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Sample records for myeloid cells regulate

  1. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  2. BCOR regulates myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Q; Gearhart, M D; Gery, S; Shojaee, S; Yang, H; Sun, H; Lin, D-C; Bai, J-W; Mead, M; Zhao, Z; Chen, Q; Chien, W-W; Alkan, S; Alpermann, T; Haferlach, T; Müschen, M; Bardwell, V J; Koeffler, H P

    2016-05-01

    BCOR is a component of a variant Polycomb group repressive complex 1 (PRC1). Recently, we and others reported recurrent somatic BCOR loss-of-function mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, the role of BCOR in normal hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we explored the function of BCOR in myeloid cells using myeloid murine models with Bcor conditional loss-of-function or overexpression alleles. Bcor mutant bone marrow cells showed significantly higher proliferation and differentiation rates with upregulated expression of Hox genes. Mutation of Bcor reduced protein levels of RING1B, an H2A ubiquitin ligase subunit of PRC1 family complexes and reduced H2AK119ub upstream of upregulated HoxA genes. Global RNA expression profiling in murine cells and AML patient samples with BCOR loss-of-function mutation suggested that loss of BCOR expression is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that BCOR plays an indispensable role in hematopoiesis by inhibiting myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation and offer a mechanistic explanation for how BCOR regulates gene expression such as Hox genes. PMID:26847029

  3. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Myeloid Cell Trafficking in AKI.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Kamal, Ahmed I; Boddu, Ravindra; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C; Rangarajan, Sunil; Chen, Bo; Curtis, Lisa M; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is mediated by a complex cascade of events, including the immune response, that occur secondary to injury to renal epithelial cells. We tested the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which is protective in ischemia-reperfusion injury, regulates trafficking of myeloid-derived immune cells in the kidney. Age-matched male wild-type (HO-1(+/+)), HO-1-knockout (HO-1(-/-)), and humanized HO-1-overexpressing (HBAC) mice underwent bilateral renal ischemia for 10 minutes. Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulted in significantly worse renal structure and function and increased mortality in HO-1(-/-) mice. In addition, there were more macrophages (CD45(+) CD11b(hi)F4/80(lo)) and neutrophils (CD45(+) CD11b(hi) MHCII(-) Gr-1(hi)) in HO-1(-/-) kidneys than in sham and HO-1(+/+) control kidneys subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. However, ischemic injury resulted in a significant decrease in the intrarenal resident dendritic cell (DC; CD45(+)MHCII(+)CD11b(lo)F4/80(hi)) population in HO-1(-/-) kidneys compared with controls. Syngeneic transplant experiments utilizing green fluorescent protein-positive HO-1(+/+) or HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys and green fluorescent protein-negative HO-1(+/+) recipients confirmed increased migration of the resident DC population from HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys, compared to HO-1(+/+) donor kidneys, to the peripheral lymphoid organs. This effect on renal DC migration was corroborated in myeloid-specific HO-1(-/-) mice subjected to bilateral ischemia. These mice also displayed impaired renal recovery and increased fibrosis at day 7 after injury. These results highlight an important role for HO-1 in orchestrating the trafficking of myeloid cells in AKI, which may represent a key pathway for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Common Traits in Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Vladimirovna, Irina Lyadova; Sosunova, Ekaterina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Nenasheva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    To protect host against immune-mediated damage, immune responses are tightly regulated. The regulation of immune responses is mediated by various populations of mature immune cells, such as T regulatory cells and B regulatory cells, but also by immature cells of different origins. In this review, we discuss regulatory properties and mechanisms whereby two distinct populations of immature cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells mediate immune regulation, focusing on their similarities, discrepancies, and potential clinical applications. PMID:27529074

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Common Traits in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To protect host against immune-mediated damage, immune responses are tightly regulated. The regulation of immune responses is mediated by various populations of mature immune cells, such as T regulatory cells and B regulatory cells, but also by immature cells of different origins. In this review, we discuss regulatory properties and mechanisms whereby two distinct populations of immature cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells mediate immune regulation, focusing on their similarities, discrepancies, and potential clinical applications. PMID:27529074

  6. Myeloid cell TRAF3 regulates immune responses and inhibits inflammation and tumor development in mice1

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Almin I.; Moore, Carissa R.; Luo, Chang; Kreider, Benjamin Z.; Liu, Yan; Morse, Herbert C.; Xie, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid cells, including granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, are crucial players in innate immunity and inflammation. These cells constitutively or inducibly express a number of receptors of the TNF receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) families, whose signals are transduced by TRAF molecules. In vitro studies showed that TRAF3 is required for TLR-induced type I interferon production, but the in vivo function of TRAF3 in myeloid cells remains unknown. Here we report the generation and characterization of myeloid cell-specific TRAF3-deficient (M-TRAF3−/−) mice, which allowed us to gain insights into the in vivo functions of TRAF3 in myeloid cells. We found that TRAF3 ablation did not affect the maturation or homeostasis of myeloid cells in young adult mice, even though TRAF3-deficient macrophages and neutrophils exhibited constitutive NF-κB2 activation. However, in response to injections with LPS (a bacterial mimic) or polyI:C (a viral mimic), M-TRAF3−/− mice exhibited an altered profile of cytokine production. M-TRAF3−/− mice immunized with T cell-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) antigens displayed elevated TI IgG3 as well as TD IgG2b responses. Interestingly, 15–22 month old M-TRAF3−/− mice spontaneously developed chronic inflammation or tumors, often affecting multiple organs. Taken together, our findings indicate that TRAF3 expressed in myeloid cells regulates immune responses in myeloid cells and acts to inhibit inflammation and tumor development in mice. PMID:25422508

  7. Tumor angiogenesis mediated by myeloid cells is negatively regulated by CEACAM1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongze; Kujawski, Maciej; Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2012-05-01

    Bv8 (prokineticin 2) expressed by Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells is critical for VEGF-independent tumor angiogenesis. Although granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to be a key inducer of Bv8 expression, the basis for Bv8 production in driving tumor angiogenesis is undefined. Because the cell adhesion molecule CEACAM1, which is highly expressed on Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells, is known to regulate G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) signaling, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 would regulate Bv8 production in these cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that Bv8 expression was elevated in Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells from Ceacam1-deficient mice implanted with B16 melanoma, increasing the infiltration of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanoma tumors and enhancing their growth and angiogenesis. Furthermore, treatment with anti-Gr1 or anti-Bv8 or anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody reduced myeloid cell infiltration, tumor growth, and angiogenesis to levels observed in tumor-bearing wild-type (WT) mice. Reconstitution of CEACAM1-deficient mice with WT bone marrow cells restored tumor infiltration of Gr1(+)CD11b(+) cells along with tumor growth and angiogenesis to WT levels. Treatment of tumor-bearing WT mice with anti-CEACAM1 antibody limited tumor outgrowth and angiogenesis, albeit to a lesser extent. Tumor growth in Ceacam1-deficient mice was not affected significantly in Rag(-/-) background, indicating that CEACAM1 expression in T and B lymphocytes had a negligible role in this pathway. Together, our findings show that CEACAM1 negatively regulates Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cell-dependent tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting the G-CSF-Bv8 signaling pathway.

  8. EVOLUTION OF MYELOID CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Daniel R.; Neely, Harold R.; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    In 1882, Elie Metchnikoff identified myeloid-like cells from starfish larvae responding to the invasion by a foreign body (rose thorn). This marked the origins of the study of innate immunity, and an appreciation that cellular immunity is already well established in these “primitive” organisms. This chapter focuses on these myeloid cells as well as the newest members of this family, the dendritic cells (DC), and explores their evolutionary origins. Our goal is to provide evolutionary context for the development of the multilayered immune system of mammals, where myeloid cells now serve as central effectors of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity. Overall, we find that core contributions of myeloid cells to the regulation of inflammation are based on mechanisms that have been honed over hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Using phagocytosis as a platform, we show how fairly simple beginnings have offered a robust foundation onto which additional control features have been integrated, resulting in central regulatory nodes that now manage multi-factorial aspects of homeostasis and immunity. PMID:27337471

  9. Regulation of vitamin D receptor expression by retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Cebrat, Małgorzata; Łaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Śnieżewski, Łukasz; Brown, Geoffrey; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by an accumulation of malignant immature myeloid precursors. A very promising way to treat AML is differentiation therapy using either all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), or the use of both these differentiation-inducing agents. However, the effect of combination treatment varies in different AML cell lines, and this is due to ATRA either down- or up-regulating transcription of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in the cells examined. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of VDR in response to ATRA has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) is responsible for regulating VDR transcription in AML cells. We have shown that a VDR transcriptional variant, originating in exon 1a, is regulated by RARα agonists in AML cells. Moreover, in cells with a high basal level of RARα protein, the VDR gene is transcriptionally repressed as long as RARα agonist is absent. In these cells down-regulation of the level of RARα leads to increased expression of VDR. We consider that our findings provide a mechanistic background to explain the different outcomes from treating AML cell lines with a combination of ATRA and 1,25D. PMID:26969398

  10. Histone deacetylase 11: A novel epigenetic regulator of myeloid derived suppressor cell expansion and function.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John J; Chen, Jie; Deng, Susan L; Cheng, Fengdong; Distler, Allison; Woods, David M; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Sodre, Andressa L; Youn, Je-In; Woan, Karrune V; Villagra, Alejandro; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells capable of suppressing anti-tumor T cell function in the tumor microenvironment, represent an imposing obstacle in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics. Thus, identifying elements essential to the development and perpetuation of these cells will undoubtedly improve our ability to circumvent their suppressive impact. HDAC11 has emerged as a key regulator of IL-10 gene expression in myeloid cells, suggesting that this may represent an important targetable axis through which to dampen MDSC formation. Using a murine transgenic reporter model system where eGFP expression is controlled by the HDAC11 promoter (Tg-HDAC11-eGFP), we provide evidence that HDAC11 appears to function as a negative regulator of MDSC expansion/function in vivo. MDSCs isolated from EL4 tumor-bearing Tg-HDAC11-eGFP display high expression of eGFP, indicative of HDAC11 transcriptional activation at steady state. In striking contrast, immature myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice display a diminished eGFP expression, implying that the transition of IMC to MDSC's require a decrease in the expression of HDAC11, where we postulate that it acts as a gate-keeper of myeloid differentiation. Indeed, tumor-bearing HDAC11-knockout mice (HDAC11-KO) demonstrate a more suppressive MDSC population as compared to wild-type (WT) tumor-bearing control. Notably, the HDAC11-KO tumor-bearing mice exhibit enhanced tumor growth kinetics when compare to the WT control mice. Thus, through a better understanding of this previously unknown role of HDAC11 in MDSC expansion and function, rational development of targeted epigenetic modifiers may allow us to thwart a powerful barrier to efficacious immunotherapies.

  11. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  12. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  13. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair. PMID:26962228

  14. MerTK Is a Functional Regulator of Myelin Phagocytosis by Human Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Healy, Luke M; Perron, Gabrielle; Won, So-Yoon; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie A; Rezk, Ayman; Ludwin, Samuel K; Moore, Craig S; Hall, Jeffery A; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2016-04-15

    Multifocal inflammatory lesions featuring destruction of lipid-rich myelin are pathologic hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. Lesion activity is assessed by the extent and composition of myelin uptake by myeloid cells present in such lesions. In the inflamed CNS, myeloid cells are comprised of brain-resident microglia, an endogenous cell population, and monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrate from the systemic compartment. Using microglia isolated from the adult human brain, we demonstrate that myelin phagocytosis is dependent on the polarization state of the cells. Myelin ingestion is significantly enhanced in cells exposed to TGF-β compared with resting basal conditions and markedly reduced in classically activated polarized cells. Transcriptional analysis indicated that TGF-β-treated microglia closely resembled M0 cells. The tyrosine kinase phagocytic receptor MerTK was one of the most upregulated among a select number of differentially expressed genes in TGF-β-treated microglia. In contrast, MerTK and its known ligands, growth arrest-specific 6 and Protein S, were downregulated in classically activated cells. MerTK expression and myelin phagocytosis were higher in CNS-derived microglia than observed in monocyte-derived macrophages, both basally and under all tested polarization conditions. Specific MerTK inhibitors reduced myelin phagocytosis and the resultant anti-inflammatory biased cytokine responses for both cell types. Defining and modulating the mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis has the potential to impact lesion and disease evolution in multiple sclerosis. Relevant effects would include enhancing myelin clearance, increasing anti-inflammatory molecule production by myeloid cells, and thereby permitting subsequent tissue repair.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape. PMID:27391078

  16. Differential Regulation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anurag; Lelis, Felipe; Braig, Stefanie; Schäfer, Iris; Hartl, Dominik; Rieber, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells characterized by their ability to suppress T-cell responses. Recently, we demonstrated that the human-pathogenic fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus induced a distinct subset of neutrophilic MDSCs. To dissect Candida-mediated MDSC induction in more depth, we studied the relative efficacy of different pathogenic non-albicans Candida species to induce and functionally modulate neutrophilic MDSCs, including C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, and C. krusei. Our data demonstrate that the extent of MDSC generation is largely dependent on the Candida species with MDSCs induced by C. krusei and C. glabrata showing a higher suppressive activity compared to MDSCs induced by C. albicans. In summary, these studies show that fungal MDSC induction is differentially regulated at the species level and differentially affects effector T-cell responses. PMID:27790210

  17. Distal regulation of c-myb expression during IL-6-induced differentiation in murine myeloid progenitor M1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfang; Han, Bingshe; Li, Xiaoxia; Bies, Juraj; Jiang, Penglei; Koller, Richard P; Wolff, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor is a major regulator that controls differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells, which is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases, such as lymphoma and leukemia. Understanding of the mechanisms regulating the transcription of c-myb gene is challenging as it lacks a typical promoter and multiple factors are involved. Our previous studies identified some distal regulatory elements in the upstream regions of c-myb gene in murine myeloid progenitor M1 cells, but the detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. In the present study, we found that a cell differentiation-related DNase1 hypersensitive site is located at a -28k region upstream of c-myb gene and that transcription factors Hoxa9, Meis1 and PU.1 bind to the -28k region. Circular chromosome conformation capture (4C) assay confirmed the interaction between the -28k region and the c-myb promoter, which is supported by the enrichment of CTCF and Cohesin. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Hoxa9 and PU.1 in distal regulation of c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells and cell differentiation. Overexpression of Hoxa9 disrupted the IL-6-induced differentiation of M1 cells and upregulated c-myb expression through binding of the -28k region. Taken together, our results provide an evidence for critical role of the -28k region in distal regulatory mechanism for c-myb gene expression during differentiation of myeloid progenitor M1 cells. PMID:27607579

  18. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21{sup Cip1}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Kim, Seonggon; Hwang, Junmo; Kim, Young Hun; Lim, Ga Young; Sohn, Wern-Joo; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Tae Sung; Park, Kwon Moo; Ryoo, Zae Young; Lee, Sanggyu

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27{sup Kip1} and repressed p21{sup Cip1}, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21{sup Cip1}, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  19. Pathogenic Fungi Regulate Immunity by Inducing Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieber, Nikolaus; Singh, Anurag; Öz, Hasan; Carevic, Melanie; Bouzani, Maria; Amich, Jorge; Ost, Michael; Ye, Zhiyong; Ballbach, Marlene; Schäfer, Iris; Mezger, Markus; Klimosch, Sascha N.; Weber, Alexander N.R.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Krappmann, Sven; Liese, Johannes; Engeholm, Maik; Schüle, Rebecca; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Marodi, Laszlo; Speckmann, Carsten; Grimbacher, Bodo; Ruland, Jürgen; Brown, Gordon D.; Beilhack, Andreas; Loeffler, Juergen; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite continuous contact with fungi, immunocompetent individuals rarely develop pro-inflammatory antifungal immune responses. The underlying tolerogenic mechanisms are incompletely understood. Using both mouse models and human patients, we show that infection with the human pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans induces a distinct subset of neutrophilic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which functionally suppress T and NK cell responses. Mechanistically, pathogenic fungi induce neutrophilic MDSCs through the pattern recognition receptor Dectin-1 and its downstream adaptor protein CARD9. Fungal MDSC induction is further dependent on pathways downstream of Dectin-1 signaling, notably reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as well as caspase-8 activity and interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. Additionally, exogenous IL-1β induces MDSCs to comparable levels observed during C. albicans infection. Adoptive transfer and survival experiments show that MDSCs are protective during invasive C. albicans infection, but not A. fumigatus infection. These studies define an innate immune mechanism by which pathogenic fungi regulate host defense. PMID:25771792

  20. Metalloproteinases: A functional pathway for myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jonathan; Chan, Matilda F.; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells have diverse roles in regulating immunity, inflammation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. To accomplish these tasks, myeloid cells carry an arsenal of metalloproteinases, which include the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the adamalysins. These enzymes have diverse substrate repertoires, and are thus involved in mediating proteolytic cascades, cell migration and cell signaling. Dysregulation of metalloproteinases contributes to pathogenic processes, including inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. Metalloproteinases also have important non-proteolytic functions in controlling cytoskeletal dynamics during macrophage fusion and enhancing transcription to promote anti-viral immunity. This review highlights the diverse contributions of metalloproteinases to myeloid cell functions. PMID:27227311

  1. Twist-1, a novel regulator of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and myeloid lineage development.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cheng-Ya; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Li-Na; Yang, Bin-Xia; Ren, Qian; Liang, Hao-Yue; Ma, Xiao-Tong

    2014-12-01

    Transcription factor Twist-1 plays essential roles in specification and differentiation of mesoderm-derived tissues. Growing evidences now link Twist-1 to the acquisition of stem-cell-like properties. However, the role of Twist-1 in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) remains largely uncharacterized. We report that Twist-1 is more highly expressed in murine HSC and its expression declines with differentiation. To investigate Twist-1 gene function, retroviral-mediated overexpression or removal experiments are performed. Competitive repopulation studies demonstrate that enforced expression of Twist-1 in HSC-enriched Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS) cells results in an increase in the size of the G(0) population, and in their reconstitution ability after the first and a second transplantation. Conversely, removal of Twist-1 in LKS cells impairs their ability to repopulate. In addition, increased Twist-1 expression causes a shift toward production of myeloid cells. Twist-1 transduction in LKS cells activates myeloid lineage-determining factors PU.1 and GATA-1 and downregulates lymphoid factor GATA-3 in vitro, suggesting that Twist-1-mediated myeloid skewing occurs in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). These findings indicate that Twist-1 is not only involved in the maintenance of HSC dormancy and self-renewal capacity but also implicated in the myeloid lineage fate choice of HSPCs. Exploration of the underlying mechanisms reveals that Runx1/c-Mpl/Tie2 regulatory pathway could possibly account for the observed effects caused by Twist-1 overexpression. Our study provides the first evidence supporting a role for Twist-1 in hematopoiesis.

  2. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34+ cells, CD34+ blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO+ leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO+ leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells. PMID:22961059

  3. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  4. Distal regulation of c-myb expression during IL-6-induced differentiation in murine myeloid progenitor M1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfang; Han, Bingshe; Li, Xiaoxia; Bies, Juraj; Jiang, Penglei; Koller, Richard P; Wolff, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor is a major regulator that controls differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells, which is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases, such as lymphoma and leukemia. Understanding of the mechanisms regulating the transcription of c-myb gene is challenging as it lacks a typical promoter and multiple factors are involved. Our previous studies identified some distal regulatory elements in the upstream regions of c-myb gene in murine myeloid progenitor M1 cells, but the detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. In the present study, we found that a cell differentiation-related DNase1 hypersensitive site is located at a −28k region upstream of c-myb gene and that transcription factors Hoxa9, Meis1 and PU.1 bind to the −28k region. Circular chromosome conformation capture (4C) assay confirmed the interaction between the −28k region and the c-myb promoter, which is supported by the enrichment of CTCF and Cohesin. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Hoxa9 and PU.1 in distal regulation of c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells and cell differentiation. Overexpression of Hoxa9 disrupted the IL-6-induced differentiation of M1 cells and upregulated c-myb expression through binding of the −28k region. Taken together, our results provide an evidence for critical role of the −28k region in distal regulatory mechanism for c-myb gene expression during differentiation of myeloid progenitor M1 cells. PMID:27607579

  5. HIF-1α regulates function and differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Condamine, Thomas; Lu, Lily; Cotter, Matthew J; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Quiceno, David G; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2010-10-25

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a major component of the immune-suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. We demonstrate that although MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor site share similar phenotype and morphology, these cells display profound functional differences. MDSC from peripheral lymphoid organs suppressed antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells but failed to inhibit nonspecific T cell function. In sharp contrast, tumor MDSC suppressed both antigen-specific and nonspecific T cell activity. The tumor microenvironment caused rapid and dramatic up-regulation of arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase in MDSC, which was accompanied by down-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase and reactive oxygen species in these cells. In contrast to MDSC from the spleen, MDSC from the tumor site rapidly differentiated into macrophages. Exposure of spleen MDSC to hypoxia resulted in the conversion of these cells to nonspecific suppressors and their preferential differentiation to macrophages. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α was found to be primarily responsible for the observed effects of the tumor microenvironment on MDSC differentiation and function. Thus, hypoxia via HIF-1α dramatically alters the function of MDSC in the tumor microenvironment and redirects their differentiation toward tumor-associated macrophages, hence providing a mechanistic link between different myeloid suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  6. HIF-1α regulates function and differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Condamine, Thomas; Lu, Lily; Cotter, Matthew J.; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Quiceno, David G.; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a major component of the immune-suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. We demonstrate that although MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor site share similar phenotype and morphology, these cells display profound functional differences. MDSC from peripheral lymphoid organs suppressed antigen-specific CD8+ T cells but failed to inhibit nonspecific T cell function. In sharp contrast, tumor MDSC suppressed both antigen-specific and nonspecific T cell activity. The tumor microenvironment caused rapid and dramatic up-regulation of arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase in MDSC, which was accompanied by down-regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–oxidase and reactive oxygen species in these cells. In contrast to MDSC from the spleen, MDSC from the tumor site rapidly differentiated into macrophages. Exposure of spleen MDSC to hypoxia resulted in the conversion of these cells to nonspecific suppressors and their preferential differentiation to macrophages. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α was found to be primarily responsible for the observed effects of the tumor microenvironment on MDSC differentiation and function. Thus, hypoxia via HIF-1α dramatically alters the function of MDSC in the tumor microenvironment and redirects their differentiation toward tumor-associated macrophages, hence providing a mechanistic link between different myeloid suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:20876310

  7. Up-regulation of transferrin receptor gene expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Y; Kataoka, T; Towatari, M; Ito, T; Inoue, H; Ogura, M; Morishima, Y; Saito, H

    1990-12-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression in two human myeloid leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which possess G-CSF receptors. Radioligand-binding assay revealed that 10 ng/ml G-CSF significantly increased TfR to 186 +/- 20 and 276 +/- 38% of control for NKM-1 cells and NOMO-1 cells, respectively, in a 24-h culture. Scatchard analysis showed the increase of transferrin (Tf)-binding sites but no change in the receptor affinity. The enhanced TfR expression was not mediated either by the kinetic change of receptor cycling or by cellular iron content. Immunoprecipitation with anti-TfR antibody was used, and the increased biosynthesis of the receptor was demonstrated in G-CSF-stimulated cells. Northern blot analysis showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of TfR mRNA of NKM-1 cells cultured in medium containing Tf and G-CSF, whereas the mRNA declined without G-CSF. The effect of G-CSF on the TfR mRNA was observed within 2 h, which preceded the increase of surface TfR and the transition to the S phase of the cell cycle. G-CSF also potentiated TfR expression in freshly obtained myeloid leukemia cells. The present study shows up-regulation of TfR expression by G-CSF in myeloid leukemia cells and provides evidence that the regulation is mediated by controlling the steady-state level of the mRNA. PMID:1701357

  8. Lewis x/CD15 expression in human myeloid cell differentiation is regulated by sialidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Sackstein, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The glycan determinant Lewis x (Lex/CD15) is a distinguishing marker for human myeloid cells and mediates neutrophil adhesion to dendritic cells. Despite broad interest in this structure, the mechanism(s) underlying Lex/CD15 expression remain relatively uncharacterized. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular basis of increasing Lex/CD15 expression associated with human myeloid cell differentiation. Flow cytometric analysis of differentiating cells together with biochemical studies employing inhibitors of glycan synthesis and of sialidases showed that increased Lex/CD15 expression was not due to de novo biosynthesis of Lex/CD15, but resulted predominantly from induction of α(2,3) sialidase activity, yielding Lex/CD15 from cell surface sLex/CD15s. This differentiation-associated conversion of surface sLex/CD15s to Lex/CD15 occurs predominantly on glycoproteins. Heretofore, modulation of post-translational glycan modifications has been attributed solely to dynamic variation(s) in glycosyltransferase expression. Our results unveil a new paradigm, demonstrating a critical role for post-Golgi membrane glycosidase activity in the “biosynthesis” of a key glycan determinant. PMID:18953356

  9. Myeloid derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Todd J.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Singhal, Sunil; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of achieving measurable response with cancer immunotherapy requires counteracting the immunosuppressive characteristics of tumors. One of the mechanisms that tumors utilize to escape immunosurveillance is the activation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Upon activation by tumor-derived signals, MDSCs inhibit the ability of the host to mount an anti-tumor immune response via their capacity to suppress both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Despite their relatively recent discovery and characterization, anti-MDSC agents have been identified, which may improve immunotherapy efficacy. PMID:23734336

  10. Migration of myeloid cells during inflammation is differentially regulated by the cell surface receptors Slamf1 and Slamf8.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxing; van Driel, Boaz J; Liao, Gongxian; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Halibozek, Peter J; Flipse, Jacky; Yigit, Burcu; Azcutia, Veronica; Luscinskas, Francis W; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the cell surface receptor Slamf1 (CD150) is requisite for optimal NADPH-oxidase (Nox2) dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in response to Gram- bacteria. By contrast, Slamf8 (CD353) is a negative regulator of ROS in response to Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Employing in vivo migration after skin sensitization, induction of peritonitis, and repopulation of the small intestine demonstrates that in vivo migration of Slamf1-/- dendritic cells and macrophages is reduced, as compared to wt mice. By contrast, in vivo migration of Slamf8-/- dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils is accelerated. These opposing effects of Slamf1 and Slamf8 are cell-intrinsic as judged by in vitro migration in transwell chambers in response to CCL19, CCL21 or CSF-1. Importantly, inhibiting ROS production of Slamf8-/- macrophages by diphenyleneiodonium chloride blocks this in vitro migration. We conclude that Slamf1 and Slamf8 govern ROS-dependent innate immune responses of myeloid cells, thus modulating migration of these cells during inflammation in an opposing manner.

  11. Migration of Myeloid Cells during Inflammation Is Differentially Regulated by the Cell Surface Receptors Slamf1 and Slamf8

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gongxian; O’Keeffe, Michael S.; Halibozek, Peter J.; Flipse, Jacky; Yigit, Burcu; Azcutia, Veronica; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the cell surface receptor Slamf1 (CD150) is requisite for optimal NADPH-oxidase (Nox2) dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in response to Gram- bacteria. By contrast, Slamf8 (CD353) is a negative regulator of ROS in response to Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Employing in vivo migration after skin sensitization, induction of peritonitis, and repopulation of the small intestine demonstrates that in vivo migration of Slamf1-/- dendritic cells and macrophages is reduced, as compared to wt mice. By contrast, in vivo migration of Slamf8-/- dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils is accelerated. These opposing effects of Slamf1 and Slamf8 are cell-intrinsic as judged by in vitro migration in transwell chambers in response to CCL19, CCL21 or CSF-1. Importantly, inhibiting ROS production of Slamf8-/- macrophages by diphenyleneiodonium chloride blocks this in vitro migration. We conclude that Slamf1 and Slamf8 govern ROS–dependent innate immune responses of myeloid cells, thus modulating migration of these cells during inflammation in an opposing manner. PMID:25799045

  12. Semisynthetic homoharringtonine induces apoptosis via inhibition of protein synthesis and triggers rapid myeloid cell leukemia-1 down-regulation in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruoping; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Majdak, Patricia; Marzac, Christophe; Dubrulle, Sabine; Marjanovic, Zora; Legrand, Ollivier; Marie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Semisynthetic homoharringtonine (ssHHT) is now being evaluated in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia patients. Here, we examined the mechanism of the apoptosis induced by ssHHT in myeloid leukemia cells. First, we have shown that ssHHT induces apoptosis in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and independently of the expression of Bax. The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c were observed in the apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT. To unveil the relationship between ssHHT and the mitochondrial disruption, we have shown that ssHHT decreased myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) expression and induced Bcl-2 cleavage in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines. The Bcl-2 cleavage could be inhibited by the Z-VAD.fmk caspase inhibitor. However, Mcl-1 turnover was very rapid and occurred before caspase activation. The Mcl-1 turnover was only induced by ssHHT and cycloheximide, but not by daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside, and could be restored by proteasome inhibitors. Second, we confirmed that ssHHT rapidly induced massive apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia patient cells. We have also confirmed the release of cytochrome c and a rapid turnover of Mcl-1 in these patient cells, taking place only in apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT but not in cells undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Finally, we have shown that ssHHT inhibits protein synthesis in both cell line and patient cells. We suggest that the inhibition of protein synthesis and resulting Mcl-1 turnover play a key role in the apoptosis induced by ssHHT. Our results encourage further clinical trials for the use of ssHHT in acute myelogenous leukemia.

  13. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Dieterich, Lothar C.; Schiller, Petter; Huang, Hua; Wawrousek, Eric F.; Loskog, Angelica; Wanders, Alkwin; Moons, Lieve; Dimberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin has emerged as a target for cancer therapy due to its expression in human tumors and its role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. αB-crystallin also reduces neuroinflammation, but its role in other inflammatory conditions has not been investigated. Here, we examined whether αB-crystallin regulates inflammation associated with tumors and ischemia. We found that CD45+ leukocyte infiltration is 3-fold increased in tumors and ischemic myocardium in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. Notably, αB-crystallin is prominently expressed in CD11b+ Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells (IMCs), known as regulators of angiogenesis and immune responses, while lymphocytes and mature granulocytes show low αB-crystallin expression. αB-Crystallin deficiency results in a 3-fold higher accumulation of CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in tumors and a significant rise in CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in spleen and bone marrow. Similarly, we noted a 2-fold increase in CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in chronically inflamed livers in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. The effect of αB-crystallin on IMC accumulation is limited to pathological conditions, as CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs are not elevated in naive mice. Through ex vivo differentiation of CD11b+ Gr-1+ cells, we provide evidence that αB-crystallin regulates systemic expansion of IMCs through a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Our study suggests a key role of αB-crystallin in limiting expansion of CD11b+ Gr-1+ IMCs in diverse pathological conditions.—Dieterich, L. C., Schiller, P., Huang, H., Wawrousek, E. F., Loskog, A., Wanders, A., Moons, L., Dimberg, A. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression. PMID:23033322

  14. Particulate β-glucan regulates the immunosuppression of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inhibiting NFIA expression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinyu; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Zhang, Yue; Ma, Jie; Wang, Yungang; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous group of cells which comprise two subsets: granulocytic MDSCs (G-MDSCs) and monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs). MDSCs involve in tumor-associated immune suppression by remarkably blocking effector T-cell activation and inducing expansion of regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. The treatment that alters the suppression of MDSCs can effectively facilitate the antitumor immune responses. Recently, we showed that the whole β-glucan particles (WGPs) are capable of altering the suppression of MDSCs. However, the regulatory mechanism of MDSCs by WGP remains unknown. In this study, we found that the expression of nuclear factor I-A (NFIA), an integral transcriptional component of myeloid differentiation and lineage commitment, was inhibited by WGP in G-MDSCs. The effect of WGP on expression of NFIA was the c-jun molecule dependent via Dectin-1 pathway in vitro. Moreover, NFIA knockdown could alter the suppressive function of G-MDSCs, promote the antitumor immune responses and delay the tumor progression in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a critical role of NFIA during WGP regulating the immunosuppression of G-MDSCs, with potential implications as an antitumor immune therapeutic approach. PMID:26405609

  15. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC.

  16. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC. PMID:25783986

  17. Kindlin-3 interacts with the ribosome and regulates c-Myc expression required for proliferation of chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Ero, Rya; Feng, Chen; Ong, Li-Teng; Tan, Hui-Foon; Lee, Hui-Shan; Ismail, Muhammad HB; Bu, Wen-Ting; Nama, Srikanth; Sampath, Prabha; Gao, Yong-Gui; Tan, Suet-Mien

    2015-01-01

    Kindlins are FERM-containing cytoplasmic proteins that regulate integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachments. Kindlin-3 is expressed in hematopoietic cells, platelets, and endothelial cells. Studies have shown that kindlin-3 stabilizes cell adhesion mediated by ß1, ß2, and ß3 integrins. Apart from integrin cytoplasmic tails, kindlins are known to interact with other cytoplasmic proteins. Here we demonstrate that kindlin-3 can associate with ribosome via the receptor for activated-C kinase 1 (RACK1) scaffold protein based on immunoprecipitation, ribosome binding, and proximity ligation assays. We show that kindlin-3 regulates c-Myc protein expression in the human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562. Cell proliferation was reduced following siRNA reduction of kindlin-3 expression and a significant reduction in tumor mass was observed in xenograft experiments. Mechanistically, kindlin-3 is involved in integrin α5ß1-Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling; however, its regulation of c-Myc protein expression could be independent of this signaling axis. PMID:26677948

  18. Influence of DNA-methylation on zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells: Regulation of zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Kessels, Jana Elena; Wessels, Inga; Haase, Hajo; Rink, Lothar; Uciechowski, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of intracellular zinc, predominantly regulated through zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins, is required to support an efficient immune response. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are involved in the expression of these genes. In demethylation experiments using 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AZA) increased intracellular (after 24 and 48h) and total cellular zinc levels (after 48h) were observed in the myeloid cell line HL-60. To uncover the mechanisms that cause the disturbed zinc homeostasis after DNA demethylation, the expression of human zinc transporters and zinc binding proteins were investigated. Real time PCR analyses of 14 ZIP (solute-linked carrier (SLC) SLC39A; Zrt/IRT-like protein), and 9 ZnT (SLC30A) zinc transporters revealed significantly enhanced mRNA expression of the zinc importer ZIP1 after AZA treatment. Because ZIP1 protein was also enhanced after AZA treatment, ZIP1 up-regulation might be the mediator of enhanced intracellular zinc levels. The mRNA expression of ZIP14 was decreased, whereas zinc exporter ZnT3 mRNA was also significantly increased; which might be a cellular reaction to compensate elevated zinc levels. An enhanced but not significant chromatin accessibility of ZIP1 promoter region I was detected by chromatin accessibility by real-time PCR (CHART) assays after demethylation. Additionally, DNA demethylation resulted in increased mRNA accumulation of zinc binding proteins metallothionein (MT) and S100A8/S100A9 after 48h. MT mRNA was significantly enhanced after 24h of AZA treatment also suggesting a reaction of the cell to restore zinc homeostasis. These data indicate that DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism affecting zinc binding proteins and transporters, and, therefore, regulating zinc homeostasis in myeloid cells.

  19. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  20. Myeloid Cells in Cutaneous Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cash, Jenna L; Martin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous wound repair is a complex, dynamic process with the goal of rapidly sealing any breach in the skin's protective barrier. Myeloid cells compose a significant proportion of the inflammatory cells recruited to a wound site and play important roles in decontaminating the injured tissue of any invading microorganisms. Subsequently, myeloid cells are able to influence many aspects of the healing response, in part through their capacity to release a large array of signaling molecules that allow them to communicate with and regulate the behavior of other wound cells and in turn, be themselves exquisitely regulated by the wound microenvironment. Macrophages, for example, appear to play important, temporally changing roles in the initiation of scarring and subsequently in matrix remodeling to resolve fibrosis. In this way, myeloid cells seem to play both positive (e.g., pathogen killing and matrix remodeling) and negative (e.g., scarring) roles in wound repair. Further research is of course needed to elucidate the precise temporal and spatial myeloid cell phenotypes and behaviors and ultimately to design effective strategies to optimize the beneficial functions of these cells while minimizing their detrimental contributions to improve wound healing in the clinic. PMID:27337466

  1. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported.

  2. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C. A.; Woll, Petter S.; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19+ B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R+CD19+ ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R+ myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R+ myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  3. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  4. Long intergenic non-coding RNA HOTAIRM1 regulates cell cycle progression during myeloid maturation in NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqing; Weissman, Sherman M; Newburger, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    HOTAIRM1 is a long intergenic non-coding RNA encoded in the human HOXA gene cluster, with gene expression highly specific for maturing myeloid cells. Knockdown of HOTAIRM1 in the NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line retarded all-trans retinoid acid (ATRA)-induced granulocytic differentiation, resulting in a significantly larger population of immature and proliferating cells that maintained cell cycle progression from G1 to S phases. Correspondingly, HOTAIRM1 knockdown resulted in retained expression of many otherwise ATRA-suppressed cell cycle and DNA replication genes, and abated ATRA induction of cell surface leukocyte activation, defense response, and other maturation-related genes. Resistance to ATRA-induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition in knockdown cells was accompanied by retained expression of ITGA4 (CD49d) and decreased induction of ITGAX (CD11c). The coupling of cell cycle progression with temporal dynamics in the expression patterns of these integrin genes suggests a regulated switch to control the transit from the proliferative phase to granulocytic maturation. Furthermore, ITGAX was among a small number of genes showing perturbation in transcript levels upon HOTAIRM1 knockdown even without ATRA treatment, suggesting a direct pathway of regulation. These results indicate that HOTAIRM1 provides a regulatory link in myeloid maturation by modulating integrin-controlled cell cycle progression at the gene expression level. PMID:24824789

  5. Inhibition of dendritic cell differentiation and accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer is regulated by S100A9 protein

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pingyan; Corzo, Cesar A.; Luetteke, Noreen; Yu, Bin; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Bui, Marylin M.; Ortiz, Myrna; Nacken, Wolfgang; Sorg, Clemens; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with inhibition of dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is one of the major immunological abnormalities in cancer and leads to suppression of antitumor immune responses. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. We report here that STAT3-inducible up-regulation of the myeloid-related protein S100A9 enhances MDSC production in cancer. Mice lacking this protein mounted potent antitumor immune responses and rejected implanted tumors. This effect was reversed by administration of wild-type MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice to S100A9-null mice. Overexpression of S100A9 in cultured embryonic stem cells or transgenic mice inhibited the differentiation of DCs and macrophages and induced accumulation of MDSCs. This study demonstrates that tumor-induced up-regulation of S100A9 protein is critically important for accumulation of MDSCs and reveals a novel molecular mechanism of immunological abnormalities in cancer. PMID:18809714

  6. Absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (Cftr) from myeloid-derived cells slows resolution of inflammation and infection

    PubMed Central

    Bonfield, T. L.; Hodges, C. A.; Cotton, C. U.; Drumm, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The absence or reduction of CFTR function causes CF and results in a pulmonary milieu characterized by bacterial colonization and unresolved inflammation. The ineffectiveness at controlling infection by species such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggests defects in innate immunity. Macrophages, neutrophils, and DCs have all been shown to express CFTR mRNA but at low levels, raising the question of whether CFTR has a functional role in these cells. Bone marrow transplants between CF and non-CF mice suggest that these cells are inherently different; we confirm this observation using conditional inactivation of Cftr in myeloid-derived cells. Mice lacking Cftr in myeloid cells overtly appear indistinguishable from non-CF mice until challenged with bacteria instilled into the lungs and airways, at which point, they display survival and inflammatory profiles intermediate in severity as compared with CF mice. These studies demonstrate that Cftr is involved directly in myeloid cell function and imply that these cells contribute to the pathophysiological phenotype of the CF lung. PMID:22859830

  7. UPF1 regulates myeloid cell functions and S100A9 expression by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Meike J.; Stein, Stefan; Grez, Manuel; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    UPF1 is a key player in nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) but also involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. In this study we found that UPF1 regulates the expression of genes with functions in inflammation and myeloid cell differentiation via hnRNP E2. The majority of the UPF1-regulated genes identified in monocytic cells contain a binding site for hnRNP E2 within 5′ UTR located introns with hnRNP E2 acting here as splicing regulator. We found that miRNA-328 which is significantly induced during monocytic cell differentiation acts independently from its gene silencing function as RNA decoy for hnRNP E2. One representative gene controlled by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance is S100A9 which plays an important role in cell differentiation and oxidative stress response of monocytes. Induction of miRNA-328 expression during cell differentiation antagonizes the blockade by hnRNP E2 which results in the upregulation of CD11b expression and ROS production in monocytic cells. Taken together, our data indicate that upregulation of miR-328 is responsible for the induction of hnRNP E2 target genes during myeloid cell differentiation. PMID:27573788

  8. UPF1 regulates myeloid cell functions and S100A9 expression by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance.

    PubMed

    Saul, Meike J; Stein, Stefan; Grez, Manuel; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    UPF1 is a key player in nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) but also involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. In this study we found that UPF1 regulates the expression of genes with functions in inflammation and myeloid cell differentiation via hnRNP E2. The majority of the UPF1-regulated genes identified in monocytic cells contain a binding site for hnRNP E2 within 5' UTR located introns with hnRNP E2 acting here as splicing regulator. We found that miRNA-328 which is significantly induced during monocytic cell differentiation acts independently from its gene silencing function as RNA decoy for hnRNP E2. One representative gene controlled by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance is S100A9 which plays an important role in cell differentiation and oxidative stress response of monocytes. Induction of miRNA-328 expression during cell differentiation antagonizes the blockade by hnRNP E2 which results in the upregulation of CD11b expression and ROS production in monocytic cells. Taken together, our data indicate that upregulation of miR-328 is responsible for the induction of hnRNP E2 target genes during myeloid cell differentiation. PMID:27573788

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates the Recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ Myeloid Cells and Regulates Bax/Bcl-2 Signaling in Myocardial Ischemia Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youen; Li, Hua; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Aijun; Zong, Nobel C.; Li, Zhaofeng; Zhu, Hongming; Zou, Yunzeng; Yang, Xiangdong; Ge, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an endogenous signaling molecule, plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Using a mouse model of myocardial infarction, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). The results demonstrated that the administration of NaHS improved survival, preserved left ventricular function, limited infarct size, and improved H2S levels in cardiac tissue to attenuate the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and to regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 pathway. Furthermore, the cardioprotective effects of NaHS were enhanced by inhibiting the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells from the spleen into the blood and by attenuating post-infarction inflammation. These observations suggest that the novel mechanism underlying the cardioprotective function of H2S is secondary to a combination of attenuation the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and regulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 apoptotic signaling. PMID:24758901

  10. Hepatitis C virus-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell differentiation and function via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Zhao, Juan; Dai, Jun; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Wang, Ling; Wu, Xiao Y; Morrison, Zheng D; Li, Guang Y; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Ning, Shun B; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2016-08-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in controlling viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for regulating T-cell differentiation and function during infections are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated an expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), in particular the monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs; CD14(+) CD33(+) CD11b(+) HLA-DR(-/low) ), in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Notably, HCV-induced M-MDSCs express high levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with healthy subjects. Blocking STAT3 signalling reduced HCV-mediated M-MDSC expansion and decreased IL-10 expression. Importantly, we observed a significant increase in the numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells following incubation of healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with MDSCs derived from HCV-infected patients or treated with HCV core protein. In addition, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs led to a significant reduction of Foxp3(+) Treg cells developed during chronic HCV infection. Moreover, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs significantly increased interferon-γ production by CD4(+) T effector (Teff) cells derived from HCV patients. These results suggest that HCV-induced MDSCs promote Treg cell development and inhibit Teff cell function, suggesting a novel mechanism for T-cell regulation and a new strategy for immunotherapy against human viral diseases. PMID:27149428

  11. RGS1 regulates myeloid cell accumulation in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm rupture through altered chemokine signalling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti; McNeill, Eileen; Douglas, Gillian; Hale, Ashley B.; de Bono, Joseph; Lee, Regent; Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Stylianou, Elena; Greaves, David R.; Channon, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine signalling drives monocyte recruitment in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. The mechanisms that lead to retention and accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall remain unclear. Regulator of G-Protein Signalling-1 (RGS1) deactivates G-protein signalling, reducing the response to sustained chemokine stimulation. Here we show that Rgs1 is upregulated in atherosclerotic plaque and aortic aneurysms. Rgs1 reduces macrophage chemotaxis and desensitizes chemokine receptor signalling. In early atherosclerotic lesions, Rgs1 regulates macrophage accumulation and is required for the formation and rupture of Angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysms, through effects on leukocyte retention. Collectively, these data reveal a role for Rgs1 in leukocyte trafficking and vascular inflammation and identify Rgs1, and inhibition of chemokine receptor signalling as potential therapeutic targets in vascular disease. PMID:25782711

  12. Cytomegalovirus immune evasion of myeloid lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Melanie M; Dağ, Franziska; Hengel, Hartmut; Messerle, Martin; Kalinke, Ulrich; Čičin-Šain, Luka

    2015-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) evades the immune system in many different ways, allowing the virus to grow and its progeny to spread in the face of an adverse environment. Mounting evidence about the antiviral role of myeloid immune cells has prompted the research of CMV immune evasion mechanisms targeting these cells. Several cells of the myeloid lineage, such as monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages, play a role in viral control, but are also permissive for CMV and are naturally infected by it. Therefore, CMV evasion of myeloid cells involves mechanisms that qualitatively differ from the evasion of non-CMV-permissive immune cells of the lymphoid lineage. The evasion of myeloid cells includes effects in cis, where the virus modulates the immune signaling pathways within the infected myeloid cell, and those in trans, where the virus affects somatic cells targeted by cytokines released from myeloid cells. This review presents an overview of CMV strategies to modulate and evade the antiviral activity of myeloid cells in cis and in trans.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates myeloid cell leukemia-1 expression through neuropilin-1-dependent activation of c-MET signaling in human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a member of the Bcl-2 family, which inhibits cell apoptosis by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Bid. Mcl-1 overexpression has been associated with progression in leukemia and some solid tumors including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the regulatory mechanism for Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells remains elusive. Results Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that Mcl-1 expression was elevated in PCa specimens with high Gleason grades and further significantly increased in bone metastasis, suggesting a pivotal role of Mcl-1 in PCa metastasis. We further found that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a novel regulator of Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells. Inhibition of endogenous Mcl-1 induced apoptosis, indicating that Mcl-1 is an important survival factor in PCa cells. Neuropilin-1 (NRP1), the "co-receptor" for VEGF165 isoform, was found to be highly expressed in PCa cells, and indispensible in the regulation of Mcl-1. Intriguingly, VEGF165 promoted physical interaction between NRP1 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-MET, and facilitated c-MET phosphorylation via a NRP1-dependent mechanism. VEGF165 induction of Mcl-1 may involve rapid activation of Src kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3). Importantly, NRP1 overexpression and c-MET activation were positively associated with progression and bone metastasis in human PCa specimens and xenograft tissues. Conclusions This study demonstrated that Mcl-1 overexpression is associated with PCa bone metastasis. Activation of VEGF165-NRP1-c-MET signaling could confer PCa cells survival advantages by up-regulating Mcl-1, contributing to PCa progression. PMID:20085644

  14. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  15. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  16. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L.; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Stephens, W. Zac; Rao, Dinesh S.; Round, June L.; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease. PMID:27081855

  17. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Dahlem, Timothy J; Stephens, W Zac; Rao, Dinesh S; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease.

  18. Impact of myeloid cells on the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Aranda, Fernando; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Tumors are not immunologically silent but evolve and respond to therapy in the context of a continuous, bi-directional interaction with the host immune system. In line with this notion, several clinically successful chemotherapeutics have been shown to mediate antineoplastic effects as they (re)activate an anticancer immune response that is generally executed by lymphoid cells. Myeloid cells play a central role in this process, not only because they critically regulate the activity of T and B lymphocytes, but also because they exert direct tumoricidal effects, at least in some settings. Here, we discuss the impact of various myeloid cell populations, including macrophages, dendritic cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, on the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy.

  19. miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador

    2015-02-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological pathways. As their role in phagocytosis remains poorly understood, we investigated their impact on phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells. Seven miRNAs (miR-24, -30b, -101, 142-3p, -652-3p, -652-5p, and -1275) that were differentially expressed during monocyte to macrophage (Mφ) and monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation were screened for their potential role in phagocytosis. Among these, overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p in human monocyte-derived Mφ, DC, monocytes, and PBMCs significantly attenuate phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the secretion of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40. miRNA-mediated changes in cytokine profiles were observed at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels and importantly exhibit miRNA-specific impact. To examine the underlying mechanism, we monitored the expression of phagocytosis pathway-associated genes and identified several genes that were altered in Mφ and DC transfected with miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p mimics. Some of these genes with altered expression also harbor putative miRNA binding sites. We show that miR-142-3p directly regulates protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a key gene involved in phagocytosis. Interestingly, miR-142-3p and PKCα exhibit antagonistic expression during Mφ and DC differentiation. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα in Mφ leads to reduced bacterial uptake, further highlighting the role of the gene in phagocytosis. Overall, these results demonstrate that miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis and associated cytokine production in myeloid inflammatory cells through modulation of various genes involved in the pathway.

  20. 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine Sensitizes Busulfan-resistant Myeloid Leukemia Cells By Regulating Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Checkpoint and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Benigno C.; Li, Yang; Murray, David; Corn, Paul; Champlin, Richard E.; Andersson, Borje S.

    2009-01-01

    Busulfan (Bu) is a DNA-alkylating drug used in myeloablative pretransplant conditioning therapy for patients with myeloid leukemia (ML). A major obstacle to successful treatment is cellular Bu-resistance. To investigate the possible contribution of DNA hypermethylation to Bu-resistance, we examined the cytotoxic activity of combined 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) and Bu. Exposure of Bu-resistant B5/Bu2506 ML cells to 0.5 μM DAC resulted in G2-arrest and apoptosis. The observed G2-arrest was associated with hypomethylation and subsequent expression of epigenetically controlled genes including p16INK4A, activation of the p53 pathway, and phosphorylation of CDC2. The DAC-mediated apoptosis was partly due to hypomethylation and up-regulation of XAF1, which resulted in down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2. The pro-apoptotic PUMA and BNIP3 proteins were up-regulated while pro-survival STAT3 and c-MYC were suppressed. Combination of 0.05 μM DAC and 5 μg/ml Bu resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity, which was associated with PARP1 cleavage and activation of caspases 3 and 8, suggesting induction of an apoptotic response. P53 inhibition in B5/Bu2506 cells using pifithrin-α alleviated these effects, suggesting a role for p53 therein; this observation was supported by the relative resistance of p53-null K562 cells to [DAC+Bu] combinations and by the effects of an anti-p53 shRNA on the OCI-AML3 cell line. We conclude that the synergistic effects of [DAC+Bu] are p53-dependent and involve cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and down-regulation of pro-survival genes. Our results suggest that, depending on tumor p53 status, incorporation of DAC might synergistically improve the cytoreductive efficacy of Bu-based pre-transplant regimen in patients with ML. PMID:19732952

  1. A Subset of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Has Leukemia Cells Characterized by Chemokine Responsiveness and Altered Expression of Transcriptional as well as Angiogenic Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Annette K.; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and heterogeneous bone marrow malignancy, the only curative treatment being intensive chemotherapy eventually in combination with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Both the AML and their neighboring stromal cells show constitutive chemokine release, but chemokines seem to function as regulators of AML cell proliferation only for a subset of patients. Chemokine targeting is therefore considered not only for immunosuppression in allotransplanted patients but also as a possible antileukemic strategy in combination with intensive chemotherapy or as part of disease-stabilizing treatment at least for the subset of patients with chemokine-responsive AML cells. In this study, we characterized more in detail the leukemia cell phenotype of the chemokine-responsive patients. We investigated primary AML cells derived from 79 unselected patients. Standardized in vitro suspension cultures were used to investigate AML cell proliferation, and global gene expression profiles were compared for chemokine responders and non-responders identified through the proliferation assays. CCL28-induced growth modulation was used as marker of chemokine responsiveness, and 38 patients were then classified as chemokine-responsive. The effects of exogenous CCL28 (growth inhibition/enhancement/no effect) thus differed among patients and was also dependent on the presence of exogenous hematopoietic growth factors as well as constitutive AML cell cytokine release. The effect of CCR1 inhibition in the presence of chemokine-secreting mesenchymal stem cells also differed among patients. Chemokine-responsive AML cells showed altered expression of genes important for (i) epigenetic transcriptional regulation, particularly lysine acetylation; (ii) helicase activity, especially DExD/H RNA helicases; and (iii) angioregulatory proteins important for integrin binding. Thus, chemokine responsiveness is part of a complex AML cell phenotype with regard to

  2. Roles nrf2 plays in myeloid cells and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Eri; Suzuki, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system protects animals from oxidative and electrophilic stresses. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces the expression of genes essential for detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytotoxic electrophiles. Keap1 is a stress sensor protein that binds to and ubiquitinates Nrf2 under unstressed conditions, leading to the rapid proteasomal degradation of Nrf2. Upon exposure to stress, Keap1 is modified and inactivated, which allows Nrf2 to accumulate and activate the transcription of a battery of cytoprotective genes. Antioxidative and detoxification activities are important for many types of cells to avoid DNA damage and cell death. Accumulating lines of recent evidence suggest that Nrf2 is also required for the primary functions of myeloid cells, which include phagocytosis, inflammation regulation, and ROS generation for bactericidal activities. In fact, results from several mouse models have shown that Nrf2 expression in myeloid cells is required for the proper regulation of inflammation, antitumor immunity, and atherosclerosis. Moreover, several molecules generated upon inflammation activate Nrf2. Although ROS detoxification mediated by Nrf2 is assumed to be required for anti-inflammation, the entire picture of the Nrf2-mediated regulation of myeloid cell primary functions has yet to be elucidated. In this review, we describe the Nrf2 inducers characteristic of myeloid cells and the contributions of Nrf2 to diseases.

  3. Multifactorial resistance to aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug CHR2863 in myeloid leukemia cells: down-regulation of carboxylesterase 1, drug sequestration in lipid droplets and pro-survival activation ERK/Akt/mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Al, Marjon; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kammerer, Sarah; Chandrupatla, Durga M.S.H.; Honeywell, Richard; Musters, Rene P.J.; Giovannetti, Elisa; O'Toole, Tom; Scheffer, George L.; Krige, David; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Lems, Willem F.; Kramer, Pieternella A.; Scheper, Rik J.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Jansen, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors are receiving attention as combination chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia. However, the factors determining therapeutic efficacy remain elusive. Here we identified the molecular basis of acquired resistance to CHR2863, an orally available hydrophobic aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug with an esterase-sensitive motif, in myeloid leukemia cells. CHR2863 enters cells by diffusion and is retained therein upon esterase activity-mediated conversion to its hydrophilic active metabolite drug CHR6768, thereby exerting amino acid depletion. Carboxylesterases (CES) serve as candidate prodrug activating enzymes given CES1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia specimens. We established two novel myeloid leukemia sublines U937/CHR2863(200) and U937/CHR2863(5uM), with low (14-fold) and high level (270-fold) CHR2863 resistance. The latter drug resistant cells displayed: (i) complete loss of CES1-mediated drug activation associated with down-regulation of CES1 mRNA and protein, (ii) marked retention/sequestration of the prodrug, (iii) a substantial increase in intracellular lipid droplets, and (iv) a dominant activation of the pro-survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Remarkably, the latter feature coincided with a gain of sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. These finding delineate the molecular basis of CHR2863 resistance and offer a novel modality to overcome this drug resistance in myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26496029

  4. Selective Involvement of the Checkpoint Regulator VISTA in Suppression of B-Cell, but Not T-Cell, Responsiveness by Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells from Mice Infected with an Immunodeficiency-Causing Retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Green, Kathy A; Wang, Li; Noelle, Randolph J; Green, William R

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of T-cell responses in tumor microenvironments by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is widely accepted. We demonstrated augmentation of monocytic MDSCs whose suppression of not only T-cell, but also B-cell, responsiveness paralleled the immunodeficiency during LP-BM5 retrovirus infection. MDSCs inhibited T cells by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/nitric oxide (NO), but uniquely, inhibition of B cells was ~50% dependent each on iNOS/NO and the MDSC-expressed negative-checkpoint regulator VISTA. Blockade with a combination of iNOS/NO and VISTA caused additive or synergistic abrogation of MDSC-mediated suppression of B-cell responsiveness.

  5. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics.

  6. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  7. miRNA dynamics in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells modulating tumor progression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mühlberg, Leonie; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Costello, Eithne; Shaw, Victoria; Sipos, Bence; Huber, Magdalena; Griesmann, Heidi; Krug, Sebastian; Schober, Marvin; Gress, Thomas M; Michl, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid cells including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are known as important mediators of tumor progression in solid tumors such as pancreatic cancer. Infiltrating myeloid cells have been identified not only in invasive tumors, but also in early pre-invasive pancreatic intraepithelial precursor lesions (PanIN). The functional dynamics of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis is largely unknown. We aimed to systematically elucidate phenotypic and transcriptional changes in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and tumor progression in a genetic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Using murine pancreatic myeloid cells isolated from the genetic mouse model at different time points during carcinogenesis, we examined both established markers of macrophage polarization using RT-PCR and FACS as well as transcriptional changes focusing on miRNA profiling. Myeloid cells isolated during carcinogenesis showed a simultaneous increase of established markers of M1 and M2 polarization during carcinogenesis, indicating that phenotypic changes of myeloid cells during carcinogenesis do not follow the established M1/M2 classification. MiRNA profiling revealed distinct regulations of several miRNAs already present in myeloid cells infiltrating pre-invasive PanIN lesions. Among them miRNA-21 was significantly increased in myeloid cells surrounding both PanIN lesions and invasive cancers. Functionally, miRNA-21-5p and -3p altered expression of the immune-modulating cytokines CXCL-10 and CCL-3 respectively. Our data indicate that miRNAs are dynamically regulated in infiltrating myeloid cells during carcinogenesis and mediate their functional phenotype by facilitating an immune-suppressive tumor-promoting micro-milieu. PMID:27471627

  8. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  9. αB-Crystallin regulates expansion of CD11b⁺Gr-1⁺ immature myeloid cells during tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Schiller, Petter; Huang, Hua; Wawrousek, Eric F; Loskog, Angelica; Wanders, Alkwin; Moons, Lieve; Dimberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin has emerged as a target for cancer therapy due to its expression in human tumors and its role in regulating tumor angiogenesis. αB-crystallin also reduces neuroinflammation, but its role in other inflammatory conditions has not been investigated. Here, we examined whether αB-crystallin regulates inflammation associated with tumors and ischemia. We found that CD45(+) leukocyte infiltration is 3-fold increased in tumors and ischemic myocardium in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. Notably, αB-crystallin is prominently expressed in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) immature myeloid cells (IMCs), known as regulators of angiogenesis and immune responses, while lymphocytes and mature granulocytes show low αB-crystallin expression. αB-Crystallin deficiency results in a 3-fold higher accumulation of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in tumors and a significant rise in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in spleen and bone marrow. Similarly, we noted a 2-fold increase in CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in chronically inflamed livers in αB-crystallin-deficient mice. The effect of αB-crystallin on IMC accumulation is limited to pathological conditions, as CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs are not elevated in naive mice. Through ex vivo differentiation of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells, we provide evidence that αB-crystallin regulates systemic expansion of IMCs through a cell-intrinsic mechanism. Our study suggests a key role of αB-crystallin in limiting expansion of CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) IMCs in diverse pathological conditions.

  10. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  11. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  12. Myeloid derived suppressor cells and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi; Zeher, Margit

    2016-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with immunoregulatory function. When activated and expanded, these cells can suppress T cell functions via cell-to cell interactions as well as soluble mediators. Recent studies investigated the involvement of MDSC in autoimmune diseases. Some papers have described beneficial effect of MDSC during the course of autoimmune diseases, and suggest a potential role as a treatment option, while others failed to detect these effects. Their contributions to autoimmune diseases are not fully understood, and many questions and some controversies remain as to the expansion, activation, and inhibitory functions of MDSC. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of MDSC in autoimmune disorders. PMID:27240453

  13. Co-administration of the mTORC1/TORC2 inhibitor INK128 and the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist ABT-737 kills human myeloid leukemia cells through Mcl-1 down-regulation and AKT inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Mohamed; Aust, Mandy Mayo; Hawkins, Elisa; Parker, Rebecca E.; Ross, Masey; Kmieciak, Maciej; Reshko, Leonid Borisovich; Rizzo, Kathryn A.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Grant, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Effects of concurrent inhibition of mTORC1/2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL in human acute myeloid leukemia cells were examined. Tetracycline-inducible Bcl-2/Bcl-xL dual knockdown markedly sensitized acute myeloid leukemia cells to the dual TORC1/2 inhibitor INK128 in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, INK128 co-administered with the Bcl-2/xL antagonist ABT-737 sharply induced cell death in multiple acute myeloid leukemia cell lines, including TKI-resistant FLT3-ITD mutants and primary acute myeloid leukemia blasts carrying various genetic aberrations e.g., FLT3, IDH2, NPM1, and Kras, while exerting minimal toxicity toward normal hematopoietic CD34+ cells. Combined treatment was particularly active against CD34+/CD38−/CD123+ primitive leukemic progenitor cells. The INK128/ABT-737 regimen was also effective in the presence of a protective stromal microenvironment. Notably, INK128 was more potent than the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin in down-regulating Mcl-1, diminishing AKT and 4EBP1 phosphorylation, and potentiating ABT-737 activity. Mcl-1 ectopic expression dramatically attenuated INK128/ABT-737 lethality, indicating an important functional role for Mcl-1 down-regulation in INK128/ABT-737 actions. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that combined treatment markedly diminished Bax, Bak, and Bim binding to all major anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members (Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1), while Bax/Bak knockdown reduced cell death. Finally, INK128/ABT-737 co-administration sharply attenuated leukemia growth and significantly prolonged survival in a systemic acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model. Analysis of subcutaneous acute myeloid leukemia-derived tumors revealed significant decrease in 4EBP1 phosphorylation and Mcl-1 protein level, consistent with results obtained in vitro. These findings demonstrate that co-administration of dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and BH3-mimetics exhibits potent anti-leukemic activity in vitro and in vivo, arguing that this strategy warrants attention in acute myeloid

  14. Myeloid Cells' Evasion of Melanoma Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    An immune-suppressive role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in melanoma has long been speculated, whereas molecular mechanisms underlying this role are not well understood. Here, Chung and colleagues show that dendritic cell-associated, heparan sulfate proteoglycans-dependent integrin ligand (DC-HIL), a cell surface immune-modulatory molecule, is highly expressed on tumor-associated MDSCs. Genetic ablation or antibody blockade of DC-HIL delays the growth of transplantable B16 melanoma in syngeneic mice, which is accompanied by enhanced antitumor T-cell activities. These findings support a role for DC-HIL in immune evasion within the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:25318429

  15. Finasteride Enhances the Generation of Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Up-Regulating the COX2/PGE2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufeng; Lin, Yingtong; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ting; Fu, Yongshui

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been known to be a key factor in the regulation of the immune system under numerous conditions such as tumors, infections, autoimmune diseases, and transplantations. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSCs in tumors and infections, MDSCs with their suppressive function are now proved to have the beneficial potential of suppressing the autoimmune response and promoting tolerance to transplantation. Therefore, the expansion of MDSCs could be a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases. In this study, we aimed to identify FDA-approved drugs that could aid in the expansion of functional MDSCs. We performed a high-throughput screening (HTS) of FDA-approved drugs based on the in vitro human MDSC-differentiation system and identified finasteride (FIN) to have the best potency to aid the generation of human MDSCs. The FIN-induced MDSCs were quite similar to monocytic MDSCs with regard to their surface phenotype, morphology, immunosuppressive function, and related gene expression. Next, we aimed to determine the mechanism of action of FIN and found that FIN induced the expansion of MDSCs through up-regulation of the COX2/PGE2 pathway by enhancing the activity of COX2 promoter. In addition, the administration of indomethacin (IND), a COX2 inhibitor, abrogated the effect of FIN. Based on these results, we suggested that FIN could find applications in the future in the expansion of MDSCs. Further development of FIN-like compounds could be a novel strategy for generating functional MDSCs for immunosuppressive therapies in various immune disorder conditions. PMID:27253400

  16. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Joseph; Wesolowski, Robert; Papenfuss, Tracey; Brooks, Taylor R.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a population of immature myeloid cells defined by their suppressive actions on immune cells such as T cells, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. MDSCs typically are positive for the markers CD33 and CD11b but express low levels of HLADR in humans. In mice, MDSCs are typically positive for both CD11b and Gr1. These cells exert their suppressive activity on the immune system via the production of reactive oxygen species, arginase, and cytokines. These factors subsequently inhibit the activity of multiple protein targets such as the T cell receptor, STAT1, and indoleamine-pyrrole 2,3-dioxygenase. The numbers of MDSCs tend to increase with cancer burden while inhibiting MDSCs improves disease outcome in murine models. MDSCs also inhibit immune cancer therapeutics. In light of the poor prognosis of metastatic breast cancer in women and the correlation of increasing levels of MDSCs with increasing disease burden, the purposes of this review are to 1) discuss why MDSCs may be important in breast cancer, 2) describe model systems used to study MDSCs in vitro and in vivo, 3) discuss mechanisms involved in MDSC induction/function in breast cancer, and 4) present pre-clinical and clinical studies that explore modulation of the MDSC-immune system interaction in breast cancer. MDSCs inhibit the host immune response in breast cancer patients and diminishing MDSC actions may improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23828498

  17. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. PTEN's regulation of VEGF and VEGFR1 expression and its clinical significance in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhiyong, Cheng; Wentong, Liang; Xiaoyang, Yang; Ling, Pan

    2012-06-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene. PTEN protein plays an important role in regulating proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and migration of many cancer cells. PTEN also modulates angiogenesis mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) via down-regulating PI3K/Akt pathway in many solid tumors. However, the effects of PTEN on VEGF and VEGFR1 (FLT1)-mediated angiogenesis, migration, invasion of leukemia cells, and its clinical significance are still unknown in myeloid leukemia. Therefore, we investigated the effect of PTEN on PI3K/Akt and VEGF/FLT1 pathways by transfecting wild-type PTEN gene to induce high expression of wild-type PTEN gene and protein in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 cells. We also observed the correlation between the expression levels of PTEN and VEGF/FLT1 and its clinical significance in myeloid leukemia patients. We found that the expression reconstitution of wild-type PTEN had significant effect on inhibiting proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities of K562 cells via down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation and inhibition of VEGF/FLT1 expression. In myeloid leukemia patients, a negative correlation was found between the expression level of PTEN mRNA and that of VEGF and FLT1 mRNA. Down-regulation of PTEN expression accompanied by up-regulation of VEGF and FLT1 mRNA indicated a higher tendency of extramedullary disease in acute myeloid leukemia patients. In conclusion, PTEN could modulate the function of VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathway down-regulation of Akt phosphorylation and that PTEN would be a candidate target to be addressed for inhibiting angiogenesis along with the treatment of myeloid leukemia.

  19. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian; Yang, Yadong; Wang, Hai; Li, Jie; Wang, Shaobin; Li, Yanming; Yang, Yaran; Cai, Kan; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yan, Jiangwei; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias. PMID:24755403

  20. The Transcription Factor Wilms Tumor 1 Confers Resistance in Myeloid Leukemia Cells against the Proapoptotic Therapeutic Agent TRAIL (Tumor Necrosis Factor α-related Apoptosis-inducing Ligand) by Regulating the Antiapoptotic Protein Bcl-xL*

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Hima; Seifert, Theresea; Bachier, Carlos; Rao, Manjeet; Tomlinson, Gail; Iyer, Swaminathan Padmanabhan; Bansal, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is considered a promising cancer therapeutic agent due to its ability to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, while sparing normal cells. However, many human tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are partially or completely resistant to monotherapy with TRAIL, limiting its therapeutic utility. Therefore, identification of factors that contribute to TRAIL resistance may facilitate future development of more effective TRAIL-based cancer therapies. Here, we report a previously unknown role for WT1 in mediating TRAIL resistance in leukemia. Knockdown of WT1 with shRNA rendered TRAIL-resistant myeloid leukemia cells sensitive to TRAIL-induced cell death, and re-expression of shRNA-resistant WT1 restored TRAIL resistance. Notably, TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in WT1-silenced cells was largely due to down-regulation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. Moreover, WT1 expression strongly correlated with overexpression of Bcl-xL in AML cell lines and blasts from AML patients. Furthermore, we found that WT1 transactivates Bcl-xL by directly binding to its promoter. We previously showed that WT1 is a novel client protein of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Consistent with this, pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 resulted in reduced WT1 and Bcl-xL expression leading to increased sensitivity of leukemia cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest that WT1-dependent Bcl-xL overexpression contributes to TRAIL resistance in myeloid leukemias. PMID:22898820

  1. Early endothelial progenitor cells as a source of myeloid cells to improve the pre-vascularisation of bone constructs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Kramer, G; Schröder, A; Kirkpatrick, C J; Seekamp, A; Schmidt, H; Fuchs, S

    2014-01-25

    According to present knowledge, blood derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) might act as proangiogenic myeloid cells, which play a fundamental role in the regulation of angiogenesis and blood vessel reorganisation. In this context, we have evaluated the contribution of endogenous myeloid cells in co-cultures of blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (OEC) and osteogenic cells. In addition, we investigated the role of EPC as a potential source of myeloid cells in the formation of vascular structures in an in vitro model consisting of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and OEC. For this purpose, we added EPCs to co-cultures of MSC and OECs. Vascular structures and the co-localisation of myeloid cells were analysed by confocal laser microscopy (CLSM) for endothelial and myeloid markers and quantitative image analysis. The molecular effects of myeloid cells were evaluated by quantitative real time PCR, ELISA and protein arrays from cell culture supernatants and lysates. Endogenous myeloid cells were significantly co-localised with angiogenic structures in co-cultures of OEC and osteogenic cells. The active addition of EPC to co-cultures of OEC and MSC resulted in a statistically approved increase in the formation of prevascular structures at early stages of the co-culture process. In addition, we observed an increase of endothelial markers, indicating beneficial effects of EPC or myeloid cells on endothelial cell growth. Furthermore, real time PCR indicated high expression levels of CD68, CD11b and CD163 in co-cultures of EPC and MSC indicating that EPC act at least partly as macrophage like-cells.

  2. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  3. Loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells prolongs survival in a syngeneic model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Braden C.; Marks, Margaret P.; Rowse, Amber L.; Fehling, Samuel C.; Gerigk, Magda; Qin, Hongwei; Benveniste, Etty N.

    2016-01-01

    In glioma, microglia and macrophages are the largest population of tumor-infiltrating cells, referred to as glioma associated macrophages (GAMs). Herein, we sought to determine the role of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 (SOCS3), a negative regulator of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), in GAM functionality in glioma. We utilized a conditional model in which SOCS3 deletion is restricted to the myeloid cell population. We found that SOCS3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages display enhanced and prolonged expression of pro-inflammatory M1 cytokines when exposed to glioma tumor cell conditioned medium in vitro. Moreover, we found that deletion of SOCS3 in the myeloid cell population delays intracranial tumor growth and increases survival of mice bearing orthotopic glioma tumors in vivo. Although intracranial tumors from mice with SOCS3-deficient myeloid cells appear histologically similar to control mice, we observed that loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in decreased M2 polarized macrophage infiltration in the tumors. Furthermore, loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in increased CD8+ T-cell and decreased regulatory T-cell infiltration in the tumors. These findings demonstrate a beneficial effect of M1 polarized macrophages on suppressing glioma tumor growth, and highlight the importance of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26967393

  4. Epigenetic regulation of cathepsin L expression in chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Samaiya, Misti; Bakhshi, Sameer; Shukla, Abhay A; Kumar, Lalit; Chauhan, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    The expression and significance of cathepsin L (CTSL) has been extensively studied in solid tumours. However no such information in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) was available. We investigated the activity and expression of this protease in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 47 adult CML patients. Thirty adults suffering from systemic diseases and 50 healthy volunteers served as controls. The mRNA levels of CTSL, its specific endogenous inhibitor cystatin C and transcriptional up-regulator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantitated by real-time qPCR. CTSL protease activity and its mRNA expression were significantly higher in CML chronic phase (CP) patients compared to CML accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) patients and controls (P≤ 0.001). VEGF whose expression was most pronounced in CP and declined (P≤ 0.001) in the advanced phases of the malignancy exhibited a strong positive correlation with CTSL expression (r= 0.97; P≤ 0.001). Cystatin C expression was significantly lower (P≤ 0.001) in CML and displayed inverse correlation with CTSL (r=−0.713; P≤ 0.001) activity. CTSL promoter was significantly hypomethylated in CML CP compared to CML AP/BC patients as well as controls. K562, a BC CML cell line displayed CTSL activity, expression and methylation status of CTSL promoter that was comparable to CML AP/BC patients. Treatment of these cells or PBMCs isolated from CML AP/BC patients with 5′-aza-cytidine resulted in a dramatic increase in CSTL activity and/or expression thereby demonstrating the role of promoter methylation in the stage specific expression of CTSL in CML. Differential expression of CTSL in CML at various stages of malignancy may prove useful in identification of the high-risk patients thereby facilitating better management of disease. PMID:21496199

  5. IFN-γ regulates survival and function of tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1high myeloid derived suppressor cells by modulating the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl2a1

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Haile, Lydia A.; Zhao, Fei; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Ma, Chi; Métais, Jean-Yves; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Kapoor, Veena; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a critical role in suppression of immune responses in cancer and inflammation. Here, we describe how regulation of Bcl2a1 by cytokines controls the suppressor function of CD11b+Gr-1high granulocytic MDSCs. Co-culture of CD11b+Gr-1high granulocytic MDSCs with antigen-stimulated T cells and simultaneous blockade of IFN-γ by the use of anti-IFN-γ blocking antibody, IFN-γ−/− effector T cells, IFN-γR−/− MDSCs or STAT1−/− MDSCs led to up-regulation of Bcl2a1 in CD11b+Gr-1high cells, improved survival and enhanced their suppressor function. Molecular studies revealed that GM-CSF released by antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells induced Bcl2a1 up-regulation, which was repressed in the presence of IFN-γ by a direct interaction of phosphorylated STAT-1 with the Bcl2a1 promotor. Bcl2a1 overexpressing granulocytic MDSCs demonstrated prolonged survival and enhanced suppressor function in vitro. Our data suggest that IFN-γ/ STAT1-dependent regulation of Bcl2a1 regulates survival and thereby suppressor function of granulocytic MDSCs. PMID:24810636

  6. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26403437

  7. C3G forms complexes with Bcr-Abl and p38α MAPK at the focal adhesions in chronic myeloid leukemia cells: implication in the regulation of leukemic cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies by our group and others have shown that C3G interacts with Bcr-Abl through its SH3-b domain. Results In this work we show that C3G and Bcr-Abl form complexes with the focal adhesion (FA) proteins CrkL, p130Cas, Cbl and Abi1 through SH3/SH3-b interactions. The association between C3G and Bcr-Abl decreased upon Abi1 or p130Cas knock-down in K562 cells, which suggests that Abi1 and p130Cas are essential partners in this interaction. On the other hand, C3G, Abi1 or Cbl knock-down impaired adhesion to fibronectin, while p130Cas silencing enhanced it. C3G, Cbl and p130Cas-SH3-b domains interact directly with common proteins involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that C3G form complexes with the FA proteins paxillin and FAK and their phosphorylated forms. Additionally, C3G, Abi1, Cbl and p130Cas regulate the expression and phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK. p38α MAPK also participates in the regulation of adhesion in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. It interacts with C3G, CrkL, FAK and paxillin and regulates the expression of paxillin, CrkL and α5 integrin, as well as paxillin phosphorylation. Moreover, double knock-down of C3G/p38α decreased adhesion to fibronectin, similarly to the single silencing of one of these genes, either C3G or p38α. These suggest that C3G and p38α MAPK are acting through a common pathway to regulate cell adhesion in K562 cells, as previously described for the regulation of apoptosis. Conclusions Our results indicate that C3G-p38αMAPK pathway regulates K562 cell adhesion through the interaction with FA proteins and Bcr-Abl, modulating the formation of different protein complexes at FA. PMID:23343344

  8. VSTM-v1, a potential myeloid differentiation antigen that is downregulated in bone marrow cells from myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Li, Ting; Li, Ning; Li, Jinlan; Yao, Qiumei; Han, Wenling; Ruan, Guorui

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte differentiation antigens often represent important markers for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis, and therapeutic targeting of myeloid leukemia. Herein, we report a potential leukocyte differentiation antigen gene VSTM1 (V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1) that was downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients and exhibited a higher degree of promoter methylation. The expression level of its predominant encoded product, VSTM1-v1, was positively correlated with myeloid cell maturation state. Restoration of VSTM1-v1 expression inhibited myeloid leukemia cells' growth. Therefore, VSTM1-v1 might represent an important myeloid leukocyte differentiation antigen and provide a potential target for the diagnosis and treatment of leukemia.

  9. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George; Huntly, Brian J P

    2015-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20-30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients.

  10. Expression of the potential therapeutic target CXXC5 in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells - high expression is associated with adverse prognosis as well as altered intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øystein; Reikvam, Håkon; Fredly, Hanne; Skavland, Jørn; Hagen, Karen-Marie; van Hoang, Tuyen Thy; Brenner, Annette K.; Kadi, Amir; Astori, Audrey; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Pendino, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The CXXC5 gene encodes a transcriptional activator with a zinc-finger domain, and high expression in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells is associated with adverse prognosis. We now characterized the biological context of CXXC5 expression in primary human AML cells. The global gene expression profile of AML cells derived from 48 consecutive patients was analyzed; cells with high and low CXXC5 expression then showed major differences with regard to extracellular communication and intracellular signaling. We observed significant differences in the phosphorylation status of several intracellular signaling mediators (CREB, PDK1, SRC, STAT1, p38, STAT3, rpS6) that are important for PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling and/or transcriptional regulation. High CXXC5 expression was also associated with high mRNA expression of several stem cell-associated transcriptional regulators, the strongest associations being with WT1, GATA2, RUNX1, LYL1, DNMT3, SPI1, and MYB. Finally, CXXC5 knockdown in human AML cell lines caused significantly increased expression of the potential tumor suppressor gene TSC22 and genes encoding the growth factor receptor KIT, the cytokine Angiopoietin 1 and the selenium-containing glycoprotein Selenoprotein P. Thus, high CXXC5 expression seems to affect several steps in human leukemogenesis, including intracellular events as well as extracellular communication. PMID:25605239

  11. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  12. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  13. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  14. Peruvoside, a Cardiac Glycoside, Induces Primitive Myeloid Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Leong, Wa Seng; Liu, Liang; Chan, Wai-In

    2016-01-01

    Despite the available chemotherapy and treatment, leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure due to frequent relapses after treatment. Among the heterogeneous leukemic cells, a rare population referred as the leukemic stem cell (LSC), is thought to be responsible for relapses and drug resistance. Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have been used in treating heart failure despite its toxicity. Recently, increasing evidence has demonstrated its new usage as a potential anti-cancer drug. Ouabain, one of the CGs, specifically targeted CD34⁺CD38(-) leukemic stem-like cells, but not the more mature CD34⁺CD38⁺ leukemic cells, making this type of compounds a potential treatment for leukemia. In search of other potential anti-leukemia CGs, we found that Peruvoside, a less studied CG, is more effective than Ouabain and Digitoxin at inducing cell death in primitive myeloid leukemia cells without obvious cytotoxicity on normal blood cells. Similar to Ouabain and Digitoxin, Peruvoside also caused cell cycle arrest at G₂/M stage. It up-regulates CDKN1A expression and activated the cleavage of Caspase 3, 8 and PARP, resulting in apoptosis. Thus, Peruvoside showed potent anti-leukemia effect, which may serve as a new anti-leukemia agent in the future. PMID:27110755

  15. The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and (iii) directed differentiation of myeloid progenitors into neutrophils, eosinophils, dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), macrophages, and osteoclasts. The generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from hPSCs requires 9 days of culture, and an additional 2 days are needed to expand myeloid progenitors. Differentiation of myeloid progenitors into mature myeloid cells requires an additional 5–19 days of culture with cytokines, depending on the cell type. PMID:21372811

  16. Reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of JNK and down-regulation of DAXX are critically involved in penta-O-galloyl-beta-d-glucose-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Sohn, Eun Jung; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lu, Junxaun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-08-01

    Although 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-d-glucose (PGG) was well known to have antitumor activities in breast, prostate, kidney, liver cancers and HL-60 leukemia via regulation of caspase 3, p53, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) and insulin receptor signaling, the underlying mechanism of PGG-induced apoptosis linked with reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and DAXX was never elucidated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells until now. Herein PGG significantly decreased the viability of CML cell lines such as K562 and KBM-5 without hurting normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). PGG increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the sub-G1 cell population as well as activated caspase cascades including caspase-8, -9 and -3 in K562 cells. Interestingly, a significant activation of JNK by PGG was observed by MULTIPLEX assay and Western blotting. Conversely, JNK inhibitor D-JNKi suppressed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by PGG in K562 cells. Also, PGG dramatically enhanced generation of ROS and reduced the expression of death-domain-associated protein (DAXX). Of note, ROS inhibitor acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed JNK-dependent apoptosis and DAXX inhibition induced by PGG. Overall, these findings suggest that ROS-dependent JNK activation and DAXX downregulation are critically involved in PGG-induced apoptosis in K562 cells.

  17. Myeloid Cell-Restricted Insulin/IGF-1 Receptor Deficiency Protects against Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Knuever, Jana; Willenborg, Sebastian; Ding, Xiaolei; Akyüz, Mehmet D; Partridge, Linda; Niessen, Carien M; Brüning, Jens C; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-12-01

    Myeloid cells are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and disease. Alterations in cell-autonomous insulin/IGF-1 signaling in myeloid cells have recently been implicated in the development of systemic inflammation and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Impaired wound healing and inflammatory skin diseases are frequent DM-associated skin pathologies, yet the underlying mechanisms are elusive. In this study, we investigated whether myeloid cell-restricted IR/IGF-1R signaling provides a pathophysiologic link between systemic insulin resistance and the development of cutaneous inflammation. Therefore, we generated mice lacking both the insulin and IGF-1 receptor in myeloid cells (IR/IGF-1R(MKO)). Whereas the kinetics of wound closure following acute skin injury was similar in control and IR/IGF-1R(MKO) mice, in two different conditions of dermatitis either induced by repetitive topical applications of the detergent SDS or by high-dose UV B radiation, IR/IGF-1R(MKO) mice were protected from inflammation, whereas controls developed severe skin dermatitis. Notably, whereas during the early phase in both inflammatory conditions the induction of epidermal proinflammatory cytokine expression was similar in control and IR/IGF-1R(MKO) mice, during the late stage, epidermal cytokine expression was sustained in controls but virtually abrogated in IR/IGF-1R(MKO) mice. This distinct kinetic of epidermal cytokine expression was paralleled by proinflammatory macrophage activation in controls and a noninflammatory phenotype in mutants. Collectively, our findings provide evidence for a proinflammatory IR/IGF-1R-dependent pathway in myeloid cells that plays a critical role in the dynamics of an epidermal-dermal cross-talk in cutaneous inflammatory responses, and may add to the mechanistic understanding of diseases associated with disturbances in myeloid cell IR/IGF-1R signaling, including DM. PMID:26519530

  18. Myeloid cell-restricted Insulin/IGF-1 receptor deficiency protects against skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaolei; Akyüz, Mehmet D.; Partridge, Linda; Niessen, Carien M.; Brüning, Jens C.; Eming, Sabine A.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and disease. Alterations in cell-autonomous Insulin/IGF-1 signaling in myeloid cells have recently been implicated in the development of systemic inflammation and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Impaired wound healing and inflammatory skin diseases are frequent DM-associated skin pathologies, yet the underlying mechanisms are elusive. Here we investigated whether myeloid cell-restricted IR/IGF-1R signalling provides a pathophysiological link between systemic insulin resistance and the development of cutaneous inflammation. Therefore, we generated mice lacking both the Insulin and IGF-1 receptor in myeloid cells (IR/IGF-1RMKO). Whereas the kinetics of wound closure following acute skin injury was similar in control and IR/IGF-1RMKO mice, in two different conditions of dermatitis either induced by repetitive topical applications of the detergent SDS or by high-dose UVB radiation, IR/IGF-1RMKO mice were protected from inflammation, whereas controls developed severe skin dermatitis. Notably, whereas during the early phase in both inflammatory conditions the induction of epidermal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was similar in control and IR/IGF-1RMKO mice, during the late stage, epidermal cytokine expression was sustained in controls, however virtually abrogated in IR/IGF-1RMKO mice. This distinct kinetic of epidermal cytokine expression was paralleled by pro-inflammatory macrophage activation in controls and a non-inflammatory phenotype in mutants. Collectively, our findings provide evidence for a pro-inflammatory IR/IGF-1R-dependent pathway in myeloid cells that plays a critical role in the dynamics of an epidermal-dermal crosstalk in cutaneous inflammatory responses, and may add to the mechanistic understanding of diseases associated with disturbances in myeloid cell IR/IGF-1R signaling including DM. PMID:26519530

  19. High-dimensional analysis of the murine myeloid cell system.

    PubMed

    Becher, Burkhard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chen, Jinmiao; Mair, Florian; Sumatoh, Hermi R; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; Low, Donovan; Ruedl, Christiane; Riccardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Poidinger, Michael; Greter, Melanie; Ginhoux, Florent; Newell, Evan W

    2014-12-01

    Advances in cell-fate mapping have revealed the complexity in phenotype, ontogeny and tissue distribution of the mammalian myeloid system. To capture this phenotypic diversity, we developed a 38-antibody panel for mass cytometry and used dimensionality reduction with machine learning-aided cluster analysis to build a composite of murine (mouse) myeloid cells in the steady state across lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In addition to identifying all previously described myeloid populations, higher-order analysis allowed objective delineation of otherwise ambiguous subsets, including monocyte-macrophage intermediates and an array of granulocyte variants. Using mice that cannot sense granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor GM-CSF (Csf2rb(-/-)), which have discrete alterations in myeloid development, we confirmed differences in barrier tissue dendritic cells, lung macrophages and eosinophils. The methodology further identified variations in the monocyte and innate lymphoid cell compartment that were unexpected, which confirmed that this approach is a powerful tool for unambiguous and unbiased characterization of the myeloid system. PMID:25306126

  20. Myeloid leukemia factor is a conserved regulator of RUNX transcription factor activity involved in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bras, Stéphanie; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Gobert, Vanessa; Augé, Benoît; Breig, Osman; Sanial, Matthieu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Haenlin, Marc; Plessis, Anne; Waltzer, Lucas

    2012-03-27

    Defining the function of the genes that, like RUNX1, are deregulated in blood cell malignancies represents an important challenge. Myeloid leukemia factors (MLFs) constitute a poorly characterized family of conserved proteins whose founding member, MLF1, has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia in humans. To gain insight into the functions of this family, we investigated the role of the Drosophila MLF homolog during blood cell development. Here we report that mlf controls the homeostasis of the Drosophila hematopoietic system. Notably, mlf participates in a positive feedback loop to fine tune the activity of the RUNX transcription factor Lozenge (LZ) during development of the crystal cells, one of the two main blood cell lineages in Drosophila. At the molecular level, our data in cell cultures and in vivo strongly suggest that MLF controls the number of crystal cells by protecting LZ from degradation. Remarkably, it appears that the human MLF1 protein can substitute for MLF in the crystal cell lineage. In addition, MLF stabilizes the human oncogenic fusion protein RUNX1-ETO and is required for RUNX1-ETO-induced blood cell disorders in a Drosophila model of leukemia. Finally, using the human leukemic blood cell line Kasumi-1, we show that MLF1 depletion impairs RUNX1-ETO accumulation and reduces RUNX1-ETO-dependent proliferation. Thus, we propose that the regulation of RUNX protein levels is a conserved feature of MLF family members that could be critical for normal and pathological blood cell development. PMID:22411814

  1. M-CSF instructs myeloid lineage fate in single haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Sarrazin, Sandrine; Kandalla, Prashanth K.; Espinosa, Leon; Stanley, E. Richard; Nutt, Stephen L.; Moore, Jordan; Sieweke, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Under stress conditions such as infection or inflammation the body rapidly needs to generate new blood cells that are adapted to the challenge. Haematopoietic cytokines are known to increase output of specific mature cells by affecting survival, expansion and differentiation of lineage-committed progenitors1,2, but it has been debated whether long-term haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are susceptible to direct lineage-specifying effects of cytokines. Although genetic changes in transcription factor balance can sensitize HSCs to cytokine instruction3, the initiation of HSC commitment is generally thought to be triggered by stochastic fluctuation in cell-intrinsic regulators such as lineage-specific transcription factors4–7, leaving cytokines to ensure survival and proliferation of the progeny cells8,9. Here we show that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called CSF1), a myeloid cytokine released during infection and inflammation, can directly induce the myeloid master regulator PU.1 and instruct myeloid cell-fate change in mouse HSCs, independently of selective survival or proliferation. Video imaging and single-cell gene expression analysis revealed that stimulation of highly purified HSCs with M-CSF in culture resulted in activation of the PU.1 promoter and an increased number of PU.1+ cells with myeloid gene signature and differentiation potential. In vivo, high systemic levels of M-CSF directly stimulated M-CSF-receptor-dependent activation of endogenous PU.1 protein in single HSCs and induced a PU.1-dependent myeloid differentiation preference. Our data demonstrate that lineage-specific cytokines can act directly on HSCs in vitro and in vivo to instruct a change of cell identity. This fundamentally changes the current view of how HSCs respond to environmental challenge and implicates stress-induced cytokines as direct instructors of HSC fate. PMID:23575636

  2. KLF6 contributes to myeloid cell plasticity in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Wendy A.; Omenetti, Sara; Date, Dipali; Di Martino, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Kim, Gun-Dong; Chowdhry, Saleem; Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Mahabeleshwar, Ganapati H.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with dysregulated macrophage responses, such that quiescent macrophages acquire a pro-inflammatory activation state and contribute to chronic intestinal inflammation. The transcriptional events governing macrophage activation and gene expression in the context of chronic inflammation such as IBD remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify Kruppel-like transcription factor-6 (KLF6) as a critical regulator of pathogenic myeloid cell activation in human and experimental IBD. We found that KLF6 was significantly upregulated in myeloid cells and intestinal tissue from IBD patients and experimental models of IBD, particularly in actively inflamed regions of the colon. Using complementary gain- and loss-of-function studies, we observed that KLF6 promotes pro-inflammatory gene expression through enhancement of NFκB signaling, while simultaneously suppressing anti-inflammatory gene expression through repression of STAT3 signaling. To study the in vivo role of myeloid KLF6, we treated myeloid-specific KLF6-knockout mice (Mac-KLF6-KO) with dextran sulfate-sodium (DSS) and found that Mac-KLF6-KO mice were protected against chemically-induced colitis; this highlights the central role of myeloid KLF6 in promoting intestinal inflammation. Collectively, our results point to a novel gene regulatory program underlying pathogenic, pro-inflammatory macrophage activation in the setting of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:26838049

  3. Radiation combined with thermal injury induces immature myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, April Elizabeth; Neely, Crystal Judith; Charles, Anthony G; Kartchner, Laurel Briane; Brickey, Willie June; Khoury, Amal Lina; Sempowski, Gregory D; Ting, Jenny P Y; Cairns, Bruce A; Maile, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The continued development of nuclear weapons and the potential for thermonuclear injury necessitates the further understanding of the immune consequences after radiation combined with injury (RCI). We hypothesized that sublethal ionization radiation exposure combined with a full-thickness thermal injury would result in the production of immature myeloid cells. Mice underwent either a full-thickness contact burn of 20% total body surface area or sham procedure followed by a single whole-body dose of 5-Gy radiation. Serum, spleen, and peripheral lymph nodes were harvested at 3 and 14 days after injury. Flow cytometry was performed to identify and characterize adaptive and innate cell compartments. Elevated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and profound leukopenia were observed after RCI. A population of cells with dual expression of the cell surface markers Gr-1 and CD11b were identified in all experimental groups, but were significantly elevated after burn alone and RCI at 14 days after injury. In contrast to the T-cell-suppressive nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells found after trauma and sepsis, myeloid cells after RCI augmented T-cell proliferation and were associated with a weak but significant increase in interferon γ and a decrease in interleukin 10. This is consistent with previous work in burn injury indicating that a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like population increases innate immunity. Radiation combined injury results in the increase in distinct populations of Gr-1CD11b cells within the secondary lymphoid organs, and we propose these immature inflammatory myeloid cells provide innate immunity to the severely injured and immunocompromised host.

  4. Identification of CD13+CD36+ cells as a common progenitor for erythroid and myeloid lineages in human bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Gao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jianqiong; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify bi-potential precursor cells of erythroid and myeloid development in human bone marrow. Materials and Methods Cells co-expressing CD13 and CD36 (CD13+CD36+) were investigated by analyzing cell surface marker expression during erythroid development (induced with a combination of cytokines plus erythropoietin [EPO]), or myeloid development (induced with the same cocktail of cytokines plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [G-CSF]) of bone marrow derived CD133 cells in liquid cultures. CD13+CD36+ subsets were also isolated on the 14th day of cultures and further evaluated for their hematopoietic clonogenic capacity in methylcellulose. Results Colony-forming analysis of sorted CD13+CD36+ cells of committed erythroid and myeloid lineages demonstrated that these cells were able to generate erythroid, granulocyte, and mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies. In contrast, CD13+CD36− or CD13−CD36+ cells exclusively committed to granulocyte/monocyte or erythroid colonies, respectively, but failed to form mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies; no colonies were detected in CD13−CD36− cells with lineage-supporting cytokines. In addition, our data confirmed that EPO induced both erythroid and myeloid commitment, while G-CSF only supported the differentiation of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions The present data identify some CD13+CD36+ cells as bi-potential precursors of erythroid and myeloid commitment in normal hematopoiesis. They provide a physiological explanation for the cell identification of myeloid and erythroid lineages observed in hematopoietic diseases. This unique fraction of CD13+CD36+ cells may be useful for further studies on regulating erythroid and myeloid differentiation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:17588473

  5. Generation of hematopoietic progenitor cell lines with myeloid and lymphoid potential

    PubMed Central

    Redecke, Vanessa; Wu, Ruiqiong; Zhou, Jingran; Finkelstein, David; Chaturvedi, Vandana; High, Anthony A.; Häcker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of immune cell differentiation and function is limited by shortcomings of suitable and scalable experimental systems. Here we show that an estrogen–regulated form of HOXB8 that is retrovirally delivered into mouse bone marrow cells can be used along with FLT3 ligand to conditionally immortalize early hematopoietic progenitor cells (Hoxb8–FL). Hoxb8–FL cells have lost self–renewal capacity and megakaryocyte/ erythroid lineage potential, but sustain myeloid and lymphoid potential. Hoxb8–FL cells differentiate in vitro and in vivo into different myeloid and lymphoid cell types, including macrophages, granulocytes, dendritic cells and B– and T–lymphocytes, which are phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from their primary counterparts. Quantitative in vitro cell lineage potential assays implicate that myeloid and B–cell potential of Hoxb8–FL cells is comparable to primary lymphoid–primed multipotent progenitors, while T–cell potential is comparatively reduced. Given the simplicity and unlimited proliferative capacity of Hoxb8–FL cells, this system provides unique opportunities to investigate cell differentiation and immune cell functions. PMID:23749299

  6. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  7. Bone marrow derived myeloid cells orchestrate antiangiogenic resistance in glioblastoma through coordinated molecular networks.

    PubMed

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Angara, Kartik; Zeng, Peng; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2015-12-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular and malignant form of brain tumors. Anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in clinical and preclinical studies, which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) to the tumor microenvironment (TME). In vivo animal models to track BMDCs and investigate molecular mechanisms in AAT resistance are rare. We exploited recently established chimeric mouse to develop orthotopic U251 tumor, which uses as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice and engrafted >70% GFP+ cells within 14 days. Our unpublished data and published studies have indicated the involvement of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in therapeutic resistance in glioma. Similarly, in the present study, vatalanib significantly increased CD68+ myeloid cells, and CD133+, CD34+ and Tie2+ endothelial cell signatures. Therefore, we tested inhibition of CSF1R+ myeloid cells using GW2580 that reduced tumor growth by decreasing myeloid (Gr1+ CD11b+ and F4/80+) and angiogenic (CD202b+ and VEGFR2+) cell signatures in TME. CSF1R blockade significantly decreased inflammatory, proangiogenic and immunosuppressive molecular signatures compared to vehicle, vatalanib or combination. TCK1 or CXCL7, a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophils, was observed as most significantly decreased cytokine in CSF1R blockade. ERK MAPK pathway was involved in cytokine network regulation. In conclusion, present study confirmed the contribution of myeloid cells in GBM development and therapeutic resistance using chimeric mouse model. We identified novel molecular networks including CXCL7 chemokine as a promising target for future studies. Nonetheless, survival studies are required to assess the beneficial effect of CSF1R blockade. PMID:26404753

  8. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  9. Myeloid cells as target of fingolimod action in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Dario, Marco; Colombo, Emanuela; Govi, Chiara; De Feo, Donatella; Messina, Maria José; Romeo, Marzia; Sangalli, Francesca; Moiola, Lucia; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Martino, Gianvito; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To track the effects of fingolimod, an approved drug for multiple sclerosis (MS), on the activation of myeloid cells from the periphery to the CNS. Methods: In vitro and ex vivo immunologic studies coupled with flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the action of fingolimod on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced expression of activation markers in human monocytes from healthy participants, participants with untreated MS, and participants with fingolimod-treated MS. In vivo administration of fingolimod during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was established to verify the activation state of splenic, CNS infiltrating, and CNS resident myeloid cells ex vivo at flow cytometer. Results: We found that in vitro exposure of human monocytes to fingolimod inhibited LPS-induced CD25 and CD150 expression and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) secretion without altering immune cell survival. Further, EAE treatment with fingolimod led to reduced amounts of TNF-α produced by myeloid cells in vivo in the spleen and CNS. Finally, while displaying normal induction of CD25 and CD150 levels at high LPS concentration, monocytes from patients with fingolimod-treated MS showed significantly higher activation threshold at suboptimal LPS stimulation than controls. Conclusions: The inhibition of myeloid cell activation may be part of the immunosuppressive action of fingolimod and take place in the periphery and in the CNS. PMID:26587553

  10. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias

  11. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  12. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  13. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  14. Radiation Combined with Thermal Injury Induces Immature Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, April Elizabeth; Neely, Crystal Judith; Charles, Anthony G.; Kartchner, Laurel Briane; Brickey, Willie June; Khoury, Amal Lina; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Ting, Jenny P.Y.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Maile, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The continued development of nuclear weapons and the potential for thermonuclear injury necessitates the further understanding of the immune consequences after radiation combined with injury (RCI). We hypothesized that sub-lethal ionization radiation exposure combined with a full thickness thermal injury would result in the production of immature myeloid cells. Mice underwent either a 20% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness contact burn or sham procedure followed by a single whole body dose of 5-Gy radiation. Serum, spleen and peripheral lymph nodes were harvested at 3 and 14 days post-injury. Flow cytometry was performed to identify and characterize adaptive and innate cell compartments. Elevated pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and profound leukopenia were observed after RCI. A population of cells with dual expression of the cell surface markers Gr-1 and CD11b were identified in all experimental groups, but was significantly elevated after burn alone and RCI at 14 days post-injury. In contrast to the T-cell suppressive nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) found after trauma and sepsis, myeloid cells after RCI augmented T-cell proliferation and were associated with a weak but significant increase in IFN-γ and a decrease in IL-10. This is consistent with previous work in burn injury indicating that a MDSC-like population increases innate immunity. RCI results in the increase of distinct populations of Gr-1+ CD11b+cells within the secondary lymphoid organs, and we propose these immature inflammatory myeloid cells provide innate immunity to the severely injured and immunocompromised host. PMID:23042190

  15. Complexity and Challenges in Defining Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. © 2014 The Authors Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25504825

  16. Complexity and challenges in defining myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models.

  17. Complexity and challenges in defining myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2014-11-26

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Tetraspanin CD82 Regulates the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of PKCα in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Termini, Christina M.; Lidke, Keith A.; Gillette, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have increased myeloid cells within their bone marrow that exhibit aberrant signaling. Therefore, therapeutic targets that modulate disrupted signaling cascades are of significant interest. In this study, we demonstrate that the tetraspanin membrane scaffold, CD82, regulates protein kinase c alpha (PKCα)-mediated signaling critical for AML progression. Utilizing a palmitoylation mutant form of CD82 with disrupted membrane organization, we find that the CD82 scaffold controls PKCα expression and activation. Combining single molecule and ensemble imaging measurements, we determine that CD82 stabilizes PKCα activation at the membrane and regulates the size of PKCα membrane clusters. Further evaluation of downstream effector signaling identified robust and sustained activation of ERK1/2 upon CD82 overexpression that results in enhanced AML colony formation. Together, these data propose a mechanism where CD82 membrane organization regulates sustained PKCα signaling that results in an aggressive leukemia phenotype. These observations suggest that the CD82 scaffold may be a potential therapeutic target for attenuating aberrant signal transduction in AML. PMID:27417454

  19. Blocking Notch signal in myeloid cells alleviates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by repressing the activation of NF-κB through CYLD

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Heng-Chao; Bai, Lu; Yang, Zhao-Xu; Qin, Hong-Yan; Tao, Kai-Shan; Han, Hua; Dou, Ke-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a major reason of hepatocyte injury during liver surgery and transplantation. Myeloid cells including macrophages and neutrophils play important roles in sustained tissue inflammation and damage, but the mechanisms regulating myeloid cells activity have been elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in myeloid cells during hepatic I/R injury by using a mouse model of myeloid specific conditional knockout of RBP-J. Myeloid-specific RBP-J deletion alleviated hepatic I/R injury. RBP-J deletion in myeloid cells decreased hepatocytes apoptosis after hepatic I/R injury. Furthermore, myeloid-specific RBP-J deletion led to attenuated inflammation response in liver after I/R injury. Consistently, Notch blockade reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines by macrophages in vitro. We also found that blocking Notch signaling reduced NF-κB activation and increased cylindromatosis (CYLD) expression and knockdown of CYLD rescued reduction of inflammatory cytokines induced by Notch blockade in macrophages during I/R injury in vitro. On the other hand, activation of Notch signaling in macrophages led to increased inflammatory cytokine production and NF-κB activation and decreased CYLD expression in vitro. These data suggest that activation of Notch signaling in myeloid cells aggravates I/R injury, by enhancing the inflammation response by NF-κB through down regulation of CYLD. PMID:27680285

  20. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+) T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  1. MYC oncogene in myeloid neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M Dolores; Albajar, Marta; Gomez-Casares, M Teresa; Batlle, Ana; León, Javier

    2013-02-01

    MYC is a transcription factor that regulates many critical genes for cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomass accumulation. MYC is one of the most prevalent oncogenes found to be altered in human cancer, being deregulated in about 50 % of tumors. Although MYC deregulation has been more frequently associated to lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia than to myeloid malignancies, a body of evidence has been gathered showing that MYC plays a relevant role in malignancies derived from the myeloid compartment. The myeloid leukemogenic activity of MYC has been demonstrated in different murine models. Not surprisingly, MYC has been found to be amplified or/and deregulated in the three major types of myeloid neoplasms: acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we review the recent literature describing the involvement of MYC in myeloid tumors.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  3. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  4. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Borodovsky, Anna; Wong, Jamie; Klebanov, Boris; Zafari, Mohammad; Yucius, Kristina; Querbes, William; Ge, Pei; Ruda, Vera M; Milstein, Stuart; Speciner, Lauren; Duncan, Rick; Barros, Scott; Basha, Genc; Cullis, Pieter; Akinc, Akin; Donahoe, Jessica S; Narayanannair Jayaprakash, K; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bogorad, Roman L; Love, Kevin; Whitehead, Katie; Levins, Chris; Manoharan, Muthiah; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP) for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs) and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells. PMID:23344621

  5. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. MYC and PIM2 co-expression in mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent myeloid cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Chung, Hee Yong

    2012-08-01

    The hematopoietic cell malignancy is one of the most prevalent type of cancer and the disease has multiple pathologic molecular signatures. Research on the origin of hematopoietic cancer stem cells and the mode of subsequent maintenance and differentiation needs robust animal models that can reproduce the transformation and differentiation event in vivo. Here, we show that co-transduction of MYC and PIM2 proto-oncogenes into mouse bone marrow cells readily establishes permanent cell lines that can induce lethal myeloid sarcoma in vivo. Unlike the previous doubly transgenic mouse model in which coexpression of MYC and PIM2 transgenes exclusively induced B cell lymphoma, we were able to show that the same combination of genes can also transform primary bone marrow myeloid cells in vitro resulting in permanent cell lines which induce myeloid sarcoma upon in vivo transplantation. By inducing cancerous transformation of fresh bone marrow cells in a controlled environment, the model we established will be useful for detailed study of the molecular events involved in initial transformation process of primary myeloid bone marrow cells and provides a model that can give insight to the molecular pathologic characteristics of human myeloid sarcoma, a rare presentation of solid tumors of undifferentiated myeloid blast cells associated with various types of myeloid leukemia. PMID:22843119

  7. Cell viability of acute myeloid leukaemia blasts in culture correlates with treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Maha, Abdullah; Cheong, Soon-Keng; Leong, Chooi-Fun; Seow, Heng-Fong

    2008-02-01

    Despite the advances in understanding the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the cure rate for acute myeloid leukaemia patients remains low. Cytogenetic abnormalities and age are the prognostic factors that guide treatment decisions. However, many AML patients still die. The biological factors that influence treatment outcome are largely unknown. Thus, the objective of our study was to use the in vitro viability test to correlate with treatment outcome. Acute myeloid leukaemia blasts demonstrated differing ability to survive in culture. Our examination of blast phenotype at various days in culture showed two possible growth directions. First, cells underwent maturation by increased expression of CD16 and down-regulated CD34 (a haemopoietic stem cell marker). These cells also appeared to have undergone apoptosis. Alternatively, cells continued to survive in culture and maintained high expression of CD34. An MTT assay was carried out to determine viability after three days of culture. Lower optical density values were obtained for samples that underwent apoptosis and higher values were obtained for samples that survived in culture. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. A comparison between results of MTT assay and duration of disease free survival revealed that a higher viability in vitro correlated significantly with shorter survival duration in the patient (R -0.761, p=0.002, n=13). Thus, this study further supports the hypothesis that AML patients with poor survival may be related to having blasts with a biologically more immature or stem cell-like nature.

  8. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  9. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  10. Myeloid Cell Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Modulates Cytokine Production but Not Atherogenesis in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vallerie, Sara N.; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Kanter, Jenny E.; Breyer, Richard M.; Andreasson, Katrin I.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cardiovascular complications induced by atherosclerosis. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is often raised in states of inflammation, including diabetes, and regulates inflammatory processes. In myeloid cells, a key cell type in atherosclerosis, PGE2 acts predominately through its Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 (EP4; Ptger4) to modulate inflammation. The effect of PGE2-mediated EP4 signaling specifically in myeloid cells on atherosclerosis in the presence and absence of diabetes is unknown. Because diabetes promotes atherosclerosis through increased arterial myeloid cell accumulation, we generated a myeloid cell-targeted EP4-deficient mouse model (EP4M-/-) of T1DM-accelerated atherogenesis to investigate the relationship between myeloid cell EP4, inflammatory phenotypes of myeloid cells, and atherogenesis. Diabetic mice exhibited elevated plasma PGE metabolite levels and elevated Ptger4 mRNA in macrophages, as compared with non-diabetic littermates. PGE2 increased Il6, Il1b, Il23 and Ccr7 mRNA while reducing Tnfa mRNA through EP4 in isolated myeloid cells. Consistently, the stimulatory effect of diabetes on peritoneal macrophage Il6 was mediated by PGE2-EP4, while PGE2-EP4 suppressed the effect of diabetes on Tnfa in these cells. In addition, diabetes exerted effects independent of myeloid cell EP4, including a reduction in macrophage Ccr7 levels and increased early atherogenesis characterized by relative lesional macrophage accumulation. These studies suggest that this mouse model of T1DM is associated with increased myeloid cell PGE2-EP4 signaling, which is required for the stimulatory effect of diabetes on IL-6, markedly blunts the effect of diabetes on TNF-α and does not modulate diabetes-accelerated atherogenesis. PMID:27351842

  11. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells impair the quality of dendritic cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Poschke, I; Mao, Y; Adamson, L; Salazar-Onfray, F; Masucci, G; Kiessling, R

    2012-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are important regulators of the immune system and key players in tumor-induced suppression of T-cell responses. CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSC have been detected in a great number of malignancies, including melanoma. MDSC are known to be impaired in their ability to differentiate along the myeloid lineage, e.g., into dendritic cells (DC). This is a concern for utilization of monocyte-derived DC for vaccination of patients with melanoma or other cancers exhibiting accumulation of CD14+ MDSC. When producing DC according to standard operating procedures of two currently ongoing clinical trials, we found that MDSC co-purified with monocytes isolated by elutriation. MDSC frequencies did not affect yield or viability of the produced DC, but induced a dose-dependent decrease in DC maturation, ability to take up antigen, migrate and induce T-cell IFNγ production. Changes in DC characteristics were most notable when 'pathological' frequencies of >50% CD14+HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture. The impaired DC quality could not be explained by altered cytokine production or increased oxidative stress in the cultures. Tracking of HLA-DR- cells throughout the culture period revealed that the observed changes were partially due to the impaired maturation and functionality of the originally HLA-DR- population, but also to their negative effects on HLA-DR+ cells. In conclusion, MDSC could be induced to differentiate into DC but, due to the impairment of overall DC vaccine quality when >50% HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture, their removal could be advisable.

  13. Deregulated KLF4 Expression in Myeloid Leukemias Alters Cell Proliferation and Differentiation through MicroRNA and Gene Targets

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valerie A.; Cummings, Carrie L.; Korb, Brendan; Boaglio, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by increased proliferation and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors mediated, in part, by altered myeloid transcription factor expression. Decreased Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) expression has been observed in AML, but how decreased KLF4 contributes to AML pathogenesis is largely unknown. We demonstrate decreased KLF4 expression in AML patient samples with various cytogenetic aberrations, confirm that KLF4 overexpression promotes myeloid differentiation and inhibits cell proliferation in AML cell lines, and identify new targets of KLF4. We have demonstrated that microRNA 150 (miR-150) expression is decreased in AML and that reintroducing miR-150 expression induces myeloid differentiation and inhibits proliferation of AML cells. We show that KLF family DNA binding sites are necessary for miR-150 promoter activity and that KLF2 or KLF4 overexpression induces miR-150 expression. miR-150 silencing, alone or in combination with silencing of CDKN1A, a well-described KLF4 target, did not fully reverse KLF4-mediated effects. Gene expression profiling and validation identified putative KLF4-regulated genes, including decreased MYC and downstream MYC-regulated gene expression in KLF4-overexpressing cells. Our findings indicate that decreased KLF4 expression mediates antileukemic effects through regulation of gene and microRNA networks, containing miR-150, CDKN1A, and MYC, and provide mechanistic support for therapeutic strategies increasing KLF4 expression. PMID:26644403

  14. Recommendations for myeloid-derived suppressor cell nomenclature and characterization standards.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Brandau, Sven; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Colombo, Mario P; Frey, Alan B; Greten, Tim F; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Murray, Peter J; Ochoa, Augusto; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Sica, Antonio; Umansky, Viktor; Vonderheide, Robert H; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-07-06

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have emerged as major regulators of immune responses in cancer and other pathological conditions. In recent years, ample evidence supports key contributions of MDSC to tumour progression through both immune-mediated mechanisms and those not directly associated with immune suppression. MDSC are the subject of intensive research with >500 papers published in 2015 alone. However, the phenotypic, morphological and functional heterogeneity of these cells generates confusion in investigation and analysis of their roles in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this communication is to suggest characterization standards in the burgeoning field of MDSC research.

  15. Recommendations for myeloid-derived suppressor cell nomenclature and characterization standards

    PubMed Central

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Brandau, Sven; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Colombo, Mario P.; Frey, Alan B.; Greten, Tim F.; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Murray, Peter J.; Ochoa, Augusto; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Sica, Antonio; Umansky, Viktor; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have emerged as major regulators of immune responses in cancer and other pathological conditions. In recent years, ample evidence supports key contributions of MDSC to tumour progression through both immune-mediated mechanisms and those not directly associated with immune suppression. MDSC are the subject of intensive research with >500 papers published in 2015 alone. However, the phenotypic, morphological and functional heterogeneity of these cells generates confusion in investigation and analysis of their roles in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this communication is to suggest characterization standards in the burgeoning field of MDSC research. PMID:27381735

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Complicated by Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemine, Hiroko; Umeda, Ryosuke; Nohda, Yasuhiro; Sakane, Emiko; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kiminari; Izumi, Mayuko; Tsuji, Goh; Kodaka, Taiichi; Itoh, Tomoo; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), a type of systemic arteritis, is rare in Japan. We herein report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) complicated by GCA that manifested during chemotherapy for AML. A 77-year-old woman with severe back pain was diagnosed with AML. She achieved complete remission with the resolution of her back pain following induction chemotherapy. However, she developed a headache and fever after consolidation chemotherapy. A diagnosis of GCA was made based on a biopsy of the temporal artery and arterial imaging. GCA should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis in AML patients complicated with a headache and fever of unknown origin. PMID:26831026

  17. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; McCarthy, Mary K.; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N.; Ng, Lisa F. P.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  18. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Tan, Jeslin J L; McCarthy, Mary K; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N; Ng, Lisa F P; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  19. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. The matricellular protein CCN3 regulates NOTCH1 signalling in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Sukanya; McCallum, Lynn; Crawford, Lisa J; Lu, Wan Hua; Sharpe, Daniel J; Irvine, Alexandra E

    2013-11-01

    Deregulated NOTCH1 has been reported in lymphoid leukaemia, although its role in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is not well established. We previously reported BCR-ABL down-regulation of a novel haematopoietic regulator, CCN3, in CML; CCN3 is a non-canonical NOTCH1 ligand. This study characterizes the NOTCH1–CCN3 signalling axis in CML. In K562 cells, BCR-ABL silencing reduced full-length NOTCH1 (NOTCH1-FL) and inhibited the cleavage of NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NOTCH1-ICD), resulting in decreased expression of the NOTCH1 targets c-MYC and HES1. K562 cells stably overexpressing CCN3 (K562/CCN3) or treated with recombinant CCN3(rCCN3) showed a significant reduction in NOTCH1 signalling (> 50% reduction in NOTCH1-ICD, p < 0.05).Gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI), which blocks NOTCH1 signalling, reduced K562/CCN3 colony formation but increased that of K562/control cells. GSI combined with either rCCN3 or imatinib reduced K562 colony formation with enhanced reduction of NOTCH1 signalling observed with combination treatments. We demonstrate an oncogenic role for NOTCH1 in CML and suggest that BCR-ABL disruption of NOTCH1–CCN3 signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of CML.

  1. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Cornelia; Teichler, Sabine; Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  2. Asparaginase induces apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Zhang, Guoping; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor enzyme asparaginase, which targets essential amino acid L-asparagine and catalyzes it to L-aspartic acid and ammonia, has been used for years in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), subtypes of myeloid leukemia and T-cell lymphomas, whereas the anti-chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) effect of asparaginase and its underlying mechanism has not been completely elucidated. We have shown here that asparaginase induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in K562 and KU812 cells. Apart from induction of apoptosis, we reported for the first time that asparaginase induced autophagic response in K562 and KU812 cells as evidenced by the formation of autophagosome, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-positive autophagy-like vacuoles, and the upregulation of LC3-II. Further study suggested that the Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and Erk (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway were involved in asparaginase-induced autophagy in K562 cells. Moreover, blocking autophagy using pharmacological inhibitors LY294002, chloroquine (CQ) and quinacrine (QN) enhanced asparaginase-induced cell death and apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in asparaginase-treated K562 and KU812 cells. Together, these findings provide a rationale that combination of asparaginase anticancer activity and autophagic inhibition might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for CML. PMID:25738356

  3. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  4. Targeting STAT3 signaling reduces immunosuppressive myeloid cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lin-Lin; Yu, Guang-Tao; Deng, Wei-Wei; Mao, Liang; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Fan, Teng-Fei; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cumulative evidence suggests that constitutively activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) may contribute to sustaining immunosuppressive status, and that inhibiting STAT3 signaling represents a potential strategy to improve antitumor immunity. In the present study, we observed that high levels phosphorylated of STAT3 are significantly associated with the markers for both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Additionally, we showed that targeting STAT3 signaling with a tolerable selective inhibitor S3I-201 significantly decreased immature myeloid cells such as MDSCs, TAMs and iDCs in genetically defined mice HNSCC model. These findings highlight that targeting STAT3 signaling may be effective to enhance antitumor immunity via myeloid suppressor cells in HNSCC. PMID:27467947

  5. Binase induces apoptosis of transformed myeloid cells and does not induce T-cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Olga N; Zelenikhin, Pavel V; Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Makarov, Alexander A

    2007-10-01

    Microbial RNases along with such animal RNases as onconase and BS-RNase are a promising basis for developing new antitumor drugs. We have shown that the Bacillus intermedius RNase (binase) induces selective apoptosis of transformed myeloid cells. It attacks artificially expressing activated c-Kit myeloid progenitor FDC cells and chronic myelogenous leukemia cells K562. Binase did not induce apoptosis in leukocytes of healthy donors and in normal myeloid progenitor cells. The inability of binase to initiate expression of activation markers CD69 and IFN-gamma in CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes testifies that enzyme is devoid of superantigenic properties. Altogether, these results demonstrate that binase possesses therapeutic opportunities for treatment of genotyped human neoplasms expressing activated kit.

  6. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed.

  7. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  8. Misfolded N-CoR is Linked to the Ectopic Reactivation of CD34/Flt3-Based Stem-Cell Phenotype in Promyelocytic and Monocytic Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Dawn Sijin; Li, Feng; Visvanathan, Sridevi; Khan, Matiullah

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) is the key component of generic co-repressor complex essential for the transcriptional control of genes involved in cellular hemostasis. We have recently reported that N-CoR actively represses Flt3, a key factor of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and growth, and that de-repression of Flt3 by the misfolded N-CoR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The leukemic cells derived from the promyelocytic and monocytic AML are distinctly characterized by the ectopic reactivation of stem cell phenotypes in relatively committed myeloid compartment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not known. Here, we report that N-CoR function is essential for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to the cells of myeloid lineage and that loss of N-CoR function due to misfolding is linked to the ectopic reactivation of generic stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Analysis of N-CoR and Flt3 transcripts in mouse hematopoietic cells revealed a positive correlation between N-CoR level and the commitment of myeloid cells and an inverse correlation between N-CoR and Flt3 levels in primitive as well as committed myeloid cells. Enforced N-CoR expression in mouse HSCs inhibited their growth and self-renewal potentials and promoted maturation toward cells of myeloid lineage, suggesting a role of N-CoR in the commitment of cells of myeloid lineage. In contrast to AML cells with natively folded N-CoR, primary and secondary promyelocytic and monocytic AML cells harboring the misfolded N-CoR were highly positive for Flt3 and myeloid antigen-based HSC marker CD34. Genetic and therapeutic restoration of N-CoR conformation significantly down-regulated the CD34 levels in monocytic AML cells, suggesting an important role of N-CoR in the suppression of CD34-based HSC phenotypes. These findings collectively suggest that N-CoR is crucial

  9. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  10. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma–Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)–secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33+ cells cultured in HNSCC cell line–derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR−/low). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33+ myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4+T-bet+ and CD8+T-bet+), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies. PMID:26740106

  11. Down-regulation of EVI1 is associated with epigenetic alterations and good prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Iria; Maicas, Miren; Cervera, José; Agirre, Xabier; Marin-Béjar, Oskar; Marcotegui, Nerea; Vicente, Carmen; Lahortiga, Idoya; Gomez-Benito, Maria; Carranza, Claudia; Valencia, Ana; Brunet, Salut; Lumbreras, Eva; Prosper, Felipe; Gómez-Casares, María T.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Calasanz, María J.; Sanz, Miguel A.; Sierra, Jorge; Odero, María D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The EVI1 gene (3q26) codes for a zinc finger transcription factor with important roles in both mammalian development and leukemogenesis. Over-expression of EVI1 through either 3q26 rearrangements, MLL fusions, or other unknown mechanisms confers a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the prevalence and prognostic impact of EVI1 over-expression in a series of 476 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, and investigated the epigenetic modifications of the EVI1 locus which could be involved in the transcriptional regulation of this gene. Results Our data provide further evidence that EVI1 over-expression is a poor prognostic marker in acute myeloid leukemia patients less than 65 years old. Moreover, we found that patients with no basal expression of EVI1 had a better prognosis than patients with expression/over-expression (P=0.036). We also showed that cell lines with over-expression of EVI1 had no DNA methylation in the promoter region of the EVI1 locus, and had marks of active histone modifications: H3 and H4 acetylation, and trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4. Conversely, cell lines with no expression of EVI1 have DNA hypermethylation and are marked by repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 at the EVI1 promoter. Conclusions Our results identify EVI1 over-expression as a poor prognostic marker in a large, independent cohort of acute myeloid leukemia patients less than 65 years old, and show that the total absence of EVI1 expression has a prognostic impact on the outcome of such patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that an aberrant epigenetic pattern involving DNA methylation, H3 and H4 acetylation, and trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 and histone H3 lysine 27 might play a role in the transcriptional regulation of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukemia. This study opens new avenues for a better understanding of the regulation of EVI1 expression at a transcriptional level. PMID:21750091

  12. Gr1intCD11b+ Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is one of the world’s leading killers, stealing 1.4 million lives and causing 8.7 million new and relapsed infections in 2011. The only vaccine against tuberculosis is BCG which demonstrates variable efficacy in adults worldwide. Human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis results in the influx of inflammatory cells to the lung in an attempt to wall off bacilli by forming a granuloma. Gr1intCD11b+ cells are called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and play a major role in regulation of inflammation in many pathological conditions. Although MDSC have been described primarily in cancer their function in tuberculosis remains unknown. During M. tuberculosis infection it is crucial to understand the function of cells involved in the regulation of inflammation during granuloma formation. Understanding their relative impact on the bacilli and other cellular phenotypes is necessary for future vaccine and drug design. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the bacterial burden, lung pathology and Gr1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell immune responses in M. tuberculosis infected NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, C3HeB/FeJ and C57/BL6 mice. Gr-1+ cells could be found on the edges of necrotic lung lesions in NOS2-/-, RAG-/-, and C3HeB/FeJ, but were absent in wild-type mice. Both populations of Gr1+CD11b+ cells expressed high levels of arginase-1, and IL-17, additional markers of myeloid derived suppressor cells. We then sorted the Gr1hi and Gr1int populations from M. tuberculosis infected NOS-/- mice and placed the sorted both Gr1int populations at different ratios with naïve or M. tuberculosis infected splenocytes and evaluated their ability to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+T cells. Our results showed that both Gr1hi and Gr1int cells were able to induce activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. However this response was reduced as the ratio of CD4+ T to Gr1+ cells increased. Our results illustrate a yet unrecognized interplay

  13. Circulating endothelial cells and their progenitors in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohammed; Aly, Sanaa Shaker; Altayeb, Hanan Ahmed; Ali, Arwa Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Studies are required to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of surrogate biomarkers. Given the importance of angiogenesis in oncology in terms of pathogenesis as well as being a target for treatment, circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are promising candidates to serve as such markers. The aim of the present study was to quantify CECs and EPCs in patients with AML at initial diagnosis and following induction chemotherapy, and to correlate these findings with the response to treatment in AML patients. The present study included 40 patients with de novo AML and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. CECs and EPCs were evaluated by flow cytometry at initial diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy (3+7 protocol for AML other than M3 and all-trans-retinoic acid plus anthracycline for M3 disease). CECs and EPCs were significantly higher in AML patients at diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy than in controls. After induction chemotherapy, CECs and EPCs were significantly decreased compared with the levels at initial diagnosis. Patients who achieved complete response (n=28) had lower initial CEC and EPC levels compared with patients who did not respond to treatment. These results suggest that CEC levels are higher in AML patients and may correlate with disease status and treatment response. Further investigations are required to better determine the predictive value and implication of these cells in AML management. PMID:27602121

  14. Drosophila as a model for the two myeloid blood cell systems in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Katrina S.; Brückner, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Fish, mice and men rely on two coexisting myeloid blood cell systems. One is sustained by hematopoietic progenitor cells, which reside in specialized microenvironments in hematopoietic organs and give rise to cells of the monocyte lineage. The other system corresponds to the independent lineage of self-renewing tissue macrophages, which colonize organs during embryonic development and are maintained during later life by proliferation in local tissue microenvironments. However, little is known about the nature of these microenvironments and their regulation. Moreover, many vertebrate tissues contain a mix of both tissue-resident and monocyte-derived macrophages, posing a challenge to the study of lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms and function. This review highlights how research in the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster can address many of these outstanding questions in the field. Drawing parallels between hematopoiesis in Drosophila and vertebrates, we illustrate the evolutionary conservation of the two myeloid systems across animal phyla. Much like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses a lineage of self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages, as well as a ‘definitive’ lineage of macrophages that derive from hematopoiesis in the progenitor-based lymph gland. We summarize key findings from Drosophila hematopoiesis that illustrate how local microenvironments, systemic signals, immune challenges and nervous inputs regulate adaptive responses of tissue-resident macrophages and progenitor-based hematopoiesis to achieve optimal fitness of the animal. PMID:24946019

  15. Myeloid Cell-Specific Lipin-1 Deficiency Stimulates Endocrine Adiponectin-FGF15 Axis and Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayou; Kim, Chunki; Jogasuria, Alvin; Han, Yoonhee; Hu, Xudong; Wu, Jiashin; Shen, Hong; Chrast, Roman; Finck, Brian N.; You, Min

    2016-01-01

    Lipin-1 is a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase (PAP) required for the generation of diacylglycerol during glycerolipid synthesis, and exhibits dual functions in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Lipin-1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the present study, we assessed lipin-1 function in myeloid cells in ALD using a myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 knockout (mLipin-1KO) mouse model. Utilizing the Gao-binge ethanol feeding protocol, matched mLipin-1KO mice and littermate loxP control (WT) mice were pair-fed with either an ethanol-containing diet or an ethanol-free diet (control). Surprisingly, deletion of lipin-1 in myeloid cells dramatically attenuated liver inflammatory responses and ameliorated liver injury that would normally occur following the ethanol feeding protocol, but slightly exacerbated the ethanol-induced steatosis in mice. Mechanistically, myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 deficiency concomitantly increased the fat-derived adiponectin and ileum-derived fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15. In concordance with concerted elevation of circulating adiponectin and FGF15, myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 deficiency diminished hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, limited liver inflammatory responses, normalized serum levels of bile acids, and protected mice from liver damage after ethanol challenge. Our novel data demonstrate that myeloid cell-specific deletion of lipin-1 ameliorated inflammation and alcoholic hepatitis in mice via activation of endocrine adiponectin-FGF15 signaling. PMID:27666676

  16. Use of RDA analysis of knockout mice to identify myeloid genes regulated in vivo by PU.1 and C/EBPalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Iwama, A; Zhang, P; Darlington, G J; McKercher, S R; Maki, R; Tenen, D G

    1998-01-01

    PU.1 and C/EBPalpha are transcription factors essential for normal myeloid development. Loss-of-function mutation of PU.1 leads to an absolute block in monocyte/macrophage development and abnormal granulocytic development while that of C/EBPalpha causes a selective block in neutrophilic differentiation. In order to understand these phenotypes, we studied the role of PU.1 and C/EBPalpha in the regulation of myeloid target genes in vivo . Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNAs encoding receptors for M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF, were expressed at low levels in PU.1(-/-) fetal liver compared with wild type. To identify additional myeloid genes regulated by PU.1 and C/EBPalpha, we performed representational difference analysis (RDA), a PCR-based subtractive hybridization using fetal livers from wild type and PU.1 or C/EBPalpha knockout mice. By introducing a new modification of RDA, that of tissue-specific gene suppression, we could selectively identify a set of differentially expressed genes specific to myeloid cells. Differentially expressed genes included both primary and secondary granule protein genes. In addition, eight novel genes were identified that were upregulated in expression during myeloid differentiation. These methods provide a general strategy for elucidating the genes affected in murine knockout models. PMID:9611252

  17. VCAM-1 and VAP-1 recruit myeloid cells that promote pulmonary metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferjančič, Špela; Gil-Bernabé, Ana M; Hill, Sally A; Allen, Philip D; Richardson, Peter; Sparey, Tim; Savory, Edward; McGuffog, Jane; Muschel, Ruth J

    2013-04-18

    Pulmonary metastasis is a frequent cause of poor outcome in cancer patients. The formation of pulmonary metastasis is greatly facilitated by recruitment of myeloid cells, which are crucial for tumor cell survival and extravasation. During inflammation, homing of myeloid cells is mediated by endothelial activation, raising the question of a potential role for endothelial activation in myeloid cell recruitment during pulmonary metastasis. Here, we show that metastatic tumor cell attachment causes the induction of the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1). Induction of VCAM-1 is dependent on tumor cell-clot formation, decreasing upon induction of tissue factor pathway inhibitor or treatment with hirudin. Furthermore, inhibition of endothelial activation with a VCAM-1 blocking antibody or a VAP-1 small molecule inhibitor leads to reduced myeloid cell recruitment and diminished tumor cell survival and metastasis without affecting tumor cell adhesion. Simultaneous inhibition of VCAM-1 and VAP-1 does not result in further reduction in myeloid cell recruitment and tumor cell survival, suggesting that both act through closely related mechanisms. These results establish VCAM-1 and VAP-1 as mediators of myeloid cell recruitment in metastasis and identify VAP-1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention to combat early metastasis.

  18. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  19. MicroRNA-126-mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F; Tojo, Arinobu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ai

    2013-08-13

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that microRNA 126 (miR-126) drives B-cell myeloid biphenotypic leukemia differentiation toward B cells without changing expression of E2A immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47 (E2A), early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), or paired box protein 5, which are critical transcription factors in B-lymphopoiesis. Similar induction of B-cell differentiation by miR-126 was observed in normal hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in uncommitted murine c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) cells, with insulin regulatory subunit-1 acting as a target of miR-126. Importantly, in EBF1-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cells, which fail to differentiate into B cells, miR-126 significantly up-regulated B220, and induced the expression of B-cell genes, including recombination activating genes-1/2 and CD79a/b. These data suggest that miR-126 can at least partly rescue B-cell development independently of EBF1. These experiments show that miR-126 regulates myeloid vs. B-cell fate through an alternative machinery, establishing the critical role of miRNAs in the lineage specification of multipotent mammalian cells.

  20. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  1. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. PMID:24801837

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  3. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias.

  4. Confocal Imaging of Myeloid Cells in the Corneal Stroma of Live Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Matilda F.; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    The accessibility and transparency of the cornea makes it a good tissue model for monitoring immunological responses using in vivo real time imaging analysis (Lee et al., 2010; Tan et al., 2013). These corneal qualities have also allowed for high-resolution in vivo imaging of non-ocular tissue transplanted into the anterior chamber of the mouse eye (Speier et al., 2008a; Speier et al., 2008b). This protocol was adapted from Speier (2008) to successfully assess real-time in vivo myeloid cell dynamics in wounded corneas of c-fms-EGFP mice (Chan et al., 2013). Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) regulates the differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. The activity of CSF-1 is mediated by the CSF-1 receptor that is encoded by c-fms (Csf1r) protooncogene. The c-fms gene is expressed in macrophage, trophoblast cell lineages, and to some extent granulocytes. In the c-fms-EGFP mice EGFP, enhanced green fluorescent protein, is driven under the Csf1r, colony stimulating factor 1 receptor, promoter and highlights myeloid cells (Sasmono et al., 2003). This protocol can be further adapted to image other transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins. PMID:26191537

  5. Inverse regulation of bridging integrator 1 and BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Morano, Annalisa; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Bianchino, Gabriella; Grieco, Vitina; Signorino, Elisabetta; Fragasso, Alberto; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Venturi, Claudia; Rosti, Gianantonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator process of tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) functional activities. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a key protein involved in RTK intracellular trafficking. Here, we report, by studying 34 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis, that BIN1 gene is downregulated in CML as compared to healthy controls, suggesting an altered endocytosis of RTKs. Rab interactor 1 (RIN1), an activator of BIN1, displayed a similar behavior. Treatment of 57 patients by tyrosine kinase inhibitors caused, along with BCR-ABL1 inactivation, an increase of BIN1 and RIN1 expression, potentially restoring endocytosis. There was a significant inverse correlation between BIN1-RIN1 and BCR-ABL1 expression. In vitro experiments on both CML and nontumorigenic cell lines treated with Imatinib confirmed these results. In order to provide another proof in favor of BIN1 and RIN1 endocytosis function in CML, we demonstrated that Imatinib induced, in K562 cell line, BIN1-RIN1 upregulation accompanied by a parallel AXL receptor internalization into cytoplasmic compartment. This study shows a novel deregulated mechanism in CML patients, indicating BIN1 and RIN1 as players in the maintenance of the abnormal RTK signaling in this hematological disease.

  6. Noncoding RNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From Key Regulators to Clinical Players.

    PubMed

    Fatica, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Recent analyses have shown that human cells transcribe almost their entire genomes, implying the existence of a huge mass of ncRNAs. At the present, microRNAs are the most investigated regulative non-coding RNAs. Several studies have demonstrated that microRNAs play a crucial role in hematopoietic differentiation and hematological malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant expression of microRNAs has been associated with specific genetic abnormalities and clinical outcome of patients with AML. In addition, since microRNAs can function as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, the potential of using these molecules as therapeutic targets opens up new opportunities in the future of AML therapy. The recent demonstration that other regulatory ncRNAs, in addition to microRNAs, are involved in hematopoietic cell differentiation and diseases, suggests that they may also have a biological relevance in AML. This paper will describe the role of ncRNAs in AML and discuss the expectations for the use of ncRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of AML.

  7. Transcriptional activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in myeloid cells promotes angiogenesis through VEGF and S100A8.

    PubMed

    Ahn, G-One; Seita, Jun; Hong, Beom-Ju; Kim, Young-Eun; Bok, Seoyeon; Lee, Chan-Ju; Kim, Kwang Soon; Lee, Jerry C; Leeper, Nicholas J; Cooke, John P; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Weissman, Irving L; Brown, J Martin

    2014-02-18

    Emerging evidence indicates that myeloid cells are essential for promoting new blood vessel formation by secreting various angiogenic factors. Given that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a critical regulator for angiogenesis, we questioned whether HIF in myeloid cells also plays a role in promoting angiogenesis. To address this question, we generated a unique strain of myeloid-specific knockout mice targeting HIF pathways using human S100A8 as a myeloid-specific promoter. We observed that mutant mice where HIF-1 is transcriptionally activated in myeloid cells (by deletion of the von Hippel-Lindau gene) resulted in erythema, enhanced neovascularization in matrigel plugs, and increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the bone marrow, all of which were completely abrogated by either genetic or pharmacological inactivation of HIF-1. We further found that monocytes were the major effector producing VEGF and S100A8 proteins driving neovascularization in matrigel. Moreover, by using a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia we observed significantly improved blood flow in mice intramuscularly injected with HIF-1-activated monocytes. This study therefore demonstrates that HIF-1 activation in myeloid cells promotes angiogenesis through VEGF and S100A8 and that this may become an attractive therapeutic strategy to treat diseases with vascular defects.

  8. Transcriptional activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in myeloid cells promotes angiogenesis through VEGF and S100A8.

    PubMed

    Ahn, G-One; Seita, Jun; Hong, Beom-Ju; Kim, Young-Eun; Bok, Seoyeon; Lee, Chan-Ju; Kim, Kwang Soon; Lee, Jerry C; Leeper, Nicholas J; Cooke, John P; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Il Han; Weissman, Irving L; Brown, J Martin

    2014-02-18

    Emerging evidence indicates that myeloid cells are essential for promoting new blood vessel formation by secreting various angiogenic factors. Given that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a critical regulator for angiogenesis, we questioned whether HIF in myeloid cells also plays a role in promoting angiogenesis. To address this question, we generated a unique strain of myeloid-specific knockout mice targeting HIF pathways using human S100A8 as a myeloid-specific promoter. We observed that mutant mice where HIF-1 is transcriptionally activated in myeloid cells (by deletion of the von Hippel-Lindau gene) resulted in erythema, enhanced neovascularization in matrigel plugs, and increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the bone marrow, all of which were completely abrogated by either genetic or pharmacological inactivation of HIF-1. We further found that monocytes were the major effector producing VEGF and S100A8 proteins driving neovascularization in matrigel. Moreover, by using a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia we observed significantly improved blood flow in mice intramuscularly injected with HIF-1-activated monocytes. This study therefore demonstrates that HIF-1 activation in myeloid cells promotes angiogenesis through VEGF and S100A8 and that this may become an attractive therapeutic strategy to treat diseases with vascular defects. PMID:24497508

  9. Biology and Clinical Relevance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Andreas; Chan, Steven M; Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-07-01

    Evidence for the cancer stem cell model was first demonstrated in xenotransplanted blood and bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) almost two decades ago, supporting the concept that a rare clonal and mutated leukemic stem cell (LSC) population is sufficient to drive leukemic growth. The inability to eliminate LSCs with conventional therapies is thought to be the primary cause of disease relapse in AML patients, and as such, novel therapies with the ability to target this population are required to improve patient outcomes. An important step towards this goal is the identification of common immunophenotypic surface markers and biological properties that distinguish LSCs from normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) across AML patients. This work has resulted in the development of a large number of potential LSC-selective therapies that target cell surface molecules, intracellular signaling pathways, and the bone marrow microenvironment. Here, we will review the basic biology, immunophenotypic detection, and clinical relevance of LSCs, as well as emerging biological and small-molecule strategies that either directly target LSCs or indirectly target these cells through modulation of their microenvironment.

  10. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials. PMID:26928248

  11. Proteomic Cornerstones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation: Distinct Signatures of Multipotent Progenitors and Myeloid Committed Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Trumpp, Andreas; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, LinnegSca-1+c-Kit+) or myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSca-1−c-Kit+). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference in the expression of metabolic enzymes, including a clear shift of specific protein isoforms of the glycolytic pathway. Proteins involved in translation showed a collective higher expression in myeloid progenitors, indicating an increased translational activity. Strikingly, the data uncover a unique signature related to immune defense mechanisms, centering on the RIG-I and type-1 interferon response systems, which are installed in multipotent progenitors but not evident in myeloid committed cells. This suggests that specific, and so far unrecognized, mechanisms protect these immature cells before they mature. In conclusion, this study indicates that the transition of hematopoietic stem/progenitors toward myeloid commitment is accompanied by a profound change in processing of

  12. Interaction of Rotavirus with Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Narváez, Carlos F.; Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that very few rotavirus (RV)-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon circulate in recently infected and seropositive adults and children. Here, we have studied the interaction of RV with myeloid immature (IDC) and mature dendritic cells (MDC) in vitro. RV did not induce cell death of IDC or MDC and induced maturation of between 12 and 48% of IDC. Nonetheless, RV did not inhibit the maturation of IDC or change the expression of maturation markers on MDC. After treatment with RV, few IDC expressed the nonstructural viral protein NSP4. In contrast, a discrete productive viral infection was shown in MDC of a subset of volunteers, and between 3 and 46% of these cells expressed NSP4. RV-treated IDC secreted interleukin 6 (IL-6) (but not IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or transforming growth factor beta), and MDC released IL-6 and small amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70. The patterns of cytokines secreted by T cells stimulated by staphylococcal enterotoxin B presented by MDC infected with RV or uninfected were comparable. The frequencies and patterns of cytokines secreted by memory RV-specific T cells evidenced after stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with RV were similar to those evidenced after stimulation of PBMC with RV-infected MDC. Finally, IDC treated with RV strongly stimulated naive allogeneic CD4+ T cells to secrete Th1 cytokines. Thus, although RV does not seem to be a strong maturing stimulus for DC, it promotes their capacity to prime Th1 cells. PMID:16282452

  13. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy. PMID:26885857

  14. Galactomutarotase and other galactose-related genes are rapidly induced by retinoic acid in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Tongkun; Chen, Qiuyan; Zhang, Yao; Zolfaghari, Reza; Ross, A Catharine

    2007-12-25

    Aldose-1-epimerase (mutarotase) catalyzes the interconversion of alpha and beta hexoses, which is essential for normal carbohydrate metabolism and the production of complex oligosaccharides. Galactose mutarotase (GALM) has been well characterized at the protein level, but information is lacking on the regulation of GALM gene expression. We report herein that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), an active metabolite of vitamin A that is known to induce myeloid lineage cell differentiation into macrophage-like cells, induces a rapid and robust regulation of GALM mRNA expression in human myeloid cells. all-trans-RA at a physiological concentration (20 nM), or Am580, a ligand selective for the nuclear retinoid receptor RARalpha, increased GALM mRNA in THP-1 cells, with significantly increased expression in 2 h, increasing further to an approximately 8-fold elevation after 6-40 h (P < 0.005). In contrast, tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not increase GALM mRNA expression, although it is capable of inducing cell differentiation. RA also increased GALM mRNA in U937 and HL-60 cells. The increase in GALM mRNA by RA was blocked by pretreating THP-1 cells with actinomycin D but not by cycloheximide. GALM protein and mutarotase activity were also increased time dependently in RA-treated THP-1 cells. In addition to GALM, several other genes in the biosynthetic pathway of galactosyl-containing complex oligosaccharides were more highly expressed in RA-treated THP-1 cells, including B4GALT5, ST3GAL3, ST6GALNAC5, and GALNAC4S-6ST. Thus, the results of this study identify RA as a significant regulator of GALM and other galactose-related genes in myeloid-monocytic cells, which could affect energy utilization and synthesis of cell-surface glycoproteins or glycolipids involved in cell motility, adhesion, and/or functional properties.

  15. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  16. Transmission of endoplasmic reticulum stress and pro-inflammation from tumor cells to myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Navin R.; Rodvold, Jeffrey; Sepulveda, Homero; Rossi, Steven; Drew, Angela F.; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic, infectious, and tumor cell-intrinsic noxae can all evoke the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in tumor cells, which is critical for tumor cell growth and cancer progression. Evidence exists that the ER stress response can drive a proinflammatory program in tumor cells and macrophages but, to our knowledge, a role for the tumor ER stress response in influencing macrophages and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has not been suggested. Here we show that macrophages cultured in conditioned medium from ER-stressed tumor cells become activated, and themselves undergo ER stress with the up-regulation of Grp78, Gadd34, Chop, and Xbp-1 splicing, suggesting a general activation of the ER stress-signaling pathways. Furthermore, these macrophages recapitulate, amplify and expand the proinflammatory response of tumor cells. We term this phenomenon “transmissible” ER stress. Although neither Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 nor interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R) signaling is involved, a reduction was observed in the transmission of ER stress to TLR4 KO macrophages, consistent with the fact that a second signal through TLR4 combined with exposure to tumor ER stress-conditioned medium results in a faster ER stress response and an enhancement of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. The injection of tumor ER stress-conditioned medium into WT mice elicited a generalized ER stress response in the liver. We suggest that transmissible ER stress is a mechanism through which tumor cells can control myeloid cells by directing them toward a proinflammatory phenotype, thus facilitating tumor progression. PMID:21464300

  17. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-O-gallate induces cell death by acid sphingomyelinase activation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUHUI; KUMAZOE, MOTOFUMI; BAE, JAEHOON; YAMADA, SHUHEI; TAKAI, MIKA; HIDAKA, SHIORI; YAMASHITA, SHUYA; KIM, YOONHEE; WON, YEONGSEON; MURATA, MOTOKI; TSUKAMOTO, SHUNTARO; TACHIBANA, HIROFUMI

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological study showed that green tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of hematopoietic malignancy. The major green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is reported to have anticancer effects. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a major hematopoietic malignancy characterized by expansion of myeloid cells. In the present study, we showed EGCG-induced acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activation and lipid raft clustering in CML cells. The ASM inhibitor desipramine significantly reduced EGCG-induced cell death. Protein kinase Cδ is a well-known kinase that plays an important role in ASM activation. We observed EGCG-induced phos-phorylation of protein kinase Cδ at Ser664. Importantly, EGCG-induced ASM activation was significantly reduced by pretreatment of CML cells with the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor NS2028, suggesting that EGCG induced ASM activation through the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway. Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of a cGMP-negative regulator enhanced the anti-CML effect of EGCG. These results indicate that EGCG-induced cell death via the cGMP/ASM pathway in CML cells. PMID:26135316

  18. Targeting myeloid cells using nanoparticles to improve cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Zohreh; Goldberg, Michael S

    2015-08-30

    While nanoparticles have traditionally been used to deliver cytotoxic drugs directly to tumors to induce cancer cell death, emerging data suggest that nanoparticles are likely to generate a larger impact on oncology through the delivery of agents that can stimulate antitumor immunity. Tumor-targeted nanocarriers have generally been used to localize chemotherapeutics to tumors and thus decrease off-target toxicity while enhancing efficacy. Challengingly, tumor heterogeneity and evolution render tumor-intrinsic approaches likely to succumb to relapse. The immune system offers exquisite specificity, cytocidal potency, and long-term activity that leverage an adaptive memory response. For this reason, the ability to manipulate immune cell specificity and function would be desirable, and nanoparticles represent an exciting means by which to perform such manipulation. Dendritic cells and tumor-associated macrophages are cells of the myeloid lineage that function as natural phagocytes, so they naturally take up nanoparticles. Dendritic cells direct the specificity and potency of cellular immune responses that can be targeted for cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the specific criteria needed for efficient vaccine design, including but not limited to the route of administration, size, morphology, surface charge, targeting ligands, and nanoparticle composition. In contrast, tumor-associated macrophages are critical mediators of immunosuppression whose trans-migratory abilities can be exploited to localize therapeutics to the tumor core and which can be directly targeted for elimination or for repolarization to a tumor suppressive phenotype. It is likely that a combination of targeting dendritic cells to stimulate antitumor immunity and tumor-associated macrophages to reduce immune suppression will impart significant benefits and result in durable antitumor responses.

  19. Targeting survival pathways in chronic myeloid leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A; Latif, A L; Holyoake, T L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the presence of a fusion oncogene BCR-ABL, which encodes a protein with constitutive TK activity. The implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) marked a major advance in CML therapy; however, there are problems with current treatment. For example, relapse occurs when these drugs are discontinued in the majority of patients who have achieved a complete molecular response on TKI and these agents are less effective in patients with mutations in the BCR-ABL kinase domain. Importantly, TKI can effectively target proliferating mature cells, but do not eradicate quiescent leukaemic stem cells (LSCs), therefore allowing disease persistence despite treatment. It is essential that alternative strategies are used to target the LSC population. BCR-ABL activation is responsible for the modulation of different signalling pathways, which allows the LSC fraction to evade cell death. Several pathways have been shown to be modulated by BCR-ABL, including PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK-STAT and autophagy signalling pathways. Targeting components of these survival pathways, alone or in combination with TKI, therefore represents an attractive potential therapeutic approach for targeting the LSC. However, many pathways are also active in normal stem cells. Therefore, potential targets must be validated to effectively eradicate CML stem cells while sparing normal counterparts. This review summarizes the main pathways modulated in CML stem cells, the recent developments and the use of novel drugs to target components in these pathways which may be used to target the LSC population. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23517124

  20. Emerging Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    El Sabban, Maya; Mouteirik, Maha; Nasr, Rihab

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder. Current targeted therapies designed to inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein have made a significant breakthrough in the treatment of CML patients. However, CML remains a chronic disease that a patient must manage for life. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) therapy has completely transformed the prognosis of CML, it has made the therapeutic management more complex. The interruption of TKI treatment results in early disease progression because it does not eliminate quiescent CML stem cells which remain a potential reservoir for disease relapse. This highlights the need to develop new therapeutic strategies for CML to achieve a permanent cure, and to allow TKI interruption. This review summarizes recent research done on alternative targeted therapies with a particular focus on some important signaling pathways (such as Alox5, Hedgehog, Wnt/b-catenin, autophagy, and PML) that have the potential to target CML stem cells and potentially provide cure for CML. PMID:23935640

  1. A novel zinc finger gene, ZNF465, is inappropriately expressed in acute myeloid leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Collin, Joseph F; Wells, James W; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Lyne, Linden; Duriez, Patrick J; Banham, Alison H; Mufti, Ghulam J; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-05-01

    To increase our knowledge of leukaemia-associated antigens, especially in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) M4, we prepared a phage display cDNA library using mRNA from the bone marrow cells of a patient with AML M4 at diagnosis. We immunoscreened 10(6) pfu with autologous sera and identified an antigen which we named GKT-AML8. The cDNA showed more than 99% similarity to a sequence on 2q21.2 and 95% sequence similarity to a sequence on 19q13.3. These genes were named ZNF465 and ZNF466, respectively, following HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) guidelines. Expressed sequence tag data suggests that both genes are transcriptionally active. ZNF465 and ZNF466 encode a 5' krüppel associated box domain typical of negative regulators of gene transcription. We have confirmed the translational start site in the +1 frame in a near-Kozak sequence that produces a 102 amino acid polypeptide from ZNF465. The high level of sequence similarity between ZNF465 and ZNF466 makes their transcripts almost indistinguishable by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, GKT-AML8 showed most sequence similarity to ZNF465 and no transcript matching the 3' ZNF466 sequence could be detected in patient samples or healthy volunteers. ZNF465/466 expression was detectable in 12/13 AML and 10/14 chronic myeloid leukaemia patients' samples but not in normal donor peripheral blood (0/8) or 0/3 bone marrow samples which had been separated into CD34(+) and CD34(-) samples. The altered expression of ZNF465/466 in patients' samples and its absence in healthy donor haematopoietic samples indicate that ZNF465 is overexpressed in early myeloid disease and as such may represent a promising target for immunotherapy.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are essential for maintaining feto-maternal immunotolerance via STAT3 signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ting; Liu, Yufeng; Zhong, Li Mei; Shi, Mao Hua; Duan, Xiao Bing; Wu, Kang; Yang, Qiong; Liu, Chao; Wei, Jian Yang; Ma, Xing Ru; Shi, Kun; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Maternal immune system tolerance to the semiallogeneic fetus is essential for a successful pregnancy; however, the mechanisms underlying this immunotolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that myeloid-derived suppressor cells play an important role in maintaining feto-maternal tolerance. A significant expansion of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells was observed in multiple immune organs and decidual tissues from pregnant mice. Pregnancy-derived granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells suppressed T cell responses in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner and required direct cell-cell contact. Mechanistic studies showed that progesterone facilitated differentiation and activation of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, mediated through STAT3 signaling. The STAT3 inhibitor JSI-124 and a specific short hairpin RNA completely abrogated the effects of progesterone on granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. More importantly, granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell depletion dramatically enhanced the abortion rate in normal pregnant mice, whereas adoptive transfer of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells clearly reduced the abortion rate in the CBA/J X DBA/2J mouse model of spontaneous abortion. These observations collectively demonstrate that granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells play an essential role in the maintenance of fetal immunotolerance in mice. Furthermore, our study supports the notion that in addition to their well-recognized roles under pathologic conditions, myeloid-derived suppressor cells perform important functions under certain physiologic circumstances. PMID:27203698

  3. Group V Phospholipase A2 in Bone Marrow-derived Myeloid Cells and Bronchial Epithelial Cells Promotes Bacterial Clearance after Escherichia coli Pneumonia*

    PubMed Central

    Degousee, Norbert; Kelvin, David J.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Hwang, David M.; Stefanski, Eva; Wang, Xing-Hua; Danesh, Ali; Angioni, Carlo; Schmidt, Helmut; Lindsay, Thomas F.; Gelb, Michael H.; Bollinger, James; Payré, Christine; Lambeau, Gérard; Arm, Jonathan P.; Keating, Armand; Rubin, Barry B.

    2011-01-01

    Group V-secreted phospholipase A2 (GV sPLA2) hydrolyzes bacterial phospholipids and initiates eicosanoid biosynthesis. Here, we elucidate the role of GV sPLA2 in the pathophysiology of Escherichia coli pneumonia. Inflammatory cells and bronchial epithelial cells both express GV sPLA2 after pulmonary E. coli infection. GV−/− mice accumulate fewer polymorphonuclear leukocytes in alveoli, have higher levels of E. coli in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung, and develop respiratory acidosis, more severe hypothermia, and higher IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α levels than GV+/+ mice after pulmonary E. coli infection. Eicosanoid levels in bronchoalveolar lavage are similar in GV+/+ and GV−/− mice after lung E. coli infection. In contrast, GV+/+ mice have higher levels of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), PGF2α, and 15-keto-PGE2 in lung and express higher levels of ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 on pulmonary endothelial cells than GV−/− mice after lung infection with E. coli. Selective deletion of GV sPLA2 in non-myeloid cells impairs leukocyte accumulation after pulmonary E. coli infection, and lack of GV sPLA2 in either bone marrow-derived myeloid cells or non-myeloid cells attenuates E. coli clearance from the alveolar space and the lung parenchyma. These observations show that GV sPLA2 in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells as well as non-myeloid cells, which are likely bronchial epithelial cells, participate in the regulation of the innate immune response to pulmonary infection with E. coli. PMID:21849511

  4. Bisphenol A (BPA) stimulates the interferon signaling and activates the inflammasome activity in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Ho, Shuk-mei; Choubey, Divaker

    2015-11-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which exhibits a strong female bias (female-to-male ratio 9:1). However, the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because a feedforward loop between the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) and type I interferon (IFN-α/β)-signaling induces the expression of certain p200-family proteins (such as murine p202 and human IFI16) that regulate innate immune responses and modify lupus susceptibility, we investigated whether treatment of myeloid cells with bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, could regulate the p200-family proteins and activate innate immune responses. We found that treatment of murine bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BPA induced the expression of ERα and IFN-β, activated the IFN-signaling, and stimulated the expression of the p202 and IFI16 proteins. Further, the treatment increased levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome and stimulated its activity. Accordingly, BPA-treatment of BMCs from non lupus-prone C57BL/6 and the lupus-prone (NZB×NZW)F1 mice activated the type I IFN-signaling, induced the expression of p202, and activated an inflammasome activity. Our study demonstrates that BPA-induced signaling in the murine and human myeloid cells stimulates the type I IFN-signaling that results in an induction of the p202 and IFI16 innate immune sensors for the cytosolic DNA and activates an inflammasome activity. These observations provide novel molecular insights into the role of environmental BPA exposures in potentiating the development of certain autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  5. Enhanced generation of myeloid lineages in hematopoietic differentiation from embryonic stem cells by silencing transcriptional repressor Twist-2.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2009-12-01

    The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1(+) and F4/80(+) cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor.

  6. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  7. Hampering the Immune Suppressors: Therapeutic Targeting of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Albeituni, Sabrin Husein; Ding, Chuanlin; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells with suppressive properties that preferentially expand in cancer. MDSC mainly suppress T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity, inhibit NK cell activation, and induce the differentiation and expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The wide spectrum of MDSC suppressive activity in cancer and its role in tumor progression have rendered these cells a promising target for effective cancer immunotherapy. In this review we briefly discuss the origin of MDSC and their main mechanisms of suppression and focus more on the approaches developed up to date targeting of MDSC in tumor-bearing animals and cancer patients. PMID:24270348

  8. Spred2 is involved in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Wu, Chu-Tse; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Qing-Fang; Yan, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2010-03-19

    Spreds, a recently established class of negative regulators of the Ras-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, are involved in hematogenesises, allergic disorders and tumourigenesis. However, their role in hematologic neoplasms is largely unknown. Possible effects of Spreds on other signal pathways closely related to Ras-ERK have been poorly investigated. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of Spred2 on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In addition to inhibiting the well-established Ras-ERK cascade, adenovirus-mediated Spred2 over-expression inhibits constitutive and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) and Mcl-1 expression, as well as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in CML cells. In K562 cells and primary CML cells, imatinib induces endogenous Spred2 expression. Spred2 silencing by stable RNA interference partly protects K562 cells against imatinib-induced apoptosis. Together, these data implicate Spred2 in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in CML cells, possibly by inhibiting the Ras-ERK cascade and the pro-survival signaling molecules SPHK1 and Mcl-1. These findings reveal potential targets for selective therapy of CML.

  9. Reduction of Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells and Lymphoma Growth by a Natural Triterpenoid

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Faisal F. Y.; Hossain, Azim; God, Jason M.; Leaphart, Nathan; Elvington, Michelle; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Tomlinson, Stephen; Haque, Azizul

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a potentially life threatening disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a natural triterpenoid, Ganoderic acid A (GA-A) in controlling lymphoma growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that GA-A treatment induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death characterized by a dose-dependent increase in active caspases 9 and 3, up-regulation of pro-apoptotic BIM and BAX proteins, and a subsequent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential with release of cytochrome c. In addition to GA-A’s anti-growth activity, we show that lower doses of GA-A enhance HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4+ T cell recognition of lymphoma in vitro. The therapeutic relevance of GA-A treatment was also tested in vivo using the EL4 syngeneic mouse model of metastatic lymphoma. GA-A-treatment significantly prolonged survival of EL4 challenged mice and decreased tumor metastasis to the liver, an outcome accompanied by a marked down-regulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, reduction myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and enhancement of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the host. Thus, GA-A not only selectively induces apoptosis in lymphoma cells, but also enhances cell-mediated immune responses by attenuating MDSCs, and elevating Ag presentation and T cell recognition. The demonstrated therapeutic benefit indicates that GA-A is a candidate for future drug design for the treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25142864

  10. Diminished immune response to vaccinations in obesity: role of myeloid-derived suppressor and other myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiyi; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Miyake, Teruki; Abe, Masanori; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Furukawa, Shinya; Bunzo, Matsuura; Hiasa, Yoichi; Onji, Morikazu

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with an increased production of cytokines and exacerbated immune response. However, obese subjects are susceptible to infections and respond poorly to vaccines. This study evaluated the immune responses of obese mice and the underlying mechanisms by exploring the roles of myeloid cells. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were prepared from C57BL/6J mice fed a high-calorie and high-fat diet for 12 weeks. Humoral and cellular immune responses of DIO mice to a hepatitis B vaccine containing the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were assessed in sera and via a lymphoproliferative assay, respectively. The effects of CD11b(+)GR1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and CD11b(+)GR1(-) non-MDSC on T cell proliferation and cytokine production were compared via a cell culture system. The production of cytokines, expression of activation and exhaustion markers, and proportions of apoptotic T cells were estimated with flow cytometry. Increased T and B lymphocyte proliferation and higher interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were detected in spleen cells and liver non-parenchymal cell cultures of DIO mice compared to controls (p<0.05). However, antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) levels and HBsAg-specific T cell proliferation were significantly lower in DIO mice compared to controls (p<0.05). The addition of MDSC, but not non-MDSC, induced a decrease in HBsAg-specific T cell proliferation, lower cytokine production, decrease in T cell activation, and increase in T cell exhaustion and apoptosis (p<0.05). MDSC play an important role in mediating impaired antigen-specific immunity.

  11. Pam2 lipopeptides systemically increase myeloid-derived suppressor cells through TLR2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Akira; Shime, Hiroaki Takeda, Yohei; Azuma, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-02-13

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are immature myeloid cells that exhibit potent immunosuppressive activity. They are increased in tumor-bearing hosts and contribute to tumor development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on MDSCs may modulate the tumor-supporting properties of MDSCs through pattern-recognition. Pam2 lipopeptides represented by Pam2CSK4 serve as a TLR2 agonist to exert anti-tumor function by dendritic cell (DC)-priming that leads to NK cell activation and cytotoxic T cell proliferation. On the other hand, TLR2 enhances tumor cell progression/invasion by activating tumor-infiltrating macrophages. How MDSCs respond to TLR2 agonists has not yet been determined. In this study, we found intravenous administration of Pam2CSK4 systemically up-regulated the frequency of MDSCs in EG7 tumor-bearing mice. The frequency of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs was accordingly increased in response to Pam2CSK4. MDSCs were not increased by Pam2CSK4 stimuli in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice. Adoptive transfer experiments using CFSE-labeled MDSCs revealed that the TLR2-positive MDSCs survived long in tumor-bearing mice in response to Pam2CSK4 treatment. Since the increased MDSC population sustained immune-suppressive properties, our study suggests that Pam2CSK4-triggered TLR2 activation enhances the MDSC potential and suppress antitumor immune response in tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Pam2CSK4 administration induces systemic accumulation of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs. • TLR2 is essential for Pam2CSK4-induced accumulation of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs. • Pam2CSK4 supports survival of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs in vivo.

  12. Opposing Roles of Dectin-1 Expressed on Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells and Myeloid Dendritic Cells in Th2 Polarization.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Upchurch, Katherine; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Ling; Li, Dapeng; Xue, Yaming; Li, Xiao-Hua; Hori, Toshiyuki; Zurawski, Sandra; Liu, Yong-Jun; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2015-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can induce and control host immune responses. DC subset-dependent functional specialties and their ability to display functional plasticity, which is mainly driven by signals via pattern recognition receptors, identify DCs as immune orchestrators. A pattern recognition receptor, Dectin-1, is expressed on myeloid DCs and known to play important roles in Th17 induction and activation during fungal and certain bacterial infections. In this study, we first demonstrate that human plasmacytoid DCs express Dectin-1 in both mRNA and protein levels. More interestingly, Dectin-1-activated plasmacytoid DCs promote Th2-type T cell responses, whereas Dectin-1-activated myeloid DCs decrease Th2-type T cell responses. Such contrasting outcomes of Th2-type T cell responses by the two DC subsets are mainly due to their distinct abilities to control surface OX40L expression in response to β-glucan. This study provides new insights for the regulation of host immune responses by Dectin-1 expressed on DCs. PMID:26123355

  13. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  16. Curcumin Down-Regulates DNA Methyltransferase 1 and Plays an Anti-Leukemic Role in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianhua; Peng, Yong; Wu, Lai-Chu; Xie, Zhiliang; Deng, Youcai; Hughes, Tiffany; He, Shun; Mo, XiaoKui; Chiu, Ming; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Liu, Shujun; Grever, Michael R.; Chan, Kenneth K.; Liu, Zhongfa

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive components from dietary supplements such as curcumin may represent attractive agents for cancer prevention or treatment. DNA methylation plays a critical role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development, and presents an excellent target for treatment of this disease. However, it remains largely unknown how curcumin, a component of the popular Indian spice turmeric, plays a role in DNA hypomethylation to reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes and to present a potential treatment option for AML. Here we show that curcumin down-regulates DNMT1 expression in AML cell lines, both in vitro and in vivo, and in primary AML cells ex vivo. Mechanistically, curcumin reduced the expression of positive regulators of DNMT1, p65 and Sp1, which correlated with a reduction in binding of these transcription factors to the DNMT1 promoter in AML cell lines. This curcumin-mediated down-regulation of DNMT1 expression was concomitant with p15INK4B tumor suppressor gene reactivation, hypomethylation of the p15INK4B promoter, G1 cell cycle arrest, and induction of tumor cell apoptosis in vitro. In mice implanted with the human AML MV4–11 cell line, administration of curcumin resulted in remarkable suppression of AML tumor growth. Collectively, our data indicate that curcumin shows promise as a potential treatment for AML, and our findings provide a basis for future studies to test the clinical efficacy of curcumin – whether used as a single agent or as an adjuvant – for AML treatment. PMID:23457487

  17. Myeloid cell signatures in tumor microenvironment predicts therapeutic response in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achyut, Bhagelu R; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment (TME) consists of several immune and nonimmune cell populations including tumor cells. For many decades, experimental studies have depicted profound contribution of TME toward cancer progression and metastasis development. Several therapeutic strategies have been tested against TME through preclinical studies and clinical trials. Unfortunately, most of them have shown transient effect, and have largely failed due to aggressive tumor growth and without improving survival. Solid tumors are known to have a strong myeloid component (eg, tumor-associated macrophages) in tumor development. Recent data suggest that therapeutic responses in tumor are characterized by alterations in immune cell signatures, including tumor-associated myeloid cells. Polarized tumor-associated myeloid cells (M1–M2) are critical in impairing therapeutic effect and promoting tumor growth. The present review is intended to compile all the literatures related to the emerging contribution of different populations of myeloid cells in the development of tumor and therapeutic failures. Finally, we have discussed targeting of myeloid cell populations as a combination therapy with chemo-, targeted-, or radiation therapies. PMID:27042097

  18. Differential mechanisms of memory CD8 T cell maintenance by individual myeloid cell types

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Loredana; Stonier, Spencer W.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Schluns, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that individual myeloid subsets have a differential ability to maintain memory CD8 T cells via IL-15. Although DCs support IL-15-mediated homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells in vivo, whether various DC subsets and other myeloid cells similarly mediate homeostasis is unknown. Therefore, we studied the ability of different myeloid cells to maintain memory CD8 T cells in vitro. Using an in vitro cocoulture system that recapitulated known roles of DCs and IL-15 on memory CD8 T cells, all in vitro-derived or ex vivo-isolated DCs maintained CD8 T cells better than rIL-15 alone, and FLT-3L-DCs are the most efficient compared with GM-DCs, BM-derived macrophages, or freshly isolated DCs. Although FLT-3L-DCs were the least effective at inducing CD8 T cell proliferation, FLT-3L-DCs promoted better CD8 T cell survival and increased Bcl-2 and MCL-2 expression in CD8 T cells. T cell maintenance correlated only partially with DC expression of IL-15Rα and IL-15, suggesting that DCs provided additional support signals. Indeed, in the absence of IL-15 signals, CD70/CD27 further supported CD8 T cell maintenance. IFN-α enhanced CD70 expression by DCs, resulting in increased proliferation of CD8 T cells. Overall, this study supports our hypothesis by demonstrating that specific DC subtypes had a greater capacity to support memory CD8 T cell maintenance and did so through different mechanisms. Furthermore, this study shows that IL-15 trans-presentation can work in conjunction with other signals, such as CD70/CD27 interactions, to mediate CD8 T cell homeostasis efficiently. PMID:20354106

  19. Regulation of p21 by TWIST2 contributes to its tumor-suppressor function in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Ma, W; Cui, J; Yao, H; Zhou, H; Ge, Y; Xiao, L; Hu, X; Liu, B-H; Yang, J; Li, Y-Y; Chen, S; Eaves, C J; Wu, D; Zhao, Y

    2015-06-01

    TWIST2 has a dual function in tumors. Its implication in the initiation and metastasis of various solid tumors is well established, and its tumor-suppressor role in murine osteosarcoma cells has been reported recently. However, the function of TWIST2 and its underlying mechanisms in human normal and malignant hematopoiesis remain unclear. In the present study, we found that TWIST2 directly regulated p21 in human hematopoietic cells and whose silence promoted cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. Hypermethylation of TWIST2 occurred to 23 out of the 75 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and resulted in the impaired expression of both TWIST2 and p21. Conversely, TWIST2 overexpression inhibited the growth of AML cells partially through its direct activation of p21 with intact HLH (helix-loop-helix) domain. The microarray data and gene expression validation showed that TWIST2 was sufficient to activate known tumor-suppressor genes, whereas suppress known oncogenes, which further supported its inhibitory effect against AML cells. Taken together, our data have identified a novel TWIST2-p21 axis that modulates the cell cycle of both normal and leukemic cells and demonstrated that the direct regulation of p21 by TWIST2 has a role in its tumor-suppressor function in AML.

  20. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  1. Regression Analysis of Combined Gene Expression Regulation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Liang, Minggao; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is a combinatorial function of genetic/epigenetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV), DNA methylation (DM), transcription factors (TF) occupancy, and microRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptional regulation. At the maturity of microarray/sequencing technologies, large amounts of data measuring the genome-wide signals of those factors became available from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). However, there is a lack of an integrative model to take full advantage of these rich yet heterogeneous data. To this end, we developed RACER (Regression Analysis of Combined Expression Regulation), which fits the mRNA expression as response using as explanatory variables, the TF data from ENCODE, and CNV, DM, miRNA expression signals from TCGA. Briefly, RACER first infers the sample-specific regulatory activities by TFs and miRNAs, which are then used as inputs to infer specific TF/miRNA-gene interactions. Such a two-stage regression framework circumvents a common difficulty in integrating ENCODE data measured in generic cell-line with the sample-specific TCGA measurements. As a case study, we integrated Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) data from TCGA and the related TF binding data measured in K562 from ENCODE. As a proof-of-concept, we first verified our model formalism by 10-fold cross-validation on predicting gene expression. We next evaluated RACER on recovering known regulatory interactions, and demonstrated its superior statistical power over existing methods in detecting known miRNA/TF targets. Additionally, we developed a feature selection procedure, which identified 18 regulators, whose activities clustered consistently with cytogenetic risk groups. One of the selected regulators is miR-548p, whose inferred targets were significantly enriched for leukemia-related pathway, implicating its novel role in AML pathogenesis. Moreover, survival analysis using the inferred activities identified C-Fos as a potential AML

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells promote cross-tolerance in B-cell lymphoma by expanding regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Mgebroff, Stephanie; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2008-07-01

    Tumor-induced T-cell tolerance is a major mechanism that facilitates tumor progression and limits the efficacy of immune therapeutic interventions. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the induction of tolerance to tumor antigens, yet the precise mechanisms regulating its induction in vivo remain to be elucidated. Using the A20 B-cell lymphoma model, here we identify myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) as the tolerogenic antigen presenting cells capable of antigen uptake and presentation to tumor-specific Tregs. MDSC-mediated Treg induction requires arginase but is transforming growth factor-beta independent. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of MDSC function, respectively, with NOHA or sildenafil abrogates Treg proliferation and tumor-induced tolerance in antigen-specific T cells. These findings establish a role for MDSCs in antigen-specific tolerance induction through preferential antigen uptake mediating the recruitment and expansion of Tregs. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions, such as in vivo phosphodiesterase 5-inhibition, which effectively abrogate the immunosuppressive role of MDSCs and reduce Treg numbers, may play a critical role in delaying and/or reversing tolerance induction. PMID:18593947

  3. MUC1-C oncoprotein promotes FLT3 receptor activation in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Suiyang; Yin, Li; Stroopinsky, Dina; Rajabi, Hasan; Puissant, Alexandre; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Avigan, David; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Blasts from approximately one-third of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harbor activating mutations in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor tyrosine kinase that confer a poor prognosis. The Mucin 1-C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in AML blasts and stem cells; however, there is no known interaction between MUC1-C and FLT3. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C associates with wild-type and mutant FLT3 in AML cells. Targeting MUC1-C with the cell-penetrating peptide inhibitor GO-203 disrupts MUC1-C/FLT3 complexes and downregulates FLT3 activation. GO-203 treatment of AML cells was also associated with inhibition of the FLT3 downstream effectors AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and STAT5. The results further show that AML cells with FLT3-activating mutations and resistant to the FLT3 inhibitor midostaurin/PKC412 are sensitive to GO-203–induced growth arrest and death. Moreover, GO-203 increases sensitivity of mutant FLT3 AML cells to FLT3 inhibitor treatment. These results indicate that MUC1-C contributes to FLT3 activation in AML cells and that targeting MUC1-C inhibits the FLT3 signaling pathway. Our findings support the development of MUC1-C inhibitors alone and in combination with agents that target FLT3 for the treatment of wild-type and mutant FLT3 AML. PMID:24282218

  4. Myeloid Angiogenic Cells Act as Alternative M2 Macrophages and Modulate Angiogenesis through Interleukin-8

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Reinhold J; O’Neill, Christina L; O’Doherty, T Michelle; Knott, Henry; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Gardiner, Tom A; Stitt, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) promote angiogenesis, and clinical trials have shown such cell therapy to be feasible for treating ischemic disease. However, clinical outcomes have been contradictory owing to the diverse range of EPC types used. We recently characterized two EPC subtypes, and identified outgrowth endothelial cells as the only EPC type with true progenitor and endothelial characteristics. By contrast, myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs) were shown to be monocytic cells without endothelial characteristics despite being widely described as “EPCs.” In the current study we demonstrated that although MACs do not become endothelial cells or directly incorporate into a microvascular network, they can significantly induce endothelial tube formation in vitro and vascular repair in vivo. MAC-derived interleukin-8 (IL-8) was identified as a key paracrine factor, and blockade of IL-8 but not vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) prevented MAC-induced angiogenesis. Extracellular IL-8 transactivates VEGFR2 and induces phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Further transcriptomic and immunophenotypic analysis indicates that MACs represent alternative activated M2 macrophages. Our findings demonstrate an unequivocal role for MACs in angiogenesis, which is linked to paracrine release of cytokines such as IL-8. We also show, for the first time, the true identity of these cells as alternative M2 macrophages with proangiogenic, antiinflammatory and pro–tissue-repair properties. PMID:21670847

  5. Essential role of spi-1-like (spi-1l) in zebrafish myeloid cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bukrinsky, Alex; Griffin, Kevin J P; Zhao, Yan; Lin, Shuo; Banerjee, Utpal

    2009-02-26

    The ETS protein Spi-1/Pu.1 plays a pivotal and widespread role throughout hematopoiesis in many species. This study describes the identification, characterization, and functional analysis of a new zebrafish spi transcription factor spi-1-like (spi-1l) that is expressed in primitive myeloid cells, erythro-myelo progenitor cells, and in the adult kidney. Spi-1l functions genetically downstream of etsrp, scl, and spi-1/pu.1 in myeloid differentiation. Spi-1l is coexpressed in a subset of spi-1/pu.1 cells and its function is necessary and sufficient for macrophage and granulocyte differentiation. These results establish a critical role for spi-1l in zebrafish myeloid cell differentiation.

  6. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  7. Oncogenic mTOR signalling recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Welte, Thomas; Kim, Ik Sun; Tian, Lin; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Li, June; Holdman, Xue B; Herschkowitz, Jason I; Pond, Adam; Xie, Guorui; Kurley, Sarah; Nguyen, Tuan; Liao, Lan; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Pang, Lan; Mo, Qianxing; Edwards, Dean P; Huang, Shixia; Xin, Li; Xu, Jianming; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Wang, Tian; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Xiang H-F

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in primary and metastatic cancer progression. MDSC regulation is widely variable even among patients harbouring the same type of malignancy, and the mechanisms governing such heterogeneity are largely unknown. Here, integrating human tumour genomics and syngeneic mammary tumour models, we demonstrate that mTOR signalling in cancer cells dictates a mammary tumour's ability to stimulate MDSC accumulation through regulating G-CSF. Inhibiting this pathway or its activators (for example, FGFR) impairs tumour progression, which is partially rescued by restoring MDSCs or G-CSF. Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) exhibit elevated G-CSF. MDSCs reciprocally increase TIC frequency through activating Notch in tumour cells, forming a feedforward loop. Analyses of primary breast cancers and patient-derived xenografts corroborate these mechanisms in patients. These findings establish a non-canonical oncogenic role of mTOR signalling in recruiting pro-tumorigenic MDSCs and show how defined cancer subsets may evolve to promote and depend on a distinct immune microenvironment. PMID:27183469

  8. Myeloid derived suppressor cells - a new therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Robert; Markowitz, Joseph; Carson, William E

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are increased in states of cancer, inflammation and infection. In malignant states, MDSC are induced by tumor secreted growth factors. MDSC play an important part in suppression of host immune responses through several mechanisms such as production of arginase 1, release of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and secretion of immune-suppressive cytokines. This leads to a permissive immune environment necessary for the growth of malignant cells. MDSC may also contribute to angiogenesis and tumor invasion. This review focuses on currently available strategies to inhibit MDSC in the treatment of cancer.

  9. Myeloid derived suppressor cells – a new therapeutic target in the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are increased in states of cancer, inflammation and infection. In malignant states, MDSC are induced by tumor secreted growth factors. MDSC play an important part in suppression of host immune responses through several mechanisms such as production of arginase 1, release of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and secretion of immune-suppressive cytokines. This leads to a permissive immune environment necessary for the growth of malignant cells. MDSC may also contribute to angiogenesis and tumor invasion. This review focuses on currently available strategies to inhibit MDSC in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24829747

  10. Transcription factor RUNX1 promotes survival of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyama, Susumu; Schibler, Janet; Cunningham, Lea; Zhang, Yue; Rao, Yalan; Nishimoto, Nahoko; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Olsson, Andre; Wunderlich, Mark; Link, Kevin A.; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Kurokawa, Mineo; Liu, P. Paul; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    RUNX1 is generally considered a tumor suppressor in myeloid neoplasms. Inactivating RUNX1 mutations have frequently been found in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no somatic RUNX1 alteration was found in AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins, such as core-binding factor (CBF) leukemia and MLL fusion leukemia, raising the possibility that RUNX1 could actually promote the growth of these leukemia cells. Using normal human cord blood cells and those expressing leukemogenic fusion proteins, we discovered a dual role of RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. RUNX1 overexpression inhibited the growth of normal cord blood cells by inducing myeloid differentiation, whereas a certain level of RUNX1 activity was required for the growth of AML1-ETO and MLL-AF9 cells. Using a mouse genetic model, we also showed that the combined loss of Runx1/Cbfb inhibited leukemia development induced by MLL-AF9. RUNX2 could compensate for the loss of RUNX1. The survival effect of RUNX1 was mediated by BCL2 in MLL fusion leukemia. Our study unveiled an unexpected prosurvival role for RUNX1 in myeloid leukemogenesis. Inhibiting RUNX1 activity rather than enhancing it could be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs with leukemogenic fusion proteins. PMID:23979164

  11. Fas (CD95) expression in myeloid cells promotes obesity-induced muscle insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wueest, Stephan; Mueller, Rouven; Blüher, Matthias; Item, Flurin; Chin, Annie S H; Wiedemann, Michael S F; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Kovtonyuk, Larisa; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Schoenle, Eugen J; Manz, Markus G; Konrad, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver has been implicated in obesity-associated insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Yet, the contribution of inflammatory cells to the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. In a large cohort of obese human individuals, blood monocyte Fas (CD95) expression correlated with systemic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance. To test a causal role for myeloid cell Fas expression in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, we generated myeloid/haematopoietic cell-specific Fas-depleted mice. Myeloid/haematopoietic Fas deficiency prevented the development of glucose intolerance in high fat-fed mice, in ob/ob mice, and in mice acutely challenged by LPS. In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated preservation of muscle insulin responsiveness with no effect on adipose tissue or liver. Studies using neutralizing antibodies demonstrated a role for TNFα as mediator between myeloid Fas and skeletal muscle insulin resistance, supported by significant correlations between monocyte Fas expression and circulating TNFα in humans. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an unanticipated crosstalk between myeloid cells and skeletal muscle in the development of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24203314

  12. Delineation of Natural Killer Cell Differentiation from Myeloid Progenitors in Human.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Ye, Weijian; Jian Tan, Wei; Mei Yong, Kylie Su; Liu, Min; Qi Tan, Shu; Loh, Eva; Te Chang, Kenneth; Chye Tan, Thiam; Preiser, Peter R; Chen, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of natural killer (NK) cell development in human is incomplete partly because of limited access to appropriate human tissues. We have developed a cytokine-enhanced humanized mouse model with greatly improved reconstitution and function of human NK cells. Here we report the presence of a cell population in the bone marrow of the cytokine-treated humanized mice that express both NK cell marker CD56 and myeloid markers such as CD36 and CD33. The CD56(+)CD33(+)CD36(+) cells are also found in human cord blood, fetal and adult bone marrow. Although the CD56(+)CD33(+)CD36(+) cells do not express the common NK cell functional receptors and exhibit little cytotoxic and cytokine-producing activities, they readily differentiate into mature NK cells by acquiring expression of NK cell receptors and losing expression of the myeloid markers. Further studies show that CD33(+)CD36(+) myeloid NK precursors are derived from granulo-myelomonocytic progenitors. These results delineate the pathway of human NK cell differentiation from myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and suggest the utility of humanized mice for studying human hematopoiesis. PMID:26456148

  13. IGK with conserved IGKV/IGKJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy. PMID:26429876

  14. Molecular analysis of the apoptotic effects of BPA in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bontempo, Paola; Mita, Luigi; Doto, Antonella; Miceli, Marco; Nebbioso, Angela; Lepore, Ilaria; Franci, GianLuigi; Menafra, Roberta; Carafa, Vincenzo; Conte, Mariarosaria; De Bellis, Floriana; Manzo, Fabio; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Benedetti, Rosaria; D'Amato, Loredana; Marino, Maria; Bolli, Alessandro; Del Pozzo, Giovanna; Diano, Nadia; Portaccio, Marianna; Mita, Gustavo D; Vietri, Maria Teresa; Cioffi, Michele; Nola, Ernesto; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Sica, Vincenzo; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Background: BPA (bisphenol A or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-phenol)propane) is present in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, which can be used in impact-resistant safety equipment and baby bottles, as protective coatings inside metal food containers, and as composites and sealants in dentistry. Recently, attention has focused on the estrogen-like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound. Methods: Cell cycle, apoptosis and differentiation analyses; western blots. Results: BPA is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in three different acute myeloid leukemias. Although some granulocytic differentiation concomitantly occurred in NB4 cells upon BPA treatment, the major action was the induction of apoptosis. BPA mediated apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred by activation of extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways modulating both FAS and TRAIL and by inducing BAD phosphorylation in NB4 cells. Finally, also non genomic actions such as the early decrease of both ERK and AKT phosphorylation were induced by BPA thus indicating that a complex intersection of regulations occur for the apoptotic action of BPA. Conclusion: BPA is able to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells via caspase activation and involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. PMID:19538739

  15. Epigenetic regulation of miRNA-124 and multiple downstream targets is associated with treatment response in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbin; Pattie, Phillip; Chandrasekara, Sahan; Spencer, Andrew; Dear, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Particular interest has focused on miRNA-124 expression, which is inhibited in MDS and has recently been demonstrated to be upregulated in response to epigenetic treatment (EGT). Previous studies have determined the in vitro and in vivo expression of miRNA-124 and several molecular targets, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, CDK6 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms associated with the miRNA-124-mediated therapeutic response to EGT in MDS and identify additional potential biomarkers of early EGT treatment response in myeloid malignancies. In vitro studies in the HL60 leukemic cell line identified upregulation of miRNA-124 expression in response to single-agent EGT with either azacytidine (AZA) or the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589). Combination EGT with AZA and LBH589 resulted in significant additive induction of miRNA-124 expression. Expression of downstream targets of miRNA-124, including CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2, in response to single agent and combined EGT was determined in HL60 cells. Single and combination EGT treatment resulted in inhibition of CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2 expression with combination EGT resulting in a significant and additive inhibitory effect. In vivo studies using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients receiving combination EGT for high risk MDS or acute myeloid leukemia demonstrated significant induction of miRNA-124 and inhibition CDK4 and CDK6 messenger (m)RNA expression in patients that responded to combination EGT. A trend to inhibited EZH2 mRNA expression was also identified in response to combination EGT. Overall, the present observations identify a potential molecular mechanism for miRNA-124-mediated response to EGT involving regulation of CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2 expression. In addition, the present findings further qualify mi

  16. Epigenetic regulation of miRNA-124 and multiple downstream targets is associated with treatment response in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbin; Pattie, Phillip; Chandrasekara, Sahan; Spencer, Andrew; Dear, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression has recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Particular interest has focused on miRNA-124 expression, which is inhibited in MDS and has recently been demonstrated to be upregulated in response to epigenetic treatment (EGT). Previous studies have determined the in vitro and in vivo expression of miRNA-124 and several molecular targets, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, CDK6 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms associated with the miRNA-124-mediated therapeutic response to EGT in MDS and identify additional potential biomarkers of early EGT treatment response in myeloid malignancies. In vitro studies in the HL60 leukemic cell line identified upregulation of miRNA-124 expression in response to single-agent EGT with either azacytidine (AZA) or the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589). Combination EGT with AZA and LBH589 resulted in significant additive induction of miRNA-124 expression. Expression of downstream targets of miRNA-124, including CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2, in response to single agent and combined EGT was determined in HL60 cells. Single and combination EGT treatment resulted in inhibition of CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2 expression with combination EGT resulting in a significant and additive inhibitory effect. In vivo studies using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients receiving combination EGT for high risk MDS or acute myeloid leukemia demonstrated significant induction of miRNA-124 and inhibition CDK4 and CDK6 messenger (m)RNA expression in patients that responded to combination EGT. A trend to inhibited EZH2 mRNA expression was also identified in response to combination EGT. Overall, the present observations identify a potential molecular mechanism for miRNA-124-mediated response to EGT involving regulation of CDK4, CDK6 and EZH2 expression. In addition, the present findings further qualify mi

  17. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias. PMID:23418874

  18. Conditional HIF-1 induction produces multistage neovascularization with stage-specific sensitivity to VEGFR inhibitors and myeloid cell independence

    PubMed Central

    Oladipupo, Sunday S.; Hu, Song; Santeford, Andrea C.; Yao, Junjie; Kovalski, Joanna R.; Shohet, Ralph V.; Maslov, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Neovascularization is a crucial component of tumor growth and ischemia. Although prior work primarily used disease models, delineation of neovascularization in the absence of disease can reveal intrinsic mechanisms of microvessel regulation amenable to manipulation in illness. We created a conditional model of epithelial HIF-1 induction in adult mice (TetON-HIF-1 mice). Longitudinal photoacoustic microscopy (L-PAM) was coincidentally developed for noninvasive, label-free serial imaging of red blood cell-perfused vasculature in the same mouse for weeks to months. TetON-HIF-1 mice evidenced 3 stages of neovascularization: development, maintenance, and transgene-dependent regression. Regression occurred despite extensive and tight pericyte coverage. L-PAM mapped microvascular architecture and quantified volumetric changes in neocapillary morphogenesis, arteriovenous remodeling, and microvessel regression. Developmental stage endothelial proliferation down-regulation was associated with a DNA damage checkpoint consisting of p53, p21, and endothelial γ-H2AX induction. The neovasculature was temporally responsive to VEGFR2 immuno-blockade, with the developmental stage sensitive, and the maintenance stage resistant, to DC101 treatment. L-PAM analysis also pinpointed microvessels ablated or resistant to VEGFR2 immuno-blockade. HIF-1–recruited myeloid cells did not mediate VEGFR2 inhibitor resistance. Thus, HIF-1 neovascularization in the absence of disease is self-regulated via cell autonomous endothelial checkpoints, and resistant to angiogenesis inhibitors independent of myeloid cells. PMID:21307392

  19. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in the stem cell compartment (CD34+lin-) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, B; George, T I; Kavanau, K; Avet-Loiseau, H; Moore, D; Willman, C L; Slovak, M L; Atwater, S; Head, D R; Pallavicini, M G

    1995-08-01

    Leukemia may be viewed as a clonal expansion of blast cells; however, the role of primitive cells and/or stem cells in disease etiology and progression is unclear. We investigated stem cell involvement in leukemia using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunofluorescence labeling of hematopoietic subpopulations, and flow cytometric analysis/sorting to discriminate and quantify cytogenetically aberrant stem cells in 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and three myelodysplastic (MDS) specimens. Flow cytometric analysis and sorting were used to discriminate and collect a primitive subpopulation enriched in stem cells expressing CD34+ and lacking CD33 and CD38 (CD34+lin-). A subpopulation containing progenitors and differentiating myeloid cells expressed CD34, CD33, and CD38 (CD34+lin+). Nine specimens contained less than 10% CD34+ cells and, thus, were considered to be CD34- leukemias. Mature lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid subpopulations were sorted on the basis of antigen-linked immunofluorescence. Cytogenetically aberrant cells in sorted subpopulations were identified using FISH with enumerator probes selected on the basis of diagnosis karyotype. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin- cells were present at frequencies between 9% and 99% in all specimens. CD34+lin- cytogenetically aberrant cells comprised between 0.05% and 11.9% of the marrow/blood specimens. Cytogenetically aberrant CD34+lin+ cells constituted 0.01% tp 56% of the marrow/blood population. These data demonstrate that aberrant cells are present in primitive CD34+ stem cell compartments, even in CD34- leukemias. Stem cell involvement was confirmed further by sorting lymphoid and erythroid subpopulations from eight specimens in which the predominant leukemic population lacked lymphoid/erythroid differentiation markers. In these specimens, as well as in multiple lineages, suggests involvement of a cell(s) with multilineage capabilities. The ability of aberrant CD34+lin- stem cells to contribute to

  20. Interaction between arsenic trioxide and human primary cells: emphasis on human cells of myeloid origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3); ATO) is considered to be one of the most potent drugs in cancer chemotherapy and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is well established that treatment of APL patients with ATO is associated with the disappearance of the PML-RARalpha fusion transcript, the characteristic APL gene product of the chromosomal translocation t(15;17). Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. Several reports have indicated that ATO acts principally by inducing cell apoptosis not only in APL, but in a variety of non-APL cells including myeloma cells, chronic myeloid leukemia cells and cells of immune origin, including B or T lymphocytes, macrophages and, more recently, neutrophils. There is an increasing amount of data, including some from our laboratory, concerning the interaction between ATO and human primary cells. The focus of this review will be to cover the role of ATO in human immune primary cells with special emphasis on cells of myeloid origin.

  1. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M.; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  2. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chang-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ru; Jadhav, Appaso; Wu, Chia-Yung; Sargeant, Aaron M; Bai, Li-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK) inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1) and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt) and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy. PMID:27537872

  3. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells: Possible Link Between Chronic Obstrucive Pulmonary Disease and Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Scrimini, Sergio; Pons, Jaume; Sauleda, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer (LC) are prevalent diseases and are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is strong evidence to show that COPD is an independent risk factor for LC. Chronic inflammation plays a significant pathogenic role in COPD comorbidities, particularly in LC. On the one hand, cellular and molecular inflammatory mediators promote carcinogenesis and, on the other, chronic inflammation impairs the capacity of the immune system to identify and destroy pre-malignant and malignant cells, a process known as tumor immune surveillance. This altered antitumor immunity is due in part to the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are characterized by an ability to suppress the antitumor activity of T-cells by down-regulation of the T-cell receptor ζ chain (TCRζ) through the catabolism of L-arginine. COPD and LC patients share a common pattern of expansion and activation of circulating MDSC associated with TCRζ downregulation and impaired peripheral T-cell function. The objectives of this study were to review the evidence on the association between COPD and LC and to analyze how MDSC accumulation may alter tumor immune surveillance in COPD, and therefore, promote LC development. PMID:26321390

  4. Mesenchymal Transition of High-Grade Breast Carcinomas Depends on Extracellular Matrix Control of Myeloid Suppressor Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Sangaletti, Sabina; Tripodo, Claudio; Santangelo, Alessandra; Castioni, Nadia; Portararo, Paola; Gulino, Alessandro; Botti, Laura; Parenza, Mariella; Cappetti, Barbara; Orlandi, Rosaria; Tagliabue, Elda; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P

    2016-09-27

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the biological and clinical heterogeneity of breast cancer, and different prognostic groups can be identified according to specific ECM signatures. In high-grade, but not low-grade, tumors, an ECM signature characterized by high SPARC expression (ECM3) identifies tumors with increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), reduced treatment response, and poor prognosis. To better understand how this ECM3 signature is contributing to tumorigenesis, we expressed SPARC in isogenic cell lines and found that SPARC overexpression in tumor cells reduces their growth rate and induces EMT. SPARC expression also results in the formation of a highly immunosuppressive microenvironment, composed by infiltrating T regulatory cells, mast cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The ability of SPARC to induce EMT depended on the localization and suppressive function of myeloid cells, and inhibition of the suppressive function MDSCs by administration of aminobisphosphonates could revert EMT, rendering SPARC-overexpressing tumor cells sensitive to Doxil. We conclude that that SPARC is regulating the interplay between MDSCs and the ECM to drive the induction of EMT in tumor cells.

  5. Mesenchymal Transition of High-Grade Breast Carcinomas Depends on Extracellular Matrix Control of Myeloid Suppressor Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Sangaletti, Sabina; Tripodo, Claudio; Santangelo, Alessandra; Castioni, Nadia; Portararo, Paola; Gulino, Alessandro; Botti, Laura; Parenza, Mariella; Cappetti, Barbara; Orlandi, Rosaria; Tagliabue, Elda; Chiodoni, Claudia; Colombo, Mario P

    2016-09-27

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes to the biological and clinical heterogeneity of breast cancer, and different prognostic groups can be identified according to specific ECM signatures. In high-grade, but not low-grade, tumors, an ECM signature characterized by high SPARC expression (ECM3) identifies tumors with increased epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), reduced treatment response, and poor prognosis. To better understand how this ECM3 signature is contributing to tumorigenesis, we expressed SPARC in isogenic cell lines and found that SPARC overexpression in tumor cells reduces their growth rate and induces EMT. SPARC expression also results in the formation of a highly immunosuppressive microenvironment, composed by infiltrating T regulatory cells, mast cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The ability of SPARC to induce EMT depended on the localization and suppressive function of myeloid cells, and inhibition of the suppressive function MDSCs by administration of aminobisphosphonates could revert EMT, rendering SPARC-overexpressing tumor cells sensitive to Doxil. We conclude that that SPARC is regulating the interplay between MDSCs and the ECM to drive the induction of EMT in tumor cells. PMID:27681434

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are involved in lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-induced endothelial cell dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong

    2014-08-15

    The underlying mechanisms that lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency causes infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in multiple organs and subsequent inflammation remain incompletely understood. Endothelial cells (ECs), lining the inner layer of blood vessels, constitute barriers regulating leukocytes transmigration to the site of inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that ECs are dysfunctional in LAL-deficient (lal(-/-)) mice. We found that Ly6G(+) cells transmigrated more efficiently across lal(-/-) ECs than wild-type (lal(+/+)) ECs, which were associated with increased levels of PECAM-1 and MCP-1 in lal(-/-) ECs. In addition, lal(-/-) ECs showed enhanced migration and proliferation, decreased apoptosis, but impaired tube formation and angiogenesis. lal(-/-) ECs also suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro. Interestingly, lal(-/-) Ly6G(+) cells promoted in vivo angiogenesis (including a tumor model), EC tube formation, and proliferation. Finally, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was activated in lal(-/-) ECs, and inhibition of mTOR reversed EC dysfunctions, including decreasing Ly6G(+) cell transmigration, delaying migration, and relieving suppression of T cell proliferation, which was mediated by decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Our results indicate that LAL regulates EC functions through interaction with MDSCs and modulation of the mTOR pathway, which may provide a mechanistic basis for targeting MDSCs or mTOR to rejuvenate EC functions in LAL deficiency-related diseases. PMID:25000979

  7. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E.; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y.J.; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin−CD34+ cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  8. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y J; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin(-)CD34(+) cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  9. Mechanisms responsible for nilotinib resistance in human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and reversal of resistance.

    PubMed

    Camgoz, Aylin; Gencer, Emel Basak; Ural, Ali Ugur; Baran, Yusuf

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance remains a significant obstacle to successful chemotherapy. The ability to determine the possible resistance mechanisms and surmount the resistance is likely to improve chemotherapy. Nilotinib is a very effective drug in the treatment of imatinib-sensitive or -resistant patients. Although very successful hematologic and cytogenetic responses have been obtained in nilotinib-treated patients, in recent years cases showing resistance to nilotinib have been observed. We aimed to examine the mechanisms underlying nilotinib resistance and to provide new targets for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). There was an up-regulation of antiapoptotic BCR/ABL, GCS and SK-1 genes and MRP1 transporter gene and down-regulation of apoptotic Bax and CerS1 genes in nilotinib-resistant cells. There was no mutation in the nilotinib-binding region of BCR/ABL in resistant cells. Inhibiton of GCS and SK-1 restored nilotinib sensitivity. Targeting the proteins that are involved in nilotinib resistance in addition to the inhibition of BCR/ABL could be a better method of treatment in CML.

  10. Critical Role of c-Myc in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Involving Direct Regulation of miR-26a and Histone Methyltransferase EZH2.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Beatrice; Iosue, Ilaria; Djodji Damas, Nkerorema; Mangiavacchi, Arianna; Chiaretti, Sabina; Messina, Monica; Padula, Fabrizio; Guarini, Anna; Bozzoni, Irene; Fazi, Francesco; Fatica, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    Increased expression or aberrant activation of c-Myc plays an important role in leukemogenesis. Here, we show that in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), c-Myc directly controls the expression of EZH2, a component of the Polycomb repressive complex 2, and miR-26a. miR-26a is downregulated in primary blasts from AML patients and, during myeloid differentiation of AML cells, is induced together with a decrease in c-Myc and Ezh2 levels. Previously, EZH2 was shown to be regulated by miR-26a at the translational levels in lymphomas. However, we demonstrate that in AML, the variation of EZH2 mainly depends on c-Myc transcriptional control. We also show that enforced expression of miR-26a in AML cells is able to inhibit cell cycle progression by downregulating cyclin E2 expression. In addition, increased levels of miR-26a potentiate the antiproliferative effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VitD) and stimulate myeloid differentiation. Our results identify new molecular targets of c-Myc in AML and highlight miR-26a attractiveness as a therapeutic target in leukemia.

  11. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii stimulates immunity to pancreatic cancer by manipulation of myeloid cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kiah L.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8+ T-cell populations. Although CD4+ T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4+ T cells as well as NK cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8+ T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer. PMID:25804437

  12. Deficient IFN Signaling by Myeloid Cells Leads to MAVS-Dependent Virus-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Amelia K.; Ramos, Hilario J.; Wu, Xiaobo; Shrestha, Bimmi; Gorman, Matthew; Kim, Kristin Y.; Suthar, Mehul S.; Atkinson, John P.; Gale Jr, Michael; Diamond, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) signaling response limits infection of many RNA and DNA viruses. To define key cell types that require type I IFN signaling to orchestrate immunity against West Nile virus (WNV), we infected mice with conditional deletions of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) gene. Deletion of the Ifnar gene in subsets of myeloid cells resulted in uncontrolled WNV replication, vasoactive cytokine production, sepsis, organ damage, and death that were remarkably similar to infection of Ifnar−/− mice completely lacking type I IFN signaling. In Mavs−/−×Ifnar−/− myeloid cells and mice lacking both Ifnar and the RIG-I-like receptor adaptor gene Mavs, cytokine production was muted despite high levels of WNV infection. Thus, in myeloid cells, viral infection triggers signaling through MAVS to induce proinflammatory cytokines that can result in sepsis and organ damage. Viral pathogenesis was caused in part by massive complement activation, as liver damage was minimized in animals lacking complement components C3 or factor B or treated with neutralizing anti-C5 antibodies. Disease in Ifnar−/− and CD11c Cre+Ifnarf/f mice also was facilitated by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, as blocking antibodies diminished complement activation and prolonged survival without altering viral burden. Collectively, our findings establish the dominant role of type I IFN signaling in myeloid cells in restricting virus infection and controlling pathological inflammation and tissue injury. PMID:24743949

  13. A Cell-Based High-Throughput Screening for Inducers of Myeloid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Radomska, Hanna S.; Jernigan, Finith; Nakayama, Sohei; Jorge, Susan E.; Sun, Lijun; Tenen, Daniel G.; Kobayashi, Susumu S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress of genetic studies has dramatically unveiled pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, overall survival of AML still remains unsatisfactory and development of novel therapeutics is required. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein α (C/EBPα) is one of crucial transcription factors that induce granulocytic differentiation and its activity is perturbed in human myeloid leukemias. As its re-expression can induce differentiation and subsequent apoptosis of leukemic cells in vitro, we hypothesized that chemical compounds that restore C/EBPα expression and/or activity would lead to myeloid differentiation of leukemic cells. Using a cell-based high-throughput screening, we identified 2-[(E)-2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)vinyl]-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone as a potent inducer of C/EBPα and myeloid differentiation. Leukemia cell lines and primary blast cells isolated from human AML patients treated with ICCB280 demonstrated evidence of morphological and functional differentiation, as well as massive apoptosis. We performed conformational analyses of the high-throughput screening hit compounds to postulate the spatial requirements for high potency. Our results warrant a development of novel differentiation therapies and significantly impact care of AML patients with unfavorable prognosis in the near future. PMID:26109609

  14. Increased sensitivity of multidrug-resistant myeloid leukemia cell lines to lovastatin.

    PubMed

    Maksumova, L; Ohnishi, K; Muratkhodjaev, F; Zhang, W; Pan, L; Takeshita, A; Ohno, R

    2000-08-01

    Lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, reportedly inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of tumor cells with MDR-1 coded P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression. In this study we investigated the sensitivity to lovastatin of eight myeloid leukemia cell lines: K562, NOMO-1, NB4 and its retinoic acid (RA) resistant subline NB4/RA, and their multidrug-resistant (MDR) sublines: K562/ADR, NOMO-1/ADR, NB4/MDR and NB4/RA/MDR. MTT and apoptosis assays revealed that K562/ADR, NOMO-1/ADR and NB4/RA/MDR were more sensitive to lovastatin than their parental cell lines, while NB4/MDR showed the same level of sensitivity as parental NB4 cells, which already were very sensitive to lovastatin. Significant elevation of transcript levels of HMG-CoA reductase was observed by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis in more than three lovastatin-sensitive MDR sublines, but not in NB4/MDR compared with the parental cell lines. HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels were up-regulated more than two-fold by the exposure to lovastatin in all of the parental non-Pgp-expressing cell lines. In NB4/MDR, HMG-CoA reductase mRNA level was elevated to a similar extent as in parental NB4, whereas in three other MDR sublines which showed preferential sensitivity to lovastatin, their HMG-CoA reductase mRNA levels were not significantly elevated after 24- and 48-h treatment with lovastatin. These results indicate a connection between drug resistance and regulation of the mevalonate pathway, and further strengthen the clinical possibility that drug resistant leukemias would be susceptible to treatment with lovastatin. PMID:10942241

  15. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  16. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  18. Myeloid STAT3 inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis by regulating T helper 1 cytokine and interleukin-17 production

    PubMed Central

    Lafdil, Fouad; Wang, Hua; Park, Ogyi; Zhang, Weici; Moritoki, Yuki; Yin, Shi; Fu, Xin Yuan; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims T-cell–mediated hepatitis is a leading cause of acute liver failure; there is no effective treatment and the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are obscure. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune-cell signaling pathways involved—specifically the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)—in T-cell–mediated hepatitis in mice. Methods T-cell–mediated hepatitis was induced in mice by injection of concanavalin A (Con A). Mice with myeloid cell-specific and T-cell–specific deletion of STAT3 were generated. Results STAT3 was activated in myeloid and T cells following Con A injection. Deletion of STAT3 specifically from myeloid cells exacerbated T-cell hepatitis and induced STAT1-dependent production of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ), and to a lesser extent of Th17 cytokines (IL-17 and IL-22), in a STAT1-independent manner. In contrast, deletion of STAT3 in T cells reduced T-cell mediated hepatitis and IL-17 production. Furthermore, deletion of IFN-γ completely abolished Con A-induced T-cell hepatitis whereas deletion of IL-17 slightly but significantly reduced such injury. In vitro experiments indicated that IL-17 promoted liver inflammation but inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Conclusion Myeloid STAT3 activation inhibits T-cell–mediated hepatitis via suppression of a Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) in a STAT1-dependent manner whereas STAT3 activation in T cells promotes T-cell hepatitis to a lesser extent, via induction of IL-17. Therefore, activation of STAT3 in myeloid cells could be a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with T-cell hepatitis. PMID:19686746

  19. Interactome analysis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine models of colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aliper, Alexander M; Frieden-Korovkina, Victoria P; Buzdin, Anton; Roumiantsev, Sergey A; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2014-11-30

    In solid cancers, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) infiltrate (peri)tumoral tissues to induce immune tolerance and hence to establish a microenvironment permissive to tumor growth. Importantly, the mechanisms that facilitate such infiltration or a subsequent immune suppression are not fully understood. Hence, in this study, we aimed to delineate disparate molecular pathways which MDSC utilize in murine models of colon or breast cancer. Using pathways enrichment analysis, we completed interactome maps of multiple signaling pathways in CD11b+/Gr1(high/low) MDSC from spleens and tumor infiltrates of mice with c26GM colon cancer and tumor infiltrates of MDSC in 4T1 breast cancer. In both cancer models, infiltrating MDSC, but not CD11b+ splenic cells, have been found to be enriched in multiple signaling molecules suggestive of their enhanced proliferative and invasive phenotypes. The interactome data has been subsequently used to reconstruct a previously unexplored regulation of MDSC cell cycle by the c-myc transcription factor which was predicted by the analysis. Thus, this study represents a first interactome mapping of distinct multiple molecular pathways whereby MDSC sustain cancer progression. PMID:25294811

  20. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  1. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a novel target for the control of osteolytic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from mice bearing bone metastases differentiate into functional osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo, through a signaling pathway that relies on nitric oxide. In addition, MDSC-targeting drugs have been shown to robustly inhibit osteolysis. Thus, MDSC stand out as novel osteoclast progenitors and hence as candidate targets for the control of osteolytic bone disease. PMID:23762794

  3. Effect of tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors on differentiation and immune suppressive features of myeloid cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that cancers affect differentiation of dendritic cells and promote systemic expansion of immune suppressive immature myeloid cells. This phenomenon may represent a mechanism of tumor escape from immune attack and could have significant impact on tumor progression. In this review we discuss the role of different tumor-derived factors, which were implicated in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation. The role of reactive oxygen species as well as JAK/STAT signaling in mechanisms of the effects of tumor-derived factors on myeloid cells is also discussed. PMID:16983515

  4. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  5. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Bernhard F; Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Prokhorov, Alexandr; Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A; Berger, Steffen M; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells.

  6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) detection of trisomy 8 in myeloid cells in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML): a study of archival blood and bone marrow smears.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P L; Arthur, D C; Litz, C E; Brunning, R D

    1994-10-01

    Patients in accelerated phase or blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) frequently develop clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in addition to the Philadelphia chromosome. Using a DNA probe directed to the centromere of chromosome 8, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on archival Wright-stained blood and bone marrow smears of seven patients with CML and with a known +8 clone by metaphase cytogenetics to determine the distribution of +8 in interphase cells. All slides had been stored at ambient temperature for 12-26 months. The bone marrow aspirate smears of 21 non-leukemic patients served as controls. Trisomy 8 was demonstrated in all myeloid cell lines including the neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and erythroid precursors, but not in the lymphocytes. The extra chromosome 8 was present in mature segmented granulocytes as well as more immature precursors. The percentage of +8 cells was highest in specimens from patients with CML in myeloid blast crisis (mean 64%), followed by those in accelerated phase (mean 39%). Three specimens from patients in morphologic chronic phase showed the lowest percentage of +8 cells (mean 13%). One patient was studied twice and showed a substantial expansion of +8 cells with progression from accelerated phase to myeloid blast crisis. Compared to metaphase cytogenetics, the proportion of +8 cells detected by FISH was often lower. We conclude that the acquisition of trisomy 8 in CML occurs in a pluripotent myeloid stem cell apparently incapable of expressing mature lymphoid phenotype, and that morphologic progression of disease is generally associated with an expansion of the +8 component.

  7. FOXP1 Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Erythroid and Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Lovrić, Eva; Pavlov, Katarina Horvat; Korać, Petra; Dominis, Mara

    2015-09-01

    FOXP1 protein was firstly analyzed in normal tissues, and afterwards in different tumor tissues, mainly carcinoma and lymphoma. In B-cell malignancies, its role was well explored; its expression was shown to be connected with disease prognosis in certain B-non Hodgkin lymphomas. In this study, 16 bone marrow trephine samples from patients with no hematopoietic malignancies and 10 samples from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were immunostained with anti-FOXP1 antibody. Positive cells in bone marrows were not only lymphocytes, but also cells that are immunohistochemically positive for glycophorin C or myeloperoxidase. Peripheral blood samples showed no other positive cells, but small round lymphocytes. Additionally 60 samples from patients with myeloid lineage neoplasms were analyzed. 25 samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 35 patients with myeloproliferative disease (MPD) were double immunostained with anti-FOXP1/anti-glycophorin C and anti-FOXP1/anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies. FOXP1 was found to be expressed in 22 cases of MDS and in none of MPD cases. Its expression in MDS was observed mostly in myeloperoxidase positive cells in contrast to gylcophorin C positive cells. Only two cases revealed both myeloperoxidase positive cells and gylcophorin C positive cells expressing FOXP1 transcription factor. Our results show that FOXP1 is present in normal cells of erythroid and myeloid linages and thus suggest its possible role in development of all hematopoetic cells as well as possible involvement in neoplasm development of myeloid disorders. PMID:26898077

  8. Apparent expansion of CD34+ cells during the evolution of myelodysplastic syndromes to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Span, L F; Dar, S E; Shetty, V; Mundle, S D; Broady-Robinson, L; Alvi, S; Raymakers, R A; de Witte, T; Raza, A

    1998-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are highly proliferative bone marrow (BM) disorders where the primary lesion presumably affects a CD34+ early progenitor or stem cell. We investigated the proliferative characteristics of CD34+ cells of 33 untreated MDS patients (19 RA, 5 RARS, 7 RAEB, 2 RAEBt) and five patients with acute myeloid leukemia after MDS (sAML). All patients received a 1-h infusion of the thymidine analogue iodoor bromodeoxyuridine intravenously before a BM aspirate and biopsy was taken. A double-labeling immunohistochemistry technique by monoclonal anti-CD34 (QBend/10) and anti-IUdR/BrdU antibodies was developed and performed. By this technique we recognised CD34+ and CD34- cells actively engaged in DNA synthesis or not. As MDS evolves a significant increase occurred in the percentage of CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (mean value: RA/RARS 1.67%; RAEB(t) 8.68%; sAML 23.83%) as well as in the percentage of proliferating CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (RA/RARS 0.19%; RAEB(t) 0.43%; and sAML 3.30%). This was associated with a decreasing trend in the overall myeloid labeling index (LI: RA/RARS 25.8%, RAEB(t) 24.6% and sAML 21.5%). This decrease in overall myeloid LI is due to an exponential increase in the proportion of CD34+ cells of the proliferating compartment during MDS evolution (RA/RARS 0.35%, RAEB(t) 1.44% and sAML 11.98% of all S-phase cells). These CD34+ cells appeared to proliferate more slowly than their more mature CD34 negative counterparts, since we found a progressive increment in the mean total cell cycling time (Tc) of all myeloid cells during MDS progression (RA/RARS 39.8, RAEB(t) 45.2 and sAML 65.8 h). This study showed that during MDS evolution to sAML the CD34+ compartment develops a growth advantage leading to apparent expansion.

  9. The developmental program of human dendritic cells is operated independently of conventional myeloid and lymphoid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Niiro, Hiroaki; Iino, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Shuro; Saito, Noriyuki; Onohara, Shinya; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujii, Shin-ichiro; Shultz, Leonard D.; Harada, Mine

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct dendritic cell (DC) subsets, conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), have been shown to develop via either the myeloid or the lymphoid pathway in murine hematopoiesis. Lineage-specific phenotypes or functions of “myeloid” and “lymphoid” DCs, however, still remain elusive. Furthermore, such analysis has been particularly difficult in humans, due to lack of an assay system appropriate for the analysis of human stem and progenitor cell differentiation. Here, using a highly efficient xenotransplantation model, we extensively analyze the origin and the molecular signature of human DCs. Purified human common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) were intravenously transplanted into nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-scid)/IL2rγnull newborn mice. CMPs and CLPs displayed significant expansion in the xenogeneic host, and human cDC and pDC progeny were isolatable. Strikingly, each human DC subset possessed indistinguishable expression patterns of surface phenotype and gene transcripts regardless of their CMP or CLP origin, even at the genome-wide level. Thus, cDC and pDC normally develop after cells have committed to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage in human hematopoiesis, while their transcriptional signatures are well preserved irrespective of their lineage origin. We propose that human DCs use unique and flexible developmental programs that cannot be categorized into the conventional myeloid or lymphoid pathway. PMID:17664352

  10. The epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 facilitate leukemogenesis and represent therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giotopoulos, G; Chan, W-I; Horton, SJ; Ruau, D; Gallipoli, P; Fowler, A; Crawley, C; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, PJ; Göttgens, B; Van Deursen, JM; Cole, PA; Huntly, BJP

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence links abnormal epigenetic control to the development of hematological malignancies. Accordingly, inhibition of epigenetic regulators is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. The acetylation status of lysine residues in histone tails is one of a number of epigenetic post-translational modifications that alter DNA-templated processes, such as transcription, to facilitate malignant transformation. Although histone deacetylases are already being clinically targeted, the role of histone lysine acetyltransferases (KAT) in malignancy is less well characterized. We chose to study this question in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), where, using in vitro and in vivo genetic ablation and knockdown experiments in murine models, we demonstrate a role for the epigenetic regulators CBP and p300 in the induction and maintenance of AML. Furthermore, using selective small molecule inhibitors of their lysine acetyltransferase activity, we validate CBP/p300 as therapeutic targets in vitro across a wide range of human AML subtypes. We proceed to show that growth retardation occurs through the induction of transcriptional changes that induce apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in leukemia cells and finally demonstrate the efficacy of the KAT inhibitors in decreasing clonogenic growth of primary AML patient samples. Taken together, these data suggest that CBP/p300 are promising therapeutic targets across multiple subtypes in AML. PMID:25893291

  11. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells as Therapeutic Target in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    De Veirman, Kim; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Lahmar, Qods; Geeraerts, Xenia; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Van Riet, Ivan; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that accumulate during pathological conditions such as cancer and are associated with a poor clinical outcome. MDSC expansion hampers the host anti-tumor immune response by inhibition of T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, and recruitment of regulatory T cells. In addition, MDSC exert non-immunological functions including the promotion of angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and metastasis. Recent years, MDSC are considered as a potential target in solid tumors and hematological malignancies to enhance the effects of currently used immune modulating agents. This review focuses on the characteristics, distribution, functions, cell–cell interactions, and targeting of MDSC in hematological malignancies including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and leukemia. PMID:25538893

  12. Glucocorticoid signaling in myeloid cells worsens acute CNS injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Shawn F; Caso, Javier R; Munhoz, Carolina D; Hu, Caroline K; Tran, Kevin V; Miguel, Zurine D; Chien, Bonnie Y; Sapolsky, Robert M

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones (GCs) are well known for being anti-inflammatory, but some reports suggest that GCs can also augment aspects of inflammation during acute brain injury. Because the GC receptor (GR) is ubiquitously expressed throughout the brain, it is difficult to know which cell types might mediate these unusual "proinflammatory" GC actions. We examined this with cell type-specific deletion or overexpression of GR in mice experiencing seizure or ischemia. Counter to their classical anti-inflammatory actions, GR signaling in myeloid cells increased Iba-1 and CD68 staining as well as nuclear p65 levels in the injured tissue. GCs also reduced levels of occludin, claudin 5, and caveolin 1, proteins central to blood-brain-barrier integrity; these effects required GR in endothelial cells. Finally, GCs compromised neuron survival, an effect mediated by GR in myeloid and endothelial cells to a greater extent than by neuronal GR. PMID:23637179

  13. Inhibition of curcumin on myeloid-derived suppressor cells is requisite for controlling lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; You, Ming; Xu, Yujun; Li, Fanlin; Zhang, Dongya; Li, Xiujun; Hou, Yayi

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are potent immune-suppressive cells and present in most cancer patients. Recently, several studies have shown that curcumin inhibits the expansion of MDSCs in some cancers. However, it is not clear how curcumin modulates the suppressive function of MDSCs, and whether curcumin achieves anti-tumor effects via regulating the expansion of MDSCs in lung cancer. Here, our results showed that curcumin significantly inhibited tumor growth in a Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) isogenic tumor model. Curcumin reduced the accumulation of MDSCs in spleen and tumor tissue in LLC isogenic model. And curcumin promoted the maturation and differentiation of MDSCs in tumor tissue. Notably, curcumin inhibited the expression level of immune suppressive factors of MDSCs, arginase-1 (Arg-1) and ROS, in purified MDSCs from tumor tissue in vivo. Expectedly, curcumin also inhibited the immunosuppressive function of isolated MDSCs from tumor tissue and spleen of tumor bearing mice in vitro. Moreover, curcumin decreased the level of IL-6 in the tumor tissue and serum from LLC-bearing mice. Taken together, curcumin indeed possesses anti-cancer effect and inhibits the accumulation and function of MDSCs. And curcumin reduces the level of IL-6 in tumor-bearing mice to impair the expansion and function of MDSCs. These results suggest that inhibition of MDSCs in tumor is requisite for controlling lung cancer. PMID:27497194

  14. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  15. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  16. T-cell defect in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas involves expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Azzaoui, Imane; Uhel, Fabrice; Rossille, Delphine; Pangault, Celine; Dulong, Joelle; Le Priol, Jerome; Lamy, Thierry; Houot, Roch; Le Gouill, Steven; Cartron, Guillaume; Godmer, Pascal; Bouabdallah, Krimo; Milpied, Noel; Damaj, Gandhi; Tarte, Karin; Fest, Thierry; Roussel, Mikael

    2016-08-25

    In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the number of circulating monocytes and neutrophils represents an independent prognostic factor. These cell subsets include monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M- and G-MDSCs) defined by their ability to suppress T-cell responses. MDSCs are a heterogeneous population described in inflammatory and infectious diseases and in numerous tumors including multiple myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and DLBCL. However, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. We broadly assessed the presence and mechanisms of suppression of MDSC subsets in DLBCL. First, a myeloid suppressive signature was identified by gene expression profiling in DLBCL peripheral blood. Accordingly, we identified, in a cohort of 66 DLBCL patients, an increase in circulating G-MDSC (Lin(neg)HLA-DR(neg)CD33(pos)CD11b(pos)) and M-MDSC (CD14(pos)HLA-DR(low)) counts. Interestingly, only M-MDSC number was correlated with the International Prognostic Index, event-free survival, and number of circulating Tregs. Furthermore, T-cell proliferation was restored after monocyte depletion. Myeloid-dependent T-cell suppression was attributed to a release of interleukin-10 and S100A12 and increased PD-L1 expression. In summary, we identified expanded MDSC subsets in DLBCL, as well as new mechanisms of immunosuppression in DLBCL. PMID:27338100

  17. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F J

    2016-01-01

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b(+) Gr1(high) cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable. PMID:26931771

  18. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b+ Gr1high cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable. PMID:26931771

  19. T Cells Contribute to Tumor Progression by Favoring Pro-Tumoral Properties of Intra-Tumoral Myeloid Cells in a Mouse Model for Spontaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jonathan; Douguet, Laetitia; Garcette, Marylène; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Bercovici, Nadège; Lucas, Bruno; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2011-01-01

    Tumors affect myelopoeisis and induce the expansion of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity. In the MT/ret model of spontaneous metastatic melanoma, myeloid cells are the most abundant tumor infiltrating hematopoietic population and their proportion is highest in the most aggressive cutaneous metastasis. Our data suggest that the tumor microenvironment favors polarization of myeloid cells into type 2 cells characterized by F4/80 expression, a weak capacity to secrete IL-12 and a high production of arginase. Myeloid cells from tumor and spleen of MT/ret mice inhibit T cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion. Interestingly, T cells play a role in type 2 polarization of myeloid cells. Indeed, intra-tumoral myeloid cells from MT/ret mice lacking T cells are not only less suppressive towards T cells than corresponding cells from wild-type MT/ret mice, but they also inhibit more efficiently melanoma cell proliferation. Thus, our data support the existence of a vicious circle, in which T cells may favor cancer development by establishing an environment that is likely to skew myeloid cell immunity toward a tumor promoting response that, in turn, suppresses immune effector cell functions. PMID:21633700

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  1. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  2. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  3. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  4. The PU.1-Modulated MicroRNA-22 Is a Regulator of Monocyte/Macrophage Differentiation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Chen, Ming-Tai; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Yin, Xiao-Lin; Ning, Hong-Mei; Su, Rui; Lin, Hai-Shuang; Song, Li; Wang, Fang; Ma, Yan-Ni; Zhao, Hua-Lu; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Jun-Wu

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNA-22 (miR-22) is emerging as a critical regulator in organ development and various cancers. However, its role in normal hematopoiesis and leukaemogenesis remains unclear. Here, we detected its increased expression during monocyte/macrophage differentiation of HL-60, THP1 cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and confirmed that PU.1, a key transcriptional factor for monocyte/macrophage differentiation, is responsible for transcriptional activation of miR-22 during the differentiation. By gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that miR-22 promoted monocyte/macrophage differentiation, and MECOM (EVI1) mRNA is a direct target of miR-22 and MECOM (EVI1) functions as a negative regulator in the differentiation. The miR-22-mediated MECOM degradation increased c-Jun but decreased GATA2 expression, which results in increased interaction between c-Jun and PU.1 via increasing c-Jun levels and relief of MECOM- and GATA2-mediated interference in the interaction, and thus promoting monocyte/macrophage differentiation. We also observed significantly down-regulation of PU.1 and miR-22 as well as significantly up-regulation of MECOM in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Reintroduction of miR-22 relieved the differentiation blockage and inhibited the growth of bone marrow blasts of AML patients. Our results revealed new function and mechanism of miR-22 in normal hematopoiesis and AML development and demonstrated its potential value in AML diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27617961

  5. The PU.1-Modulated MicroRNA-22 Is a Regulator of Monocyte/Macrophage Differentiation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chao; Chen, Ming-Tai; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Yin, Xiao-Lin; Ning, Hong-Mei; Su, Rui; Lin, Hai-Shuang; Song, Li; Wang, Fang; Ma, Yan-Ni; Zhao, Hua-Lu; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Jun-Wu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-22 (miR-22) is emerging as a critical regulator in organ development and various cancers. However, its role in normal hematopoiesis and leukaemogenesis remains unclear. Here, we detected its increased expression during monocyte/macrophage differentiation of HL-60, THP1 cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and confirmed that PU.1, a key transcriptional factor for monocyte/macrophage differentiation, is responsible for transcriptional activation of miR-22 during the differentiation. By gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that miR-22 promoted monocyte/macrophage differentiation, and MECOM (EVI1) mRNA is a direct target of miR-22 and MECOM (EVI1) functions as a negative regulator in the differentiation. The miR-22-mediated MECOM degradation increased c-Jun but decreased GATA2 expression, which results in increased interaction between c-Jun and PU.1 via increasing c-Jun levels and relief of MECOM- and GATA2-mediated interference in the interaction, and thus promoting monocyte/macrophage differentiation. We also observed significantly down-regulation of PU.1 and miR-22 as well as significantly up-regulation of MECOM in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Reintroduction of miR-22 relieved the differentiation blockage and inhibited the growth of bone marrow blasts of AML patients. Our results revealed new function and mechanism of miR-22 in normal hematopoiesis and AML development and demonstrated its potential value in AML diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27617961

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor promotes tumor growth and metastasis by inducing Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kendra D.; Templeton, Dennis J.; Cross, Janet V.

    2012-01-01

    The Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine, is overexpressed in many solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. We previously identified inhibitors of MIF within a class of natural products with demonstrated anti-cancer activities. We therefore sought to determine how MIF contributes to tumor growth and progression. We show here that, in murine tumors including the 4T1 model of aggressive, spontaneously metastatic breast cancer in immunologically intact mice, tumor-derived MIF promotes tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis through control of inflammatory cells within the tumor. Specifically, MIF increases the prevalence of a highly immune suppressive subpopulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within the tumor. In vitro, MIF promotes differentiation of myeloid cells into the same population of MDSCs. Pharmacologic inhibition of MIF reduces MDSC accumulation in the tumor similar to MIF depletion, and blocks the MIF-dependent in vitro differentiation of MDSCs. Our results demonstrate that MIF is a therapeutically targetable mechanism for control of tumor growth and metastasis through regulation of the host immune response, and support the potential utility of MIF inhibitors, either alone or in combination with standard tumor-targeting therapeutic or immunotherapy approaches. PMID:23125418

  7. Lung epithelium and myeloid cells cooperate to clear acute pneumococcal infection

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, M; Puttur, F; Arnold-Schrauf, C; Kühl, A A; Holzmann, B; Henriques-Normark, B; Berod, L; Sparwasser, T

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae causes life-threatening infections, especially among immunocompromised patients. The host's immune system senses S. pneumoniae via different families of pattern recognition receptors, in particular the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family that promotes immune cell activation. Yet, while single TLRs are dispensable for initiating inflammatory responses against S. pneumoniae, the central TLR adapter protein myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is of vital importance, as MyD88-deficient mice succumb rapidly to infection. Since MyD88 is ubiquitously expressed in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, the extent to which MyD88 signaling is required in different cell types to control S. pneumoniae is unknown. Therefore, we used novel conditional knockin mice to investigate the necessity of MyD88 signaling in distinct lung-resident myeloid and epithelial cells for the initiation of a protective immune response against S. pneumoniae. Here, we show that MyD88 signaling in lysozyme M (LysM)– and CD11c-expressing myeloid cells, as well as in pulmonary epithelial cells, is critical to restore inflammatory cytokine and antimicrobial peptide production, leading to efficient neutrophil recruitment and enhanced bacterial clearance. Overall, we show a novel synergistic requirement of compartment-specific MyD88 signaling in S. pneumoniae immunity. PMID:26627460

  8. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: a review and principles for the development of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pollyea, Daniel A; Gutman, Jonathan A; Gore, Lia; Smith, Clayton A; Jordan, Craig T

    2014-08-01

    Despite an increasingly rich understanding of its pathogenesis, acute myeloid leukemia remains a disease with poor outcomes, overwhelmingly due to disease relapse. In recent years, work to characterize the leukemia stem cell population, the disease compartment most difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and most responsible for relapse, has been undertaken. This, in conjunction with advances in drug development that have allowed for increasingly targeted therapies to be engineered, raises the hope that we are entering an era in which the leukemia stem cell population can be eliminated, resulting in therapeutic cures for acute myeloid leukemia patients. For these therapies to become available, they must be tested in the setting of clinical trials. A long-established clinical trials infrastructure has been employed to shepherd new therapies from proof-of-concept to approval. However, due to the unique features of leukemia stem cells, drugs that are designed to specifically eliminate this population may not be adequately tested when applied to this model. Therefore, in this review article, we seek to identify the relevant features of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells for clinical trialists, discuss potential strategies to target leukemia stem cells, and propose a set of guidelines outlining the necessary elements of clinical trials to allow for the successful testing of stem cell-directed therapies.

  9. Lung epithelium and myeloid cells cooperate to clear acute pneumococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Dudek, M; Puttur, F; Arnold-Schrauf, C; Kühl, A A; Holzmann, B; Henriques-Normark, B; Berod, L; Sparwasser, T

    2016-09-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae causes life-threatening infections, especially among immunocompromised patients. The host's immune system senses S. pneumoniae via different families of pattern recognition receptors, in particular the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family that promotes immune cell activation. Yet, while single TLRs are dispensable for initiating inflammatory responses against S. pneumoniae, the central TLR adapter protein myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is of vital importance, as MyD88-deficient mice succumb rapidly to infection. Since MyD88 is ubiquitously expressed in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, the extent to which MyD88 signaling is required in different cell types to control S. pneumoniae is unknown. Therefore, we used novel conditional knockin mice to investigate the necessity of MyD88 signaling in distinct lung-resident myeloid and epithelial cells for the initiation of a protective immune response against S. pneumoniae. Here, we show that MyD88 signaling in lysozyme M (LysM)- and CD11c-expressing myeloid cells, as well as in pulmonary epithelial cells, is critical to restore inflammatory cytokine and antimicrobial peptide production, leading to efficient neutrophil recruitment and enhanced bacterial clearance. Overall, we show a novel synergistic requirement of compartment-specific MyD88 signaling in S. pneumoniae immunity. PMID:26627460

  10. Inhibition of growth by p205: a nuclear protein and putative tumor suppressor expressed during myeloid cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Jonathan M; Gooya, John M; Asefa, Benyam; Weiler, Sarah R; Smith, Mark; Keller, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    p205 belongs to a family of interferon-inducible proteins called the IFI-200 family, which have been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. While p205 is induced in hematopoietic stem cells during myeloid cell differentiation, its function is not known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of p205 in regulating proliferation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and in nonhematopoietic cell lines. We found that p205 localizes to the nucleus in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Transient expression of p205 in murine IL-3-dependent BaF3 and 32D-C123 progenitor cell lines inhibited IL-3-induced growth and proliferation. The closely related IFI-200 family members, p204 and p202, similarly inhibited IL-3-dependent progenitor cell proliferation. p205 also inhibited the proliferation and growth of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In nonhematopoietic cell lines, p205 and p204 expression inhibited NIH3T3 cell colony formation in vitro, and microinjection of p205 expression vectors into NIH3T3 fibroblasts inhibited serum-induced proliferation. We have determined the functional domains of p205 necessary for activity, which were identified as the N-terminal domain in apoptosis and interferon response (DAPIN)/PYRIN domain, and the C-terminal retinoblastoma protein (Rb)-binding motif. In addition, we have demonstrated that a putative ataxia telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) kinase phosphorylation site specifically regulates the activity of p205. Taken together, these data suggest that p205 is a potent cell growth regulator whose activity is mediated by its protein-binding domains. We propose that during myelomonocytic cell differentiation, induction of p205 expression contributes to cell growth arrest, thus allowing progenitor cells to differentiate. PMID:15342947

  11. RARα-PLZF oncogene inhibits C/EBPα function in myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Nathalie; Tremblay, Mathieu; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Haman, André; Labrecque, Jean; Chen, Bing; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan; Hoang, Trang

    2013-01-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia, granulocytic differentiation is arrested at the promyelocyte stage. The variant t(11;17) translocation produces two fusion proteins, promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) and RARα-PLZF, both of which participate in leukemia development. Here we provide evidence that the activity of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), a master regulator of granulocytic differentiation, is severely impaired in leukemic promyelocytes with the t(11;17) translocation compared with those associated with the t(15;17) translocation. We show that RARα-PLZF inhibits myeloid cell differentiation through interactions with C/EBPα tethered to DNA, using ChIP and DNA capture assays. Furthermore, RARα-PLZF recruits HDAC1 and causes histone H3 deacetylation at C/EBPα target loci, thereby decreasing the expression of C/EBPα target genes. In line with these results, HDAC inhibitors restore in part C/EBPα target gene expression. These findings provide molecular evidence for a mechanism through which RARα-PLZF acts as a modifier oncogene that subverts differentiation in the granulocytic lineage by associating with C/EBPα and inhibiting its activity. PMID:23898169

  12. Pulmonary epithelial cancer cells and their exosomes metabolize myeloid cell-derived leukotriene C4 to leukotriene D4.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Ana; Ji, Jie; Idborg, Helena; Samuelsson, Bengt; Palmberg, Lena; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Rådmark, Olof

    2016-09-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) play major roles in lung immune responses, and LTD4 is the most potent agonist for cysteinyl LT1, leading to bronchoconstriction and tissue remodeling. Here, we studied LT crosstalk between myeloid cells and pulmonary epithelial cells. Monocytic cells (Mono Mac 6 cell line, primary dendritic cells) and eosinophils produced primarily LTC4 In coincubations of these myeloid cells and epithelial cells, LTD4 became a prominent product. LTC4 released from the myeloid cells was further transformed by the epithelial cells in a transcellular manner. Formation of LTD4 was rapid when catalyzed by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)1 in the A549 epithelial lung cancer cell line, but considerably slower when catalyzed by GGT5 in primary bronchial epithelial cells. When A549 cells were cultured in the presence of IL-1β, GGT1 expression increased about 2-fold. Also exosomes from A549 cells contained GGT1 and augmented LTD4 formation. Serine-borate complex (SBC), an inhibitor of GGT, inhibited conversion of LTC4 to LTD4 Unexpectedly, SBC also upregulated translocation of 5-lipoxygenase (LO) to the nucleus in Mono Mac 6 cells, and 5-LO activity. Our results demonstrate an active role for epithelial cells in biosynthesis of LTD4, which may be of particular relevance in the lung. PMID:27436590

  13. Myeloid deletion of SIRT1 suppresses collagen-induced arthritis in mice by modulating dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong Ji; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Lim, Hye Song; Hah, Young-Sool; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Kim, Hyun-Ok; Cheon, Yun-Hong; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Park, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Il

    2016-01-01

    The type III histone deacetylase silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is an enzyme that is critical for the modulation of immune and inflammatory responses. However, the data on its role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are limited and controversial. To better understand how SIRT1 regulates adaptive immune responses in RA, we evaluated collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in myeloid cell-specific SIRT1 knockout (mSIRT1 KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Arthritis severity was gauged on the basis of clinical, radiographic and pathologic scores. Compared with their WT counterparts, the mSIRT1 KO mice exhibited less severe arthritis, which was less destructive to the joints. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases and ROR-γT were also reduced in the mSIRT1 KO mice compared with the WT mice and were paralleled by reductions in the numbers of Th1 and Th17 cells and CD80- or CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs). In addition, impaired DC maturation and decreases in the Th1/Th17 immune response were observed in the mSIRT1 KO mice. T-cell proliferation was also investigated in co-cultures with antigen-pulsed DCs. In the co-cultures, the DCs from the mSIRT1 KO mice showed decreases in T-cell proliferation and the Th1/Th17 immune response. In this study, myeloid cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 appeared to suppress CIA by modulating DC maturation. Thus, a careful investigation of DC-specific SIRT1 downregulation is needed to gauge the therapeutic utility of agents targeting SIRT1 in RA. PMID:26987484

  14. SYK Is a Critical Regulator of FLT3 In Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Alexandre; Fenouille, Nina; Alexe, Gabriela; Pikman, Yana; Bassil, Christopher F.; Mehta, Swapnil; Du, Jinyan; Kazi, Julhash U.; Luciano, Frédéric; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kung, Andrew L.; Aster, Jon C.; Galinsky, Ilene; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Hemann, Michael T.; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cooperative dependencies between mutant oncoproteins and wild-type proteins are critical in cancer pathogenesis and therapy resistance. Although spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been implicated in hematologic malignancies, it is rarely mutated. We used kinase activity profiling to identify collaborators of SYK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and determined that FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is transactivated by SYK via direct binding. Highly activated SYK is predominantly found in FLT3-ITD positive AML and cooperates with FLT3-ITD to activate MYC transcriptional programs. FLT3-ITD AML cells are more vulnerable to SYK suppression than FLT3 wild-type counterparts. In a FLT3-ITD in vivo model, SYK is indispensable for myeloproliferative disease (MPD) development, and SYK overexpression promotes overt transformation to AML and resistance to FLT3-ITD-targeted therapy. SIGNIFICANCE Although imatinib therapy has been paradigm shifting for treating patients with BCR-ABL-rearranged chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the application of targeted kinase inhibitors to treating AML has been a more complex undertaking. In this study, we identified an oncogenic partnership between the most commonly mutated kinase in AML, FLT3, and the cytoplasmic kinase SYK. SYK transactivates FLT3 by a direct physical interaction, is critical for the development of FLT3-ITD-induced myeloid neoplasia, and is more highly activated in primary human FLT3-ITD-positive AML. These studies also raise the possibility of SYK activation as a mechanism of resistance to FLT3 inhibitors, suggest FLT3 mutant AML as a subtype for SYK inhibitor testing, and nominate the clinical testing of SYK and FLT3 inhibitor combinations. PMID:24525236

  15. Tasquinimod modulates tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the antitumor immune response to PD-L1 blockade in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakhlé, Jessica; Pierron, Valérie; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Plas, Pascale; Thiongane, Amath; Meyer-Losic, Florence; Schmidlin, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infiltration of myeloid cells helps tumors to overcome immune surveillance and imparts resistance to cancer immunotherapy. Thus, strategies to modulate the effects of these immune cells may offer a potential therapeutic benefit. We report here that tasquinimod, a novel immunotherapy which targets S100A9 signaling, reduces the immunosuppressive properties of myeloid cells in preclinical models of bladder cancer (BCa). As single anticancer agent, tasquinimod treatment was effective in preventing early stage tumor growth, but did not achieve a clear antitumor effect in advanced tumors. Investigations of this response revealed that tasquinimod induces an increase in the expression of a negative regulator of T cell activation, Programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). This markedly weakens its antitumor immunity, yet provokes an “inflamed” milieu rendering tumors more prone to T cell-mediated immune attack by PD-L1 blockade. Interestingly, the combination of tasquinimod with an Anti-PD-L1 antibody enhanced the antitumor immune response in bladder tumors. This combination synergistically modulated tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, thereby strongly affecting proliferation and activation of effector T cells. Together, our data provide insight into the rational combination of therapies that activate both innate and adaptive immune system, such as the association of S100A9-targeting agents with immune checkpoints inhibitors, to improve the response to cancer immunotherapeutic agents in BCa. PMID:27471612

  16. Identification and functional characterization of the miRNA-gene regulatory network in chronic myeloid leukemia lineage negative cells.

    PubMed

    Agatheeswaran, S; Pattnayak, N C; Chakraborty, S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is maintained by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which are resistant to the existing TKI therapy. Hence a better understanding of the CML LSCs is necessary to eradicate these cells and achieve complete cure. Using the miRNA-gene interaction networks from the CML lin(-) cells we identified a set of up/down-regulated miRNAs and corresponding target genes. Association studies (Pearson correlation) from the miRNA and gene expression data showed that miR-1469 and miR-1972 have significantly higher number of target genes, 75 and 50 respectively. We observed that miR-1972 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest and miR-1469 moderately arrested G1 cell cycle when overexpressed in KCL22 cells. We have earlier shown that a combination of imatinib and JAK inhibitor I can significantly bring down the proliferation of CML lineage negative cells. Here we observed that imatinib and JAK inhibitor I combination restored the expression pattern of the down-regulated miRNAs in primary CML lin(-) cells. Thus effective manipulation of the deregulated miRNAs can restore the miRNA-mRNA networks that can efficiently inhibit CML stem and progenitor cells and alleviate the disease. PMID:27586591

  17. Identification and functional characterization of the miRNA-gene regulatory network in chronic myeloid leukemia lineage negative cells

    PubMed Central

    Agatheeswaran, S.; Pattnayak, N. C.; Chakraborty, S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is maintained by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which are resistant to the existing TKI therapy. Hence a better understanding of the CML LSCs is necessary to eradicate these cells and achieve complete cure. Using the miRNA-gene interaction networks from the CML lin(−) cells we identified a set of up/down-regulated miRNAs and corresponding target genes. Association studies (Pearson correlation) from the miRNA and gene expression data showed that miR-1469 and miR-1972 have significantly higher number of target genes, 75 and 50 respectively. We observed that miR-1972 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest and miR-1469 moderately arrested G1 cell cycle when overexpressed in KCL22 cells. We have earlier shown that a combination of imatinib and JAK inhibitor I can significantly bring down the proliferation of CML lineage negative cells. Here we observed that imatinib and JAK inhibitor I combination restored the expression pattern of the down-regulated miRNAs in primary CML lin(−) cells. Thus effective manipulation of the deregulated miRNAs can restore the miRNA-mRNA networks that can efficiently inhibit CML stem and progenitor cells and alleviate the disease. PMID:27586591

  18. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  19. Cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen connects glycolysis and cell survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ohayon, Delphine; De Chiara, Alessia; Chapuis, Nicolas; Candalh, Céline; Mocek, Julie; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Haddaoui, Lamya; Ifrah, Norbert; Hermine, Olivier; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Frachet, Philippe; Bouscary, Didier; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a scaffolding protein involved in DNA replication, has been described as a key element in survival of mature neutrophil granulocytes, which are non-proliferating cells. Herein, we demonstrated an active export of PCNA involved in cell survival and chemotherapy resistance. Notably, daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cells (HL-60R) have a prominent cytosolic PCNA localization due to increased nuclear export compared to daunorubicin-sensitive HL-60 cells (HL-60S). By interacting with nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), a protein involved in NAD biosynthesis, PCNA coordinates glycolysis and survival, especially in HL-60R cells. These cells showed a dramatic increase in intracellular NAD+ concentration as well as glycolysis including increased expression and activity of hexokinase 1 and increased lactate production. Furthermore, this functional activity of cytoplasmic PCNA was also demonstrated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our data uncover a novel pathway of nuclear export of PCNA that drives cell survival by increasing metabolism flux. PMID:27759041

  20. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  1. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  2. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4+CD25− T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  3. Interplay between myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and Th17 cells: foe or friend?

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Shou, Dawei; Liu, Baoqing; Chen, Yiwen; Bao, Changqian; Chen, Li; Liu, Xiaowei; Liang, Tingbo; Gong, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and Th17 cells were first discovered in the fields of cancer and autoimmunity, respectively. In recent years, their activities have been explored in other biological and pathological conditions, such as infective diseases and solid organ transplantation. However, the interplay between MDSCs and Th17 cells and the mechanism of their interaction remain obscure. This review summarized and analyzed the relationship between MDSCs and Th17 cells, both of which participate in tumor, autoimmune disease, infection and other conditions. In tumors, the increase in MDSCs at the tumor site is usually accompanied by the accumulation of Th17 cells. However, their relationship is inconsistent in different tumors. In arthritic mice or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, an increase in MDSCs, which could ameliorate disease symptoms, causes decreased IL-17A gene expression and Th17 cells accumulation. Furthermore, we concluded that the interaction between MDSCs and Th17 cells is mainly mediated by cytokines. However, the mechanisms require further investigation. Determining the details of their interplay will provide a better understanding of immune networks and could lead to the development of immunotherapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:27007054

  4. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  5. Effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and leukemia mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinyan; Yang, Wenzhong; Han, Jia; Xiong, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia mice as well as to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: Unbtreated K562 cells (CON), blank lentivirus transfected K562 cells (NC) and K562 cells expressing STAT3 siRNA (STAT3 siRNA) were injected into SCID mice to establish the chronic myeloid leukemia model in mice. The growth, peripheral white blood cell count and spleen index in these mice were determined. Results: In vitro experiment showed, when compared with control group, the interference efficiency of STAT3 expression was as high as 97.5% in K562 cells. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 reduced by 17.01%, 7.3% and 6.82%, respectively, showing significant difference when compared with control group (P < 0.01). These findings were consistent with those from fluorescence quantitative PCR. In vivo experiment showed the body weight of mice reduced progressively and the peripheral white blood cell count increased gradually in control group, accompanied by dragging hind limbs and progressive enlargement of the spleen. The body weight remained unchanged, peripheral white blood cell count reduced gradually and the spleen did not enlarge in mice treated with STAT3 siRNA expressing cells. Conclusion: Lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing may inhibit the expression of its downstream genes (c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1) related to cell proliferation, apoptosis and cycle to suppress the malignant biological behaviors, and STAT3 silencing also inhibit the leukemogenic potency of K562 cells in mice. PMID:25550912

  6. Discovery of 2-Indole-acylsulfonamide Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) Inhibitors Using Fragment-Based Methods.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Nicholas F; Bian, Zhiguo; Zhao, Bin; Shaw, Subrata; Tarr, James C; Belmar, Johannes; Gregg, Claire; Camper, DeMarco V; Goodwin, Craig M; Arnold, Allison L; Sensintaffar, John L; Friberg, Anders; Rossanese, Olivia W; Lee, Taekyu; Olejniczak, Edward T; Fesik, Stephen W

    2016-03-10

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for the regulation of programmed cell death. Amplification of Mcl-1 is a common genetic aberration in human cancer whose overexpression contributes to the evasion of apoptosis and is one of the major resistance mechanisms for many chemotherapies. Mcl-1 mediates its effects primarily through interactions with pro-apoptotic BH3 containing proteins that achieve high affinity for the target by utilizing four hydrophobic pockets in its binding groove. Here we describe the discovery of Mcl-1 inhibitors using fragment-based methods and structure-based design. These novel inhibitors exhibit low nanomolar binding affinities to Mcl-1 and >500-fold selectivity over Bcl-xL. X-ray structures of lead Mcl-1 inhibitors when complexed to Mcl-1 provided detailed information on how these small-molecules bind to the target and were used extensively to guide compound optimization. PMID:26878343

  7. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Natural Product Vibsanin A Induces Differentiation of Myeloid Leukemia Cells through PKC Activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, He; Wang, Li-Mei; Shen, Xing; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Cui, Yu; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Dong, Bo; Feng, Jian-Nan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Luo, Qing-Liang; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2016-05-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-based cell differentiation therapy has been successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, other subtypes of AML display resistance to ATRA-based treatment. In this study, we screened natural, plant-derived vibsane-type diterpenoids for their ability to induce differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells, discovering that vibsanin A potently induced differentiation of AML cell lines and primary blasts. The differentiation-inducing activity of vibsanin A was mediated through direct interaction with and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Consistent with these findings, pharmacological blockade of PKC activity suppressed vibsanin A-induced differentiation. Mechanistically, vibsanin A-mediated activation of PKC led to induction of the ERK pathway and decreased c-Myc expression. In mouse xenograft models of AML, vibsanin A administration prolonged host survival and inhibited PKC-mediated inflammatory responses correlated with promotion of skin tumors in mice. Collectively, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for vibsanin A as a myeloid differentiation-inducing compound, with potential application as an antileukemic agent. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2698-709. ©2016 AACR.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells function as novel osteoclast progenitors enhancing bone loss in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Deshane, Jessy; Jules, Joel; Lee, Carnella M.; Harris, Brittney A.; Feng, Xu; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced bone destruction is a hallmark of various carcinomas such as breast cancer, where osteolytic bone metastasis is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Immune cells contribute to osteolysis in cancer growth but the factors contributing to aggressive bone destruction are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the importance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in this process at bone metastatic sites. Since MDSC originate from the same myeloid lineage as macrophages, which are osteoclast precursors, we hypothesized that MDSC may undergo osteoclast differentiation and contribute to enhanced bone destruction and tumor growth. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer bone metastasis, we confirmed that MDSC isolated from the tumor-bone microenvironment differentiated into functional osteoclasts both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations revealed that nitric oxide signaling was critical for differentiation of MDSC into osteoclasts. Remarkably, osteoclast differentiation did not occur in MDSC isolated from control or tumor-bearing mice that lacked bone metastasis, signifying the essential cross-talk between tumor cells and myeloid progenitors in the bone microenvironment as a requirement for osteoclast differentiation of MDSC. Overall, our results identify a wholly new facet to the multifunctionality of MDSC in driving tumor progression, in this case as a novel osteoclast progenitor that specifically drives bone metastasis during cancer progression. PMID:23243021

  10. Natural killer cell immunosenescence in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: new targets for immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Morgado, Sara; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2016-04-01

    Several age-associated changes in natural killer (NK) cell phenotype have been reported that contribute to the defective NK cell response observed in elderly patients. A remodelling of the NK cell compartment occurs in the elderly with a reduction in the output of immature CD56(bright) cells and an accumulation of highly differentiated CD56(dim) NK cells. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is generally a disease of older adults. NK cells in AML patients show diminished expression of several activating receptors that contribute to impaired NK cell function and, in consequence, to AML blast escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. In AML patients, phenotypic changes in NK cells have been correlated with disease progression and survival. NK cell-based immunotherapy has emerged as a possibility for the treatment of AML patients. The understanding of age-associated alterations in NK cells is therefore necessary to define adequate therapeutic strategies in older AML patients.

  11. Prognostic significance of NPM1 mutation-modulated microRNA-mRNA regulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y-C; Tsai, M-H; Chou, W-C; Liu, Y-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Hou, H-A; Lu, T-P; Lai, L-C; Chen, Y; Tien, H-F; Chuang, E Y

    2016-02-01

    Distinct microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA signatures were reported in nucleophosmin (NPM1)-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it remains unknown whether the mutation participates in the dynamic interaction between miRNA and mRNA. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NPM1 mutation in modulating miRNA-mRNA regulation (MMR). From the sample-paired miRNA/mRNA microarrays of 181 de novo AML patients, we found that MMR was dynamic and could be affected by NPM1 mutation. By a systematic framework, we identified 493 NPM1 mutation-modulated MMR pairs, where the strength of MMR was significantly attenuated in patients carrying NPM1 mutations, compared to those with wild-type NPM1. These miRNAs/mRNAs were associated with pathways implicated in cancer and known functions of NPM1 mutation. Such modulation of MMR was validated in two independent cohorts as well as in cells with different NPM1 mutant burdens. Furthermore, we showed that the regulatory strength of nine MMR pairs could predict patients' outcomes. Combining these pairs, a scoring system was proposed and shown to predict survival in discovery and validation data sets, independent of other known prognostic factors. Our study provides novel biological insights into the role of NPM1 mutation as a modulator of MMR, based on which a novel prognostic marker is proposed in AML. PMID:26376228

  12. Prognostic significance of NPM1 mutation-modulated microRNA-mRNA regulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Y-C; Tsai, M-H; Chou, W-C; Liu, Y-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Hou, H-A; Lu, T-P; Lai, L-C; Chen, Y; Tien, H-F; Chuang, E Y

    2016-02-01

    Distinct microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA signatures were reported in nucleophosmin (NPM1)-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it remains unknown whether the mutation participates in the dynamic interaction between miRNA and mRNA. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of NPM1 mutation in modulating miRNA-mRNA regulation (MMR). From the sample-paired miRNA/mRNA microarrays of 181 de novo AML patients, we found that MMR was dynamic and could be affected by NPM1 mutation. By a systematic framework, we identified 493 NPM1 mutation-modulated MMR pairs, where the strength of MMR was significantly attenuated in patients carrying NPM1 mutations, compared to those with wild-type NPM1. These miRNAs/mRNAs were associated with pathways implicated in cancer and known functions of NPM1 mutation. Such modulation of MMR was validated in two independent cohorts as well as in cells with different NPM1 mutant burdens. Furthermore, we showed that the regulatory strength of nine MMR pairs could predict patients' outcomes. Combining these pairs, a scoring system was proposed and shown to predict survival in discovery and validation data sets, independent of other known prognostic factors. Our study provides novel biological insights into the role of NPM1 mutation as a modulator of MMR, based on which a novel prognostic marker is proposed in AML.

  13. Mobilization of CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells after priming in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plesa, Adriana; Chelghoum, Youcef; Mattei, Eve; Labussière, Hélène; Elhamri, Mohamed; Cannas, Giovanna; Morisset, Stéphane; Tagoug, Inès; Michallet, Mauricette; Dumontet, Charles; Thomas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the different CD34+ cell subsets after priming by chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (± G-CSF) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were harvested in 8 acute myeloid leukemia patients during and after induction chemotherapy. The CD34/CD38 cell profile was analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adhesion profile was made using CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) (CD184), VLA-4 (CD49d/CD29) and CD47. RESULTS: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilized immature cells (CD34+CD38− population), while the more mature cells (CD34+CD38low and CD34+CD38+ populations) decreased progressively after treatment. Circulating CD34+ cells tended to be more sensitive to chemotherapy after priming with G-CSF. CD34+ cell mobilization was correlated with a gradual increase in CXCR4 and CD47 expression, suggesting a role in cell protection and the capacity of homing back to the marrow. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilizes into the circulation CD34+ bone marrow cells, of which, the immature CD34+CD38– cell population. Further manipulations of these interactions may be a means with which to control the trafficking of leukemia stem cells to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:24179607

  14. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM)-2 Impairs Host Defense in Experimental Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Hommes, Tijmen J.; Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; de Jong, Hanna K.; Roelofs, Joris. J.T.H.; de Vos, Alex F.; Colonna, Marco; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2016-01-01

    Background Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) -1 and TREM-2 are key regulators of the inflammatory response that are involved in the clearance of invading pathogens. Melioidosis, caused by the "Tier 1" biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a common form of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast-Asia. TREM-1 has been suggested as a biomarker for sepsis and melioidosis. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of TREM-1 and TREM-2 in melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Wild-type, TREM-1/3 (Trem-1/3-/-) and TREM-2 (Trem-2-/-) deficient mice were intranasally infected with live B. pseudomallei and killed after 24, and/or 72 h for the harvesting of lungs, liver, spleen, and blood. Additionally, survival studies were performed. Cellular functions were further analyzed by stimulation and/or infection of isolated cells. TREM-1 and TREM-2 expression was increased both in the lung and liver of B. pseudomallei-infected mice. Strikingly, Trem-2-/-, but not Trem-1/3-/-, mice displayed a markedly improved host defense as reflected by a strong survival advantage together with decreased bacterial loads, less inflammation and reduced organ injury. Cellular responsiveness of TREM-2, but not TREM-1, deficient blood and bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) was diminished upon exposure to B. pseudomallei. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. pseudomallei by BMDM and alveolar macrophages were TREM-1 and TREM-2-independent. Conclusions/Significance We found that TREM-2, and to a lesser extent TREM-1, plays a remarkable detrimental role in the host defense against a clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogen in mice: TREM-2 deficiency restricts the inflammatory response, thereby decreasing organ damage and mortality. PMID:27253382

  15. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  16. Complete Remission of Acute Myeloid Leukemia following Cisplatin Based Concurrent Therapy with Radiation for Squamous Cell Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harpaul S.; Higgins, Kristin A.; Saba, Nabil F.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a myeloid disorder with several established treatment regimens depending on patient and leukemic factors. Cisplatin is known to have strong leukemogenic potential and is rarely used even as salvage therapy in relapsed or refractory AML. We present a patient simultaneously diagnosed with AML and squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, who was found to be in complete remission from AML following treatment with cisplatin based chemoradiotherapy for his laryngeal cancer. PMID:27127664

  17. Studies on the differentiation inducers of myeloid leukemic cells from Citrus species.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, S; Umehara, K; Kuroyanagi, M; Ueno, A; Taki, T

    1993-04-01

    An attempt was made to isolate differentiation inducers from Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium and the fruit peel of Citrus reticulata Blanco (Rutaceae). Twenty-seven kinds of flavones, including five new flavones, were isolated after repeated chromatography from methanol extracts of these plants and their structures were established, from their physicochemical data, to be highly methoxylated flavones. Each compound, except for two flavone glucosides, showed the differentiation inducing activity toward mouse myeloid leukemia cells (M1), and the cells came to have phagocytic activity. Furthermore, differentiation inducing activity was tested using human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60). PMID:8508474

  18. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-02-01

    Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells". PMID:16168663

  19. CCR1-mediated accumulation of myeloid cells in the liver microenvironment promoting mouse colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hideyo; Fujishita, Teruaki; Kurimoto, Kazuki; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kitano, Satsuki; Inamoto, Susumu; Itatani, Yoshiro; Saitou, Mitinori; Maekawa, Taira; Taketo, M Mark

    2014-12-01

    To understand colon cancer metastasis, we earlier analyzed a mouse model that developed liver metastasis of cancer cells disseminated from the spleen. We suggested that CCR1(+) bone marrow (BM)-derived cells are recruited to the microenvironment of disseminated colon cancer cells, and produce metalloproteinases MMP9 and MMP2, helping metastatic colonization. In the present study, we have examined these myeloid cells expressing CCR1 and/or MMPs in detail. To this end, we have established bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based transgenic mouse lines in which membrane-targeted Venus fluorescent protein (mVenus) was expressed under the control of Ccr1 gene promoter. Then, myeloid cells obtained from the BM and liver metastatic foci were analyzed by the combination of flow cytometry and cytology/immunohistochemistry, in situ RNA hybridization, or quantitative RT-PCR. We have found four distinct types of myeloid cells recruited to the metastatic foci; neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and fibrocytes. These cell types exhibited distinct expression patterns for CCR1, MMP2 and MMP9. Namely, neutrophils found in the early phase of cancer cell dissemination expressed CCR1 exclusively and MMP9 preferentially, whereas fibrocytes accumulated in later phase expressed MMP2 exclusively. Either genetic inactivation of Ccr1 or antibody-mediated neutrophil depletion reduced subsequent recruitment of fibrocytes. The recruitment of CCR1(+) neutrophils in early phase of colon cancer dissemination appears to cause that of fibrocytes in late phase. These results implicate the key role of CCR1 in colon cancer metastasis in this mouse model, and explain why both MMP9 and MMP2 are essential as genetically demonstrated previously. The results also suggest relevant mechanisms in humans.

  20. Characterization of resistance to rhabdovirus and retrovirus infection in a human myeloid cell line.

    PubMed

    Boso, Guney; Somia, Nikunj V

    2015-01-01

    Viruses interact with various permissive and restrictive factors in host cells throughout their replication cycle. Cell lines that are non-permissive to viral infection have been particularly useful in discovering host cell proteins involved in viral life cycles. Here we describe the characterization of a human myeloid leukemia cell line, KG-1, that is resistant to infection by retroviruses and a Rhabdovirus. We show that KG-1 cells are resistant to infection by Vesicular Stomatits Virus as well as VSV Glycoprotein (VSVG) pseudotyped retroviruses due to a defect in binding. Moreover our results indicate that entry by xenotropic retroviral envelope glycoprotein RD114 is impaired in KG-1 cells. Finally we characterize a post- entry block in the early phase of the retroviral life cycle in KG-1 cells that renders the cell line refractory to infection. This cell line will have utility in discovering proteins involved in infection by VSV and HIV-1.

  1. Human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells express IDO and promote tolerance via Treg-cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Zoso, Alessia; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca

    2014-11-01

    By restraining T-cell activation and promoting Treg-cell expansion, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tolerogenic DCs can control self-reactive and antigraft effector T cells in autoimmunity and transplantation. Their therapeutic use and characterization, however, is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. In the present study, we describe and characterize a novel population of human myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC, which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood precursors by 4-day culture with FDA-approved cytokines (recombinant human-GM-CSF and recombinant human-G-CSF). This MDSC subset, characterized by the expression of MDSC-, DC-, and fibrocyte-associated markers, promotes Treg-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic mouse model of Type 1 diabetes. In order to exert their protolerogenic function, fibrocytic MDSCs require direct contact with activated T cells, which leads to the production and secretion of IDO. This new myeloid subset may have an important role in the in vitro and in vivo production of Treg cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and in either the prevention or control of allograft rejection.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as osteoclast progenitors: a novel target for controlling osteolytic bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells and their secreted growth factors play major roles in tumor growth and metastasis. Interplay between the growing tumor and infiltrating immune cells decides the nature of immune response and ultimately, tumor fate. Increased infiltration of pro-tumorigenic immune cells promotes tumor growth as well as dissemination to distant sites. These cells induce immunosuppression that inhibits proliferation and functions of cells of anti-tumor immune response. One population of immunosuppressive cells that is increasingly gaining attention is myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs are immature myeloid progenitors that suppress T cell effector functions and promote angiogenesis. MDSC numbers are elevated at both the primary tumor and metastatic sites including bone. In addition to immunosuppressive functions of MDSCs, we and other have recently discovered a novel function for MDSCs as osteoclast progenitors. Osteolysis is a common complication in the carcinomas of breast, lung, prostate and multiple myeloma with poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting MDSCs functions may exert dual therapeutic effects on immunosuppression and bone pathology. PMID:23887974

  3. PU. 1 is not essential for early myeloid gene expression but is required for terminal myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olson, M C; Scott, E W; Hack, A A; Su, G H; Tenen, D G; Singh, H; Simon, M C

    1995-12-01

    We have previously shown using gene targeting that PU.1 is essential for the development of lymphoid and myeloid lineages during fetal liver hematopoiesis. We now show that PU.1 is required for the maturation of yolk sac-derived myeloid progenitors and for the differentiation of ES cells into macrophages. The role of PU.1 in regulating target genes, thought to be critical in the development of monocytes and granulocytes, has been analyzed. Early genes such as GM-CSFR, G-CSFR, and myeloperoxidase are expressed in PU.1-/- embryos and differentiated PU.1-/- ES cells. However, the expression of genes associated with terminal myeloid differentiation (CD11b, CD64, and M-CSFR) is eliminated in differentiated PU.1-/- ES cells. Development of macrophages is restored with the introduction of a PU.1 cDNA regulated by its own promoter. The PU.1-/- ES cells represent an important model for analyzing myeloid cell development.

  4. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: Identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    REIKVAM, HÅKON; RYNINGEN, ANITA; SÆTERDAL, LARS RUNE; NEPSTAD, INA; FOSS, BRYNJAR; BRUSERUD, ØYSTEIN

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell-cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions. PMID:25529637

  5. Targeting VEGF-A in myeloid cells enhances natural killer cell responses to chemotherapy and ameliorates cachexia.

    PubMed

    Klose, Ralph; Krzywinska, Ewelina; Castells, Magali; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Putz, Eva Maria; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Chikdene, Naima; Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Schrödter, Katrin; Helfrich, Iris; Fandrey, Joachim; Sexl, Veronika; Stockmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy remains a mainstay of cancer treatment but its use is often limited by the development of adverse reactions. Severe loss of body weight (cachexia) is a frequent cause of death in cancer patients and is exacerbated by chemotherapy. We show that genetic inactivation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in myeloid cells prevents chemotherapy-induced cachexia by inhibiting skeletal muscle loss and the lipolysis of white adipose tissue. It also improves clearance of senescent tumour cells by natural killer cells and inhibits tumour regrowth after chemotherapy. The effects depend on the chemoattractant chemerin, which is released by the tumour endothelium in response to chemotherapy. The findings define chemerin as a critical mediator of the immune response, as well as an important inhibitor of cancer cachexia. Targeting myeloid cell-derived VEGF signalling should impede the lipolysis and weight loss that is frequently associated with chemotherapy, thereby substantially improving the therapeutic outcome. PMID:27538380

  6. Targeting VEGF-A in myeloid cells enhances natural killer cell responses to chemotherapy and ameliorates cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Ralph; Krzywinska, Ewelina; Castells, Magali; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Putz, Eva Maria; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Chikdene, Naima; Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Schrödter, Katrin; Helfrich, Iris; Fandrey, Joachim; Sexl, Veronika; Stockmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy remains a mainstay of cancer treatment but its use is often limited by the development of adverse reactions. Severe loss of body weight (cachexia) is a frequent cause of death in cancer patients and is exacerbated by chemotherapy. We show that genetic inactivation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A in myeloid cells prevents chemotherapy-induced cachexia by inhibiting skeletal muscle loss and the lipolysis of white adipose tissue. It also improves clearance of senescent tumour cells by natural killer cells and inhibits tumour regrowth after chemotherapy. The effects depend on the chemoattractant chemerin, which is released by the tumour endothelium in response to chemotherapy. The findings define chemerin as a critical mediator of the immune response, as well as an important inhibitor of cancer cachexia. Targeting myeloid cell-derived VEGF signalling should impede the lipolysis and weight loss that is frequently associated with chemotherapy, thereby substantially improving the therapeutic outcome. PMID:27538380

  7. Characterization of the Murine Myeloid Precursor Cell Line MuMac-E8

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Stephan; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies. PMID:25546418

  8. Characterization of the murine myeloid precursor cell line MuMac-E8.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Stephan; Pfefferkorn, Cathleen; Wolf, Doris; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies.

  9. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    SciTech Connect

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  10. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented.

  11. Angiogenic Role of MMP-2/9 Expressed on the Cell Surface of Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells/Myeloid Angiogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanayasu-Toyoda, Toshie; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hiroko; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenic cell therapy using early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs) have been expected to be useful in treating ischemic diseases. In order to elucidate the angiogenic properties of MACs/EPCs, we clarified the characteristics of MACs as compared to M2 macrophages (Mϕs). Comparison of the gene expression profiles of MACs and late EPCs revealed that MACs expressed greater amounts of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. It should be noted that the profile of MMP-2/9 expression on the cell surface of MACs was similar to that of M2 Mϕs, and that cell surface MMP-2/9 might be an active form based on molecular size. In addition, the invasion of MACs was prohibited not only by MMP-2/9 inhibitor, but also by the hyaluronidase treatment that caused the down-regulation of MMP-9 on the cell surface of MACs and inhibited their invasion activity. These results indicate that cell surface MMP-2/9 plays an important role in the high invasion ability of MACs. The conditioned medium of both MACs and M2 Mϕs stimulated tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro. MACs caused an increase in vessel formation in in vivo models through the production of IL-8. We propose that the role of MACs with cell surfaces expressing MMP-2/9 is rapidly invading ischemic tissue. PMID:25820539

  12. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Ryningen, Anita; Sæterdal, Lars Rune; Nepstad, Ina; Foss, Brynjar; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell‑cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)‑17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon‑γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions.

  13. Inhibition of the differentiation of human myeloid cell lines by redox changes induced through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, F; Agosti, V; Morrone, G; Morra, F; Cuomo, C; Russo, T; Venuta, S; Cimino, F

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of redox changes in vivo on the differentiation of two human myeloid cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1. The glutathione-depleting agent diethyl maleate (DEM) prevented the development of differentiated features in response to phorbol esters, including adherence of the cells to plastic surfaces and repression of the myeloperoxidase and CD34 genes. Moreover, DEM abolished phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and Egr-1, suggesting that inhibition of differentiation may be due, at least in part, to redox modifications of these proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519845

  14. Cytotoxic T cells induce proliferation of chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by secreting interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian; Riether, Carsten; Amrein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasia arising from the oncogenic break point cluster region/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 translocation in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), resulting in a leukemia stem cell (LSC). Curing CML depends on the eradication of LSCs. Unfortunately, LSCs are resistant to current treatment strategies. The host’s immune system is thought to contribute to disease control, and several immunotherapy strategies are under investigation. However, the interaction of the immune system with LSCs is poorly defined. In the present study, we use a murine CML model to show that LSCs express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and co-stimulatory molecules and are recognized and killed by leukemia-specific CD8+ effector CTLs in vitro. In contrast, therapeutic infusions of effector CTLs into CML mice in vivo failed to eradicate LSCs but, paradoxically, increased LSC numbers. LSC proliferation and differentiation was induced by CTL-secreted IFN-γ. Effector CTLs were only able to eliminate LSCs in a situation with minimal leukemia load where CTL-secreted IFN-γ levels were low. In addition, IFN-γ increased proliferation and colony formation of CD34+ stem/progenitor cells from CML patients in vitro. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which the immune system contributes to leukemia progression and may be important to improve T cell–based immunotherapy against leukemia. PMID:23401488

  15. Antigen Processing and Presentation Mechanisms in Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Unlike B cells, CD8-positive and CD4-positive T cells of the adaptive immune system do not recognize intact foreign proteins but instead recognize polypeptide fragments of potential antigens. These antigenic peptides are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells bound to MHC class I and MHC class II proteins. Here, we review the basics of antigen acquisition by antigen presenting cells, antigen proteolysis into polypeptide fragments, antigenic peptide binding to MHC proteins, and surface display of both MHC class I-peptide and MHC class II-peptide complexes.

  16. TGF{beta}-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Xiaotang

    2008-05-02

    TGF{beta} is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGF{beta} inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGF{beta} upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGF{beta} arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGF{beta}-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGF{beta}-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  17. TGFbeta-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao Tang

    2008-05-01

    TGFbeta is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGFbeta inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGFbeta upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGFbeta arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGFbeta-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGFbeta-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are elevated in patients with psoriasis and produce various molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ilkovitch, Dan; Ferris, Laura K.

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a debilitating chronic inflammatory disease. In addition to the characteristic effects on the skin, chronic inflammation associated with the disease is recognized to contribute to cardiovascular, hepatic and renal comorbidities. Immature myeloid regulatory cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have been demonstrated to accumulate in various diseases and chronic inflammatory states, including inflammatory bowel disease and various types of cancer. The results of the present study, obtained using flow cytometry and cell culture analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from psoriasis and healthy patients, revealed that MDSC levels are significantly increased in the blood of patients with psoriasis compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, these cells are capable of producing various molecules, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 and-1, interleukin-8, growth-related oncogene, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1. These molecules may recruit additional immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, and contribute to the chronic inflammatory state in these patients. Therefore, MDSCs, which have various immune regulatory functions, may contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis as a systemic inflammatory disease. PMID:27574042

  19. Perturbations of mucosal homeostasis through interactions of intestinal microbes with myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Regina; Danzer, Claudia; Mattner, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces represent the largest areas of interactions of the host with its environment. Subsequently, the mucosal immune system has evolved complex strategies to maintain the integrity of the host by inducing protective immune responses against pathogenic and tolerance against dietary and commensal microbial antigens within the broad range of molecules the intestinal epithelium is exposed to. Among many other specialized cell subsets, myeloid cell populations - due to their strategic location in the subepithelial lamina propria - are the first ones to scavenge and process these intestinal antigens and to send consecutive signals to other immune and non-immune cell subsets. Thus, myeloid cell populations represent attractive targets for clinical intervention in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) as they initiate and modulate inflammatory or regulatory immune response and shape the intestinal T cell pool. Here, we discuss the interactions of the intestinal microbiota with dendritic cell and macrophage populations and review in this context the literature on four promising candidate molecules that are critical for the induction and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis on the one hand, but also for the initiation and propagation of chronic intestinal inflammation on the other. PMID:25466587

  20. Pegylated Gold Nanoparticles Induce Apoptosis in Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Yang, Kai-Chien; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Wang, Tao-Yeuan; Hwu, Yeukuang

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have several potential biological applications as well as excellent biocompatibility. AuNPs with surface modification using polyethylene glycol (PEG-AuNPs) can facilitate easy conjugation with various biological molecules of interest. To examine the anticancer bioactivity of PEG-AuNPs, we investigated their effect on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. The results indicated that PEG-AuNPs markedly inhibited the viability and impaired the cell membrane integrity of K562 cells. The particles caused morphological changes typical of cell death, and a marked increase in the sub-G1 population in DNA histogram, indicating apoptosis. In addition, PEG-AuNPs reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, a hallmark of the involvement of intrinsic apoptotic pathway in K562 cells. Observation of ultrastructure under a transmission electron microscope revealed that the internalized PEG-AuNPs were distributed into cytoplasmic vacuoles and damaged mitochondria, and subsequently accumulated in areas surrounding the nuclear membrane. In conclusion, PEG-AuNPs may have the potential to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:24790990

  1. Schlafen 4–expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells are induced during murine gastric metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Hayes, Michael M.; Photenhauer, Amanda; Eaton, Kathryn A.; Li, Qian; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection triggers neoplastic transformation of the gastric mucosa in a small subset of patients, but the risk factors that induce progression to gastric metaplasia have not been identified. Prior to cancer development, the oxyntic gastric glands atrophy and are replaced by metaplastic cells in response to chronic gastritis. Previously, we identified schlafen 4 (Slfn4) as a GLI1 target gene and myeloid differentiation factor that correlates with spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that migration of SLFN4-expressing cells from the bone marrow to peripheral organs predicts preneoplastic changes in the gastric microenvironment. Lineage tracing in Helicobacter-infected Slfn4 reporter mice revealed that SLFN4+ cells migrated to the stomach, where they exhibited myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) markers and acquired the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. SLFN4+ MDSCs were not observed in infected GLI1-deficient mice. Overexpression of sonic hedgehog ligand (SHH) in infected WT mice accelerated the appearance of SLFN4+ MDSCs in the gastric corpus. Similarly, in the stomachs of H. pylori–infected patients, the human SLFN4 ortholog SLFN12L colocalized to cells that expressed MDSC surface markers CD15+CD33+HLA-DRlo. Together, these results indicate that SLFN4 marks a GLI1-dependent population of MDSCs that predict a shift in the gastric mucosa to a metaplastic phenotype. PMID:27427984

  2. Emetine induces chemosensitivity and reduces clonogenicity of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cornet-Masana, Josep Maria; Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Etxabe, Amaia; Tesi, Niccolò; Pratcorona, Marta; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an hematologic neoplasia characterized by the accumulation of transformed immature myeloid cells in bone marrow. Although the response rate to induction therapy is high, survival rate 5-year after diagnosis is still low, highlighting the necessity of new novel agents. To identify agents with the capability to abolish the self-renewal capacity of AML blasts, an in silico screening was performed to search for small molecules that induce terminal differentiation. Emetine, a hit compound, was validated for its anti-leukemic effect in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Emetine, a second-line anti-protozoa drug, differentially reduced cell viability and clonogenic capacity of AML primary patient samples, sparing healthy blood cells. Emetine treatment markedly reduced AML burden in bone marrow of xenotransplanted mice and decreased self-renewal capacity of the remaining engrafted AML cells. Emetine also synergized with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents such as ara-C. At a molecular level, emetine treatment was followed by a reduction in HIF-1α protein levels. This study validated the anti-leukemiceffect of emetine in AML cell lines, a group of diverse AML primary samples, and in a human AML-transplanted murine model, sparing healthy blood cells. The selective anti-leukemic effect of emetine together with the safety of the dose range required to exert this effect support the development of this agent in clinical practice. PMID:26992240

  3. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Isolation and killing of candidate chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by antibody targeting of IL-1 receptor accessory protein.

    PubMed

    Järås, Marcus; Johnels, Petra; Hansen, Nils; Agerstam, Helena; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Rissler, Marianne; Lassen, Carin; Olofsson, Tor; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Richter, Johan; Fioretos, Thoas

    2010-09-14

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is genetically characterized by the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, formed through a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and giving rise to the constitutively active tyrosine kinase P210 BCR/ABL1. Therapeutic strategies aiming for a cure of CML will require full eradication of Ph chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML stem cells. Here we used gene-expression profiling to identify IL-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) as up-regulated in CML CD34(+) cells and also in cord blood CD34(+) cells as a consequence of retroviral BCR/ABL1 expression. To test whether IL1RAP expression distinguishes normal (Ph(-)) and leukemic (Ph(+)) cells within the CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cell compartment, we established a unique protocol for conducting FISH on small numbers of sorted cells. By using this method, we sorted cells directly into drops on slides to investigate their Ph-chromosome status. Interestingly, we found that the CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(+) cells were Ph(+), whereas CML CD34(+)CD38(-)IL1RAP(-) cells were almost exclusively Ph(-). By performing long-term culture-initiating cell assays on the two cell populations, we found that Ph(+) and Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells could be prospectively separated. In addition, by generating an anti-IL1RAP antibody, we provide proof of concept that IL1RAP can be used as a target on CML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells to induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. This study thus identifies IL1RAP as a unique cell surface biomarker distinguishing Ph(+) from Ph(-) candidate CML stem cells and opens up a previously unexplored avenue for therapy of CML. PMID:20805474

  5. Calcineurin/NFAT signalling inhibits myeloid haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice X F; Koh, Esther G L; Hofmann, Benjamin; Chen, Jinmiao; Tay, Hock Soon; Mohammad Isa, Siti Aminah Bte; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Ruedl, Christiane; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) comprises a family of transcription factors that regulate T cell development, activation and differentiation. NFAT signalling can also mediate granulocyte and dendritic cell (DC) activation, but it is unknown whether NFAT influences their development from progenitors. Here, we report a novel role for calcineurin/NFAT signalling as a negative regulator of myeloid haematopoiesis. Reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with haematopoietic stem cells expressing an NFAT-inhibitory peptide resulted in enhanced development of the myeloid compartment. Culturing bone marrow cells in media supplemented with Flt3-L in the presence of the calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor Cyclosporin A increased numbers of differentiated DC. Global gene expression analysis of untreated DC and NFAT-inhibited DC revealed differential expression of transcripts that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that calcineurin/NFAT signalling negatively regulates myeloid lineage development. The finding that inhibition of NFAT enhances myeloid development provides a novel insight into understanding how the treatment with drugs targeting calcineurin/NFAT signalling influence the homeostasis of the innate immune system.

  6. The bone marrow microenvironment enhances multiple myeloma progression by exosome-mediated activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; De Beule, Nathan; Maes, Ken; De Bruyne, Elke; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Vanderkerken, Karin; Menu, Eline

    2015-12-22

    Exosomes, extracellular nanovesicles secreted by various cell types, modulate the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment by regulating angiogenesis, cytokine release, immune response, inflammation, and metastasis. Interactions between bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells play crucial roles in MM development. We previously reported that BMSC-derived exosomes directly promote MM cell growth, whereas the other possible mechanisms for supporting MM progression by these exosomes are still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of BMSC-derived exosomes on the MM BM cells with specific emphasis on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). BMSC-derived exosomes were able to be taken up by MM MDSCs and induced their expansion in vitro. Moreover, these exosomes directly induced the survival of MDSCs through activating STAT3 and STAT1 pathways and increasing the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Inhibition of these pathways blocked the enhancement of MDSC survival. Furthermore, these exosomes increased the nitric oxide release from MM MDSCs and enhanced their suppressive activity on T cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BMSC-derived exosomes activate MDSCs in the BM through STAT3 and STAT1 pathways, leading to increased immunosuppression which favors MM progression.

  7. The bone marrow microenvironment enhances multiple myeloma progression by exosome-mediated activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; De Beule, Nathan; Maes, Ken; De Bruyne, Elke; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, extracellular nanovesicles secreted by various cell types, modulate the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment by regulating angiogenesis, cytokine release, immune response, inflammation, and metastasis. Interactions between bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells play crucial roles in MM development. We previously reported that BMSC-derived exosomes directly promote MM cell growth, whereas the other possible mechanisms for supporting MM progression by these exosomes are still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of BMSC-derived exosomes on the MM BM cells with specific emphasis on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). BMSC-derived exosomes were able to be taken up by MM MDSCs and induced their expansion in vitro. Moreover, these exosomes directly induced the survival of MDSCs through activating STAT3 and STAT1 pathways and increasing the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Inhibition of these pathways blocked the enhancement of MDSC survival. Furthermore, these exosomes increased the nitric oxide release from MM MDSCs and enhanced their suppressive activity on T cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BMSC-derived exosomes activate MDSCs in the BM through STAT3 and STAT1 pathways, leading to increased immunosuppression which favors MM progression. PMID:26556857

  8. Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury in the absence of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 in mice.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sergio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuriyama, Naohisa; Suko, Kathryn; Ishikawa, Tomo-O; Busuttil, Ronald W; Herschman, Harvey R; Coito, Ana J

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a mediator of hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI). While both global COX-2 deletion and pharmacologic COX-2 inhibition ameliorate liver IRI, the clinical use of COX-2 inhibitors has been linked to increased risks of heart attack and stroke. Therefore, a better understanding of the role of COX-2 in different cell types may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for hepatic IRI. Macrophages of myeloid origin are currently considered to be important sources of the COX-2 in damaged livers. Here, we used a Cox-2flox conditional knockout mouse (COX-2-M/-M) to examine the function of COX-2 expression in myeloid cells during liver IRI. COX-2-M/-M mice and their WT control littermates were subjected to partial liver ischemia followed by reperfusion. COX-2-M/-M macrophages did not express COX-2 upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation and COX-2-M/-M livers showed reduced levels of COX-2 protein post-IRI. Nevertheless, selective deletion of myeloid cell-derived COX-2 failed to ameliorate liver IRI; serum transaminases and histology were comparable in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice. COX-2-M/-M livers, like WT livers, developed extensive necrosis, vascular congestion, leukocyte infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression post-reperfusion. In addition, myeloid COX-2 deletion led to a transient increase in IL-6 levels after hepatic reperfusion, when compared to controls. Administration of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in significantly improved liver function and histology in both COX-2-M/-M and WT mice post-reperfusion, providing evidence that COX-2-mediated liver IRI is caused by COX-2 derived from a source(s) other than myeloid cells. In conclusion, these results support the view that myeloid COX-2, including myeloid-macrophage COX-2, is not responsible for the hepatic IRI phenotype.

  9. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  10. Exogenous interleukin-33 targets myeloid-derived suppressor cells and generates periphery-induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in skin-transplanted mice

    PubMed Central

    Gajardo, Tania; Morales, Rodrigo A; Campos-Mora, Mauricio; Campos-Acuña, Javier; Pino-Lagos, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been a focus of study because of its variety of functions shaping CD4+ T-cell biology. In the present work, we evaluated the modulatory effect of IL-33 on suppressor cells in an in vivo transplantation model. C57BL/6 wild-type mice were grafted with syngeneic or allogeneic skin transplants and treated with exogenous IL-33 daily. After 10 days of treatment, we analysed draining lymph node cellularity and found in allogeneic animals an increment in myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which co-express MHC-II, and become enriched upon IL-33 treatment. In line with this observation, inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase 1 expression were also increased in allogeneic animals upon IL-33 administration. In addition, IL-33 treatment up-regulated the number of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in the allogeneic group, complementing the healthier integrity of the allografts and the increased allograft survival. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-33 promotes CD4+ T-cell expansion and conversion of CD4+ Foxp3− T cells into CD4+ Foxp3+ Treg cells in the periphery. Lastly, the cytokine pattern of ex vivo-stimulated draining lymph nodes indicates that IL-33 dampens interferon-γ and IL-17 production, stimulating IL-10 secretion. Altogether, our work complements previous studies on the immune-modulatory activity of IL-33, showing that this cytokine affects myeloid-derived suppressor cells at the cell number and gene expression levels. More importantly, our research demonstrates for the first time that IL-33 allows for in vivo Foxp3+ Treg cell conversion and favours an anti-inflammatory or tolerogenic state by skewing cytokine production. Therefore, our data suggest a potential use of IL-33 to prevent allograft rejection, bringing new therapeutics to the transplantation field. PMID:25988395

  11. Gene expression profiling to define the cell intrinsic role of the SKI proto-oncogene in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Chalk, Alistair M; Liddicoat, Brian J J; Walkley, Carl R; Singbrant, Sofie

    2014-12-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced gene signatures associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation. Here we provide detailed experimental methods and analysis for the gene expression profiling described in our recently published study of Singbrant et al. (2014) in Haematologica. Our data sets (available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE39457) provide a resource for exploring the underlying molecular mechanisms of the involvement of the proto-oncogene SKI in hematopoietic stem cell function and development of myeloid neoplasms.

  12. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice.

    PubMed

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A; Marignani, Paola A; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-07-01

    Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1(-/-)/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  13. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression. PMID:27622015

  14. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Philip, Kemly; Acero, Luis F.; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Molina, Jose G.; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Bunge, Isabelle; Volcik, Kelly A.; Le, Thanh-Thuy T.; Johnston, Richard A.; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, fibroproliferative disease. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can develop secondary to IPF and increase mortality. Alternatively, activated macrophages (AAMs) contribute to the pathogenesis of both IPF and PH. Here we hypothesized that adenosine signaling through the ADORA2B on AAMs impacts the progression of these disorders and that conditional deletion of ADORA2B on myeloid cells would have a beneficial effect in a model of these diseases. Conditional knockout mice lacking ADORA2B on myeloid cells (Adora2Bf/f-LysMCre) were exposed to the fibrotic agent bleomycin (BLM; 0.035 U/g body weight, i.p.). At 14, 17, 21, 25, or 33 d after exposure, SpO2, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histologic analyses were performed. On day 33, lung function and cardiovascular analyses were determined. Markers for AAM and mediators of fibrosis and PH were assessed. Adora2Bf/f-LysMCre mice presented with attenuated fibrosis, improved lung function, and no evidence of PH compared with control mice exposed to BLM. These findings were accompanied by reduced expression of CD206 and arginase-1, markers for AAMs. A 10-fold reduction in IL-6 and a 5-fold decrease in hyaluronan, both linked to lung fibrosis and PH, were also observed. These data suggest that activation of the ADORA2B on macrophages plays an active role in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and PH.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Philip, K., Acero, L. F., Chen, N.-Y., Weng, T., Molina, J. G., Luo, F., Davies, J., Le, N.-B., Bunge, I., Volcik, K. A., Le, T.-T. T., Johnston, R. A., Xia, Y., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25318478

  15. Ranitidine modifies myeloid cell populations and inhibits breast tumor development and spread in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Oldford, Sharon A.; Marignani, Paola A.; Wang, Jun; Haidl, Ian D.; Marshall, Jean S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histamine receptor 2 (H2) antagonists are widely used clinically for the control of gastrointestinal symptoms, but also impact immune function. They have been reported to reduce tumor growth in established colon and lung cancer models. Histamine has also been reported to modify populations of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). We have examined the impact of the widely used H2 antagonist ranitidine, on both myeloid cell populations and tumor development and spread, in three distinct models of breast cancer that highlight different stages of cancer progression. Oral ranitidine treatment significantly decreased the monocytic MDSC population in the spleen and bone marrow both alone and in the context of an orthotopic breast tumor model. H2 antagonists ranitidine and famotidine, but not H1 or H4 antagonists, significantly inhibited lung metastasis in the 4T1 model. In the E0771 model, ranitidine decreased primary tumor growth while omeprazole treatment had no impact on tumor development. Gemcitabine treatment prevented the tumor growth inhibition associated with ranitidine treatment. In keeping with ranitidine-induced changes in myeloid cell populations in non-tumor-bearing mice, ranitidine also delayed the onset of spontaneous tumor development, and decreased the number of tumors that developed in LKB1−/−/NIC mice. These results indicate that ranitidine alters monocyte populations associated with MDSC activity, and subsequently impacts breast tumor development and outcome. Ranitidine has potential as an adjuvant therapy or preventative agent in breast cancer and provides a novel and safe approach to the long-term reduction of tumor-associated immune suppression.

  16. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs).

    PubMed

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376.

  17. Gene expression profiling of human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (f-MDSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Zoso, Alessia; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca; Bicciato, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to control self-reactive and anti-graft effector T-cells in autoimmunity and transplantation, but their therapeutic use is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. We isolated and characterized a novel population of myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC (f-MDSC), which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) precursors (Zoso et al., 2014). This MDSC subset promotes regulatory T-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic model of type 1 diabetes. Here we describe in details the experimental design and the bioinformatics analyses of the gene expression dataset used to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the base of MDSC tolerogenic and suppressive properties. We also provide an R code to easily access the data and perform the quality controls and basic analyses relevant to this dataset. Raw and pre-processed data are available at Gene Expression Omnibus under accession GSE52376. PMID:26484135

  18. Sensing developing biofilms: the bitter receptor T2R38 on myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gaida, Matthias Martin; Dapunt, Ulrike; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2016-04-01

    Quorum-sensing molecules, also known as autoinducer, are essential for bacterial biofilm formation. Our focus is on N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (AHL-12), because it is also known as an 'interkingdom signalling molecule', which means that it also interacts with mammalian cells. AHL-12 activates defence-relevant functions of phagocytic cells, including enhancement of phagocytosis, increased expression of adhesion receptors and induction of chemotaxis. This leads to the hypothesis that early recognition of developing biofilms might be the key to a successful host defence against biofilm infection. In that context we studied activation of phagocytic cells by AHL-12, and found that phagocytes are activated via a rather specialized receptor that was not previously described on myeloid cells, the bitter taste receptor T2R38. Taste receptors are commonly associated with cells of the gustatory system. The extragustatory expression, however, suggests an additional role, namely the sensing of the onset of bacterial biofilm infection. PMID:26782143

  19. Current status of hematopoietic stem cell transplant in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alok; Khattry, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Indications for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have changed over time. This change has largely been influenced by the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying disease phase progression as well as drug resistance, refinement of transplant techniques and exploitation of graft versus leukemia effect in this disease. Here, we have discussed the status of HSCT in CML in the present era with regards to the current indications, factors determining outcome and management strategies for posttransplant relapse. PMID:25336791

  20. Evaluation of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils and mast cells) infiltration in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Debta, Priyanka; Debta, Fakir Mohan; Chaudhary, Minal; Bussari, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The multifunctional involvement and infiltration of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils [TATE] and mast cells) can provide a unique opportunity to define relevant effectors functions that may represent novel, therapeutic options for modulation of tumor onset/growth. Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate infiltration of myeloid cells (TATE and Mast cells) infiltration in different grades (WHO grading) of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Total 30 cases of OSCC were selected for this study. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue special stain, to evaluate TATE and the mast cells infiltration, were used. Three-year follow-up of OSCC cases was done. Result: Among 30 cases, 63.33% cases of OSCC showed TATE-positive and 36.66% cases showed TATE-negative. Regarding mast cells infiltration, 66.66% OSCC cases showed mast cells positive and 33.33% cases did not show significant mast cells infiltration. We found significant association of TATE and mast cells infiltration in OSCC cases. These myeloid cells infiltration significantly associated with age of patients but did not show any significant association with gender, site, and habit of cases. When we compared these cells infiltration with clinical stages and different histological grades of tumor, we found their infiltration is decreasing, from Stages 1 to Stage 3 of tumor and from well to poorly differentiated carcinoma. We have also found the less infiltration of these myeloid in recurrence cases of OSCC. Conclusion: As the infiltration of TATE and mast cells are correlated, along with evaluation of TATE, we should also evaluate the presence of mast cells infiltration in OSCC. The assessment of myeloid cells could become, in the future, useful for therapeutic approaches in this subset of the patient. PMID:27688609

  1. Evaluation of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils and mast cells) infiltration in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Debta, Priyanka; Debta, Fakir Mohan; Chaudhary, Minal; Bussari, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Background: The multifunctional involvement and infiltration of myeloid cells (tumor-associated tissue eosinophils [TATE] and mast cells) can provide a unique opportunity to define relevant effectors functions that may represent novel, therapeutic options for modulation of tumor onset/growth. Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate infiltration of myeloid cells (TATE and Mast cells) infiltration in different grades (WHO grading) of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and Methods: Total 30 cases of OSCC were selected for this study. Hematoxylin and eosin stain and toluidine blue special stain, to evaluate TATE and the mast cells infiltration, were used. Three-year follow-up of OSCC cases was done. Result: Among 30 cases, 63.33% cases of OSCC showed TATE-positive and 36.66% cases showed TATE-negative. Regarding mast cells infiltration, 66.66% OSCC cases showed mast cells positive and 33.33% cases did not show significant mast cells infiltration. We found significant association of TATE and mast cells infiltration in OSCC cases. These myeloid cells infiltration significantly associated with age of patients but did not show any significant association with gender, site, and habit of cases. When we compared these cells infiltration with clinical stages and different histological grades of tumor, we found their infiltration is decreasing, from Stages 1 to Stage 3 of tumor and from well to poorly differentiated carcinoma. We have also found the less infiltration of these myeloid in recurrence cases of OSCC. Conclusion: As the infiltration of TATE and mast cells are correlated, along with evaluation of TATE, we should also evaluate the presence of mast cells infiltration in OSCC. The assessment of myeloid cells could become, in the future, useful for therapeutic approaches in this subset of the patient.

  2. The Role of Myeloid Cell Activation and Arginine Metabolism in the Pathogenesis of Virus-Induced Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    When an antiviral immune response is generated, a balance must be reached between two opposing pathways: the production of proinflammatory and cytotoxic effectors that drive a robust antiviral immune response to control the infection and regulators that function to limit or blunt an excessive immune response to minimize immune-mediated pathology and repair tissue damage. Myeloid cells, including monocytes and macrophages, play an important role in this balance, particularly through the activities of the arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2; iNOS) and arginase 1 (Arg1). Nitric oxide (NO) production by iNOS is an important proinflammatory mediator, whereas Arg1-expressing macrophages contribute to the resolution of inflammation and wound repair. In the context of viral infections, expression of these enzymes can result in a variety of outcomes for the host. NO has direct antiviral properties against some viruses, whereas during other virus infections NO can mediate immunopathology and/or inhibit the antiviral immune response to promote chronic infection. Arg1 activity not only has important wound healing functions but can also inhibit the antiviral immune response during some viral infections. Thus, depending on the specific virus and the tissue(s) involved, the activity of both of these arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes can either exacerbate or limit the severity of virus-induced disease. In this review, we will discuss a variety of viral infections, including HIV, SARS-CoV, LCMV, HCV, RSV, and others, where myeloid cells influence the control and clearance of the virus from the host, as well as the severity and resolution of tissue damage, via the activities of iNOS and/or Arg1. Clearly, monocyte/macrophage activation and arginine metabolism will continue to be important areas of investigation in the context of viral infections. PMID:25250029

  3. Over-expression of catalase in myeloid cells confers acute protection following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Brown, Milton E; Che, Pao Lin; Pendergrass, Karl D; Chiang, Bryce; Taylor, W Robert; Davis, Michael E

    2014-05-21

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  4. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  5. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity.

  6. Involvement of a common progenitor cell in core binding factor acute myeloid leukaemia associated with mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Edouard; Dumézy, Florent; Roumier, Christophe; Lepelley, Pascale; Jouy, Nathalie; Philippe, Nathalie; Renneville, Aline; Berthon, Céline; Nelken, Brigitte; Quesnel, Bruno; Preudhomme, Claude

    2012-11-01

    In core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), realtime quantitative PCR is useful to quantify the fusion transcript ratio (CBFβ-MYH11 and AML1-ETO, in case of inv(16) and t(8;21) respectively) in peripheral blood and bone marrow during the courses of chemotherapy, in order to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD). In two cases of CBF AML associated with systemic mastocytosis (SM), the persistence of mast cells and the detection of a high ratio of fusion transcript, in bone marrow, during the courses of chemotherapy, led us to determine whether the mast cell component of the disease carried the same molecular alterations as leukaemic blasts. We demonstrate that sorted mast cells carried CBF abnormality. These observations point out the lack of specificity of MRD monitoring by RQ-PCR in these exceptional AML cases with SM. Moreover, this suggests that leukaemic blasts and mast cells derive from a common malignant progenitor.

  7. HLA-DR expression on myeloid cells is a potential prognostic factor in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Madhu; Payne, Kyle K; Godder, Kamar; Manjili, Masoud H

    2013-10-01

    The adaptive immune system has been reported to play a dual role in many cancers, on one hand inhibiting tumor growth and, on the other hand, promoting disease progression, escape from cancer immunosurveillance and relapse. We have previously reported that the suppression of the adaptive immune response associated with high levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was evident in patients with low-risk neuroblastoma. Here, we report the results of a pilot study demonstrating that the amounts of HLA-DR-positive or negative myeloid cells in the peripheral blood might predict disease outcome among individuals affected by high-risk neuroblastoma.

  8. Antigen Presenting Properties of a Myeloid Dendritic-Like Cell in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-ying; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper distinguishes a rare subset of myeloid dendritic-like cells found in mouse spleen from conventional (c) dendritic cells (DC) in terms of phenotype, function and gene expression. These cells are tentatively named “L-DC” since they resemble dendritic-like cells produced in longterm cultures of spleen. L-DC can be distinguished on the basis of their unique phenotype as CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII-CD43+Ly6C-Ly6G-Siglec-F- cells. They demonstrate similar ability as cDC to uptake and retain complex antigens like mannan via mannose receptors, but much lower ability to endocytose and retain soluble antigen. While L-DC differ from cDC by their inability to activate CD4+ T cells, they are capable of antigen cross-presentation for activation of CD8+ T cells, although less effectively so than the cDC subsets. In terms of gene expression, CD8- cDC and CD8+ cDC are quite distinct from L-DC. CD8+ cDC are distinguishable from the other two subsets by expression of CD24a, Clec9a, Xcr1 and Tlr11, while CD8- cDC are distinguished by expression of Ccnd1 and H-2Eb2. L-DC are distinct from the two cDC subsets through upregulated expression of Clec4a3, Emr4, Itgam, Csf1r and CD300ld. The L-DC gene profile is quite distinct from that of cDC, confirming a myeloid cell type with distinct antigen presenting properties. PMID:27654936

  9. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  10. Reduction of myeloid suppressor cell derived nitric oxide provides a mechanistic basis of lead enhancement of alloreactive CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, David G.; Hueber, Sara; Laiosa, Michael D.; Eckles, Kevin G.; McCabe, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    The persistent environmental toxicant and immunomodulator, lead (Pb), has been proposed to directly target CD4{sup +} T cells. However, our studies suggest that CD4{sup +} T cells are an important functional, yet indirect target. In order to identify the direct target of Pb in the immune system and the potential mechanism of Pb-induced immunotoxicity, myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) were evaluated for their ability to modulate CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation after Pb exposure. Myeloid suppressor cells regulate the adaptive immune response, in part, by inhibiting the proliferation of CD4{sup +} T cells. It is thought that the mechanism of MSC-dependent regulation involves the release of the bioactive gas, nitric oxide (NO), blocking cell signaling cascades downstream of the IL-2 receptor and thus preventing T cells from entering cell-cycle. In mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), increasing numbers of MSCs suppressed T cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and this suppression is strikingly abrogated with 5 {mu}M lead (Pb) treatment. The Pb-sensitive MSC population is CD11b{sup +}, GR1{sup +}and CD11c{sup -} and thus phenotypically consistent with MSCs described in other literature. Inhibition of NO-synthase (NOS), the enzyme responsible for the production of NO, enhanced alloreactive T cell proliferation in MLC. Moreover, Pb attenuated NO production in MLC, and exogenous replacement of NO restored suppression in the presence of Pb. Significantly, MSC from iNOS-/- mice were unable to suppress T cell proliferation. An MSC-derived cell line (MSC-1) also suppressed T cell proliferation in MLC, and Pb disrupted this suppression by attenuating NO production. Additionally, Pb disrupted NO production in MSC-1 cells in response to treatment with interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and LPS or in response to concanavalin A-stimulated splenocytes. However, neither the abundance of protein nor levels of mRNA for the inducible isoform of NOS (iNOS) were altered with Pb

  11. Dnmt3a Regulates Myeloproliferation and Liver-Specific Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guryanova, Olga A.; Lieu, Yen K.; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E.; Spitzer, Barbara; Glass, Jacob L.; Shank, Kaitlyn; Valencia Martinez, Ana Belen; Rivera, Sharon A.; Durham, Benjamin H.; Rapaport, Franck; Keller, Matthew D.; Pandey, Suveg; Bastian, Lennart; Tovbin, Daniel; Weinstein, Abby R.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Santini, Valeria; Mason, Christopher E.; Melnick, Ari M.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Levine, Ross L.

    2015-01-01

    DNMT3A mutations are observed in myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transplantation studies have elucidated an important role for Dnmt3a in stem cell self-renewal and in myeloid differentiation. Here we investigated the impact of conditional hematopoietic Dnmt3a loss on disease phenotype in primary mice. Mx1-Cre-mediated Dnmt3a ablation led to the development of a lethal, fully penetrant myeloproliferative neoplasm with myelodysplasia (MDS/MPN) characterized by peripheral cytopenias and by marked, progressive hepatomegaly. We detected expanded stem/progenitor populations in the liver of Dnmt3a-ablated mice. The MDS/MPN induced by Dnmt3a ablation was transplantable, including the marked hepatomegaly. Homing studies showed that Dnmt3a-deleted bone marrow cells preferentially migrated to the liver. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses of progenitor cell populations identified differential regulation of hematopoietic regulatory pathways, including fetal liver hematopoiesis transcriptional programs. These data demonstrate that Dnmt3a ablation in the hematopoietic system leads to myeloid transformation in vivo, with cell autonomous aberrant tissue tropism and marked extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) with liver involvement. Hence, in addition to the established role of Dnmt3a in regulating self-renewal, Dnmt3a regulates tissue tropism and limits myeloid progenitor expansion in vivo. PMID:26710888

  12. IL-36-Induced Toxicity in Neonatal Mice Involves TNF-α Production by Liver Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Jennifer; Mastelic-Gavillet, Beatris; Woldt, Estelle; Troccaz, Sabina; Rodriguez, Emiliana; Palmer, Gaby; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Gabay, Cem

    2016-09-15

    Human and mouse neonates exhibit limited vaccine responses characterized by predominant Th2 and limited Th1 responses. Because IL-36 exerts a synergic adjuvant effect with IL-12, enhancing Th1 polarization in adult (AD) mice, we administered IL-36β to neonatal (1-wk old) and AD control mice at the time of immunization with tetanus toxoid adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (TT/Alum). Unexpectedly, the combination of IL-36β with TT/Alum, which was well tolerated in AD mice, proved toxic and even lethal in neonates. This neonatal toxicity was associated with high Il36r mRNA expression in neonatal liver, resulting in increased cytokine production. Liver Il36r mRNA expression decreased with the termination of fetal liver hematopoiesis, and this decrease correlated with a complete protection from TT/Alum/IL-36β-induced mortality. The combination of IL-36β and TT/Alum induced the rapid production of TNF-α and IFN-γ by liver myeloid and lymphoid cells, respectively. These responses were less marked when IL-36β was used alone, with no adverse effect. The toxicity of IL-36β + TT/Alum was abrogated by the administration of a neutralizing anti-TNF-α Ab, confirming causality. In conclusion, liver myeloid cells in neonatal mice are an important source of proinflammatory cytokines that may lead to TNF-α-mediated toxicity and even lethality. PMID:27527592

  13. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: general characteristics and relevance to clinical management of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goedegebuure, P.; Mitchem, J.B.; Porembka, M.R.; Tan, M.C.B.; Belt, B.A.; Wang-Gillam, A.; Gillanders, W.E.; Hawkins, W.G.; Linehan, D.C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies describe a heterogeneous population of cells of the myeloid lineage, termed myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are observed with increased prevalence in the peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of cancer patients, including pancreatic cancer. Accumulation of MDSC in the peripheral circulation has been related to extent of disease, and correlates with stage. MDSC have primarily been implicated in promoting tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immunity. There is also compelling evidence MDSC are also involved in angiogenesis and metastatic spread. Two main subsets of MDSC have been identified in cancer patients: a monocytic subset, characterized by expression of CD14, and a granulocytic subset characterized by expression of CD15. Both subsets of MDSC actively suppress host immunity through a variety of mechanisms including production of reactive oxygen species and arginase. Just as in humans, accumulation of monocytic and granulocytic MDSC has been noted in the bone marrow, spleen, peripheral circulation, and tumors of tumor bearing mice. Successful targeting of MDSC in mice is associated with improved immune responses, delayed tumor growth, improved survival, and increased efficacy of vaccine therapy. By further elucidating mechanisms of MDSC recruitment and maintenance in the tumor environment, strategies could be developed to reverse immune tolerance to tumor. We discuss here what is currently known about MDSC as well as some potential strategies targeting MDSC in the context of our work on pancreatic cancer and recent literature. Due to the number of new reports on MDSC, the most pertinent ones have been selected. PMID:21599634

  14. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Philip, Kemly; Acero, Luis F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Molina, Jose G; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Bunge, Isabelle; Volcik, Kelly A; Le, Thanh-Thuy T; Johnston, Richard A; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, fibroproliferative disease. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can develop secondary to IPF and increase mortality. Alternatively, activated macrophages (AAMs) contribute to the pathogenesis of both IPF and PH. Here we hypothesized that adenosine signaling through the ADORA2B on AAMs impacts the progression of these disorders and that conditional deletion of ADORA2B on myeloid cells would have a beneficial effect in a model of these diseases. Conditional knockout mice lacking ADORA2B on myeloid cells (Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre)) were exposed to the fibrotic agent bleomycin (BLM; 0.035 U/g body weight, i.p.). At 14, 17, 21, 25, or 33 d after exposure, SpO2, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histologic analyses were performed. On day 33, lung function and cardiovascular analyses were determined. Markers for AAM and mediators of fibrosis and PH were assessed. Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre) mice presented with attenuated fibrosis, improved lung function, and no evidence of PH compared with control mice exposed to BLM. These findings were accompanied by reduced expression of CD206 and arginase-1, markers for AAMs. A 10-fold reduction in IL-6 and a 5-fold decrease in hyaluronan, both linked to lung fibrosis and PH, were also observed. These data suggest that activation of the ADORA2B on macrophages plays an active role in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and PH.

  15. PcpA Promotes Higher Levels of Infection and Modulates Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa M; Novak, Lea; Widener, Rebecca; Grubbs, James Aaron; King, Janice; Hale, Joanetha Y; Ochs, Martina M; Myers, Lisa E; Briles, David E; Deshane, Jessy

    2016-03-01

    We used two different infection models to investigate the kinetics of the PcpA-dependent pneumococcal disease in mice. In a bacteremic pneumonia model, we observed a PcpA-dependent increase in bacterial burden in the lungs, blood, liver, bronchoalveolar lavage, and spleens of mice at 24 h postinfection. This PcpA-dependent effect on bacterial burden appeared earlier (within 12 h) in the focal pneumonia model, which lacks bacteremia or sepsis. Histological changes show that the ability of pneumococci to make PcpA was associated with unresolved inflammation in both models of infection. Using our bacteremic pneumonia model we further investigated the effects of PcpA on recruitment of innate immune regulatory cells. The presence of PcpA was associated with increased IL-6 levels, suppressed production of TRAIL, and reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells. The ability of pneumococci to make PcpA negatively modulated both the infiltration and apoptosis of macrophages and the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor-like cells. The latter have been shown to facilitate the clearance and control of bacterial pneumonia. Taken together, the ability to make PcpA was strongly associated with increased bacterial burden, inflammation, and negative regulation of innate immune cell recruitment to the lung tissue during bacteremic pneumonia.

  16. Kruppel-like factor KLF4 facilitates cutaneous wound healing by promoting fibrocyte generation from myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Ou, Lingling; Shi, Ying; Dong, Wenqi; Liu, Chunming; Schmidt, Thomas J; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Fan, Daping; Ai, Walden

    2015-05-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are serious skin injuries whereby the wound healing process is frequently stalled in the inflammatory phase. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate as a result of inflammation and promote cutaneous wound healing by mechanisms that are not fully understood. Recently, MDSCs have been shown to differentiate into fibrocytes, which serve as emerging effector cells that enhance cell proliferation in wound healing. We postulate that in wound healing MDSCs not only execute their immunosuppressive function to regulate inflammation but also stimulate cell proliferation once they differentiate into fibrocytes. In the current study, by using full-thickness and PU mouse models, we found that Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) deficiency resulted in decreased accumulation of MDSCs and fibrocytes, and wound healing was significantly delayed. Conversely, KLF4 activation by the plant-derived product Mexicanin I increased the number of MDSCs and fibrocytes and accelerated the wound healing. Collectively, our study revealed a previously unreported function of MDSCs in cutaneous wound healing and identified Mexicanin I as a potential agent to accelerate PU wound healing.

  17. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  18. Cytokine-induced memory-like natural killer cells exhibit enhanced responses against myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Romee, Rizwan; Rosario, Maximillian; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M; Wagner, Julia A; Jewell, Brea A; Schappe, Timothy; Leong, Jeffrey W; Abdel-Latif, Sara; Schneider, Stephanie E; Willey, Sarah; Neal, Carly C; Yu, Liyang; Oh, Stephen T; Lee, Yi-Shan; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Frans; Cooper, Megan A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2016-09-21

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an emerging cellular immunotherapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the best approach to maximize NK cell antileukemia potential is unclear. Cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells differentiate after a brief preactivation with interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18 and exhibit enhanced responses to cytokine or activating receptor restimulation for weeks to months after preactivation. We hypothesized that memory-like NK cells exhibit enhanced antileukemia functionality. We demonstrated that human memory-like NK cells have enhanced interferon-γ production and cytotoxicity against leukemia cell lines or primary human AML blasts in vitro. Using mass cytometry, we found that memory-like NK cell functional responses were triggered against primary AML blasts, regardless of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) to KIR-ligand interactions. In addition, multidimensional analyses identified distinct phenotypes of control and memory-like NK cells from the same individuals. Human memory-like NK cells xenografted into mice substantially reduced AML burden in vivo and improved overall survival. In the context of a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial, adoptively transferred memory-like NK cells proliferated and expanded in AML patients and demonstrated robust responses against leukemia targets. Clinical responses were observed in five of nine evaluable patients, including four complete remissions. Thus, harnessing cytokine-induced memory-like NK cell responses represents a promising translational immunotherapy approach for patients with AML.

  19. Cytokine-induced memory-like natural killer cells exhibit enhanced responses against myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Romee, Rizwan; Rosario, Maximillian; Berrien-Elliott, Melissa M; Wagner, Julia A; Jewell, Brea A; Schappe, Timothy; Leong, Jeffrey W; Abdel-Latif, Sara; Schneider, Stephanie E; Willey, Sarah; Neal, Carly C; Yu, Liyang; Oh, Stephen T; Lee, Yi-Shan; Mulder, Arend; Claas, Frans; Cooper, Megan A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2016-09-21

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an emerging cellular immunotherapy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the best approach to maximize NK cell antileukemia potential is unclear. Cytokine-induced memory-like NK cells differentiate after a brief preactivation with interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18 and exhibit enhanced responses to cytokine or activating receptor restimulation for weeks to months after preactivation. We hypothesized that memory-like NK cells exhibit enhanced antileukemia functionality. We demonstrated that human memory-like NK cells have enhanced interferon-γ production and cytotoxicity against leukemia cell lines or primary human AML blasts in vitro. Using mass cytometry, we found that memory-like NK cell functional responses were triggered against primary AML blasts, regardless of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) to KIR-ligand interactions. In addition, multidimensional analyses identified distinct phenotypes of control and memory-like NK cells from the same individuals. Human memory-like NK cells xenografted into mice substantially reduced AML burden in vivo and improved overall survival. In the context of a first-in-human phase 1 clinical trial, adoptively transferred memory-like NK cells proliferated and expanded in AML patients and demonstrated robust responses against leukemia targets. Clinical responses were observed in five of nine evaluable patients, including four complete remissions. Thus, harnessing cytokine-induced memory-like NK cell responses represents a promising translational immunotherapy approach for patients with AML. PMID:27655849

  20. Real-time imaging of myeloid cells dynamics in ApcMin/+ intestinal tumors by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonnans, Caroline; Lohela, Marja; Werb, Zena

    2014-10-06

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant immune cells within tumors and have been shown to promote tumor progression. Modern intravital imaging techniques enable the observation of live cellular behavior inside the organ but can be challenging in some types of cancer due to organ and tumor accessibility such as intestine. Direct observation of intestinal tumors has not been previously reported. A surgical procedure described here allows direct observation of myeloid cell dynamics within the intestinal tumors in live mice by using transgenic fluorescent reporter mice and injectable tracers or antibodies. For this purpose, a four-color, multi-region, micro-lensed spinning disk confocal microscope that allows long-term continuous imaging with rapid image acquisition has been used. Apc(Min/+) mice that develop multiple adenomas in the small intestine are crossed with c-fms-EGFP mice to visualize myeloid cells and with ACTB-ECFP mice to visualize intestinal epithelial cells of the crypts. Procedures for labeling different tumor components, such as blood vessels and neutrophils, and the procedure for positioning the tumor for imaging through the serosal surface are also described. Time-lapse movies compiled from several hours of imaging allow the analysis of myeloid cell behavior in situ in the intestinal microenvironment.

  1. Real-time Imaging of Myeloid Cells Dynamics in ApcMin/+ Intestinal Tumors by Spinning Disk Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant immune cells within tumors and have been shown to promote tumor progression. Modern intravital imaging techniques enable the observation of live cellular behavior inside the organ but can be challenging in some types of cancer due to organ and tumor accessibility such as intestine. Direct observation of intestinal tumors has not been previously reported. A surgical procedure described here allows direct observation of myeloid cell dynamics within the intestinal tumors in live mice by using transgenic fluorescent reporter mice and injectable tracers or antibodies. For this purpose, a four-color, multi-region, micro-lensed spinning disk confocal microscope that allows long-term continuous imaging with rapid image acquisition has been used. ApcMin/+ mice that develop multiple adenomas in the small intestine are crossed with c-fms-EGFP mice to visualize myeloid cells and with ACTB-ECFP mice to visualize intestinal epithelial cells of the crypts. Procedures for labeling different tumor components, such as blood vessels and neutrophils, and the procedure for positioning the tumor for imaging through the serosal surface are also described. Time-lapse movies compiled from several hours of imaging allow the analysis of myeloid cell behavior in situ in the intestinal microenvironment. PMID:25350573

  2. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Hyperoside enhances the suppressive effects of arsenic trioxide on acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Fang-Bing; Li, Jia-Jia; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoside (Hyp) is the chief component of some Chinese herbs which has anticancer effect and the present study is to identify whether it could enhance the anti leukemic properties of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We provide evidence on the concomitant treatment of HL-60 human AML cells with hyperoside potentiates As2O3-dependent induction of apoptosis. The activation of caspase-9, Bcl-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD), p-BAD, p27 was assessed by Western blot. Results showed that hyperoside inhibited BAD from phosphorylating, reactivated caspase-9, and increased p27 levels. Importantly, hyperoside demonstrated its induction of autophagy effect by upregulation of LC-II in HL-60 AML cell line. Taken together, hyperoside may serve as a great candidate of concomitant treatment for leukemia; these effects were probably related to induction of autophagy and enhancing apoptosis-inducing action of As2O3. PMID:26629016

  4. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  5. Differential responses of FLIPlong and FLIPshort overexpressing human myeloid leukemia cells to TNFα and TRAIL-initiated apoptotic signals

    PubMed Central

    Seal, Sudeshna; Hockenbery, David M.; Spaulding, Emily; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Abbassi, Nissa; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Objective Clonal marrow cells from patients with early myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) undergo apoptosis in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Cells from advanced MDS are resistant to TRAIL. Two isoforms of the Flice inhibitory protein, FLIPshort(S) and FLIPlong(L), which modulate TRAIL signals, showed disease-stage- dependent differential regulation. Therefore, we aimed at characterizing potential differential effects of FLIPL and FLIPS, on TRAIL and TNFα–induced apoptosis in model leukemic cell lines. Methods Using lentiviral constructs, FLIPL and FLIPS, as well as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) control were overexpressed in ML-1 cells, which constitutively express very low levels of FLIP and are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction. Cells were then exposed to TRAIL or TNFα, and effects on the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis induction were assessed. Results Overexpression of FLIP reduced TRAIL and TNFα–induced apoptosis in ML-1 cells. However, while FLIPL completely abrogated apoptosis, FLIPS allowed for BID cleavage and caspase-3 activation. Concurrently there was a decline of Bcl-xL and XIAP in FLIPS cells followed by apoptosis. Further, inhibition of NF-κB activation in TNFα-treated cells resulted in profound apoptosis in FLIPS, but not in FLIPL overexpressing cells, consistent with the observations in patients with early stage MDS. Inhibition of NF-κB had only minimal effects on TRAIL signaling. Conclusion Thus, FLIPL and FLIPS exerted differential effects in myeloid leukemic cell lines in response to TRAIL and TNFα. It might be possible to therapeutically exploit those differences with effector molecules specific for the FLIP isoforms. PMID:18838202

  6. Circulating Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Are Increased and Activated in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cecilia M.; Belchenko, Dmitry D.; Colvin, Kelley L.; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are increased in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders and orchestrate immune cell responses therein. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with inflammation, autoimmunity, and lung vascular remodeling. Immature myeloid cells are found in the lungs of humans and animals with PH, and we hypothesized that they would be increased in the blood of patients with PH compared with control subjects. Methods: Twenty-six children with PH and 10 undergoing cardiac catheterization for arrhythmia ablation were studied. Five milliliters of fresh blood were analyzed using flow cytometry. Results were confirmed using magnetic bead sorting and immunofluorescence, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction and intracellular urea concentration assays were used as measures of MDSC arginase-1 activation. Results: Flow cytometry demonstrated enrichment of circulating MDSCs among patients with PH (n = 26; mean, 0.271 × 106 cells/mL ± 0.17; 1.86% of CD45+ population ± 1.51) compared with control subjects (n = 10; mean, 0.176 × 106 cells/mL ± 0.05; 0.57% of CD45+ population ± 0.29; P < .05). Higher numbers of circulating MDSCs correlated to increasing mean pulmonary artery pressure (r = 0.510, P < .05). Among patients with PH, female patients had a twofold increase in MDSCs compared with male patients. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the results of flow cytometry. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay results for arginase-1 and measurement of intracellular urea concentration revealed increased activity of MDSCs from patients with PH compared with control subjects. Conclusions: Circulating activated MDSCs are significantly increased in children with PH compared with control subjects. Further investigation of these cells is warranted, and we speculate that they might play significant immunomodulatory roles in the disease pathogenesis of PH. PMID:21940769

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Multiple Myeloma: Pre-Clinical Research and Translational Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Gullà, Annamaria; Correale, Pierpaolo; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cells have been reported to play an important role in tumor-progression mainly because of their capability to promote immune-escape, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Among them, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been recently identified as immature myeloid cells, induced by tumor-associated inflammation, able to impair both innate and adaptive immunity. While murine MDSCs are usually identified by the expression of CD11b and Gr1, human MDSCs represent a more heterogeneous population characterized by the expression of CD33 and CD11b, low or no HLA-DR, and variable CD14 and CD15. In particular, the last two may alternatively identify monocyte-like or granulocyte-like MDSC subsets with different immunosuppressive properties. Recently, a substantial increase of MDSCs has been found in peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients with a role in disease progression and/or drug resistance. Pre-clinical models recapitulating the complexity of the MM-related BM microenvironment (BMM) are major tools for the study of the interactions between MM cells and cells of the BMM (including MDSCs) and for the development of new agents targeting MM-associated immune-suppressive cells. This review will focus on current strategies for human MDSCs generation and investigation of their immunosuppressive function in vitro and in vivo, taking into account the relevant relationship occurring within the MM–BMM. We will then provide trends in MDSC-associated research and suggest potential application for the treatment of MM. PMID:25538892

  8. Multi-Parameter Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting and Analysis of Stem and Progenitor Cells in Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Owing to the discovery that rare leukemia-initiating cells (or leukemia stem cells, LSC) give origin to and propagate a hierarchical cellular organization of variably differentiated leukemic blasts, the analysis of precisely defined stem and progenitor cells has increasingly gained importance. Emergence of multi-parameter high-speed fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for the subfractionation of hematopoietic progenitor cells has allowed research on the biology of the cell-of-origin for LSCs and of LSCs as potential (or essential) therapeutic targets that may escape chemotherapy and consequently contribute to disease relapse. This review introduces the current state-of-the-art methods for the fractionation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, with particular focus on myeloid malignancies. As many aspects of human normal and malignant hematopoiesis are frequently modeled in animal studies, we also provide an overview of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell purification methods that are commonly utilized for research in murine models of disease. PMID:21112038

  9. Chronic intake of high fish oil diet induces myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Xia, Sheng; Li, Xiaoping; Cheng, Lu; Han, Mutian; Zhang, Miaomiao; Liu, Xia; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Minghui; Shao, Qixiang; Qi, Ling

    2014-07-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched fish oil exerts beneficial anti-inflammatory effects in animal models with acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), comprised of myeloid progenitors and precursors of myeloid cells, play vital roles in cancer. How fish oil affects the generation of MDSCs and the tumor development remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that dietary intake of high fish oil diet suppresses CD8(+) T cells activation and proliferation in vivo via elevated levels of MDSCs. Mechanistically, high fish oil diet induces the expression of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and promotes myelopoiesis in the spleen as well as other peripheral tissues. The immature myeloid cells in the spleen exhibit morphological and functional characteristics of MDSCs with the capability to downregulate CD8(+) T cells activation. Depletion of MDSCs using anti-Gr-1 antibody decreases the growth of subcutaneously transferred B16 melanoma in mice on high fish oil diet. Interestingly, diet-induced production of MDSCs is not solely dependent of the spleen, as splenectomy has no effect on the tumor progress. Our data show that the liver functions as an alternative extramedullary hematopoiesis organ to support MDSCs differentiation and maintain tumor growth. Taken together, our study provides a novel insight into the physiological effects of fish oil and points to MDSCs as a possible mediator linking dietary fish oil intake and immunosuppression in cancer immunosurveillance.

  10. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn++-chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4– but not (R)-2 – caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  11. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26738569

  12. Clinical review: Role of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 during sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gibot, Sébastien

    2005-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is a recently identified molecule that is involved in monocytic activation and in the inflammatory response. It belongs to a family related to the natural killer cell receptors and is expressed on neutrophils, mature monocytes and macrophages. The inflammatory response mediated by Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 stimulation is amplified by the engagement of TREM-1. The expression of membrane-bound TREM-1 is greatly increased on monocytes during sepsis. Moreover, infection induces the release of a soluble form of this receptor, which can be measured in biological fluid and may be useful as a diagnostic tool. Modulation of the TREM-1 signalling pathway by the use of small synthetic peptides confers interesting survival advantages during experimental septic shock in mice, even when this teatment is administered late after the onset of sepsis. PMID:16277737

  13. Adjuvants and myeloid-derived suppressor cells: enemies or allies in therapeutic cancer vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Audry; Oliver, Liliana; Alvarez, Rydell; Fernández, Luis E; Lee, Kelvin P; Mesa, Circe

    2014-01-01

    Adjuvants are a critical but largely overlooked and poorly understood component included in vaccine formulations to stimulate and modulate the desired immune responses to an antigen. However, unlike in the protective infectious disease vaccines, adjuvants for cancer vaccines also need to overcome the effect of tumor-induced suppressive immune populations circulating in tumor-bearing individuals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are considered to be one of the key immunosuppressive populations that inhibit tumor-specific T cell responses in cancer patients. This review focuses on the different signals for the activation of the immune system induced by adjuvants, and the close relationship to the mechanisms of recruitment and activation of MDSC. This work explores the possibility that a cancer vaccine adjuvant may either strengthen or weaken the effect of tumor-induced MDSC, and the crucial need to address this in present and future cancer vaccines.

  14. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 as a new therapeutic target during inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Derive, Marc; Massin, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is a recently identified molecule involved in monocytic activation and inflammatory response. It belongs to a family related to Natural Killer cell-receptors and is expressed on neutrophils, mature monocytes and macrophages. The engagement of TREM-1 synergizes with several Toll Like Receptors (TLR) and/or NOD Like Receptors (NLR) activation in amplifying the inflammatory response mediated by microbial components or danger signals. The implication of TREM-1 during experimental models of acute or chronic inflammatory conditions, as well as during cancer, begins to understand. Furthermore, the modulation of the TREM-1 signaling pathway by the use of small synthetic peptides derived from its extracellular moiety confers interesting survival advantages during experimental murine septic shock and protects from organ damage during other inflammatory diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances on TREM-1 biology and highlights the promises of its therapeutic modulation. PMID:21487478

  15. Enhancement of antitumor immunity in lung cancer by targeting myeloid-derived suppressor cell pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anandi; Schafer, Cara C.; Jin, Tong Huan; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Tse, Hubert M.; Roth, Justin; Sun, Zhihuan; Siegal, Gene P.; Thannickal, Victor J.; Grant, Stefan C.; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Deshane, Jessy S.

    2013-01-01

    Chemoresistance due to heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment (TME) hampers the long-term efficacy of frontline therapies for lung cancer. Current combination therapies for lung cancer provide only modest improvement in survival, implicating necessity for novel approaches that suppress malignant growth and stimulate long-term anti-tumor immunity. Oxidative stress in the TME promotes immunosuppression by tumor infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which inhibit host protective anti-tumor immunity. Using a murine model of lung cancer, we demonstrate that a combination treatment with gemcitabine and a superoxide dismutase mimetic targets immunosuppressive MDSC in the TME and enhances the quantity and quality of both effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses. At the effector cell function level, the unique combination therapy targeting MDSC and redox signaling greatly enhanced cytolytic CD8+ T cell response and further decreased T regulatory cell infiltration. For long-term anti-tumor effects, this therapy altered the metabolism of memory cells with self-renewing phenotype and provided a preferential advantage for survival of memory subsets with long-term efficacy and persistence. Adoptive transfer of memory cells from this combination therapy prolonged survival of tumor-bearing recipients. Furthermore, the adoptively-transferred memory cells responded to tumor re-challenge exerting long-term persistence. This approach offers a new paradigm to inhibit immunosuppression by direct targeting of MDSC function, generate effector and persistent memory cells for tumor eradication, and prevent lung cancer relapse. PMID:24085788

  16. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells involves a novel mechanism mediated by clusterin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmin; Donatelli, Sarah S; Gilvary, Danielle L; Tejera, Melba M; Eksioglu, Erika A; Chen, Xianghong; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute a key checkpoint that impedes tumor immunity against cancer. Chemotherapeutic intervention of MDSCs has gained ground as a strategy for cancer therapy but its mechanism remains obscure.We report here a unique mechanism by which monocytic (M)-MDSCs are spared, allowing them to polarize towards M1 macrophages for reactivation of immunity against breast cancer. We first demonstrated that curcumin, like docetaxel (DTX), can selectively target CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(low) granulocytic (G)-MDSCs, sparing CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(high) M-MDSCs, with reduced tumor burden in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice. Curcumin treatment polarized surviving M-MDSCs toward CCR7(+) Dectin-1(-)M1 cells, accompanied by IFN-γ production and cytolytic function in T cells. Selective M-MDSC chemoresistence to curcumin and DTX was mediated by secretory/cytoplasmic clusterin (sCLU). sCLU functions by trapping Bax from mitochondrial translocation, preventing the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, sCLU was only found in M-MDSCs but not in G-MDSCs. Knockdown of sCLU in M-MDSCs and RAW264.7 macrophages was found to reverse their natural chemoresistance. Clinically, breast cancer patients possess sCLU expression only in mature CD68(+) macrophages but not in immature CD33(+) immunosuppressive myeloid cells infiltrating the tumors. We thus made the seminal discovery that sCLU expression in M-MDSCs accounts for positive immunomodulation by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27405665

  17. Inhibition of myeloid cell differentiation in cancer: the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2003-08-01

    It is well established that tumor growth is associated with accumulation of immature myeloid cells (ImC). They play an important role in tumor-associated immune suppression. ImC accumulate not only in tumor-bearing hosts but also in immunized, tumor-free hosts or hosts infected with bacterial pathogens. The kinetics of ImC in these mice is different. If in tumor-bearing mice, the number of ImC continues to increase with tumor progression in tumor-free mice after an initial spike, it decreases to the control level. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms of ImC accumulation in tumor-bearing hosts by comparing differentiation of ImC obtained from tumor-free and tumor-bearing mice. In the presence of appropriate growth factors, ImC isolated from tumor-free mice quickly differentiated in vitro into mature dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and granulocytes. In contrast, differentiation of ImC from tumor-bearing mice was significantly delayed. Similar results were obtained in vivo after adoptive transfer of ImC into naïve, congeneic mice. ImC transferred into tumor-bearing recipients failed to differentiate into DC or macrophages. ImC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than ImC obtained from tumor-free mice. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) but not superoxide radical anions was found to be the major part of this increased ROS production. In vitro experiments demonstrated that scavenging of H(2)O(2) with catalase induced differentiation of ImC from tumor-bearing mice into macrophages. Thus, this is a first demonstration that tumors may prevent differentiation of antigen-presenting cells by increasing the level of endogenous H(2)O(2) in immature myeloid cells.

  18. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells involves a novel mechanism mediated by clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junmin; Donatelli, Sarah S.; Gilvary, Danielle L.; Tejera, Melba M.; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Chen, Xianghong; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute a key checkpoint that impedes tumor immunity against cancer. Chemotherapeutic intervention of MDSCs has gained ground as a strategy for cancer therapy but its mechanism remains obscure.We report here a unique mechanism by which monocytic (M)-MDSCs are spared, allowing them to polarize towards M1 macrophages for reactivation of immunity against breast cancer. We first demonstrated that curcumin, like docetaxel (DTX), can selectively target CD11b+Ly6G+Ly6Clow granulocytic (G)-MDSCs, sparing CD11b+Ly6G−Ly6Chigh M-MDSCs, with reduced tumor burden in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice. Curcumin treatment polarized surviving M-MDSCs toward CCR7+ Dectin-1−M1 cells, accompanied by IFN-γ production and cytolytic function in T cells. Selective M-MDSC chemoresistence to curcumin and DTX was mediated by secretory/cytoplasmic clusterin (sCLU). sCLU functions by trapping Bax from mitochondrial translocation, preventing the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, sCLU was only found in M-MDSCs but not in G-MDSCs. Knockdown of sCLU in M-MDSCs and RAW264.7 macrophages was found to reverse their natural chemoresistance. Clinically, breast cancer patients possess sCLU expression only in mature CD68+ macrophages but not in immature CD33+ immunosuppressive myeloid cells infiltrating the tumors. We thus made the seminal discovery that sCLU expression in M-MDSCs accounts for positive immunomodulation by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27405665

  19. Maritoclax induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells with elevated Mcl-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kenichiro; Liu, Qiang; Gowda, Krishne; Barth, Brian M; Claxton, David; Amin, Shantu; Loughran Jr, Thomas P; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the deadliest leukemias for which there is an urgent and unmet need for the development of novel treatment strategies. Multiple drug resistance mechanisms mediate poor drug response and relapse in patients, and a selective Mcl-1 inhibitor has been speculated to be a promising agent in the treatment of AML. Here, we describe that maritoclax, a small molecule Mcl-1 inhibitor, induces Mcl-1 proteasomal degradation without transcriptional downregulation. Maritoclax killed AML cell lines and primary cells with elevated Mcl-1 levels through selective Mcl-1 downregulation, and synergized with ABT-737 to overcome Mcl-1-mediated ABT-737 resistance. Maritoclax was more effective than daunorubicin at inducing leukemic cell death when co-cultured with HS-5 bone marrow stroma cells, while being less toxic than daunorubicin against HS-5 stroma cells, primary mouse bone marrow cells, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Moreover, maritoclax administration at 20 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally caused significant U937 tumor shrinkage, as well as 36% tumors remission rate in athymic nude mice, without apparent toxicity to healthy tissue or circulating blood cells. In summary, our studies suggest that maritoclax belongs to a novel class of Mcl-1 inhibitors that has the potential to be developed for the treatment of AML. PMID:24842334

  20. Cytotoxic activity to acute myeloid leukemia cells by Antp-TPR hybrid peptide targeting Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Kawamoto, Megumi; Kohno, Masayuki; Kawakami, Koji

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with TPR2A and had selective cytotoxic activity discriminating between normal and cancer cells to induce cancer cell death. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of Antp-TPR peptide toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. It was demonstrated that Antp-TPR peptide induced AML cell death in cell lines such as U937, K562, THP-1, and HL-60 via activation of caspases 3 and 7, and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, Antp-TPR peptide did not reduce the viability of normal cells including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), although both geldanamycin and 17-AAG, small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, mediated cytotoxicity to these normal cells at low concentrations. In addition, mutation analysis of TPR peptide demonstrated that the highly conserved amino acids Lys and Arg were critical to the cytotoxic activity. These results indicated that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide would provide potent and selective therapeutic options in the treatment of AML.

  1. FT-infrared spectroscopic studies of lymphoma, lymphoid, and myeloid leukemia cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babrah, Jaspreet; McCarthy, Keith P.; Lush, Richard; Rye, Adam D.; Bessant, Conrad; Stone, Nicholas

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method to characterise spectral differences that distinguish leukaemia and lymphoma cell lines. This is based on objective spectral measurements of major cellular biochemical constituents and multivariate spectral processing. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) maps of the lymphoma, lymphoid and myeloid leukaemia cell samples were obtained using a Perkin-Elmer Spotlight 300 FT-IR imaging spectrometer. Multivariate statistical techniques incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to construct a mathematical model. This model was validated for reproducibility. Multivariate statistical analysis of FTIR spectra collected for each cell sample permit a combination of unsupervised and supervised methods of distinguishing cell line types. This resulted in the clustering of cell line populations, indicating distinct bio-molecular differences. Major spectral differences were observed in the 4000 to 800 cm -1 spectral region. Bands in the averaged spectra for the cell line were assigned to the major biochemical constituents including; proteins, fatty acids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. The combination of FT-IR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis provides an important insight into the fundamental spectral differences between the cell lines, which differ according to the cellular biochemical composition. These spectral differences can serve as potential biomarkers for the differentiation of leukaemia and lymphoma cells. Consequently these differences could be used as the basis for developing a spectral method for the detection and identification of haematological malignancies.

  2. The Uptake of Extracellular Vesicles is Affected by the Differentiation Status of Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Czernek, L; Chworos, A; Duechler, M

    2015-12-01

    Intercellular communication includes the exchange of various membrane vesicles including exosomes. Exosomes are intraluminal nanovesicles generated from multivesicular bodies, a late endosomal compartment. Cancer cells release exosomes that influence their proximate and distant environment to facilitate angiogenesis, metastatic dissemination and immune escape. Cancer-derived vesicles may also trigger an anti-tumour response by transferring tumour antigens to immune cells. We wanted to investigate whether differentiation and maturation of myeloid cells changes their capacity to take up cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EV). We compared the efficiency of vesicle uptake by monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. To visualize and quantify the cellular uptake, EV were labelled with two different dyes, carboxyfluoresceine diacetate succinimidyl-ester (CFSE), or DSSN+, a water soluble distyrylstilbene oligoelectrolyte which preferentially intercalates into the cell membrane. With the help of cytokines, THP-1 monocytes were differentiated into immature or mature dendritic cells, or macrophages. EV uptake was monitored by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The results show that macrophages and mature dendritic cells acquired stronger fluorescence transferred by EV than monocytes or immature dendritic cells indicating that the differentiation status influences the efficiency of EV uptake. PMID:26332303

  3. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C.; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ+ AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ+ THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34+ HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  4. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  5. Chronic inflammation promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell activation blocking antitumor immunity in transgenic mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christiane; Sevko, Alexandra; Ramacher, Marcel; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Falk, Christine S; Osen, Wolfram; Borrello, Ivan; Kato, Masashi; Schadendorf, Dirk; Baniyash, Michal; Umansky, Viktor

    2011-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment is characterized by chronic inflammation represented by infiltrating leukocytes and soluble mediators, which lead to a local and systemic immunosuppression associated with cancer progression. Here, we used the ret transgenic spontaneous murine melanoma model that mimics human melanoma. Skin tumors and metastatic lymph nodes showed increased levels of inflammatory factors such as IL-1β, GM-CSF, and IFN-γ, which correlated with tumor progression. Moreover, Gr1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), known to inhibit tumor reactive T cells, were enriched in melanoma lesions and lymphatic organs during tumor progression. MDSC infiltration was associated with a strong TCR ζ-chain down-regulation in all T cells. Coculturing normal splenocytes with tumor-derived MDSC induced a decreased T-cell proliferation and ζ-chain expression, verifying the MDSC immunosuppressive function and suggesting that the tumor inflammatory microenvironment supports MDSC recruitment and immunosuppressive activity. Indeed, upon manipulation of the melanoma microenvironment with the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil, we observed reduced levels of numerous inflammatory mediators (e.g., IL-1β, IL-6, VEGF, S100A9) in association with decreased MDSC amounts and immunosuppressive function, indicating an antiinflammatory effect of sildenafil. This led to a partial restoration of ζ-chain expression in T cells and to a significantly increased survival of tumor-bearing mice. CD8 T-cell depletion resulted in an abrogation of sildenafil beneficial outcome, suggesting the involvement of MDSC and CD8 T cells in the observed therapeutic effects. Our data imply that inhibition of chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment should be applied in conjunction with melanoma immunotherapies to increase their efficacy. PMID:21969559

  6. Dynamics of cytotoxic T cell subsets during immunotherapy predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Rydström, Anna; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Riise, Rebecca; Aurelius, Johan; Anderson, Harald; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Martner, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Preventing relapse after chemotherapy remains a challenge in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighty-four non-transplanted AML patients in first complete remission received relapse-preventive immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride and low-dose interleukin-2 in an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996). Blood samples were drawn during cycles of immunotherapy and analyzed for CD8+ (cytotoxic) T cell phenotypes in blood. During the first cycle of therapy, a re-distribution of cytotoxic T cells was observed comprising a reduction of T effector memory cells and a concomitant increase of T effector cells. The dynamics of T cell subtypes during immunotherapy prognosticated relapse and survival, in particular among older patients and remained significantly predictive of clinical outcome after correction for potential confounders. Presence of CD8+ T cells with specificity for leukemia-associated antigens identified patients with low relapse risk. Our results point to novel aspects of T cell-mediated immunosurveillance in AML and provide conceivable biomarkers in relapse-preventive immunotherapy. PMID:26863635

  7. Re-polarizing Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) with Cationic Polymers for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Liang, Pei; Guo, Guangxing; Huang, Zhen; Niu, Yiming; Dong, Lei; Wang, Chunming; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Our evolving understandings of cell-material interactions provide insights for using polymers to modulate cell behaviour that may lead to therapeutic applications. It is known that in certain cancers, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play vital roles in promoting tumour progression, chiefly because of their ‘alternatively activated’ (or M2) phenotype that orchestrates immunosuppression. In this study, we demonstrated that two cationic polymers – cationic dextran (C-dextran) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) – could directly remodel these cells into an anti-tumour, ‘classically activated’ (or M1) phenotype, thereby stimulating these cells to express tumouricidal cytokines, reactivating the T cell functions, and prolonging the lifespan of the mice model. Our investigations with knock-out mice further indicate that the functions of these cationic polymers require the involvement of toll-like receptor 4-mediated signalling. Taken together, our study suggests that these cationic polymers can effectively and directly re-polarize MDSCs from an immunosuppressive characteristic to an anti-tumour phenotype, leading to successful restoration of immune surveillance in the tumour microenvironment and elimination of tumour cells. Our findings may have immediate impact on further development of polymer-based therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27074905

  8. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  9. Targeting Stat3 in the myeloid compartment drastically improves the in vivo antitumor functions of adoptively transferred T cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Reckamp, Karen; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Lin; Kowolik, Claudia; Deng, Jiehui; Robert, Figlin; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Improving effector T cell functions is highly desirable for preventive or therapeutic interventions of diverse diseases. Stat3 in the myeloid compartment constrains Th-1 type immunity, dampening natural and induced antitumor immune responses. We have recently developed an in vivo siRNA delivery platform by conjugating a TLR9 agonist with siRNA that efficiently targets myeloid and B cells. Here we show that either ablating the Stat3 alleles in the myeloid compartment and B cells combined with CpG triggering or administrating the CpG-Stat3siRNA conjugates drastically augments effector functions of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. Specifically, we demonstrate that both approaches are capable of increasing dendritic cell and CD8+ T cell engagement in tumor draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, both approaches can significantly activate the transferred CD8+ T cells in vivo, upregulating effector molecules such as perforin, granzyme B and IFN-γ. Intravital multiphoton microscopy reveals that Stat3 silencing combined with CpG triggering greatly increases killing activity and tumor infiltration of transferred T cells. These results suggest the use of CpG-Stat3siRNA, and possibly other Stat3 inhibitors, as a potent adjuvant to improve T cell therapies. PMID:20841481

  10. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  11. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2016-03-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk.

  12. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John A.; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W.; Alexander, M. Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  13. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass.

  14. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulate in the liver site after sepsis to induce immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dongping; Bi, Qi; Li, Li; Gao, Yongqiang; Liang, Yu; Li, Yingju; Liu, Jun; Peng, Li; Xiao, Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play a major role in modulating immune response, but only a few reports focused on MDSCs in the liver of sepsis states. Here, we investigated the changes in MDSCs in liver of the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mice. The results of flow cytometry showed that MDSCs accumulate in the liver site of mice after CLP for 7days (CLP7d model mice) and settled to the livers of both normal and LPS stimulated mice. In vitro experiment showed a strong suppressive effect of MDSCs on the proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes of spleen. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of the liver MDSCs from CLP7d miceincreased the survival rate of acute hepatic failure (AHF) model mice in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that sepsis-induced liver MDSCs may have exert a key role in maintaining the immune homoeostasis in liver during the sepsis state.

  16. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Facenda-Lorenzo, María; Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called "sanctuaries," are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  17. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  18. Properties of the K562 cell line, derived from a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klein, E; Ben-Bassat, H; Neumann, H; Ralph, P; Zeuthen, J; Polliack, A; Vánky, F

    1976-10-15

    The K562 cell line derived from a CML patient in blast crisis was examined for properties of B and T lymphocytes and cell lines. K562 lacks the B markers of immunoglobulins, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome and associated nuclear antigen, and receptors for EBV. A low proportion of cells from rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, the frequency of which is considerably increased after neuraminidase treatment. Unlike B lines but like T lines, K562 cells are lysed rapidly by C'/Fc receptor-positive human blood leukocytes and do not stimulate MLC reactions. On the other hand, K562 lacks T antigen, high radiosensitivity and sensitivity to growth inhibition by thymidine. The cells do not contain N-APase, an enzyme found in all lines derived from lymphoid cells and in lymphoproliferative diseases. By scanning electron microscopy, K562 cells were seen to be rounded and relatively smooth, with small numbers of short microvilli resembling undifferentiated leukemic cells. A few cells had narrow ridge-like profiles and small ruffles similar to granulocytic leukemic cells. K562 is strongly positive for immunoglobuln Fc receptors and pinocytosis, but does not phagocytose or mediate antibody-dependent phagocytosis or cytolysis. Among histochemical stains, K562 is positive for esterase, lipid, and acid phosphatase. There seems to be no doubt that K562 is not a B cell line. While it has some T cell properties, these are not exclusive. Some of its characteristics indicate that it is probably not lymphoid. Due to its low level of differentiation, its nature cannot be stated with certainty. On the basis of the possible presence of the cellular marker of chronic myeloid leukemia, the Ph chromosome, it may be regarded as belonging to the granulocytic series of cells.

  19. Bioactive compounds or metabolites from black raspberries modulate T lymphocyte proliferation, myeloid cell differentiation and Jak/STAT signaling.

    PubMed

    Mace, Thomas A; King, Samantha A; Ameen, Zeenath; Elnaggar, Omar; Young, Gregory; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Clinton, Steven K; Knobloch, Thomas J; Weghorst, Christopher M; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2014-09-01

    Bioactive phytochemicals from natural products, such as black raspberries (BRB; Rubus occidentalis), have direct anticancer properties on malignant cells in culture and in xenograft models. BRB components inhibit cancer progression in more complex rodent carcinogenesis models. Although mechanistic targets for BRB phytochemicals in cancer cells are beginning to emerge, the potential role in modulating host immune processes impacting cancer have not been systematically examined. We hypothesized that BRB contain compounds capable of eliciting potent immunomodulatory properties that impact cellular mediators relevant to chronic inflammation and tumor progression. We studied both an ethanol extract from black raspberries (BRB-E) containing a diverse mixture of phytochemicals and two abundant phytochemical metabolites of BRB produced upon ingestion (Cyanidin-3-Rutinoside, C3R; Quercitin-3-Rutinoside, Q3R). BRB-E inhibited proliferation, and viability of CD3/CD28 activated human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. BRB-E also limited in vitro expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and their suppressive capacity. Pre-treatment of immune cells with BRB-E attenuated IL-6-mediated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. In contrast, pre-treatment of immune cells with the C3R and Q3R metabolites inhibited MDSC expansion, IL-6-mediated STAT3 signaling, but not IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation and were less potent inhibitors of T cell viability. Together these data indicate that BRB extracts and their physiologically relevant metabolites contain phytochemicals that affect immune processes relevant to carcinogenesis and immunotherapy. Furthermore, specific BRB components and their metabolites may be a source of lead compounds for drug development that exhibits targeted immunological outcomes or inhibition of specific STAT-regulated signaling pathways. PMID:24893859

  20. Bioactive compounds or metabolites from black raspberries modulate T lymphocyte proliferation, myeloid cell differentiation and Jak/STAT signaling.

    PubMed

    Mace, Thomas A; King, Samantha A; Ameen, Zeenath; Elnaggar, Omar; Young, Gregory; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Clinton, Steven K; Knobloch, Thomas J; Weghorst, Christopher M; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2014-09-01

    Bioactive phytochemicals from natural products, such as black raspberries (BRB; Rubus occidentalis), have direct anticancer properties on malignant cells in culture and in xenograft models. BRB components inhibit cancer progression in more complex rodent carcinogenesis models. Although mechanistic targets for BRB phytochemicals in cancer cells are beginning to emerge, the potential role in modulating host immune processes impacting cancer have not been systematically examined. We hypothesized that BRB contain compounds capable of eliciting potent immunomodulatory properties that impact cellular mediators relevant to chronic inflammation and tumor progression. We studied both an ethanol extract from black raspberries (BRB-E) containing a diverse mixture of phytochemicals and two abundant phytochemical metabolites of BRB produced upon ingestion (Cyanidin-3-Rutinoside, C3R; Quercitin-3-Rutinoside, Q3R). BRB-E inhibited proliferation, and viability of CD3/CD28 activated human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. BRB-E also limited in vitro expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and their suppressive capacity. Pre-treatment of immune cells with BRB-E attenuated IL-6-mediated phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation. In contrast, pre-treatment of immune cells with the C3R and Q3R metabolites inhibited MDSC expansion, IL-6-mediated STAT3 signaling, but not IL-2-induced STAT5 phosphorylation and were less potent inhibitors of T cell viability. Together these data indicate that BRB extracts and their physiologically relevant metabolites contain phytochemicals that affect immune processes relevant to carcinogenesis and immunotherapy. Furthermore, specific BRB components and their metabolites may be a source of lead compounds for drug development that exhibits targeted immunological outcomes or inhibition of specific STAT-regulated signaling pathways.

  1. Targeting cells of the myeloid lineage attenuates pain and disease progression in a prostate model of bone cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Chartier, Stephane; Tsai, James; Burton, Elizabeth A; Habets, Gaston; Lin, Paul S; West, Brian L; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-09-01

    Tumor cells frequently metastasize to bone where they can generate cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) that can be difficult to fully control using available therapies. Here, we explored whether PLX3397, a high-affinity small molecular antagonist that binds to and inhibits phosphorylation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, the tyrosine-protein kinase c-Kit, and the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3, can reduce CIBP. These 3 targets all regulate the proliferation and function of a subset of the myeloid cells including macrophages, osteoclasts, and mast cells. Preliminary experiments show that PLX3397 attenuated inflammatory pain after formalin injection into the hind paw of the rat. As there is an inflammatory component in CIBP, involving macrophages and osteoclasts, the effect of PLX3397 was explored in a prostate model of CIBP where skeletal pain, cancer cell proliferation, tumor metastasis, and bone remodeling could be monitored in the same animal. Administration of PLX3397 was initiated on day 14 after prostate cancer cell injection when the tumor was well established, and tumor-induced bone remodeling was first evident. Over the next 6 weeks, sustained administration of PLX3397 attenuated CIBP behaviors by approximately 50% and was equally efficacious in reducing tumor cell growth, formation of new tumor colonies in bone, and pathological tumor-induced bone remodeling. Developing a better understanding of potential effects that analgesic therapies have on the tumor itself may allow the development of therapies that not only better control the pain but also positively impact disease progression and overall survival in patients with bone cancer.

  2. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Valle, Luis Del; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSC in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSC remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSC, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSC and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSC (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSC and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T-cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSC immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSC in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSC and enhance various cancer therapies.

  3. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Oxidation Modulates Immunosuppressive Functions of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fokhrul; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Hernandez, Claudia; Zheng, Liqin; Reiss, Krzystoff; Del Valle, Luis; Trillo-Tinoco, Jimena; Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote tumor growth by inhibiting T-cell immunity and promoting malignant cell proliferation and migration. The therapeutic potential of blocking MDSCs in tumors has been limited by their heterogeneity, plasticity, and resistance to various chemotherapy agents. Recent studies have highlighted the role of energy metabolic pathways in the differentiation and function of immune cells; however, the metabolic characteristics regulating MDSCs remain unclear. We aimed to determine the energy metabolic pathway(s) used by MDSCs, establish its impact on their immunosuppressive function, and test whether its inhibition blocks MDSCs and enhances antitumor therapies. Using several murine tumor models, we found that tumor-infiltrating MDSCs (T-MDSC) increased fatty acid uptake and activated fatty acid oxidation (FAO). This was accompanied by an increased mitochondrial mass, upregulation of key FAO enzymes, and increased oxygen consumption rate. Pharmacologic inhibition of FAO blocked immune inhibitory pathways and functions in T-MDSCs and decreased their production of inhibitory cytokines. FAO inhibition alone significantly delayed tumor growth in a T cell-dependent manner and enhanced the antitumor effect of adoptive T-cell therapy. Furthermore, FAO inhibition combined with low-dose chemotherapy completely inhibited T-MDSCs immunosuppressive effects and induced a significant antitumor effect. Interestingly, a similar increase in fatty acid uptake and expression of FAO-related enzymes was found in human MDSCs in peripheral blood and tumors. These results support the possibility of testing FAO inhibition as a novel approach to block MDSCs and enhance various cancer therapies. PMID:26025381

  4. Targeting cells of the myeloid lineage attenuates pain and disease progression in a prostate model of bone cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M; Chartier, Stephane; Tsai, James; Burton, Elizabeth A; Habets, Gaston; Lin, Paul S; West, Brian L; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-09-01

    Tumor cells frequently metastasize to bone where they can generate cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) that can be difficult to fully control using available therapies. Here, we explored whether PLX3397, a high-affinity small molecular antagonist that binds to and inhibits phosphorylation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor, the tyrosine-protein kinase c-Kit, and the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3, can reduce CIBP. These 3 targets all regulate the proliferation and function of a subset of the myeloid cells including macrophages, osteoclasts, and mast cells. Preliminary experiments show that PLX3397 attenuated inflammatory pain after formalin injection into the hind paw of the rat. As there is an inflammatory component in CIBP, involving macrophages and osteoclasts, the effect of PLX3397 was explored in a prostate model of CIBP where skeletal pain, cancer cell proliferation, tumor metastasis, and bone remodeling could be monitored in the same animal. Administration of PLX3397 was initiated on day 14 after prostate cancer cell injection when the tumor was well established, and tumor-induced bone remodeling was first evident. Over the next 6 weeks, sustained administration of PLX3397 attenuated CIBP behaviors by approximately 50% and was equally efficacious in reducing tumor cell growth, formation of new tumor colonies in bone, and pathological tumor-induced bone remodeling. Developing a better understanding of potential effects that analgesic therapies have on the tumor itself may allow the development of therapies that not only better control the pain but also positively impact disease progression and overall survival in patients with bone cancer. PMID:25993548

  5. Mangiferin activates Nrf2-antioxidant response element signaling without reducing the sensitivity to etoposide of human myeloid leukemia cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ben-ping; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shan-shan; Yang, Li-jing; Zeng, Ling-lan; Chen, Yan; Fang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Mangiferin is glucosylxanthone extracted from plants of the Anacardiaceae and Gentianaceae families. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mangiferin on Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling and the sensitivity to etoposide of human myeloid leukemia cells in vitro. Methods: Human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells and mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (MNCs) were examined. Nrf2 protein was detected using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. Binding of Nrf2 to ARE was examined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The level of NQO1 was assessed with real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. DCFH-DA was used to evaluate intracellular ROS level. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed using MTT and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: Mangiferin (50 μmol/L) significantly increased Nrf2 protein accumulation in HL-60 cells, particularly in the nucleus. Mangiferin also enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to an ARE, significantly up-regulated NQO1 expression and reduced intracellular ROS in HL60 cells. Mangiferin alone dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells. Mangiferin (50 mol/L) did not attenuate etoposide-induced cytotoxicity in HL-60 cells, and combined treatment of mangiferin with low concentration of etoposide (0.8 μg/mL) even increased the cell inhibition rate. Nor did mangiferin change the rate of etoposide-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. In MNCs, mangiferin significantly relieved oxidative stress, but attenuated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity. Conclusion: Mangiferin is a novel Nrf2 activator that reduces oxidative stress and protects normal cells without reducing the sensitivity to etoposide of HL-60 leukemia cells in vitro. Mangiferin may be a potential chemotherapy adjuvant. PMID:24374812

  6. Myeloid/Microglial Driven Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy Corrects a Neuronopathic Lysosomal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sergijenko, Ana; Langford-Smith, Alexander; Liao, Ai Y; Pickford, Claire E; McDermott, John; Nowinski, Gabriel; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Merry, Catherine LR; Jones, Simon A; Wraith, J Edmond; Wynn, Robert F; Wilkinson, Fiona L; Bigger, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPSIIIA) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH), resulting in heparan sulfate (HS) accumulation and progressive neurodegeneration. There are no treatments. We previously demonstrated improved neuropathology in MPSIIIA mice using lentiviral vectors (LVs) overexpressing SGSH in wild-type (WT) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplants (HSCTs), achieved via donor monocyte/microglial engraftment in the brain. However, neurological disease was not corrected using LVs in autologous MPSIIIA HSCTs. To improve brain expression via monocyte/microglial specificity, LVs expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) or myeloid-specific promoters were compared in transplanted HSCs. LV-CD11b-GFP gave significantly higher monocyte/B-cell eGFP expression than LV-PGK-GFP or LV-CD18-GFP after 6 months. Subsequently, autologous MPSIIIA HSCs were transduced with either LV-PGK-coSGSH or LV-CD11b-coSGSH vectors expressing codon-optimized SGSH and transplanted into MPSIIIA mice. Eight months after HSCT, LV-PGK-coSGSH vectors produced bone marrow SGSH (576% normal activity) similar to LV-CD11b-coSGSH (473%), but LV-CD11b-coSGSH had significantly higher brain expression (11 versus 7%), demonstrating improved brain specificity. LV-CD11b-coSGSH normalized MPSIIIA behavior, brain HS, GM2 ganglioside, and neuroinflammation to WT levels, whereas LV-PGK-coSGSH partly corrected neuropathology but not behavior. We demonstrate compelling evidence of neurological disease correction using autologous myeloid driven lentiviral-HSC gene therapy in MPSIIIA mice. PMID:23748415

  7. Inhibitory effects of apoptotic cell ingestion upon endotoxin-driven myeloid dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Lynda M; Lucas, Mark; Simpson, Cathy; Lamb, Jonathan; Savill, John; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam

    2002-02-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the sentinels of the immune system, able to interact with both naive and memory T cells. The recent observation that DCs can ingest cells dying by apoptosis has raised the possibility that DCs may, in fact, present self-derived Ags, initiating both autoimmunity and tumor-specific responses, especially if associated with appropriate danger signals. Although the process of ingestion of apoptotic cells has not been shown to induce DC maturation, the exact fate of these phagocytosing DCs remains unclear. In this paper we demonstrate that DCs that ingest apoptotic cells are able to produce TNF-alpha but have a diminished ability to produce IL-12 in response to external stimuli, a property that corresponds to a failure to up-regulate CD86. By single-cell analysis we demonstrate that these inhibitory effects are restricted to those DCs that have engulfed apoptotic cells, with bystander DCs remaining unaffected. These changes were independent of the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-beta1 and IL-10 and corresponded with a diminished capacity to stimulate naive T cells. Thus, the ingestion of apoptotic cells is not an immunologically null event but is capable of modulating DC maturation. These results have important implications for our understanding of the role of clearance of dying cells by DCs not only in the normal resolution of inflammation but also in control of subsequent immune responses to apoptotic cell-derived Ags.

  8. Identification of a glycoprotein ligand for E-selectin on mouse myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    E-selectin is an inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecule for neutrophils which functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin. Using a recombinant, antibody-like form of mouse E-selectin, we have searched for glycoprotein ligands on mouse neutrophils and the neutrophil progenitor cell line 32D cl 3. We have identified a 150-kD glycoprotein as the only protein which could be affinity-isolated with soluble E- selectin from [35S]methionine/[35S]cysteine-labeled 32D cl 3 cells. Binding of this protein was strictly Ca(2+)-dependent, was blocked by a cell adhesion-blocking mAb against mouse E-selectin, and required the presence of sialic acid on the 150-kD ligand. This glycoprotein was also affinity-isolated from mature neutrophils, in addition to a minor component at 250 kD, but could not be isolated from several other non- myeloid cell lines. The 150-kD glycoprotein was the only protein from 32D cl 3 cells, which was detectable by silver-staining after a one- step affinity-isolation. PMID:7682218

  9. Analyzing tumor heterogeneity and driver genes in single myeloid leukemia cells with SBCapSeq.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karen M; Newberg, Justin Y; Black, Michael A; Jones, Devin J; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Kodama, Takahiro; Ward, Jerrold M; Rust, Alistair G; van der Weyden, Louise; Yew, Christopher Chin Kuan; Waters, Jill L; Leung, Marco L; Rogers, Keith; Rogers, Susan M; McNoe, Leslie A; Selvanesan, Luxmanan; Navin, Nicholas; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Mann, Michael B

    2016-09-01

    A central challenge in oncology is how to kill tumors containing heterogeneous cell populations defined by different combinations of mutated genes. Identifying these mutated genes and understanding how they cooperate requires single-cell analysis, but current single-cell analytic methods, such as PCR-based strategies or whole-exome sequencing, are biased, lack sequencing depth or are cost prohibitive. Transposon-based mutagenesis allows the identification of early cancer drivers, but current sequencing methods have limitations that prevent single-cell analysis. We report a liquid-phase, capture-based sequencing and bioinformatics pipeline, Sleeping Beauty (SB) capture hybridization sequencing (SBCapSeq), that facilitates sequencing of transposon insertion sites from single tumor cells in a SB mouse model of myeloid leukemia (ML). SBCapSeq analysis of just 26 cells from one tumor revealed the tumor's major clonal subpopulations, enabled detection of clonal insertion events not detected by other sequencing methods and led to the identification of dominant subclones, each containing a unique pair of interacting gene drivers along with three to six cooperating cancer genes with SB-driven expression changes. PMID:27479497

  10. Exosomes released by granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells attenuate DSS-induced colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Ke; Tian, Xinyu; Ma, Jie; Ma, Bin; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but their role in the disease remains controversial. We sought to define the effect of granulocytic MDSC-derived exosomes (G-MDSC exo) in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis. G-MDSC exo-treated mice showed greater resistance to colitis, as reflected by lower disease activity index, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration damage. There was a decrease in the proportion of Th1 cells and an increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from G-MDSC exo-treated colitis mice. Moreover, lower serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in G-MDSC exo-treated colitis mice. Interestingly, inhibition of arginase (Arg)-1 activity in G-MDSC exo partially abrogated the spontaneous improvement of colitis. In addition, G-MDSC exo could suppress CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in vitro and inhibit the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, and these abilities were associated with Arg-1 activity. Moreover, G-MDSC exo promoted the expansion of Tregs in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that G-MDSC exo attenuate DSS-induced colitis through inhibiting Th1 cells proliferation and promoting Tregs expansion. PMID:26885611

  11. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  12. α-tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CHEN, SHAOHUA; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; LI, DONGLI; FARICHON, CHELSEA; HE, YAN; ZHANG, QIUYAN; ZHANG, KUN; CONNEY, ALLAN H; GOODIN, SUSAN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    α-tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α-tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL-60 cells with α-tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α-tomatine in HL-60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α-tomatine and cell membrane-associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α-tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with α-tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α-tomatine inhibited the growth of HL-60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α-tomatine may have useful anti-leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  13. Hispidulin induces mitochondrial apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells by targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Liu, Yongji; Li, Kan; Wu, Tianhui; Peng, Jianjun; Jing, Fanbo

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of hematological neoplasms with marked heterogeneity in response to both standard therapy and survival. Hispidulin, a flavonoid compound that is anactive ingredient in the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Salvia plebeia R. Br, has recently been reported to have anantitumor effect against solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hispidulin on the human leukemia cell line in vitro and the underlying mechanisms of its actions on these cells. Our results showed that hispidulin inhibits AML cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and induces cell apoptosis throughan intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Our results also revealed that hispidulin treatment significantly inhibits extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) expression in both tested AML cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, and that the overexpression of EMMPRIN protein markedly attenuates hispidulin-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results strongly indicated that the modulating effect of hispidulin on EMMPRIN is correlated with its inhibitory effect on both the Akt and STAT3 signaling pathways. PMID:27158398

  14. Exosomes released by granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells attenuate DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yungang; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Rui, Ke; Tian, Xinyu; Ma, Jie; Ma, Bin; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-03-29

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but their role in the disease remains controversial. We sought to define the effect of granulocytic MDSC-derived exosomes (G-MDSC exo) in dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis. G-MDSC exo-treated mice showed greater resistance to colitis, as reflected by lower disease activity index, decreased inflammatory cell infiltration damage. There was a decrease in the proportion of Th1 cells and an increase in the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from G-MDSC exo-treated colitis mice. Moreover, lower serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in G-MDSC exo-treated colitis mice. Interestingly, inhibition of arginase (Arg)-1 activity in G-MDSC exo partially abrogated the spontaneous improvement of colitis. In addition, G-MDSC exo could suppress CD4+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in vitro and inhibit the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, and these abilities were associated with Arg-1 activity. Moreover, G-MDSC exo promoted the expansion of Tregs in vitro. Taken together, these results suggest that G-MDSC exo attenuate DSS-induced colitis through inhibiting Th1 cells proliferation and promoting Tregs expansion.

  15. EM23, A Natural Sesquiterpene Lactone from Elephantopus mollis, Induces Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Thioredoxin- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyu; Li, Manmei; Wang, Guocai; Shao, Fangyuan; Chen, Wenbo; Xia, Chao; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yaolan; Zhou, Guangxiong; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Elephantopus mollis (EM) is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases, and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR), two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation, and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human CML K562 cells and AML HL-60 cells. PMID:27064563

  16. EM23, A Natural Sesquiterpene Lactone from Elephantopus mollis, Induces Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells through Thioredoxin- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Li, Manmei; Wang, Guocai; Shao, Fangyuan; Chen, Wenbo; Xia, Chao; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yaolan; Zhou, Guangxiong; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Elephantopus mollis (EM) is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases, and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR), two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation, and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human CML K562 cells and AML HL-60 cells. PMID:27064563

  17. Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study of cultured circulating myeloid progenitor cells from workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Smith, Martyn T; Tang, Xiaojiang; Guo, Weihong; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Hu, Wei; Hubbard, Alan E; Shen, Min; McHale, Cliona M; Qiu, Chuangyi; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Blair, Aaron; Ge, Yichen; Xiong, Jun; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M; Huang, Hanlin; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an economically important industrial chemical to which millions of people worldwide are exposed environmentally and occupationally. Recently, the International Agency for Cancer Research concluded that there is sufficient evidence that FA causes leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia. To evaluate the biological plausibility of this association, we employed a chromosome-wide aneuploidy study approach, which allows the evaluation of aneuploidy and structural chromosome aberrations (SCAs) of all 24 chromosomes simultaneously, to analyze cultured myeloid progenitor cells from 29 workers exposed to relatively high levels of FA and 23 unexposed controls. We found statistically significant increases in the frequencies of monosomy, trisomy, tetrasomy and SCAs of multiple chromosomes in exposed workers compared with controls, with particularly notable effects for monosomy 1 [P = 6.02E-06, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.31], monosomy 5 (P = 9.01E-06; IRR = 2.24), monosomy 7 (P = 1.57E-05; IRR = 2.17), trisomy 5 (P = 1.98E-05; IRR = 3.40) and SCAs of chromosome 5 (P = 0.024; IRR = 4.15). The detection of increased levels of monosomy 7 and SCAs of chromosome 5 is particularly relevant as they are frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings provide further evidence that leukemia-related cytogenetic changes can occur in the circulating myeloid progenitor cells of healthy workers exposed to FA, which may be a potential mechanism underlying FA-induced leukemogenesis.

  18. Chromosome-wide aneuploidy study of cultured circulating myeloid progenitor cells from workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Smith, Martyn T; Tang, Xiaojiang; Guo, Weihong; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Hu, Wei; Hubbard, Alan E; Shen, Min; McHale, Cliona M; Qiu, Chuangyi; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Blair, Aaron; Ge, Yichen; Xiong, Jun; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M; Huang, Hanlin; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an economically important industrial chemical to which millions of people worldwide are exposed environmentally and occupationally. Recently, the International Agency for Cancer Research concluded that there is sufficient evidence that FA causes leukemia, particularly myeloid leukemia. To evaluate the biological plausibility of this association, we employed a chromosome-wide aneuploidy study approach, which allows the evaluation of aneuploidy and structural chromosome aberrations (SCAs) of all 24 chromosomes simultaneously, to analyze cultured myeloid progenitor cells from 29 workers exposed to relatively high levels of FA and 23 unexposed controls. We found statistically significant increases in the frequencies of monosomy, trisomy, tetrasomy and SCAs of multiple chromosomes in exposed workers compared with controls, with particularly notable effects for monosomy 1 [P = 6.02E-06, incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.31], monosomy 5 (P = 9.01E-06; IRR = 2.24), monosomy 7 (P = 1.57E-05; IRR = 2.17), trisomy 5 (P = 1.98E-05; IRR = 3.40) and SCAs of chromosome 5 (P = 0.024; IRR = 4.15). The detection of increased levels of monosomy 7 and SCAs of chromosome 5 is particularly relevant as they are frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia. Our findings provide further evidence that leukemia-related cytogenetic changes can occur in the circulating myeloid progenitor cells of healthy workers exposed to FA, which may be a potential mechanism underlying FA-induced leukemogenesis. PMID:25391402

  19. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Hepatoblastoma: Two Cancer Models to Link Metabolism to Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Marzi, Ilaria; Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2016-01-01

    Low oxygen tension is a critical aspect of the stem cell niche where stem cells are long-term maintained. In “physiologically hypoxic” stem cell niches, low oxygen tension restrains the clonal expansion of stem cells without blocking their cycling, thereby contributing substantially to favor their self-renewal. The capacity of stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells in particular, to reside in low oxygen is likely due to their specific metabolic profile. A strong drive to the characterization of this profile emerges from the notion that cancer stem cells (CSC), like normal stem cells, most likely rely on metabolic cues for the balance between self-renewal/maintenance and clonal expansion/differentiation. Accordingly, CSC homing to low oxygen stem cell niches is the best candidate mechanism to sustain the so-called minimal residual disease. Thus, the metabolic profile of CSC impacts long-term cancer response to therapy. On that basis, strategies to target CSC are intensely sought as a means to eradicate neoplastic diseases. Our “metabolic” approach to this challenge was based on two different experimental models: (A) the Yoshida’s ascites hepatoma AH130 cells, a highly homogeneous cancer cell population expressing stem cell features, used to identify, in CSC adapted to oxygen and/or nutrient shortage, metabolic features of potential therapeutic interest; (B) chronic myeloid leukemia, used to evaluate the impact of oxygen and/or nutrient shortage on the expression of an oncogenetic protein, the loss of which determines the refractoriness of CSC to oncogene-targeting therapies. PMID:27148487

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-05-30

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an "individual" gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia.

  1. High salt drives Th17 responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis without impacting myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jörg, Stefanie; Kissel, Jan; Manzel, Arndt; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Haghikia, Aiden; Gold, Ralf; Müller, Dominik N; Linker, Ralf A

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that high dietary salt intake aggravates T helper cell (Th) 17 responses and neuroinflammation. Here, we employed in vitro assays for myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) maturation, DC cytokine production, T cell activation and ex vivo analyses in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to investigate whether the salt effect on Th17 cells is further mediated through DCs in vivo. In cell culture, an excess of 40mM sodium chloride did neither affect the generation, maturation nor the function of DCs, but, in different assays, significantly increased Th17 differentiation. During the initiation phase of MOG35-55 EAE, we did not observe altered DC frequencies or co-stimulatory capacities in lymphoid organs, while IL-17A production and Th17 cells in the spleen were significantly increased. Complementary ex vivo analyses of the spinal cord during the effector phase of EAE showed increased frequencies of Th17 cells, but did not reveal differences in phenotypes of CNS invading DCs. Finally, adaption of transgenic mice harboring a MOG specific T cell receptor to a high-salt diet led to aggravated clinical disease only after active immunization. Wild-type mice adapted to a high-salt diet in the effector phase of EAE, bypassing the priming phase of T cells, only displayed mildly aggravated disease. In summary, our data argue for a direct effect of NaCl on Th17 cells in neuroinflammation rather than an effect primarily exerted via DCs. These data may further fuel our understanding on the dietary impact on different immune cell subsets in autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis.

  2. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M; van der Linden, Wouter A; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S

    2015-09-29

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis.

  3. Sensitivity and engineered resistance of myeloid leukemia cells to BRD9 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Anja F; Martin, Laetitia J; Minder, Jessica L; Roe, Jae-Seok; Shi, Junwei; Steurer, Steffen; Bader, Gerd; McConnell, Darryl; Pearson, Mark; Gerstberger, Thomas; Gottschamel, Teresa; Thompson, Diane; Suzuki, Yutaka; Koegl, Manfred; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2016-09-01

    Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells require the BRD9 subunit of the SWI-SNF chromatin-remodeling complex to sustain MYC transcription, rapid cell proliferation and a block in differentiation. Based on these observations, we derived small-molecule inhibitors of the BRD9 bromodomain that selectively suppress the proliferation of mouse and human AML cell lines. To establish these effects as on-target, we engineered a bromodomain-swap allele of BRD9 that retains functionality despite a radically altered bromodomain pocket. Expression of this allele in AML cells confers resistance to the antiproliferative effects of our compound series, thus establishing BRD9 as the relevant cellular target. Furthermore, we used an analogous domain-swap strategy to generate an inhibitor-resistant allele of EZH2. To our knowledge, our study provides the first evidence for a role of BRD9 in cancer and reveals a simple genetic strategy for constructing resistance alleles to demonstrate on-target activity of chemical probes in cells. PMID:27376689

  4. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activity and expression of cysteine cathepsins in a mouse model of breast cancer metastasis to bone. In mice bearing highly metastatic tumors, we detected abundant cysteine cathepsin expression and activity in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These immature immune cells have known metastasis-promoting roles, including immunosuppression and osteoclastogenesis, and we assessed the contribution of cysteine cathepsins to these functions. Blocking cysteine cathepsin activity with multiple small-molecule inhibitors resulted in enhanced differentiation of multinucleated osteoclasts. This highlights a potential role for cysteine cathepsin activity in suppressing the fusion of osteoclast precursor cells. In support of this hypothesis, we found that expression and activity of key cysteine cathepsins were downregulated during MDSC-osteoclast differentiation. Another cysteine protease, legumain, also inhibits osteoclastogenesis, in part through modulation of cathepsin L activity. Together, these data suggest that cysteine protease inhibition is associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis, a process that has been implicated in bone metastasis. PMID:26308073

  5. Exogenous cardiolipin localizes to mitochondria and prevents TAZ knockdown-induced apoptosis in myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Su, Betty; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-21

    The concentration and composition of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria are altered in age-related heart disease, Barth Syndrome, and other rare genetic disorders, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. To explore whether exogenous CL can be delivered to cells, CL was combined with apolipoprotein A-I to generate water-soluble, nanoscale complexes termed nanodisks (ND). Mass spectrometry of HL60 myeloid progenitor cell extracts revealed a 30-fold increase in cellular CL content following incubation with CL-ND. When CL-ND containing a fluorescent CL analogue was employed, confocal microscopy revealed CL localization to mitochondria. The ability of CL-ND to elicit a physiological response was examined in an HL60 cell culture model of Barth Syndrome neutropenia. siRNA knockdown of the phospholipid transacylase, tafazzin (TAZ), induced apoptosis in these cells. When TAZ knockdown cells were incubated with CL-ND, the apoptotic response was attenuated. Thus, CL-ND represent a potential intervention strategy for replenishment of CL in Barth Syndrome, age-related heart disease, and other disorders characterized by depletion of this key mitochondrial phospholipid.

  6. Nuclear receptors license phagocytosis by trem2+ myeloid cells in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, Julie C; Jay, Taylor; Goduni, Elanda; Quigley, Caitlin; Mariani, Monica M; Malm, Tarja; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Landreth, Gary E

    2015-04-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a robust inflammatory response elicited by the accumulation and subsequent deposition of amyloid (Aβ) within the brain. The brain's immune cells migrate to and invest their processes within Aβ plaques but are unable to efficiently phagocytose and clear plaques from the brain. Previous studies have shown that treatment of myeloid cells with nuclear receptor agonists increases expression of phagocytosis-related genes. In this study, we elucidate a novel mechanism by which nuclear receptors act to enhance phagocytosis in the AD brain. Treatment of murine models of AD with agonists of the nuclear receptors PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and RXR stimulated microglial phagocytosis in vitro and rapidly induced the expression of the phagocytic receptors Axl and MerTK. In murine models of AD, we found that plaque-associated macrophages expressed Axl and MerTK and treatment of the cells with an RXR agonist further induced their expression, coincident with the rapid reduction in plaque burden. Further characterization of MerTK(+)/Axl(+) macrophages revealed that they also expressed the phagocytic receptor TREM2 and high levels of CD45, consistent with a peripheral origin of these cells. Importantly, in an ex vivo slice assay, nuclear receptor agonist treatment reversed the AD-related suppression of phagocytosis through a MerTK-dependent mechanism. Thus, nuclear receptor agonists increase MerTK and Axl expression on plaque-associated immune cells, consequently licensing their phagocytic activity and promoting plaque clearance.

  7. Selective BCL-2 Inhibition by ABT-199 Causes On Target Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Rongqing; Hogdal, Leah J.; Benito, Juliana M; Bucci, Donna; Han, Lina; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Debose, LaKeisha; Mu, Hong; Döhner, Hartmut; Gaidzik, Verena I.; Galinsky, Ilene; Golfman, Leonard S.; Haferlach, Torsten; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Hu, Jianhua; Leverson, Joel D; Marcucci, Guido; Müschen, Markus; Newman, Rachel; Park, Eugene; Ruvolo, Peter P.; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ryan, Jeremy; Schindela, Sonja; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Stone, Richard M.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Letai, Anthony G.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) prevents commitment to programmed cell death at the mitochondrion. It remains a challenge to identify those tumors that are best treated by inhibition of BCL-2. Here we demonstrate that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, primary patient samples, and murine primary xenografts are very sensitive to treatment with the selective BCL-2 antagonist ABT-199. In primary patient cells, the median IC50 was approximately 10 nM, and cell death occurred within 2 h. Our ex vivo sensitivity results compare favorably with those observed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a disease for which ABT-199 has demonstrated consistent activity in clinical trials. Moreover, mitochondrial studies using BH3 profiling demonstrate activity at the mitochondrion that correlates well with cytotoxicity, supporting an on target mitochondrial mechanism of action. Our protein and BH3 profiling studies provide promising tools that can be tested as predictive biomarkers in any clinical trial of ABT-199 in AML. PMID:24346116

  8. Exogenous cardiolipin localizes to mitochondria and prevents TAZ knockdown-induced apoptosis in myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikon, Nikita; Su, Betty; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Forteand, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    The concentration and composition of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria are altered in age-related heart disease, Barth Syndrome, and other rare genetic disorders, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. To explore whether exogenous CL can be delivered to cells, CL was combined with apolipoprotein A-I to generate water-soluble, nanoscale complexes termed nanodisks (ND). Mass spectrometry HL60 myeloid progenitor cell extracts revealed a 30-fold increase in cellular CL content following incubation with CL-ND. When CL-ND containing a fluorescent CL analogue was employed, confocal microscopy revealed CL localization to mitochondria. The ability of CL-ND to elicit a physiological response was examined in an HL60 cell culture model of Barth Syndrome neutropenia. siRNA knockdown of the phospholipid transacylase, tafazzin (TAZ), induced apoptosis in these cells. When TAZ knockdown cells were incubated with CL-ND, the apoptotic response was attenuated. Thus, C