine the similarities and the differences. In this study we compared the fine optic nerve structures as observed by SEM and AFM. The fibers of the right optic nerve of a 61-year-old man show different arrangements in transverse sections taken from the same individual 5 mm central to the optic canal and 5 mm peripheral to the optic chiasma; this difference can be recognized by light microscopy (LM), SEM, and AFM. AFM revealed such typical optic nerve fibers (taken from a point 5 mm central to the optic canal) with annular and longitudinal orientations, which were not visible by SEM in this form. By contrast, LM and SEM visualized other structures, such as pia mater and optic nerve fibers loosely arranged in bundles, none of which was visualized by AFM. The images, however, taken 5 mm peripheral from the optic chiasma show shapeless nerve fibers having a wavy course. Our results reveal that more detailed information on optic nerve morphology is obtained by exploiting the advantages of both SEM and AFM. These are the first SEM and AFM images of healthy human optic nerve fibers, containing clear representations of the three dimensions of the optic nerve.

  18. Registration of adaptive optics corrected retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Gomathy; Lombardo, Marco; Devaney, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the western world. Investigation of high-resolution retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images in patients may lead to new indicators of its onset. Adaptive optics (AO) can provide diffraction-limited images of the retina, providing new opportunities for earlier detection of neuroretinal pathologies. However, precise processing is required to correct for three effects in sequences of AO-assisted, flood-illumination images: uneven illumination, residual image motion and image rotation. This processing can be challenging for images of the RNFL due to their low contrast and lack of clearly noticeable features. Here we develop specific processing techniques and show that their application leads to improved image quality on the nerve fiber bundles. This in turn improves the reliability of measures of fiber texture such as the correlation of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). PMID:24940551

  19. Registration of adaptive optics corrected retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Gomathy; Lombardo, Marco; Devaney, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the western world. Investigation of high-resolution retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) images in patients may lead to new indicators of its onset. Adaptive optics (AO) can provide diffraction-limited images of the retina, providing new opportunities for earlier detection of neuroretinal pathologies. However, precise processing is required to correct for three effects in sequences of AO-assisted, flood-illumination images: uneven illumination, residual image motion and image rotation. This processing can be challenging for images of the RNFL due to their low contrast and lack of clearly noticeable features. Here we develop specific processing techniques and show that their application leads to improved image quality on the nerve fiber bundles. This in turn improves the reliability of measures of fiber texture such as the correlation of Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM).

  20. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique.

  1. Analysis of motor fibers in the communicating branch between the cervical nerves and the spinal accessory nerve to innervate trapezius in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Hitomi, Jiro

    2006-11-01

    The communicating branch between the ventral rami of cervical nerves and the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) has been reported to also send motor fibers to supply the trapezius. However, the motor fiber type of the communicating branch and its peripheral distribution are still unclear. To determine the fiber elements within the branch and its peripheral distribution of the motor fibers in the trapezius, the anterograde tracing method was used in this study. The results show that a few a motor end plates from the communicating branch were observed on the extrafusal fibers, while in the muscle spindle the motor elements from the communicating branch were distributed to the polar portions of the intrafusal fibers. These results indicated that the motor fibers passing through the communicating branch to supply the trapezius are mainly y motor fibers, with some a motor fibers. Moreover, the a and y motor fibers from the communicating branch were observed in the clavotrapezius, acromiotrapezius and the rostral part of spinotrapezius. These findings also correlate with the clinical observation indicating that even when the spinal accessory nerve is injured, the trapezius is still capable of slight movement.

  2. Functional and structural nerve fiber findings in heterozygote patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Torvin Møller, Anette; Winther Bach, Flemming; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase; Hasholt, Lis; Lan, He; Sommer, Claudia; Kølvraa, Steen; Ballegaard, Martin; Staehelin Jensen, Troels

    2009-09-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked inherited lysosomal disorder with dysfunction of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A causing accumulation of glycolipids in multiple organs including the nervous system. Pain and somatosensory disturbances are prominent manifestations of this disease. Until recently disease manifestations in female carriers of Fabry disease have been questioned. To explore the frequency of symptoms and the functional and structural involvement of the nervous system in female patients we examined the presence of pain, manifestations of peripheral neuropathy and nerve density in skin biopsies in 19 female patients with Fabry disease and 19 sex- and age-matched controls. Diaries, quantitative sensory testing, neurophysiologic tests and skin biopsies were performed. Daily pain was present in 63% of patients, with a median VAS score of 4.0. Tactile detection threshold and pressure pain threshold were lower and cold detection thresholds increased in patients. Sensory nerve action potential amplitude and maximal sensory conduction velocity were not different, whereas there was a highly significant reduction in intraepidermal nerve fiber density. We found no correlation between pain VAS score, quantitative sensory testing and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Our study demonstrates that careful evaluation of symptoms in female Fabry patients is important as small fiber disease manifestations are present, which in some cases is only detected by skin biopsy.

  3. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Vascular Microcirculation in Glaucoma Using Optical Coherence Tomography–Based Microangiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Zhang, Anqi; Bojikian, Karine D.; Wen, Joanne C.; Zhang, Qinqin; Xin, Chen; Mudumbai, Raghu C.; Johnstone, Murray A.; Chen, Philip P.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the vascular microcirculation changes in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal, glaucoma suspect, and open-angle glaucoma (OAG) groups using optical coherence tomography–based microangiography (OMAG). Methods One eye from each subject was scanned with a Cirrus HD-OCT 5000–based OMAG prototype system montage scanning protocol centered at the optic nerve head (ONH). Blood flow signals were extracted using OMAG algorithm. Retinal nerve fiber layer vascular microcirculation was measured by calculating the blood flux index and vessel area density within a 1.2-mm width annulus centered at the ONH with exclusion of big retinal vessels. One-way ANOVA were performed to analyze the RNFL microcirculation among groups. Linear-regression models were constructed to analyze the correlation between RNFL microcirculation and clinical parameters. Discrimination capabilities of the flow metrics were assessed with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC). Results Twenty normal, 26 glaucoma suspect, and 42 OAG subjects were enrolled. Eyes from OAG subjects and glaucoma suspects showed significantly lower blood flux index compared with normal eyes (P ≤ 0.0015). Retinal nerve fiber layer blood flow metrics showed significant correlations with visual field indices and structural changes in glaucomatous eyes (P ≤ 0.0123). Similar discrimination capability of blood flux index compared with RNFL thickness was found in both disease groups. Conclusions Peripapillary RNFL vascular microcirculation measured as blood flux index by OMAG showed significant differences among OAG, glaucoma suspect, and normal controls and was significantly correlated with functional and structural defects. Retinal nerve fiber layer microcirculation measurement using OMAG may help physicians monitor glaucoma. PMID:27442341

  4. High-resolution measurement of electrically-evoked vagus nerve activity in the anesthetized dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Paul B.; Lubock, Nathan B.; Hincapie, Juan G.; Ruble, Stephen B.; Hamann, Jason J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Not fully understanding the type of axons activated during vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is one of several factors that limit the clinical efficacy of VNS therapies. The main goal of this study was to characterize the electrical recruitment of both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers within the cervical vagus nerve. Approach. In anesthetized dogs, recording nerve cuff electrodes were implanted on the vagus nerve following surgical excision of the epineurium. Both the vagal electroneurogram (ENG) and laryngeal muscle activity were recorded in response to stimulation of the right vagus nerve. Main results. Desheathing the nerve significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio of the ENG by 1.2 to 9.9 dB, depending on the nerve fiber type. Repeated VNS following nerve transection or neuromuscular block (1) enabled the characterization of A-fibers, two sub-types of B-fibers, and unmyelinated C-fibers, (2) confirmed the absence of stimulation-evoked reflex compound nerve action potentials in both the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves, and (3) provided evidence of stimulus spillover into muscle tissue surrounding the stimulating electrode. Significance. Given the anatomical similarities between the canine and human vagus nerves, the results of this study provide a template for better understanding the nerve fiber recruitment patterns associated with VNS therapies.

  5. Automatic identification and quantitative morphometry of unstained spinal nerve using molecular hyperspectral imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Chen, Zenggan; He, Xiaofu; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Xu, Qintong

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative observation of nerve fiber sections is often complemented by morphological analysis in both research and clinical condition. However, existing manual or semi-automated methods are tedious and labour intensive, fully automated morphometry methods are complicated as the information of color or gray images captured by traditional microscopy is limited. Moreover, most of the methods are time-consuming as the nerve sections need to be stained with some reagents before observation. To overcome these shortcomings, a molecular hyperspectral imaging system is developed and used to observe the spinal nerve sections. The molecular hyperspectral images contain both the structural and biochemical information of spinal nerve sections which is very useful for automatic identification and quantitative morphological analysis of nerve fibers. This characteristic makes it possible for researchers to observe the unstained spinal nerve and live cells in their native environment. To evaluate the performance of the new method, the molecular hyperspectral images were captured and the improved spectral angle mapper algorithm was proposed and used to segment the myelin contours. Then the morphological parameters such as myelin thickness and myelin area were calculated and evaluated. With these morphological parameters, the three dimension surface view images were drawn to help the investigators observe spinal nerve at different angles. The experiment results show that the hyperspectral based method has the potential to identify the spinal nerve more accurate than the traditional method as the new method contains both the spectral and spatial information of nerve sections.

  6. Biophysical and functional consequences of receptor-mediated nerve fiber transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Tanelian, D L; Markin, V S

    1997-01-01

    Stimulation of the nervous system by substance P, a G protein-coupled receptor, and subsequent receptor internalization causes dendrites to change their shape from homogeneous cylinders to a heterogeneous string of swollen varicosities (beads) connected by thin segments. In this paper we have analyzed this phenomenon and propose quantitative mechanisms to explain this type of physical shape transformation. We developed a mathematical solution to describe the relationship between the initial radius of a cylindrical nerve fiber and the average radii of the subsequently created varicosities and connecting segments, as well as the periodicity of the varicosities along the nerve fiber. Theoretical predictions are in good agreement with our own and published experimental data from dorsal root ganglion neurons, spinal cord, and brain. Modeling the electrical properties of these beaded fibers has led to an understanding of the functional biophysical consequences of nerve fiber transformation. Several hypotheses for how this shape transformation can be used to process information within the nervous system have been put forth. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 6 PMID:9138558

  7. Development of a computer algorithm for feedback controlled electrical nerve fiber stimulation.

    PubMed

    Doruk, R Özgür

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop an algorithm for a feedback controlled local electrical nerve fiber stimulation system which has the purpose to stop the repetitive firing in a particular region of the nervous system. The electrophysiological behavior of the neurons (under electrical currents) is modeled by Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) type nonlinear nerve fiber dynamics. The repetitive firing of in the modeled fiber is due to the deviations in the channel parameters, which is also called as bifurcation in the nonlinear systems theory. A washout filter is augmented to the HH dynamics and then the output of the filter is fed to the external current generator through a linear gain. This gain is computed by linear projective control theory. That is a linear output feedback control technique where the closed loop spectrum of the full state feedback closed loop is partially maintained. By obtaining a spectrum of eigenvalues with completely negative real parts the nerve fibers can be relaxed to the equilibrium point with or without a damped oscillation. The MATLAB script applying the theory of this work is provided at the end of this paper. A MATLAB-Simulink computer simulation is performed in order to verify the algorithm.

  8. Marked loss of sympathetic nerve fibers in chronic Charcot foot of diabetic origin compared to ankle joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Franz-Xaver; Bobrik, Verena; Fassold, Alexander; Grifka, Joachim; Kessler, Sigurd; Straub, Rainer H

    2009-06-01

    The pathogenesis of Charcot foot is based on three disputed factors: (1) loss of neurotrophic influence, (2) microtraumatic lesions, and (3) neurovascular disturbances. These etiological causes were uncovered by clinicophysiological tests. However, no results of quantitative nerve density studies of sympathetic and sensory substance P-positive (SP+) nerve fibers are available. We studied the density of sympathetic and SP+ nerve fibers in three distinct areas of the tarsus. Fifteen patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA) and 15 patients with diabetic Charcot foot were included. Patients with OA did not differ from those with Charcot foot in SP+ sensory nerve fiber density. However, at all three areas, the density of sympathetic nerve fibers was significantly lower in patients with Charcot foot compared to OA (p = 0.006). In addition, we found that the sympathetic nerve repellent factor semaphorin 3C was highly expressed in inflamed tissue in Charcot patients. In Charcot foot of diabetic origin a severe loss of sympathetic nerve fibers was observed. These findings in chronically inflamed Charcot foot lend support to the neurovascular theory in the late chronic phase, which probably depends on the inflammatory upregulation of nerve repellent factors.

  9. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  10. The cutaneous nerve biopsy: technical aspects, indications, and contribution.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Nolano, Maria; Sommer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy with a 3mm disposable circular punch is easy to perform and allows, after proper processing, the visualization of epidermal, dermal, and sweat gland nerve fibers. A technique of sampling the epidermis alone by applying a suction capsule, the "blister" technique, has also been developed. It is most common to stain immunohistochemically for the pan-axonal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), an ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase. The sections are then observed and analyzed with bright-field microscopy or with indirect immunofluorescence with or without confocal microscopy. Most studies report quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density displayed in bright-field microscopy. Normative values have been established, particularly from the distal part of the leg, 10cm above the external malleolus. In diabetes mellitus early degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers is induced and there is slower regeneration even when there is no evidence of neuropathy. Skin biopsy is of particular value in the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy when nerve conduction studies are normal. It may also be repeated in order to study the progressive nature of the disease and also has the potential of studying regeneration of nerve fibers and thus the effects of treatment. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies may also involve loss of small-diameter nerve fibers and IgM deposits in dermal myelinated nerve fibers in anti-MAG neuropathy. In some cases the presence of vasculitis in skin may indicate a nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy and in HIV neuropathy intraepidermal nerve fiber density is reduced in a length-dependent manner. In several hereditary neuropathies intraepidermal nerve fiber density may be reduced but other abnormalities can also be demonstrated in dermal myelinated fibers. Some small swellings and varicosities may be present in the distal leg skin biopsy of healthy individuals but large axonal swellings are considered as evidence of a pathological

  11. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo-han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves. PMID:28197200

  12. Biodegradable magnesium wire promotes regeneration of compressed sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Han; Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) wire has been shown to be biodegradable and have anti-inflammatory properties. It can induce Schwann cells to secrete nerve growth factor and promote the regeneration of nerve axons after central nervous system injury. We hypothesized that biodegradable Mg wire may enhance compressed peripheral nerve regeneration. A rat acute sciatic nerve compression model was made, and AZ31 Mg wire (3 mm diameter; 8 mm length) bridged at both ends of the nerve. Our results demonstrate that sciatic functional index, nerve growth factor, p75 neurotrophin receptor, and tyrosine receptor kinase A mRNA expression are increased by Mg wire in Mg model. The numbers of cross section nerve fibers and regenerating axons were also increased. Sciatic nerve function was improved and the myelinated axon number was increased in injured sciatic nerve following Mg treatment. Immunofluorescence histopathology showed that there were increased vigorous axonal regeneration and myelin sheath coverage in injured sciatic nerve after Mg treatment. Our findings confirm that biodegradable Mg wire can promote the regeneration of acute compressed sciatic nerves.

  13. Intraepidermal free nerve fiber endings in the hairless skin of the rat as revealed by the zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide technique.

    PubMed

    Müller, T

    2000-04-01

    The nerve fiber distribution in the epidermis of the hairless rat skin was studied light microscopically by means of zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide staining. Two different morphological types of free nerve fiber endings could be detected: clusters of relatively thick nerve fibers stretched up through the spinous layer up to the granular layer sending off terminal branches. In addition, many solitary thin varicose nerve fibers were seen within the epidermis. The observed discrepancies in nerve fiber diameters appeared to be larger than those reported for human intraepidermal nerve fibers in recent immunohistochemical studies. Moreover, dendritic cells, most probably representing Langerhans cells, could be selectively stained. These cells appeared to be in a close location to thin varicose nerve fibers. Both types of demonstrated free nerve endings have to be functionally connected with different sensoric functions. Possibly, a subpopulation of the thin nerve fibers might possess primarily a nociceptive task, whereas the thick ones have most probably to be regarded as mechanoreceptive. The nerve fibers innervating dendritic cells appear to be identical to the peptidergic ones which may regulate the antigen-presenting capacity of these cells. Due to its selectivity for intraepidermal nerve fibers, the used method might supplement immunohistochemical procedures in a helpful manner.

  14. The histology of retinal nerve fiber layer bundles and bundle defects.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1979-05-01

    The fiber bundle striations recognized clinically in normal monkey eyes appear to be bundles of axons compartmentalized within glial tunnels formed by Müller's-cell processes, when viewed histologically. The dark boundaries that separate individual bundles are the broadened foot endings of these cells near the inner surface of the retina. Within one week after focal retinal photocoagulation, characteristic fundus changes could be seen in experimental eyes. In histologic sections of the involved retina, there was marked cystic degeneration of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Within one month, atrophy of distal axon segments was complete. With the drop-out of damaged axons and thinning of individual fiber bundles, retinal striations became less prominent. The resulting fundus picture in these experimental eyes is similar to fiber bundle defects that can be seen clinically in various neuro-ophthalmic disorders.

  15. Simultaneous degeneration of myenteric plexuses and pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve in slow transit constipation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Kun; Bi, Dongsong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Slow transit constipation (STC) is a common disease of which the etiology is still not clear. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain STC, including autonomic neuropathy, disorders of the enteric nervous system and so forth. Morphological abnormalities of the enteric nerves of the colon in patients with STC have been extensively reported, while there have been no morphological reports focusing on extrinsic extramural fibers from the pelvic plexus to the distal colon (i.e., pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve) in patients with STC. Patient concerns: Whether morphological changes of pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve coexist with abnormalities of the enteric nerves of the colon in the patient with STC. Diagnosis: Slow transit constipation (STC). Interventions: The patient with STC underwent a partial colectomy (sigmoid colon and partial descending colon). The fibers of the myenteric plexuses within the removed colon and the myelinated fibers of the pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve were observed under optical and electron-microscope. Outcomes: The fibers of the myenteric plexuses showed vacuolated degeneration between the muscularis propria layer under optical microscope. Myelinated fibers of the pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve showed obvious vacuolated degeneration under electron-microscopic examination. Lessons: Such a simultaneous neuropathy in both myenteric plexuses and extrinsic extramural nerves has not been documented previously. Our finding supports the notion that neuropathy remains the most plausible explanation for STC, in which nerve dysfunction might occur by way of a degenerative process. PMID:28296784

  16. A nanofibrous PHBV tube with Schwann cell as artificial nerve graft contributing to rat sciatic nerve regeneration across a 30-mm defect bridge.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Heidari Keshel, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    A nanofibrous PHBV nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of nerve regeneration in rats. The designed conduits were investigated by physical, mechanical and microscopic analyses. The conduits were implanted into a 30-mm gap in the sciatic nerves of the rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology. This polymeric conduit had sufficiently high mechanical properties to serve as a nerve guide. The results demonstrated that in the nanofibrous graft with cells, the sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. For the grafts especially the nanofibrous conduits with cells, muscle cells of gastrocnemius on the operated side were uniform in their size and structures. This study proves the feasibility of artificial conduit with Schwann cells for nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in a rat model.

  17. Innervation of TRPV1-, PGP-, and CGRP-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the subepithelial layer of a whole mount preparation of the rat cornea.

    PubMed

    Hiura, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The pattern of innervation of capsaicin receptor, TRPV1-(transient receptor protein vanilloid 1), PGP 9.5-(protein gene product, a marker of peripheral nerve fibers)-, and CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide)-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers was examined by immunohistological staining of whole mount preparations of the adult rat cornea. The outer corneoscleral limbus toward the central cornea in the subepithelial (stromal) layer was richly innervated by a meshwork of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. Sparse innervation was observed in the central cornea, presumably owing to insufficient staining. Dense innervation of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers were demonstrated in addition to innervation of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers, running from the corneoscleral margin to the central cornea. Although the density of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers appeared to gradually diminish, immunostaining of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers was not as clear as that of PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. The TRPV1-IR nerve fibers appeared to be thinner than the PGP- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers. The TRPV1-IR leash fibers were observed in the basal epithelial layer, presumably ensuring effective corneal reflex, response to noxious stimuli, and repair of cornea injury.

  18. Atrophic nerve fibers in regions of reduced MIBG uptake in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hajime; Ozawa Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Isao

    1995-11-01

    A myocardial MIBG-SPECT examination was conducted 2 wk after doxorubicin chemotherapy on a 52-yr-old woman without cardiac symptoms. Despite normal {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy, reduced MIBG uptake was detected in the apical anterior, inferior and lateral segments of the left ventricle. The patient died of congestive heart failure due to doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy 10 mo later. At necropsy, the left ventricle was markedly dilated and the apical anterior, inferior and lateral walls were thin, stiff and whitish. Nerve fibers in the apical inferior wall were atrophic and markedly fibrotic where MIBG uptake was most reduced. Nerve fibers in the septum were normal where MIBG uptake had remained normal. The histologic findings correspond with the findings on the MIBG image. MIBG imaging may detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy before cardiac symptoms are manifest and cardiac function deteriorates. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The human trochlear and abducens nerves at different ages - a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Muthu; Sharma, Saroj; Jacob, Tony G; Bhardwaj, Daya N; Nag, Tapas C; Roy, Tara Sankar

    2015-02-01

    The trochlear and abducens nerves (TN and AN) control the movement of the superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles of the eyeball, respectively. Despite their immense clinical and radiological importance no morphometric data was available from a wide spectrum of age groups for comparison with either pathological or other conditions involving these nerves. In the present study, morphometry of the TN and AN was performed on twenty post-mortem samples ranging from 12-90 years of age. The nerve samples were processed for resin embedding and toluidine blue stained thin (1µm) sections were used for estimating the total number of myelinated axons by fractionator and the cross sectional area of the nerve and the axons by point counting methods. We observed that the TN was covered by a well-defined epineurium and had ill-defined fascicles, whereas the AN had multiple fascicles with scanty epineurium. Both nerves contained myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of various sizes intermingled with each other. Out of the four age groups (12-20y, 21-40y, 41-60y and >61y) the younger groups revealed isolated bundles of small thinly myelinated axons. The total number of myelinated fibers in the TN and AN at various ages ranged from 1100-3000 and 1600-7000, respectively. There was no significant change in the cross-sectional area of the nerves or the axonal area of the myelinated nerves across the age groups. However, myelin thickness increased significantly in the AN with aging (one way ANOVA). The present study provides baseline morphometric data on the human TN and AN at various ages.

  20. Changes of the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the diabetic rat's alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet; Batbayar, Bayarchimeg; Vér, Agota; Zelles, Tivadar

    2006-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, where neuropeptides and immunocells might play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article we have quantified the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's alimentary tract (tongue, duodenum, colon) using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were found in all layers of the alimentary tract and their distribution pattern was similar in both control and diabetic groups. Mast cell-nerve fiber contacts were rarely found in the controls. However, after 4 weeks duration of diabetes the number of IR nerve fibers and the immunocompetent cells increased significantly (P < 0.05), and the number of mast cell-nerve fiber contacts was even more significantly increased (P < 0.001). The distance between nerve fibers and immunocells was about 1 mum or even less. Some of the mast cells were degranulated in the vicinity of nerve fibers. No immunocompetent cells were IR for any antisera in the control. However, after the streptozotocin treatment, a large number of the immunocompetent cells showed immunoreactivity for SP and NPY. Counting all immunocompetent cells in whole sections showed that 12.3% of them were IR for SP and 25.4% were IR for NPY. Increased number of SP-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in diabetes mellitus might be the reason for painful neuropathy and might amplify the inflammatory reaction in an axon reflex manner; the released histamine and leukotrienes, cytokines, and chemokines might cause inflammations and lesions of the mucosa.

  1. Normal axonal ion channel function in large peripheral nerve fibers following chronic ciguatera sensitization.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2008-03-01

    Although the acute clinical effects of ciguatera poisoning, due to ingestion of ciguatoxin, are mediated by activation of transient Na+ channels, the mechanisms underlying ciguatera sensitization remain undefined. Axonal excitability studies were performed by stimulating the median motor and sensory nerves in two patients with ciguatera sensitization. Excitability parameters were all within normal limits, thereby arguing against dysfunction of axonal membrane ion channels in large-diameter fibers in ciguatera sensitization.

  2. Latency of auditory evoked potential monitoring the effects of general anesthetics on nerve fibers and synapses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bowan; Liang, Feixue; Zhong, Lei; Lin, Minlin; Yang, Juan; Yan, Linqing; Xiao, Jinfan; Xiao, Zhongju

    2015-08-06

    Auditory evoked potential (AEP) is an effective index for the effects of general anesthetics. However, it's unknown if AEP can differentiate the effects of general anesthetics on nerve fibers and synapses. Presently, we investigated AEP latency and amplitude changes to different acoustic intensities during pentobarbital anesthesia. Latency more regularly changed than amplitude during anesthesia. AEP Latency monotonically decreased with acoustic intensity increase (i.e., latency-intensity curve) and could be fitted to an exponential decay equation, which showed two components, the theoretical minimum latency and stimulus-dependent delay. From the latency-intensity curves, the changes of these two components (∆L and ∆I) were extracted during anesthesia. ∆L and ∆I monitored the effect of pentobarbital on nerve fibers and synapses. Pentobarbital can induce anesthesia, and two side effects, hypoxemia and hypothermia. The hypoxemia was not related with ∆L and ∆I. However, ∆L was changed by the hypothermia, whereas ∆I was changed by the hypothermia and anesthesia. Therefore, we conclude that, AEP latency is superior to amplitude for the effects of general anesthetics, ∆L monitors the effect of hypothermia on nerve fibers, and ∆I monitors a combined effect of anesthesia and hypothermia on synapses. When eliminating the temperature factor, ∆I monitors the anesthesia effect on synapses.

  3. Timing of cochlear responses inferred from frequency-threshold tuning curves of auditory-nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Temchin, Andrei N.; Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Ruggero, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Links between frequency tuning and timing were explored in the responses to sound of auditory-nerve fibers. Synthetic transfer functions were constructed by combining filter functions, derived via minimum-phase computations from average frequency-threshold tuning curves of chinchilla auditory-nerve fibers with high spontaneous activity (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 100: 2889–2898, 2008), and signal-front delays specified by the latencies of basilar-membrane and auditory-nerve fiber responses to intense clicks (A. N. Temchin et al., J. Neurophysiol. 93: 3635–3648, 2005). The transfer functions predict several features of the phase-frequency curves of cochlear responses to tones, including their shape transitions in the regions with characteristic frequencies of 1 kHz and 3–4 kHz (A. N. Temchin and M. A. Ruggero, JARO 11: 297–318, 2010). The transfer functions also predict the shapes of cochlear impulse responses, including the polarities of their frequency sweeps and their transition at characteristic frequencies around 1 kHz. Predictions are especially accurate for characteristic frequencies < 1 kHz. PMID:20951191

  4. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes.

  5. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  6. Nanofibrous nerve conduits for repair of 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Pouya, Majid; Rad, Hadi; Nava, Melody Omrani; Azarbakhsh, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit can promote peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. However, its efficiency in repair of over 30-mm-long sciatic nerve defects needs to be assessed. In this study, we used a nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit to bridge a 30-mm-long gap in the rat sciatic nerve. At 4 months after nerve conduit implantation, regenerated nerves were cally observed and histologically assessed. In the nanofibrous graft, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed by restoration of nerve continuity and formation of myelinated nerve fiber. There were Schwann cells and glial cells in the regenerated nerves. Masson's trichrome staining showed that there were no pathological changes in the size and structure of gastrocnemius muscle cells on the operated side of rats. These findings suggest that nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit is suitable for repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:25206536

  7. The "Lillie transition": models of the onset of saltatory conduction in myelinating axons.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert G; Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2013-06-01

    Almost 90 years ago, Lillie reported that rapid saltatory conduction arose in an iron wire model of nerve impulse propagation when he covered the wire with insulating sections of glass tubing equivalent to myelinated internodes. This led to his suggestion of a similar mechanism explaining rapid conduction in myelinated nerve. In both their evolution and their development, myelinating axons must make a similar transition between continuous and saltatory conduction. Achieving a smooth transition is a potential challenge that we examined in computer models simulating a segmented insulating sheath surrounding an axon having Hodgkin-Huxley squid parameters. With a wide gap under the sheath, conduction was continuous. As the gap was reduced, conduction initially slowed, owing to the increased extra-axonal resistance, then increased (the "rise") up to several times that of the unmyelinated fiber, as saltatory conduction set in. The conduction velocity slowdown was little affected by the number of myelin layers or modest changes in the size of the "node," but strongly affected by the size of the "internode" and axon diameter. The steepness of the rise of rapid conduction was greatly affected by the number of myelin layers and axon diameter, variably affected by internode length and little affected by node length. The transition to saltatory conduction occurred at surprisingly wide gaps and the improvement in conduction speed persisted to surprisingly small gaps. The study demonstrates that the specialized paranodal seals between myelin and axon, and indeed even the clustering of sodium channels at the nodes, are not necessary for saltatory conduction.

  8. Cutaneous afferent C-fibers regenerating along the distal nerve stump after crush lesion show two types of cold sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Lydia; Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Teliban, Alina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2009-08-01

    Cutaneous C-fiber afferents show two distinct types of cold sensitivity corresponding to non-noxious and noxious cold sensations. Here, responses to cold stimulation of afferent fibers regenerating in the rat sural nerve were studied in vivo 7-14 days after nerve crush and compared with responses to mechanical and heat stimulation. The physiological stimuli were applied to the sural nerve at or distal to the lesion site. Ectopic activity was evoked in 43% of 98 A-fibers (all mechanosensitive; a few additionally weakly thermosensitive). Ectopic activity was evoked in 127 (49.2%) of 258 electrically identified C-fibers by the physiological stimuli. Eight C-fibers were spontaneously active only. Of the 127 C-fibers, 46% had one of two distinct response patterns to cooling: (1) type 1 cold-sensitive C-fibers (n=29) had a high rate of activity at 28 degrees C on the nerve surface and showed graded responses to cooling with maximal discharge rates of 11.5+/-1.1 imp/s. This activity was completely inhibited by heating, while 12/29 fibers were also excited at high threshold (median 48 degrees C) by heating. Only one type 1 cold-sensitive C-fiber was mechanosensitive. (2) Type 2 cold-sensitive C-fibers (n=29) were silent or showed a low rate of activity at 28 degrees C, had a high threshold (median 5 degrees C) and low maximal discharge rates (2.4+/-0.4 imp/s) to cooling. They were also heat-sensitive (n=25) and/or mechanosensitive (n=20). These C-fibers were, apart from their cold sensitivity, functionally indistinguishable from C-fibers with mechano- and/or heat sensitivity only. Thus regenerating cutaneous C-fibers show two types of cold sensitivity similar to those observed in intact skin: fibers of one group are predominantly sensitive to cooling, whereas the others are polymodal.

  9. SUSTAINED BLOCKADE OF NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTORS TrkA, TrkB AND TrkC REDUCES NON-MALIGNANT SKELETAL PAIN BUT NOT THE MAINTENANCE OF SENSORY AND SYMPATHETIC NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Bouhana, Karyn S.; Trollinger, David; Winkler, James; Lee, Patrice; Andrews, Steven W.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    Current therapies for treating skeletal pain have significant limitations as available drugs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates) have significant unwanted side effects. Targeting nerve growth factor or it's cognate receptor Tropomysin receptor kinase A (TrkA) has recently become an attractive target for inhibition of adult skeletal pain. Here we explore whether sustained administration of a selective small molecule Trk inhibitor that blocks TrkA, TrkB and TrkC kinase activity with nanomolar affinity reduces skeletal pain while allowing the maintenance of sensory and sympathetic neurons in the adult mouse. Twice-daily administration of a Trk inhibitor was begun 1 day post fracture and within 8 hours of acute administration fracture pain related behaviors were reduced by 50% without significant sedation, weight gain or inhibition of fracture healing. Following administration of the Trk inhibitor for 7 weeks, there was no significant decline in the density of unmyelinated, myelinated sensory or sympathetic nerve fibers, measures of acute thermal pain, acute mechanical pain, or general neuromuscular function. The present results suggest that sustained administration of a peripherally selective TrkA, B & C inhibitor significantly reduces skeletal pain without having any obvious detrimental effects on adult sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or early fracture healing. As with any potential therapeutic advance, understanding whether the benefits of NGF blockade by ARRY-470 are associated with any risks or unexpected effects will be required to fully appreciate the patient populations that may benefit from this therapy. PMID:20854944

  10. Immunodominant fragments of myelin basic protein initiate T cell-dependent pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The myelin sheath provides electrical insulation of mechanosensory Aβ-afferent fibers. Myelin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) damage the myelin sheath. The resulting electrical instability of Aβ-fibers is believed to activate the nociceptive circuitry in Aβ-fibers and initiate pain from innocuous tactile stimulation (mechanical allodynia). The precise molecular mechanisms, responsible for the development of this neuropathic pain state after nerve injury (for example, chronic constriction injury, CCI), are not well understood. Methods and results Using mass spectrometry of the whole sciatic nerve proteome followed by bioinformatics analyses, we determined that the pathways, which are classified as the Infectious Disease and T-helper cell signaling, are readily activated in the nerves post-CCI. Inhibition of MMP-9/MMP-2 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and concomitant TNF-α and IL-17A expression in nerves. MMP-9 proteolysis of myelin basic protein (MBP) generated the MBP84-104 and MBP68-86 digest peptides, which are prominent immunogenic epitopes. In agreement, the endogenous MBP69-86 epitope co-localized with MHCII and MMP-9 in Schwann cells and along the nodes of Ranvier. Administration of either the MBP84-104 or MBP68-86 peptides into the naïve nerve rapidly produced robust mechanical allodynia with a concomitant increase in T cells and MHCII-reactive cell populations at the injection site. As shown by the genome-wide expression profiling, a single intraneural MBP84-104 injection stimulated the inflammatory, immune cell trafficking, and antigen presentation pathways in the injected naïve nerves and the associated spinal cords. Both MBP84-104-induced mechanical allodynia and characteristic pathway activation were remarkably less prominent in the T cell-deficient athymic nude rats. Conclusions These data implicate MBP as a novel mediator of pain. Furthermore, the action of MMPs expressed within 1 day post-injury is critical

  11. Methods for exploring the morpho-functional relations of the aortic depressor nerve in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Jussara Márcia; Júnior, Rubens Fazan; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Fazan, Valéria Paula Sassoli

    2011-01-30

    The present study investigated morpho-functional relations of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) 5, 15 and 120 days after the onset of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats. Time control animals received vehicle. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, ADN activity was recorded simultaneously with arterial pressure. After the recordings, nerves were prepared for light microscopy study and morphometry. ADN function was accessed by means of pressure-nerve activity curve (fitted by sigmoidal regression) and cross-spectral analysis between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and ADN activity. The relation between morphological (myelinated fibers number and density, total myelin area, total fiber area and percentage of occupancy) and functional (gain, signal/noise relation, frequency) parameters were accessed by linear regression analysis and correlation coefficient calculations. Functional parameters obtained by means of the sigmoidal regression curve as well as by cross-spectral analysis were similar in diabetic and control rats. Morphometric parameters of the ADN were similar between groups 5 days after the onset of diabetes. Average myelin area and myelinated fiber area were significantly smaller on diabetic rats 15 and 120 days after the onset of diabetes, being the myelinated fiber and respective axons area and diameter also smaller on 120 days group. Nevertheless, G ratio (ratio between axon and fiber diameter) was nearly 0.6 and not different between groups or experimental times. No significant relationship between morphological and functional parameters was detected in all experimental groups. The present study suggests that ADN diabetic neuropathy was time-dependent, with damage to myelinated fibers to be the primary event, not evidenced by physiological methods.

  12. [Expression and dynamics of peptidergic nerve fibers in granulation tissue after distance osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Wolf, K; Höcherl, E; Farkas, T; Pfister, C

    2001-10-01

    The transmitters and/or modulators calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) are supposed to be involved in bone growth, fracture healing and internal remodeling. Immunohistochemical proof of neuropeptide positive fibers in normal bone let us assume that these substances effect the early phase of fracture healing. Exact time of appearance of neuropeptide positive fibers, localisation in the bone, chemospecifity and mode of genesis are unknown so fare. Research was done on a model of distance osteosynthesis of the rabbit tibia. Primary and secondary antibodies were used for indirect immunohistochemical technique. We put more strength on the concrete stereological calculation of length of the nerve fibers than on a conventional statistical evaluation. After histological preparation of tissue specimens from the interfragmental gap and the bone marrow beside the gap the neuropeptides CGRP, SP and NPY were immunohistochemically expressed. Sprouting of CGRP- and SP-positive nerve fibers has its origin in the bone marrow. A vascularisation in the early state of osteoneogenesis after fracture seems impossible without the nerval peptidergic influence and transmission.

  13. Modulation of action potential trains in rabbit saphenous nerve unmyelinated fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Ru; Liu, Yi-Hui; Ji, Wei-Gang; Duan, Jian-Hong; Hu, San-Jue

    2013-01-01

    Usually, the main axon is assumed to faithfully conduct action potentials (APs). Recent data have indicated that neural processing can occur along the axonal path. However, the patterns and mechanisms of temporal coding are not clear. In the present study, single fiber recording was used to analyze activity-dependent modulation of AP trains in the main axons of C fibers in the rabbit saphenous nerve. Trains of 5 superthreshold electrical pulses at interstimulus intervals of 20 or 50 ms were applied to the nerve trunk for 200 s. The interspike intervals (ISIs) for these trains were compared to the input interstimulus intervals. Three basic types of C fibers were observed in response to repeated stimuli: first, the ISI between the first and second AP (ISI1-2) of type 1 was longer than the interstimulus interval; second, the ISI1-2 of type 2 showed wavelike fluctuations around the interstimulus interval, and third, the ISI1-2 of type 3 exhibited shorter intervals for a long period. Furthermore, both 4-aminopyridine-sensitive potassium and hyperpolarization-activated cation currents were involved in the modulation of ISI1-2 of train pulses. These data provide new evidence that multiple modes of neural conduction can occur along the main axons of C fibers.

  14. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    PubMed

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  15. Reflectance Spectrum and Birefringence of the Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer With Hypertensive Damage of Axonal Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiang-Run; Knighton, Robert W.; Spector, Ye Z.; Qiao, Jianzhong; Kong, Wei; Zhao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Glaucoma damages the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL). This study used precise multimodal image registration to investigate the changes of the RNFL reflectance spectrum and birefringence in nerve fiber bundles with different degrees of axonal damage. Methods The reflectance spectrum of individual nerve fiber bundles in normal rats and rats with experimental glaucoma was measured from 400 to 830 nm and their birefringence was measured at 500 nm. Optical measurements of the same bundles were made at different distances from the optic nerve head (ONH). After the optical measurements, the axonal cytoskeleton of the RNFL was evaluated by confocal microscopy to assess the severity of cytoskeletal change. Results For normal bundles, the shape of the RNFL reflectance spectrum and the value of RNFL birefringence did not change along bundles. In treated retinas, damage to the cytoskeleton varied within and across retinas. The damage in retinal sectors was subjectively graded from normal-looking to severe. Change of spectral shape occurred near the ONH in all sectors studied. This change became more prominent and occurred farther from the ONH with increased damage severity. In contrast, RNFL birefringence did not show change in normal-looking sectors, but decreased in sectors with mild and moderate damage. The birefringence of severely damaged sectors was either within or below the normal range. Conclusions Varying degrees of cytoskeletal damage affect the RNFL reflectance spectrum and birefringence differently, supporting differences in the ultrastructural basis for the two optical properties. Both properties, however, may provide a means to detect disease and to estimate ultrastructural damage of the RNFL in glaucoma. PMID:28395028

  16. Early axonal damage and progressive myelin pathology define the kinetics of CNS histopathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Stormanns, Eva R; Bader, Jonas; Arnhold, Stefan; Addicks, Klaus; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2013-10-01

    Studies of MS histopathology are largely dependent on suitable animal models. While light microscopic analysis gives an overview of tissue pathology, it falls short in evaluating detailed changes in nerve fiber morphology. The ultrastructural data presented here and obtained from studies of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG):35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice delineate that axonal damage and myelin pathology follow different kinetics in the disease course. While myelin pathology accumulated with disease progression, axonal damage coincided with the initial clinical disease symptoms and remained stable over time. This pattern applied both to irreversible axolysis and early axonal pathology. Notably, these histopathological patterns were reflected by the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM), suggesting that the NAWM is also in an active neurodegenerative state. The data underline the need for neuroprotection in MS and suggest the MOG model as a highly valuable tool for the assessment of different therapeutic strategies.

  17. Unmyelinated visceral afferents exhibit frequency dependent action potential broadening while myelinated visceral afferents do not.

    PubMed

    Li, Bai-Yan; Feng, Bin; Tsu, Hwa Y; Schild, John H

    2007-06-21

    Sensory information arising from visceral organ systems is encoded into action potential trains that propagate along afferent fibers to target nuclei in the central nervous system. These information streams range from tight patterns of action potentials that are well synchronized with the sensory transduction event to irregular, patternless discharge with no clear correlation to the sensory input. In general terms these afferent pathways can be divided into unmyelinated and myelinated fiber types. Our laboratory has a long standing interest in the functional differences between these two types of afferents in terms of the preprocessing of sensory information into action potential trains (synchrony, frequency, duration, etc.), the reflexogenic consequences of this sensory input to the central nervous system and the ionic channels that give rise to the electrophysiological properties of these unique cell types. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were any functional differences in the somatic action potential characteristics of unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in response to different rates of sensory nerve stimulation. Our results showed that activity and frequency-dependent widening of the somatic action potential was quite prominent in unmyelinated but not myelinated vagal afferents. Spike broadening often leads to increased influx of Ca(2+) ions that has been associated with a diverse range of modulatory mechanisms both at the cell body and central synaptic terminations (e.g. increased neurotransmitter release.) We conclude that our observations are indicative of fundamentally different mechanisms for neural integration of sensory information arising from unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents.

  18. The organization of taste sensibilities in hamster chorda tympani nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Frank, ME; Bieber, SL; Smith, DV

    1988-01-01

    Electrophysiological measurements of nerve impulse frequencies were used to explore the organization of taste sensibilities in single fibers of the hamster chorda tympani nerve. Moderately intense taste solutions that are either very similar or easily discriminated were applied to the anterior lingual surface. 40 response profiles or 13 stimulus activation patterns were considered variables and examined with multivariate statistical techniques. Three kinds of response profiles were seen in fibers that varied in their overall sensitivity to taste solutions. One profile (S) showed selectivity for sweeteners, a second (N) showed selectivity for sodium salts, and a third (H) showed sensitivity to salts, acids, and other compounds. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that profiles fell into discrete classes. Responses to many pairs of effective stimuli were covariant across profiles within a class, but some acidic stimuli had more idiosyncratic effects. Factor analysis of profiles identified two common factors, accounting for 77% of the variance. A unipolar factor was identified with the N profile, and a bipolar factor was identified with the S profile and its opposite, the H profile. Three stimulus activation patterns were elicited by taste solutions that varied in intensity of effect. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that the patterns fell into discrete classes. Factor analysis of patterns identified three common unipolar factors accounting for 82% of the variance. Eight stimuli (MgSO4, NH4Cl, KCl, citric acid, acetic acid, urea, quinine HCl, HCl) selectively activated fibers with H profiles, three stimuli (fructose, Na saccharin, sucrose) selectively activated fibers with S profiles, and two stimuli (NaNO3, NaCl) activated fibers with N profiles more strongly than fibers with H profiles. Stimuli that evoke different patterns taste distinct to hamsters. Stimuli that evoke the same pattern taste more similar. It was concluded that the hundreds of peripheral

  19. Enkephalin-like immunoreactivity of olivocochlear nerve fibers in cochlea of guinea pig and cat

    PubMed Central

    Fex, Jörgen; Altschuler, Richard A.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of enkephalin-like immunoreactivity in the cochlea of the guinea pig and cat was studied. Indirect immunofluorescence immunohistochemistry using antisera generated against a methionine enkephalin-bovine thyroglobulin conjugate was applied to surface preparations of the organ of Corti and cryostat sections of the whole of the cochlea. In the cochlear osseous spiral lamina, immunofluorescence was localized to unmyelinated fibers of the intraganglionic spiral bundle. In the organ of Corti, immunofluorescence was localized to a small number of fibers at inner hair cells, the inner spiral bundle, and tunnel spiral bundle, to tunnel crossing fibers at the level of the tunnel floor, to an occasional spiral outer fiber, and to the synaptic region of outer hair cells in the three rows of the basal turn of the cochlea. Less immunofluorescence was found in this region as one progressed towards the apex, with none seen at the apex. At the most apical region the inner spiral bundle became patchy and the tunnel spiral bundle developed arcades. There was no immunofluorescence found in spiral ganglion cells, in auditory nerve fibers, or in the hair cells of the organ of Corti. The findings were the same in cat as in guinea pig, the latter being studied in more detail. It was concluded that efferent, olivocochlear neurons of the cochlea, synapsing predominantly with primary auditory nerve fibers from the inner sensory cells or with the sensory cells, contain enkephalin-like immunoreactivity. Also, the findings indicate that endings of olivocochlear neurons that synapse predominantly with outer hair cells contain enkephalin-like immunoreactivity. It has previously been shown that olivocochlear neurons are likely to be cholinergic. Images PMID:7015329

  20. A simple method for fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment having potential for nerve regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Vimal, Sunil Kumar; Ahamad, Nadim; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2016-06-01

    In peripheral nerve injuries where direct suturing of nerve endings is not feasible, nerve regeneration has been facilitated through the use of artificially aligned fibrous scaffolds that provide directional growth of neurons to bridge the gap. The degree of fiber alignment is crucial and can impact the directionality of cells in a fibrous scaffold. While there have been multiple approaches that have been used for controlling fiber alignment, however, they have been associated with a compromised control on other properties, such as diameter, morphology, curvature, and topology of fibers. Therefore, the present study demonstrates a modified electrospinning set-up, that enabled fabrication of electrospun fibers with controlled degree of alignment from non-aligned (NA), moderately aligned (MA, 75%) to highly aligned (HA, 95%) sub-micron fibers while keeping other physical properties unchanged. The results demonstrate that the aligned fibers (MA and HA) facilitated directional growth of human astrocytoma cells (U373), wherein the aspect ratio of cells was found to increase with an increase in degree of fibers alignment. In contrast to NA and MA fibers, the HA fibers showed improved contact guidance to U373 cells that was demonstrated by a significantly higher cell aspect ratio and nuclear aspect ratio. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a modified electrospinning setup to fabricate differentially aligned fibrous scaffolds with the HA fibers showing potential for use in neural tissue engineering.

  1. Novel Immunohistochemical Techniques Using Discrete Signal Amplification Systems for Human Cutaneous Peripheral Nerve Fiber Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Confocal imaging uses immunohistochemical binding of specific antibodies to visualize tissues, but technical obstacles limit more widespread use of this technique in the imaging of peripheral nerve tissue. These obstacles include same-species antibody cross-reactivity and weak fluorescent signals of individual and co-localized antigens. The aims of this study were to develop new immunohistochemical techniques for imaging of peripheral nerve fibers. Three-millimeter punch skin biopsies of healthy individuals were fixed, frozen, and cut into 50-µm sections. Tissues were stained with a variety of antibody combinations with two signal amplification systems, streptavidin-biotin-fluorochrome (sABC) and tyramide-horseradish peroxidase-fluorochrome (TSA), used simultaneously to augment immunohistochemical signals. The combination of the TSA and sABC amplification systems provided the first successful co-localization of sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic nerve fibers in cutaneous human sweat glands and vasomotor and pilomotor systems. Primary antibodies from the same species were amplified individually without cross-reactivity or elevated background interference. The confocal fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio increased, and image clarity improved. These modifications to signal amplification systems have the potential for widespread use in the study of human neural tissues. PMID:21411809

  2. Higher Sensitivity of Human Auditory Nerve Fibers to Positive Electrical Currents

    PubMed Central

    Carlyon, Robert P.; van Wieringen, Astrid; Deeks, John M.; Wouters, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Most contemporary cochlear implants (CIs) stimulate the auditory nerve with trains of amplitude-modulated, symmetric biphasic pulses. Although both polarities of a pulse can depolarize the nerve fibers and generate action potentials, it remains unknown which of the two (positive or negative) phases has the stronger effect. Understanding the effects of pulse polarity will help to optimize the stimulation protocols and to deliver the most relevant information to the implant listeners. Animal experiments have shown that cathodic (negative) current flows are more effective than anodic (positive) ones in eliciting neural responses, and this finding has motivated the development of novel speech-processing algorithms. In this study, we show electrophysiologically and psychophysically that the human auditory system exhibits the opposite pattern, being more sensitive to anodic stimulation. We measured electrically evoked compound action potentials in CI listeners for phase-separated pulses, allowing us to tease out the responses to each of the two opposite-polarity phases. At an equal stimulus level, the anodic phase yielded the larger response. Furthermore, a measure of psychophysical masking patterns revealed that this polarity difference was still present at higher levels of the auditory system and was therefore not solely due to antidromic propagation of the neural response. This finding may relate to a particular orientation of the nerve fibers relative to the electrode or to a substantial degeneration and demyelination of the peripheral processes. Potential applications to improve CI speech-processing strategies are discussed. PMID:18288537

  3. Extracellular Recording of Light Responses from Optic Nerve Fibers and the Caudal Photoreceptor in the Crayfish.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, Steven C; Van Hoof, Alexander G; Le, Chi C; Dearworth, James R

    2015-01-01

    Few laboratory exercises have been developed using the crayfish as a model for teaching how neural processing is done by sensory organs that detect light stimuli. This article describes the dissection procedures and methods for conducting extracellular recording from light responses of both the optic nerve fibers found in the animal's eyestalk and from the caudal photoreceptor located in the ventral nerve cord. Instruction for ADInstruments' data acquisition system is also featured for the data collection and analysis of responses. The comparison provides students a unique view on how spike activities measured from neurons code image-forming and non-image-forming processes. Results from the exercise show longer latency and lower frequency of firing by the caudal photoreceptor compared to optic nerve fibers to demonstrate evidence of different functions. After students learn the dissection, recording procedure, and the functional anatomy, they can develop their own experiments to learn more about the photoreceptive mechanisms and the sensory integration of modalities by these light-responsive interneurons.

  4. Extracellular Recording of Light Responses from Optic Nerve Fibers and the Caudal Photoreceptor in the Crayfish

    PubMed Central

    Nesbit, Steven C.; Van Hoof, Alexander G.; Le, Chi C.; Dearworth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Few laboratory exercises have been developed using the crayfish as a model for teaching how neural processing is done by sensory organs that detect light stimuli. This article describes the dissection procedures and methods for conducting extracellular recording from light responses of both the optic nerve fibers found in the animal’s eyestalk and from the caudal photoreceptor located in the ventral nerve cord. Instruction for ADInstruments’ data acquisition system is also featured for the data collection and analysis of responses. The comparison provides students a unique view on how spike activities measured from neurons code image-forming and non-image-forming processes. Results from the exercise show longer latency and lower frequency of firing by the caudal photoreceptor compared to optic nerve fibers to demonstrate evidence of different functions. After students learn the dissection, recording procedure, and the functional anatomy, they can develop their own experiments to learn more about the photoreceptive mechanisms and the sensory integration of modalities by these light-responsive interneurons. PMID:26557793

  5. FK506-loaded chitosan conduit promotes the regeneration of injured sciatic nerves in the rat through the upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zheng, Xifu; Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei; Wei, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-09-15

    FK506 has been shown to exert neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects, but its long-term application for nerve regeneration is limited. This study evaluated the potential application of a novel FK506-loaded chitosan conduit for peripheral nerve repair, and explored the underlying mechanism. A sciatic nerve injury model was created in male Wistar rats, which were then randomly divided into three treatment groups (n=40, each): chitosan-only, chitosan+FK506 injection, and FK506-loaded chitosan. We found significant recovery of normal morphology of sciatic nerves and higher density of myelinated nerve fibers in rats treated with FK506-loaded chitosan. Similarly, the total number of myelinated nerve fibers, myelin sheath thickness, and axon diameters were significantly higher in this group compared with the others, and the compound muscle action potentials and motor nerve conduction velocity values of sciatic nerves were significantly higher. BDNF and TrkB levels in motor neurons were highest in rats treated with FK506-loaded chitosan. In conclusion, FK506-loaded chitosan promoted peripheral nerve repair and regeneration in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. These effects are correlated with increased BDNF and TrkB expression in motor neurons.

  6. Needle stylet with integrated optical fibers for spectroscopic contrast during peripheral nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; van der Voort, Marjolein; Roggeveen, Stefan; Lucassen, Gerald; Bierhoff, Walter; Hendriks, Benno H. W.; Brynolf, Marcus; Holmström, Björn

    2011-07-01

    The effectiveness of peripheral nerve blocks is highly dependent on the accuracy at which the needle tip is navigated to the target injection site. Even when electrical stimulation is utilized in combination with ultrasound guidance, determining the proximity of the needle tip to the target region close to the nerve can be challenging. Optical reflectance spectroscopy could provide additional information about tissues that is complementary to these navigation methods. We demonstrate a novel needle stylet for acquiring spectra from tissue at the tip of a commercial 20-gauge needle. The stylet has integrated optical fibers that deliver broadband light to tissue and receive scattered light. Two spectrometers resolve the light that is received from tissue across the wavelength range of 500-1600 nm. In our pilot study, measurements are acquired from a postmortem dissection of the brachial plexus of a swine. Clear differences are observed between spectra acquired from nerves and those acquired from adjacent tissue structures. We conclude that spectra acquired with the stylet have the potential to increase the accuracy with which peripheral nerve blocks are performed.

  7. Sacral neural crest-derived cells enter the aganglionic colon of Ednrb-/- mice along extrinsic nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Christopher S; Zaitoun, Ismail; Haberman, Kathryn M; Gosain, Ankush; Druckenbrod, Noah R; Epstein, Miles L

    2012-02-15

    Both vagal and sacral neural crest cells contribute to the enteric nervous system in the hindgut. Because it is difficult to visualize sacral crest cells independently of vagal crest, the nature and extent of the sacral crest contribution to the enteric nervous system are not well established in rodents. To overcome this problem we generated mice in which only the fluorescent protein-labeled sacral crest are present in the terminal colon. We found that sacral crest cells were associated with extrinsic nerve fibers. We investigated the source, time of appearance, and characteristics of the extrinsic nerve fibers found in the aganglionic colon. We observed that the pelvic ganglion neurons contributed a number of extrinsic fibers that travel within the hindgut between circular and longitudinal muscles and within the submucosa and serosa. Sacral crest-derived cells along these fibers diminished in number from fetal to postnatal stages. A small number of sacral crest-derived cells were found between the muscle layers and expressed the neuronal marker Hu. We conclude that sacral crest cells enter the hindgut by advancing on extrinsic fibers and, in aganglionic preparations, they form a small number of neurons at sites normally occupied by myenteric ganglia. We also examined the colons of ganglionated preparations and found sacral crest-derived cells associated with both extrinsic nerve fibers and nascent ganglia. Extrinsic nerve fibers serve as a route of entry for both rodent and avian sacral crest into the hindgut.

  8. Detection of Glaucoma Progression with Stratus OCT Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer, Optic Nerve Head, and Macular Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Alencar, Luciana M.; Bowd, Christopher; Sample, Pamela A.; Susanna, Remo; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), optic nerve head, and macular thickness parameters to detect progressive structural damage in glaucoma. Methods This observational cohort study included 253 eyes of 253 patients. Images were obtained annually with the Stratus OCT (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, CA) along with optic disc stereophotographs and standard automated perimetry (SAP) visual fields. The median follow-up time was 4.01 years. Progression was determined by the Guided Progression Analysis software for SAP (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.) and by masked assessment of optic disc stereophotographs performed by expert graders. Random coefficient models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the relationship between change in Stratus OCT parameters over time and progression as determined by SAP and/or stereophotographs. Results From the 253 eyes, 31 (13%) showed progression over time by stereophotographs and/or SAP. Mean rates of change in average RNFL thickness were significantly higher for progressors compared with nonprogressors (−0.72 μm/y vs. 0.14 μm/y; P = 0.004), with sensitivity of 77% for specificity of 80%. RNFL parameters performed significantly better than ONH and macular thickness measurements in discriminating progressors from nonprogressors. The parameters with the largest ROC curve areas for each scanning area were inferior RNFL thickness (0.84), cup area (0.66), and inferior inner macula thickness (0.64). Conclusions Stratus OCT RNFL parameters discriminated between eyes progressing by visual fields or optic disc photographs and eyes that remained stable by these methods and performed significantly better than ONH and macular thickness parameters in detecting change over time. PMID:19815731

  9. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique. PMID:24390374

  10. Vagal nerve stimulation activates vagal afferent fibers that reduce cardiac efferent parasympathetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Kentaro; Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Takamiya, Tatsuo; Yagishita, Daigo; So, Eileen L.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to have antiarrhythmic effects, but many of these benefits were demonstrated in the setting of vagal nerve decentralization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of afferent fiber activation during VNS on efferent control of cardiac hemodynamic and electrophysiological parameters. In 37 pigs a 56-electrode sock was placed over the ventricles to record local activation recovery intervals (ARIs), a surrogate of action potential duration. In 12 of 37 animals atropine was given systemically. Right and left VNS were performed under six conditions: both vagal trunks intact (n = 25), ipsilateral right (n = 11), ipsilateral left (n = 14), contralateral right (n = 7), contralateral left (n = 10), and bilateral (n = 25) vagal nerve transection (VNTx). Unilateral VNTx significantly affected heart rate, PR interval, Tau, and global ARIs. Right VNS after ipsilateral VNTx had augmented effects on hemodynamic parameters and increase in ARI, while subsequent bilateral VNTx did not significantly modify this effect (%change in ARI in intact condition 2.2 ± 0.9% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 1.7% and bilateral VNTx 5.3 ± 0.8%, P < 0.05). Left VNS after left VNTx tended to increase its effects on hemodynamics and ARI response (P = 0.07), but only after bilateral VNTx did these changes reach significance (intact 1.1 ± 0.5% vs. ipsilateral VNTx 3.6 ± 0.7% and bilateral VNTx 6.6 ± 1.6%, P < 0.05 vs. intact). Contralateral VNTx did not modify VNS response. The effect of atropine on ventricular ARI was similar to bilateral VNTx. We found that VNS activates afferent fibers in the ipsilateral vagal nerve, which reflexively inhibit cardiac parasympathetic efferent electrophysiological and hemodynamic effects. PMID:26371172

  11. In vitro evaluation of gelatin and chitosan electrospun fibers as artificial guide in peripheral nerve repair: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, S; Fornasari, B E; Tonda-Turo, C; Laurano, R; Zanetti, M; Ciardelli, G; Geuna, S

    2016-11-12

    Random and aligned gelatin and chitosan nano-fibers have been prepared by electrospinning tuning the collector rotation speed. The effect of fiber alignment on cell adhesion and proliferation was assessed in vitro by using different Schwann cell and neuronal models. Moreover, actin cytoskeleton organization, lamellipodia and filipodia formation and axon outgrowth were evaluated. Gelatin and chitosan fibers induced similar adhesion and proliferation rate. Gelatin and chitosan random fibers promoted higher adhesion and proliferation rate induction in comparisons to the aligned ones. Although, gelatin and chitosan fibers alignment resulted in SC and axon oriented growth. Filipodia formation was higher on aligned fibers, suggesting that these substrates can promote higher cell migration in comparison to random ones. 50B11 (neuronal cell line) differentiation was higher on gelatin fibers, whereas no differences were observed in DRG explants model. These data suggest that both gelatin and chitosan fibers can be promising substrates to be used in peripheral nerve reconstruction.

  12. Rabbit facial nerve regeneration in NGF-containing silastic tubes.

    PubMed

    Spector, J G; Lee, P; Derby, A; Frierdich, G E; Neises, G; Roufa, D G

    1993-05-01

    Previous reports suggest that exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) enhanced nerve regeneration in rabbit facial nerves. Rabbit facial nerve regeneration in 10-mm Silastic tubes prefilled with NGF was compared to cytochrome C (Cyt. C), bridging an 8-mm nerve gap. Three weeks following implantation, NGF-treated regenerates exhibited a more mature fascicular organization and more extensive neovascularization than cytochrome-C-treated controls. Morphometric analysis at the midtube of 3- and 5-week regenerates revealed no significant difference in the mean number of myelinated or unmyelinated axons between NGF- and cytochrome-C-treated implants. However, when the number of myelinated fibers in 5-week regenerates were compared to their respective preoperative controls, NGF-treated regenerates had recovered a significantly greater percentage of myelinated axons than cytochrome-C--treated implants (46% vs. 18%, respectively). In addition, NGF-containing chambers reinnervated a higher percentage of myelinated axons in the distal transected neural stumps (49% vs. 34%). Behavioral and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated spontaneous and induced activities in the target muscles when approximately one third of the myelinated axons were recovered in the midchamber (1280 axons). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) studies demonstrated retrograde axonal transport to the midchamber and proximal transected neural stump. PC12 bioassay demonstrated persistent NGF activity in the intrachamber fluids at 3 (5:1 dilution) and 5 (2:1 dilution) weeks of entubation. Electrophysiologic tests demonstrated a slow conduction velocity of a propagated electrical impulse (43.5 m/s-1 vs. 67 m/s-1) and shallow wide compound action potential. In wider defects (15-mm chambers) and longer entubation periods (7 weeks), no regeneration or NGF activity was seen. Therefore, exogenous NGF provides an early but limited neurotrophic effect on the regeneration of the rabbit buccal division of the facial nerve and a

  13. The importance of endometrial nerve fibers and macrophage cell count in the diagnosis of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Cihan; Serdaroglu, Hasan; Tuzlali, Sitki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a disease that is hard to diagnose without the gold standard method, laparoscopy. An easier diagnostic method is needed. Objective: The aim of the study is to determine whether the number of macrophage cells in the endometrium and/or the detection of nerve fibers can be used in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Materials and Methods: Endometrial sampling was done to 31 patients prior to laparoscopy (L/S) or laparotomy (L/T) at Istanbul University Istanbul School of Medicine Hospital between January 2010 February 2011. Also 34 patients who were retrospectively chosen from their files were added to the study. 5 patients were excluded from the study. Totally, 31 patients were placed in the endometriosis and 29 patients in the control group. Endometrial samples were evaluated immunohistochemically with the markers protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and neurofilament (NF) for nerve fibers and CD68 for macrophages. Results: None of the samples were stained with PGP 9.5 and NF. As for CD68+cells, no statistically significant difference was observed between groups (endometriosis: 216.10±104.41; control: 175.93±43.05, p=0.06). Results were also evaluated in the subgroups of menstruel phases and disease stages. Only in the proliferative phase there was a significant increase in the endometriosis group (p=0.03). No significant difference was observed between the stages. Conclusion: The detection of nerve fibers in the eutopic endometrium with the markers of PGP 9.5 and NF is not found to be helpful in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Macrophage cells may be helpful in the diagnosis only in the proliferative phase. PMID:24639773

  14. Vagus Nerve and Vagus Nerve Stimulation, a Comprehensive Review: Part I.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve (VN), the "great wondering protector" of the body, comprises an intricate neuro-endocrine-immune network that maintains homeostasis. With reciprocal neural connections to multiple brain regions, the VN serves as a control center that integrates interoceptive information and responds with appropriate adaptive modulatory feedbacks. While most VN fibers are unmyelinated C-fibers from the visceral organs, myelinated A- and B-fiber play an important role in somatic sensory, motor, and parasympathetic innervation. VN fibers are primarily cholinergic but other noncholinergic nonadrenergic neurotransmitters are also involved. VN has four vagal nuclei that provide critical controls to the cardiovascular, respiratory, and alimentary systems. Latest studies revealed that VN is also involved in inflammation, mood, and pain regulation, all of which can be potentially modulated by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). With a broad vagal neural network, VNS may exert a neuromodulatory effect to activate certain innate "protective" pathways for restoring health.

  15. Early changes in muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion after spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection cause muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion. It is still unknown how spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection each affect the differentiation of muscle fiber type conversion mechanism and muscle atrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference of muscle weight change, muscle fiber type conversion, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivatior-1α (PGC-1α) expression brought about by spinal cord transection and by peripheral nerve transection. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats underwent surgery, the control rats underwent a laminectomy; the spinal cord injury group underwent a spinal cord transection; the denervation group underwent a sciatic nerve transection. The rats were harvested of the soleus muscle and the TA muscle at 0 week, 1 week and 2 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunofluorescent staing. Western blot was performed with 3 groups. Results Both sciatic nerve transection and spinal cord transection caused muscle atrophy with the effect being more severe after sciatic nerve transection. Spinal cord transection caused a reduction in the expression of both sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection produced an increase in expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. The results of the expression of PGC-1α were expected in other words muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection is less than after spinal cord transection, however muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection was more severe than after spinal cord transection. Conclusion In the conclusion, spinal cord transection diminished the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection enhanced the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus

  16. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and diabetic neuropathy in the rat: morphological investigations of the sural nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Unger, J W; Klitzsch, T; Pera, S; Reiter, R

    1998-09-01

    A number of functions for nerve growth factor (NGF) have been described over the past years, including its role for neuronal function and regeneration during toxic or metabolic neuropathies. In order to further assess the effects of NGF on the somatosensory system in diabetic neuropathy, the sural nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and dorsal horn of the spinal cord were investigated by morphological and quantitative methods in rats after 12 weeks of uncontrolled streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. The results from our study suggest a twofold effect of NGF: (1) In sural nerve treatment with NGF (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg) for 12 weeks was able to reverse distinct diabetes-related alterations in myelinated nerve fiber morphology, such as myelin thickness. These changes occurred in the entire myelinated population of sensory nerves and were not restricted to nociceptive nerve fibers. (2) The NGF effect on neurotransmitters of the sensory, nociceptive system was reflected by increased CGRP and substance P content in the DRG and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. No change of trkA receptor immunostaining was seen in DRGs of diabetic rats; however, a reduction of trkA immunoreactivity of DRG neurons was noted after long-term NGF treatment of healthy controls. The data demonstrate that NGF regulates a number of neuronal parameters along peripheral and central parts of the somatosensory pathway in the adult. This neurotrophic support may be essential for inducing functionally significant regenerative mechanisms in diabetic neuropathy.

  17. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  18. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  19. Reduced intraepidermal nerve fiber density in patients with chronic ischemic pain in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gröne, Eva; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Abahji, Thomas; Fleckenstein, Johannes; Irnich, Dominik; Mussack, Thomas; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Sommer, Claudia; Lang, Philip M

    2014-09-01

    Chronic ischemic pain in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading cause of pain in the lower extremities. A neuropathic component of chronic ischemic pain has been shown independent of coexisting diabetes. We aimed to identify a morphological correlate potentially associated with pain and sensory deficits in PAD. Forty patients with symptomatic PAD (Fontaine stages II-IV), 20 with intermittent claudication (CI), and 20 with critical limb ischemia (CLI) were enrolled; 12 volunteers served as healthy controls. All patients were examined using pain scales and questionnaires. All study participants underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) at the distal calf and skin punch biopsy at the distal leg for determination of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Additionally, S100 beta serum levels were measured as a potential marker for ischemic nerve damage. Neuropathic pain questionnaires revealed slightly higher scores and more pronounced pain-induced disability in CLI patients compared to CI patients. QST showed elevated thermal and mechanical detection pain thresholds as well as dynamic mechanical allodynia, particularly in patients with advanced disease. IENFD was reduced in PAD compared to controls (P<0.05), more pronounced in the CLI subgroup (CLI: 1.3 ± 0.5 fibers/mm, CI: 2.9 ± 0.5 fibers/mm, controls: 5.3 ± 0.6 fibers/mm). In particular, increased mechanical and heat pain thresholds negatively correlated with lower IENFD. Mean S100 beta levels were in the normal range but were higher in advanced disease. Patients with chronic ischemic pain had a reduced IENFD associated with impaired sensory functions. These findings support the concept of a neuropathic component in ischemic pain.

  20. Intrinsic optical fiber sensor for sensing organophosphate nerve agent using the modified cladding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Lalitkumar; El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-03-01

    The concept of modified cladding based sensors represents the largest class of intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensors. In this design, the passive cladding of the optical fiber is replaced by an active coating, called modified cladding. The analyte in this case diffuses into the coating and induces changes in the absorbance, fluorescence, or some other spectroscopic property of the modified cladding, the coating acts as a chemo-chromic transducer and sensing takes place by intensity modulation. This design i.e. of the coating based sensors, has found enormous applicability in the realm of chemical and biochemical sensing which also includes environmental monitoring and detection of chemical warfare agents. In this paper, the development of an intrinsic fiber optic sensor for detection of organophosphate dimethyl-methyl phoshopnate (DMMP) is presented. DMMP is a chemical precursor to the nerve agent sarin. The chemo-chromic transducer material used as a modified coating on the fiber core is NDSA (Naphthalene disulphonic acid) doped polypyrrole. This coating material shows conductivity and absorbance change when exposed to DMMP. The fabrication of the sensor device is a three step process which involves (a) etching a small section of the optical fiber to expose the core, (b) coating the etched section of the optical fiber with the polymer, (c) integration of sensor components and testing. Thin film characterization is done using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer on in-situ coated films of polypyrrole on a glass substrate to check for absorbance change upon exposure to DMMP. The development procedure is presented next and encouraging results are discussed.

  1. Onset coding is degraded in auditory nerve fibers from mutant mice lacking synaptic ribbons.

    PubMed

    Buran, Bradley N; Strenzke, Nicola; Neef, Andreas; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Moser, Tobias; Liberman, M Charles

    2010-06-02

    Synaptic ribbons, found at the presynaptic membrane of sensory cells in both ear and eye, have been implicated in the vesicle-pool dynamics of synaptic transmission. To elucidate ribbon function, we characterized the response properties of single auditory nerve fibers in mice lacking Bassoon, a scaffolding protein involved in anchoring ribbons to the membrane. In bassoon mutants, immunohistochemistry showed that fewer than 3% of the hair cells' afferent synapses retained anchored ribbons. Auditory nerve fibers from mutants had normal threshold, dynamic range, and postonset adaptation in response to tone bursts, and they were able to phase lock with normal precision to amplitude-modulated tones. However, spontaneous and sound-evoked discharge rates were reduced, and the reliability of spikes, particularly at stimulus onset, was significantly degraded as shown by an increased variance of first-spike latencies. Modeling based on in vitro studies of normal and mutant hair cells links these findings to reduced release rates at the synapse. The degradation of response reliability in these mutants suggests that the ribbon and/or Bassoon normally facilitate high rates of exocytosis and that its absence significantly compromises the temporal resolving power of the auditory system.

  2. Easy method to examine single nerve fiber excitability and conduction parameters using intact nonanesthetized earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christiane K.

    2014-01-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For this purpose, they used the median giant nerve fiber (MGF) in the ventral nerve cord of the common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris). Here, we introduce a specialized stimulation and recording chamber that the nonanesthetized earthworm enters completely unforced. The worm resides in a narrow round duct with silver electrodes on the bottom such that individual APs of the MGF can be elicited and recorded superficially. Our experimental setup combines several advantages: it allows noninvasive single fiber AP measurements taken from a nonanesthetized animal that is yet restrained. Students performed the experiments with a high success rate. According to the data acquired by the students, the mean conduction velocity of the MGF was 30.2 m/s. From the amplitude-duration relationship for threshold stimulation, rheobase and chronaxie were graphically determined by the students according to Lapicque's method. The mean rheobase was 1.01 V, and the mean chronaxie was 0.06 ms. The acquired data and analysis results are of high quality, as deduced from critical examination based on the law of Weiss. In addition, we provide video material, which was also used in the practical course. PMID:25179616

  3. Automatic identification of the temporal retinal nerve fiber raphe from macular cube data

    PubMed Central

    Bedggood, Phillip; Tanabe, Fumi; McKendrick, Allison M.; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated several approaches for automatic location of the temporal nerve fiber raphe from standard macular cubes acquired on a Heidelberg Spectralis OCT. Macular cubes with B-scan separation of 96–122 µm were acquired from 15 healthy participants, and “high density” cubes with scan separation of 11 µm were acquired from the same eyes. These latter scans were assigned to experienced graders for subjective location of the raphe, providing the ground truth by which to compare methods operating on the lower density data. A variety of OCT scan parameters and image processing strategies were trialed. Vertically oriented scans, purposeful misalignment of the pupil to avoid reflective artifacts, and the use of intensity as opposed to thickness of the nerve fiber layer were all critical to minimize error. The best performing approach “cFan” involved projection of a fan of lines from each of several locations across the foveal pit; in each fan the line of least average intensity was identified. The centroid of the crossing points of these lines provided the raphe orientation with an average error of 1.5° (max = 4.1°) relative to the human graders. The disc-fovea-raphe angle was 172.4 ± 2.3° (range = 168.5–176.2°), which agrees well with other published estimates. PMID:27867714

  4. Thin-fiber mechanoreceptors reflexly increase renal sympathetic nerve activity during static contraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyung; Hayes, Shawn G; Kindig, Angela E; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-02-01

    The renal vasoconstriction induced by the sympathetic outflow during exercise serves to direct blood flow from the kidney toward the exercising muscles. The renal circulation seems to be particularly important in this regard, because it receives a substantial part of the cardiac output, which in resting humans has been estimated to be 20%. The role of group III mechanoreceptors in causing the reflex renal sympathetic response to static contraction remains an open question. To shed some light on this question, we recorded the renal sympathetic nerve responses to static contraction before and after injection of gadolinium into the arterial supply of the statically contracting triceps surae muscles of decerebrate unanesthetized and chloralose-anesthetized cats. Gadolinium has been shown to be a selective blocker of mechanogated channels in thin-fiber muscle afferents, which comprise the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reflex arc. In decerebrate (n = 15) and chloralose-anesthetized (n = 12) cats, we found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) significantly attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve and pressor responses to static contraction (60 s) after a latent period of 60 min; both responses recovered after a latent period of 120 min. We conclude that thin-fiber mechanoreceptors supplying contracting muscle are involved in some of the renal vasoconstriction evoked by the exercise pressor reflex.

  5. [Axon-reflex based nerve fiber function assessment in the detection of autonomic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, T; Illigens, B M-W; Reichmann, H; Ziemssen, T

    2014-10-01

    Axon-reflex-based tests of peripheral small nerve fiber function including techniques to quantify vasomotor and sudomotor responses following acetylcholine iontophoresis are used in the assessment of autonomic neuropathy. However, the established axon-reflex-based techniques, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess vasomotor function and quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test (QSART) to measure sudomotor function, are limited by technically demanding settings as well as interindividual variability and are therefore restricted to specialized clinical centers. New axon-reflex tests are characterized by quantification of axon responses with both temporal and spatial resolution and include "laser Doppler imaging (LDI) axon-reflex flare area test" to assess vasomotor function, the quantitative direct and indirect test of sudomotor function (QDIRT) to quantify sudomotor function, as well as the quantitative pilomotor axon-reflex test (QPART), a technique to measure pilomotor nerve fiber function using adrenergic cutaneous stimulation through phenylephrine iontophoresis. The effectiveness of new axon-reflex tests in the assessment of neuropathy is currently being investigated in clinical studies.

  6. Evaluating Glaucomatous Retinal Nerve Fiber Damage by GDx VCC Polarimetry in Taiwan Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Mei-Ling; Huang, Wei-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the capability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) to detect differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between normal and glaucomatous eyes in a Taiwan Chinese population. Methods This study included 44 normal eyes and 107 glaucomatous eyes. The glaucomatous eyes were divided into three subgroups on the basis of its visual field defects (early, moderate, severe). Each subject underwent a GDx-VCC exam and visual field testing. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AROC) of each relevant parameter was used to differentiate normal from each glaucoma subgroup, respectively. The correlation between visual field index and each parameter was evaluated for the eyes in the glaucoma group. Results For normal vs. early glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was Nerve fiber indicator (NFI) (0.942). For normal vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter showing the best AROC was NFI (0.985). For normal vs. severe glaucoma, the parameter that had the best AROC was NFI (1.000). For early vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.732). For moderate vs. severe, the parameter showing the best AROC was temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal average (0.652). For early vs. severe, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.852). Conclusions GDx-VCC-measured parameters may serve as a useful tool to distinguish normal from glaucomatous eyes; in particular, NFI turned out to be the best discriminating parameter.

  7. Tracking Epidermal Nerve Fiber Changes in Asian Macaques: Tools and Techniques for Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Lisa M; Dorsey, Jamie L; Weinberg, Rachel L; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Hauer, Peter; Laast, Victoria A; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative assessment of epidermal nerve fibers (ENFs) has become a widely used clinical tool for the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathies such as diabetic neuropathy and human immunodeficiency virus-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN). To model and investigate the pathogenesis of HIV-SN using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Asian macaques, we adapted the skin biopsy and immunostaining techniques currently employed in human patients and then developed two unbiased image analysis techniques for quantifying ENF in macaque footpad skin. This report provides detailed descriptions of these tools and techniques for ENF assessment in macaques and outlines important experimental considerations that we have identified in the course of our long-term studies. Although initially developed for studies of HIV-SN in the SIV-infected macaque model, these methods could be readily translated to a range of studies involving peripheral nerve degeneration and neurotoxicity in nonhuman primates as well as preclinical investigations of agents aimed at neuroprotection and regeneration.

  8. Mammalian-Specific Central Myelin Protein Opalin Is Redundant for Normal Myelination: Structural and Behavioral Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, Koujiro; Akagi, Takumi; Furuse, Tamio; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Mika; Shinoda, Yo; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Sano, Yoshitake; Ghandour, M. Said; Wakana, Shigeharu

    2016-01-01

    Opalin, a central nervous system-specific myelin protein phylogenetically unique to mammals, has been suggested to play a role in mammalian-specific myelin. To elucidate the role of Opalin in mammalian myelin, we disrupted the Opalin gene in mice and analyzed the impacts on myelination and behavior. Opalin-knockout (Opalin−/−) mice were born at a Mendelian ratio and had a normal body shape and weight. Interestingly, Opalin−/− mice had no obvious abnormalities in major myelin protein compositions, expression of oligodendrocyte lineage markers, or domain organization of myelinated axons compared with WT mice (Opalin+/+) mice. Electron microscopic observation of the optic nerves did not reveal obvious differences between Opalin+/+ and Opalin−/− mice in terms of fine structures of paranodal loops, transverse bands, and multi-lamellae of myelinated axons. Moreover, sensory reflex, circadian rhythm, and locomotor activity in the home cage, as well as depression-like behavior, in the Opalin−/− mice were indistinguishable from the Opalin+/+ mice. Nevertheless, a subtle but significant impact on exploratory activity became apparent in Opalin−/− mice exposed to a novel environment. These results suggest that Opalin is not critical for central nervous system myelination or basic sensory and motor activities under conventional breeding conditions, although it might be required for fine-tuning of exploratory behavior. PMID:27855200

  9. Expression of growth-associated protein 43 in the skin nerve fibers of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bursova, Sarka; Dubovy, Petr; Vlckova-Moravcova, Eva; Nemec, Martin; Klusakova, Ilona; Belobradkova, Jana; Bednarik, Josef

    2012-04-15

    The growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) is known as a marker of regenerating nerve fibers and their continuous remodeling in the adult human skin. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate a possible role for GAP-43 in the detection of the early stages of small-fiber neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) as compared with a well- established and validated parameter - intra-epidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) immunoreactive intra-epidermal C fibers. In a group of 21 patients with DM2 within three years of diagnosis (13 men, 8 women; mean age 53.9±12.8; range 30-74) and a group of 17 healthy volunteers (8 men, 9 women; mean age 55.8±8.5; range 45-70 years), skin punch biopsies were taken from a distal calf and double immunostained with both PGP 9.5 and GAP-43. In healthy controls, 96.8% of 629 PGP 9.5 immunoreactive fibers were immunostained with GAP-43; the proportion of PGP 9.5 intra-epidermal nerve fibers immunoreactive for GAP-43 in control subjects ranged from 86.5 to 100%. In DM2 patients, IENFD was significantly lower compared to controls (median, 1.5 vs. 11.2/mm; p<0.001). The proportion of GAP-43 immunoreactive intraepidermal nerve fibers was significantly lower in DM2 patients compared to healthy controls (73.6% of 337 PGP 9.5 positive fibers; p<0.001); ranged from 0 to 98.1%. In conclusion, these results show that impaired regeneration of intra-epidermal C fibers in the early stages of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as indicated by GAP-43, might be a marker of incipient diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Sound and vibration sensitivity of VIIIth nerve fibers in the grassfrog, Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Jørgensen, M B

    1996-10-01

    We have studied the sound and vibration sensitivity of 164 amphibian papilla fibers in the VIIIth nerve of the grassfrog, Rana temporaria. The VIIIth nerve was exposed using a dorsal approach. The frogs were placed in a natural sitting posture and stimulated by free-field sound. Furthermore, the animals were stimulated with dorso-ventral vibrations, and the sound-induced vertical vibrations in the setup could be canceled by emitting vibrations in antiphase from the vibration exciter. All low-frequency fibers responded to both sound and vibration with sound thresholds from 23 dB SPL and vibration thresholds from 0.02 cm/s2. The sound and vibration sensitivity was compared for each fiber using the offset between the rate-level curves for sound and vibration stimulation as a measure of relative vibration sensitivity. When measured in this way relative vibration sensitivity decreases with frequency from 42 dB at 100 Hz to 25 dB at 400 Hz. Since sound thresholds decrease from 72 dB SPL at 100 Hz to 50 dB SPL at 400 Hz the decrease in relative vibration sensitivity reflects an increase in sound sensitivity with frequency, probably due to enhanced tympanic sensitivity at higher frequencies. In contrast, absolute vibration sensitivity is constant in most of the frequency range studied. Only small effects result from the cancellation of sound-induced vibrations. The reason for this probably is that the maximal induced vibrations in the present setup are 6-10 dB below the fibers' vibration threshold at the threshold for sound. However, these results are only valid for the present physical configuration of the setup and the high vibration-sensitivities of the fibers warrant caution whenever the auditory fibers are stimulated with free-field sound. Thus, the experiments suggest that the low-frequency sound sensitivity is not caused by sound-induced vertical vibrations. Instead, the low-frequency sound sensitivity is either tympanic or mediated through bone conduction or sound

  11. Evaluation of a multi-layer microbraided polylactic acid fiber-reinforced conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chin; Huang, Yen-Ting; Lin, Jia-Horng; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Lou, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated peripheral nerve regeneration using a biodegradable multi-layer microbraided polylactic acid (PLA) fiber-reinforced conduit. Biodegradability of the PLA conduit and its effectiveness as a guidance channel were examined as it was used to repair a 10 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. As a result, tube fragmentation was not obvious and successful regeneration through the gap occurred in all the conduits at 8 weeks after operation. These results indicate the superiority of the PLA materials and suggest that the multi-layer microbraided PLA fiber-reinforced conduits provide a promising tool for neuro-regeneration.

  12. Use of retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence as an addition to absorption in retinal scanning for biometric purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agopov, Mikael; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We built a device sensitive to the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer for biometric purposes. A circle of 20° diameter on the retina was scanned around the optic disk with a spot of light from a 785 nm laser diode. The nonbirefringent blood vessels indenting or displacing the retinal nerve fiber layer were seen as “blips” in the measured birefringence-derived signal. For comparison, the reflection-absorption signature of the blood vessel pattern in the scanned circle was also measured. The birefringence-derived signal proved to add useful information to the reflectance-absorption signature for retinal biometric scanning.

  13. Use of retinal nerve fiber layer birefringence as an addition to absorption in retinal scanning for biometric purposes.

    PubMed

    Agopov, Mikael; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Irsch, Kristina; Guyton, David L

    2008-03-10

    We built a device sensitive to the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer for biometric purposes. A circle of 20 degrees diameter on the retina was scanned around the optic disk with a spot of light from a 785 nm laser diode. The nonbirefringent blood vessels indenting or displacing the retinal nerve fiber layer were seen as "blips" in the measured birefringence-derived signal. For comparison, the reflection-absorption signature of the blood vessel pattern in the scanned circle was also measured. The birefringence-derived signal proved to add useful information to the reflectance-absorption signature for retinal biometric scanning.

  14. In vivo Imaging of Optic Nerve Fiber Integrity by Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Reichenbach, Jürgen R.; Witte, Otto W.; Weih, Falk; Kretz, Alexandra; Haenold, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    The rodent visual system encompasses retinal ganglion cells and their axons that form the optic nerve to enter thalamic and midbrain centers, and postsynaptic projections to the visual cortex. Based on its distinct anatomical structure and convenient accessibility, it has become the favored structure for studies on neuronal survival, axonal regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. Recent advancements in MR imaging have enabled the in vivo visualization of the retino-tectal part of this projection using manganese mediated contrast enhancement (MEMRI). Here, we present a MEMRI protocol for illustration of the visual projection in mice, by which resolutions of (200 µm)3 can be achieved using common 3 Tesla scanners. We demonstrate how intravitreal injection of a single dosage of 15 nmol MnCl2 leads to a saturated enhancement of the intact projection within 24 hr. With exception of the retina, changes in signal intensity are independent of coincided visual stimulation or physiological aging. We further apply this technique to longitudinally monitor axonal degeneration in response to acute optic nerve injury, a paradigm by which Mn2+ transport completely arrests at the lesion site. Conversely, active Mn2+ transport is quantitatively proportionate to the viability, number, and electrical activity of axon fibers. For such an analysis, we exemplify Mn2+ transport kinetics along the visual path in a transgenic mouse model (NF-κB p50KO) displaying spontaneous atrophy of sensory, including visual, projections. In these mice, MEMRI indicates reduced but not delayed Mn2+ transport as compared to wild type mice, thus revealing signs of structural and/or functional impairments by NF-κB mutations. In summary, MEMRI conveniently bridges in vivo assays and post mortem histology for the characterization of nerve fiber integrity and activity. It is highly useful for longitudinal studies on axonal degeneration and regeneration, and investigations of mutant mice for genuine or

  15. Relationship between birefringence and neurotubule density in the primate retinal nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranibar, R. G.; Kemp, N. J.; Dwelle, J. C.; Byers, S. E.; Markey, M. K.; Milner, T. E.; Rylander, H. G.

    2007-02-01

    The relationship between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) birefringence (Δn) and neurotubule density (NTD, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neurotubules per unit RNFL area) was investigated by correlating measurements of these two parameters in 1 eye of a healthy cynomolgus monkey. Phase retardation per unit depth (PR/UD, proportional to Δn) was measured at 5.6-15 ° intervals around the optic nerve head (ONH) with an enhanced polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (EPS-OCT) instrument. Transverse tissue sections containing 3 RGC nerve fiber bundles from each peripapillary RNFL octant were imaged with a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Morphological measurements taken in TEM images were used by a novel algorithm to estimate NTD. Registered PR/UD and NTD data were then correlated using single- and multi-level models, yielding correlation coefficients in the range 0.49 <= r <= 0.61 (0.06 <= P <= 0.11). It was found that in order for the single-level correlation coefficient (r = 0.61) to be statistically significant (P <= 0.05) and powerful (Power >= 80%), NTD measurements in at least 16, rather than 8, RNFL sectors were needed. Interestingly, a single-level correlation coefficient of r = 0.81 (P = 0.01) was calculated between octant-averaged PR/UD and RGC axoplasmic area (A x, axon area less non-cytoskeletal organelle area) mode. A x represents a RGC axon's neurotubule-inhabitable area. Intuitively, a strong relationship should exist between A x and neurotubule number if neurotubules provide the primary structural support for RGC axons and structural requirements are the same in all RGC axons. If this relationship exists, error resulting from NTD estimation methods or preservation artifacts may have caused lower observed correlations of PR/UD with NTD than with A x mode, and more accurate methods of measuring in vivo NTD may be required to determine an accurate relationship between RNFL birefringence and NTD.

  16. Does the addition of a nerve wrap to a motor nerve repair affect motor outcomes?

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Yup; Parisi, Thomas J; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wrapping bioabsorbable nerve conduit around primary suture repair on motor nerve regeneration in a rat model. Forty rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups according to the type of repair of the rat sciatic nerve: group I had primary suture repair; group II had primary suture repair and bioabsorbable collagen nerve conduit (NeuraGen® 1.5 mm, Integra LifeSciences Corp., Plainsboro, NJ) wrapped around the repair. At 12 weeks, no significant differences in the percentage of recovery between the two groups were observed with respect to compound muscle action potentials, isometric muscle force, and muscle weight (P = 0.816, P = 0.698, P = 0.861, respectively). Histomorphometric analysis as compared to the non-operative sites was also not significantly different between the two groups in terms of number of myelinated axons, myelinated fiber area, and nerve fiber density (P = 0.368, P = 0.968, P = 0.071, respectively). Perineural scar tissue formation was greater in primary suture repair group (0.36 ± 0.15) than in primary repair plus conduit wrapping group (0.17 ± 0.08). This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Wrapping bioabsorbable nerve conduit around primary nerve repair can decrease perineural scar tissue formation. Although the scar-decreasing effect of bioabsorbable nerve wrap does not translate into better motor nerve recovery in this study, it might have an effect on the functional outcome in humans where scar formation is much more evident than in rats.

  17. The effect on the efferent vagal nerves to the heart of stimulating atrial receptors in the dog.

    PubMed

    Walters, G E; Mary, D A

    1986-10-01

    In chloralose-anaesthetized dogs, distension of small balloons at the pulmonary vein-atrial junctions to stimulate atrial receptors with myelinated vagal afferent nerves causes an increase in heart rate but does not influence the activity in efferent vagal cardiac nerves. However, distension of these small balloons also stimulates atrial receptors with non-myelinated vagal and sympathetic afferent nerves, which are thought to affect the heart rate and activity in efferent vagal cardiac nerves. In the present investigation, seven dogs anaesthetized with chloralose were studied by distension of small balloons at the pulmonary vein-atrial junctions and in the left atrial appendage, and by graded cooling of the vagal nerves in the neck; cooling to 9 degrees C was used to prevent the increase in activity in myelinated vagal afferent nerves to distension of the small balloons and cooling to 0 degree C was used to prevent responses to the distension in all vagal afferent nerves. Eleven vagal efferent nerve fibers were studied which responded to stimulation of carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors. Distension of the small balloons did not affect the activity in these eleven efferent vagal nerve fibres, with the vagi at 37 degrees C or during vagal cooling to 9 degrees C or to 0 degree C. The results indicate that upon distension of the small balloons, none of the three types of atrial receptor influence the activity in efferent vagal cardiac nerves. The results support the conclusion that stimulation of atrial receptors with myelinated vagal afferent nerves, responsible for the reflex increase in heart rate, does not influence the activity in efferent vagal cardiac nerves.

  18. Intraepidermal Nerve Fiber Density: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Relevance in the Management of Chronic Pruritus: a Review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Manuel P; Mühl, Sebastian; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Ständer, Sonja

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, measurement of the intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density has gained relevance in the diagnostics of chronic pruritus. This method allows the objectification and quantification of a small-fiber neuropathy, which may manifest clinically with pruritus, pain or dysesthetic sensory symptoms, such as burning, stinging and tingling sensations or numbness. Upon suspicion of a small-fiber neuropathy as a cause for chronic pruritus, targeted diagnostic procedures are essential for the early detection of the neuroanatomical changes. After a punch biopsy of the lower leg, the obtained tissue undergoes an immunofluorescence staining process with a primary antibody against the protein gene product 9.5. The IENFs can thus be detected and are quantified according to pre-determined guidelines based on an international consensus. In addition to morphological changes, functional impairment of small-fibers can be assessed using quantitative sensory testing by assessing detection and pain thresholds of various thermal and mechanic modalities. This method, however, is time-consuming and requires a specialized investigator, and thus it is not routinely used in the diagnostic investigation of chronic pruritus. Diagnosing a small-fiber neuropathy underlying chronic pruritus has therapeutic relevance. If possible, the underlying cause of the neuropathy should be treated. Alternatively, symptomatic therapy options include topical (capsaicin) and systemic (anticonvulsants and/or antidepressants) agents. Chronification processes may lead to refractory pruritus, and thus treatment should be initiated as soon as possible. The aim of this review is to present and discuss the measurement of the IENF density as a diagnostic tool and its role in the management of patients with chronic pruritus. A brief case report is presented to better illustrate the role of this diagnostic method in the clinical setting.

  19. Development of rat tibia innervation: colocalization of autonomic nerve fiber markers with growth-associated protein 43.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Mariusz; Litwin, Jan A; Tabarowski, Zbigniew; Zagólski, Olaf; Cichocki, Tadeusz; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Development of autonomic innervation of the tibia was investigated in rat fetuses on gestational days (GD) 17-21 and in juvenile animals on postnatal days (PD) 1-28. Double immunofluorescence combined with confocal microscopy was applied to study colocalization of neuronal growth- associated protein 43 (GAP-43) and panneuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) with markers of the autonomic nervous system: neuropeptide Y (NPY) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) for adrenergic, as well as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) for cholinergic fibers. The first GAP-43-immunoreactive (GAP-IR) nerve fibers were seen on GD17 in the perichondrium of the proximal epiphysis. Further GAP- and PGP-IR innervation appeared in the perichondrium/periosteum of the diaphysis and in the distal epiphysis (GD19), then in the bone marrow and in the intercondylar eminence (GD21). On PD1, NPY-IR and DbetaH-IR fibers appeared within the diaphyseal periosteum and on PD4 within the bone marrow. From PD14, GAP-43 immunoreactivity of NPY-positive fibers decreased. From PD7 on, NPY-IR fibers were observed in cartilage canals of both epiphyses and in the intercondylar eminence. In secondary ossification centers, NPY-IR fibers were seen from PD10, and in the bone marrow of the epiphyses from PD14. First VIP-IR and VAChT-IR fibers were observed on PD4 within the periosteum, bone marrow and patellar ligament. From PD10 on, VIP-positive fibers were seen in the intercondylar eminence, and from PD14 in secondary ossification centers. GAP-43 proved to be superior to PGP 9.5 as marker of growing nerve fibers, mostly due to its earlier appearance. The presence of specific nerve fibers may suggest possible involvement of autonomic innervation in regulation of bone development.

  20. Effect of surface pore structure of nerve guide conduit on peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-03-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration.

  1. Self-segregation of myelin membrane lipids in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Yurlova, Larisa; Kahya, Nicoletta; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Chiantia, Salvatore; Bakhti, Mostafa; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Ben-David, Oshrit; Futerman, Anthony H; Brügger, Britta; Simons, Mikael

    2011-12-07

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are multilamellar, lipid-rich membranes produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. To act as an insulator, myelin has to form a stable and firm membrane structure. In this study, we have analyzed the biophysical properties of myelin membranes prepared from wild-type mice and from mouse mutants that are unable to form stable myelin. Using C-Laurdan and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we find that lipids are tightly organized and highly ordered in myelin isolated from wild-type mice, but not from shiverer and ceramide synthase 2 null mice. Furthermore, only myelin lipids from wild-type mice laterally segregate into physically distinct lipid phases in giant unilamellar vesicles in a process that requires very long chain glycosphingolipids. Taken together, our findings suggest that oligodendrocytes exploit the potential of lipids to self-segregate to generate a highly ordered membrane for electrical insulation of axons.

  2. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it "functional demyelination", a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP.

  3. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it “functional demyelination”, a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP. PMID:27583434

  4. Erbin regulates NRG1 signaling and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yanmei; Dai, Penggao; Liu, Yu; Marchetto, Sylvie; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Borg, Jean-Paul; Mei, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) plays a critical role in myelination. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of NRG1 signaling. We show here that Erbin, a protein that contains leucine-rich repeats (LRR) and a PSD95-Dlg-Zol (PDZ) domain and that interacts specifically with ErbB2, is necessary for NRG1 signaling and myelination of peripheral nervous system (PNS). In Erbin null mice, myelinated axons were hypomyelinated with reduced expression of P0, a marker of mature myelinating Schwann cells (SCs), whereas unmyelinated axons were aberrantly ensheathed in Remak bundles, with increased numbers of axons in the bundles and in pockets. The morphological deficits were associated with decreased nerve conduction velocity and increased sensory threshold to mechanistic stimulation. These phenotypes were duplicated in erbinΔC/ΔC mice, in which Erbin lost the PDZ domain to interact with ErbB2. Moreover, ErbB2 was reduced at protein levels in both Erbin mutant sciatic nerves, and ErbB2 became unstable and NRG1 signaling compromised when Erbin expression was suppressed. These observations indicate a critical role of Erbin in myelination and identify a regulatory mechanism of NRG1 signaling. Our results suggest that Erbin, via the PDZ domain, binds to and stabilizes ErbB2, which is necessary for NRG1 signaling that has been implicated in tumorigenesis, heart development, and neural function. PMID:19458253

  5. Neuroanatomical evidence for segregation of nerve fibers conveying light touch and pain sensation in Eimer's organ of the mole.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Paul D; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Bautista, Diana M; Julius, David; Catania, Kenneth C

    2006-06-13

    Talpid moles are small insectivores that live in dark underground tunnels. They depend heavily on touch to navigate and find food. Most species have an array of complex epidermal sensory structures called Eimer's organs that cover the tip of the nose. In this study, the anatomy of Eimer's organ was examined in the coast mole and star-nosed mole by using the fluorescent styryl pyridinium dye AM1-43 and immunocytochemical staining for neurofilament 200 and substance P. In addition, DiI was used to label neural components of Eimer's organ. AM1-43 labeled all of the Eimer's organ receptors after systemic injection, suggesting a role in mechanotransduction. Immunostaining with neurofilament 200 and substance P labeled distinct subtypes of sensory fibers. Substance P labeled a group of free nerve endings along the outer edge of Eimer's organ, indicating a nociceptive role for these fibers. In contrast, neurofilament 200 labeled a more central set of nerve endings, suggesting that these fibers function as low-threshold mechanoreceptors. By labeling subsets of trigeminal afferents distant from the receptor array with DiI, we revealed innervation patterns indicating that one afferent supplies the outer, substance P-positive set of free nerve endings, whereas several afferents differentially innervate the central free nerve endings. Our results suggest that the free nerve endings innervating Eimer's organ are largely mechanosensitive and may play an important role in the rapid sensory discrimination observed in these species.

  6. Schwann cell-neuronal interactions in the rat involve nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Urschel, B A; Hulsebosch, C E

    1990-06-01

    To gain some insight into possible functions of nerve growth factor (NGF), we suppressed the endogenous levels of NGF in newborn rats by subcutaneous injections (3 microliters/g body weight) of rabbit antibodies to purified mouse beta-NGF (ANTI-NGF). Fiber and axonal areas and perimeters were measured for unmyelinated and myelinated sensory fibers in T9 dorsal roots (DR) in three groups of animals: 1) ANTI-NGF treated littermates, 2) preimmune sera treated littermates (PREIMM), and 3) untreated littermates (UNTR). In some rats, fibers in ventral roots (VR) were measured and, in other rats, sensory processes in peripheral nerves (PN) were measured following radical ventral rhizotomy. The only outer area and perimeter measurements that were statistically different were those in the ventral root (P less than 0.013 and P less than 0.043, respectively). However, myelin thickness was significantly thinner in the dorsal roots of the ANTI-NGF group than in the dorsal roots of the UNTR and PREIMM groups (P less than 0.000009 and P less than 10(-6), respectively). Myelin thickness in the ventral roots of the ANTI-NGF group was also statistically thinner than that in the UNTR group (P less than 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences when comparing the UNTR group to the PREIMM group. In the peripheral nerves studied, there was no significant change in the myelin thickness between the ANTI-NGF and UNTR groups of animals. These results indicate that Schwann cell-neuronal interactions are altered by the inactivation of NGF, and that 1) the central processes of sensory fibers are affected and not the peripheral processes and 2) motor fiber myelination is altered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The effect of aging on the density of the sensory nerve fiber innervation of bone and acute skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Mantyh, William G.; Bloom, Aaron P.; Freeman, Katie T.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2010-01-01

    As humans age there is a decline in most sensory systems including vision, hearing, taste, smell, and tactile acuity. In contrast, the frequency and severity of musculoskeletal pain generally increases with age. To determine whether the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce skeletal pain changes with age, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200) sensory nerve fibers that innervate the femur were examined in the femurs of young (4 month old), middle-aged (13 month) and old (36 month) male F344/BNF1 rats. Whereas the bone quality showed a significant age-related decline, the density of CGRP+ and NF200+ nerve fibers that innervate the bone remained remarkably unchanged as well as the severity of acute skeletal fracture pain. Thus, while bone mass, quality and strength undergo a significant decline with age, the density of sensory nerve fibers that transduce noxious stimuli remain largely intact. These data may in part explain why musculoskeletal pain increases with age. PMID:20947214

  8. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  9. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  10. Depth-resolved birefringence imaging of the primate retinal nerve fiber layer using polarization-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Nathaniel J.; Park, Jesung; Marsack, Jason D.; Dave, Digant P.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Milner, Thomas E.; Rylander, Henry G., III

    2002-06-01

    Imaging the optical phase retardation per unit depth (OPR/UD) in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) may aid in glaucoma diagnosis. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PSOCT) was used to record in vivo high-resolution images of the RNFL in two cynomologous monkeys. The depth variation in the Stokes vector of reflected light was used to calculate the OPR/UD as a function of RNFL position. OPR/UD decreased from 35 degree(s)/100 micrometers near the optic nerve to 5 degree(s)/100 micrometers at a location 600 micrometers superior to the optic nerve. Variation of OPR/UD in the RNFL with retinal position demonstrates a change in birefringence for different densities of ganglion cell axons. PSOCT may be useful for noninvasive determination of RNFL thickness and fiber density.

  11. Dexamethasone enhanced functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinhong; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone is currently used for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, but its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. Inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is known to be an essential trigger of the pathological changes that have a critical impact on nerve repair and regeneration. In this study, we observed the effects of various doses of dexamethasone on the functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model. Motor functional recovery was monitored by walking track analysis and gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio. The myelinated axon number was counted by morphometric analysis. Rats administered dexamethasone by local intramuscular injection had a higher nerve function index value, increased gastrocnemius muscle mass ratio, reduced Wallerian degeneration severity, and enhanced regenerated myelinated nerve fibers. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for CD3 expression, which is a marker for T-cell activation, and infiltration in the sciatic nerve. Dexamethasone-injected rats had fewer CD3-positive cells compared to controls. Furthermore, we found increased expression of GAP-43, which is a factor associated with development and plasticity of the nervous system, in rat nerves receiving dexamethasone. These results provide strong evidence that dexamethasone enhances sciatic nerve regeneration and function recovery in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury through immunosuppressive and potential neurotrophic effects.

  12. Utilization of scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in laser-induced bilateral human retinal nerve fiber layer damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Gagliano, Donald A.; Ruiz, S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a military laser accident case where bilateral Q-switched laser exposure resulted in bilateral macular damage with immediate visual acuity loss in one eye (OS) and delayed visual acuity loss in the other exposed eye (OD), where retinal damage appeared more parafoveal. At 6 weeks post exposure, OS had recovered to 20/17 and OD had dropped to 20/100 Snellen activity. Retinal nerve fiber damage was observed in both eyes at this time. Contrast sensitivity measurements made in OS were suppressed across all spatial frequencies, even though Snellen acuity measured in the normal range. More severe high spatial frequency loss in contrast was measured in the right eye as well as low spatial frequency loss. Both OS and OD revealed a parafoveal preferred retinal locus with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy contrast sensitivity measurements, suggesting parafoveal retinal compensatory processes.

  13. Conduction in the giant nerve fiber pathway in temperature-sensitive paralytic mutants of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Elkins, T; Ganetzky, B

    1990-08-01

    To study electrogenic conduction in neurons of the cervical giant nerve fiber (CGF) pathway in Drosophila adults carrying temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations that affect sodium channels, we recorded dorsal longitudinal muscle (DLM) responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain. In the mutants tipE, napts and parats, conduction in certain neurons presynaptic to the CGF failed at about the same temperature at which paralysis occurred in each mutant. Conduction in the CGF and neurons postsynaptic to it remained active in all mutants even at very elevated temperatures. In contrast, analysis of sei mutants showed enhanced spontaneous activity at elevated temperatures in at least some neurons of the CGF pathway. The implications of these results with respect to the normal in vivo functions of these genes in neuronal signalling are considered.

  14. Incorporation of fiber optic beam shaping into a laparoscopic probe for laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Mayeh, Mona; Burnett, Arthur L.; Farahi, Faramarz; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the nerve surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5- ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of the CN's during laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  15. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  16. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes.

  17. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Changes in Preclinical Diabetic Retinopathy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Nie, Chuang; Gong, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Jin, Xin; Wei, Shihui; Zhang, Maonian

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular neurodegenerative disorder in diabetic patients. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer changes have been described in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy, but study results have been inconsistent. Objective To assess changes in peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in diabetic patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy. Methods A literature search was conducted through PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library. Case-control studies on RNFL thickness in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients and healthy controls were retrieved. A meta-analysis of weighted mean difference and a sensitivity analysis were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Results Thirteen case-control studies containing 668 diabetic patients and 556 healthy controls were selected. Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly reduced in patients with preclinical diabetic retinopathy compared to healthy controls in studies applying Optical Coherence Tomography (-2.88μm, 95%CI: -4.44 to -1.32, P = 0.0003) and in studies applying Scanning Laser Polarimeter (-4.21μm, 95%CI: -6.45 to -1.97, P = 0.0002). Reduction of RNFL thickness was significant in the superior quadrant (-3.79μm, 95%CI: -7.08 to -0.50, P = 0.02), the inferior quadrant (-2.99μm, 95%CI: -5.44 to -0.54, P = 0.02) and the nasal quadrant (-2.88μm, 95%CI: -4.93 to -0.82, P = 0.006), but was not significant in the temporal quadrant (-1.22μm, 95%CI: -3.21 to 0.76, P = 0.23), in diabetic patients. Conclusion Peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly decreased in preclinical diabetic retinopathy patients compared to healthy control. Neurodegenerative changes due to preclinical diabetic retinopathy need more attention. PMID:25965421

  18. Increased serum level of homocysteine correlates with retinal nerve fiber layer thinning in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastav, Khushboo; Mahdi, Abbas A.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Meyer, Carsten H.; Akduman, Levent; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the correlation between serum levels of vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine and the severity of diabetic retinopathy and the correlation with retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods In a tertiary care center–based prospective cross-sectional study, 60 consecutive cases and 20 healthy controls in the age group of 40–65 years were included. The eyes of the cases were divided into three groups according to Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) classification: diabetes mellitus without retinopathy (n = 20), non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema (n = 20), and proliferative diabetic retinopathy with macular edema (n = 20). The serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured using a standard protocol. The serum homocysteine assay was performed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Average RNFL thickness was measured using SD-OCT. Statistical analysis was used to assess the correlations between the study variables. Results Increased severity of diabetic retinopathy was found to correlate with an increase in the serum levels of homocysteine (F = 53.79; p<0.001). The mean serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were found to be within the normal reference range. A positive correlation was found between retinal nerve fiber layer thinning and serum levels of homocysteine (p<0.001). Conclusions This study, for the first time, demonstrated a correlation between increased homocysteine with a decrease in RNFL thickness and increased severity of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994434

  19. The role of peripheral nerve fibers and their neurotransmitters in cartilage and bone physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Grässel, Susanne G

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system is critically involved in bone metabolism, osteogenesis, and bone remodeling. Nerve fibers of sympathetic and sensory origin innervate synovial tissue and subchondral bone of diathrodial joints. They modulate vascularization and matrix differentiation during endochondral ossification in embryonic limb development, indicating a distinct role in skeletal growth and limb regeneration processes. In pathophysiological situations, the innervation pattern of sympathetic and sensory nerve fibers is altered in adult joint tissues and bone. Various resident cell types of the musculoskeletal system express receptors for sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, mesenchymal stem cells, synovial fibroblasts, and different types of chondrocytes produce distinct subtypes of adrenoceptors, receptors for vasointestinal peptide, for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Many of these cells even synthesize neuropeptides such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide and are positive for tyrosine-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of catecholamines. Sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters modulate osteo-chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells during endochondral ossification in limb development. In adults, sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters are critical for bone regeneration after fracture and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory diseases as rheumatoid arthritis which manifests mainly in joints. Possibly, they might also play a role in pathogenesis of degenerative joint disorders, such as osteoarthritis. All together, accumulating data imply that sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters have crucial trophic effects which are critical for proper limb formation during embryonic skeletal growth. In adults, they modulate bone regeneration, bone remodeling, and articular cartilage homeostasis in addition to their classic neurological actions.

  20. Imaging retinal nerve fiber bundles using optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Omer P; Cense, Barry; Jonnal, Ravi S; Wang, Qiang; Lee, Sangyeol; Gao, Weihua; Miller, Donald T

    2011-08-15

    Early detection of axonal tissue loss in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is critical for effective treatment and management of diseases such as glaucoma. This study aims to evaluate the capability of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (UHR-AO-OCT) for imaging the RNFL axonal bundles (RNFBs) with 3×3×3μm(3) resolution in the eye. We used a research-grade UHR-AO-OCT system to acquire 3°×3° volumes in four normal subjects and one subject with an arcuate retinal nerve fiber layer defect (n=5; 29-62years). Cross section (B-scans) and en face (C-scan) slices extracted from the volumes were used to assess visibility and size distribution of individual RNFBs. In one subject, we reimaged the same RNFBs twice over a 7month interval and compared bundle width and thickness between the two imaging sessions. Lastly we compared images of an arcuate RNFL defect acquired with UHR-AO-OCT and commercial OCT (Heidelberg Spectralis). Individual RNFBs were distinguishable in all subjects at 3° retinal eccentricity in both cross-sectional and en face views (width: 30-50μm, thickness: 10-15μm). At 6° retinal eccentricity, RNFBs were distinguishable in three of the five subjects in both views (width: 30-45μm, thickness: 20-40μm). Width and thickness RNFB measurements taken 7months apart were strongly correlated (p<0.0005). Mean difference and standard deviation of the differences between the two measurement sessions were -0.1±4.0μm (width) and 0.3±1.5μm (thickness). UHR-AO-OCT outperformed commercial OCT in terms of clarity of the microscopic retina. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of RNFB cross section reported in the living human eye.

  1. Changes across time in the temporal responses of auditory nerve fibers stimulated by electric pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles A; Hu, Ning; Zhang, Fawen; Robinson, Barbara K; Abbas, Paul J

    2008-03-01

    Most auditory prostheses use modulated electric pulse trains to excite the auditory nerve. There are, however, scant data regarding the effects of pulse trains on auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses across the duration of such stimuli. We examined how temporal ANF properties changed with level and pulse rate across 300-ms pulse trains. Four measures were examined: (1) first-spike latency, (2) interspike interval (ISI), (3) vector strength (VS), and (4) Fano factor (FF, an index of the temporal variability of responsiveness). Data were obtained using 250-, 1,000-, and 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. First-spike latency decreased with increasing spike rate, with relatively small decrements observed for 5,000-pulse/s trains, presumably reflecting integration. ISIs to low-rate (250 pulse/s) trains were strongly locked to the stimuli, whereas ISIs evoked with 5,000-pulse/s trains were dominated by refractory and adaptation effects. Across time, VS decreased for low-rate trains but not for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. At relatively high spike rates (>200 spike/s), VS values for 5,000-pulse/s trains were lower than those obtained with 250-pulse/s stimuli (even after accounting for the smaller periods of the 5,000-pulse/s stimuli), indicating a desynchronizing effect of high-rate stimuli. FF measures also indicated a desynchronizing effect of high-rate trains. Across a wide range of response rates, FF underwent relatively fast increases (i.e., within 100 ms) for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. With a few exceptions, ISI, VS, and FF measures approached asymptotic values within the 300-ms duration of the low- and high-rate trains. These findings may have implications for designs of cochlear implant stimulus protocols, understanding electrically evoked compound action potentials, and interpretation of neural measures obtained at central nuclei, which depend on understanding the output of the auditory nerve.

  2. Effects of thiocolchicine on axonal cytoskeleton of the rat peroneus nerve.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Paola; Bruno, Cesare; Cecchini, Tiziana; Ciaroni, Sandra; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Guidi, Loretta; Cuppini, Riccardo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Morazzoni, Paolo; Riva, Antonella; Del Grande, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    Thiocolchicine is a colchicine-derivative used in the therapy of some diseases and extensively studied in the field of oncological research as antimitotic agent. Here we studied the activity of thiocolchicine on the cytoskeleton of the peroneus nerve, performing a histological and ultrastructural analysis. We observed a decrease in mean myelinated fiber area in thiocolchicine-treated rats in comparison to controls; this was due to a decrease in mean axoplasm area, while myelin thickness was constant. In the ultrastructural analysis a decrease in microtubule density and an increase in neurofilaments were found; moreover, the myelinated fibers seemed to be more affected in comparison to the unmyelinated axons. These findings are in agreement with the capability of binding to microtubule skeleton shared by all the colchicinoids.

  3. BDNF gene therapy induces auditory nerve survival and fiber sprouting in deaf Pou4f3 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Fukui, H; Wong, H T; Beyer, L A; Case, B G; Swiderski, D L; Di Polo, A; Ryan, A F; Raphael, Y

    2012-01-01

    Current therapy for patients with hereditary absence of cochlear hair cells, who have severe or profound deafness, is restricted to cochlear implantation, a procedure that requires survival of the auditory nerve. Mouse mutations that serve as models for genetic deafness can be utilized for developing and enhancing therapies for hereditary deafness. A mouse with Pou4f3 loss of function has no hair cells and a subsequent, progressive degeneration of auditory neurons. Here we tested the influence of neurotrophin gene therapy on auditory nerve survival and peripheral sprouting in Pou4f3 mouse ears. BDNF gene transfer enhanced preservation of auditory neurons compared to control ears, in which nearly all neurons degenerated. Surviving neurons in treated ears exhibited pronounced sprouting of nerve fibers into the auditory epithelium, despite the absence of hair cells. This enhanced nerve survival and regenerative sprouting may improve the outcome of cochlear implant therapy in patients with hereditary deafness.

  4. Chapter 5: Methods and protocols in peripheral nerve regeneration experimental research: part II-morphological techniques.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Stefania; Fornaro, Michele; Di Scipio, Federica; Ronchi, Giulia; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria G; Geuna, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    This paper critically overviews the main procedures used for carrying out morphological analysis of peripheral nerve fibers in light, confocal, and electron microscopy. In particular, this paper emphasizes the importance of osmium tetroxide post-fixation as a useful procedure to be adopted independently from the embedding medium. In order to facilitate the use of any described techniques, all protocols are presented in full details. The pros and cons for each method are critically addressed and practical indications on the different imaging approaches are reported. Moreover, the basic rules of morpho-quantitative stereological analysis of nerve fibers are described addressing the important concepts of design-based sampling and the disector. Finally, a comparison of stereological analysis on myelinated nerve fibers between paraffin- and resin-embedded rat radial nerves is reported showing that different embedding procedures might influence the distribution of size parameters.

  5. Synergistic motor nerve fiber transfer between different nerves through the use of end-to-side coaptation.

    PubMed

    Schmidhammer, R; Nógrádi, A; Szabó, A; Redl, H; Hausner, T; van der Nest, D G; Millesi, H

    2009-06-01

    End-to-end nerve repair is a widely used and successful experimental microsurgical technique via which a denervated nerve stump is supplied with reinnervating motor or sensory axons. On the other hand, questions are still raised as concerns the reliability and usefulness of the end-to-side coaptation technique. This study had the aim of the reinnervation of the denervated forearm flexor muscles in baboons through the use of an end-to-side coaptation technique and the synergistic action of the radial nerve. The median and ulnar nerves were transected, and the motor branch of the radial nerve supplying the extensor carpi radialis muscles (MBECR) was used as an axon donor for the denervated superficial forearm flexors. A nerve graft was connected to the axon donor nerve through end-to-side coaptation, while at the other end of the graft an end-to-end connection was established so as to reinnervate the motor branch of the forearm flexors. Electrophysiological investigations and functional tests indicated successful reinnervation of the forearm flexors and recovery of the flexor function. The axon counts in the nerve segments proximal (1038+/-172 S.E.M.) and distal (1050+/-116 S.E.M.) to the end-to-side coaptation site and in the nerve graft revealed that motor axon collaterals were given to the graft without the loss or appreciable misdirection of the axons in the MBECR nerve distal to the coaptation site. The nerve graft was found to contain varying, but satisfactory numbers of axons (269+/-59 S.E.M.) which induced morphological reinnervation of the end-plates in the flexor muscles. Accordingly, we have provided evidence that end-to-side coaptation can be a useful technique when no free donor nerve is available. This technique is able to induce limited, but still useful reinnervation for the flexor muscles, thereby producing a synergistic action of the flexor and extensor muscles which allows the hand to achieve a basic gripping function.

  6. Localization of TRPV1 and P2X3 in unmyelinated and myelinated vagal afferents in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hermes, Sam M.; Andresen, Michael C.; Aicher, Sue A.

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve is dominated by afferent fibers that convey sensory information from the viscera to the brain. Most vagal afferents are unmyelinated, slow-conducting C-fibers, while a smaller portion are myelinated, fast-conducting A-fibers. Vagal afferents terminate in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) in the dorsal brainstem and regulate autonomic and respiratory reflexes, as well as ascending pathways throughout the brain. Vagal afferents form glutamatergic excitatory synapses with postsynaptic NTS neurons that are modulated by a variety of channels. The organization of vagal afferents with regard to fiber type and channels is not well understood. In the present study, we used tract tracing methods to identify distinct populations of vagal afferents to determine if key channels are selectively localized to specific groups of afferent fibers. Vagal afferents were labeled with isolectin B4 (IB4) or cholera toxin B (CTb) to detect unmyelinated and myelinated afferents, respectively. We find that TRPV1 channels are preferentially found in unmyelinated vagal afferents identified with IB4, with almost half of all IB4 fibers showing co-localization with TRPV1. These results agree with prior electrophysiological findings. In contrast, we found that the ATP-sensitive channel P2X3 is found in a subset of both myelinated and unmyelinated vagal afferent fibers. Specifically, 18% of IB4 and 23% of CTb afferents contained P2X3. The majority of CTb-ir vagal afferents contained neither channel. Since neither channel was found in all vagal afferents, there are likely further degrees of heterogeneity in the modulation of vagal afferent sensory input to the NTS beyond fiber type. PMID:26706222

  7. Increased axonal regeneration and swellings in intraepidermal nerve fibers characterize painful phenotypes of diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H.T.; Dauch, J.R.; Porzio, M.T.; Yanik, B.M.; Hsieh, W.; Smith, A.G.; Singleton, J.R.; Feldman, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    We examined changes in intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) to differentiate patients with diabetic neuropathy (DN) and neuropathic pain (DN-P) from those with DN without pain (DN-NOP). Punch skin biopsies were collected from the proximal thigh (PT) and distal leg (DL) of normal subjects (NS), patients with type 2 diabetes without evidence of DN (DM), or DN-P and DN-NOP patients. Protein gene product 9.5 (PGP) immunohistochemistry was used to quantify total IENF, and growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) for regenerating IENF. Compared to NS and DM, both DN-P and DN-NOP have reduced PGP+ IENF densities in DL and PT. Although GAP43+ IENF densities were also reduced in DL for both DN-P and DN-NOP, the GAP43+ IENF densities in PT of DN-P remained at the control levels. Higher GAP43/PGP ratios were detected in DN-P compared to DN-NOP in the DL and PT. In parallel, increased numbers of axonal swellings per PGP+ fiber (axonal swelling/PGP) were detected in DN-P compared to NS, DM, and DN-NOP in the DL. These axonal swellings were positive for tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (Trk) A and substance P, suggesting that they are associated with nociception. PMID:23685187

  8. A Novel Approach for Studying the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Myelinated and Non-Myelinated Axons in the CNS White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Samoilova, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Advances in brain connectomics set the need for detailed knowledge of functional properties of myelinated and non-myelinated (if present) axons in specific white matter pathways. The corpus callosum (CC), a major white matter structure interconnecting brain hemispheres, is extensively used for studying CNS axonal function. Unlike another widely used CNS white matter preparation, the optic nerve where all axons are myelinated, the CC contains also a large population of non-myelinated axons, making it particularly useful for studying both types of axons. Electrophysiological studies of optic nerve use suction electrodes on nerve ends to stimulate and record compound action potentials (CAPs) that adequately represent its axonal population, whereas CC studies use microelectrodes (MEs), recording from a limited area within the CC. Here we introduce a novel robust isolated "whole" CC preparation comparable to optic nerve. Unlike ME recordings where the CC CAP peaks representing myelinated and non-myelinated axons vary broadly in size, "whole" CC CAPs show stable reproducible ratios of these two main peaks, and also reveal a third peak, suggesting a distinct group of smaller caliber non-myelinated axons. We provide detailed characterization of "whole" CC CAPs and conduction velocities of myelinated and non-myelinated axons along the rostro-caudal axis of CC body and show advantages of this preparation for comparing axonal function in wild type and dysmyelinated shiverer mice, studying the effects of temperature dependence, bath-applied drugs and ischemia modeled by oxygen-glucose deprivation. Due to the isolation from gray matter, our approach allows for studying CC axonal function without possible "contamination" by reverberating signals from gray matter. Our analysis of "whole" CC CAPs revealed higher complexity of myelinated and non-myelinated axonal populations, not noticed earlier. This preparation may have a broad range of applications as a robust model for studying

  9. Sensory nerve conduction and nociception in the equine lower forelimb during perineural bupivacaine infusion along the palmar nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zarucco, Laura; Driessen, Bernd; Scandella, Massimiliano; Cozzi, Francesca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral palmar nerve (LPN) and medial palmar nerve (MPN) morphology and determine nociception and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) following placement of continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) catheters along LPN and MPN with subsequent bupivacaine (BUP) infusion. Myelinated nerve fiber distribution in LPN and MPN was examined after harvesting nerve specimens in 3 anesthetized horses and processing them for morphometric analysis. In 5 sedated horses, CPNB catheters were placed along each PN in both forelimbs. Horses then received in one forelimb 3 mL 0.125% BUP containing epinephrine 1:200 000 and 0.04% NaHCO3 per catheter site followed by 2 mL/h infusion over a 6-day period, while in the other forelimb equal amounts of saline (SAL) solution were administered. The hoof withdrawal response (HWR) threshold during pressure loading of the area above the dorsal coronary band was determined daily in both forelimbs. On day 6 SNCV was measured under general anesthesia of horses in each limb’s LPN and MPN to detect nerve injury, followed by CPNB catheter removal. The SNCV was also recorded in 2 anesthetized non-instrumented horses (sham controls). In both LPN and MPN myelinated fiber distributions were bimodal. The fraction of large fibers (>7 μm) was greater in the MPN than LPN (P < 0.05). Presence of CPNB catheters and SAL administration did neither affect measured HWR thresholds nor SNCVs, whereas BUP infusion suppressed HWRs. In conclusion, CPNB with 0.125% BUP provides pronounced analgesia by inhibiting sensory nerve conduction in the distal equine forelimb. PMID:21197231

  10. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, P; López, M; Larraya, I; Chamorro, J; Cobo, J L; Ordóñez, S; Vega, J A

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  11. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  12. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  13. Effects of nerve growth factor delivery via a gel to inferior alveolar nerve in mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Jian; Lei, De-lin; Cheng, Xiao-bing; Yang, Yao-wu; Hou, Rui; Zhao, Ying-hua; Cui, Fu-zhai

    2009-11-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury is a concern in mandible distraction osteogenesis (DO). We have previously demonstrated that repeated local injections of human nerve growth factor beta (NGF-beta) have significantly enhanced the histologic recovery of the IAN in a rabbit model of DO. This study was to further test the effect of a single injection of human NGF-beta delivered via a collagen/nanohydroxyapatite/kappa-carrageenan gel to the recovery of the IAN in DO. Rabbits underwent mandibular DO at a rate of 0.75 mm/12 h for 6 days. At the end of the distraction period, injections were performed near the IAN percutaneously as follows: group 1, human NGF-beta in the gel; group 2, human NGF-beta in saline; group 3, the gel alone; and group 4, saline alone. At 14 days after the end of distraction, IAN histologic findings and histomorphometric parameters were evaluated. Histologically, there were less myelin debris and more abundant regenerating nerve fibers in group 1 than the other groups. Both the myelinated fiber density and the myelinated axon area in group 1 were significantly higher than groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.01); the myelinated axon area in the group 1 was significantly higher than group 2 (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the delivery of human NGF-beta in the gel leads to a better acceleration of the IAN injury recovery over the saline delivery. It provides a possible way to enhance the recovery of nerve injuries in craniofacial DO clinically.

  14. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  15. Raman spectroscopy of non-penetrating peripheral nerve damage in swine: a tool for spectral pathology of nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilwa, Katherine E.; Slaughter, Tiffani; Elster, Eric A.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2015-03-01

    Over 30% of combat injuries involve peripheral nerve injury compared to only 3% in civilian trauma. In fact, nerve dysfunction is the second leading cause of long-term disability in injured service members and is present in 37% of upper limb injuries with disability. Identification and assessment of non-penetrating nerve injury in trauma patients could improve outcome and aid in therapeutic monitoring. We report the use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive, non-destructive method for detection of nerve degeneration in intact nerves due to non-penetrating trauma. Nerve trauma was induced via compression and ischemia/reperfusion injury using a combat relevant swine tourniquet model (>3 hours ischemia). Control animals did not undergo compression/ischemia. Seven days post-operatively, sciatic and femoral nerves were harvested and fixed in formalin. Raman spectra of intact, peripheral nerves were collected using a fiber-optic probe with 3 mm diameter spot size and 785 nm excitation. Data was preprocessed, including fluorescence background subtraction, and Raman spectroscopic metrics were determined using custom peak fitting MATLAB scripts. The abilities of bivariate and multivariate analysis methods to predict tissue state based on Raman spectroscopic metrics are compared. Injured nerves exhibited changes in Raman metrics indicative of 45% decreased myelin content and structural damage (p<<0.01). Axonal and myelin degeneration, cell death and digestion, and inflammation of nerve tissue samples were confirmed via histology. This study demonstrates the non-invasive ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect nerve degeneration associated with non-penetrating injury, relevant to neurapraxic and axonotmetic injuries; future experiments will further explore the clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy to recognize neural injury.

  16. Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation on Nerve Fibers of A Rat Model of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Takushige, Natsuko; Kong, Bei-Hua; Wang, Guo-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is a common, benign, oestrogen-dependent, chronic gynaecological disorder associated with pelvic pain and infertility. Some researchers have identified nerve fibers in endometriotic lesions in women with endometriosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted interest for their possible use for both cell and gene therapies because of their capacity for self-renewal and multipotentiality of differentiation. We investigated how human umbilical cord-MSCs (hUC-MSCs) could affect nerve fibers density in endometriosis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, hUC-MSCs were isolated from fresh human umbilical cord, characterized by flow cytometry, and then transplanted into surgically induced endometriosis in a rat model. Ectopic endometrial implants were collected four weeks later. The specimens were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against neurofilament (NF), nerve growth factor (NGF), NGF receptor p75 (NGFRp75), tyrosine kinase receptor-A (Trk-A), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) to compare the presence of different types of nerve fibers between the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs and the control group without the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. Results There were significantly less nerve fibers stained with specific markers we used in the treatment group than in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion MSC from human umbilical cord reduced nerve fiber density in the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. PMID:25918595

  17. Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning Lags Retinal Ganglion Cell Density Following Crush Axonopathy

    PubMed Central

    Munguba, Gustavo C.; Galeb, Sanja; Liu, Yuan; Landy, David C.; Lam, Daisy; Camp, Andrew; Samad, Sinthia; Tapia, Mary L.; Lee, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the progressive nature of neurodegenerative structural changes following injury to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons using quantifiable and noninvasive in vivo imaging techniques. Methods. To track degenerative RGC progression in retinas following optic nerve crush (ONC) injury, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to quantitate the RGC nerve fiber layer (NFL) density. The RGC soma cell density (RCD) was measured by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO). The RCD counts were performed using blood vessels as landmarks to anatomically track defined progressive changes in enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion protein (EYFP)-labeled RGCs. Results. Following ONC injury, 68% of the observed decrease in RCD measured by CSLO and 54% of the NFL thickness obtained by SD-OCT imaging (N = 4 retinas) occurred within the first week. Between days 7 and 14, an additional 22% decrease in RCD was concurrent with a 31% decrease in overall NFL thickness. Finally, between days 14 and 21, an additional 10% decrease in RCD measured in vivo by CSLO and 15% decrease in NFL thickness by SD-OCT was observed. Conclusions. Our data suggest that in vivo CSLO imaging of EYFP-RGC expression and SD-OCT measured NFL thickness are fast and reliable methods that longitudinally track neurodegenerative progression following ONC injury. Neurodegenerative changes in NFL thickness measured by SD-OCT imaging have the same overall trajectory as those observed by CSLO for RCD; however, changes in NFL thickness initially lag behind in vivo RGC soma counts with a slower decline in overall measurable change. PMID:25228542

  18. Reproducibility of Circumpapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurements Using Handheld Optical Coherence Tomography in Sedated Children

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Cnaan, Avital; Schuman, Joel S.; Chen, Chieh-Li; Glaug, Natalie C.; Packer, Roger J.; Quinn, Graham E.; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the intra- and intervisit reproducibility of circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measures using handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) in sedated children. Design Prospective cross-sectional and longitudinal study Methods Children undergoing sedation for a clinically indicated MRI for an optic pathway glioma and or Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) had multiple 6 × 6 mm volumes (isotropic 300×300 or non-isotropic 1000×100 samplings) acquired over the optic nerve. Children with two handheld OCT sessions within 6 months were included in the intervisit cohort. The intra- and inter-visit coefficient of variation (CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated for the average and anatomic quadrant circumpapillary RNFL thickness. Results Fifty-nine subjects (mean age 5.1 years, range 0.8–13.0 years) comprised the intravisit cohort and 29 subjects (mean age 5.7 years, range 1.8–12.7 years) contributed to the intervisit cohort. Forty-nine subjects had an optic pathway glioma and 10 subjects had NF1 without an optic pathway glioma. The CV was comparable regardless of imaging with an isotropic and non-isotropic volume in both the intra- and intervisit cohorts. The average circumpapillary RNFL demonstrated the lowest CV and highest ICC compared to the quadrants. For the intervisit cohort, the average ICC was typically higher while the CV was typically lower, but not statistically different compared to the other quadrants. Discussion Circumpapillary RNFL measures acquired with handheld OCT during sedation demonstrate good intra- and intervisit reproducibility. Handheld OCT has the potential to monitor progressive optic neuropathies in young children who have difficulty cooperating with traditional OCT devices. PMID:24983792

  19. Nogo-A and myelin-associated glycoprotein differently regulate oligodendrocyte maturation and myelin formation.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Vincent; Joly, Sandrine; Christ, Franziska; Dimou, Leda; Schwab, Martin E

    2008-07-16

    Nogo-A is one of the most potent oligodendrocyte-derived inhibitors for axonal regrowth in the injured adult CNS. However, the physiological function of Nogo-A in development and in healthy oligodendrocytes is still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the role of Nogo-A for myelin formation in the developing optic nerve. By quantitative real-time PCR, we found that the expression of Nogo-A increased faster in differentiating oligodendrocytes than that of the major myelin proteins MBP (myelin basic protein), PLP (proteolipid protein)/DM20, and CNP (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase). The analysis of optic nerves and cerebella of mice deficient for Nogo-A (Nogo-A(-/-)) revealed a marked delay of oligodendrocyte differentiation, myelin sheath formation, and axonal caliber growth within the first postnatal month. The combined deletion of Nogo-A and MAG caused a more severe transient hypomyelination. In contrast to MAG(-/-) mice, Nogo-A(-/-) mutants did not present abnormalities in the structure of myelin sheaths and Ranvier nodes. The common binding protein for Nogo-A and MAG, NgR1, was exclusively upregulated in MAG(-/-) animals, whereas the level of Lingo-1, a coreceptor, remained unchanged. Together, our results demonstrate that Nogo-A and MAG are differently involved in oligodendrocyte maturation in vivo, and suggest that Nogo-A may influence also remyelination in pathological conditions such as multiple sclerosis.

  20. Comparing Optic Nerve Head Rim Width, Rim Area, and Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness to Axon Count in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fortune, Brad; Hardin, Christy; Reynaud, Juan; Cull, Grant; Yang, Hongli; Wang, Lin; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compare spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) measurements of minimum rim width (MRW), minimum rim area (MRA), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) to complete orbital optic nerve axon counts in nonhuman primates (NHP) with unilateral experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods Biweekly SDOCT measurements of MRW, MRA, and RNFLT were acquired under manometric IOP control (10 mm Hg) in 51 NHP during baseline (mean ± SD, 5.0 ± 1.6 sessions) and after laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of one eye to induce chronic IOP elevation. At the study endpoint (predefined for each NHP), 100% axon counts were obtained from each optic nerve. Results For SDOCT parameters at baseline, the correlation between the two eyes of each animal was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.97) and MRW (R = 0.97), but lower for MRA (R = 0.85). At the final time point, average values in EG eyes relative to control eyes were: −22% for RNFLT, −38% for MRW, −36% for MRA, and −36% for optic nerve axons. The correlation with axon counts was strongest for RNFLT (R = 0.81), compared to MRW (R = 0.72, P = 0.001) or MRA (R = 0.70, P = 0.001). Diagnostic sensitivity was 75% for RNFLT, 90% for MRW, and 88% for MRA; all had 100% specificity. Conclusions Peripapillary RNFLT was correlated more closely with total orbital optic nerve axon count than were the ONH parameters MRW or MRA. This is likely because glaucomatous deformation (beyond axon loss alone) has a greater influence on the ONH parameters MRW and MRA than on RNFLT. PMID:27409499

  1. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  2. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  3. Can Automated Imaging for Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Analysis Aid Glaucoma Detection?

    PubMed Central

    Banister, Katie; Boachie, Charles; Bourne, Rupert; Cook, Jonathan; Burr, Jennifer M.; Ramsay, Craig; Garway-Heath, David; Gray, Joanne; McMeekin, Peter; Hernández, Rodolfo; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of automated imaging for glaucoma. Design Prospective, direct comparison study. Participants Adults with suspected glaucoma or ocular hypertension referred to hospital eye services in the United Kingdom. Methods We evaluated 4 automated imaging test algorithms: the Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) glaucoma probability score (GPS), the HRT Moorfields regression analysis (MRA), scanning laser polarimetry (GDx enhanced corneal compensation; Glaucoma Diagnostics (GDx), Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) nerve fiber indicator (NFI), and Spectralis optical coherence tomography (OCT; Heidelberg Engineering) retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) classification. We defined abnormal tests as an automated classification of outside normal limits for HRT and OCT or NFI ≥ 56 (GDx). We conducted a sensitivity analysis, using borderline abnormal image classifications. The reference standard was clinical diagnosis by a masked glaucoma expert including standardized clinical assessment and automated perimetry. We analyzed 1 eye per patient (the one with more advanced disease). We also evaluated the performance according to severity and using a combination of 2 technologies. Main Outcome Measures Sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios, diagnostic, odds ratio, and proportion of indeterminate tests. Results We recruited 955 participants, and 943 were included in the analysis. The average age was 60.5 years (standard deviation, 13.8 years); 51.1% were women. Glaucoma was diagnosed in at least 1 eye in 16.8%; 32% of participants had no glaucoma-related findings. The HRT MRA had the highest sensitivity (87.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 80.2%–92.1%), but lowest specificity (63.9%; 95% CI, 60.2%–67.4%); GDx had the lowest sensitivity (35.1%; 95% CI, 27.0%–43.8%), but the highest specificity (97.2%; 95% CI, 95.6%–98.3%). The HRT GPS sensitivity was 81.5% (95% CI, 73.9%–87.6%), and

  4. Reduced BACE1 activity enhances clearance of myelin debris and regeneration of axons in the injured peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Mohamed H.; Pan, Bao Han; Hoffman, Paul N.; Ferraris, Dana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Nguyen, Thien; Wong, Philip C.; Price, Donald L.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Griffin, John W.

    2012-01-01

    β- site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease best known for its role in generating the amyloid β peptides that are present in plaques of Alzheimer's Disease. BACE1 has been an attractive target for drug development. In cultured embryonic neurons BACE1-cleaved N-terminal APP is further processed to generate a fragment that can trigger axonal degeneration, suggesting a vital role for BACE1 in axonal health. In addition, BACE1 cleaves neuregulin 1 type III, a protein critical for myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells during development. Here, we asked if axonal degeneration or axonal regeneration in adult nerves might be affected by inhibition or elimination of BACE1. We report that BACE1 knockout and wild-type nerves degenerated at a similar rate after axotomy and to a similar extent in the experimental neuropathies produced by administration of paclitaxel and acrylamide. These data indicate N-APP is not the sole culprit in axonal degeneration in adult nerves. Unexpectedly, however, we observed that BACE1 knockout mice had markedly enhanced clearance of axonal and myelin debris from degenerated fibers, accelerated axonal regeneration, and earlier reinnervation of neuromuscular junctions, compared to littermate controls. These observations were reproduced in part by pharmacological inhibition of BACE1. These data suggest BACE1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach to accelerate regeneration and recovery after peripheral nerve damage. PMID:21490216

  5. Morphological changes of the peripheral nerves evaluated by high-resolution ultrasonography are associated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not corneal nerve fiber pathology in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Fukashi; Taniguchi, Miki; Kojima, Rie; Kawasaki, Asami; Kosaka, Aiko; Uetake, Harumi

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction To evaluate the morphological changes of the median and posterior tibial nerve using high-resolution ultrasonography, and the corneal C fiber pathology by corneal confocal microscopy in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves were measured by high-resolution ultrasonography in 200 type 2 diabetic patients, stratified by the severity of diabetic neuropathy, and in 40 age- and sex-matched controls. These parameters were associated with corneal C fiber pathology visualized by corneal confocal microscopy, neurophysiological tests and severity of diabetic neuropathy. Results The cross-sectional area, hypoechoic area and maximum thickness of the nerve fascicle of both nerves in patients without diabetic neuropathy were larger than those in control subjects (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), and further increased relative to the severity of neuropathy (P < 0.0001). All morphological changes of both nerves were negatively associated with motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (P = 0.01 to P < 0.0001), and directly associated with 2,000-Hz current perception threshold (P = 0.009 to P < 0.001). The significant corneal C fiber pathology occurred before developing the neuropathy, and deteriorated only in patients with the most severe neuropathy. The association between the morphological changes of both nerves and corneal C fiber pathology was poor. Conclusions The morphological changes in peripheral nerves of type 2 diabetic patients were found before the onset of neuropathy, and were closely correlated with the severity of diabetic neuropathy, but not with corneal C fiber pathology. PMID:25969719

  6. The phylogeny of invertebrates and the evolution of myelin.

    PubMed

    Roots, Betty I

    2008-05-01

    Current concepts of invertebrate phylogeny are reviewed. Annelida and Arthropoda, previously regarded as closely related, are now placed in separate clades. Myelin, a sheath of multiple layers of membranes around nerve axons, is found in members of the Annelida, Arthropoda and Chordata. The structure, composition and function of the sheaths in Annelida and Arthropoda are examined and evidence for the separate evolutionary origins of myelin in the three clades is presented. That myelin has arisen independently at least three times, namely in Annelids, Arthropodas and Chordates, provides a remarkable example of convergent evolution.

  7. Rat sciatic nerve reconstruction across a 30 mm defect bridged by an oriented porous PHBV tube with Schwann cell as artificial nerve graft.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mina; Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Doostmohamadpour, Jafar; Janfada, Alireza; Montazeri, Arash

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model.

  8. Rat Sciatic Nerve Reconstruction Across a 30 mm Defect Bridged by an Oriented Porous PHBV Tube With Schwann Cell as Artificial Nerve Graft

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model. PMID:24399063

  9. Clinicopathological Features and Immunohistochemical Alterations of Keratinocyte Proliferation, Melanocyte Density, Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia and Nerve Fiber Distribution in Becker's Nevus

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Ping; Cheng, Yun-Long; Cai, Chuan-Chuan; Guo, Wei-Jin; Zhou, Ying; Shi, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Becker's nevus (BN) is a relatively common disease, the systematic studies of clinicopathological and immunohistochemical results are poorly reported. Objective To investigate the clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical alterations of keratinocyte proliferation, melanocyte density, smooth muscle hyperplasia and nerve fiber distribution in BN. Methods Clinical and pathological data were collected in 60 newly-diagnosed BN cases. Immunohistochemical stain of Ki-67, Melan-A, keratin 15, smooth muscle actin and protein gene product 9.5 was performed in 21 cases. Results The median diagnostic and onset age was 17 and 12 years, respectively. Skin lesions usually appeared on the upper trunk and upper limbs. The pathological features included the rete ridge elongation and fusion and basal hyperpigmentation. Epidermal Ki-67, Melan-A and keratin 15 expression and dermal nerve fiber length were significantly higher in lesional and perilesional skin than in normal skin (p<0.05~0.01), while smooth muscle actin expression was upregulated only in skin lesion (p<0.05). Conclusion Although the clinical diagnosis of BN is often straightforward, histopathology is helpful to differentiate from other pigmentary disorders. The hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, melanocytes, arrector pili muscle and dermal nerve fibers could be involved in the pathogenesis of BN. PMID:27904268

  10. YAP/TAZ initiate and maintain Schwann cell myelination

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Matthew; Kim, Hyukmin; Santerre, Maryline; Krupka, Alexander J; Han, Seung Baek; Zhai, Jinbin; Cho, Jennifer Y; Park, Raehee; Harris, Michele; Kim, Seonhee; Sawaya, Bassel E; Kang, Shin H; Barbe, Mary F; Cho, Seo-Hee; Lemay, Michel A; Son, Young-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear exclusion of the transcriptional regulators and potent oncoproteins, YAP/TAZ, is considered necessary for adult tissue homeostasis. Here we show that nuclear YAP/TAZ are essential regulators of peripheral nerve development and myelin maintenance. To proliferate, developing Schwann cells (SCs) require YAP/TAZ to enter S-phase and, without them, fail to generate sufficient SCs for timely axon sorting. To differentiate, SCs require YAP/TAZ to upregulate Krox20 and, without them, completely fail to myelinate, resulting in severe peripheral neuropathy. Remarkably, in adulthood, nuclear YAP/TAZ are selectively expressed by myelinating SCs, and conditional ablation results in severe peripheral demyelination and mouse death. YAP/TAZ regulate both developmental and adult myelination by driving TEAD1 to activate Krox20. Therefore, YAP/TAZ are crucial for SCs to myelinate developing nerve and to maintain myelinated nerve in adulthood. Our study also provides a new insight into the role of nuclear YAP/TAZ in homeostatic maintenance of an adult tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20982.001 PMID:28124973

  11. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, vanilloid 2 and melastatin 8 immunoreactive nerve fibers in human skin from individuals with and without Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, H E; Minde, J K; Sonesson, A; Toolanen, G; Högestätt, E D; Zygmunt, P M

    2009-09-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) and melastatin 8 (TRPM8) are thermosensitive cation channels expressed on primary sensory neurons. In contrast to TRPV1, which is present on nociceptive primary afferents and keratinocytes in human skin, less is known about the distribution of TRPV2 and TRPM8 in this tissue. Immunohistochemistry of human forearm skin identified TRPV2 and TRPM8 immunoreactive nerve fibers in epidermis-papillary dermis and around blood vessels and hair follicles in dermis, although these nerve fibers were less abundant than TRPV1 immunoreactive nerve fibers throughout the skin. The TRPV2 and TRPM8 immunoreactive nerve fibers also showed immunoreactivity for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and to a lesser extent substance P (SP). Neither of the TRP ion channels co-localized with neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Nerve fibers immunoreactive for TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, CGRP and SP were absent or substantially reduced in number in individuals with Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain, an autosomal disease selectively affecting the development of C-fiber and Adelta-fiber primary afferents. Quantitative real time PCR detected mRNA transcripts encoding TRPV1 and TRPV2, but not TRPM8, in skin from healthy volunteers, suggesting that these ion channels are also expressed extraneuronally. In conclusion, nerve fibers in human skin express TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 that co-localize with the sensory neuropeptides CGRP and SP, but not with NF200, VIP or TH. A dramatic loss of such nerve fibers was seen in skin from individuals with Norrbottnian congenital insensitivity to pain, further suggesting that these ion channels are expressed primarily on nociceptive primary sensory neurons in human skin.

  12. High spatial resolution imaging mass spectrometry of human optic nerve lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David M G; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Rose, Kristie L; Schey, Kevin L

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  13. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  14. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and the Evolution of Cognitive Performance in an Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Gómez, Juan Luis; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Tellouck, Laury; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Schweitzer, Cédric; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Delcourt, Cécile; Helmer, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness is reduced in Alzheimer’s patients. However, whether it is associated with early evolution of cognitive function is unknown. Within 427 participants from the Three-City-Alienor longitudinal population-based cohort, we explored the relationship between peripapillary RNFL thicknesses and the evolution of cognitive performance. RNFL was assessed at baseline by spectral domain optical coherence tomography; cognitive performances were assessed at baseline and at 2 years, with the Mini–Mental State Examination, the Isaacs’ set test, and the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT). Multivariate linear mixed models were performed. The RNFL was not associated with initial cognitive performance. Nevertheless, a thicker RNFL was significantly associated with a better cognitive evolution over time in the free delayed recall (p = 0.0037) and free + cued delayed recall (p = 0.0043) scores of the FCSRT, particularly in the temporal, superotemporal, and inferotemporal segments. No associations were found with other cognitive tests. The RNFL was associated with changes in scores that assess episodic memory. RNFL thickness could reflect a higher risk of developing cognitive impairment over time. PMID:28373855

  15. Thickness related textural properties of retinal nerve fiber layer in color fundus images.

    PubMed

    Odstrcilik, Jan; Kolar, Radim; Tornow, Ralf-Peter; Jan, Jiri; Budai, Attila; Mayer, Markus; Vodakova, Martina; Laemmer, Robert; Lamos, Martin; Kuna, Zdenek; Gazarek, Jiri; Kubena, Tomas; Cernosek, Pavel; Ronzhina, Marina

    2014-09-01

    Images of ocular fundus are routinely utilized in ophthalmology. Since an examination using fundus camera is relatively fast and cheap procedure, it can be used as a proper diagnostic tool for screening of retinal diseases such as the glaucoma. One of the glaucoma symptoms is progressive atrophy of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) resulting in variations of the RNFL thickness. Here, we introduce a novel approach to capture these variations using computer-aided analysis of the RNFL textural appearance in standard and easily available color fundus images. The proposed method uses the features based on Gaussian Markov random fields and local binary patterns, together with various regression models for prediction of the RNFL thickness. The approach allows description of the changes in RNFL texture, directly reflecting variations in the RNFL thickness. Evaluation of the method is carried out on 16 normal ("healthy") and 8 glaucomatous eyes. We achieved significant correlation (normals: ρ=0.72±0.14; p≪0.05, glaucomatous: ρ=0.58±0.10; p≪0.05) between values of the model predicted output and the RNFL thickness measured by optical coherence tomography, which is currently regarded as a standard glaucoma assessment device. The evaluation thus revealed good applicability of the proposed approach to measure possible RNFL thinning.

  16. Screening of nerve agent markers with hollow fiber-chemosorption of phosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, Karin Höjer; Gustafsson, Tomas; Östin, Anders

    2016-10-15

    This report describes a method developed for extracting nerve gas markers such as phosphonic acids from urine and other aqueous samples. It involves single-step microextraction with chemosorption to hollow fibers that have been pre-soaked in a solution containing a derivatization reagent (3,5 triflouro methyl benzene diazomethane). The derivatives it forms with phosphonic acids can be sensitively detected by mass spectrometric detectors operating in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode. Limits of quantification obtained in analyses of water and urine extracts by GC/MS in negative chemical ionization and selected ion monitoring mode were 0.1-10 and 0.5-10ng/mL, respectively. Pentaflourophenyl diazomethane can also be used as a derivatization reagent, and the micro-extracts (which generate low background signals) can be sensitively analyzed by GC-MS/MS in NCI selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode, using two specific transitions for both reagents. Thus, this sensitive approach can be flexibly modified to obtain confirmatory information, or address potential problems caused by interferences in some samples.

  17. Retinal nerve fiber layer retardation measurements using a polarization-sensitive fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Yasufumi; Okazaki, Yoshio; Shioiri, Takashi; Iida, Yukio; Kikuta, Hisao; Shirakashi, Motohiro; Yaoeda, Kiyoshi; Abe, Haruki; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-01

    To measure the retardation distribution of the optic retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) from a single image, we have developed a new polarization analysis system that is able to detect the Stokes vector using a fundus camera. The polarization analysis system is constructed with a CCD area image sensor, a linear polarizing plate, a microphase plate array, and a circularly polarized light illumination unit. In this system, the Stokes vector expressing the whole state of polarization is detected, and the influence of the background scattering in the retina and of the retardation caused by the cornea are numerically eliminated. The measurement method is based on the hypothesis that the retardation process of the eye optics can be quantified by a numerical equation that consists of a retardation matrix of all the polarization components. We show the method and the measurement results for normal eyes. Our results indicate that the present method may provide a useful means for the evaluation of retardation distribution of the RNFL.

  18. Is Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Change Related to Headache Lateralization in Migraine?

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Seden; Tok, Levent; Tok, Ozlem; Demirci, Serpil; Kutluhan, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in migraine patients with unilateral headache. Methods A total of 58 patients diagnosed with migraine headache consistently occurring on the same side and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. RNFL thickness was measured using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and the side with the headache was com-pared with the contralateral side as well as with the results of healthy subjects. Results The mean patient age was 33.05 ± 8.83 years, and that of the healthy subjects was 31.44 ± 8.64 years (p = 0.32). The mean duration of disease was 10.29 ± 9.03 years. The average and nasal RNFL thicknesses were significantly thinner on the side of headache and on the contralateral side compared to control eyes (p < 0.05, for all). Thinning was higher on the side of the headache compared to the contralateral side; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions The RNFL thicknesses were thinner on the side of the headache compared to the contralateral side in the migraine patients with unilateral headache, but this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:27051262

  19. Macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Japanese measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Hanawa, Katsuhiro; Adachi-Usami, Emiko

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the thickness of the macula and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in Japanese subjects by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT), and to compare the findings with the normative data of subjects from the United States of America (USA). Sixty-one eyes from 31 healthy subjects were used for the measurement of the macular thickness, and 60 eyes from 30 healthy subjects were used for the RNFL thickness measurements. The values obtained from the Japanese subjects were compared with the corresponding values in healthy subjects from the USA. The superior, nasal, temporal, and inferior macular sectors and the mean and inferior areas of the RNFL in the Japanese subjects were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of normal subjects in the USA (272 +/- 13 vs 255 +/- 17 mum, 274 +/- 12 vs 267 +/- 16 mum, 262 +/- 12 vs 251 +/- 13 mum, 268 +/- 13 vs 260 +/- 15 mum; p < 0.0001, 104 +/- 11 vs 100 +/- 12 mum, 134 +/- 20 vs. 126 +/- 18 mum; p = 0.0167, 0.0047, respectively). In conclusion, the significantly thicker macular regions and RNFL in the Japanese indicate not only that there are racial differences in retinal thicknesses but also that the normative values provided by the Stratus OCT should not be used for different races.

  20. Evaluation of Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Layer after Dexamethasone Implantation (Ozurdex) in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Özertürk, Yusuf; Çallı, Ümit; Akçay, Güzide; Kıvrak, Ulviye; Bulut, Kezban

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknesses of patients treated with intravitreal Ozurdex implant due to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) related macular edema (ME). Methods. Thirty-three eyes of 33 patients treated with Ozurdex implant due to ME associated with BRVO were included in the study. Ophthalmic examinations including determination of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP), and central macular thickness (CMT) and peripapillary RNFL assessment with optical coherence tomography (OCT) were performed before the injection of Ozurdex implant and during the 6-month follow-up period after the injection. Results. The mean age was 55.2 ± 7.4 (range: 40–68) years. The BCVAs were significantly increased and CMTs were significantly decreased at month 3 and month 6 visits compared to baseline values. The mean IOP was significantly increased from baseline at day 1, week 1, and month 1 visits (p1 = 0.008, p2 = 0.018, and p3 = 0.022, resp.). The average and inferior quadrant peripapillary RNFL thicknesses were significantly reduced at month 6 control visit compared to baseline values (both p < 0.001). Conclusions. Ozurdex implant improved the BCVA and reduced the CMT in the eyes with RVO related ME. However, IOP elevations occurred within the first month after the injection and the average and inferior quadrant RNFL thinning was found six months after the injection. Further controlled studies are warranted. PMID:27882244

  1. Assessing the Relationship between Central Corneal Thickness and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Townsend, Kelly A; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bilonick, Richard A; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between central corneal thickness (CCT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness obtained by scanning laser polarimetry (GDx-VCC; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT II; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) and optical coherence tomography (Stratus OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Design Multi-center clinical trial, retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods One hundred and nine healthy subjects from the Advanced Imaging in Glaucoma Study were enrolled in this study. All subjects had a standard clinical examination, including visual field and good quality scans from all three imaging devices. Central corneal thickness was measured using an ultrasonic pachymeter. A linear mixed effects model was used to assess the relationship between RNFL thickness and CCT, accounting for clustering of eyes within subjects, testing site, ethnicity, family history of glaucoma, axial length intraocular pressure and visual field global indices. Results For OCT and GDx, there was a slight non-statistically significant positive relationship between CCT and RNFL thickness. For HRT, there was a slight non-statistically significant negative relationship between CCT and RNFL thickness. Relationships for each device were found to differ between sites. Conclusions CCT was not statistically significantly related to RNFL thickness in healthy eyes. PMID:18657796

  2. Diurnal changes in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chirapapaisan, Niphon; Likitgorn, Techawit; Pleumchitchom, Mintra; Sakiyalak, Darin; Banhiran, Wish; Saiman, Manatsawin; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in the morning and evening in Thai patients with varying degrees of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). METHODS In this cross-sectional study, potential OSAHS patients at Siriraj Hospital underwent polysomnography to determine the severity of OSAHS and an eye examination (including best corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, and Goldmann applanation tonometry). RNFL thickness was recorded once in the morning and once in the evening, using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Thickness was expressed as an average and given for each quadrant. Patients with ocular or systemic diseases that might affect RNFL thickness were excluded. RESULTS Forty-one eyes of 41 patients were classified into 4 OSAHS groups. The average and mean RNFL thickness in most of the four quadrants of the severe OSAHS group trended toward being less than those in the comparable quadrants of the other groups in both the morning and evening. In the moderate OSAHS group, the average RNFL thickness and temporal and superior quadrant thickness in the morning were significantly higher than in the evening (P=0.01, P=0.01, and P=0.03, respectively). In the severe OSAHS group, the inferior quadrant thickness in the morning was significantly higher than in the evening (P=0.03). CONCLUSION The RNFL thickness in the morning was higher than in the evening in moderate OSAHS. PMID:27500104

  3. Distributed nerve gases sensor based on IR absorption in hollow optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, R.; Liberatore, N.; Luciani, D.; Mengali, S.; Pierno, L.

    2010-10-01

    The Nerve gases are persistent gases that appear as very challenging menace in homeland security scenarios, due to the low pressure vapor at ambient temperature, and the very low lethal concentrations. A novel approach to the detection and identification of these very hazardous volatile compounds in large areas such as airports, underground stations, big events arenas, aimed to a high selectivity (Low false alarm probability), has been explored under the SENSEFIB Corporate Project of Finmeccanica S.p.A. The technical demonstrator under development within the Project is presented. It is based on distributed line sensors performing infrared absorption measurements to reveal even trace amounts of target compounds from the retrieval of their spectral fingerprint. The line sensor is essentially constituted by a widely tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), coupled to IR thermoelectrically cooled MCT fast detectors by means of a infrared hollow core fibers (HCF). The air is sampled through several micro-holes along the HCF, by means of a micropump, while the infrared radiation travels inside the fiber from the source to the detector, that are optically coupled with the opposite apertures of the HCF. The architecture of the sensor and its principle of operation, in order to cover large areas with a few line sensors instead of with a grid of many point sensors, are illustrated. The sensor is designed to use the HCF as an absorption cell, exploiting long path length and very small volume, (e.g fast response), at the same time. Furthermore the distributed sensor allows to cover large areas and/or not easily accessible locations, like air ducts, with a single line sensor by extending the HCF for several tens of meters. The main components implemented in the sensor are described, in particular: the EC-QCL source to span the spectral range of wavelength between 9.15um and 9.85um; and the hollow core fiber, exhibiting a suitably low optical loss in this spectral

  4. The Multiple Silicone Tube Device, “Tubes within a Tube,” for Multiplication in Nerve Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Lars B.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple nerve branches were created during the regeneration procedure after a nerve injury and such multiple branches are suggested to be used to control, for example, prosthesis with many degrees of freedom. Transected rat sciatic nerve stumps were inserted into a nine mm long silicone tube, which contained four, five mm long, smaller tubes, thus leaving a five mm gap for regenerating nerve fibers. Six weeks later, several new nerve structures were formed not only in the four smaller tubes, but also in the spaces in-between. The 7–9 new continuous nerve structures, which were isolated as individual free nerves after removal of the tubes, were delineated by a perineurium and contained both myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers as well as blood vessels. Stimulation of the proximal nerve elicited contractions in distal muscles. Thin metal electrodes, inserted initially into the smaller tubes in some experiments, became embedded in the new nerve structures and when stimulated contractions of the distal muscles were observed. The “tubes within a tube” technique, creating multiple new nerves from a single “mother” nerve, can be used to record multiple signals for prosthetic device control or as sources for supply of multiple denervated targets. PMID:24864255

  5. Use of natural neural scaffolds consisting of engineered vascular endothelial growth factor immobilized on ordered collagen fibers filled in a collagen tube for peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fukai; Xiao, Zhifeng; Meng, Danqing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhu, Jianhong; Dai, Jianwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2014-10-15

    The search for effective strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration has attracted much attention in recent years. In this study, ordered collagen fibers were used as intraluminal fibers after nerve injury in rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in nerve regeneration, but its very fast initial burst of activity within a short time has largely limited its clinical use. For the stable binding of VEGF to ordered collagen fibers, we fused a collagen-binding domain (CBD) to VEGF through recombinant DNA technology. Then, we filled the ordered collagen fibers-CBD-VEGF targeting delivery system in a collagen tube to construct natural neural scaffolds, which were then used to bridge transected nerve stumps in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. After transplantation, the natural neural scaffolds showed minimal foreign body reactions and good integration into the host tissue. Oriented collagen fibers in the collagen tube could guide regenerating axons in an oriented manner to the distal, degenerating nerve segment, maximizing the chance of target reinnervation. Functional and histological analyses indicated that the recovery of nerve function in the natural neural scaffolds-treated group was superior to the other grafted groups. The guiding of oriented axonal regeneration and effective delivery systems surmounting the otherwise rapid and short-lived diffusion of growth factors in body fluids are two important strategies in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration. The natural neural scaffolds described take advantage of these two aspects and may produce synergistic effects. These properties qualified the artificial nerve conduits as a putative candidate system for the fabrication of peripheral nerve reconstruction devices.

  6. Long-term daily vibration exposure alters current perception threshold (CPT) sensitivity and myelinated axons in a rat-tail model of vibration-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Kristine; Raju, Sandya G; Miller, G Roger; Johnson, Claud; Waugh, Stacey; Kashon, Michael L; Riley, Danny A

    2016-01-01

    Repeated exposure to hand-transmitted vibration through the use of powered hand tools may result in pain and progressive reductions in tactile sensitivity. The goal of the present study was to use an established animal model of vibration-induced injury to characterize changes in sensory nerve function and cellular mechanisms associated with these alterations. Sensory nerve function was assessed weekly using the current perception threshold test and tail-flick analgesia test in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 28 d of tail vibration. After 28 d of exposure, Aβ fiber sensitivity was reduced. This reduction in sensitivity was partly attributed to structural disruption of myelin. In addition, the decrease in sensitivity was also associated with a reduction in myelin basic protein and 2',3'- cyclic nucleotide phosphodiasterase (CNPase) staining in tail nerves, and an increase in circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) concentrations. Changes in Aβ fiber sensitivity and CGRP concentrations may serve as early markers of vibration-induced injury in peripheral nerves. It is conceivable that these markers may be utilized to monitor sensorineural alterations in workers exposed to vibration to potentially prevent additional injury.

  7. Influence of Myopia on Size of Optic Nerve Head and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measured by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seok Hyun; Kang, Shin Hee; Feng, Chi Shian; Park, Joohyun; Jeong, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate optic nerve head size and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness according to refractive status and axial length. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 252 eyes of 252 healthy volunteers underwent ocular biometry measurement as well as optic nerve head and RNFL imaging by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for all subjects. The magnification effect was adjusted by the modified axial length method. Results Disc area and spherical equivalent were positively correlated (r = 0.225, r2 = 0.051, p = 0.000). RNFL thickness showed significant correlations with spherical equivalent (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000), disc radius (r = 0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), and radius of the scan circle (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). After adjustment for the magnification effect, those relationships were reversed; RNFL thickness showed negative correlation with spherical equivalent and disc radius, and positive correlation with axial length and radius of the scan circle. The distance between the disc margin and the scan circle was closely correlated with RNFL thickness (r = -0.359, r2 = 0.129, p = 0.000), which showed a negative correlation with axial length (r = -0.262, r2 = 0.069, p = 0.000). Conclusions Optic disc radius and RNFL thickness decreased in more severely myopic eyes, but they increased after adjustment for magnification effect. The error due to the magnification effect and optic nerve head size difference might be factors that should be considered when interpreting optical coherence tomography results. PMID:27729753

  8. Hierarchical structural health monitoring system combining a fiber optic spinal cord network and distributed nerve cell devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Tsukamoto, Haruka; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-03-01

    This study proposes novel hierarchical sensing concept for detecting damages in composite structures. In the hierarchical system, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with the optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed "sensory nerve cell" devices detect the damage, and the fiber optic "spinal cord" network gathers damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of the hierarchical sensing system thorough comparison with existing fiber optic based systems and nerve systems in the animal kingdom. Then, in order to validate the proposed sensing concept, impact damage detection system for the composite structure was proposed. The sensor devices were developed based on Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVM) system and the Brillouin based distributed strain sensing was utilized to gather the damage signals from the distributed devices. Finally a verification test was conducted using prototype devices. Occurrence of barely visible impact damage was successfully detected and it was clearly indicated that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and wider monitorable area compared to existing systems utilizing embedded optical fiber sensors.

  9. TACE (ADAM17) inhibits Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Rosa; Cerri, Federica; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Bachi, Angela; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Blobel, Carl P; Quattrini, Angelo; Salzer, James L; Taveggia, Carla

    2011-06-12

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE; also known as ADAM17) is a proteolytic sheddase that is responsible for the cleavage of several membrane-bound molecules. We report that TACE cleaves neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III in the epidermal growth factor domain, probably inactivating it (as assessed by deficient activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway), and thereby negatively regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelination. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of TACE in vitro in dorsal root ganglia neurons accelerates the onset of myelination and results in hypermyelination. In agreement, motor neurons of conditional knockout mice lacking TACE specifically in these cells are significantly hypermyelinated, and small-caliber fibers are aberrantly myelinated. Further, reduced TACE activity rescues hypomyelination in NRG1 type III haploinsufficient mice in vivo. We also show that the inhibitory effect of TACE is neuron-autonomous, as Schwann cells lacking TACE elaborate myelin of normal thickness. Thus, TACE is a modulator of NRG1 type III activity and is a negative regulator of myelination in the PNS.

  10. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  11. Via beta-adrenoceptors, stimulation of extrasplenic sympathetic nerve fibers inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF secretion in perfused rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Kees, Martin G; Pongratz, Georg; Kees, Frieder; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Straub, Rainer H

    2003-12-01

    Using a spleen slice microsuperfusion technique in mice, we have previously characterized the role of norepinephrine (NE) and other neurotransmitters for sympathetic modulation of IL-6 and TNF secretion of splenic macrophages. Since experiments in spleen slices do not reflect the situation of an entire perfused organ, we investigated sympathetic modulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of IL-6 and TNF in perfusion experiments of rat spleen. In an organ bath, perfusion was performed in explanted whole spleens, and catecholamines and cytokines were measured by HPLC and ELISA, respectively. Release of NE depended on stimulation frequency (maximum at 10 Hz). Apart from NE, perfusates also contained significant amounts of dopamine and epinephrine. Furthermore, perfusate epinephrine levels correlated positively with perfusate NE levels (RRank=0.750, p<0.001) but not with plasma epinephrine concentrations. This indicates that epinephrine is a conversion product of sympathetically released NE. Early electrical stimulation of extrasplenic splenic nerves, 20 min after administration of LPS, significantly inhibited TNF secretion. This electrically induced effect was abrogated by simultaneous administration of propranolol (10(-6) M) but it was not influenced by administration of either an alpha1- or alpha2-adrenergic antagonist. Late electrical stimulation of splenic nerves, 2.5 h after administration of LPS, did not change TNF secretion. Interestingly, no influence of early or late sympathetic nerve fiber stimulation on IL-6 secretion was observed. In conclusion, this is the first perfusion study of the entire spleen that demonstrates that early electrical stimulation of sympathetic splenic nerve fibers directly inhibits LPS-induced TNF secretion. This study corroborates the idea that splenic sympathetic nerves are able to inhibit important activators of the innate immune system when stimulation happens very early or even prior to their induction by LPS.

  12. Chitosan-cross-linked nanofibrous PHBV nerve guide for rat sciatic nerve regeneration across a defect bridge.

    PubMed

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a chitosan-cross-linked nanofibrous biodegradable poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit. The artificial nerve scaffold designed by electrospinning method and cross-linked with chitosan by chemical method. Afterwards, the scaffolds were evaluated by microscopic, physical, and mechanical analyses and cell culture assays with Schwann cells. The conduits were implanted into a 10 mm gap in the sciatic nerves of the rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology. This polymeric conduit had sufficiently good mechanical properties to serve as a nerve guide. Cellular experiments showed a better cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation inside the cross-linked nanofibrous scaffolds compared with un-cross-linked ones, also Schwann cells well attached on chitosan-cross-linked nanofibrous surface. The in vivo results demonstrated that in the nanofibrous graft, the sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. This neural conduit appears to have the right organization for testing in vivo nerve tissue engineering studies.

  13. Elevated protein carbonylation, and misfolding in sciatic nerve from db/db and Sod1(-/-) mice: plausible link between oxidative stress and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Ryan T; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Walsh, Michael E; Shi, Yun; Wei, Rochelle; Zhang, Yiqiang; Rodriguez, Karl A; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Chaudhuri, Asish R; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy is associated with decrements in motor/sensory neuron myelination, nerve conduction and muscle function; however, the mechanisms of reduced myelination in diabetes are poorly understood. Chronic elevation of oxidative stress may be one of the potential determinants for demyelination as lipids and proteins are important structural constituents of myelin and highly susceptible to oxidation. The goal of the current study was to determine whether there is a link between protein oxidation/misfolding and demyelination. We chose two distinct models to test our hypothesis: 1) the leptin receptor deficient mouse (dbdb) model of diabetic polyneuropathy and 2) superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-) ) mouse model of in vivo oxidative stress. Both experimental models displayed a significant decrement in nerve conduction, increase in tail distal motor latency as well as reduced myelin thickness and fiber/axon diameter. Further biochemical studies demonstrated that oxidative stress is likely to be a potential key player in the demyelination process as both models exhibited significant elevation in protein carbonylation and alterations in protein conformation. Since peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a key component of myelin sheath and has been found mutated and aggregated in several peripheral neuropathies, we predicted that an increase in carbonylation and aggregation of PMP22 may be associated with demyelination in dbdb mice. Indeed, PMP22 was found to be carbonylated and aggregated in sciatic nerves of dbdb mice. Sequence-driven hydropathy plot analysis and in vitro oxidation-induced aggregation of purified PMP22 protein supported the premise for oxidation-dependent aggregation of PMP22 in dbdb mice. Collectively, these data strongly suggest for the first time that oxidation-mediated protein misfolding and aggregation of key myelin proteins may be linked to demyelination and reduced nerve conduction in peripheral neuropathies.

  14. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy differentially affects smaller axons in the optic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Sadun, A A; Win, P H; Ross-Cisneros, F N; Walker, S O; Carelli, V

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), though known to be due to 1 of 3 pathogenic mtDNA point mutations (nucleotide positions 11,778, 3460, and 14,484), usually manifests itself acutely in young adulthood with a stereotypical presentation of dyschromatopsia, loss of central vision, and loss of the papillomacular bundle nerve fiber layer. Histopathologic investigations have demonstrated devastating losses of axons with relative sparing of the most peripherally placed fibers in the optic nerves. This study was designed to morphometrically investigate the nerve fiber spectrum from ultrastructural studies of optic nerves obtained from 2 patients with LHON. METHODS: Two cases of LHON were molecularly characterized and the optic nerves from these cases studied by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Montages were made of electron micrographs cut orthogonal to fibers obtained from the periphery of each optic nerve, and these were then used for the measurement of each axon (short and long axis) and its myelin sheath. From this, a spectrum of nerve fiber layer was generated, yielding axon caliber profiles that could be compared between optic nerves. RESULTS: The total depletion of optic nerve fiber population in the 2 cases of LHON varied from 95% to 99%. Those fibers that were spared were limited to the peripheral optic nerve. The nerve fiber layer spectra of these remaining fibers showed a marked diminution of the first peak of axons of less than 1 micron in diameter, with relative emphasis of a second peak of axons of about 2 microns in diameter. In comparison to normal controls, this reflected a preferential loss of the smallest axons corresponding to the P-cell population. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical features of dyschromatopsia and central scotoma (with preservation of pupils) in LHON suggests the selective loss of the P-cell population known to subserve these (and not pupil) functions. This also correlates well with the fundus findings of early

  15. Variation in quantitative sensory testing and epidermal nerve fiber density in repeated measurements.

    PubMed

    Selim, Mona M; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Hodges, James S; Simone, Donald A; Foster, Shawn X Y-L; Vanhove, Geertrui F; Kennedy, William R

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is commonly used to evaluate peripheral sensory function in neuropathic conditions. QST measures vary in repeated measurements of normal subjects but it is not known whether QST can reflect small changes in epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFd). This study evaluated QST measures (touch, mechanical pain, heat pain and innocuous cold sensations) for differences between genders and over time using ENFd as an objective-independent measure. QST was performed on the thighs of 36 healthy volunteers on four occasions between December and May. ENFd in skin biopsies was determined on three of those visits. Compared to men, women had a higher ENFd, a difference of 12.2 ENFs/mm. They also had lower tactile and innocuous cold thresholds, and detected mechanical pain (pinprick) at a higher frequency. Heat pain thresholds did not differ between genders. By the end of the 24-week study, men and women showed a small reduction (p<0.05) in the frequency of sharp mechanical pain evoked by pinprick whereas tactile and thermal thresholds showed no change. This coincided with a small decrease in ENFd, 4.18 ENFs/mm. Variation in measurements over time was large in a fraction of normal subjects. We conclude that most QST measures detect relatively large differences in epidermal innervation (12.2 ENFs/mm), but response to mechanical pain was the only sensory modality tested with the sensitivity to detect small changes in innervation (4.18 ENFs/mm). Since some individuals had large unsystematic variations, unexpected test results should therefore alert clinicians to test additional locations.

  16. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measures and Cognitive Function in the EPIC-Norfolk Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Anthony P.; Chan, Michelle P. Y.; Yip, Jennifer L. Y.; Broadway, David C.; Garway-Heath, David F.; Luben, Robert; Hayat, Shabina; Matthews, Fiona E.; Brayne, Carol; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the relationship between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and cognitive function in a population of older British adults. Methods Participants of the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC) Norfolk cohort study underwent ophthalmic and cognitive assessment. Measurements of RNFL thickness were made using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT). Cognitive testing included a short form of the Mini-Mental State Examination (SF-MMSE), an animal naming task, a letter cancellation task, the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT), the National Adult Reading Test (NART), and the Paired Associates Learning Test. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess associations of RNFL thickness with cognitive test scores, adjusted for age, sex, education level, social class, visual acuity, axial length, and history of cataract surgery. Results Data were available from 5563 participants with a mean age of 67 years. A thicker HRT-derived RNFL thickness was associated with better scores for the SF-MMSE (0.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], [0.02, 0.10], P = 0.005), HVLT (0.16, 95% CI [0.03, 0.29]; P = 0.014), and NART (−0.24, 95% CI [−0.46, −0.02], P = 0.035). The associations of RNFL thickness with SF-MMSE and HVLT remained significant following further adjustment for NART. Conclusions We found a significant association between HRT-derived RNFL thickness and scores from cognitive tests assessing global function, recognition, learning, episodic memory, and premorbid intelligence. However, the associations were weak and not currently of predictive value. Further research is required to confirm and clarify the nature of these associations, and identify biological mechanisms. PMID:27092718

  17. Longitudinal Change of Circumpapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Children with Optic Pathway Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Robert A.; Cnaan, Avital; Schuman, Joel S.; Trimboli-Heidler, Carmelina; Chen, Chieh-Li; Packer, Roger J.; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate longitudinal changes in circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), in children with optic pathway gliomas. Design Longitudinal cohort study Methods Global and quadrant specific circumpapillary RNFL thickness measures were acquired using either a hand-held during sedation or a table-top SD-OCT in children old enough to cooperate. Vision loss was defined as either a 0.2 logMAR decline in visual acuity, or progression of visual field. Percent change in circumpapillary RNFL thickness in eyes experiencing vision loss was compared to eyes with stable vision. Results Fifty-five eyes completed two-hundred fifty study visits. Ten eyes (18%) from 7 patients experienced a new episode of vision loss during the study and 45 (82%) eyes from 39 patients demonstrated stable vision across study visits. Percent decline of RNFL thickness between the baseline visit and first event of vision loss event was greatest in the superior (−14%) and inferior (−10%) quadrants as well as global average (−13%). Using a threshold of ≥ 10% decline in RNFL, the positive and negative predictive value for vision loss when two or more anatomic sectors were affected was 100% and 94%, respectively. Conclusions Children experiencing vision loss from their optic pathway gliomas frequently demonstrate a ≥ 10% decline of RNFL thickness in one or more anatomic sectors. Global average and the inferior quadrant demonstrated the best positive and negative predictive values. Circumpapillary RNFL is a surrogate marker of vision and could be helpful in making treatment decisions for children with optic pathway gliomas. PMID:26231306

  18. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in prematurity is correlated with stage of retinopathy of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Park, K-A; Oh, S Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness profiles between preterm and full-term children and to investigate factors affecting the RNFL distribution in preterm children. Methods We performed Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) peripapillary RNFL circular scan centered on the optic disc in 50 premature and 58 full-term children. RNFL thickness profiles were compared between preterm and full-term children using a linear regression model. Among preterm patients in this study, 20 patients previously received laser treatment for severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Results Global average, nasal, and superior disc RNFL thickness profiles were significantly smaller in preterm children (92.70±16.57 μm, 56.02±17.04 μm, and 108.74±27.36 μm, respectively) compared with full-term children (101.63±9.21 μm, P=0.006, 69.14±14.15 μm, P<0.001, and superior, 129.11±18.14 μm, P<0.001, respectively). Multivariable analysis revealed that ROP stage was inversely correlated with nasal RNFL thickness (P=0.010). Conclusions Our SD-OCT data demonstrate decreased global average, nasal, and superior disc RNFL thicknesses in preterm children. ROP stage was inversely correlated with nasal RNFL thickness. Further studies are needed to better understand the association between these structural changes and visual functions in preterm children. PMID:26403327

  19. Comparison of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients having pseudo exfoliation syndrome with healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Naila; Fatima, Nauroz; Qamar-ul-Islam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients having pseudo exfoliation (PXF) with normal age matched controls using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods: This was a case control study conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) Rawalpindi from 12 June 2013 to 12 January 2014. Seventy eyes (Group A - 35 patients with PXF and Group B - 35 healthy age matched subjects) of more than 40 years of age were included in the study. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) and peripapillary RNFL thickness was measured in four quadrants with SD-OCT (Topcon 3D OCT-1000 Mark II) in all subjects. Data was analyzed using the SPSS version 14. Results: Mean age of group A (PXF patients) was 65.63 ± 8.47 years and of group B (Healthy subjects) was 64.31 ± 6.51 years (p = 0.470). Both groups were gender matched with male preponderance (p = 0.673). Mean IOP in each group was 13.80 ± 2.59 mm Hg, and 13.49 ± 2.07 mm Hg respectively (p= 0.578). Mean average peripapillary RNFL thickness was 77.46 ± 12.17 µm in group A and 83.96 ± 10.58 µm in group B. Statistically significant differences were detected between two groups for mean average RNFL thickness (p= 0.020) and mean RNFL thickness in inferior quadrant (p=0.014). Conclusion: PXF patients with normal IOP and visual fields have thin RNFL as compared to healthy age matched controls. Therefore routine assessment and follow up of PXF patients with OCT may help in early diagnosis of PXF glaucoma. PMID:28083059

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness analysis in suspected malingerers with optic disc temporal pallor

    PubMed Central

    Civelekler, Mustafa; Halili, Ismail; Gundogan, Faith C; Sobaci, Gungor

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of temporal retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFLtemporal) thickness in the prediction of malingering. Materials and Methods: This prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on 33 military conscripts with optic disc temporal pallor (ODTP) and 33 age-and sex-matched healthy controls. Initial visual acuity (VAi) and visual acuity after simulation examination techniques (VAaset) were assessed. The subjects whose VAaset were two or more lines higher than VAi were determined as malingerers. Thickness of the peripapillary RNFL was determined with OCT (Stratus OCT™, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.). RNFLtemporal thickness of the subjects were categorized into one of the 1+ to 4+ groups according to 50% confidence interval (CI), 25% CI and 5% CI values which were assessed in the control group. The VAs were converted to LogMAR-VAs for statistical comparisons. Results: A significant difference was found only in the temporal quadrant of RNFL thickness in subjects with ODTP (P=0.002). Mean LogMAR-VA increased significantly after SETs (P<0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of categorized RNFLtemporal thickness in diagnosing malingering were 84.6%, 75.0%, 68.8%, 88.2%, respectively. ROC curve showed that RNFLtemporal thickness of 67.5 μm is a significant cut-off point in determining malingering (P=0.001, area under the curve:0.862). The correlations between LogMAR-VAs and RNFLtemporal thicknesses were significant; the correlation coefficient for LogMAR-VAi was lower than the correlation for LogMAR-VAaset (r=−0.447, P=0.009 for LogMAR-VAi; r=−0.676, P<0.001 for LogMAR-VAaset). Conclusions: RNFLtemporal thickness assessment may be a valuable tool in determining malingering in subjects with ODTP objectively. PMID:19700875

  1. Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness and Axial Length on Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dhasmana, Renu; Nagpal, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The assessment of the peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness has been an important tool for evaluating and diagnosing glaucoma and its progression. Literature suggests that myopic eyes are at an increased risk for developing glaucoma. This study gives an insight into the relationship of RNFL thickness to the axial length in normal population. Aim To correlate the RNFL thickness and the axial length in normal individuals with Fourier domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods In the current study, 298 eyes of 149 normal individuals (10 years or older) with or without refractive error were recruited. The RNFL thickness was measured using Optovue (RTVue) three-dimensional Fourier domain OCT. Results We observed an inverse relationship between average RNFL thickness and increasing axial length(p=0.003). Maximum RNFL thickness was seen in the Infero-Temporal (IT) quadrant and minimum in the Supero-Nasal (SN) quadrant. RNFL thickness did not show any tendency to decline with age using the Pearsons correlation (r=0.07). Females had an increased RNFL thickness in the Supero-Temporal (ST) and Infero-Nasal (IN) quadrant (p-value 0.046 and 0.02) in comparison to males. There was a statistically significant thinning in Ganglion Cell Complex (GCC) with increasing axial length (p-value 0.000) Conclusion The current study suggests that the average RNFL thickness does not decrease with age. The RNFL and GCC thickness shows an inverse correlation with axial length of the eyeball hence observations have to be carefully interpreted in myopic eyes. Clinicians need to keep the anatomical variations in RNFL for better patient management. PMID:27190850

  2. A Phenomenological Model of the Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Fiber: Temporal and Biphasic Response Properties

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Colin D. F.; Sumner, Christian J.; Seeber, Bernhard U.

    2016-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). The model reproduces the probabilistic and temporal properties of the ANF response to both monophasic and biphasic stimuli, in isolation. The main contribution of the model lies in its ability to reproduce statistics of the ANF response (mean latency, jitter, and firing probability) under both monophasic and cathodic-anodic biphasic stimulation, without changing the model's parameters. The response statistics of the model depend on stimulus level and duration of the stimulating pulse, reproducing trends observed in the ANF. In the case of biphasic stimulation, the model reproduces the effects of pseudomonophasic pulse shapes and also the dependence on the interphase gap (IPG) of the stimulus pulse, an effect that is quantitatively reproduced. The model is fitted to ANF data using a procedure that uniquely determines each model parameter. It is thus possible to rapidly parameterize a large population of neurons to reproduce a given set of response statistic distributions. Our work extends the stochastic leaky integrate and fire (SLIF) neuron, a well-studied phenomenological model of the electrically stimulated neuron. We extend the SLIF neuron so as to produce a realistic latency distribution by delaying the moment of spiking. During this delay, spiking may be abolished by anodic current. By this means, the probability of the model neuron responding to a stimulus is reduced when a trailing phase of opposite polarity is introduced. By introducing a minimum wait period that must elapse before a spike may be emitted, the model is able to reproduce the differences in the threshold level observed in the ANF for monophasic and biphasic stimuli. Thus, the ANF response to a large variety of pulse shapes are reproduced correctly by this model. PMID:26903850

  3. Microcystic Inner Nuclear Layer Changes and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Defects in Eyes with Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Akagi, Tadamichi; Yoshikawa, Munemitsu; Suda, Kenji; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yugo; Nakanishi, Hideo; Miyake, Masahiro; Unoki, Noriyuki; Ikeda, Hanako Ohashi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine microcystic inner nuclear layer (INL) changes in glaucomatous eyes and to determine associated factors. Design Retrospective, cross-sectional, observational study. Methods Two hundred seventeen eyes of 133 patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), 41 eyes of 32 patients with preperimetric glaucoma and 181 normal eyes of 117 subjects were ultimately included. Microcystic INL lesions were examined with infrared fundus images and with 19 vertical spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in the macular area. Results Microcystic INL changes were observed in 6.0% of eyes with POAG, but none of the normal eyes or eyes with preperimetric glaucoma showed microcystic INL changes. The proportion of eyes with advanced glaucoma was significantly larger (P = 0.013) in eyes with microcystic lesions than without. The visual field mean deviation (MD) slope was also significantly worse (P = 0.027) in eyes with microcystic lesions. No significant differences were observed in age, sex, refraction, axial length, intraocular pressure, or MD value between eyes with and without microcystic INL lesions. In several cases, microcystic INL lesions occurred along with glaucomatous visual field progression. The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness (P = 0.013) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) + inner plexiform layer thickness (P = 0.023) were significantly lower in areas with microcystic lesions than without. The INL was also significantly thicker (P = 0.002) in areas with microcystic lesions. Conclusions Microcystic INL lesions in glaucomatous eyes are closely associated with RNFL and GCL thinning and correlated with worse MD slope. These INL lesions may indicate focal and progressive damage in glaucoma. PMID:26066021

  4. Longitudinal Study of Vision and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in MS

    PubMed Central

    Talman, Lauren S.; Bisker, Esther R.; Sackel, David J.; Long, David A.; Galetta, Kristin M.; Ratchford, John N.; Lile, Deacon J.; Farrell, Sheena K.; Loguidice, Michael J.; Remington, Gina; Conger, Amy; Frohman, Teresa C.; Jacobs, Dina A.; Markowitz, Clyde E.; Cutter, Gary R.; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Dai, Yang; Maguire, Maureen G.; Galetta, Steven L.; Frohman, Elliot M.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Balcer, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cross-sectional studies of optical coherence tomography (OCT) show that retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS) and correlates with visual function. We determined how longitudinal changes in RNFL thickness relate to visual loss. We also examined patterns of RNFL thinning over time in MS eyes with and without a prior history of acute optic neuritis (ON). Methods Patients underwent OCT measurement of RNFL thickness at baseline and at 6-month intervals during a mean follow-up of 18 months at three centers. Low-contrast letter acuity (2.5%, 1.25% contrast) and visual acuity (VA) were assessed. Results Among 299 patients (593 eyes) with ≥6 months follow-up, eyes with visual loss showed greater RNFL thinning compared to eyes with stable vision (low-contrast acuity, 2.5%: p<0.001; VA: p=0.005). RNFL thinning increased over time, with average losses of 2.9 μm at 2-3 years and 6.1 μm at 3-4.5 years (p<0.001 vs. 0.5-1-year follow-up interval). These patterns were observed for eyes with or without prior history of ON. Proportions of eyes with RNFL loss greater than test-retest variability (≥6.6 μm) increased from 11% at 0-1 year to 44% at 3-4.5 years (p<0.001). Interpretation Progressive RNFL thinning occurs as a function of time in some patients with MS, even in the absence of ON, and is associated with clinically significant visual loss. These findings are consistent with sub-clinical axonal loss in the anterior visual pathway in MS and support the use of OCT and low-contrast acuity as methods to evaluate the effectiveness of putative neuroprotection protocols. PMID:20517936

  5. Autocrine/paracrine modulation of baroreceptor activity after antidromic stimulation of aortic depressor nerve in vivo.

    PubMed

    Santana-Filho, Valter J; Davis, Greg J; Castania, Jaci A; Ma, Xiuying; Salgado, Helio C; Abboud, Francois M; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-02-01

    Activation of the sensory nerve endings of non-myelinated C-fiber afferents evokes release of autocrine/paracrine factors that cause localized vasodilation, neurogenic inflammation, and modulation of sensory nerve activity. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of antidromic electrical stimulation on afferent baroreceptor activity in vivo, and investigate the role of endogenous prostanoids and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating changes in nerve activity. Baroreceptor activity was recorded from the left aortic depressor nerve (ADN) in anesthetized rats before and after stimulating the ADN for brief (5–20 s) periods. The rostral end of the ADN was crushed or sectioned beforehand to prevent reflex changes in blood pressure. Antidromic stimulation of ADN using parameters that activate both myelinated A-fibers and non-myelinated C-fibers caused pronounced and long-lasting (> 1 min) inhibition of baroreceptor activity (n = 9, P < 0.05), with the magnitude and duration of inhibition dependent on the duration of the stimulation period (n = 5). Baroreceptor activity was only transiently inhibited after selective stimulation of A-fibers. The inhibition of activity after antidromic stimulation of A and C fibers was prolonged after administration of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg, IV, n = 7) and abolished after administration of PEG-catalase (104 units/kg, IV, n = 7), an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2 to water and oxygen. The results demonstrate a long-lasting inhibition of baroreceptor activity after antidromic stimulation of ADN and suggest that endogenous prostanoids and H2O2 oppose and mediate the inhibition, respectively. These mechanisms may contribute to rapid baroreceptor resetting during acute hypertension and be engaged during chronic baroreceptor activation therapy in patients with hypertension.

  6. Changes in microtubule stability and density in myelin-deficient shiverer mouse CNS axons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, L. L.; Witt, A. S.; Payne, H. R.; Shine, H. D.; Brady, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    Altered axon-Schwann cell interactions in PNS myelin-deficient Trembler mice result in changed axonal transport rates, neurofilament and microtubule-associated protein phosphorylation, neurofilament density, and microtubule stability. To determine whether PNS and CNS myelination have equivalent effects on axons, neurofilaments, and microtubules in CNS, myelin-deficient shiverer axons were examined. The genetic defect in shiverer is a deletion in the myelin basic protein (MBP) gene, an essential component of CNS myelin. As a result, shiverer mice have little or no compact CNS myelin. Slow axonal transport rates in shiverer CNS axons were significantly increased, in contrast to the slowing in demyelinated PNS nerves. Even more striking were substantial changes in the composition and properties of microtubules in shiverer CNS axons. The density of axonal microtubules is increased, reflecting increased expression of tubulin in shiverer, and the stability of microtubules is drastically reduced in shiverer axons. Shiverer transgenic mice with two copies of a wild-type myelin basic protein transgene have an intermediate level of compact myelin, making it possible to determine whether the actual level of compact myelin is an important regulator of axonal microtubules. Both increased microtubule density and reduced microtubule stability were still observed in transgenic mouse nerves, indicating that signals beyond synaptogenesis and the mere presence of compact myelin are required for normal regulation of the axonal microtubule cytoskeleton.

  7. CONFIGURATION OF A FILAMENTOUS NETWORK IN THE AXOPLASM OF THE SQUID (LOLIGO PEALII L.) GIANT NERVE FIBER

    PubMed Central

    Metuzals, J.

    1969-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy is integrated with physicochemical methods in order to investigate the following preparations of the giant nerve fibers of the squid (Loligo pealii L.): (1) Thin sections of fibers fixed in four different fixatives; (2) fresh axoplasm stained negatively in solutions of different pH and composition; (3) chemically isolated threadlike elements of the axoplasm. A continuous, three-dimensional network can be identified in all these preparations of the axoplasm. The network is composed of coiled or looped unit-filaments ∼30 A wide. The unit-filaments are intercoiled in strands ∼ 70–250 A wide. The strands are oriented longitudinally in the axoplasm, often having a sinuous course and cross-associations. Microtubules are surrounded by intercoiled unit-filaments and filamentous strands. Calcium ions cause loosening and disintegration of the network configuration. UO2++ ions of a 1% uranyl acetate solution at pH 4.4 display a specific affinity for filamentous protein structures of the squid giant nerve fiber axoplasm, segregating the filamentous elements of the axoplasm in a coiled, threadlike preparation. The uranyl ions combine probably with the carboxyl groups of the main amino acids of the protein—glutamic and aspartic acids. It is proposed that by coiling/decoiling and folding/unfolding of the unit-filaments, shifts in physicochemical properties of the axoplasm are maintained. PMID:5351403

  8. KV1 channels identified in rodent myelinated axons, linked to Cx29 in innermost myelin: support for electrically active myelin in mammalian saltatory conduction

    PubMed Central

    Vanderpool, Kimberly G.; Yasumura, Thomas; Hickman, Jordan; Beatty, Jonathan T.; Nagy, James I.

    2016-01-01

    Saltatory conduction in mammalian myelinated axons was thought to be well understood before recent discoveries revealed unexpected subcellular distributions and molecular identities of the K+-conductance pathways that provide for rapid axonal repolarization. In this study, we visualize, identify, localize, quantify, and ultrastructurally characterize axonal KV1.1/KV1.2 channels in sciatic nerves of rodents. With the use of light microscopic immunocytochemistry and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling electron microscopy, KV1.1/KV1.2 channels are localized to three anatomically and compositionally distinct domains in the internodal axolemmas of large myelinated axons, where they form densely packed “rosettes” of 9-nm intramembrane particles. These axolemmal KV1.1/KV1.2 rosettes are precisely aligned with and ultrastructurally coupled to connexin29 (Cx29) channels, also in matching rosettes, in the surrounding juxtaparanodal myelin collars and along the inner mesaxon. As >98% of transmembrane proteins large enough to represent ion channels in these specialized domains, ∼500,000 KV1.1/KV1.2 channels define the paired juxtaparanodal regions as exclusive membrane domains for the voltage-gated K+ conductance that underlies rapid axonal repolarization in mammals. The 1:1 molecular linkage of KV1 channels to Cx29 channels in the apposed juxtaparanodal collars, plus their linkage to an additional 250,000–400,000 Cx29 channels along each inner mesaxon in every large-diameter myelinated axon examined, supports previously proposed K+ conductance directly from juxtaparanodal axoplasm into juxtaparanodal myeloplasm in mammalian axons. With neither Cx29 protein nor myelin rosettes detectable in frog myelinated axons, these data showing axon-to-myelin linkage by abundant KV1/Cx29 channels in rodent axons support renewed consideration of an electrically active role for myelin in increasing both saltatory conduction velocity and maximum propagation frequency in

  9. ST8SIA2 promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and the integrity of myelin and axons

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Lukasz Mateusz; Brozko, Nikola; Nagalski, Andrzej; Röckle, Iris; Werneburg, Sebastian; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    ST8SIA2 is a polysialyltransferase that attaches polysialic acid to the glycoproteins NCAM1 and CADM1. Polysialylation is involved in brain development and plasticity. ST8SIA2 is a schizophrenia candidate gene, and St8sia2 −/− mice exhibit schizophrenia‐like behavior. We sought to identify new pathological consequences of ST8SIA2 deficiency. Our proteomic analysis suggested myelin impairment in St8sia2 −/− mice. Histological and immune staining together with Western blot revealed that the onset of myelination was not delayed in St8sia2 −/− mice, but the content of myelin was lower. Ultrastructure analysis of the corpus callosum showed thinner myelin sheaths, smaller and irregularly shaped axons, and white matter lesions in adult St8sia2 −/− mice. Then we evaluated oligodendrocyte differentiation in vivo and in vitro. Fewer OLIG2+ cells in the cortex and corpus callosum, together with the higher percentage of undifferentiated oligodenroglia in St8sia2 −/− mice suggested an impairment in oligodendrocyte generation. Experiment on primary cultures of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) confirmed a cell‐autonomous effect of ST8SIA2 in oligodendroglia, and demonstrated that OPC to oligodendrocyte transition is inhibited in St8sia2 −/− mice. Concluding, ST8SIA2‐mediated polysialylation influences on oligodendrocyte differentiation, and oligodendrocyte deficits in St8sia2 mice are a possible cause of the demyelination and degeneration of axons, resembling nerve fiber alterations in schizophrenia. GLIA 2016;65:34–49 PMID:27534376

  10. Automated method for the segmentation and morphometry of nerve fibers in large-scale CARS images of spinal cord tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bégin, Steve; Dupont-Therrien, Olivier; Bélanger, Erik; Daradich, Amy; Laffray, Sophie; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    A fully automated method for large-scale segmentation of nerve fibers from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images is presented. The method is specifically designed for CARS images of transverse cross sections of nervous tissue but is also suitable for use with standard light microscopy images. After a detailed description of the two-part segmentation algorithm, its accuracy is quantified by comparing the resulting binary images to manually segmented images. We then demonstrate the ability of our method to retrieve morphological data from CARS images of nerve tissue. Finally, we present the segmentation of a large mosaic of CARS images covering more than half the area of a mouse spinal cord cross section and show evidence of clusters of neurons with similar g-ratios throughout the spinal cord. PMID:25574428

  11. Visualization of nerve fiber orientation in gross histological sections of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Axer, H; Berks, G; Keyserlingk, D G

    2000-12-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) allows visualization of the orientation of the nervous fibers in the living brain. For comparison, a method was developed to examine the orientation of fibers in histological sections of the human brain. Serial sections through the entire human brain were analyzed regarding fiber orientation using polarized light. Direction of fibers in the cutting plane was obtained by measuring the azimuth with the lowest intensity value at each point, and inclination of fibers in the section was evaluated using fuzzy logic approximations. Direction and inclination of fibers revealing their three-dimensional orientation were visualized by colored arrows mapped into the images. Using this procedure, various fiber tracts were identified (pyramidal tract, radiatio optica, radiatio acustica, arcuate fascicle, and 11 more). Intermingled fibers could be separated from each other. The orientation of the fiber tracts derived from polarized light microscopy was validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy in a defined volume of the internal capsule, where the fiber orientation was studied in four human brains. The polarization method visualizes the high degree of intermingled fiber bundles in the brain, so that distinct fiber pathways cannot be understood as solid, compact tracts: Neighbouring bundles of fibers can belong to different systems of fibers distinguishable by their orientation.

  12. [CHANGES OF THE SUPERFICIAL PERONEAL NERVE IN RELATION TO THE FREQUENCY OF HIGH-FRACTIONAL AUTODISTRACTION IN ORTHOPEDIC LENGTHENING OF THE TIBIA IN DOGS WITH A DAILY RATE OF 3 mm].

    PubMed

    Varsegova, T N; Shchudlo, N A; Shchudlo, M M; Yemanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The experiments on the elongation of the tibia in 18 dogs were performed for 10 days using the Ilizarov apparatus with an automatic drive providing the pace of 3 mm/day for 120 moves (group 1) and 180 moves (group 2). The impact of fractionation of distraction on the structure of the peroneal nerve was estimated. In group 1, perineurium micro-injuries and endoneural blood vessel destruction were detected. In group 2, perineurium preserved its integrity and fine-lamellar structure, endoneural blood vessels were also preserved, however, the decrease in the total area of nerve fiber bundles was more pronounced. Morphometric analysis of the preserved myelinated nerve fibers 60 days after the cessation of distraction indicated less marked axonal atrophy and better myelination in group 2.

  13. Signal Strength Is an Important Determinant of Accuracy of Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Measurement by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziqiang; Huang, Jingjing; Dustin, Laurie; Sadda, Srinivas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of signal strength on the measurement of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Eyes with known or suspected glaucoma or non-glaucomatous optic atrophy were scanned twice within the same visit using Stratus OCT's Fast Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness (FNFLT) protocol. Only those eyes with two high quality scans (signal strengths of at least 5 and different from each other, no error messages, and no obvious segmentation errors) were included in the study. The RNFL thickness measurements from the initial and the repeat scans were compared and then correlated with the differences in signal strength. Subgroup analyses were performed similarly among patients with average RNFL thickness less than 90 microns and those with at least 90 microns. Results Scans with higher signal strengths are associated with greater RNFL thickness measurements if the signal strength is less than 7. Scans with signal strength of at least 7 have higher reproducibility. This is true among all patients as well as subgroups divided on the basis of average RNFL thickness. Additionally, we found that the greater the variability between the initial and repeat scans, the greater the variability in the RNFL thickness measurements. Scans with higher signal strengths have less variability, especially when the optic nerve is relatively healthy. Conclusions When measuring the RNFL thickness with the Stratus OCT, it is important to aim for a signal strength of at least 7. Visual field testing may be more reliable in some patients, especially when the optic nerve is significantly compromised. PMID:19295375

  14. Hypoxia-induced increases in serotonin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the medulla oblongata of the rat.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Ryosuke; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia induces respiratory responses in mammals and serotonergic neurons in the medulla oblongata participate in respiratory control. However, the morphological changes in serotonergic neurons induced by hypoxia have not yet been examined and respiratory controls of serotonergic neurons have not been clarified. We herein investigated the distribution of immunoreactivity for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in the medulla oblongata of control rats and rats exposed to 1-6h of hypoxia (10% O2). We also examined the medulla oblongata by multiple immunofluorescence labeling for 5-HT, neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1R), a marker for some respiratory neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (PBC), and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), a marker for catecholaminergic neurons. The number of 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in the raphe nuclei was higher in rats exposed to hypoxia than in control rats. The number of 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve fibers significantly increased in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of rats exposed to 1-6h of hypoxia, caudal ventrolateral medulla of rats exposed to 2-6h of hypoxia, and lateral part of the nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve of rats exposed to 1-2h of hypoxia. Multiple immunofluorescence labeling showed that 5-HT-immunoreactive nerve fibers were close to NK1R-immunoreactive neurons in ventrolateral medulla and to DBH-immunoreactive neurons in the medulla. These results suggest that serotonergic neurons partly regulate respiratory control under hypoxic conditions by modulating the activity of NK1R-expressing and catecholaminergic neurons.

  15. The Potential Role of Endometrial Nerve Fibers in the Pathogenesis of Pain During Endometrial Biopsy at Office Hysteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Fernandez, Loredana Maria Sosa; Guerra, Germano; Spinelli, Marialuigia; Di Carlo, Costantino; Filippeschi, Marco; Nappi, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate whether nerve fibers are present in the endometrial layer of patients submitted to office hysteroscopy and their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of pain during that procedure. Through a prospective case–control study performed in tertiary centers for women’s health, endometrium samples were collected during operative office hysteroscopy from 198 cycling women who previously underwent laparoscopy and/or magnetic resonance imaging investigation for infertility assessment. Samples were classified according to the degree of the pain patients experienced and scored from values ranging from 0 (absence of discomfort/pain) to 10 (intolerable pain) on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). The presence of nerve fiber markers (S100, NSE, SP, VIP, NPY, NKA, NKB, NKR1, NKR2, and NKR3) in the endometrium was also evaluated by morphologic and immunohistochemical analyses. We found that S-100, NSE, NKR1, NK-A, NK-B, VIP, and NPY, were immunolocalized in samples of endometrium, in significantly (P < .01, for all) higher levels in samples collected from patients with VAS score > 5 (group A) than ≤ 5 (group B) and significantly (P < .0001 for all) positively correlated with VAS levels. A statistically significant (P = .018) higher prevalence of endometriosis and/or adenomyosis was depicted in patients of group A than group B. Data from the present study led us to conclude that nerve fibers are expressed at the level of the functional layer of the endometrium and may contribute to pain generation during office hysteroscopy, mainly in women affected by endometriosis and adenomyosis. PMID:24807378

  16. Diet-induced obesity severely impairs myelinated aortic baroreceptor reflex responses.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L; Andresen, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) attenuates the arterial cardiac baroreceptor reflex, but the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that DIO impairs central aortic baroreceptor pathways. Normal chow control (CON) and high-fat-chow obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) rats were anesthetized (inactin, 120 mg/kg) and underwent sinoaortic denervation. The central end of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) was electrically stimulated to generate frequency-dependent baroreflex curves (5-100 Hz) during selective activation of myelinated (A-fiber) or combined (A- and C-fiber) ADN baroreceptors. A mild stimulus (1 V) that activates only A-fiber ADN baroreceptors induced robust, frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses in CON and OR rats, but these responses were completely abolished in OP rats. Maximal activation of A fibers (3 V) elicited frequency-dependent reflexes in all groups, but a dramatic deficit was still present in OP rats. Activation of all ADN baroreceptors (20 V) evoked even larger reflex responses. Depressor responses were nearly identical among groups, but OP rats still exhibited attenuated bradycardia. In separate groups of rats, the reduced heart rate (HR) response to maximal activation of ADN A fibers (3 V) persisted in OP rats following pharmacological blockade of β(1)-adrenergic or muscarinic receptors, suggesting deficits in both parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reflex pathways. However, the bradycardic responses to direct efferent vagal stimulation were similar among groups. Taken together, our data suggest that DIO severely impairs the central processing of myelinated aortic baroreceptor control of HR, including both PNS and SNS components.

  17. Creation of highly aligned electrospun poly-L-lactic acid fibers for nerve regeneration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han Bing; Mullins, Michael E.; Cregg, Jared M.; Hurtado, Andres; Oudega, Martin; Trombley, Matthew T.; Gilbert, Ryan J.

    2009-02-01

    Aligned, electrospun polymer fibers have shown considerable promise in directing regenerating axons in vitro and in vivo. However, in several studies, final electrospinning parameters are presented for producing aligned fiber scaffolds, and alignment where minimal fiber crossing occurs is not achieved. Highly aligned species are necessary for neural tissue engineering applications to ensure that axonal extension occurs through a regenerating environment efficiently. Axonal outgrowth on fibers that deviate from the natural axis of growth may delay axonal extension from one end of a scaffold to the other. Therefore, producing aligned fiber scaffolds with little fiber crossing is essential. In this study, the contributions of four electrospinning parameters (collection disk rotation speed, needle size, needle tip shape and syringe pump flow rate) were investigated thoroughly with the goal of finding parameters to obtain highly aligned electrospun fibers made from poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA). Using an 8 wt% PLLA solution in chloroform, a collection disk rotation speed of 1000 revolutions per minute (rpm), a 22 gauge, sharp-tip needle and a syringe pump rate of 2 ml h-1 produced highly aligned fiber (1.2-1.6 µm in diameter) scaffolds verified using a fast Fourier transform and a fiber alignment quantification technique. Additionally, the application of an insulating sheath around the needle tip improved the rate of fiber deposition (electrospinning efficiency). Optimized scaffolds were then evaluated in vitro using embryonic stage nine (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and rat Schwann cells (SCs). To demonstrate the importance of creating highly aligned scaffolds to direct neurite outgrowth, scaffolds were created that contained crossing fibers. Neurites on these scaffolds were directed down the axis of the aligned fibers, but neurites also grew along the crossed fibers. At times, these crossed fibers even stopped further axonal extension. Highly aligned PLLA fibers

  18. Comparison of histopathological effects of perineural administration of bupivacaine and bupivacaine-dexmedetomidine in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Memari, Elham; Hosseinian, Mohammad-Ali; Mirkheshti, Ali; Arhami-Dolatabadi, Ali; Mirabotalebi, Mojtaba; Khandaghy, Mohsen; Daneshbod, Yahya; Alizadeh, Leila; Shirian, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

    Injection of a variety of drugs such as local anesthetics (LAs) for peripheral nerve block has been shown to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Bupivacaine is a local anesthetic widely used in surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the neurotoxicity of LAs including Bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine (DEX)-Bupivacaine on sciatic nerve tissue at histopathological level. In addition, we investigated whether perineural administration of DEX can attenuate Bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Twenty adult Sprague Dawley rats received unilateral sciatic nerve blocks with either 0.2ml of 0.5% bupivacaine (n=8) or 0.5% bupivacaine plus 0.005% DEX (n=8) or normal saline (0.9%, as control group) (n=4) in the left hind extremity. Sciatic nerves were harvested at 14days post-injection and analyzed for nerve damage using ultrastructure and histopathologic analysis. Histopathology of sciatic nerve at day 14 post-injection showed a variable degree of neuronal injury associated with perineural inflammation in each treatment group and was classified as none or mild, intermediate or severe. Administration of both LAs resulted in a significant decrease in the total number of myelinated fibers per nerve (95% CI for group difference: Bupivacaine, P=0.001, DEX-Bupivacaine, P=0.036) compared to the saline control group. Animals that received these perineural local anesthetics (LAs) injections showed increased severity of injury compared to the control group. Animals in the DEX-Bupivacaine group had higher perineural inflammation and nerve damage than those of the saline control group and less than those of the Bupivacaine group at day 14 post-injection. Quantitatively, average total nerve fiber per nerve and average myelinated nerve fiber density in the injured region of the Bupivacaine-treated group was less than that of the DEX-Bupivacaine-treated group. LAs injection into the nerve causes peripheral nerve damage and remains an important clinical danger. Bupivacaine is

  19. Findings of Optical Coherence Tomography of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer in Two Common Types of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yousefipour, Gholamali; Hashemzahi, Zabihollah; Yasemi, Masood; Jahani, Pegah

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent disease caused by the inflammatory demyelinating process that causes progressive nervous system degeneration over the time. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technology, which can measure the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer as well as the diameter of the macula. The purpose of the study is evaluation OCT findings in two common types of multiple sclerosis. For doing the cross-sectional study, 63 patients with two prevalent types of multiple sclerosis (35 patients with Relapse Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) and 28 patients with Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS) were evaluated for 6 months. Exclusion criteria of the study were a history of optic neuritis, suffering from diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ocular disease, and the presence of other neurologic degenerative diseases. Then, the thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), as well as thickness and volume of the macula, were measured in the patients using OCT technology. The disability rate of patients was evaluated according to Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Finally, data was analyzed by means of SPSS software. Overall, 35 patients with RRMS (with mean age of 32.37+10.01, average disease period of 3.81+3.42 and mean EDSS of 1.84+0.45) and 28 patients with SPMS (with mean age of 39.21+9.33, average disease period of 11.32+5.87 and mean EDSS of 5.12+1.46) were assessed and compared in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer and size and thickness of macula. In all of these sections, the thicknesses were smaller in SPMS patients than patients with RRMS. But, there was a significant difference in total thickness (81.82µm versus 96.03µm with P=0.04) and thickness of temporal sector (54.5 µm versus 69.34 µm with P=0.04) of retinal nerve fiber layer and macular size at the superior sector of external ring (1.48 mm³ versus 1.58 mm³ with P=0.03), and nasal sector of external ring surrounding macula (1

  20. Retinal nerve fiber layer evaluation in multiple sclerosis with spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Khanifar, Aziz A; Parlitsis, George J; Ehrlich, Joshua R; Aaker, Grant D; D’Amico, Donald J; Gauthier, Susan A; Kiss, Szilárd

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Histopathologic studies have reported retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning in various neurodegenerative diseases. Attempts to quantify this loss in vivo have relied on time-domain optical coherence tomography (TDOCT), which has low resolution and requires substantial interpolation of data for volume measurements. We hypothesized that the significantly higher resolution of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) would better detect RNFL changes in patients with multiple sclerosis, and that RNFL thickness differences between eyes with and without optic neuritis might be identified more accurately. Methods: In this retrospective case series, patients with multiple sclerosis were recruited from the Judith Jaffe Multiple Sclerosis Center at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York. Patients with a recent clinical diagnosis of optic neuritis (less than three months) were excluded. Eyes with a history of glaucoma, optic neuropathy (other than multiple sclerosis-related optic neuritis), age-related macular degeneration, or other relevant retinal and/or optic nerve disease were excluded. Both eyes of each patient were imaged with the Heidelberg Spectralis® HRA + OCT. RNFL and macular thickness were measured for each eye using the Heidelberg OCT software. These measurements were compared with validated published normal values, and were modeled as linear functions of duration of disease. The odds of an optic neuritis diagnosis as a function of RNFL and macular thickness were calculated. Results: Ninety-four eyes were prospectively evaluated using OCT. Ages of patients ranged from 26 to 69 years, with an average age of 39 years. Peripapillary RNFL thinning was demonstrated in multiple sclerosis patients; mean RNFL thickness was 88.5 μm for individuals with multiple sclerosis compared with a reported normal value of 97 μm (P < 0.001). Eyes with a history of optic neuritis had more thinning compared with those without optic neuritis (83.0

  1. Nerve growth factor combined with an epineural conduit for bridging a short nerve gap (10 mm). A study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Barmpitsioti, Antonia; Konofaos, Petros; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Zoubos, Aristides B; Soucacos, Panagiotis N

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of direct administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) into an epineural conduit across a short nerve gap (10 mm) in a rabbit sciatic nerve model. The animals were divided into two groups. In group 1, n = 6, a 10-mm defect was created in the sciatic nerve and bridged with an epineural flap. A dose of 1 μg of NGF was locally administered daily for the first 21 days. NGF administration was made inside the epineural flap using a silicone reservoir connected to a silicone tube. In group 2, n = 6, the 10-mm defect was bridged with a nerve graft. This group did not receive any further treatment. At 13 weeks, all animals, before euthanasia, underwent electromyography (EMG) studies and then specimen sent for histology morphometric analysis. NGF administration ensured a significantly increased average number of myelinated axons per μm(2) (P = 0.028) and promoted fiber maturation (P = 0.031) and better EMG results (P = 0.046 for latency P = 0.048 for amplitude), compared with the control group. Although nerve grafts remain the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair, NGF-treated epineural conduits represent a good alternative, particularly when an unfavorable environment for nerve grafts is present.

  2. Far-Infrared Therapy Promotes Nerve Repair following End-to-End Neurorrhaphy in Rat Models of Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Chin; Sha, Ya-Na; Chou, Jiun-Rou

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a rat model of sciatic nerve injury to investigate the effects of postoperative low-power far-infrared (FIR) radiation therapy on nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy. The rat models were divided into the following 3 groups: (1) nerve injury without FIR biostimulation (NI/sham group); (2) nerve injury with FIR biostimulation (NI/FIR group); and (3) noninjured controls (normal group). Walking-track analysis results showed that the NI/FIR group exhibited significantly higher sciatic functional indices at 8 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) compared with the NI/sham group. The decreased expression of CD4 and CD8 in the NI/FIR group indicated that FIR irradiation modulated the inflammatory process during recovery. Compared with the NI/sham group, the NI/FIR group exhibited a significant reduction in muscle atrophy (P < 0.05). Furthermore, histomorphometric assessment indicated that the nerves regenerated more rapidly in the NI/FIR group than in the NI/sham group; furthermore, the NI/FIR group regenerated neural tissue over a larger area, as well as nerve fibers of greater diameter and with thicker myelin sheaths. Functional recovery, inflammatory response, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessment all indicated that FIR radiation therapy can accelerate nerve repair following end-to-end neurorrhaphy of the sciatic nerve. PMID:25722734

  3. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer May Be Better Preserved in MOG-IgG versus AQP4-IgG Optic Neuritis: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chodick, Gabriel; Bialer, Omer; Marignier, Romain; Bach, Michael; Hellmann, Mark Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Background Optic neuritis (ON) in patients with anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-IgG antibodies has been associated with a better clinical outcome than anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4)- IgG ON. Average retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL) correlates with visual outcome after ON. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine whether anti-MOG-IgG ON is associated with better average RNFL compared to anti-AQP4-IgG ON, and whether this corresponds with a better visual outcome. Methods A retrospective study was done in a consecutive cohort of patients following anti-AQP4-IgG and anti-MOG-IgG ON. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) models analysis was used to compare average RNFL outcomes in ON eyes of patients with MOG-IgG to AQP4-IgG-positive patients, after adjusting for the number of ON events. The final mean visual field defect and visual acuity were compared between ON eyes of MOG-IgG and AQP4-IgG-positive patients. A correlation between average RNFL and visual function was performed in all study eyes. Results Sixteen patients were analyzed; ten AQP4-IgG-positive and six MOG-IgG-positive. The six patients with MOG-IgG had ten ON events with disc edema, five of which were bilateral. In the AQP4-IgG-positive ON events, 1/10 patients had disc edema. Final average RNFL was significantly better in eyes following MOG-IgG-ON (75.33μm), compared to 63.63μm in AQP4-IgG-ON, after adjusting for the number of ON attacks (GEE, p = 0.023). Mean visual field defects were significantly smaller (GEE, p = 0.046) among MOG-IgG positive ON eyes compared to AQP-IgG positive ON eyes, but last visual acuity did not differ between the groups (GEE, p = 0.153). Among all eyes, average RNFL positively correlated with mean visual field defect (GEE, p = 0.00015) and negatively correlated with final visual acuity (GEE, p = 0.00005). Conclusions Following ON, RNFL is better preserved in eyes of patients with MOG-IgG antibodies compared to those with AQP4-IgG antibodies

  4. The effect of in ovo ethanol exposure on retina and optic nerve in a chick embryo model system.

    PubMed

    Tufan, A Cevik; Abban, Gulcin; Akdogan, Ilgaz; Erdogan, Deniz; Ozogul, Candan

    2007-01-01

    Ocular anomalies seen in children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) suggest that ocular structures are sensitive to alcohol exposure during their development. This study was designed to investigate the effect of in ovo ethanol (EtOH) exposure on retinal development and myelinization of optic nerve fibers at an ultra structural level in a chick embryo model system. Prior to incubation, fertilized chicken eggs were injected once with 100 microl of either 0.9% NaCl (vehicle control), or EtOH solutions at different doses (10, 30, or 50%, v:v in 0.9% NaCl) into their air sacs and incubated at 37.5 degrees C and saturation humidity. On day 20 embryos were analyzed in terms of their viability and growth and the optic cups including the optic nerves were dissected out. Specimens were processed for electron microscopy (EM). Results showed that, EtOH significantly decreased the viability of chick embryos (P < 0.045), and caused significant prenatal growth retardation (P < 0.004) in a dose-dependant manner. Light microscopy of semi thin sections revealed that prenatal exposure to EtOH resulted in both retinal degeneration and optic nerve hypoplasia (P < 0.001) in a dose-dependant manner. EM revealed that a dose-dependant decrease in the number of myelinated nerve fibers was profound in groups exposed to EtOH (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the myelin coats observed were thinner than those seen in control embryos. In groups exposed to EtOH myelin sheets were unorganized and contained vacuolar structures in between them. The tissue in between the cells and optic nerve fibers, on the other hand, lost its intact appearance with vacuolar and vesicular structures in between them. In addition, the optic nerve fibers contained granular accumulations in EtOH exposed groups. A dose dependent degeneration was also observed in retinas of EtOH exposed groups. The effect of EtOH was profound in pigment epithelium (PE), inner plexiform layer (IPL), and ganglion cell layer (GC). Mitochondrial

  5. [Normal myelination patterns].

    PubMed

    González Alenda, F J; Pérez-Romero, M; Sánchez, I; Frutos, R; Fraile, E; Romero, J; Carrasco, E G

    1991-12-01

    The MR images obtained of brain during the process of myelination taking place from birth to 2 years of age are analyzed. Basically, the study focuses on the changes in signal intensity experienced by the elements of the brain in the different sequences, consisting in an increase (T1 weighted sequence) or decrease (T2 sequences) in the signal. The chronological evolution of these changes is compared with the classic myelination pattern, described prior to the development of MR, based on necropsies. Also assessed were the progressive changes in the signals of the gray and white matter, reflecting their hydric contents, throughout the period of maturation of the brain structures. It is concluded that MR imaging is presently the diagnostic method of choice in the monitoring of myelination. MR spectroscopy studies offer important perspectives for assessment and follow up of this process from the metabolic point of view.

  6. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness Changes in Parkinson Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-guo; Feng, Yi-fan; Xiang, Yi; Huang, Jin-hai; Savini, Giacomo; Parisi, Vincenzo; Yang, Wan-ju; Fu, Xun-an

    2014-01-01

    Background Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative process that leads to a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons, mainly in the basal ganglia of the brain. Numerous studies have analyzed the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness abnormalities and changes in PD, but the results have not always been consistent. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis to evaluate the RNFL thickness measured with OCT in PD. Methods and Findings Case-control studies were selected through an electronic search of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PUBMED and EMBASE. For the continuous outcomes, we calculated the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The statistical analysis was performed by RevMan 5.0 software. Thirteen case-control studies were included in the present meta-analysis, containing a total of 644 eyes in PD patients and 604 eyes in healthy controls. The results of our study showed that there was a significant reduction in average RNFL thickness in patients with PD compared to healthy controls (WMD = −5.76, 95% CI: −8.99 to −2.53, P = 0.0005). Additionally, differences of RNFL thickness in superior quadrant (WMD = −4.44, 95% CI: −6.93 to −1.94, P = 0.0005), inferior quadrant (WMD = −7.56, 95% CI: −11.33 to −3.78, P<0.0001), nasal quadrant (WMD = −3.12, 95% CI: −5.63 to −0.61, P = 0.01) and temporal quadrant (WMD = −4.63, 95% CI: −7.20 to −2.06, P = 0.0004) were all significant between the two groups. Conclusion In view of these results and the noninvasive nature of OCT technology, we surmise that OCT could be a useful tool for evaluating the progression of the Parkinson disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01928212 PMID:24465663

  7. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cikmazkara, Ipek; Ugurlu, Seyda Karadeniz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods: 102 female patients who had IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dl, serum transferrin saturation <15%, serum iron <50 μg/dl, and serum ferritin <15 μg/dl) were enrolled in the study. Optic disc and RNFL parameters obtained by Cirrus high-definition OCT 4000 were compared with those of 49 age and sex-matched nonanemic individuals. The time between blood analysis and OCT measurements was 3.14 ± 5.6 (range, 0–28) days in the anemia group, and 3.5 ± 6.7 (range, 0–27) days in the control group (P = 0.76). Results: Average ages of 102 patients and 49 control subjects were 35.76 ± 10.112 (range, 18–66) years, and 36.08 ± 8.416 (range, 19–57) years (P = 0.850), respectively. The average RNFL thickness was 94.67 ± 9.380 in the anemia group, and 100.22 ± 9.12 in the control group (P = 0.001). Temporal, nasal, and lower quadrant average RNFL thicknesses of IDA group were thinner than the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.013, P = 0.008). Upper quadrant RNFL thicknesses in IDA and control groups were similar. Correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between mean RNFL thickness and hemoglobin (r = 0.273), iron (r = 0.177), ferritin (r = 0.163), and transferrin saturations (r = 0.185), while a negative correlation was found between total iron binding capacity (r = −0.199) and mean RNFL thickness. Conclusions: Peripapillary RNFL thickness measured by OCT is thinner in adult female patients with IDA. It may have a significant influence on the management of many disorders such as glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmological diseases. PMID:27146929

  8. The Relationship between Intraocular Pressure and Progressive Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Loss in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Felipe A.; Alencar, Luciana M.; Zangwill, Linda M.; Sample, Pamela A.; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP) and progressive retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) loss, as measured by scanning laser polarimetry with enhanced corneal compensation (GDx ECC), in a cohort of glaucoma patients and individuals suspected of having the disease followed over time. Design Observational cohort study. Participants The study included 344 eyes of 204 patients recruited from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study (DIGS). There were 98 eyes (28%) with a diagnosis of glaucoma and 246 (72%) were considered glaucoma suspects at baseline. Methods Images were obtained annually with the GDx ECC scanning laser polarimeter, along with stereophotographs and SAP. The study included a total of 1211 GDx ECC visits with an average of 3.5 visits per eye. Progression was determined by the Guided Progression Analysis software for SAP and by masked assessment of stereophotographs performed by expert graders. Main Outcome Measures Random coefficient models were used to evaluate the relationship between IOP and RNFL thickness measurements over time in progressors and nonprogressors. Models were adjusted for baseline diagnosis and central corneal thickness. Results For all 344 eyes, the overall rate of change for the GDx ECC average thickness at an average IOP of 17 mmHg was −0.25 μm per year (P = 0.002). Each 1-mmHg higher IOP was associated with an additional loss of 0.05 μm per year of RNFL (P = 0.001). Twenty-nine eyes (8%) showed progression on SAP and/or optic disc stereophotographs. These eyes had a significantly higher rate of RNFL change (−0.95μm/year) than nonprogressors (−0.17 μm/year; P = 0.001). For progressors, each 1-mmHg higher IOP was associated with an additional loss of 0.13 μm per year of RNFL. Conclusions Higher levels of IOP during follow-up were significantly related to higher rates of progressive RNFL loss detected by the GDx ECC. These findings suggest that the GDx ECC may be helpful in monitoring

  9. Decreased retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Lin; Zhou, Li-Xiao; Dang, Yalong; Huo, Yin-Ping; Shi, Lei; Chang, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the changes of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. Methods: Relevant studies were selected from 3 major literature databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) without language restriction. Main inclusion criteria is that a case-control study in which RNFL thickness was measured by a commercial available optical coherence tomography (OCT) in OSAS patients. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0 software. Efficacy estimates were evaluated by weighted mean difference with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Primary outcome evaluations were: the average changes of RNFL thickness in total OSAS patients, subgroup analysis of RNFL thickness changes in patients of different OSAS stages, and subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant RNFL thickness changes in total OSAS patients. Results: Of the initial 327 literatures, 8 case-control studies with 763 eyes of OSA patients and 474 eyes of healthy controls were included (NOS scores ≥6). For the people of total OSAS, there had an average 2.92 μm decreased RNFL thickness compared with controls (95% CI: −4.61 to −1.24, P = 0.001). For subgroup analysis of OSAS in different stages, the average changes of RNFL thickness in mild, moderate, severe, and moderate to severe OSAS were 2.05 (95% CI: −4.40 to 0.30, P = 0.088), 2.32 (95% CI: −5.04 to 0.40, P = 0.094), 4.21 (95% CI: −8.36 to −0.06, P = 0.047), and 4.02 (95% CI: −7.65 to −0.40, P = 0.03), respectively. For subgroup analysis of 4-quadrant, the average changes of RNFL thickness in Superior, Nasal, Inferior, and Temporal quadrant were 2.43 (95% CI: −4.28 to −0.57, P = 0.01), 1.41 (95% CI: −3.33 to 0.51, P = 0.151), 3.75 (95% CI: −6.92 to −0.59, P = 0.02), and 0.98 (95% CI: −2.49 to 0.53, P = 0.203), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that RNFL thickness in OSAS patients is much thinner than

  10. Polarization properties of the retinal nerve fiber layer investigated with multispectral imaging micropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiangrun

    Evaluation of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is valuable in diagnosing glaucoma and other ocular neuropathic diseases. Several optical methods have been developed to assess the RNFL quantitatively. Knowledge about the optical properties of the RNFL and the underlying mechanisms is essential to understand these techniques and improve their assessment ability. Experimental studies show that the RNFL reflectance arises from the scattering of light by cylindrical structures. The measured reflectance spectra of the RNFL suggest that both thin and thick cylinders contribute to the RNFL reflection and experiments with colchicine suggest that microtubules are a likely candidate for the thin cylinders. The RNFL was modeled mathematically as an ensemble of uniformly distributed cylinders assumed to be form birefringent. The Mueller matrix of the RNFL model was derived and decomposed to reveal its polarization properties. The diattenuation of the model was due to the cylindrical scattering properties. The retardance exhibited in the model included the phase changes due to cylindrical scattering and to the RNFL birefringence. Reflection by the RNFL model preserved polarization. A multispectral imaging micropolarimeter was designed and calibrated. It was used to investigate the reflectance and polarization properties of the RNFL of isolated rat retinas. The RNFL retardance measured in transmission was constant over visible wavelengths, which suggested that only one mechanism was involved in the RNFL birefringence and agreed with the assumption of the RNFL being form birefringent. Measurements of diattenuation spectra of the RNFL reflectance revealed that intrinsic diattenuation is small at all wavelengths. The results led to two possible conclusions (1)if the RNFL reflection arises from scattering by spatially separated cylinders, the refractive index of these cylinders is close to that of the surrounding medium and (2)cylindrical structures other than spatially

  11. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  12. Adipose-derived stem cells stimulate regeneration of peripheral nerves: BDNF secreted by these cells promotes nerve healing and axon growth de novo.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Tatiana; Kalinina, Natalia; Karagyaur, Maxim; Stambolsky, Dmitry; Rubina, Kseniya; Revischin, Alexander; Pavlova, Galina; Parfyonova, Yelena; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2011-03-14

    Transplantation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) induces tissue regeneration by accelerating the growth of blood vessels and nerve. However, mechanisms by which they accelerate the growth of nerve fibers are only partially understood. We used transplantation of ASCs with subcutaneous matrigel implants (well-known in vivo model of angiogenesis) and model of mice limb reinnervation to check the influence of ASC on nerve growth. Here we show that ASCs stimulate the regeneration of nerves in innervated mice's limbs and induce axon growth in subcutaneous matrigel implants. To investigate the mechanism of this action we analyzed different properties of these cells and showed that they express numerous genes of neurotrophins and extracellular matrix proteins required for the nerve growth and myelination. Induction of neural differentiation of ASCs enhances production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as ability of these cells to induce nerve fiber growth. BDNF neutralizing antibodies abrogated the stimulatory effects of ASCs on the growth of nerve sprouts. These data suggest that ASCs induce nerve repair and growth via BDNF production. This stimulatory effect can be further enhanced by culturing the cells in neural differentiation medium prior to transplantation.

  13. Selective activation of carotid nerve fibers by acetylcholine applied to the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, J; Iturriaga, R; Varas, R; Arroyo, J; Zapata, P

    1998-03-09

    The petrosal ganglion innervates carotid body chemoreceptors through the carotid (sinus) nerve. These primary sensory neurons are activated by transmitters released from receptor (glomus) cells, acetylcholine (ACh) having been proposed as one of the transmitters involved in this process. Since the perikarya of primary sensory neurons share several properties with peripheral sensory endings, we studied the electrical responses of the carotid nerve and glossopharyngeal branch to ACh locally applied to the cat petrosal ganglion superfused in vitro. Ganglionar applications of AChCl (1 microg-1 mg) generated bursts of action potentials conducted along the carotid nerve, while only a few spikes were exceptionally recorded from the glossopharyngeal branch in response to the largest doses. Carotid nerve responses to ACh were dose-dependent, the higher doses inducing transient desensitization. Application of nicotine to the petrosal ganglion also evoked dose-dependent excitatory responses in the carotid nerve. Responses to ACh were reversibly antagonized by adding hexamethonium to the superfusate, more intense and prolonged block of ACh responses being produced by mecamylamine. Ganglionar applications of gamma-amino butyric acid and serotonin, in doses of up to 5 mg, did not induce firing of action potentials in any of the branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Our results indicate that petrosal ganglion neurons projecting through the carotid nerve are selectively activated by ACh acting on nicotinic ACh receptors located in the somata of these neurons. Thus, cholinosensitivity would be shared by the membranes of peripheral endings and perikarya of primary sensory neurons involved in arterial chemoreception.

  14. Neutron scattering from myelin revisited: bilayer asymmetry and water-exchange kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Andrew R.; Demé, Bruno; Cristiglio, Viviana; LeDuc, Géraldine; Feller, W. Bruce; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2014-12-01

    The structure of internodal myelin in the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems has been determined using neutron diffraction. The kinetics of water exchange in these tissues is also described. Rapid nerve conduction in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS, respectively) of higher vertebrates is brought about by the ensheathment of axons with myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar assembly of membranes. The ability of myelin to electrically insulate depends on the regular stacking of these plasma membranes and on the presence of a number of specialized membrane-protein assemblies in the sheath, including the radial component, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and the axo–glial junctions of the paranodal loops. The disruption of this fine-structure is the basis for many demyelinating neuropathies in the CNS and PNS. Understanding the processes that govern myelin biogenesis, maintenance and destabilization requires knowledge of myelin structure; however, the tight packing of internodal myelin and the complexity of its junctional specializations make myelin a challenging target for comprehensive structural analysis. This paper describes an examination of myelin from the CNS and PNS using neutron diffraction. This investigation revealed the dimensions of the bilayers and aqueous spaces of myelin, asymmetry between the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets of the membrane, and the distribution of water and exchangeable hydrogen in internodal multilamellar myelin. It also uncovered differences between CNS and PNS myelin in their water-exchange kinetics.

  15. Swimming Exercise in the Acute or Late Phase after Sciatic Nerve Crush Accelerates Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Teodori, Rosana Macher; Betini, Joice; de Oliveira, Larissa Salgado; Sobral, Luciane Lobato; Takeda, Sibele Yoko Mattozo; Montebelo, Maria Imaculada de Lima

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus about the best time to start exercise after peripheral nerve injury. We evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the sciatic nerves of rats that began to swim immediately after crush nerve injury (CS1), those that began to swim 14 days after injury (CS14), injured rats not submitted to swimming (C), and uninjured rats submitted to swimming (S). After 30 days the number of axons in CS1 and CS14 was lower than in C (P < 0.01). The diameter of axons and nerve fibers was larger in CS1 (P < 0.01) and CS14 (P < 0.05) than in C, and myelin sheath thickness was lower in all crushed groups (P < 0.05). There was no functional difference between CS1 and CS14 (P > 0.05). Swimming exercise applied during the acute or late phase of nerve injury accelerated nerve regeneration and synaptic elimination after axonotmesis, suggesting that exercise may be initiated immediately after injury. PMID:21876821

  16. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-09-04

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands.

  17. A study of the sympathetic skin response and sensory nerve action potential after median and ulnar nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, M; Ghavanini, M R; Rahimi, H R; Raissi, G R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare SSR with sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) responses in regeneration of injured peripheral nerves after nerve repair. We studied 10 male patients with a mean age of 26.7 years. All the patients had complete laceration of median or ulnar nerves. The patients were followed up at least for six months. SSR and SNAP assessment were performed every one to two months. Normal hands were used as controls. SSR was positive after 15.8 +/- 9.4 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD) and SNAP after 27.8 +/- 12.9 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD). The difference was statistically significant (P value < 0.001). This can be due to more rapi