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Sample records for myeloid cells regulate

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    IVASHKIV, LIONEL B.; PARK, SUNG HO

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in myeloid cells is crucial for cell differentiation and activation in response to developmental and environmental cues. Epigenetic control involves posttranslational modification of DNA or chromatin, and is also coupled to upstream signaling pathways and transcription factors. In this review, we summarize key epigenetic events and how dynamics in the epigenetic landscape of myeloid cells shape the development, immune activation, and innate immune memory. PMID:27337441

  2. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  3. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated hematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells — macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes — are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immune suppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response. PMID:22437938

  4. BCOR regulates myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Gearhart, Micah D.; Gery, Sigal; Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Yang, Henry; Sun, Haibo; Lin, De-chen; Bai, Jing-wen; Mead, Monica; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Qi; Chien, Wen-wen; Alkan, Serhan; Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Torsten; Müschen, Markus; Bardwell, Vivian J.; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2016-01-01

    BCOR is a component of a variant Polycomb group repressive complex 1 (PRC1). Recently, we and others reported recurrent somatic BCOR loss-of-function mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML). However, the role of BCOR in normal hematopoiesis is largely unknown. Here, we explored the function of BCOR in myeloid cells using myeloid murine models with Bcor conditional loss-of-function or overexpression alleles. Bcor mutant bone marrow cells showed significantly higher proliferation and differentiation rates with upregulated expression of Hox genes. Mutation of Bcor reduced protein levels of RING1B, an H2A ubiquitin ligase subunit of PRC1 family complexes and reduced H2AK119ub upstream of upregulated HoxA genes. Global RNA expression profiling in murine cells and AML patient samples with BCOR loss-of-function mutation suggested that loss of BCOR expression is associated with enhanced cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation. Our results strongly suggest that BCOR plays an indispensable role in hematopoiesis by inhibiting myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation and offer a mechanistic explanation for how BCOR regulates gene expression such as Hox genes. PMID:26847029

  5. Transcriptional regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Thomas; Mastio, Jérôme; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of pathologically activated immature cells that play a major role in the negative regulation of the immune response in cancer, autoimmunity, many chronic infections, and inflammatory conditions, as well as in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion, and metastases. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is governed by a network of transcriptional regulators that could be combined into 2 partially overlapping groups: factors promoting myelopoiesis and preventing differentiation of mature myeloid cells and factors promoting pathologic activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In this review, we discuss the specific nature of these factors and their impact on myeloid-derived suppressor cell development. PMID:26337512

  6. Bone marrow myeloid cells in regulation of multiple myeloma progression.

    PubMed

    Herlihy, Sarah E; Lin, Cindy; Nefedova, Yulia

    2017-08-01

    Survival, growth, and response to chemotherapy of cancer cells depends strongly on the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment. In multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells that localizes preferentially in the bone marrow, the microenvironment is highly enriched with myeloid cells. The majority of myeloid cells are represented by mature and immature neutrophils. The contribution of the different myeloid cell populations to tumor progression and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma is discussed.

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: natural regulators for transplant tolerance.

    PubMed

    Boros, Peter; Ochando, Jordi C; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2010-11-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to the negative regulation of immune response in cancer patients. This review summarizes results on important issues related to MDSC biology, including expansion and activation of MDSC, phenotype, and subsets as well pathways and different mechanisms by which these cells exert their suppressive effect. Recent observations suggesting that MDSC may have roles in transplant tolerance are presented. Although therapeutic targeting and destruction of MDCS is of primary interest in cancer patients, in transplantation it will instead be necessary to induce, expand, and activate these cells; thus current possibilities for in vitro generation of MDSC are also discussed.

  8. Myeloid cell-derived reactive oxygen species externally regulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors in emergency granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Peng; Bajrami, Besnik; Xu, Yuanfu; Park, Shin-Young; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; Mondal, Subhanjan; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Haiyan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cellular mechanisms controlling infection-induced emergency granulopoiesis are poorly defined. Here we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in the bone marrow (BM) were elevated during acute infection in a phagocytic NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in myeloid cells. Gr1+ myeloid cells were uniformly distributed in the BM, and all c-Kit+ progenitor cells were adjacent to Gr1+ myeloid cells. Inflammation-induced ROS production in the BM played a critical role in myeloid progenitor expansion during emergency granulopoiesis. ROS elicited oxidation and deactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in up-regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in BM myeloid progenitors. We further revealed that BM myeloid cell-produced ROS stimulated proliferation of myeloid progenitors via a paracrine mechanism. Taken together, our results establish that phagocytic NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production by BM myeloid cells plays a critical role in mediating emergency granulopoiesis during acute infection. PMID:25579427

  9. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Myeloid Cell Trafficking in AKI.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Kamal, Ahmed I; Boddu, Ravindra; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C; Rangarajan, Sunil; Chen, Bo; Curtis, Lisa M; George, James F; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-09-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury is mediated by a complex cascade of events, including the immune response, that occur secondary to injury to renal epithelial cells. We tested the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which is protective in ischemia-reperfusion injury, regulates trafficking of myeloid-derived immune cells in the kidney. Age-matched male wild-type (HO-1(+/+)), HO-1-knockout (HO-1(-/-)), and humanized HO-1-overexpressing (HBAC) mice underwent bilateral renal ischemia for 10 minutes. Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulted in significantly worse renal structure and function and increased mortality in HO-1(-/-) mice. In addition, there were more macrophages (CD45(+) CD11b(hi)F4/80(lo)) and neutrophils (CD45(+) CD11b(hi) MHCII(-) Gr-1(hi)) in HO-1(-/-) kidneys than in sham and HO-1(+/+) control kidneys subjected to ischemia-reperfusion. However, ischemic injury resulted in a significant decrease in the intrarenal resident dendritic cell (DC; CD45(+)MHCII(+)CD11b(lo)F4/80(hi)) population in HO-1(-/-) kidneys compared with controls. Syngeneic transplant experiments utilizing green fluorescent protein-positive HO-1(+/+) or HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys and green fluorescent protein-negative HO-1(+/+) recipients confirmed increased migration of the resident DC population from HO-1(-/-) donor kidneys, compared to HO-1(+/+) donor kidneys, to the peripheral lymphoid organs. This effect on renal DC migration was corroborated in myeloid-specific HO-1(-/-) mice subjected to bilateral ischemia. These mice also displayed impaired renal recovery and increased fibrosis at day 7 after injury. These results highlight an important role for HO-1 in orchestrating the trafficking of myeloid cells in AKI, which may represent a key pathway for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  10. MiRNA182 regulates percentage of myeloid and erythroid cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepak; Sachithanandan, Sasikala P; Ross, Cecil; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Li, Shang; Krishna, Sudhir

    2017-01-12

    The deregulation of lineage control programs is often associated with the progression of haematological malignancies. The molecular regulators of lineage choices in the context of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance remain poorly understood in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). To find a potential molecular regulator contributing to lineage distribution and TKI resistance, we undertook an RNA-sequencing approach for identifying microRNAs (miRNAs). Following an unbiased screen, elevated miRNA182-5p levels were detected in Bcr-Abl-inhibited K562 cells (CML blast crisis cell line) and in a panel of CML patients. Earlier, miRNA182-5p upregulation was reported in several solid tumours and haematological malignancies. We undertook a strategy involving transient modulation and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)-mediated knockout of the MIR182 locus in CML cells. The lineage contribution was assessed by methylcellulose colony formation assay. The transient modulation of miRNA182-5p revealed a biased phenotype. Strikingly, Δ182 cells (homozygous deletion of MIR182 locus) produced a marked shift in lineage distribution. The phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of miRNA182-5p in Δ182 cells. A bioinformatic analysis and Hes1 modulation data suggested that Hes1 could be a putative target of miRNA182-5p. A reciprocal relationship between miRNA182-5p and Hes1 was seen in the context of TK inhibition. In conclusion, we reveal a key role for miRNA182-5p in restricting the myeloid development of leukemic cells. We propose that the Δ182 cell line will be valuable in designing experiments for next-generation pharmacological interventions.

  11. Myeloid Suppressor Cells Accumulate and Regulate Blood Pressure in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kandarp H; Shi, Peng; Giani, Jorge F; Janjulia, Tea; Bernstein, Ellen A; Li, You; Zhao, Tuantuan; Harrison, David G; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Shen, Xiao Z

    2015-10-23

    Chronic inflammation is a major contributor to the progressive pathology of hypertension, and T-cell activation is required for the genesis of hypertension. However, the precise role of myeloid cells in this process is unclear. To characterize and understand the role of peripheral myeloid cells in the development of hypertension. We examined myeloid cells in the periphery of hypertensive mice and found that increased numbers of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells in blood and the spleen are a characteristic of 3 murine models of experimental hypertension (angiotensin II, L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester, and high salt). These cells express surface markers and transcription factors associated with immaturity and immunosuppression. Also, they produce hydrogen peroxide to suppress T-cell activation. These are characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Depletion of hypertensive MDSCs increased blood pressure and renal inflammation. In contrast, adoptive transfer of wild-type MDSCs to hypertensive mice reduced blood pressure, whereas the transfer of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2-deficient MDSCs did not. The accumulation of MDSCs is a characteristic of experimental models of hypertension. MDSCs limit inflammation and the increase of blood pressure through the production of hydrogen peroxide. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Regulation of angiogenesis by a non-canonical Wnt-Flt1 pathway in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Stefater, James A; Lewkowich, Ian; Rao, Sujata; Mariggi, Giovanni; Carpenter, April C; Burr, Adam R; Fan, Jieqing; Ajima, Rieko; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Williams, Bart O; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Yamaguchi, Terry; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerhardt, Holger; Lang, Richard A

    2011-05-29

    Myeloid cells are a feature of most tissues. Here we show that during development, retinal myeloid cells (RMCs) produce Wnt ligands to regulate blood vessel branching. In the mouse retina, where angiogenesis occurs postnatally, somatic deletion in RMCs of the Wnt ligand transporter Wntless results in increased angiogenesis in the deeper layers. We also show that mutation of Wnt5a and Wnt11 results in increased angiogenesis and that these ligands elicit RMC responses via a non-canonical Wnt pathway. Using cultured myeloid-like cells and RMC somatic deletion of Flt1, we show that an effector of Wnt-dependent suppression of angiogenesis by RMCs is Flt1, a naturally occurring inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These findings indicate that resident myeloid cells can use a non-canonical, Wnt-Flt1 pathway to suppress angiogenic branching.

  13. B-myb is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell and myeloid progenitor cell development

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stacey J.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Lieu, Yen K.; John, Premila; Reddy, M. V. Ramana; Chen, Edward Y.; Duan, Qiaonan; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Reddy, E. Premkumar

    2014-01-01

    The B-myb (MYBL2) gene is a member of the MYB family of transcription factors and is involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and maintenance of genomic integrity. However, its function during adult development and hematopoiesis is unknown. We show here that conditional inactivation of B-myb in vivo results in depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, leading to profound reductions in mature lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cells. This defect is autonomous to the bone marrow and is first evident in stem cells, which accumulate in the S and G2/M phases. B-myb inactivation also causes defects in the myeloid progenitor compartment, consisting of depletion of common myeloid progenitors but relative sparing of granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. Microarray studies indicate that B-myb–null LSK+ cells differentially express genes that direct myeloid lineage development and commitment, suggesting that B-myb is a key player in controlling cell fate. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that B-myb is essential for HSC and progenitor maintenance and survival during hematopoiesis. PMID:24516162

  14. B-myb is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell and myeloid progenitor cell development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stacey J; Ma'ayan, Avi; Lieu, Yen K; John, Premila; Reddy, M V Ramana; Chen, Edward Y; Duan, Qiaonan; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Reddy, E Premkumar

    2014-02-25

    The B-myb (MYBL2) gene is a member of the MYB family of transcription factors and is involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and maintenance of genomic integrity. However, its function during adult development and hematopoiesis is unknown. We show here that conditional inactivation of B-myb in vivo results in depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, leading to profound reductions in mature lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cells. This defect is autonomous to the bone marrow and is first evident in stem cells, which accumulate in the S and G2/M phases. B-myb inactivation also causes defects in the myeloid progenitor compartment, consisting of depletion of common myeloid progenitors but relative sparing of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Microarray studies indicate that B-myb-null LSK(+) cells differentially express genes that direct myeloid lineage development and commitment, suggesting that B-myb is a key player in controlling cell fate. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that B-myb is essential for HSC and progenitor maintenance and survival during hematopoiesis.

  15. Metabolic regulation of suppressive myeloid cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Strauss, Laura; Consonni, Francesca Maria; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando; Porta, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism to promote growth, survival, proliferation and long-term maintenance. The common feature of this altered metabolism is the increased glucose uptake and fermentation of glucose to lactate, which is observed even in the presence of completely functioning mitochondria. This effect is known as the 'Warburg Effect' and its intensive investigation in the last decade has partially established either its causes or its functions. It is now emerging that a major side effect of the Warburg Effect is immunosuppression, which limits the immunogenicity of cancer cells and therefore restricts the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer immunotherapy. Here we discuss how the metabolic communication between cancer and infiltrating myeloid cells contributes to cancer immune evasion and how the understanding of these mechanisms may improve current immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Myeloid cell HIF-1α regulates asthma airway resistance and eosinophil function

    PubMed Central

    Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Feldstein, Stephanie; Johansson, Per; Nyugen, Anh; McEachern, Elisa K.; Nicatia, Shari; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Olson, Joshua; Cho, Jae Youn; Isaacs, Hart; Johnson, Randall S.; Broide, David H.; Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is a master regulator of inflammatory activities of myeloid cells, including neutrophils and macrophages. These studies examine the role of myeloid cell HIF-1α in regulating asthma induction and pathogenesis, and for the first time, evaluate the roles of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in the chemotactic properties of eosinophils, the myeloid cells most associated with asthma. Wild-type (WT) and myeloid cell-specific HIF-1α knockout (KO) C57BL/6 mice were studied in an ovalbumin (OVA) model of asthma. Administration of the pharmacological HIF-1α antagonist YC-1 was used to corroborate findings from the genetic model. WT, HIF-1α, and HIF-2α KO eosinophils underwent in vitro chemotaxis assays. We found that deletion of HIF-1α in myeloid cells and systemic treatment with YC-1 during asthma induction decreased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Deletion of HIF-1α in myeloid cells in OVA-induced asthma also reduced eosinophil infiltration, goblet cell hyperplasia, and levels 34 of cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the lung. HIF-1α inhibition with YC-1 during asthma induction decreased eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage, lung parenchyma, and blood, as well as decreased total lung inflammation, IL-5, and serum OVA-specific IgE levels. Deletion of HIF-1α in eosinophils decreased their chemotaxis, while deletion of the isoform HIF-2α led to increased chemotaxis. This work demonstrates that HIF-1α in myeloid cells plays a role in asthma pathogenesis, particularly in AHR development. Additionally, treatment with HIF-1α inhibitors during asthma induction decreases AHR and eosinophilia. Finally, we show that HIF- 1α and HIF-2α regulate eosinophil migration in opposing ways. PMID:23250618

  17. Effects of notch signaling on regulation of myeloid cell differentiation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pingyan; Kumar, Vinit; Liu, Hao; Youn, Je-In; Fishman, Mayer; Sherman, Simon; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Functionally altered myeloid cells play an important role in immune suppression in cancer, in angiogenesis, and in tumor cells' invasion and metastases. Here, we report that inhibition of Notch signaling in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and dendritic cells is directly involved in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation in cancer. Inhibition of Notch signaling was caused by the disruption of the interaction between Notch receptor and transcriptional repressor CSL, which is normally required for efficient transcription of target genes. This disruption was the result of serine phosphorylation of Notch. We demonstrated that increased activity of casein kinase 2 (CK2) observed in HPC and in MDSC could be responsible for the phosphorylation of Notch and downregulation of Notch signaling. Inhibition of CK2 by siRNA or by pharmacological inhibitor restored Notch signaling in myeloid cells and substantially improved their differentiation, both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism regulation of Notch signaling in cancer. This may suggest a new perspective for pharmacological regulation of differentiation of myeloid cells in cancer.

  18. Hepatic Stellate Cells Regulate Immune Response via Induction of Myeloid Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Yang, Horng-Ren; Wang, Lianfu; Arakawa, Yusuke; Brown, Kathleen; Wu, Qingyu; Lin, Feng; Peters, Marion; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang

    2011-01-01

    Although organ transplants have been applied for decades, outcomes of somatic cell transplants remain disappointing, presumably due to lack of appropriate supporting stromal cells. Thus, cotransplantation with liver stromal cells, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), achieves long-term survival of islet allografts in mice via induction of effector T cell apoptosis and generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. In this study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in vivo that HSC can promote generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). HSC-induced MDSC demonstrate potent immune inhibitory activity. Induction of MDSC is dependent on intact IFN-γ signaling pathway in HSC, and is mediated by soluble factors, suggesting that the specific tissue stromal cells, such as HSC, play a crucial role in regulating immune response via inflammation-induced generation of MDSC. Large amounts of MDSC can be propagated in vitro from bone marrow derived myeloid precursor cells under the influence of HSC. Cotransplantation with in vitro generated MDSC can effectively protects islet allografts from host immune attack. Local delivery of potent immune suppressor cells for cell transplants holds a great clinical application potential. PMID:21374665

  19. NR4A Receptors Differentially Regulate NF-κB Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Caitriona; de Gaetano, Monica; Giffney, Hugh E.; Bahar, Bojlul; Cummins, Eoin P.; Brennan, Eoin P.; Barry, Mary; Belton, Orina; Godson, Catherine G.; Murphy, Evelyn P.; Crean, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of inflammatory responses is a hallmark of multiple diseases such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. As constitutively active transcription factors, NR4A nuclear receptors function to control the magnitude of inflammatory responses and in chronic inflammatory disease can be protective or pathogenic. Within this study, we demonstrate that TLR4 stimulation using the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) rapidly enhances NR4A1–3 expression in human and murine, primary and immortalized myeloid cells with concomitant gene transcription and protein secretion of MIP-3α, a central chemokine implicated in numerous pathologies. Deficiency of NR4A2 and NR4A3 in human and murine myeloid cells reveals that both receptors function as positive regulators of enhanced MIP-3α expression. In contrast, within the same cell types and conditions, altered NR4A activity leads to suppression of LPS-induced MCP-1 gene and protein expression. An equivalent pattern of inflammatory gene regulation is replicated in TNFα-treated myeloid cells. We show that NF-κB is the critical regulator of NR4A1–3, MIP-3α, and MCP-1 during TLR4 stimulation in myeloid cells and highlight a parallel mechanism whereby NR4A activity can repress or enhance NF-κB target gene expression simultaneously. Mechanistic insight reveals that NR4A2 does not require DNA-binding capacity in order to enhance or repress NF-κB target gene expression simultaneously and establishes a role for NF-κB family member Relb as a novel NR4A target gene involved in the positive regulation of MIP-3α. Thus, our data reveal a dynamic role for NR4A receptors concurrently enhancing and repressing NF-κB activity in myeloid cells leading to altered transcription of key inflammatory mediators. PMID:28167941

  20. EVOLUTION OF MYELOID CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Daniel R.; Neely, Harold R.; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    In 1882, Elie Metchnikoff identified myeloid-like cells from starfish larvae responding to the invasion by a foreign body (rose thorn). This marked the origins of the study of innate immunity, and an appreciation that cellular immunity is already well established in these “primitive” organisms. This chapter focuses on these myeloid cells as well as the newest members of this family, the dendritic cells (DC), and explores their evolutionary origins. Our goal is to provide evolutionary context for the development of the multilayered immune system of mammals, where myeloid cells now serve as central effectors of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity. Overall, we find that core contributions of myeloid cells to the regulation of inflammation are based on mechanisms that have been honed over hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Using phagocytosis as a platform, we show how fairly simple beginnings have offered a robust foundation onto which additional control features have been integrated, resulting in central regulatory nodes that now manage multi-factorial aspects of homeostasis and immunity. PMID:27337471

  1. Activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma is a critical regulator of myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Si, Jutong; Collins, Steven J

    2008-05-15

    Ca(2+) signaling is an important component of signal transduction pathways regulating B and T lymphocyte proliferation, but the functional role of Ca(2+) signaling in regulating myeloid leukemia cell proliferation has been largely unexplored. We observe that the activated (autophosphorylated) Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma (CaMKIIgamma) is invariably present in myeloid leukemia cell lines as well as in the majority of primary acute myelogenous leukemia patient samples. In contrast, myeloid leukemia cells induced to terminally differentiate or undergo growth arrest display a marked reduction in this CaMKIIgamma autophosphorylation. In cells harboring the bcr-abl oncogene, the activation (autophosphorylation) of CaMKIIgamma is regulated by this oncogene. Moreover, inhibition of CaMKIIgamma activity with pharmacologic agents, dominant-negative constructs, or short hairpin RNAs inhibits the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells, and this is associated with the inactivation/down-regulation of multiple critical signal transduction networks involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta)/beta-catenin pathways. In myeloid leukemia cells, CaMKIIgamma directly phosphorylates Stat3 and enhances its transcriptional activity. Thus, CaMKIIgamma is a critical regulator of multiple signaling networks regulating the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells. Inhibiting CaMKIIgamma may represent a novel approach in the targeted therapy of myeloid leukemia.

  2. Reprogramming of myeloid angiogenic cells by Bartonella henselae leads to microenvironmental regulation of pathological angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Fiona; Mändle, Tanja; Urbich, Carmen; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Michaelis, U Ruth; Brandes, Ralf P; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Lauber, Kirsten; Ballhorn, Wibke; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2015-10-01

    The contribution of myeloid cells to tumour microenvironments is a decisive factor in cancer progression. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) mediate tumour invasion and angiogenesis through matrix remodelling, immune modulation and release of pro-angiogenic cytokines. Nothing is known about how pathogenic bacteria affect myeloid cells in these processes. Here we show that Bartonella henselae, a bacterial pathogen causing vasculoproliferative diseases (bacillary angiomatosis), reprogrammes human myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), a pro-angiogenic subset of circulating progenitor cells, towards a TAM-like phenotype with increased pro-angiogenic capacity. B. henselae infection resulted in inhibition of cell death, activation of angiogenic cellular programmes and induction of M2 macrophage polarization. MACs infected with B. henselae incorporated into endothelial sprouts and increased angiogenic growth. Infected MACs developed a vascular mimicry phenotype in vitro, and expression of B. henselae adhesin A was essential in inducing these angiogenic effects. Secretome analysis revealed that increased pro-angiogenic activities were associated with the creation of a tumour-like microenvironment dominated by angiogenic inflammatory cytokines and matrix remodelling compounds. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of myeloid cells by pathogenic bacteria can contribute to microenvironmental regulation of pathological tissue growth and suggest parallels underlying both bacterial infections and cancer. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Soluble factors regulated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediate tumour angiogenesis and myeloid cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Bourcy, Morgane; Lesage, Julien; Leroi, Natacha; Syne, Laïdya; Blacher, Silvia; Hubert, Pascale; Erpicum, Charlotte; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Delvenne, Philippe; Birembaut, Philippe; Noël, Agnès; Polette, Myriam; Gilles, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programmes provide cancer cells with invasive and survival capacities that might favour metastatic dissemination. Whilst signalling cascades triggering EMT have been extensively studied, the impact of EMT on the crosstalk between tumour cells and the tumour microenvironment remains elusive. We aimed to identify EMT-regulated soluble factors that facilitate the recruitment of host cells in the tumour. Our findings indicate that EMT phenotypes relate to the induction of a panel of secreted mediators, namely IL-8, IL-6, sICAM-1, PAI-1 and GM-CSF, and implicate the EMT-transcription factor Snail as a regulator of this process. We further show that EMT-derived soluble factors are pro-angiogenic in vivo (in the mouse ear sponge assay), ex vivo (in the rat aortic ring assay) and in vitro (in a chemotaxis assay). Additionally, conditioned medium from EMT-positive cells stimulates the recruitment of myeloid cells. In a bank of 40 triple-negative breast cancers, tumours presenting features of EMT were significantly more angiogenic and infiltrated by a higher quantity of myeloid cells compared to tumours with little or no EMT. Taken together, our results show that EMT programmes trigger the expression of soluble mediators in cancer cells that stimulate angiogenesis and recruit myeloid cells in vivo, which might in turn favour cancer spread.

  4. Myeloid cell receptor LRP1/CD91 regulates monocyte recruitment and angiogenesis in tumors.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Nicole D; Jo, Minji; Hu, Jingjing; Bristow, Jeanne M; Pizzo, Donald P; Gaultier, Alban; VandenBerg, Scott R; Gonias, Steven L

    2013-07-01

    Recruitment of monocytes into sites of inflammation is essential in the immune response. In cancer, recruited monocytes promote invasion, metastasis, and possibly angiogenesis. LDL receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic and cell-signaling receptor that regulates cell migration. In this study, we isografted PanO2 pancreatic carcinoma cells into mice in which LRP1 was deleted in myeloid lineage cells. Recruitment of monocytes into orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors was significantly increased in these mice, compared with control mice. LRP1-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) expressed higher levels of multiple chemokines, including, most prominently, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3, which is known to amplify inflammation. Increased levels of CCL3 were detected in LRP1-deficient tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), isolated from PanO2 tumors, and in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells in which LRP1 was silenced. LRP1-deficient BMDMs migrated more rapidly than LRP1-expressing cells in vitro. The difference in migration was reversed by CCL3-neutralizing antibody, by CCR5-neutralizing antibody, and by inhibiting NF-κB with JSH-23. Inhibiting NF-κB reversed the increase in CCL3 expression associated with LRP1 gene silencing in RAW 264.7 cells. Tumors formed in mice with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells showed increased angiogenesis. Although VEGF mRNA expression was not increased in LRP1-deficient TAMs, at the single-cell level, the increase in TAM density in tumors with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells may have allowed these TAMs to contribute an increased amount of VEGF to the tumor microenvironment. Our results show that macrophage density in tumors is correlated with cancer angiogenesis in a novel model system. Myeloid cell LRP1 may be an important regulator of cancer progression. ©2013 AACR.

  5. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1(+)CD11b(+)Ly6G(med)Ly6C(med) MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27(+)CD11b(+)NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14(+)HLA-DR(-) and CD14(-) HLA-DR(-) MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14(+)HLA-DR(-)MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma.

  6. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1+CD11b+Ly6GmedLy6Cmed MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27+CD11b+NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14+HLA-DR− and CD14− HLA-DR− MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14+HLA-DR−MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma. PMID:25949922

  7. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Reuterswärd, Philippa; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge; Kiessling, Rolf; Kogner, Per

    2016-01-01

    Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor.

  8. Tumour-activated liver stromal cells regulate myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; He, G; Kong, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, B; Sun, X; Jia, B; Xie, X; Wang, X; Chen, D; Wei, L; Zhang, M; Zeng, H; Chen, H

    2017-04-01

    Regulating mechanisms underlying hepatic myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation remain to be described. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of tumour-activated liver stromal cells in the process of hepatic MDSCs migration and accumulation. Our data showed an elevated frequency of MDSCs in the liver of tumour-bearing mice. Moreover, tumour-activated liver stromal cells promote MDSC migration into the liver site. Further investigation indicated higher levels of cytokine and chemokine expression in liver stromal cells after exposure to the tumour-conditioned supernatant. Notably, the expression levels of proinflammatory factors, mainly including macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), increased after treatment with tumour-conditioned supernatant, and blockade of MCP-1 or SDF-1 decreased the proportion of tumour infiltrated MDSCs in mice co-transplanted with liver stromal cells and tumour cells, but not in mice with only tumour cells injection. These findings demonstrate that tumour-activated liver stromal cells produce higher levels of chemokines and cytokines, which may contribute to MDSC accumulation into the liver site in patients with liver cancer. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Myeloid 12/15-LOX regulates B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. The myeloid enzyme 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX), which generates bioactive oxidized lipids, has been implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases, with several studies demonstrating an improvement in pathology in mice lacking the enzyme. However, the ability of 12/15-LOX to directly regulate B cell function has not been studied. Methods. The influence of 12/15-LOX on B cell phenotype and function, and IgM generation, was compared using wildtype (WT) and 12/15-LOX (Alox15-/-) deficient mice. The proliferative and functional capacity of splenic CD19+ B cells was measured in vitro in response to various toll-like receptor agonists. Results. WT and Alox15-/- displayed comparable responses. However in vivo, splenic B cell numbers were significantly elevated in Alox15-/- mice with a corresponding elevation in titres of total IgM in lung, gut and serum, and lower serum IgM directed against the 12/15-LOX product, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phosphatidylethanolamine (HETE-PE). Discussion. Myeloid 12/15-LOX can regulate B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo, potentially contributing to its ability to regulate inflammatory disease. Furthermore, the alterations seen in 12/15-LOX deficiency likely result from changes in the equilibrium of the immune system that develop from birth. Further studies in disease models are warranted to elucidate the contribution of 12/15-LOX mediated alterations in B cell numbers and innate immune antibody generation to driving inflammation in vivo. PMID:28239665

  10. The long non-coding RNA Morrbid regulates Bim and short-lived myeloid cell lifespan

    PubMed Central

    McCright, Sam J.; Kumar, Dinesh B. Uthaya; Collet, Magalie A.; Mowel, Walter K.; Elliott, Ellen N.; Uyar, Asli; Makiya, Michelle A.; Dunagin, Margaret C.; Harman, Christian C.D.; Virtue, Anthony T.; Zhu, Stella; Bailis, Will; Stein, Judith; Hughes, Cynthia; Raj, Arjun; Wherry, E. John; Goff, Loyal A.; Klion, Amy D.; Rinn, John L.; Williams, Adam; Flavell, Richard A.; Henao-Mejia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neutrophils, eosinophils and “classical” monocytes collectively account for ~70% of human blood leukocytes and are among the shortest-lived cells in the body1,2. Precise regulation of the lifespan of these myeloid cells is critical to maintain protective immune responses while minimizing the deleterious consequences of prolonged inflammation1,2. However, how the lifespan of these cells is strictly controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we identify a novel long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that we termed Morrbid, which tightly controls the survival of neutrophils, eosinophils and “classical” monocytes in response to pro-survival cytokines. To control the lifespan of these cells, Morrbid regulates the transcription of its neighboring pro-apoptotic gene, Bcl2l11 (Bim), by promoting the enrichment of the PRC2 complex at the Bcl2l11 promoter to maintain this gene in a poised state. Notably, Morrbid regulates this process in cis, enabling allele-specific control of Bcl2l11 transcription. Thus, in these highly inflammatory cells, changes in Morrbid levels provide a locus-specific regulatory mechanism that allows for rapid control of apoptosis in response to extracellular pro-survival signals. As MORRBID is present in humans and dysregulated in patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome, this lncRNA may represent a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory disorders characterized by aberrant short-lived myeloid cell lifespan. PMID:27525555

  11. Myeloid 12/15-LOX regulates B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Sarah N; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Gray, David; Collins, Peter; Jones, Simon A; Taylor, Philip R; O'Donnell, Valerie

    2017-01-04

    Background. The myeloid enzyme 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX), which generates bioactive oxidized lipids, has been implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases, with several studies demonstrating an improvement in pathology in mice lacking the enzyme. However, the ability of 12/15-LOX to directly regulate B cell function has not been studied. Methods. The influence of 12/15-LOX on B cell phenotype and function, and IgM generation, was compared using wildtype (WT) and 12/15-LOX (Alox15(-/-)) deficient mice. The proliferative and functional capacity of splenic CD19(+) B cells was measured in vitro in response to various toll-like receptor agonists. Results. WT and Alox15(-/-) displayed comparable responses. However in vivo, splenic B cell numbers were significantly elevated in Alox15(-/-) mice with a corresponding elevation in titres of total IgM in lung, gut and serum, and lower serum IgM directed against the 12/15-LOX product, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phosphatidylethanolamine (HETE-PE). Discussion. Myeloid 12/15-LOX can regulate B cell numbers and innate immune antibody levels in vivo, potentially contributing to its ability to regulate inflammatory disease. Furthermore, the alterations seen in 12/15-LOX deficiency likely result from changes in the equilibrium of the immune system that develop from birth. Further studies in disease models are warranted to elucidate the contribution of 12/15-LOX mediated alterations in B cell numbers and innate immune antibody generation to driving inflammation in vivo.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor 8 regulates pathways for antigen presentation in myeloid cells and during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Jean-François; Kapoustina, Oxana; Langlais, David; Ruddy, Rebecca; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Bae-Hoon; MacMicking, John D; Giguère, Vincent; Gros, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8) plays an important role in defenses against intracellular pathogens, including several aspects of myeloid cells function. It is required for ontogeny and maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells, for activation of anti-microbial defenses, and for production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) in response to interferon gamma (IFNγ) and protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcriptional programs and cellular pathways that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ and that are important for defenses against M. tuberculosis are poorly understood. These were investigated by transcript profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip). Studies in primary macrophages identified 368 genes that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ/CpG and that behave as stably segregating expression signatures (eQTLs) in F2 mice fixed for a wild-type or mutant allele at IRF8. A total of 319 IRF8 binding sites were identified on promoters genome-wide (ChIP-chip) in macrophages treated with IFNγ/CpG, defining a functional G/AGAAnTGAAA motif. An analysis of the genes bearing a functional IRF8 binding site, and showing regulation by IFNγ/CpG in macrophages and/or in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs, revealed a striking enrichment for the pathways of antigen processing and presentation, including multiple structural and enzymatic components of the Class I and Class II MHC (major histocompatibility complex) antigen presentation machinery. Also significantly enriched as IRF8 targets are the group of endomembrane- and phagosome-associated small GTPases of the IRG (immunity-related GTPases) and GBP (guanylate binding proteins) families. These results identify IRF8 as a key regulator of early response pathways in myeloid cells, including phagosome maturation, antigen processing, and antigen presentation by myeloid cells.

  13. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell responses against vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Carl; Yang, Yiping; Huang, Xiaopei

    2017-04-06

    Vaccinia virus (VV) can potently activate NK- and T-cell responses, leading to efficient viral control and generation of long-lasting protective immunity. However, immune responses against viral infections are often tightly controlled to avoid collateral damage and systemic inflammation. We have previously shown that granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells (g-MDSCs) can suppress the NK-cell response to VV infection. It remains unknown what regulates T-cell responses to VV infection in vivo. In this study, we first showed that monocytic MDSCs (m-MDSCs), but not g-MDSCs, from VV-infected mice could directly suppress CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell activation in vitro. We then demonstrated that defective recruitment of m-MDSCs to the site of VV infection in CCR2(-/-) mice enhanced VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and that adoptive transfer of m-MDSCs into VV-infected mice suppressed VV-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation, leading to a delay in viral clearance. Mechanistically, we further showed that T-cell suppression by m-MDSCs is mediated by indication of iNOS and production of NO upon VV infection, and that IFN-γ is required for activation of m-MDSCs. Collectively, our results highlight a critical role for m-MDSCs in regulating T-cell responses against VV infection and may suggest potential strategies using m-MDSCs to modulate T-cell responses during viral infections. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  15. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  16. β-Catenin-regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing.

    PubMed

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A

    2014-06-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin-mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury.

  17. β-Catenin–regulated myeloid cell adhesion and migration determine wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Cambridge, Elizabeth; Yu, Winston; Guo, Anne; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puviindran; Poon, Raymond; Hinz, Boris; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    A β-catenin/T cell factor–dependent transcriptional program is critical during cutaneous wound repair for the regulation of scar size; however, the relative contribution of β-catenin activity and function in specific cell types in the granulation tissue during the healing process is unknown. Here, cell lineage tracing revealed that cells in which β-catenin is transcriptionally active express a gene profile that is characteristic of the myeloid lineage. Mice harboring a macrophage-specific deletion of the gene encoding β-catenin exhibited insufficient skin wound healing due to macrophage-specific defects in migration, adhesion to fibroblasts, and ability to produce TGF-β1. In irradiated mice, only macrophages expressing β-catenin were able to rescue wound-healing deficiency. Evaluation of scar tissue collected from patients with hypertrophic and normal scars revealed a correlation between the number of macrophages within the wound, β-catenin levels, and cellularity. Our data indicate that β-catenin regulates myeloid cell motility and adhesion and that β-catenin–mediated macrophage motility contributes to the number of mesenchymal cells and ultimate scar size following cutaneous injury. PMID:24837430

  18. Regulation of myeloid cells by activated T cells determines the efficacy of PD-1 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Eissler, Nina; Mao, Yumeng; Brodin, David; Andersson Svahn, Helene; Johnsen, John Inge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Removal of immuno-suppression has been reported to enhance antitumor immunity primed by checkpoint inhibitors. Although PD-1 blockade failed to control tumor growth in a transgenic murine neuroblastoma model, concurrent inhibition of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) by BLZ945 reprogrammed suppressive myeloid cells and significantly enhanced therapeutic effects. Microarray analysis of tumor tissues identified a significant increase of T-cell infiltration guided by myeloid cell-derived chemokines CXCL9, 10, and 11. Blocking the responsible chemokine receptor CXCR3 hampered T-cell infiltration and reduced antitumor efficacy of the combination therapy. Multivariate analysis of 59 immune-cell parameters in tumors and spleens detected the correlation between PD-L1-expressing myeloid cells and tumor burden. In vitro, anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab in combination with BLZ945 increased the activation of primary human T and NK cells. Importantly, we revealed a previously uncharacterized pathway, in which T cells secreted M-CSF upon PD-1 blockade, leading to enhanced suppressive capacity of monocytes by upregulation of PD-L1 and purinergic enzymes. In multiple datasets of neuroblastoma patients, gene expression of CD73 correlated strongly with myeloid cell markers CD163 and CSF-1R in neuroblastoma tumors, and associated with worse survival in high-risk patients. Altogether, our data reveal the dual role of activated T cells on myeloid cell functions and provide a rationale for the combination therapy of anti-PD-1 antibody with CSF-1R inhibitor. PMID:28123870

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Romano, Alessandra; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape. PMID:27391078

  1. TPL-2 negatively regulates interferon-β production in macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Frank; Cook, Dorthe; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Wu, Xuemei; Yang, Huei-Ting; Grant, Susan; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Tsichlis, Philip N.; O'Garra, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pathogen-derived products induces the production of cytokines, which play an important role in immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of the TPL-2 signaling pathway in TLR induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in these cell types. It has previously been suggested that IFN-β and IL-10 are coordinately regulated after TLR stimulation. However, in the absence of TPL-2 signaling, lipopolysaccharide (TLR4) and CpG (TLR9) stimulation resulted in increased production of IFN-β while decreasing IL-10 production by both macrophages and myeloid DCs. In contrast, CpG induction of both IFN-α and IFN-β by plasmacytoid DCs was decreased in the absence of TPL-2, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was blocked. Extracellular signal-related kinase–dependent negative regulation of IFN-β in macrophages was IL-10–independent, required protein synthesis, and was recapitulated in TPL-2–deficient myeloid DCs by retroviral transduction of the ERK-dependent transcription factor c-fos. PMID:19667062

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T cell and B cell responses during autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Crook, Kristen R; Jin, Mengyao; Weeks, Michael F; Rampersad, Rishi R; Baldi, Robert M; Glekas, Amy S; Shen, Yajuan; Esserman, Denise A; Little, Paul; Schwartz, Todd A; Liu, Peng

    2015-03-01

    MDSCs are a heterogeneous group of myeloid cells that suppress T cell activity in cancer and autoimmune disease. The effect of MDSCs on B cell function is not clear. Using the CIA model of autoimmune disease, we found an increase in M-MDSCs in the periphery of WT mice with CIA compared with naïve mice. These MDSCs were absent from the periphery of CCR2(-/-) mice that developed exacerbated disease. M-MDSCs, isolated from immunized mice, inhibited autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. The M-MDSC-mediated suppression of T cell proliferation was NO and IFN-γ dependent but IL-17 independent. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that M-MDSCs from CIA mice also inhibited autologous B cell proliferation and antibody production. The suppression of B cells by M-MDSCs was dependent on the production of NO and PGE2 and required cell-cell contact. Administration of M-MDSCs rescued CCR2(-/-) mice from the exacerbated CIA phenotype and ameliorated disease in WT mice. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of M-MDSCs reduced autoantibody production by CCR2(-/-) and WT mice. In summary, M-MDSCs inhibit T cell and B cell function in CIA and may serve as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of autoimmune arthritis.

  3. Regulatory myeloid cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, Brian R; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-02-27

    Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages, regulatory dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents, and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity after RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and to promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and to usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin.

  4. Oxidative stress regulates expression of VEGFR1 in myeloid cells: link to tumor-induced immune suppression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kübler, Hubert; Tseng, Timothy; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Su, Zhen; Kaliberov, Sergei; Heiser, Axel; Rosser, Charles; Dahm, Philip; Siemann, Dietmar; Vieweg, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associates with overproduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) due to the mutation/inactivation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Herein we demonstrate that implantation of human RCC tumor cells into athymic nude mice promotes the appearance of VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR1)/CD11b double-positive myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Avastin-mediated VEGF neutralization was capable of significantly reducing the numbers of circulating VEGFR1+ myeloid cells. Conversely, up-regulation of VEGFR1 by myeloid cells could also be achieved in vitro by coculturing bone marrow cells with RCC-conditioned medium or by short-term exposure of naive myeloid cells to oxidative stress. Treatment of myeloid cells with H2O2, lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, or an inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase all resulted in increased expression of VEGFR1. Furthermore, after exposure to oxidative stress, myeloid cells acquire immunosuppressive features and become capable of inhibiting T cell proliferation. Data suggest that tumor-induced oxidative stress may promote both VEGFR1 up-regulation and immunosuppressive function in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Analysis of tumor tissue and peripheral blood from patients with metastatic RCC revealed that VEGFR1+ cells can be also found in cancer patients. Restoration of immunocompetence in metastatic RCC patients by pharmacological elimination of VEGFR1+ cells may have a significant impact on the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines or other immune-based therapies.

  5. Arginine regulation by myeloid derived suppressor cells and tolerance in cancer: mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2008-04-01

    Patients with cancer have an impaired T-cell response that can decrease the potential therapeutic benefit of cancer vaccines and other forms of immunotherapy. L-arginine (L-Arg) is a conditionally essential amino acid that is fundamental for the function of T lymphocytes. Recent findings in tumor-bearing mice and cancer patients indicate that increased metabolism of L-Arg by myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) producing arginase I inhibits T-lymphocyte responses. Here we discuss some of the most recent concepts how MDSC expressing arginase I may regulate T-cell function in cancer and other chronic inflammatory diseases and suggest possible therapeutic interventions to overcome this inhibitory effect.

  6. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation.

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Survival and Function Are Regulated by the Transcription Factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Beury, Daniel W; Carter, Kayla A; Nelson, Cassandra; Sinha, Pratima; Hanson, Erica; Nyandjo, Maeva; Fitzgerald, Phillip J; Majeed, Amry; Wali, Neha; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-04-15

    Tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to immune suppression in tumor-bearing individuals and are a major obstacle to effective immunotherapy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the mechanisms used by MDSC to suppress T cell activation. Although ROS are toxic to most cells, MDSC survive despite their elevated content and release of ROS. NF erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that regulates a battery of genes that attenuate oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that MDSC resistance to ROS may be regulated by Nrf2. To test this hypothesis, we used Nrf2(+/+)and Nrf2(-/-)BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bearing 4T1 mammary carcinoma and MC38 colon carcinoma, respectively. Nrf2 enhanced MDSC suppressive activity by increasing MDSC production of H2O2, and it increased the quantity of tumor-infiltrating MDSC by reducing their oxidative stress and rate of apoptosis. Nrf2 did not affect circulating levels of MDSC in tumor-bearing mice because the decreased apoptotic rate of tumor-infiltrating MDSC was balanced by a decreased rate of differentiation from bone marrow progenitor cells. These results demonstrate that Nrf2 regulates the generation, survival, and suppressive potency of MDSC, and that a feedback homeostatic mechanism maintains a steady-state level of circulating MDSC in tumor-bearing individuals.

  8. Dickkopf-related protein 1 (Dkk1) regulates the accumulation and function of myeloid derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Lucia; Mahajan, Sahil; Capietto, Aude-Hélène; Yang, Zhengfeng; Zamani, Ali; Ricci, Biancamaria; Bumpass, David B; Meyer, Melissa; Su, Xinming; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Weilbaecher, Katherine; Stewart, Sheila A; DeNardo, David G; Faccio, Roberta

    2016-05-02

    Tumor-stroma interactions contribute to tumorigenesis. Tumor cells can educate the stroma at primary and distant sites to facilitate the recruitment of heterogeneous populations of immature myeloid cells, known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs suppress T cell responses and promote tumor proliferation. One outstanding question is how the local and distant stroma modulate MDSCs during tumor progression. Down-regulation of β-catenin is critical for MDSC accumulation and immune suppressive functions in mice and humans. Here, we demonstrate that stroma-derived Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) targets β-catenin in MDSCs, thus exerting immune suppressive effects during tumor progression. Mice bearing extraskeletal tumors show significantly elevated levels of Dkk1 in bone microenvironment relative to tumor site. Strikingly, Dkk1 neutralization decreases tumor growth and MDSC numbers by rescuing β-catenin in these cells and restores T cell recruitment at the tumor site. Recombinant Dkk1 suppresses β-catenin target genes in MDSCs from mice and humans and anti-Dkk1 loses its antitumor effects in mice lacking β-catenin in myeloid cells or after depletion of MDSCs, demonstrating that Dkk1 directly targets MDSCs. Furthermore, we find a correlation between CD15(+) myeloid cells and Dkk1 in pancreatic cancer patients. We establish a novel immunomodulatory role for Dkk1 in regulating tumor-induced immune suppression via targeting β-catenin in MDSCs.

  9. MicroRNA-193b regulates c-Kit proto-oncogene and represses cell proliferation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-ning; Lin, Ji; Gao, Li; Li, Yong-hui; Wang, Li-li; Yu, Li

    2011-09-01

    Mutations and/or overexpression of c-Kit proto-oncogene frequently occur in subsets of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and contribute to abnormal cell proliferation and poor outcomes. We showed that c-Kit expression was subject to post-transcriptional regulation by microRNA (miRNA)-193b. Notably, miR-193b was significantly down-regulated in the examined AML cells and its levels were inversely correlated with c-Kit levels. Restoration of miR-193b expression in AML cells resulted in distinctly reduced c-Kit expression and inhibited cell growth. These data reveal a role for miR-193b dysregulation in myeloid leukemogenesis and the therapeutic promise of regulating miR-193b expression for c-Kit-positive AML.

  10. T cell development requires constraint of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa by the Notch target and transcriptional repressor Hes1

    PubMed Central

    De Obaldia, Maria Elena; Bell, J Jeremiah; Wang, Xinxin; Harly, Christelle; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; DeLong, Jonathan H; Zlotoff, Daniel A; Sultana, Dil Afroz; Pear, Warren S; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2014-01-01

    Notch signaling induces gene expression of the T cell lineage and discourages alternative fate outcomes. Hematopoietic deficiency in the Notch target Hes1 results in severe T cell lineage defects; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found here that Hes1 constrained myeloid gene-expression programs in T cell progenitor cells, as deletion of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa restored the development of T cells from Hes1-deficient progenitor cells. Repression of Cebpa by Hes1 required its DNA-binding and Groucho-recruitment domains. Hes1-deficient multipotent progenitor cells showed a developmental bias toward myeloid and dendritic cells after Notch signaling, whereas Hes1-deficient lymphoid progenitor cells required additional cytokine signaling for diversion into the myeloid lineage. Our findings establish the importance of constraining developmental programs of the myeloid lineage early in T cell development. PMID:24185616

  11. IFN-γ differentially regulates subsets of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaoxia; Fang, Yimin; Hu, Shengfeng; Wu, Yongjian; Yang, Kun; Liao, Chunxin; Zhang, Yuanqing; Huang, Xi; Wu, Minhao

    2015-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, prolonged over-reactive immune response may lead to tissue destruction, while immune suppression hinders tissue repair and pathogen elimination. Therefore, precise regulation of the immune response is needed to avoid immuno-pathology. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is widely used in clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of IFN-γ on CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cell differentiation and function, using a heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced chronic inflammation model. After challenge with heat-killed BCG, two subpopulations of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells were generated in the mouse spleen. Phenotypical, morphological and functional analysis indicated that the CD11b(+)Gr-1(high) Ly6G(high) Ly6C(low) subset was neutrophil-like myeloid-derived inducer cells (N-MDICs), which promoted T cell activation, while the other subset was CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) Ly6G(neg) Ly6C(high) monocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) that displayed extensive suppressor function. IFN-γ treatment dampened N-MDICs-mediated T cell activation through up-regulating T cell suppressive mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and arginase I. While for M-MDSCs, IFN-γ reduced their suppressing activity by decreasing the arginase activity. Our study provides evidence that IFN-γ balances the over-reactive vs compromised immune response through different regulation of distinct myeloid subsets, and therefore displays significant therapeutic potential for effective immuno-therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  12. MicroRNA-192 regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle transition in acute myeloid leukemia via interaction with CCNT2.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shun; Li, Rui-Chao; Lu, Jun; Meng, Fan-Kai; Feng, Yi-Kuan; Fang, Ming-Hao

    2017-04-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs approximately 18-22 nucleotides in length, which play an important role in malignant transformation. The roles of miR-192 as an oncogene or tumor suppressor in solid tumors have been previously reported. However, little is known about the role of miR-192 in human acute myeloid leukemia. The results of the present study indicate that miR-192 is significantly downregulated in specimens from acute myeloid leukemia patients. Functional assays demonstrated that overexpression of miR-192 in NB4 and HL-60 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation compared with that in control cells, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in vitro. Dual-luciferase reporter gene assays showed that miR-192 significantly suppressed the activity of a reporter gene containing the wild type 3'-UTR of CCNT2, but it did not suppress the activity of a reporter gene containing mutated 3'-UTR of CCNT2. QRT-PCR and Western blot assays showed that miR-192 significantly downregulated the expression of CCNT2 in human leukemia cells. Exogenous expression of CCNT2 attenuated the cell cycle arrest induced by miR-192 in NB4 and HL-60 cells. Collectively, miR-192 inhibits cell proliferation and induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in AML by regulating the expression of CCNT2.

  13. Monocytic and granulocytic myeloid derived suppressor cells differentially regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity during metastatic cascade

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounova, Maria; Lee, Eunmi; Piranlioglu, Raziye; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Demirci, Mehmet F.; Marasco, Daniela; Asm, Iskander; Chadli, Ahmed; Hassan, Khaled A.; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Zhou, Gang; Arbab, Ali S.; Cowell, John K.; Korkaya, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that dynamic and reversible tumour cell plasticity is required for metastasis, however, in vivo steps and molecular mechanisms are poorly elucidated. We demonstrate here that monocytic (mMDSC) and granulocytic (gMDSC) subsets of myeloid-derived suppressor cells infiltrate in the primary tumour and distant organs with different time kinetics and regulate spatiotemporal tumour plasticity. Using co-culture experiments and mouse transcriptome analyses in syngeneic mouse models, we provide evidence that tumour-infiltrated mMDSCs facilitate tumour cell dissemination from the primary site by inducing EMT/CSC phenotype. In contrast, pulmonary gMDSC infiltrates support the metastatic growth by reverting EMT/CSC phenotype and promoting tumour cell proliferation. Furthermore, lung-derived gMDSCs isolated from tumour-bearing animals enhance metastatic growth of already disseminated tumour cells. MDSC-induced ‘metastatic gene signature' derived from murine syngeneic model predicts poor patient survival in the majority of human solid tumours. Thus spatiotemporal MDSC infiltration may have clinical implications in tumour progression. PMID:28382931

  14. ER stress regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell fate through TRAIL-R-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Thomas; Kumar, Vinit; Ramachandran, Indu R; Youn, Je-In; Celis, Esteban; Finnberg, Niklas; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Winograd, Rafael; Vonderheide, Robert H; English, Nickolas R; Knight, Stella C; Yagita, Hideo; McCaffrey, Judith C; Antonia, Scott; Hockstein, Neil; Witt, Robert; Masters, Gregory; Bauer, Thomas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2014-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) dampen the immune response thorough inhibition of T cell activation and proliferation and often are expanded in pathological conditions. Here, we studied the fate of MDSCs in cancer. Unexpectedly, MDSCs had lower viability and a shorter half-life in tumor-bearing mice compared with neutrophils and monocytes. The reduction of MDSC viability was due to increased apoptosis, which was mediated by increased expression of TNF-related apoptosis-induced ligand receptors (TRAIL-Rs) in these cells. Targeting TRAIL-Rs in naive mice did not affect myeloid cell populations, but it dramatically reduced the presence of MDSCs and improved immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Treatment of myeloid cells with proinflammatory cytokines did not affect TRAIL-R expression; however, induction of ER stress in myeloid cells recapitulated changes in TRAIL-R expression observed in tumor-bearing hosts. The ER stress response was detected in MDSCs isolated from cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice, but not in control neutrophils or monocytes, and blockade of ER stress abrogated tumor-associated changes in TRAIL-Rs. Together, these data indicate that MDSC pathophysiology is linked to ER stress, which shortens the lifespan of these cells in the periphery and promotes expansion in BM. Furthermore, TRAIL-Rs can be considered as potential targets for selectively inhibiting MDSCs.

  15. ER stress regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell fate through TRAIL-R–mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Thomas; Kumar, Vinit; Ramachandran, Indu R.; Youn, Je-In; Celis, Esteban; Finnberg, Niklas; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Winograd, Rafael; Vonderheide, Robert H.; English, Nickolas R.; Knight, Stella C.; Yagita, Hideo; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Antonia, Scott; Hockstein, Neil; Witt, Robert; Masters, Gregory; Bauer, Thomas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) dampen the immune response thorough inhibition of T cell activation and proliferation and often are expanded in pathological conditions. Here, we studied the fate of MDSCs in cancer. Unexpectedly, MDSCs had lower viability and a shorter half-life in tumor-bearing mice compared with neutrophils and monocytes. The reduction of MDSC viability was due to increased apoptosis, which was mediated by increased expression of TNF-related apoptosis–induced ligand receptors (TRAIL-Rs) in these cells. Targeting TRAIL-Rs in naive mice did not affect myeloid cell populations, but it dramatically reduced the presence of MDSCs and improved immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Treatment of myeloid cells with proinflammatory cytokines did not affect TRAIL-R expression; however, induction of ER stress in myeloid cells recapitulated changes in TRAIL-R expression observed in tumor-bearing hosts. The ER stress response was detected in MDSCs isolated from cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice, but not in control neutrophils or monocytes, and blockade of ER stress abrogated tumor-associated changes in TRAIL-Rs. Together, these data indicate that MDSC pathophysiology is linked to ER stress, which shortens the lifespan of these cells in the periphery and promotes expansion in BM. Furthermore, TRAIL-Rs can be considered as potential targets for selectively inhibiting MDSCs. PMID:24789911

  16. DACH1 regulates cell cycle progression of myeloid cells through the control of cyclin D, Cdk 4/6 and p21{sup Cip1}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hyeng-Soo; Kim, Seonggon; Hwang, Junmo; Kim, Young Hun; Lim, Ga Young; Sohn, Wern-Joo; Yoon, Suk-Ran; Kim, Jae-Young; Park, Tae Sung; Park, Kwon Moo; Ryoo, Zae Young; Lee, Sanggyu

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DACH1 increases cyclin D, F and Cdk 1, 4, 6 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The novel effect of DACH1 related with cell cycle regulation and leukemogenesis. -- Abstract: The cell-fate determination factor Dachshund, a component of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), has a role in breast tumor proliferation through the repression of cyclin D1 and several key regulators of embryonic stem cell function, such as Nanog and Sox2. However, little is known about the role of DACH1 in a myeloid lineage as a cell cycle regulator. Here, we identified the differential expression levels of extensive cell cycle regulators controlled by DACH1 in myeloid progenitor cells. The forced expression of DACH1 induced p27{sup Kip1} and repressed p21{sup Cip1}, which is a pivotal characteristic of the myeloid progenitor. Furthermore, DACH1 significantly increased the expression of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 in myeloid progenitor cells. The knockdown of DACH1 blocked the cell cycle progression of HL-60 promyeloblastic cells through the decrease of cyclin D1, D3, F, and Cdk 1, 4, and 6 and increase in p21{sup Cip1}, which in turn decreased the phosphorylation of the Rb protein. The expression of Sox2, Oct4, and Klf4 was significantly up-regulated by the forced expression of DACH1 in mouse myeloid progenitor cells.

  17. microRNAs as potential regulators of myeloid-derived suppressor cell expansion.

    PubMed

    El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Proper development and activation of cells of the myeloid lineage are critical for supporting innate immunity. This myelopoiesis is orchestrated by interdependent interactions between cytokine receptors, transcription factors and, as recently described, microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs contribute to normal and dysregulated myelopoiesis. Alterations in myelopoiesis underlie myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) expansion, a poorly understood heterogeneous population of immature and suppressive myeloid cells that expand in nearly all diseases where inflammation exists. MDSCs associated with inflammation often have immunosuppressive properties, but molecular mechanisms responsible for MDSC expansion are unclear. Emerging data implicate miRNAs in MDSC expansion. This review focuses on miRNAs that contribute to myeloid lineage differentiation and maturation under physiological conditions, and introduces the concept that altered miRNA expression my underlie expansion and accumulation of MDSCs. We divide our miRNAs into those with potential to promote MDSC expansion and two with known direct links to MDSC expansion, miR-223 and miR-494.

  18. Scaffolding protein Gab1 regulates myeloid dendritic cell migration in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Xu, Yun; Liu, Shuwan; Guo, Xiaohong; Cen, Dong; Xu, Jiaqi; Li, Heyuan; Li, Kaijun; Zeng, Chunlai; Lu, Linrong; Zhou, Yiting; Shen, Huahao; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-11-01

    Asthma is a common allergic disorder involving a complex interplay among multiple genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies identified genetic variants of human GAB1 as a novel asthma susceptibility factor. However, the functions of Gab1 in lung remain largely unexplored. In this study, we first observed an elevation of Gab1 level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from asthmatic patients during acute exacerbation compared with convalescence. Mice with a selectively disrupted Gab1 in myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) considerably attenuated allergic inflammation in experimental models of asthma. Further investigations revealed a prominent reduction in CCL19-mediated migration of Gab1-deficient mDCs to draining lymph nodes and subsequent impairment of Th2-driven adaptive activation. Mechanistically, Gab1 is an essential component of the CCL19/CCR7 chemokine axis that regulates mDC migration during asthmatic responses. Together, these findings provide the first evidence for the roles of Gab1 in lung, giving us deeper understanding of asthmatic pathogenesis.

  19. Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Fuel the Fire.

    PubMed

    Achyut, B R; Arbab, Ali S

    2014-08-01

    Low oxygen tension, hypoxia, is a characteristic of many tumors and associated with the poor prognosis. Hypoxia invites bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) from bone marrow to the site of tumor. These recruited CXCR4+ BMDCs provide favorable environment for the tumor growth by acquiring pro-angiogenic phenotype such as CD45+VEGFR2+ Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPC), or CD45+Tie2+ myeloid cells. CD11b+CD13+ myeloid population of the BMDCs modulate tumor progression. These myeloid populations retain immunosuppressive characteristics, for example, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and regulates immune- suppression by inhibiting cytotoxic T cell function. In addition, MDSCs were observed at the premetastatic niche of the distant organs in other tumors. Protumorigenic and prometastatic role of the myeloid cells provides a basis for therapeutic targeting of immunosuppression and thus inhibiting tumor development and metastasis.

  20. Metalloproteinases: a Functional Pathway for Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jonathan; Chan, Matilda F; Werb, Zena

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid cells have diverse roles in regulating immunity, inflammation, and extracellular matrix turnover. To accomplish these tasks, myeloid cells carry an arsenal of metalloproteinases, which include the matrix metalloproteinases and the adamalysins. These enzymes have diverse substrate repertoires, and are thus involved in mediating proteolytic cascades, cell migration, and cell signaling. Dysregulation of metalloproteinases contributes to pathogenic processes, including inflammation, fibrosis, and cancer. Metalloproteinases also have important nonproteolytic functions in controlling cytoskeletal dynamics during macrophage fusion and enhancing transcription to promote antiviral immunity. This review highlights the diverse contributions of metalloproteinases to myeloid cell functions.

  1. Transcription factor AP-2α regulates acute myeloid leukemia cell proliferation by influencing Hoxa gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofeng; Yang, Zijian; Zhou, Fangliang; Wang, Fangmei; Li, Xinxin; Chen, Cheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xiang; Xiang, Shuanglin; Zhang, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Transcription factor AP-2α mediates transcription of a number of genes implicated in mammalian development, cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In the current study, we identified Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Hox cofactor Meis1 as AP-2α target genes, which are involved in myeloid leukemogenesis. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that overexpression of AP-2α activated transcription activities of Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Meis1, whereas siRNA of AP-2α inhibited their transcription activities. We found that AP-2 binding sites in regulatory regions of three genes activated their transcription by mutant analysis and AP-2α could interact with AP-2 binding sites in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Further results showed that the AP-2α shRNA efficiently inhibited mRNA and protein levels of Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Meis1 in AML cell lines U937 and HL60. Moreover, decreased expression of AP-2α resulted in a significant reduction in the growth and proliferation of AML cells in vitro. Remarkably, AP-2α knockdown leukemia cells exhibit decreased tumorigenicity in vivo compared with controls. Finally, AP-2α and target genes in clinical acute myeloid leukemia samples of M5b subtype revealed variable expression levels and broadly paralleled expression. These data support a role of AP-2α in mediating the expression of Hoxa genes in acute myeloid leukemia to influence the proliferation and cell survival.

  2. An acute myeloid leukemia gene, AML1, regulates hemopoietic myeloid cell differentiation and transcriptional activation antagonistically by two alternative spliced forms.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T; Tanaka, K; Ogawa, S; Kurokawa, M; Mitani, K; Nishida, J; Shibata, Y; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1995-01-01

    The AML1 gene on chromosome 21 is disrupted in the (8;21)(q22;q22) and (3;21)(q26;q22) translocations associated with myelogenous leukemias and encodes a DNA binding protein. From the AML1 gene, two representative forms of proteins, AML1a and AML1b, are produced by alternative splicing. Both forms have a DNA binding domain but, unlike AML1b, AML1a lacks a putative transcriptional activation domain. Here we demonstrate that overexpressed AML1a totally suppresses granulocytic differentiation and stimulates cell proliferation in 32Dcl3 murine myeloid cells treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. These effects of AML1a were canceled by the concomitant overexpression of AML1b. Such biological phenomena could be explained by our observations that (i) AML1a, which on its own has no effects as a transcriptional regulator, dominantly suppresses transcriptional activation by AML1b, and (ii) AML1a exhibits the higher affinity for DNA binding compared with AML1b. These antagonistic actions could be important in leukemogenesis and/or myeloid cell differentiation because more than half of myelogenous leukemia patients showed an increase in the relative amounts of AML1a. Images PMID:7530657

  3. Triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) trafficking in microglial cells: continuous shuttling to and from the plasma membrane regulated by cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Prada, I; Ongania, G Naum; Buonsanti, C; Panina-Bordignon, P; Meldolesi, J

    2006-07-21

    Cell biology of triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2, a receptor expressed in brain cells (microglia and possibly neurons and oligodendrocytes) which is responsible for a neurological and psychiatric genetic disease, polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy otherwise called the Nasu-Hakola disease, is still largely unknown. Using immortalized mouse N9 microglial cells we demonstrate that triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 is mostly distributed intracellularly in two pools: a deposit in the Golgi complex and a population of exocytic vesicles, distinct from endosomes and lysosomes, which is continuously translocated to, and recycled from the cell surface. Results with ionomycin and gamma-interferon, showing rapid and slow increases, respectively, of triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 surface density, documented that the exocytosis of the receptor-rich vesicles is regulated. Pulse labeling in the cold of surface triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 with its antibody (or Fab fragment) followed by chase at 37 degrees C showed internalization, with recovery of the antibody in endosomes and lysosomes. However, part of the receptor/antibody complex, internalized for up to 30 min chase, was recycled to the cell surface within 2 min of ionomycin stimulation, together with a fraction of the total biotinylated surface protein chased in parallel. The internalized receptor appears therefore to get access to exocytic organelles distinct from lysosomes which may resemble the exocytic vesicles of resting cells. These results document that, in microglial cells, the surface density of the triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 and thus, presumably, the response to its activation, is continuously adapted and can be greatly increased, even at rapid rate, as a function of cell activation.

  4. Ontogeny of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Kleer, Ismé; Willems, Fabienne; Lambrecht, Bart; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    Granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) represent a subgroup of leukocytes, collectively called myeloid cells. During the embryonic development of mammalians, myelopoiesis occurs in a stepwise fashion that begins in the yolk sac and ends up in the bone marrow (BM). During this process, these early monocyte progenitors colonize various organs such as the brain, liver, skin, and lungs and differentiate into resident macrophages that will self-maintain throughout life. DCs are constantly replenished from BM precursors but can also arise from monocytes in inflammatory conditions. In this review, we summarize the different types of myeloid cells and discuss new insights into their early origin and development in mice and humans from fetal to adult life. We specifically focus on the function of monocytes, macrophages, and DCs at these different developmental stages and on the intrinsic and environmental influences that may drive these adaptations. PMID:25232355

  5. Complement regulates conventional DC-mediated NK-cell activation by inducing TGF-β1 in Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xiaoping; Koo, Gloria C; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-07-01

    Complement activation modulates DC-mediated T-cell activation, but whether complement affects DC-mediated priming of NK cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that conventional DCs (cDCs) from C3(-/-) and C5aR(-/-) mice are hyperresponsive to polyI:C, a TLR3 ligand, leading to enhanced NK-cell activation. We found that cDCs lack C5a receptor (C5aR) and do not respond to C5a directly. Depletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells augments polyI:C-induced cDC activation in WT but not in C3(-/-) or C5aR(-/-) mice, indicating that the effect of complement activation on cDCs is indirectly mediated through C5aR-expressing Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. We further demonstrated that the mechanism by which Gr-1(+) myeloid cells regulate the activity of cDCs involves C5a-dependent TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. C5a enhances and blocking C5aR decreases TGF-β1 production in cultured bone marrow Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. C5aR deficiency is associated with reduced circulating TGF-β1 levels, while depleting Gr-1(+) myeloid cells abrogates this difference between WT and C5aR(-/-) mice. Lastly, we showed that enhanced cDC-NK-cell activity in C3(-/-) mice led to delayed melanoma tumor growth. Thus, complement activation indirectly regulates cDC-NK-cell activation in response to inflammatory stimuli such as TLR3 by promoting TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells at steady state.

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells play crucial roles in the regulation of mouse collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Wataru; Ashihara, Eishi; Hirai, Hideyo; Nagahara, Hidetake; Kajitani, Naoko; Fujioka, Kazuki; Murakami, Ken; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Ishino, Hidetaka; Kohno, Masataka; Maekawa, Taira; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are of myeloid origin and are able to suppress T cell responses. The role of MDSCs in autoimmune diseases remains controversial, and little is known about the function of MDSCs in autoimmune arthritis. In this study, we clarify that MDSCs play crucial roles in the regulation of proinflammatory immune response in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. MDSCs accumulated in the spleens of mice with CIA when arthritis severity peaked. These MDSCs inhibited the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and their differentiation into Th17 cells in vitro. Moreover, MDSCs inhibited the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 by CD4(+) T cells in vitro, whereas they promoted the production of IL-10. Adoptive transfer of MDSCs reduced the severity of CIA in vivo, which was accompanied by a decrease in the number of CD4(+) T cells and Th17 cells in the draining lymph nodes. However, depletion of MDSCs abrogated the spontaneous improvement of CIA. In conclusion, MDSCs in CIA suppress the progression of CIA by inhibiting the proinflammatory immune response of CD4(+) T cells. These observations suggest that MDSCs play crucial roles in the regulation of autoimmune arthritis, which could be exploited in new cell-based therapies for human rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Epigenetic control of myeloid cell differentiation, identity and function.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Vento-Tormo, Roser; Sieweke, Michael; Ballestar, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells are crucial effectors of the innate immune response and important regulators of adaptive immunity. The differentiation and activation of myeloid cells requires the timely regulation of gene expression; this depends on the interplay of a variety of elements, including transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic control involves histone modifications and DNA methylation, and is coupled to lineage-specifying transcription factors, upstream signalling pathways and external factors released in the bone marrow, blood and tissue environments. In this Review, we highlight key epigenetic events controlling myeloid cell biology, focusing on those related to myeloid cell differentiation, the acquisition of myeloid identity and innate immune memory.

  8. Fenretinide targets chronic myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells by regulation of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yanzhi; Xia, Yuan; Pan, Xiaoling; Chen, Zi; Wang, Aihua; Wang, Kankan; Li, Junmin; Zhang, Ji

    2014-04-20

    We have recently shown that fenretinide preferentially targets CD34(+) cells of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and here, we test whether this agent exerts the effect on CD34(+) cells of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which are refractory to imatinib. As tested by colony-forming cell assays using clinical specimens, both number and size of total colonies derived from CD34(+) CML cells were significantly reduced by fenretinide, and by combining fenretinide with imatinib. In particular, colonies derived from erythroid progenitors and more primitive pluripotent/multipotent progenitors were highly sensitive to fenretinide/fenretinide plus imatinib. Accordantly, fenretinide appeared to induce apoptosis in CD34(+) CML cells, particularly with regard to the cells in the subpopulation of CD34(+)CD38(-). Through cell quiescent assays, including Ki-67 negativity test, we added evidence that nonproliferative CD34(+) CML cells were largely eliminated by fenretinide. Transcriptome and molecular data further showed that mechanisms underlying the apoptosis in CD34(+) CML cells were highly complex, involving multiple events of oxidative stress responses. As compared with CD34(+) AML cells, the apoptotic effects of fenretinide on CD34(+) CML cells were more prominent whereas less varied among the samples of different patients, and also various stress-responsive events appeared to be more robust in fenretinide-treated CD34(+) CML cells. Thus, the combination of fenretinide with imatinib may represent a more sophisticated strategy for CML treatment, in which imatinib mainly targets leukemic blast cells through the intrinsic pathway of apopotosis, whereas fenretinide primarily targets CML stem/progenitor cells through the oxidative/endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated pathway.

  9. Fenretinide Targets Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem/Progenitor Cells by Regulation of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanzhi; Xia, Yuan; Pan, Xiaoling; Chen, Zi; Wang, Aihua; Wang, Kankan; Li, Junmin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: We have recently shown that fenretinide preferentially targets CD34+ cells of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and here, we test whether this agent exerts the effect on CD34+ cells of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which are refractory to imatinib. Results: As tested by colony-forming cell assays using clinical specimens, both number and size of total colonies derived from CD34+ CML cells were significantly reduced by fenretinide, and by combining fenretinide with imatinib. In particular, colonies derived from erythroid progenitors and more primitive pluripotent/multipotent progenitors were highly sensitive to fenretinide/fenretinide plus imatinib. Accordantly, fenretinide appeared to induce apoptosis in CD34+ CML cells, particularly with regard to the cells in the subpopulation of CD34+CD38−. Through cell quiescent assays, including Ki-67 negativity test, we added evidence that nonproliferative CD34+ CML cells were largely eliminated by fenretinide. Transcriptome and molecular data further showed that mechanisms underlying the apoptosis in CD34+ CML cells were highly complex, involving multiple events of oxidative stress responses. Innovation and Conclusion: As compared with CD34+ AML cells, the apoptotic effects of fenretinide on CD34+ CML cells were more prominent whereas less varied among the samples of different patients, and also various stress-responsive events appeared to be more robust in fenretinide-treated CD34+ CML cells. Thus, the combination of fenretinide with imatinib may represent a more sophisticated strategy for CML treatment, in which imatinib mainly targets leukemic blast cells through the intrinsic pathway of apopotosis, whereas fenretinide primarily targets CML stem/progenitor cells through the oxidative/endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1866–1880. PMID:24021153

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are implicated in regulating permissiveness for tumor metastasis during mouse gestation

    PubMed Central

    Mauti, Laetitia A.; Le Bitoux, Marie-Aude; Baumer, Karine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Golshayan, Dela; Provero, Paolo; Stamenkovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis depends on the ability of tumor cells to establish a relationship with the newly seeded tissue that is conducive to their survival and proliferation. However, the factors that render tissues permissive for metastatic tumor growth have yet to be fully elucidated. Breast tumors arising during pregnancy display early metastatic proclivity, raising the possibility that pregnancy may constitute a physiological condition of permissiveness for tumor dissemination. Here we have shown that during murine gestation, metastasis is enhanced regardless of tumor type, and that decreased NK cell activity is responsible for the observed increase in experimental metastasis. Gene expression changes in pregnant mouse lung and liver were shown to be similar to those detected in premetastatic sites and indicative of myeloid cell infiltration. Indeed, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated in pregnant mice and exerted an inhibitory effect on NK cell activity, providing a candidate mechanism for the enhanced metastatic tumor growth observed in gestant mice. Although the functions of MDSCs are not yet understood in the context of pregnancy, our observations suggest that they may represent a shared mechanism of immune suppression occurring during gestation and tumor growth. PMID:21646719

  11. Lewis x/CD15 expression in human myeloid cell differentiation is regulated by sialidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Gadhoum, Samah Zeineb; Sackstein, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The glycan determinant Lewis x (Lex/CD15) is a distinguishing marker for human myeloid cells and mediates neutrophil adhesion to dendritic cells. Despite broad interest in this structure, the mechanism(s) underlying Lex/CD15 expression remain relatively uncharacterized. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular basis of increasing Lex/CD15 expression associated with human myeloid cell differentiation. Flow cytometric analysis of differentiating cells together with biochemical studies employing inhibitors of glycan synthesis and of sialidases showed that increased Lex/CD15 expression was not due to de novo biosynthesis of Lex/CD15, but resulted predominantly from induction of α(2,3) sialidase activity, yielding Lex/CD15 from cell surface sLex/CD15s. This differentiation-associated conversion of surface sLex/CD15s to Lex/CD15 occurs predominantly on glycoproteins. Heretofore, modulation of post-translational glycan modifications has been attributed solely to dynamic variation(s) in glycosyltransferase expression. Our results unveil a new paradigm, demonstrating a critical role for post-Golgi membrane glycosidase activity in the “biosynthesis” of a key glycan determinant. PMID:18953356

  12. Gamma Delta T-Cells Regulate Wound Myeloid Cell Activity After Burn

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    14). No analgesics were used postburn because they can impact the immune response to burn injury and other forms of trauma (15). The mice were then...Shock 22(1):11 15, 2004. 13. Schwacha MG, Daniel T: Up-regulation of cell surface Toll-like receptors on cir- culating gammadelta T-cells following...macrophage hyperactivity and immuno- suppression? Shock 14(6):623 628, 2000. 15. Alexander M, Daniel T, Chaudry IH, Schwacha MG: Opiate analgesics con

  13. Identification of a human intestinal myeloid cell subset that regulates gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Kayama, Hisako; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ogino, Takayuki; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Mori, Masaki; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Inappropriate activation of T helper (Th) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). CX3CR1(high) macrophages contribute to intestinal homeostasis through various mechanisms in mice. However, whether mononuclear phagocytes with regulatory functions are present in the human colon is not clearly defined. We investigated whether innate myeloid cells that suppress activation of effector T cells exist in the human intestinal mucosa. Among intestinal lamina propria cells, Lin(-) HLA-DR(high) CD14(+) CD163(high) cells were subdivided into CD160(low) and CD160(high) cells. Both subsets produced high levels of IL-10. CD163(high) CD160(high) cells suppressed effector T cell proliferation, whereas CD163(high) CD160(low) cells induced Th17 differentiation. Patients with UC exhibited increased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(low) cells, while showing profoundly decreased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(high) cells. In this context, CD163(high) CD160(high) cells had higher CD80/CD86 expression and lower IL10RB expression, and these cells did not suppress effector T cell proliferation. The CD163(high) CD160(high) subset in normal intestinal mucosa inhibits inappropriate Th1/Th17 responses through suppression of their proliferation, and its number and suppressive activity are impaired in patients with UC. These findings indicate how human innate immune cells might prevent UC development.

  14. Migration of Myeloid Cells during Inflammation Is Differentially Regulated by the Cell Surface Receptors Slamf1 and Slamf8

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Gongxian; O’Keeffe, Michael S.; Halibozek, Peter J.; Flipse, Jacky; Yigit, Burcu; Azcutia, Veronica; Luscinskas, Francis W.; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the cell surface receptor Slamf1 (CD150) is requisite for optimal NADPH-oxidase (Nox2) dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in response to Gram- bacteria. By contrast, Slamf8 (CD353) is a negative regulator of ROS in response to Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Employing in vivo migration after skin sensitization, induction of peritonitis, and repopulation of the small intestine demonstrates that in vivo migration of Slamf1-/- dendritic cells and macrophages is reduced, as compared to wt mice. By contrast, in vivo migration of Slamf8-/- dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils is accelerated. These opposing effects of Slamf1 and Slamf8 are cell-intrinsic as judged by in vitro migration in transwell chambers in response to CCL19, CCL21 or CSF-1. Importantly, inhibiting ROS production of Slamf8-/- macrophages by diphenyleneiodonium chloride blocks this in vitro migration. We conclude that Slamf1 and Slamf8 govern ROS–dependent innate immune responses of myeloid cells, thus modulating migration of these cells during inflammation in an opposing manner. PMID:25799045

  15. Migration of myeloid cells during inflammation is differentially regulated by the cell surface receptors Slamf1 and Slamf8.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxing; van Driel, Boaz J; Liao, Gongxian; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Halibozek, Peter J; Flipse, Jacky; Yigit, Burcu; Azcutia, Veronica; Luscinskas, Francis W; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the cell surface receptor Slamf1 (CD150) is requisite for optimal NADPH-oxidase (Nox2) dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by phagocytes in response to Gram- bacteria. By contrast, Slamf8 (CD353) is a negative regulator of ROS in response to Gram+ and Gram- bacteria. Employing in vivo migration after skin sensitization, induction of peritonitis, and repopulation of the small intestine demonstrates that in vivo migration of Slamf1-/- dendritic cells and macrophages is reduced, as compared to wt mice. By contrast, in vivo migration of Slamf8-/- dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils is accelerated. These opposing effects of Slamf1 and Slamf8 are cell-intrinsic as judged by in vitro migration in transwell chambers in response to CCL19, CCL21 or CSF-1. Importantly, inhibiting ROS production of Slamf8-/- macrophages by diphenyleneiodonium chloride blocks this in vitro migration. We conclude that Slamf1 and Slamf8 govern ROS-dependent innate immune responses of myeloid cells, thus modulating migration of these cells during inflammation in an opposing manner.

  16. A RAS oncogene imparts growth factor independence to myeloid cells that abnormally regulate protein kinase C: a nonautocrine transformation pathway.

    PubMed

    Boswell, H S; Nahreini, T S; Burgess, G S; Srivastava, A; Gabig, T G; Inhorn, L; Srour, E F; Harrington, M A

    1990-06-01

    The factor-dependent cell line FDC-P1 has been utilized as a model of interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent myeloid cell proliferation. However, it has been recently observed that active phorbol esters (e.g., phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) may entirely replace IL-3 to promote its proliferation. These observations reveal abnormal regulation of protein kinase C (pkC) (absence of downregulation or overexpression). This property allowed a test of the hypothesis that the T24 RAS (codon 12) oncogene acts by constitutive and persistent pkC activation, driving proliferation. FDC-P1 cells were transfected by electroporation with the T24 RAS-containing vector pAL 8, or with a control vector pSVX Zip Neo, and neomycin-resistant clones were selected. Multiple RAS-transfectant clones were categorized for their growth factor requirement and incorporation of the 6.6-kb human mutant H-RAS genome. IL-3-independent clones had incorporated multiple (more than two) copies of the entire 6.6-kb RAS genome. The incorporation of multiple 6.6-kb RAS genomes was correlated with high-level p21 RAS expression. No evidence for autostimulatory growth factor production by clones containing the RAS oncogene was observed. Thus, acquisition of growth factor independence in myeloid cells by abundant expression of a RAS oncogene is linked, in part, to abnormal regulation of pkC, which acts as a collaborating oncogene.

  17. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation. PMID:26622774

  18. Proinflammatory S100 proteins regulate the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pratima; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Foell, Dirk; Freeze, Hudson H; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Srikrishna, Geetha

    2008-10-01

    Chronic inflammation is a complex process that promotes carcinogenesis and tumor progression; however, the mechanisms by which specific inflammatory mediators contribute to tumor growth remain unclear. We and others recently demonstrated that the inflammatory mediators IL-1beta, IL-6, and PGE(2) induce accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing individuals. MDSC impair tumor immunity and thereby facilitate carcinogenesis and tumor progression by inhibiting T and NK cell activation, and by polarizing immunity toward a tumor-promoting type 2 phenotype. We now show that this population of immature myeloid cells induced by a given tumor share a common phenotype regardless of their in vivo location (bone marrow, spleen, blood, or tumor site), and that Gr1(high)CD11b(high)F4/80(-)CD80(+)IL4Ralpha(+/-)Arginase(+) MDSC are induced by the proinflammatory proteins S100A8/A9. S100A8/A9 proteins bind to carboxylated N-glycans expressed on the receptor for advanced glycation end-products and other cell surface glycoprotein receptors on MDSC, signal through the NF-kappaB pathway, and promote MDSC migration. MDSC also synthesize and secrete S100A8/A9 proteins that accumulate in the serum of tumor-bearing mice, and in vivo blocking of S100A8/A9 binding to MDSC using an anti-carboxylated glycan Ab reduces MDSC levels in blood and secondary lymphoid organs in mice with metastatic disease. Therefore, the S100 family of inflammatory mediators serves as an autocrine feedback loop that sustains accumulation of MDSC. Since S100A8/A9 activation of MDSC is through the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, drugs that target this pathway may reduce MDSC levels and be useful therapeutic agents in conjunction with active immunotherapy in cancer patients.

  19. Proinflammatory S100 Proteins Regulate the Accumulation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pratima; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Foell, Dirk; Freeze, Hudson H.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Srikrishna, Geetha

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a complex process that promotes carcinogenesis and tumor progression; however, the mechanisms by which specific inflammatory mediators contribute to tumor growth remain unclear. We and others recently demonstrated that the inflammatory mediators IL-1β, IL-6, and PGE2 induce accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in tumor-bearing individuals. MDSC impair tumor immunity and thereby facilitate carcinogenesis and tumor progression by inhibiting T and NK cell activation, and by polarizing immunity toward a tumor-promoting type 2 phenotype. We now show that this population of immature myeloid cells induced by a given tumor share a common phenotype regardless of their in vivo location (bone marrow, spleen, blood, or tumor site), and that Gr1highCD11bhighF4/80−CD80+IL4Rα+/−Arginase+ MDSC are induced by the proinflammatory proteins S100A8/A9. S100A8/A9 proteins bind to carboxylated N-glycans expressed on the receptor for advanced glycation end-products and other cell surface glycoprotein receptors on MDSC, signal through the NF-κB pathway, and promote MDSC migration. MDSC also synthesize and secrete S100A8/A9 proteins that accumulate in the serum of tumor-bearing mice, and in vivo blocking of S100A8/A9 binding to MDSC using an anti-carboxylated glycan Ab reduces MDSC levels in blood and secondary lymphoid organs in mice with metastatic disease. Therefore, the S100 family of inflammatory mediators serves as an autocrine feedback loop that sustains accumulation of MDSC. Since S100A8/A9 activation of MDSC is through the NF-κB signaling pathway, drugs that target this pathway may reduce MDSC levels and be useful therapeutic agents in conjunction with active immunotherapy in cancer patients. PMID:18802069

  20. Semisynthetic homoharringtonine induces apoptosis via inhibition of protein synthesis and triggers rapid myeloid cell leukemia-1 down-regulation in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruoping; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Majdak, Patricia; Marzac, Christophe; Dubrulle, Sabine; Marjanovic, Zora; Legrand, Ollivier; Marie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Semisynthetic homoharringtonine (ssHHT) is now being evaluated in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia patients. Here, we examined the mechanism of the apoptosis induced by ssHHT in myeloid leukemia cells. First, we have shown that ssHHT induces apoptosis in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and independently of the expression of Bax. The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c were observed in the apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT. To unveil the relationship between ssHHT and the mitochondrial disruption, we have shown that ssHHT decreased myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) expression and induced Bcl-2 cleavage in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines. The Bcl-2 cleavage could be inhibited by the Z-VAD.fmk caspase inhibitor. However, Mcl-1 turnover was very rapid and occurred before caspase activation. The Mcl-1 turnover was only induced by ssHHT and cycloheximide, but not by daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside, and could be restored by proteasome inhibitors. Second, we confirmed that ssHHT rapidly induced massive apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia patient cells. We have also confirmed the release of cytochrome c and a rapid turnover of Mcl-1 in these patient cells, taking place only in apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT but not in cells undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Finally, we have shown that ssHHT inhibits protein synthesis in both cell line and patient cells. We suggest that the inhibition of protein synthesis and resulting Mcl-1 turnover play a key role in the apoptosis induced by ssHHT. Our results encourage further clinical trials for the use of ssHHT in acute myelogenous leukemia.

  1. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC.

  2. Kindlin-3 interacts with the ribosome and regulates c-Myc expression required for proliferation of chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jing; Ero, Rya; Feng, Chen; Ong, Li-Teng; Tan, Hui-Foon; Lee, Hui-Shan; Ismail, Muhammad H B; Bu, Wen-Ting; Nama, Srikanth; Sampath, Prabha; Gao, Yong-Gui; Tan, Suet-Mien

    2015-12-18

    Kindlins are FERM-containing cytoplasmic proteins that regulate integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachments. Kindlin-3 is expressed in hematopoietic cells, platelets, and endothelial cells. Studies have shown that kindlin-3 stabilizes cell adhesion mediated by ß1, ß2, and ß3 integrins. Apart from integrin cytoplasmic tails, kindlins are known to interact with other cytoplasmic proteins. Here we demonstrate that kindlin-3 can associate with ribosome via the receptor for activated-C kinase 1 (RACK1) scaffold protein based on immunoprecipitation, ribosome binding, and proximity ligation assays. We show that kindlin-3 regulates c-Myc protein expression in the human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562. Cell proliferation was reduced following siRNA reduction of kindlin-3 expression and a significant reduction in tumor mass was observed in xenograft experiments. Mechanistically, kindlin-3 is involved in integrin α5ß1-Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling; however, its regulation of c-Myc protein expression could be independent of this signaling axis.

  3. Distinct mechanisms of regulation of the ITGA6 and ITGB4 genes by RUNX1 in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jessica L; Taberlay, Phillippa C; Woodworth, Alexandra M; Hardy, Kristine; Brettingham-Moore, Kate H; Dickinson, Joanne L; Holloway, Adele F

    2017-09-19

    Integrins are transmembrane adhesion receptors that play an important role in hematopoiesis by facilitating interactions between hematopoietic cells and extracellular matrix components of the bone marrow and hematopoietic tissues. These interactions are important in regulating the function, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells, as well as their homing and mobilization in the bone marrow. Not surprisingly altered expression and function of integrins plays a key role in the development and progression of cancer including leukemias. However, the regulation of integrin gene expression is not well characterized and the mechanisms by which integrin genes are disrupted in cancer remain unclear. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a key regulator of hematopoiesis, RUNX1, binds to and regulates the promoters of both the ITGA6 and ITGB4 genes in myeloid cells. The ITGA6 and ITGB4 integrin genes form the α6β4 integrin receptor. However our data indicates that RUNX1 functions differently at these two promoters. RUNX1 regulates ITGA6 through a consensus RUNX1 binding motif in its promoter. In contrast, although the ITGB4 promoter is also activated by RUNX1, it does so in the absence of a recognized consensus RUNX1 binding motif. Further, our data suggest that regulation of ITGB4 may involve interactions between the promoter and upstream regulatory elements. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females

    PubMed Central

    Paglia, David N.; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2–3 times) (P < .05) without alteration of osteoblast histomorphometric indices. We also demonstrated that loss of Runx1 in pluripotential myeloid precursors with LysM-Cre did not alter the number of myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow or their ability to differentiate into phagocytizing or antigen-presenting cells. This study demonstrates that abrogation of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells significantly and specifically enhanced the ability of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1fl/fl mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  5. IL-10 immunomodulation of myeloid cells regulates a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Kevin M; Byrne, Katelyn T; Molloy, Michael J; Usherwood, Edward M; Berwin, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Elevated levels of IL-10 in the microenvironment of human ovarian cancer and murine models of ovarian cancer are well established and correlate with poor clinical prognosis. However, amongst a myriad of immunosuppressive factors, the actual contribution of IL-10 to the ovarian tumor microenvironment, the mechanisms by which it acts, and its possible functional redundancy are unknown. We previously demonstrated that elimination of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) compartment within the ovarian tumor ascites inhibited tumor progression and, intriguingly, significantly decreased local IL-10 levels. Here we identify a novel pathway in which the tumor-infiltrating MDSC are the predominant producers of IL-10 and, importantly, require it to develop their immunosuppressive function in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrate that the role of IL-10 is critical, and not redundant with other immunosuppressive molecules, to in vivo tumor progression: blockade of the IL-10 signaling network results in alleviation of MDSC-mediated immunosuppression, altered T cell phenotype and activity, and improved survival. These studies define IL-10 as a fundamental modulator of both MDSC and T cells within the ovarian tumor microenvironment. Importantly, IL-10 signaling is shown to be necessary to the development and maintenance of a permissive tumor microenvironment and represents a viable target for anti-tumor strategies.

  6. Stat 6-dependent induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells after physical injury regulates nitric oxide response to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Munera, Veronica; Popovic, Petar J; Bryk, Jodie; Pribis, John; Caba, David; Matta, Benjamin M; Zenati, Mazen; Ochoa, Juan B

    2010-01-01

    To delineate the role of T-helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in the induction of trauma induced myeloid suppressor cells (TIMSC) and the regulation of nitric oxide production. Trauma induces myeloid cells that express CD11b+/Gr1+ and arginase 1 and exhibit an immune suppressing activity. This article explores the mechanisms that induce TIMSC and the effects on nitric oxide production in response to endotoxin. TIMSC were studied in response to Th2 cytokines and a subsequent challenge to endotoxin. The role of Th2 cytokines was studied in STAT6-/- mice. Accumulation of TIMSC in spleens was studied using flow cytometry and immunhistochemistry. Plasma was recovered to measure accumulation of nitric oxide metabolites. TIMSC accumulated in the spleen of injured mice and were particularly sensitive to IL-4 and IL-13 with large inductions of arginase activity. Significant blunting in both the accumulation of TIMSC in the spleen and induction of arginase 1 was observed in STAT6-/- mice after physical injury. Accumulation of nitric oxide metabolites to endotoxin was observed in STAT6-/- mice. This study shows that induction of CD11b+/Gr1+ cells after physical injury play an essential role in the regulation of nitric oxide production after a septic challenge. The accumulation and induction of arginase 1 in TIMSC is Th2 cytokine dependent. To our knowledge, the role of TIMSC in the regulation of nitric oxide is a novel finding. This observation adds to the possibility that TIMSC could play an important role in immunosuppression observed after physical injury.

  7. Role of the Cytoskeleton in Myeloid Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Fine, Noah; Khaliq, Samira; Hassanpour, Siavash; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-08-01

    During an innate immune response, myeloid cells undergo complex morphological adaptations in response to inflammatory cues, which allow them to exit the vasculature, enter the tissues, and destroy invading pathogens. The actin and microtubule cytoskeletons are central to many of the most essential cellular functions including cell division, cell morphology, migration, intracellular trafficking, and signaling. Cytoskeletal structure and regulation are crucial for many myeloid cell functions, which require rapid and dynamic responses to extracellular signals. In this chapter, we review the roles of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons in myeloid cells, focusing primarily on their roles in chemotaxis and phagocytosis. The role of myeloid cell cytoskeletal defects in hematological disorders is highlighted throughout.

  8. A novel crosstalk between calcium/calmodulin kinases II and IV regulates cell proliferation in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Sara; Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Maione, Angela S; Soprano, Maria; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Todd, Lance R; Campiglia, Pietro; Salzano, Salvatore; Pastore, Lucio; Leggiero, Eleonora; Wilkerson, Donald C; Rocco, Monia; Selleri, Carmine; Iaccarino, Guido; Sankar, Uma; Illario, Maddalena

    2015-02-01

    CaMKs link transient increases in intracellular Ca(2+) with biological processes. In myeloid leukemia cells, CaMKII, activated by the bcr-abl oncogene, promotes cell proliferation. Inhibition of CaMKII activity restricts cell proliferation, and correlates with growth arrest and differentiation. The mechanism by which the inhibition of CaMKII results in growth arrest and differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells is still unknown. We report that inhibition of CaMKII activity results in an upregulation of CaMKIV mRNA and protein in leukemia cell lines. Conversely, expression of CaMKIV inhibits autophosphorylation and activation of CaMKII, and elicits G0/G1cell cycle arrest,impairing cell proliferation. Furthermore, U937 cells expressing CaMKIV show elevated levels of Cdk inhibitors p27(kip1) and p16(ink4a) and reduced levels of cyclins A, B1 and D1. These findings were also confirmed in the K562 leukemic cell line. The relationship between CaMKII and CaMKIV is also observed in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, and it correlates with their immunophenotypic profile. Indeed, immature MO/M1 AML showed increased CaMKIV expression and decreased pCaMKII, whereas highly differentiated M4/M5 AML showed decreased CaMKIV expression and increased pCaMKII levels. Our data reveal a novel cross-talk between CaMKII and CaMKIV and suggest that CaMKII suppresses the expression of CaMKIV to promote leukemia cell proliferation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Glucose-Regulated Protein 78-Induced Myeloid Antigen-Presenting Cells Maintained Tolerogenic Signature upon LPS Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muyang; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Kai; Wu, Min; Li, Heli; Zhu, Huifen; Ning, Qin; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (Grp78) is stress-inducible chaperone that mostly reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Grp78 has been described to be released at times of cellular stress and as having extracellular properties that are anti-inflammatory or favor the resolution of inflammation. As antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a critical role in both the priming of adaptive immune responses and the induction of self-tolerance, herein, we investigated the effect of Grp78 on the maturation of murine myeloid APCs (CD11c+ cells). Results showed that CD11c+ cells could be bound by AF488-labeled Grp78 and that Grp78 treatment induced a tolerogenic phenotype comparable to immature cells. Furthermore, when exposed to lipopolysaccharide, Grp78-treated CD11c+ cells (DCGrp78) did not adopt a mature dendritic cell phenotype. DCGrp78-primed T cells exhibited reduced proliferation along with a concomitant expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells in pancreaticoduodenal lymph nodes and induction of T cell apoptosis in vitro and ex vivo. The above work suggests that Grp78 is an immunomodulatory molecule that could aid resolution of inflammation. It may thus contribute to induce durable tolerance to be of potential therapeutic benefit in transplanted allogeneic grafts and autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes. PMID:27990144

  10. Myeloid progenitor cells lacking p53 exhibit delayed up-regulation of Puma and prolonged survival after cytokine deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Daunt, Carmel P.; Green, Benjamin D.; Vogel, Sandra; Gordon, Lavinia; Lee, Rachel S.; Silke, Natasha; Pearson, Richard B.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Kelly, Priscilla N.; Nutt, Stephen L.; Strasser, Andreas; Borner, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Loss of p53-dependent apoptosis contributes to the development of hematologic malignancies and failure to respond to treatment. Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Puma is essential for apoptosis in HoxB8-immortalized interleukin-3 (IL-3)–dependent myeloid cell lines (FDM cells) provoked by IL-3 deprivation. p53 and FoxO3a can transcriptionally regulate Puma. To investigate which transcriptional regulator is responsible for IL-3 deprivation-induced Puma expression and apoptosis, we generated wild-type (WT), p53−/−, and FoxO3a−/− FDM cells and found that p53−/− but not FoxO3a−/− cells were protected against IL-3 withdrawal. Loss of p21cip/waf, which is critical for p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, afforded no protection against IL-3 deprivation. A survival advantage was also observed in untransformed p53−/− hematopoietic progenitor cells cultured in the presence or absence of cytokines. In response to IL-3 deprivation, increased Puma protein levels in p53−/− cells were substantially delayed compared with WT cells. Increased p53 transcriptional activity was detected after cytokine deprivation. This was substantially less than that induced by DNA damage and associated not with increased p53 protein levels but with loss of the p53 regulator, MDM2. Thus, we conclude that p53 protein is activated after IL-3 deprivation by loss of MDM2. Activated p53 transcriptionally up-regulates Puma, which initiates apoptosis. PMID:19965665

  11. Growth Arrest Specific 2 Is Up-Regulated in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells and Required for Their Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjuan; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Xiuyan; Hu, Xiaohui; Eaves, Connie J.; Wu, Depei; Zhao, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Although the generation of BCR-ABL is the molecular hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the comprehensive molecular mechanisms of the disease remain unclear yet. Growth arrest specific 2 (GAS2) regulates multiple cellular functions including cell cycle, apoptosis and calpain activities. In the present study, we found GAS2 was up-regulated in CML cells including CD34+ progenitor cells compared to their normal counterparts. We utilized RNAi and the expression of dominant negative form of GAS2 (GAS2DN) to target GAS2, which resulted in calpain activity enhancement and growth inhibition of both K562 and MEG-01 cells. Targeting GAS2 also sensitized K562 cells to Imatinib mesylate (IM). GAS2DN suppressed the tumorigenic ability of MEG-01 cells and impaired the tumour growth as well. Moreover, the CD34+ cells from CML patients and healthy donors were transduced with control and GAS2DN lentiviral vectors, and the CD34+ transduced (YFP+) progeny cells (CD34+YFP+) were plated for colony-forming cell (CFC) assay. The results showed that GAS2DN inhibited the CFC production of CML cells by 57±3% (n = 3), while affected those of normal hematopoietic cells by 31±1% (n = 2). Next, we found the inhibition of CML cells by GAS2DN was dependent on calpain activity but not the degradation of beta-catenin. Lastly, we generated microarray data to identify the differentially expressed genes upon GAS2DN and validated that the expression of HNRPDL, PTK7 and UCHL5 was suppressed by GAS2DN. These 3 genes were up-regulated in CML cells compared to normal control cells and the growth of K562 cells was inhibited upon HNRPDL silence. Taken together, we have demonstrated that GAS2 is up-regulated in CML cells and the inhibition of GAS2 impairs the growth of CML cells, which indicates GAS2 is a novel regulator of CML cells and a potential therapeutic target of this disease. PMID:24465953

  12. Myeloid cell turnover and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, William J.; Bratton, Donna L.; Jakubzick, Claudia V.; Henson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the dual and intrinsically contradictory roles for myeloid cells in both protective and yet also damaging effects of inflammatory and immunological processes we suggest that it is important to consider the mechanisms and circumstances by which these cells are removed, either in the normal unchallenged state or during inflammation or disease. In this essay we address these subjects from a conceptual perspective, focusing as examples on four main myeloid cell types (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells) and their clearance from the circulation or from naïve and inflamed tissues. While the primary clearance process appears to involve endocytic uptake into macrophages, various tissue cell types can also recognize and remove dying cells though their overall quantitative contribution is unclear. In fact, surprisingly, given the wealth of study in this area over the last 30 years, our conclusion is that we are still challenged with substantial lack of mechanistic and regulatory understanding of when, how and by what mechanisms migratory myeloid cells come to die, are recognized as needing to be removed and indeed the precise processes of uptake of either the intact or fragmented cells. This reflects the extreme complexity and inherent redundancy of the clearance processes and argues for substantial investigative effort in this arena. In addition, it leads us to a sense that approaches to significant therapeutic modulation of selective myeloid clearance is still a long way off. PMID:27837740

  13. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  14. Long intergenic non-coding RNA HOTAIRM1 regulates cell cycle progression during myeloid maturation in NB4 human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqing; Weissman, Sherman M; Newburger, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    HOTAIRM1 is a long intergenic non-coding RNA encoded in the human HOXA gene cluster, with gene expression highly specific for maturing myeloid cells. Knockdown of HOTAIRM1 in the NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line retarded all-trans retinoid acid (ATRA)-induced granulocytic differentiation, resulting in a significantly larger population of immature and proliferating cells that maintained cell cycle progression from G1 to S phases. Correspondingly, HOTAIRM1 knockdown resulted in retained expression of many otherwise ATRA-suppressed cell cycle and DNA replication genes, and abated ATRA induction of cell surface leukocyte activation, defense response, and other maturation-related genes. Resistance to ATRA-induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition in knockdown cells was accompanied by retained expression of ITGA4 (CD49d) and decreased induction of ITGAX (CD11c). The coupling of cell cycle progression with temporal dynamics in the expression patterns of these integrin genes suggests a regulated switch to control the transit from the proliferative phase to granulocytic maturation. Furthermore, ITGAX was among a small number of genes showing perturbation in transcript levels upon HOTAIRM1 knockdown even without ATRA treatment, suggesting a direct pathway of regulation. These results indicate that HOTAIRM1 provides a regulatory link in myeloid maturation by modulating integrin-controlled cell cycle progression at the gene expression level. PMID:24824789

  15. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C. A.; Woll, Petter S.; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19+ B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R+CD19+ ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R+ myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R+ myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  16. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Human Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells: Phenotypic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Louise A.; Doherty, Glen A.; Sheahan, Kieran; Ryan, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of human tumor-resident myeloid cells is, for the most part, based on a large body of work in murine models or studies enumerating myeloid cells in patient tumor samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC). This has led to the establishment of the theory that, by and large, tumor-resident myeloid cells are either “protumor” M2 macrophages or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). This concept has accelerated our understanding of myeloid cells in tumor progression and enabled the elucidation of many key regulatory mechanisms involved in cell recruitment, polarization, and activation. On the other hand, this paradigm does not embrace the complexity of the tumor-resident myeloid cell phenotype (IHC can only measure 1 or 2 markers per sample) and their possible divergent function in the hostile tumor microenvironment. Here, we examine the criteria that define human tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets and provide a comprehensive and critical review of human myeloid cell nomenclature in cancer. We also highlight new evidence characterizing their contribution to cancer pathogenesis based on evidence derived from clinical studies drawing comparisons with murine studies where necessary. We then review the mechanisms in which myeloid cells are regulated by tumors in humans and how these are being targeted therapeutically. PMID:28220123

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Geyh, Stefanie; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by hematopoietic insufficiency. As MDS and AML are considered to originate from genetic and molecular defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), the main focus of research in this field has focused on the characterization of these cells. Recently, the contribution of BM microenvironment to the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, in particular MDS and AML has gained more interest. This is based on a better understanding of its physiological role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Additionally, it was demonstrated as a ‘proof of principle’ that genetic disruption of cells of the mesenchymal or osteoblastic lineage can induce MDS, MPS or AML in mice. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of the BM microenvironment, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to the pathogenesis of AML and MDS. Furthermore, potential models integrating the BM microenvironment into the pathophysiology of these myeloid disorders are discussed. Finally, strategies to therapeutically exploit this knowledge and to interfere with the crosstalk between clonal hematopoietic cells and altered stem cell niches are introduced. PMID:28090484

  19. Emerging concepts in myeloid cell biology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Alicia L; Popovich, Phillip G

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) affects the activation, migration, and function of microglia, neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages. Because these myeloid cells can positively and negatively affect survival of neurons and glia, they are among the most commonly studied immune cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate myeloid cell activation and recruitment after SCI have not been adequately defined. In general, the dynamics and composition of myeloid cell recruitment to the injured spinal cord are consistent between mammalian species; only the onset, duration, and magnitude of the response vary. Emerging data, mostly from rat and mouse SCI models, indicate that resident and recruited myeloid cells are derived from multiple sources, including the yolk sac during development and the bone marrow and spleen in adulthood. After SCI, a complex array of chemokines and cytokines regulate myelopoiesis and intraspinal trafficking of myeloid cells. As these cells accumulate in the injured spinal cord, the collective actions of diverse cues in the lesion environment help to create an inflammatory response marked by tremendous phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Indeed, it is difficult to attribute specific reparative or injurious functions to one or more myeloid cells because of convergence of cell function and difficulties in using specific molecular markers to distinguish between subsets of myeloid cell populations. Here we review each of these concepts and include a discussion of future challenges that will need to be overcome to develop newer and improved immune modulatory therapies for the injured brain or spinal cord.

  20. IL-1β regulates a novel myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset that impairs NK cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Ribeiro, Vera S.G.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Di Santo, James P.; Apte, Ron N.; Vosshenrich, Christian A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with promotion of malignancy and tumor progression. Many tumors enhance the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which contribute to tumor progression and growth by suppressing anti-tumor immune responses. Tumor-derived IL-1β secreted into the tumor microenvironment has been shown to induce the accumulation of MDSC possessing an enhanced capacity to suppress T cells. In this study, we found that the enhanced suppressive potential of IL-1β-induced MDSC was due to the activity of a novel subset of MDSC lacking Ly6C expression. This subset was present at low frequency in tumor-bearing mice in the absence of IL-1β-induced inflammation; however, under inflammatory conditions Ly6Cneg MDSC were predominant. Ly6Cneg MDSC impaired NK cell development and functions in vitro and in vivo. These results identify a novel IL-1β-induced subset of MDSC with unique functional properties. Ly6Cneg MDSC mediating NK cell suppression may thus represent useful targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:21110318

  1. UPF1 regulates myeloid cell functions and S100A9 expression by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Meike J.; Stein, Stefan; Grez, Manuel; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    UPF1 is a key player in nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) but also involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. In this study we found that UPF1 regulates the expression of genes with functions in inflammation and myeloid cell differentiation via hnRNP E2. The majority of the UPF1-regulated genes identified in monocytic cells contain a binding site for hnRNP E2 within 5′ UTR located introns with hnRNP E2 acting here as splicing regulator. We found that miRNA-328 which is significantly induced during monocytic cell differentiation acts independently from its gene silencing function as RNA decoy for hnRNP E2. One representative gene controlled by the hnRNP E2/miRNA-328 balance is S100A9 which plays an important role in cell differentiation and oxidative stress response of monocytes. Induction of miRNA-328 expression during cell differentiation antagonizes the blockade by hnRNP E2 which results in the upregulation of CD11b expression and ROS production in monocytic cells. Taken together, our data indicate that upregulation of miR-328 is responsible for the induction of hnRNP E2 target genes during myeloid cell differentiation. PMID:27573788

  2. Functional Impairment of Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Advanced Stage of HIV-1 Infection: Role of Factors Regulating Cytokine Signaling.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Sharma, Aman; Arora, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Severely immunocompromised state during advanced stage of HIV-1 infection has been linked to functionally defective antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs). The molecular mechanisms behind DC impairment are still obscure. We investigated changes in DC function and association of key regulators of cytokine signaling during different stages of HIV-1 infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Phenotypic and functional characteristics of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) in 56 ART-naive patients (23 in early and 33 in advanced stage of disease), 36 on ART and 24 healthy controls were evaluated. Sixteen patients were studied longitudinally prior-to and 6 months after the start of ART. For functional studies, monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs) were evaluated for endocytosis, allo-stimulation and cytokine secretion. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and other regulators of cytokine signaling was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. The ability to respond to an antigenic stimulation was severely impaired in patients in advanced HIV-1 disease which showed partial recovery in the treated group. Mo-DCs from patients with advanced HIV-disease remained immature with low allo-stimulation and reduced cytokine secretion even after TLR-4 mediated stimulation ex-vivo. The cells had an increased expression of negative regulatory factors like SOCS-1, SOCS-3, SH2-containing phosphatase (SHP)-1 and a reduced expression of positive regulators like Janus kinase (JAK)2 and Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB)1. A functional recovery after siRNA mediated silencing of SOCS-1 in these mo-DCs confirms the role of negative regulatory factors in functional impairment of these cells. Functionally defective DCs in advanced stage of HIV-1 infection seems to be due to imbalanced state of negative and positive regulatory gene expression. Whether this is a cause or effect of increased viral replication at this stage of disease, needs

  3. Functional Impairment of Myeloid Dendritic Cells during Advanced Stage of HIV-1 Infection: Role of Factors Regulating Cytokine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Meenakshi; Sharma, Aman; Arora, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Severely immunocompromised state during advanced stage of HIV-1 infection has been linked to functionally defective antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs). The molecular mechanisms behind DC impairment are still obscure. We investigated changes in DC function and association of key regulators of cytokine signaling during different stages of HIV-1 infection and following antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Phenotypic and functional characteristics of circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) in 56 ART-naive patients (23 in early and 33 in advanced stage of disease), 36 on ART and 24 healthy controls were evaluated. Sixteen patients were studied longitudinally prior-to and 6 months after the start of ART. For functional studies, monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs) were evaluated for endocytosis, allo-stimulation and cytokine secretion. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and other regulators of cytokine signaling was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Results The ability to respond to an antigenic stimulation was severely impaired in patients in advanced HIV-1 disease which showed partial recovery in the treated group. Mo-DCs from patients with advanced HIV-disease remained immature with low allo-stimulation and reduced cytokine secretion even after TLR-4 mediated stimulation ex-vivo. The cells had an increased expression of negative regulatory factors like SOCS-1, SOCS-3, SH2-containing phosphatase(SHP)-1 and a reduced expression of positive regulators like Janus kinase(JAK)2 and Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells(NF-κB)1. A functional recovery after siRNA mediated silencing of SOCS-1 in these mo-DCs confirms the role of negative regulatory factors in functional impairment of these cells. Conclusions Functionally defective DCs in advanced stage of HIV-1 infection seems to be due to imbalanced state of negative and positive regulatory gene expression. Whether this is a cause or effect of increased viral

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Attenuates the Recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ Myeloid Cells and Regulates Bax/Bcl-2 Signaling in Myocardial Ischemia Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youen; Li, Hua; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Aijun; Zong, Nobel C.; Li, Zhaofeng; Zhu, Hongming; Zou, Yunzeng; Yang, Xiangdong; Ge, Junbo

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an endogenous signaling molecule, plays an important role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Using a mouse model of myocardial infarction, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). The results demonstrated that the administration of NaHS improved survival, preserved left ventricular function, limited infarct size, and improved H2S levels in cardiac tissue to attenuate the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and to regulate the Bax/Bcl-2 pathway. Furthermore, the cardioprotective effects of NaHS were enhanced by inhibiting the migration of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells from the spleen into the blood and by attenuating post-infarction inflammation. These observations suggest that the novel mechanism underlying the cardioprotective function of H2S is secondary to a combination of attenuation the recruitment of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells and regulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 apoptotic signaling. PMID:24758901

  5. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of human acute myeloid leukemia (part 1) - gene transcription, cell cycle regulation, metabolism and intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Hauge, Michelle; Brenner, Annette K; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-06-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and the effect of therapeutic targeting of specific molecular mechanisms will probably vary between patient subsets. Cell cycle regulators are among the emerging targets (e.g., aurora and polo-like kinases, cyclin-dependent kinases). Inhibition of communication between acute myeloid leukemia and stromal cells is also considered; among the most promising of these strategies are inhibition of hedgehog-initiated, CXCR4-CXCL12 and Axl-Gas6 signaling. Finally, targeting of energy and protein metabolism is considered, the most promising strategy being inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase in patients with IDH mutations. Thus, several strategies are now considered, and a major common challenge for all of them is to clarify how they should be combined with each other or with conventional chemotherapy, and whether their use should be limited to certain subsets of patients.

  6. Myeloid Cells in Infantile Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Matthew R.; Reinisch, John; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Friedlander, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas despite the fact that they are relatively common tumors. These benign neoplasms occur in as many as 1 in 10 births, and although rarely life threatening, hemangiomas can pose serious concerns to the cosmetic and psychosocial development of the afflicted child. Ulceration, scarring, and disfigurement are significant problems as are encroachment of the ear and eye, which can threaten hearing and vision. The precise mechanisms controlling the rapid growth observed in the first months of life and the spontaneous involution that follows throughout the course of years remain unknown. In this report we demonstrate the presence of large numbers of hematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage in proliferating hemangiomas and propose a mechanism for the observed evolution of these lesions that is triggered by hypoxia and involves the participation of myeloid cells. We report the results of experiments using myeloid markers (CD83, CD32, CD14, CD15) that unexpectedly co-labeled hemangioma endothelial cells, providing new evidence that these cells are distinct from normal endothelium. PMID:16436675

  7. Identification of a subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by long-term in vitro proliferation and altered cell cycle regulation of the leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2014-11-01

    The malignant cell population of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) includes a small population of stem/progenitor cells with long-term in vitro proliferation. We wanted to compare long-term AML cell proliferation for unselected patients, investigate the influence of endothelial cells on AML cell proliferation and identify biological characteristics associated with clonogenic capacity. Cells were cultured in medium supplemented with recombinant growth factors FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand, stem cell factor, IL-3, G-CSF and thrombopoietin. The colony-forming unit assay was used to estimate the number of progenitors in AML cell populations after 35 days of culture, and microarray was used to study global gene expression profiles between AML patients. Long-term cell proliferation was observed in 7 of 31 patients, whereas 3 additional patients showed long-term proliferation after endothelial cell coculture. Patient-specific differences in constitutive cytokine release were maintained during cell culture. Patients with long-term proliferation showed altered expression in six cell cycle-related genes (HMMR, BUB1, NUSAP1, AURKB, CCNF, DLGAP5), two genes involved in DNA replication (TOP2A, RFC3) and one gene with unknown function (LHFPL2). We identified a subset of AML patients characterized by long-term in vitro cell proliferation and altered expression of cell cycle regulators that may be potential candidates for treatment of AML.

  8. Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C.; Varner, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a critical role during growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumors exhibit significant myeloid cell infiltrates, which are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Myeloid cells promote tumor growth by stimulating tumor angiogenesis, suppressing tumor immunity, and promoting metastasis to distinct sites. In this review, we discuss the role of myeloid cells in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we describe a subset of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity (known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells). Finally, we will comment on the mechanisms regulating myeloid cell recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and on the potential of myeloid cells as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:20490273

  9. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  10. The lncRNA HOTAIRM1 regulates the degradation of PML-RARA oncoprotein and myeloid cell differentiation by enhancing the autophagy pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Wen-Tao; Huang, Wei; Fang, Ke; Sun, Yu-Meng; Liu, Shu-Rong; Luo, Xue-Qun; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are of great importance in different cell contexts. However, only a very small number of lncRNAs have been experimentally validated and functionally annotated during human hematopoiesis. Here, we report an lncRNA, HOTAIRM1, which is associated with myeloid differentiation and has pivotal roles in the degradation of oncoprotein PML-RARA and in myeloid cell differentiation by regulating autophagy pathways. We first revealed that HOTAIRM1 has different variants that are expressed at different levels in cells and that the expression pattern of HOTAIRM1 is closely related to that of the PML-RARA oncoprotein in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. We further revealed that the downregulation of HOTAIRM1 could inhibit all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) -induced degradation of PML-RARA in APL cells and repress the process of differentiation from promyelocytic to granulocytic cells. More importantly, we found that HOTAIRM1 regulates autophagy and that autophagosome formation was inhibited when HOTAIRM1 expression was reduced in the cells. Finally, through the use of a dual luciferase activity assay, AGO2 RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down, HOTAIRM1 was revealed to act as a microRNA sponge in a pathway that included miR-20a/106b, miR-125b and their targets ULK1, E2F1 and DRAM2. We constructed a human APL-ascites SCID mouse model to validate the function of HOTAIRM1 and its regulatory pathway in vivo. This is the first report showing that a lncRNAs regulates autophagy and the degradation of the PML-RARA oncoprotein during the process of myeloid cell differentiation blockade, suggesting that lncRNAs may be the potential therapeutic targets for leukemia. PMID:27740626

  11. Effect of Prostaglandin I2 Analogs on Cytokine Expression in Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells via Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chang-Hung; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Yang, San-Nan; Huang, Ming-Yii; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Huang, Shau-Ku; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Wei, Wan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Pin; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) analog is regarded as a potential candidate for treating asthma. Human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, the effects of PGI2 analog on human mDCs are unknown. In the present study, circulating mDCs were isolated from six healthy subjects. The effects of PGI2 analogs iloprost and treprostinil on cytokine production, maturation and T-cell stimulatory function of human mDCs were investigated. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of costimulatory molecules was investigated by flow cytometry. T-cell stimulatory function was investigated by measuring interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-13 and IL-10 production by T cells cocultured with iloprost-treated mDCs. Intracellular signaling was investigated by Western blot and chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that iloprost and treprostinil induced IL-10, but suppressed TNF-α production in polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C)-stimulated mDCs. This effect was reversed by the I-prostanoid (IP), E-prostanoid (EP) receptor antagonists or intracellular free calcium (Ca2+) chelator. Forskolin, an adenyl cyclase activator, conferred a similar effect. Iloprost and treprostinil increased intracellular adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels, and iloprost also increased intracellular Ca2+. Iloprost suppressed poly I:C-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phospho-p38 and phospho–activating transcription factor (ATF)2 expression. Iloprost downregulated poly I:C-induced histone H3K4 trimethylation in the TNFA gene promoter region via suppressing translocation of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4)-specific methyltransferases MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) and WDR5 (WD repeat domain 5). Iloprost-treated mDCs inhibited IL-13, IFN-γ and IL-10 production by T cells. In conclusion, PGI2 analogs enhance IL-10 and suppress TNF-α expression through the IP/EP2/EP4

  12. RGS1 regulates myeloid cell accumulation in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm rupture through altered chemokine signalling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jyoti; McNeill, Eileen; Douglas, Gillian; Hale, Ashley B.; de Bono, Joseph; Lee, Regent; Iqbal, Asif J.; Regan-Komito, Daniel; Stylianou, Elena; Greaves, David R.; Channon, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine signalling drives monocyte recruitment in atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms. The mechanisms that lead to retention and accumulation of macrophages in the vascular wall remain unclear. Regulator of G-Protein Signalling-1 (RGS1) deactivates G-protein signalling, reducing the response to sustained chemokine stimulation. Here we show that Rgs1 is upregulated in atherosclerotic plaque and aortic aneurysms. Rgs1 reduces macrophage chemotaxis and desensitizes chemokine receptor signalling. In early atherosclerotic lesions, Rgs1 regulates macrophage accumulation and is required for the formation and rupture of Angiotensin II-induced aortic aneurysms, through effects on leukocyte retention. Collectively, these data reveal a role for Rgs1 in leukocyte trafficking and vascular inflammation and identify Rgs1, and inhibition of chemokine receptor signalling as potential therapeutic targets in vascular disease. PMID:25782711

  13. Downregulation of miR-224 and let-7i contribute to cell survival and chemoresistance in chronic myeloid leukemia cells by regulating ST3GAL IV expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huimin; Li, Yang; Liu, Bing; Shan, Yujia; Li, Yan; Zhao, Lifen; Su, Zhen; Jia, Li

    2017-08-30

    Acquired resistance to imatinib is frequently associated with poor clinical outcome of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patient. To date, evidence indicates that protein glycosylation and its upstream regulators might be implicated in tumorigenesis and chemoresistance occurrence. In current study we initially explored N-glycan profiles on the surface of CML cell lines and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) of CML patients by using mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. An elevated sialylation was detected in K562R cells (CML cells with imatinib resistance phenotype) compare to K562 cells. By quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting analysis we observed that imatinib resistant K562R cells exhibited marked high levels of CMP-N-acetylneuraminate-beta-galactosamide-alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase (ST3Gal IV) as compared to imatinib sensitive K562 cells. Further studies revealed that manipulated expression of ST3GAL IV led to the significant alterations of cell cycle distribution, apoptotic signal, cell proliferation and the effectiveness of imatinib treatment. Using microRNA array, miRNA database searching and luciferase reporter assay, we identified that miR-224 and let-7i directly regulate the expression of ST3GAL IV gene. Moreover, engineered expression of miR-224 and let-7i in K562 and K562R cells could significantly affect ST6Gal IV-induced proliferation rate and drug-resistance. Thus we propose that miR-224 and let-7i regulate the proliferation and chemosensitivity of CML cells probably via targeting ST3GAL IV. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway regulates PD-L1 expression in tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Kaliberov, Sergey; Curiel, David T; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2017-01-31

    In recent years, it has been established that programmed cell death protein ligand 1 (PD-L1)-mediated inhibition of activated PD-1(+) T lymphocytes plays a major role in tumor escape from immune system during cancer progression. Lately, the anti-PD-L1 and -PD-1 immune therapies have become an important tool for treatment of advanced human cancers, including bladder cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms of PD-L1 expression in cancer are not fully understood. We found that coculture of murine bone marrow cells with bladder tumor cells promoted strong expression of PD-L1 in bone marrow-derived myeloid cells. Tumor-induced expression of PD-L1 was limited to F4/80(+) macrophages and Ly-6C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. These PD-L1-expressing cells were immunosuppressive and were capable of eliminating CD8 T cells in vitro. Tumor-infiltrating PD-L1(+) cells isolated from tumor-bearing mice also exerted morphology of tumor-associated macrophages and expressed high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-forming enzymes microsomal PGE2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) and COX2. Inhibition of PGE2 formation, using pharmacologic mPGES1 and COX2 inhibitors or genetic overexpression of PGE2-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), resulted in reduced PD-L1 expression. Together, our study demonstrates that the COX2/mPGES1/PGE2 pathway involved in the regulation of PD-L1 expression in tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and, therefore, reprogramming of PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment provides an opportunity to reduce immune suppression in tumor host.

  15. Distinct regulation of c-myb gene expression by HoxA9, Meis1 and Pbx proteins in normal hematopoietic progenitors and transformed myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Dassé, E; Volpe, G; Walton, D S; Wilson, N; Del Pozzo, W; O'Neill, L P; Slany, R K; Frampton, J; Dumon, S

    2012-06-01

    The proto-oncogenic protein c-Myb is an essential regulator of hematopoiesis and is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant expression of c-Myb in myeloid leukemia, we analyzed and compared c-myb gene transcriptional regulation using two cell lines modeling normal hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and transformed myelomonocytic blasts. We report that the transcription factors HoxA9, Meis1, Pbx1 and Pbx2 bind in vivo to the c-myb locus and maintain its expression through different mechanisms in HPCs and leukemic cells. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Pbx2 in deregulating c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells cotransformed by the cooperative activity of HoxA9 and Meis1. This effect is associated with an intronic positioning of epigenetic marks and RNA polymerase II binding in the orthologous region of a previously described alternative promoter for c-myb. Taken together, our results could provide a first hint to explain the abnormal expression of c-myb in leukemic cells.

  16. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Gravekamp, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    While conventional anticancer therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, are relatively efficient at eliminating primary tumors, these treatment modalities are largely ineffective against metastases. At least in part, this reflects the rather inefficient delivery of conventional anticancer agents to metastatic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can be used as cellular missiles to selectively deliver a radioisotope-coupled attenuated variant of Listeria monocytogenes to both primary and metastatic neoplastic lesions in mice with pancreatic cancer. This novel immunotherapeutic intervention robustly inhibited tumor growth while promoting a dramatic decrease in the number of metastases. PMID:24427545

  17. Myeloid cell origins, differentiation, and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Schnorr, Peter J.; Pang, Wendy W.; Chao, Mark P.; Chhabra, Akanksha; Seita, Jun; Feng, Mingye; Weissman, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a multipotent stem cell that resides in the bone marrow and has the ability to form all of the cells of the blood and immune system. Since its first purification in 1988, additional studies have refined the phenotype and functionality of HSCs and characterized all of their downstream progeny. The hematopoietic lineage is divided into two main branches: the myeloid and lymphoid arms. The myeloid arm is characterized by the Common Myeloid Progenitor and all of its resulting cell types. The stages of hematopoiesis have been defined in both mice and humans. During embryological development, the earliest hematopoiesis takes place in yolk sac blood islands then migrates to the fetal liver and hematopoietic organs. Some adult myeloid populations develop directly from yolk sac progenitors without apparent bone marrow intermediates, such as tissue resident macrophages. Hematopoiesis also changes over time, with a bias of the dominating HSCs towards myeloid development as animals age. Defects in myelopoiesis contribute to many hematologic disorders, and some of these can be overcome with therapies that target the aberrant stage of development. Furthermore, insights into myeloid development have informed us of mechanisms of programmed cell removal. The CD47/SIRPα axis, a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint, limits macrophage removal of HSCs but can be exploited by hematologic and solid malignancies. Therapeutics targeting CD47 represent a new strategy for treating cancer. Overall, an understanding of hematopoiesis and myeloid cell development has implications for regenerative medicine, hematopoietic cell transplantation, malignancy, and many other diseases. PMID:27763252

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates myeloid cell leukemia-1 expression through neuropilin-1-dependent activation of c-MET signaling in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shumin; Zhau, Haiyen E; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Iqbal, Shareen; Yang, Xiaojian; Fan, Songqing; Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Ruoxiang; Marshall, Fray F; Chung, Leland W K; Wu, Daqing

    2010-01-19

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a member of the Bcl-2 family, which inhibits cell apoptosis by sequestering pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Bid. Mcl-1 overexpression has been associated with progression in leukemia and some solid tumors including prostate cancer (PCa). However, the regulatory mechanism for Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells remains elusive. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that Mcl-1 expression was elevated in PCa specimens with high Gleason grades and further significantly increased in bone metastasis, suggesting a pivotal role of Mcl-1 in PCa metastasis. We further found that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a novel regulator of Mcl-1 expression in PCa cells. Inhibition of endogenous Mcl-1 induced apoptosis, indicating that Mcl-1 is an important survival factor in PCa cells. Neuropilin-1 (NRP1), the "co-receptor" for VEGF165 isoform, was found to be highly expressed in PCa cells, and indispensible in the regulation of Mcl-1. Intriguingly, VEGF165 promoted physical interaction between NRP1 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-MET, and facilitated c-MET phosphorylation via a NRP1-dependent mechanism. VEGF165 induction of Mcl-1 may involve rapid activation of Src kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (Stat3). Importantly, NRP1 overexpression and c-MET activation were positively associated with progression and bone metastasis in human PCa specimens and xenograft tissues. This study demonstrated that Mcl-1 overexpression is associated with PCa bone metastasis. Activation of VEGF165-NRP1-c-MET signaling could confer PCa cells survival advantages by up-regulating Mcl-1, contributing to PCa progression.

  19. Elusive Identities and Overlapping Phenotypes of Proangiogenic Myeloid Cells in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Lewis, Claire E.; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J. Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-01-01

    It is now established that bone marrow–derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as “bone marrow–derived myeloid cells.” Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying—and thus being able to target—this proangiogenic force in tumors. PMID:20167863

  20. Elusive identities and overlapping phenotypes of proangiogenic myeloid cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, J Martin; Ferrara, Napoleone; De Palma, Michele

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells regulate tumor angiogenesis. This was originally inferred from studies of human tumor biopsies in which a positive correlation was seen between the number of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils, and tumor microvessel density. However, unequivocal evidence was only provided once mouse models were used to examine the effects on tumor angiogenesis by genetically or pharmacologically targeting myeloid cells. Since then, identifying the exact myeloid cell types involved in this process has proved challenging because of myeloid cell heterogeneity and the expression of overlapping phenotypic markers in tumors. As a result, investigators often simply refer to them now as "bone marrow-derived myeloid cells." Here we review the findings of various attempts to phenotype the myeloid cells involved and discuss the therapeutic implications of correctly identifying-and thus being able to target-this proangiogenic force in tumors.

  1. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K H; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed "L-DC" in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(lo)Ly6G(-) cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6C(lo) and Ly6C(hi) monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) cells, which are CD43(+), Siglec-F(-) and CD115(-). Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types.

  2. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Delpozzo, Federica; Desantis, Giacomo; Papalini, Francesca; Simonato, Francesca; Sonda, Nada; Zilio, Serena; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a subset of myeloid cells that expand under pathological conditions, such as cancer development, acute and chronic infections, trauma, bone marrow transplantations, and some autoimmune diseases. MDSCs mediate a negative regulation of the immune response by affecting different T lymphocyte subsets. Potential mechanisms, which underlie this inhibitory activity range from those requiring direct cell-to-cell contact with others, more indirect, and mediated by the modification of the microenvironment. Pharmacological inhibition of MDSC suppressive pathways is a promising strategy to overcome disease-induced immune defects, which might be a key step in enhancing the effectiveness of immune-based therapies.

  3. Arginine Metabolism in Myeloid Cells Shapes Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Ochoa, Augusto C.; Al-Khami, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    Arginine metabolism has been a key catabolic and anabolic process throughout the evolution of the immune response. Accruing evidence indicates that arginine-catabolizing enzymes, mainly nitric oxide synthases and arginases, are closely integrated with the control of immune response under physiological and pathological conditions. Myeloid cells are major players that exploit the regulators of arginine metabolism to mediate diverse, although often opposing, immunological and functional consequences. In this article, we focus on the importance of arginine catabolism by myeloid cells in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. Revisiting this matter could result in novel therapeutic approaches by which the immunoregulatory nodes instructed by arginine metabolism can be targeted. PMID:28223985

  4. Immunotherapy with myeloid cells for tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-García, Mercedes; Boros, Peter; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Understanding the interplay between myeloid dendritic cells and T cells under tolerogenic conditions, and whether their interactions induce the development of antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) is critical to uncover the mechanisms involved in the induction of indefinite allograft survival. Recent findings Myeloid dendritic cell–T-cell interactions are seminal events that determine the outcome of the immune response, and multiple in-vitro protocols suggest the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that modulate T-cell responses, and determine the outcome of the immune response to an allograft following adoptive transfer. We believe that identifying specific conditions that lead to the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells and Tregs are critical for the manipulation the immune response towards the development of transplantation tolerance. Summary We summarize recent findings regarding specific culture conditions that generate tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness and Treg development, and represents a novel immunotherapeutic approach to promote the induction of indefinite graft survival prolongation. The interpretations presented here illustrate that different mechanisms govern the generation tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells, and we discuss the concomitant therapeutic implications. PMID:20616727

  5. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  6. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Dahlem, Timothy J; Stephens, W Zac; Rao, Dinesh S; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease.

  7. Long noncoding RNA HULC promotes cell proliferation by regulating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinghao; Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian; Zhao, Peng; Xiong, Jie; Wang, Jishi

    2017-04-05

    Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HULC is associated with various human cancers. However, the role of HULC in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. In this study, we found that HULC was remarkably overexpressed in both leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells derived from CML patients. The increase in HULC expression was positively correlated with clinical stages in CML. Moreover, the knockdown of HULC significantly inhibited CML cell proliferation and induced apoptosis by repressing c-Myc and Bcl-2. Furthermore, inhibition of HULC enhanced imatinib-induced apoptosis of CML cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HULC silencing markedly suppressed the phosphorylation of PI3K and AKT, indicating that enhancement of imatinib-induced apoptosis by HULC inhibition is related with the reduction of c-Myc expression and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway activity. Furthermore, HULC could modulate c-Myc and Bcl-2 by miR-200a as an endogenous sponge. Taken together, these results reveal that HULC promotes oncogenesis in CML and suggest a potential strategy for the CML treatment.

  8. Role of mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway in regulation of hematopoietic stem cell and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Joydeep; Kapur, Reuben

    2017-03-22

    Dysregulation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-p70 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling pathway occurs frequently in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. This pathway also plays a critical role in maintaining normal cellular processes. Given the importance of leukemia stem cells (LSC) in the development of minimal residual disease (MRD), it is critical to use therapeutic interventions that target LSC population to prevent disease relapse. mTORC1-S6K1 pathway has been identified as an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and LSC functions. Both HSC and LSC functions require regulation of key cellular processes including proliferation, metabolism and autophagy, which are regulated by mTORC1 pathway. Despite mTORC1-S6K1 pathway being a critical regulator of AML initiation and progression, inhibitors of this pathway alone have yielded mixed results in clinical studies. Recent studies have identified strategies to develop new mTORC1-S6K1 inhibitors like RapaLink-1, which could circumvent the drug resistance observed in AML cells as well as in LSC. In this article, we review recent advances made in identifying the role of different components of this pathway in the regulation of HSC and LSC along with possible therapeutic approaches.

  9. miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador

    2015-02-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological pathways. As their role in phagocytosis remains poorly understood, we investigated their impact on phagocytosis in myeloid inflammatory cells. Seven miRNAs (miR-24, -30b, -101, 142-3p, -652-3p, -652-5p, and -1275) that were differentially expressed during monocyte to macrophage (Mφ) and monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation were screened for their potential role in phagocytosis. Among these, overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p in human monocyte-derived Mφ, DC, monocytes, and PBMCs significantly attenuate phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as the secretion of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12p40. miRNA-mediated changes in cytokine profiles were observed at transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional levels and importantly exhibit miRNA-specific impact. To examine the underlying mechanism, we monitored the expression of phagocytosis pathway-associated genes and identified several genes that were altered in Mφ and DC transfected with miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p mimics. Some of these genes with altered expression also harbor putative miRNA binding sites. We show that miR-142-3p directly regulates protein kinase Cα (PKCα), a key gene involved in phagocytosis. Interestingly, miR-142-3p and PKCα exhibit antagonistic expression during Mφ and DC differentiation. Short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKCα in Mφ leads to reduced bacterial uptake, further highlighting the role of the gene in phagocytosis. Overall, these results demonstrate that miR-24, miR-30b, and miR-142-3p regulate phagocytosis and associated cytokine production in myeloid inflammatory cells through modulation of various genes involved in the pathway.

  10. 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine Sensitizes Busulfan-resistant Myeloid Leukemia Cells By Regulating Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Checkpoint and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Benigno C.; Li, Yang; Murray, David; Corn, Paul; Champlin, Richard E.; Andersson, Borje S.

    2009-01-01

    Busulfan (Bu) is a DNA-alkylating drug used in myeloablative pretransplant conditioning therapy for patients with myeloid leukemia (ML). A major obstacle to successful treatment is cellular Bu-resistance. To investigate the possible contribution of DNA hypermethylation to Bu-resistance, we examined the cytotoxic activity of combined 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) and Bu. Exposure of Bu-resistant B5/Bu2506 ML cells to 0.5 μM DAC resulted in G2-arrest and apoptosis. The observed G2-arrest was associated with hypomethylation and subsequent expression of epigenetically controlled genes including p16INK4A, activation of the p53 pathway, and phosphorylation of CDC2. The DAC-mediated apoptosis was partly due to hypomethylation and up-regulation of XAF1, which resulted in down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2. The pro-apoptotic PUMA and BNIP3 proteins were up-regulated while pro-survival STAT3 and c-MYC were suppressed. Combination of 0.05 μM DAC and 5 μg/ml Bu resulted in synergistic cytotoxicity, which was associated with PARP1 cleavage and activation of caspases 3 and 8, suggesting induction of an apoptotic response. P53 inhibition in B5/Bu2506 cells using pifithrin-α alleviated these effects, suggesting a role for p53 therein; this observation was supported by the relative resistance of p53-null K562 cells to [DAC+Bu] combinations and by the effects of an anti-p53 shRNA on the OCI-AML3 cell line. We conclude that the synergistic effects of [DAC+Bu] are p53-dependent and involve cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis induction and down-regulation of pro-survival genes. Our results suggest that, depending on tumor p53 status, incorporation of DAC might synergistically improve the cytoreductive efficacy of Bu-based pre-transplant regimen in patients with ML. PMID:19732952

  11. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein 1 suppresses tumor growth in breast cancer-bearing mice by negatively regulating myeloid-derived suppressor cell functions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Jin; Lim, Hui Xuan; Song, Ju Han; Lee, Arim; Kim, Eugene; Cho, Daeho; Cohen, Edward P; Kim, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are one of the most important cell types that contribute to negative regulation of immune responses in the tumor microenvironment. Recently, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein 1 (AIMP1), a novel pleiotropic cytokine, was identified as an antitumor protein that inhibits angiogenesis and induces antitumor responses. However, the effect of AIMP1 on MDSCs in the tumor environment remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that AIMP1 significantly inhibited tumor growth in 4T1 breast cancer-bearing mice and reduced MDSCs population of tumor sites and spleens of tumor-bearing mice. AIMP1 reduced expansion of MDSCs from bone marrow-derived cells in the tumor-conditioned media. AIMP1 also negatively regulated suppressive activities of MDSCs by inhibiting IL-6 and NO production, and Arg-1 expression. Furthermore, treatment of breast cancer-bearing mice with AIMP1 decreased the capacity of MDSCs to suppress T cell proliferation and Treg cell induction. Western blot and inhibition experiments showed that downregulation of MDSCs functions by AIMP1 may result from attenuated activation of STATs, Akt, and ERK. These findings indicate that AIMP1 plays an essential role in negative regulation of suppressive functions of MDSCs. Therefore, it has a significant potential as a therapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  12. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  13. Multifactorial resistance to aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug CHR2863 in myeloid leukemia cells: down-regulation of carboxylesterase 1, drug sequestration in lipid droplets and pro-survival activation ERK/Akt/mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Al, Marjon; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kammerer, Sarah; Chandrupatla, Durga M.S.H.; Honeywell, Richard; Musters, Rene P.J.; Giovannetti, Elisa; O'Toole, Tom; Scheffer, George L.; Krige, David; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Lems, Willem F.; Kramer, Pieternella A.; Scheper, Rik J.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Jansen, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors are receiving attention as combination chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia. However, the factors determining therapeutic efficacy remain elusive. Here we identified the molecular basis of acquired resistance to CHR2863, an orally available hydrophobic aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug with an esterase-sensitive motif, in myeloid leukemia cells. CHR2863 enters cells by diffusion and is retained therein upon esterase activity-mediated conversion to its hydrophilic active metabolite drug CHR6768, thereby exerting amino acid depletion. Carboxylesterases (CES) serve as candidate prodrug activating enzymes given CES1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia specimens. We established two novel myeloid leukemia sublines U937/CHR2863(200) and U937/CHR2863(5uM), with low (14-fold) and high level (270-fold) CHR2863 resistance. The latter drug resistant cells displayed: (i) complete loss of CES1-mediated drug activation associated with down-regulation of CES1 mRNA and protein, (ii) marked retention/sequestration of the prodrug, (iii) a substantial increase in intracellular lipid droplets, and (iv) a dominant activation of the pro-survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Remarkably, the latter feature coincided with a gain of sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. These finding delineate the molecular basis of CHR2863 resistance and offer a novel modality to overcome this drug resistance in myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26496029

  14. History of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, James E; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-01

    Tumour-induced granulocytic hyperplasia is associated with tumour vasculogenesis and escape from immunity via T cell suppression. Initially, these myeloid cells were identified as granulocytes or monocytes; however, recent studies have revealed that this hyperplasia is associated with populations of multipotent progenitor cells that have been identified as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The study of MDSCs has provided a wealth of information regarding tumour pathobiology, has extended our understanding of neoplastic progression and has modified our approaches to immune adjuvant therapy. In this Timeline article, we discuss the history of MDSCs, their influence on tumour progression and metastasis, and the crosstalk between tumour cells, MDSCs and the host macroenvironment.

  15. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Massarotti, Marco

    2017-07-17

    A bottleneck for immunotherapy of cancer is the immunosuppressive microenvironment in which the tumor cells proliferate. Cancers harness the immune regulatory mechanism that prevents autoimmunity from evading immunosurveillance and promoting immune destruction. Regulatory T cells, myeloid suppressor cells, inhibitory cytokines and immune checkpoint receptors are the major components of the immune system acting in concert with cancer cells and causing the subversion of anti-tumor immunity. This redundant immunosuppressive network poses an impediment to efficacious immunotherapy by facilitating tumor progression. Tumor-associated myeloid cells comprise heterogeneous populations acting systemically (myeloid-derived suppressor cells/MDSCs) and/or locally in the tumor microenvironment (MDSCs and tumor-associated macrophages/TAMs). Both populations promote cancer cell proliferation and survival, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis and elicit immunosuppression through different pathways, including the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors. Several evidences have demonstrated that myeloid cells can express different functional programs in response to different microenvironmental signals, a property defined as functional plasticity. The opposed extremes of this functional flexibility are generally represented by the classical macrophage activation, which identifies inflammatory and cytotoxic M1 polarized macrophages, and the alternative state of macrophage activation, which identifies M2 polarized anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive macrophages. Functional skewing of myeloid cells occurs in vivo under physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and autoimmunity. Here we discuss how myeloid suppressor cells can on one hand support tumor growth and, on the other, limit autoimmune responses, indicating that their therapeutic reprogramming can generate opportunities in relieving immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment or

  16. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ost, Michael; Singh, Anurag; Peschel, Andreas; Mehling, Roman; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise monocytic and granulocytic innate immune cells with the capability of suppressing T- and NK-cell responses. While the role of MDSCs has been studied in depth in malignant diseases, the understanding of their regulation and function in infectious disease conditions has just begun to evolve. Here we summarize and discuss the current view how MDSCs participate in bacterial infections and how this knowledge could be exploited for potential future therapeutics. PMID:27066459

  17. Sorafenib induces paradoxical phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway in acute myeloid leukemia cells lacking FLT3-ITD mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fouladi, Fariba; Jehn, Lutz B.; Metzelder, Stephan K.; Hub, Florian; Henkenius, Katharina; Burchert, Andreas; Brendel, Cornelia; Stiewe, Thorsten; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the RAS and FLT3 genes are frequently found in cells of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), leading to constitutive activation of signaling pathways that regulate fundamental cellular processes, and are therefore attractive targets for AML therapy. The multi-targeted kinase inhibitor sorafenib is efficacious in AML with FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD), but resistance to therapy is an important clinical problem. It is unclear whether AML lacking FLT3-ITD responds to sorafenib. Using AML cell lines, we have shown that a low concentration of sorafenib induces opposing effects depending on the oncogenic background. In FLT3-ITD positive cells sorafenib blocks Erk activity and cell proliferation, and triggers apoptosis. However, in cells lacking FLT3-ITD, sorafenib paradoxically activates Erk2, and stimulates cellular proliferation and metabolic activity. Thus, depending on the genetic context, sorafenib is a beneficial inhibitor or paradoxical activator of mitogenic signaling pathways in AML. These results harbor important consequences in planning clinical trials in AML. PMID:25665465

  18. The linker for activation of B cells (LAB)/non-T cell activation linker (NTAL) regulates triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-2 signaling and macrophage inflammatory responses independently of the linker for activation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Gillian C; Orr, Selinda J; Quigley, Laura; Hughes, Laurel; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Zhang, Weigou; McVicar, Daniel W

    2010-01-29

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2) is rapidly emerging as a key regulator of the innate immune response via its regulation of macrophage inflammatory responses. Here we demonstrate that proximal TREM-2 signaling parallels other DAP12-based receptor systems in its use of Syk and Src-family kinases. However, we find that the linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is severely reduced as monocytes differentiate into macrophages and that TREM-2 exclusively uses the linker for activation of B cells (LAB encoded by the gene Lat2(-/-)) to mediate downstream signaling. LAB is required for TREM-2-mediated activation of Erk1/2 and dampens proximal TREM-2 signals through a novel LAT-independent mechanism resulting in macrophages with proinflammatory properties. Thus, Lat2(-/-) macrophages have increased TREM-2-induced proximal phosphorylation, and lipopolysaccharide stimulation of these cells leads to increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and decreased IL-12p40 production relative to wild type cells. Together these data identify LAB as a critical, LAT-independent regulator of TREM-2 signaling and macrophage development capable of controlling subsequent inflammatory responses.

  19. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Bozena

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of early myeloid progenitors and precursors at different stages of differentiation into granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Blockade of their differentiation into mature myeloid cells in cancer results in an expansion of this population. High-grade gliomas are the most common malignant tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), with a poor prognosis despite intensive radiation and chemotherapy. Histopathological and flow cytometry analyses of human and rodent experimental gliomas revealed the extensive heterogeneity of immune cells infiltrating gliomas and their microenvironment. Immune cell infiltrates consist of: resident (microglia) and peripheral macrophages, granulocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and T lymphocytes. Intratumoural density of glioma-associated MDSCs correlates positively with the histological grade of gliomas and patient’s survival. MDSCs have the ability to attract T regulatory lymphocytes to the tumour, but block the activation of tumour-reactive CD4+ T helper cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Immunomodulatory mechanisms employed by malignant gliomas pose an appalling challenge to brain tumour immunotherapy. In this mini-review we describe phenotypic and functional characteristics of MDSCs in humans and rodents, and their occurrence and potential roles in glioma progression. While understanding the complexity of immune cell interactions in the glioma microenvironment is far from being accomplished, there is significant progress that may lead to the development of immunotherapy for gliomas. PMID:28373814

  20. Long Non-Coding RNA CCAT1 Acts as a Competing Endogenous RNA to Regulate Cell Growth and Differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lianxiang; Wang, Wei; Cao, Lixia; Li, Zhijun; Wang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in multiple cellular events, as well as in tumorigenesis. Colon cancer-associated transcript-1 (CCAT1) gene encodes an lncRNA whose over-activation was observed in an expanding list of primary human solid tumors and tumor cell lines, however its biological roles in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has not been reported yet at present. In this study, the aberrant upregulation of CCAT1 was detected in French-American-British M4 and M5 subtypes of adult AML patients. By gain- and loss-of-function analysis, we determined that CCAT1 repressed monocytic differentiation and promoted cell growth of HL-60 by sequestering tumor suppressive miR-155. Accordingly, a significant decrease in miR-155 level was detected in AML patients. Re-introduction of miR-155 into HL-60 cells restored monocytic maturation and repressed cell proliferation. Furthermore, CCAT1 could up-regulated c-Myc via its competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) activity on miR-155. In conclusion, these results revealed new mechanism of lncRNA CCAT1 in AML development, and suggested that the manipulation of CCAT1 expression could serve as a potential strategy in AML therapy. PMID:26923190

  1. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) enhances the accumulation and functional activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinhoi; Lee, Jaemin; Kim, Jinsil; Jo, Seongyea; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Baek, Ji Eun; Kwon, Eun-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Yang, Siyoung; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kang, Tae Heung; Park, Yun-Yong; Chang, Suhwan; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Song Cheol; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, Seokho

    2016-08-09

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) with a profound immune infiltrate populated by a significant number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs have been increasingly recognized for their role in immune evasion and cancer progression as well as their potential as a target for immunotherapy. However, not much is known about the mechanisms regulating their behavior and function in the pancreatic TME. Here we report that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a soluble protein involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis, plays a role as an enhancer of tumor-infiltrating MDSC and its functional activity. We show that PAUF enhanced the accumulation of MDSCs in the spleen and tumor tissues of PAUF-overexpressing tumor cell-injected mice. In addition, PAUF was found to enhance the immunosuppressive function of MDSCs via the TLR4-mediated signaling pathway, which was demonstrated by PAUF-induced increased levels of arginase, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of PAUF in modulating the functional properties of MDSCs was further demonstrated by the use of a PAUF-neutralizing antibody that caused a decreased number of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and reduced MDSC immunosuppressive activity. The observations made in mice were confirmed in human pancreatic cancer patient-derived MDSCs, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. Collectively, we conclude that the PAUF is a powerful and multifunctional promoter of tumor growth through increase and functional activation of MDSCs, suggesting therapeutic potential for targeting PAUF in pancreatic cancers.

  2. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  3. Role of myeloid cells in HIV-1-host interplay.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The AIDS research field has embarked on a bold mission to cure HIV-1-infected individuals of the virus. To do so, scientists are attempting to identify the reservoirs that support viral persistence in patients on therapy, to understand how viral persistence is regulated and to come up with strategies that interrupt viral persistence and that eliminate the viral reservoirs. Most of the attention regarding the cure of HIV-1 infection has focused on the CD4+ T cell reservoir. Investigators are developing tools to probe the CD4+ T cell reservoirs as well as in vitro systems that provide clues on how to perturb them. By comparison, the myeloid cell, and in particular, the macrophage has received far less attention. As a consequence, there is very little understanding as to the role played by myeloid cells in viral persistence in HIV-1-infected individuals on suppressive therapy. As such, should myeloid cells constitute a viral reservoir, unique strategies may be required for their elimination. This article will overview research that is examining the role of macrophage in virus-host interplay and will discuss features of this interplay that could impact efforts to eliminate myeloid cell reservoirs.

  4. Secretion from Myeloid Cells: Secretory Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Gillian M

    2016-08-01

    Many cells of the myeloid lineage use an unusual secretory organelle to deliver their effector mechanisms. In these cells, the lysosomal compartment is often modified not only to fulfill the degradative functions of a lysosome but also as a mechanism for secreting additional proteins that are found in the lysosomes of each specialized cell type. These extra proteins vary from one cell type to another according to the specialized function of the cell. For example, mast cells package histamine; cytotoxic T cells express perforin; azurophilic granules in neutrophils express antimicrobial peptides, and platelets von Willebrand factor. Upon release, these very different proteins can trigger inflammation, cell lysis, microbial death, and clotting, respectively, and hence deliver the very different effector mechanisms of these different myeloid cells.

  5. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1) is regulated post-transcriptionally and its ligand is present in the sera of some septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, I; González-Roldán, N; Ferat-Osorio, E; Esquivel-Callejas, N; Aduna-Vicente, R; Arriaga-Pizano, L; Astudillo-de la Vega, H; Villasis-Keever, M A; Torres-González, R; Estrada-García, I; López-Macías, C; Isibasi, A

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation is necessary for survival, but it is also an important cause of human morbidity and mortality, as exemplified by sepsis. During inflammation, cells of the innate immune system are recruited and activated in response to infection, trauma or injury. These cells are activated through receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 amplifies the inflammatory response initiated by TLRs, and its expression on the surface of monocytes increases in the presence of TLR ligands. Here we have shown that in monocytes TREM-1 mRNA levels, measured by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR), remained unchanged and TREM-1 protein levels, measured by flow cytometry, increased, indicating that LPS increases TREM-1 expression by a post-transcriptional mechanism. We also showed that TREM-1/Fc fusion protein decreased the ability of the sera of some patients with sepsis to activate monocytes, indicating that the TREM-1 ligand, whose identity is unknown, may be present in the sera of some of these patients. We describe a mechanism for the regulation of TREM-1 expression on monocytes and the possible presence of its ligand in serum; these findings help to explain the contribution of TREM-1 during systemic inflammation. PMID:16907912

  6. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Signaling Induces Apoptosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells via Regulation of the Bcl-2 Family Members Bcl-XL, Noxa, and Bak*

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Schneider, Paula A.; Meng, X. Wei; Dai, Haiming; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Rodriguez-Ramirez, Christie; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    The CXCR4 chemokine receptor promotes survival of many different cell types. Here, we describe a previously unsuspected role for CXCR4 as a potent inducer of apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and a subset of clinical AML samples. We show that SDF-1, the sole ligand for CXCR4, induces the expected migration and ERK activation in the KG1a AML cell line transiently overexpressing CXCR4, but ERK activation did not lead to survival. Instead, SDF-1 treatment led via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism to apoptosis, as evidenced by increased annexin V staining, condensation of chromatin, and cleavage of both procaspase-3 and PARP. This SDF-1-induced death pathway was partially inhibited by hypoxia, which is often found in the bone marrow of AML patients. SDF-1-induced apoptosis was inhibited by dominant negative procaspase-9 but not by inhibition of caspase-8 activation, implicating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Further analysis showed that this pathway was activated by multiple mechanisms, including up-regulation of Bak at the level of mRNA and protein, stabilization of the Bak activator Noxa, and down-regulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-XL. Furthermore, adjusting expression levels of Bak, Bcl-XL, or Noxa individually altered the level of apoptosis in AML cells, suggesting that the combined modulation of these family members by SDF-1 coordinates their interplay to produce apoptosis. Thus, rather than mediating survival, SDF-1 may be a means to induce apoptosis of CXCR4-expressing AML cells directly in the SDF-1-rich bone marrow microenvironment if the survival cues of the bone marrow are disrupted. PMID:23798675

  7. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Hadi; Baradaran, Behzad; Esfahani, Ali; Sakhinia, Masoud; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy. PMID:24754007

  8. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  9. Cooperative loss of RAS feedback regulation drives myeloid leukemognesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Chen, Chi-Chao; Rillahan, Cory D.; Shen, Ronglai; Kitzing, Thomas; McNerney, Megan E.; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Zuber, Johannes; Shannon, Kevin; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Spector, Mona S.; Kogan, Scott C.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    RAS network activation is common in human cancers and, in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), achieved mainly through gain-of-function mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or the FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase1. In mice, we show that premalignant myeloid cells harboring a KrasG12D allele retain low Ras signaling owing to a negative feedback involving Spry4 that prevents transformation. In humans, SPRY4 is located on chromosome 5q, a region affected by large heterozygous deletion that are associated with an aggressive disease in which gain-of-function RAS pathway mutations are rare. These 5q deletions often co-occur with chromosome 17 alterations involving deletion of NF1 - another RAS negative regulator - and TP53. Accordingly, combined suppression of Spry4, Nf1 and Trp53 produces high Ras signaling and drives AML in mice. Therefore, SPRY4 is a 5q tumor suppressor whose disruption contributes to a lethal AML subtype that appears to acquire RAS pathway activation through loss of negative regulators. PMID:25822087

  10. Pivotal Advance: Tumor-mediated induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and M2-polarized macrophages by altering intracellular PGE₂ catabolism in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Ortiz, Javier; Vieweg, Johannes; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2010-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells frequently up-regulate COX-2 expression and have enhanced PGE₂ metabolism. This may affect the maturation and immune function of tumor-infiltrated antigen-presenting cells. In vitro studies demonstrate that tumor-derived factors can skew GM-CSF-driven differentiation of T(h)1-oriented myeloid APCs into M2-oriented Ly6C(+)F4/80(+) MDSCs or Ly6C(-)F4/80(+) arginase-expressing macrophages. These changes enable myeloid cells to produce substantial amounts of IL-10, VEGF, and MIP-2. The tumor-mediated inhibition of APC differentiation was associated with the up-regulated expression of PGE₂-forming enzymes COX-2, mPGES1 in myeloid cells, and the simultaneous repression of PGE(2)-catabolizing enzyme 15-PGDH. The presence of tumor-derived factors also led to a reduced expression of PGT but promoted the up-regulation of MRP4, which works as a PGE₂ efflux receptor. Addition of COX-2 inhibitor to the BM cell cultures could prevent the tumor-induced skewing of myeloid cell differentiation, partially restoring cell phenotype and down-regulating the arginase expression in the myeloid APCs. Our study suggests that tumors impair the intracellular PGE(2) catabolism in myeloid cells through simultaneous stimulation of PGE(2)-forming enzymes and inhibition of PGE₂-degrading systems. This tumor-induced dichotomy drives the development of M2-oriented, arginase-expressing macrophages or the MDSC, which can be seen frequently among tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells.

  11. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  12. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and myeloid regulatory cells in cancer and autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barnie, Prince Amoah; Zhang, Pan; Lv, Hongxiang; Wang, Dan; Su, Xiaolian; Su, Zhaoliang; Xu, Huaxi

    2017-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were originally described as a heterogeneous population of immature cells derived from myeloid progenitors with immune-suppressive functions in tumor-bearing hosts. In recent years, increasing number of studies have described various populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of cancer and autoimmune diseases. These studies have observed that the populations of MDSCs are increased during inflammation and autoimmune conditions. In addition, MDSCs can effectively suppress T cell responses and modulate the activity of natural killer cells and other myeloid cells. MDSCs have also been implicated in the induction of regulatory T cell production. Furthermore, these cells have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. Myeloid regulatory cells (Mregs) are recently attracting increasing attention, since they function in proinflammatory and immune suppression in autoimmune diseases, as well as in various types of cancer. Currently, research focus is directed from MDSCs to Mregs in cancer and autoimmune diseases. The present study reviewed the suppressive roles of MDSCs in various autoimmune murine models, the immune modulation of MDSCs to T helper 17 lymphocytes, as well as the proinflammatory and immunosuppressive roles of Mregs in various types of cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28352304

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) enhances the accumulation and functional activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Seongyea; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Baek, Ji Eun; Kwon, Eun-Soo; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Yang, Siyoung; Kwon, Ki-Sun; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kang, Tae Heung; Park, Yun-Yong; Chang, Suhwan; Cho, Hee Jun; Kim, Song Cheol; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, Seokho

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) with a profound immune infiltrate populated by a significant number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs have been increasingly recognized for their role in immune evasion and cancer progression as well as their potential as a target for immunotherapy. However, not much is known about the mechanisms regulating their behavior and function in the pancreatic TME. Here we report that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a soluble protein involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis, plays a role as an enhancer of tumor-infiltrating MDSC and its functional activity. We show that PAUF enhanced the accumulation of MDSCs in the spleen and tumor tissues of PAUF-overexpressing tumor cell-injected mice. In addition, PAUF was found to enhance the immunosuppressive function of MDSCs via the TLR4-mediated signaling pathway, which was demonstrated by PAUF-induced increased levels of arginase, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of PAUF in modulating the functional properties of MDSCs was further demonstrated by the use of a PAUF-neutralizing antibody that caused a decreased number of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and reduced MDSC immunosuppressive activity. The observations made in mice were confirmed in human pancreatic cancer patient-derived MDSCs, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. Collectively, we conclude that the PAUF is a powerful and multifunctional promoter of tumor growth through increase and functional activation of MDSCs, suggesting therapeutic potential for targeting PAUF in pancreatic cancers. PMID:27322081

  14. Knock-down of CIAPIN1 sensitizes K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells to Imatinib by regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis-associated members via NF-κB and ERK5 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Li, Qinghua; Wang, Chijuan; Xiong, Qingqing; Lin, Yani; Sun, Qian; Jin, Hao; Yang, Fan; Ren, Xiubao; Pang, Tianxiang

    2016-01-01

    CIAPIN1 (cytokine-induced apoptosis inhibitor 1) was recently identified as an essential downstream effector of the Ras signaling pathway. However, its potential role in regulating myeloid leukemia cells sensitivity to Imatinib remains unclear. In this study, we found depletion of CIAPIN1 inhibited proliferation and triggered more apoptosis of K562CML (chronic myeloid leukemia) cells with or without Imatinib treatment. Meanwhile, CIAPIN1 depletion decreased ERK5 phosphorylation and NF-κB activity. Importantly, treating CIAPIN1-depleted K562 cells with ERK5 signaling pathway specific inhibitor, XMD8-92, further inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis with or without Imatinib treatment. Treatment with the NF-κB specific inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, induced nearly the same inhibition of proliferation and promotion of apoptosis conferred by CIAPIN1 depletion as was observed with XMD8-92 treatment. Further, XMD8-92 and Bay 11-7082 synergistically inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of CIAPIN1-depleted K562 cells with or without Imatinib treatment. The nude mice transplantation model was also performed to confirm the enhanced sensitivity of CIAPIN1-depleted K562 cells to Imatinib. Thus, our results provided a potential management by which CIAPIN1 knock-down might have a crucial impact on enhancing sensitivity of K562 cells to Imatinib in the therapeutic approaches, indicating that CIAPIN1 knock-down might serve as a combination with chemotherapeutical agents in leukemia diseases therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jason R; Azimzadeh, Agnes M; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2011-10-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of hematopoietic derived cell precursors that can suppress immune responses in a variety of inflammatory settings. Here we review recent studies detailing expansion of phenotypically and functionally disparate MDSC. Findings related to MDSC accumulation, activation, and mechanisms utilized in immune suppression are presented. Further, we discuss recent reports that suggest MDSC are expanded during transplantation and that modulation of MDSC can participate in preventing graft rejection.

  16. Myeloid cell expressed proprotein convertase FURIN attenuates inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Grönholm, Anna; Kytölä, Ville; Taverniti, Valentina; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Aittomäki, Saara; Niininen, Wilhelmiina; Junttila, Ilkka; Ylipää, Antti; Nykter, Matti; Pesu, Marko

    2016-08-23

    The proprotein convertase enzyme FURIN processes immature pro-proteins into functional end- products. FURIN is upregulated in activated immune cells and it regulates T-cell dependent peripheral tolerance and the Th1/Th2 balance. FURIN also promotes the infectivity of pathogens by activating bacterial toxins and by processing viral proteins. Here, we evaluated the role of FURIN in LysM+ myeloid cells in vivo. Mice with a conditional deletion of FURIN in their myeloid cells (LysMCre-fur(fl/fl)) were healthy and showed unchanged proportions of neutrophils and macrophages. Instead, LysMCre-fur(fl/fl) mice had elevated serum IL-1β levels and reduced numbers of splenocytes. An LPS injection resulted in accelerated mortality, elevated serum pro-inflammatory cytokines and upregulated numbers of pro-inflammatory macrophages. A genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed the overexpression of several pro-inflammatory genes in resting FURIN-deficient macrophages. Moreover, FURIN inhibited Nos2 and promoted the expression of Arg1, which implies that FURIN regulates the M1/M2-type macrophage balance. FURIN was required for the normal production of the bioactive TGF-β1 cytokine, but it inhibited the maturation of the inflammation-provoking TACE and Caspase-1 enzymes. In conclusion, FURIN has an anti-inflammatory function in LysM+ myeloid cells in vivo.

  17. Myeloid cell expressed proprotein convertase FURIN attenuates inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, Zuzet Martinez; Grönholm, Anna; Kytölä, Ville; Taverniti, Valentina; Hämäläinen, Sanna; Aittomäki, Saara; Niininen, Wilhelmiina; Junttila, Ilkka; Ylipää, Antti; Nykter, Matti; Pesu, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The proprotein convertase enzyme FURIN processes immature pro-proteins into functional end- products. FURIN is upregulated in activated immune cells and it regulates T-cell dependent peripheral tolerance and the Th1/Th2 balance. FURIN also promotes the infectivity of pathogens by activating bacterial toxins and by processing viral proteins. Here, we evaluated the role of FURIN in LysM+ myeloid cells in vivo. Mice with a conditional deletion of FURIN in their myeloid cells (LysMCre-fur(fl/fl)) were healthy and showed unchanged proportions of neutrophils and macrophages. Instead, LysMCre-fur(fl/fl) mice had elevated serum IL-1β levels and reduced numbers of splenocytes. An LPS injection resulted in accelerated mortality, elevated serum pro-inflammatory cytokines and upregulated numbers of pro-inflammatory macrophages. A genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed the overexpression of several pro-inflammatory genes in resting FURIN-deficient macrophages. Moreover, FURIN inhibited Nos2 and promoted the expression of Arg1, which implies that FURIN regulates the M1/M2-type macrophage balance. FURIN was required for the normal production of the bioactive TGF-β1 cytokine, but it inhibited the maturation of the inflammation-provoking TACE and Caspase-1 enzymes. In conclusion, FURIN has an anti-inflammatory function in LysM+ myeloid cells in vivo. PMID:27527873

  18. Finasteride Enhances the Generation of Human Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells by Up-Regulating the COX2/PGE2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufeng; Lin, Yingtong; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Ting; Fu, Yongshui

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been known to be a key factor in the regulation of the immune system under numerous conditions such as tumors, infections, autoimmune diseases, and transplantations. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSCs in tumors and infections, MDSCs with their suppressive function are now proved to have the beneficial potential of suppressing the autoimmune response and promoting tolerance to transplantation. Therefore, the expansion of MDSCs could be a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases. In this study, we aimed to identify FDA-approved drugs that could aid in the expansion of functional MDSCs. We performed a high-throughput screening (HTS) of FDA-approved drugs based on the in vitro human MDSC-differentiation system and identified finasteride (FIN) to have the best potency to aid the generation of human MDSCs. The FIN-induced MDSCs were quite similar to monocytic MDSCs with regard to their surface phenotype, morphology, immunosuppressive function, and related gene expression. Next, we aimed to determine the mechanism of action of FIN and found that FIN induced the expansion of MDSCs through up-regulation of the COX2/PGE2 pathway by enhancing the activity of COX2 promoter. In addition, the administration of indomethacin (IND), a COX2 inhibitor, abrogated the effect of FIN. Based on these results, we suggested that FIN could find applications in the future in the expansion of MDSCs. Further development of FIN-like compounds could be a novel strategy for generating functional MDSCs for immunosuppressive therapies in various immune disorder conditions. PMID:27253400

  19. Immature myeloid cells and cancer-associated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2002-08-01

    Impaired balance between mature and immature myeloid cells is one of the hallmarks of cancer. In cancer patients as well as in mouse models there is increasing evidence that progressive tumor growth is associated with an accumulation of immature myeloid cells, monocytes/macrophages, and with a decreased number and function of dendritic cells (DC). This review examines recent findings on the contribution of immature myeloid cells (ImC) to cancer-induced immune suppression.

  20. G-CSF induces the release of the soluble form of LR11, a regulator of myeloid cell mobilization in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Naomi; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Jiang, Meizi; Nishii, Keigo; Yokote, Koutaro; Iseki, Tohru; Higashi, Morihiro; Tamaru, Junichi; Schneider, Wolfgang Johann; Bujo, Hideaki

    2014-07-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induces the mobilization of leukocytes from the bone marrow (BM) to the circulation by a yet incompletely understood mechanism. Here, we describe that the membrane-bound receptor LR11 is highly expressed in human myeloid cells and that the shed soluble form of LR11 (sLR11) is a modifier of myeloid cell migration. In the process of leukocyte mobilization by G-CSF treatment, circulating sLR11 levels are transiently elevated in humans and mice. Moreover, following G-CSF treatment, the sLR11 levels in patients show significant positive correlation with the numbers of mobilized leukocytes. The changes of LR11 levels in BM cells and of sLR11 released into the BM fluid of mice correlate tightly with the changes in circulating sLR11 levels. G-CSF dose-dependently enhanced sLR11 release from HL-60 cells, which in turn accelerated cell migration. Finally, cooperatively with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and G-CSF, sLR11 increased the attachment of floating cells (HL-60 and U937) to endothelial cells. We propose that sLR11 is a novel candidate modifier of G-CSF-mediated mobilization of hematologic cells. Identification of sLR11 as a regulatory component of G-CSF-mediated hematologic cell mobilization may facilitate further improvement of hematologic stem cell collection for clinical applications.

  1. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: linking inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Sinha, Pratima

    2009-04-15

    Many cancer immunotherapies developed in experimental animals have been tested in clinical trials. Although some have shown modest clinical effects, most have not been effective. Recent studies have identified myeloid-origin cells that are potent suppressors of tumor immunity and therefore a significant impediment to cancer immunotherapy. "Myeloid-derived suppressor cells" (MDSC) accumulate in the blood, lymph nodes, and bone marrow and at tumor sites in most patients and experimental animals with cancer and inhibit both adaptive and innate immunity. MDSC are induced by tumor-secreted and host-secreted factors, many of which are proinflammatory molecules. The induction of MDSC by proinflammatory mediators led to the hypothesis that inflammation promotes the accumulation of MDSC that down-regulate immune surveillance and antitumor immunity, thereby facilitating tumor growth. This article reviews the characterization and suppressive mechanisms used by MDSC to block tumor immunity and describes the mechanisms by which inflammation promotes tumor progression through the induction of MDSC.

  2. Aberrant PGE2 metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE2. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE2, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE2 metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue. PMID:21315786

  3. Expression of human myeloid-associated surface antigens in human-mouse myeloid cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Geurts van Kessel, A H; Tetteroo, P A; von dem Borne, A E; Hagemeijer, A; Bootsma, D

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid cell lines were obtained after fusion of mouse myeloid cells (WEHI-TG) with leukocytes from two patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. A third fusion was carried out with leukocytes from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All three patients carried the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) in the leukemia cell population. Cytochemical analysis confirmed the myelo-monocytic nature of the hybrid cell lines. The presence of Ph1 translocation products could be established in most hybrids derived from the two chronic myeloid leukemic patients, which confirms that indeed human myeloid cells were fused. Several of these hybrid lines showed reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to be specific for human myeloid cells, whereas interlineage Chinese hamster fibroblast-human chronic myeloid leukemia hybrids failed to react with these antibodies. Five independently obtained monoclonal antibodies--MI/NI, UJ-308, VIM-D5, FMC-10, and B4.3--showed very similar reactivity patterns when tested on the hybrid clones. This result substantiates the evidence obtained from other studies, that these five antibodies are directed against the same myeloid-associated antigen. The gene(s) for expression of the latter antigen could be assigned to human chromosome 11. Images PMID:6574514

  4. Establishment of lal-/- myeloid lineage cell line that resembles myeloid-derived suppressive cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinchun; Wu, Lingyan; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in mouse are inflammatory cells that play critical roles in promoting cancer growth and metastasis by directly stimulating cancer cell proliferation and suppressing immune surveillance. In order to facilitate characterization of biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MDSCs, it is urgent to establish an "MDSC-like" cell line. By cross breeding of immortomouse (simian virus 40 large T antigen transgenic mice) with wild type and lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) knock-out (lal-/-) mice, we have established a wild type (HD1A) and a lal-/- (HD1B) myeloid cell lines. Compared with HD1A cells, HD1B cells demonstrated many characteristics similar to lal-/- MDSCs. HD1B cells exhibited increased lysosomes around perinuclear areas, dysfunction of mitochondria skewing toward fission structure, damaged membrane potential, and increased ROS production. HD1B cells showed increased glycolytic metabolism during blockage of fatty acid metabolism to fuel the energy need. Similar to lal-/- MDSCs, the mTOR signal pathway in HD1B cells is overly activated. Rapamycin treatment of HD1B cells reduced ROS production and restored the mitochondrial membrane potential. HD1B cells showed much stronger immunosuppression on CD4+ T cell proliferation and function in vitro, and enhanced cancer cells proliferation. Knockdown of mTOR with siRNA reduced the HD1B cell ability to immunosuppress T cells and stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, the HD1B myeloid cell line is an "MDSC-like" cell line that can be used as an alternative in vitro system to study how LAL controls various myeloid cell functions.

  5. Regulation of death induction and chemosensitizing action of 3-bromopyruvate in myeloid leukemia cells: energy depletion, oxidative stress, and protein kinase activity modulation.

    PubMed

    Calviño, Eva; Estañ, María Cristina; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; Brea, Rocío; de Blas, Elena; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-02-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrP) is an alkylating, energy-depleting drug that is of interest in antitumor therapies, although the mechanisms underlying its cytotoxicity are ill-defined. We show here that 3-BrP causes concentration-dependent cell death of HL60 and other human myeloid leukemia cells, inducing both apoptosis and necrosis at 20-30 μM and a pure necrotic response at 60 μM. Low concentrations of 3-BrP (10-20 μM) brought about a rapid inhibition of glycolysis, which at higher concentrations was followed by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. The combination of these effects causes concentration-dependent ATP depletion, although this cannot explain the lethality at intermediate 3-BrP concentrations (20-30 μM). The oxidative stress caused by exposure to 3-BrP was evident as a moderate overproduction of reactive oxygen species and a concentration-dependent depletion of glutathione, which was an important determinant of 3-BrP toxicity. In addition, 3-BrP caused glutathione-dependent stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mitogen-induced extracellular kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6K phosphorylation or activation, as well as rapid LKB-1/AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, which was later followed by Akt-mediated inactivation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors revealed that p38 MAPK activation enhances 3-BrP toxicity, which is conversely restrained by ERK and Akt activity. Finally, 3-BrP was seen to cooperate with antitumor agents like arsenic trioxide and curcumin in causing cell death, a response apparently mediated by both the generation of oxidative stress induced by 3-BrP and the attenuation of Akt and ERK activation by curcumin. In summary, 3-BrP cytotoxicity is the result of several combined regulatory mechanisms that might represent important targets to improve therapeutic efficacy.

  6. ZNF143 is an important regulator of the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, David; Luyten, Annouck; Bartholdy, Boris; Zhou, Qiling; Kardosova, Miroslava; Ebralidze, Alex; Swanson, Kenneth D; Radomska, Hanna; Zhang, Pu; Kobayashi, Susumu S; Welner, Robert S; Levantini, Elena; Steidl, Ulrich; Chong, Gilbert; Collombet, Samuel; Choi, Min Hee; Friedman, Alan D; Scott, Linda M; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Tenen, Daniel G

    2017-09-12

    The transcription factor (TF) C/EBPα is essential for myeloid differentiation and is frequently dysregulated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While studied extensively, the precise regulation of its gene by upstream factors has remained largely elusive. Here, we investigated its transcriptional activation during myeloid differentiation. We identified an evolutionarily conserved octameric sequence, CCCAGCAG, approximately 100 bases upstream of the CEBPA transcription start site (TSS), and demonstrated through mutational analysis that this sequence is crucial for C/EBPα expression. This sequence is present in the genes encoding C/EBPα in humans, rodents, chicken and frog, and is also present in the promoters of other C/EBP family members. We identified that ZNF143, the human homolog of the Xenopus transcriptional activator STAF, specifically binds to this 8bp sequence to activate C/EBPα expression in myeloid cells through a mechanism that is distinct from that observed in liver cells and adipocytes. Altogether, our data suggests that ZNF143 plays an important role in the expression of C/EBPα in myeloid cells. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. The role of myeloid cells in the promotion of tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Craig; Muthana, Munitta; Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E

    2008-08-01

    The use of various transgenic mouse models and analysis of human tumour biopsies has shown that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells and dendritic cells, have an important role in regulating the formation and maintenance of blood vessels in tumours. In this Review the evidence for each of these cell types driving tumour angiogenesis is outlined, along with the mechanisms regulating their recruitment and activation by the tumour microenvironment. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of recent findings that specific myeloid cell populations modulate the responses of tumours to agents such as chemotherapy and some anti-angiogenic therapies.

  8. Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by tumor exosomes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoyu; Poliakov, Anton; Liu, Cunren; Liu, Yuelong; Deng, Zhong-bin; Wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Ziqiang; Shah, Spandan V; Wang, Gui-Jun; Zhang, Liming; Grizzle, William E; Mobley, Jim; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote tumor progression. The mechanisms of MDSC development during tumor growth remain unknown. Tumor exosomes (T-exosomes) have been implicated to play a role in immune regulation, however the role of exosomes in the induction of MDSCs is unclear. Our previous work demonstrated that exosomes isolated from tumor cells are taken up by bone marrow myeloid cells. Here, we extend those findings showing that exosomes isolated from T-exosomes switch the differentiation pathway of these myeloid cells to the MDSC pathway (CD11b(+)Gr-1(+)). The resulting cells exhibit MDSC phenotypic and functional characteristics including promotion of tumor growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in vivo MDSC mediated promotion of tumor progression is dependent on T-exosome prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and TGF-beta molecules. T-exosomes can induce the accumulation of MDSCs expressing Cox2, IL-6, VEGF, and arginase-1. Antibodies against exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta block the activity of these exosomes on MDSC induction and therefore attenuate MDSC-mediated tumor-promoting ability. Exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta are enriched in T-exosomes when compared with exosomes isolated from the supernatants of cultured tumor cells (C-exosomes). The tumor microenvironment has an effect on the potency of T-exosome mediated induction of MDSCs by regulating the sorting and the amount of exosomal PGE2 and TGF-beta available. Together, these findings lend themselves to developing specific targetable therapeutic strategies to reduce or eliminate MDSC-induced immunosuppression and hence enhance host antitumor immunotherapy efficacy.

  9. DOWN-REGULATION OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCER AND ACTIVATOR OF TRANSCRIPTION 3 IMPROVES HUMAN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA-DERIVED DENDRITIC CELL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Michael T.; Miller, Austin; Sait, Sheila N.; Ford, Laurie A.; Minderman, Hans; Wang, Eunice S.; Lee, Kelvin P.; Baumann, Heinz; Wetzler, Meir

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 inhibits dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is constitutively activated in blasts of approximately half of AML patients. We investigated the correlation between STAT3 activity, DC maturation and the ability to stimulate T-cells in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-derived DCs. STAT3 knock-down by shRNAmir increased the ability of AML-DCs to stimulate T-cells. Treatment of AML-DC with arsenic trioxide, but not AG490, JSI-124 or NSC-74859, led to a more mature phenotype and enhanced T-cell stimulation, while having minimal effect on normal DC. We conclude that AML-DCs have improved immunogenicity after reducing STAT3. PMID:23628554

  10. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gamradt, Pia; Xu, Yun; Gratz, Nina; Duncan, Kellyanne; Kobzik, Lester; Högler, Sandra; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl)-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg), thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen. PMID:27973535

  11. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  12. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  13. Tumor-induced immune dysfunctions caused by myeloid suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Bronte, V; Serafini, P; Apolloni, E; Zanovello, P

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1970s, several findings suggested that accessory cells distinct from lymphocytes might suppress immune reactivity in tumor-bearing hosts. Studies in animal models and patients later confirmed that cells driven to act as dominant immune suppressors by growing cancers could subvert the immune system. These cells have also been termed natural suppressors, a functional definition connoting their ability to hamper various T- and B-lymphocyte responses without prior activation and independently from antigen and MHC restriction. These properties were attributed to distinct cell populations. The phenotypic discrepancies, together with the lack of antigen specificity, have generated serious restraints to research on tumor-induced suppression. Recent evidence indicates that suppressor cells are closely related to immature myeloid precursors and can be found in several situations that can exert adverse effects on the immunotherapy of cancer. The present review is an attempt to address the nature and properties of immature myeloid suppressors and their relationship to dendritic cells and macrophages, with the aim of clarifying the complex network of tumor-induced, negative regulators of the immune system.

  14. Dendritic cell vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-07-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal, with a 5-year overall survival rate of only 5.2% for the continuously growing subgroup of AML patients older than 65 years. These patients are generally not considered eligible for intensive chemotherapy and/or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because of high treatment-related morbidity and mortality, emphasizing the need for novel, less toxic, treatment alternatives. It is within this context that immunotherapy has gained attention in recent years. In this review, we focus on the use of dendritic cell (DC) vaccines for immunotherapy of AML. DC are central orchestrators of the immune system, bridging innate and adaptive immunity and critical to the induction of anti-leukemic immunity. We discuss the rationale and basic principles of DC-based therapy for AML and review the clinical experience that has been obtained so far with this form of immunotherapy for patients with AML.

  15. Tissue factor expression by myeloid cells contributes to protective immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TF(Δ) ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2-like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. TISSUE FACTOR EXPRESSION BY MYELOID CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST Mycobacterium tuberculosis INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TFΔ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2 like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. PMID:26471500

  17. NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase Is Regulated by All-Trans Retinoic Acid and by 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elżbieta; Marchwicka, Aleksandra; Bujko, Kamila; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines can be driven to differentiate to monocyte-like cells by 1,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) and to granulocyte-like cells by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA). Both compounds activate their specific intracellular receptors, vitamin D receptor (VDR) and retinoic acid receptors (RARs) respectively. Inside the cells 1,25D is degraded to calcitrioic acid by a mitochondrial enzyme CYP24A1, while ATRA is degraded to several polar metabolites by CYP26. NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a membrane-bound enzyme required for electron transfer to cytochrome P450 (CYP), vital in the processes of the metabolism of drugs and steroid production in humans. In this paper we report that POR in AML cells, from both cell lines and patients, is upregulated by ATRA and by 1,25D at the level of mRNA and protein. Partial silencing of POR in HL60 cells resulted in augmented differentiation response to 1,25D. PMID:24642534

  18. Early endothelial progenitor cells as a source of myeloid cells to improve the pre-vascularisation of bone constructs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Kramer, G; Schröder, A; Kirkpatrick, C J; Seekamp, A; Schmidt, H; Fuchs, S

    2014-01-25

    According to present knowledge, blood derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) might act as proangiogenic myeloid cells, which play a fundamental role in the regulation of angiogenesis and blood vessel reorganisation. In this context, we have evaluated the contribution of endogenous myeloid cells in co-cultures of blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (OEC) and osteogenic cells. In addition, we investigated the role of EPC as a potential source of myeloid cells in the formation of vascular structures in an in vitro model consisting of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and OEC. For this purpose, we added EPCs to co-cultures of MSC and OECs. Vascular structures and the co-localisation of myeloid cells were analysed by confocal laser microscopy (CLSM) for endothelial and myeloid markers and quantitative image analysis. The molecular effects of myeloid cells were evaluated by quantitative real time PCR, ELISA and protein arrays from cell culture supernatants and lysates. Endogenous myeloid cells were significantly co-localised with angiogenic structures in co-cultures of OEC and osteogenic cells. The active addition of EPC to co-cultures of OEC and MSC resulted in a statistically approved increase in the formation of prevascular structures at early stages of the co-culture process. In addition, we observed an increase of endothelial markers, indicating beneficial effects of EPC or myeloid cells on endothelial cell growth. Furthermore, real time PCR indicated high expression levels of CD68, CD11b and CD163 in co-cultures of EPC and MSC indicating that EPC act at least partly as macrophage like-cells.

  19. The Role and Potential Therapeutic Application of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Allo- and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fujino, Masayuki; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Xiao-kang

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that consists of myeloid progenitor cells and immature myeloid cells. They have been identified as a cell population that may affect the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells to regulate the immune response negatively, which makes them attractive targets for the treatment of transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Several studies have suggested the potential suppressive effect of MDSCs on allo- and autoimmune responses. Conversely, MDSCs have also been found at various stages of differentiation, accumulating during pathological situations, not only during tumor development but also in a variety of inflammatory immune responses, bone marrow transplantation, and some autoimmune diseases. These findings appear to be contradictory. In this review, we summarize the roles of MDSCs in different transplantation and autoimmune diseases models as well as the potential to target these cells for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26078493

  20. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  1. Loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells prolongs survival in a syngeneic model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Braden C.; Marks, Margaret P.; Rowse, Amber L.; Fehling, Samuel C.; Gerigk, Magda; Qin, Hongwei; Benveniste, Etty N.

    2016-01-01

    In glioma, microglia and macrophages are the largest population of tumor-infiltrating cells, referred to as glioma associated macrophages (GAMs). Herein, we sought to determine the role of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 (SOCS3), a negative regulator of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), in GAM functionality in glioma. We utilized a conditional model in which SOCS3 deletion is restricted to the myeloid cell population. We found that SOCS3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages display enhanced and prolonged expression of pro-inflammatory M1 cytokines when exposed to glioma tumor cell conditioned medium in vitro. Moreover, we found that deletion of SOCS3 in the myeloid cell population delays intracranial tumor growth and increases survival of mice bearing orthotopic glioma tumors in vivo. Although intracranial tumors from mice with SOCS3-deficient myeloid cells appear histologically similar to control mice, we observed that loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in decreased M2 polarized macrophage infiltration in the tumors. Furthermore, loss of SOCS3 in myeloid cells results in increased CD8+ T-cell and decreased regulatory T-cell infiltration in the tumors. These findings demonstrate a beneficial effect of M1 polarized macrophages on suppressing glioma tumor growth, and highlight the importance of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26967393

  2. C3G forms complexes with Bcr-Abl and p38α MAPK at the focal adhesions in chronic myeloid leukemia cells: implication in the regulation of leukemic cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies by our group and others have shown that C3G interacts with Bcr-Abl through its SH3-b domain. Results In this work we show that C3G and Bcr-Abl form complexes with the focal adhesion (FA) proteins CrkL, p130Cas, Cbl and Abi1 through SH3/SH3-b interactions. The association between C3G and Bcr-Abl decreased upon Abi1 or p130Cas knock-down in K562 cells, which suggests that Abi1 and p130Cas are essential partners in this interaction. On the other hand, C3G, Abi1 or Cbl knock-down impaired adhesion to fibronectin, while p130Cas silencing enhanced it. C3G, Cbl and p130Cas-SH3-b domains interact directly with common proteins involved in the regulation of cell adhesion and migration. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies revealed that C3G form complexes with the FA proteins paxillin and FAK and their phosphorylated forms. Additionally, C3G, Abi1, Cbl and p130Cas regulate the expression and phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK. p38α MAPK also participates in the regulation of adhesion in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. It interacts with C3G, CrkL, FAK and paxillin and regulates the expression of paxillin, CrkL and α5 integrin, as well as paxillin phosphorylation. Moreover, double knock-down of C3G/p38α decreased adhesion to fibronectin, similarly to the single silencing of one of these genes, either C3G or p38α. These suggest that C3G and p38α MAPK are acting through a common pathway to regulate cell adhesion in K562 cells, as previously described for the regulation of apoptosis. Conclusions Our results indicate that C3G-p38αMAPK pathway regulates K562 cell adhesion through the interaction with FA proteins and Bcr-Abl, modulating the formation of different protein complexes at FA. PMID:23343344

  3. Myeloid cells in atherosclerosis: a delicate balance of anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Koltsova, Ekaterina K.; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, whose progression is orchestrated by the balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils can be found in normal and atherosclerotic aortas, in which they regulate inflammation and progression of atherosclerosis. The lineage relationship between blood monocyte subsets and the various phenotypes and functions of myeloid cells in diseased aortas is under active investigation. Recent findings Various subsets of myeloid cells play diverse roles in atherosclerosis. This review discusses new findings in phenotypic and functional characterization of different subsets of macrophages, in part determined by the transcription factors IRF5 and Trib1, and dendritic cells, characterized by the transcription factor Zbtb46, in atherosclerosis. Summary Improved understanding proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms of macrophages and dendritic cell functions is needed for better preventive and therapeutic measures in atherosclerosis. PMID:24005215

  4. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 cooperate in regulating BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Holly; Wang, Guan; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ge, Yubin

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy and a high relapse rate highlight the importance of finding new therapeutic options for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACIs) are a promising class of drugs for the treatment of AML. HDACIs have limited single-agent clinical activities, but when combined with conventional or investigational drugs they have demonstrated favorable outcomes. Previous studies have shown that decreasing expression of important DNA damage repair proteins enhances standard chemotherapy drugs. In our recent studies, the pan-HDACI panobinostat has been shown to enhance conventional chemotherapy drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin in AML cells by decreasing the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51. In this study, we utilized class- and isoform-specific HDACIs and shRNA knockdown of individual HDACs to determine which HDACs are responsible for decreased expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 following pan-HDACI treatment in AML cells. We found that inhibition of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 was necessary to decrease the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51, enhance cytarabine- or daunorubicin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and abrogate cytarabine- or daunorubicin-induced cell cycle checkpoint activation in AML cells. These findings may aid in the development of rationally designed drug combinations for the treatment of AML. PMID:28030834

  5. Interleukin 6 induces myeloid differentiation of a human biphenotypic leukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A; Petsche, D; Grunberger, T; Freedman, M H

    1992-08-01

    The human leukemic cell line B1, is characterized by a specific 4;11 chromosomal translocation, immature myeloid/pre-B biphenotypic features, expression of multiple cytokine receptors and IL-1-dependent autocrine growth regulation [Cohen et al. (1991) Blood 78, 94]. Exposure of B1 cells to low concentrations of IL-6 abolished the leukemic cells ability to form colonies in semi-solid medium and slowed down their proliferation rate in suspension. Associated with these changes in growth characteristics, the B1 cells differentiated along the myeloid lineage as judged by the induction of the myeloid-specific surface antigens CD33, CD13 and CD11b, as well as histochemical and morphological changes characteristic of myeloid cells. The induction of differentiation was specific to IL-6 since none of the other cytokines which inhibited B1 cell growth (IL-7, gamma IFN and TNF alpha) were able to induce myeloid or lymphoid differentiation in these cells. The IL-6-induced differentiation was completed over a two week period and was essentially irreversible. Together with the phenotypic changes, IL-6 induced the expression of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45) which may be associated with altered growth observed in IL-6-treated cells. Induction of terminal differentiation of leukemic cells by recombinant bioregulators has therapeutic implications and merits further study.

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in transplantation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochando, Jordi C; Chen, Shu Hsia

    2012-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are myeloid cells that suppress the immune response, a definition that reflects both their origin and their function. As negative regulators of the immune response, MDSC represent a novel therapeutic approach for manipulating the immune system toward tolerance or immunity. MDSC are present in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice and are in part responsible for the inhibition of the cell-mediated immune response against the tumor. Our laboratories investigate the immunologic mechanisms of tumor acceptance mediated by MDSC, which can be exploited to prevent allograft rejection in transplantation. A better understanding of MDSC biology will open new avenues for therapeutic intervention, either by inhibiting their function (i.e. in cancer patients), or by enhancing their suppressive effects and promoting their expansion (i.e. in organ transplantation and alloimmune responses). In this review, we summarize some of the critical aspects of the immunoregulatory function of MDSC in cancer and transplantation and discuss their potential clinical applications.

  7. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Roles for Cell-Cell Adhesion and Contact in Obesity-Induced Hepatic Myeloid Cell Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Yasutaka; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Komiya, Chikara; Shiba, Kumiko; Shimazu, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Deushi, Michiyo; Osaka, Mizuko; Inoue, Kouji; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Kikuta, Junichi; Wake, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ishii, Masaru; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-14

    Obesity promotes infiltration of inflammatory cells into various tissues, leading to parenchymal and stromal cell interaction and development of cellular and organ dysfunction. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are the first cells that contact portal blood cells and substances in the liver, but their functions in the development of obesity-associated glucose metabolism remain unclear. Here, we find that LSECs are involved in obesity-associated accumulation of myeloid cells via VLA-4-dependent cell-cell adhesion. VLA-4 blockade in mice fed a high-fat diet attenuated myeloid cell accumulation in the liver to improve hepatic inflammation and systemic glucose intolerance. Ex vivo studies further show that cell-cell contact between intrahepatic leukocytes and parenchymal hepatocytes induces gluconeogenesis via a Notch-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that cell-cell interaction between parenchymal and stromal cells regulates hepatic glucose metabolism and offers potential strategies for treatment or prevention of obesity-associated glucose intolerance.

  9. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN.

  10. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greten, Tim F.; Manns, Michael P.; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been described as a heterogeneous cell population with potent immune suppressor function in mice. Limited data are available on MDSC in human diseases. Interpretation of these data is complicated by the fact that different markers have been used to analyze human MDSC subtypes in various clinical settings. Human MDSC are CD11b+, CD33+, HLA-DRneg/low and can be divided into granulocytic CD14− and monocytic CD14+ subtypes. Interleukin 4Rα, VEGFR, CD15 and CD66b have been suggested to be more specific markers for human MDSC, however these markers can only be found on some MDSC subsets. Until today the best marker for human MDSC remains their suppressor function, which can be either direct or indirect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Immune suppressor activity has been associated with high arginase 1 and iNOS activity as well as ROS production by MDSC. Not only in murine models, but even more importantly in patients with cancer, different drugs have been shown to either reverse the immune suppressor function of MDSC or directly target these cells. Systemic treatment with all-trans-retinoic acid has been shown to mature human MDSC and reverse their immune suppressor function. Alternatively, MDSC can be targeted by treatment with the multi-targeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. In this review will provide a comprehensive summary of the recent literature on human MDSC. PMID:21237299

  11. Distinct Regulatory Effects of Myeloid Cell and Endothelial Cell NAPDH Oxidase 2 on Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sag, Can Martin; Schnelle, Moritz; Zhang, Juqian; Murdoch, Colin E; Kossmann, Sabine; Protti, Andrea; Santos, Celio X C; Sawyer, Greta; Zhang, Xiaohong; Mongue-Din, Heloise; Richards, Daniel A; Brewer, Alison C; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Maier, Lars S; Wenzel, Philip; Eaton, Philip J; Shah, Ajay M

    2017-05-30

    Hypertension caused by increased renin-angiotensin system activation is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species production. Previous studies implicate NADPH oxidase (Nox) proteins as important reactive oxygen species sources during renin-angiotensin system activation, with different Nox isoforms being potentially involved. Among these, Nox2 is expressed in multiple cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune cells, and microglia. Blood pressure (BP) is regulated at the central nervous system, renal, and vascular levels, but the cell-specific role of Nox2 in BP regulation is unknown. We generated a novel mouse model with a floxed Nox2 gene and used Tie2-Cre, LysM Cre, or Cdh5-CreERT2 driver lines to develop cell-specific models of Nox2 perturbation to investigate its role in BP regulation. Unexpectedly, Nox2 deletion in myeloid but not endothelial cells resulted in a significant reduction in basal BP. Both Tie2-CreNox2 knockout (KO) mice (in which Nox2 was deficient in both endothelial cells and myeloid cells) and LysM CreNox2KO mice (in which Nox2 was deficient in myeloid cells) had significantly lower BP than littermate controls, whereas basal BP was unaltered in Cdh5-CreERT2 Nox2KO mice (in which Nox2 is deficient only in endothelial cells). The lower BP was attributable to an increased NO bioavailability that dynamically dilated resistance vessels in vivo under basal conditions without a change in renal function. Myeloid-specific Nox2 deletion had no effect on angiotensin II-induced hypertension, which, however, was blunted in Tie2-CreNox2KO mice, along with preservation of endothelium-dependent relaxation during angiotensin II stimulation. We identify a hitherto unrecognized modulation of basal BP by myeloid cell Nox2, whereas endothelial cell Nox2 regulates angiotensin II-induced hypertension. These results identify distinct cell-specific roles for Nox2 in BP regulation. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. bcl-2 proto-oncogene expression in normal and neoplastic human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Delia, D; Aiello, A; Soligo, D; Fontanella, E; Melani, C; Pezzella, F; Pierotti, M A; Della Porta, G

    1992-03-01

    The present study provides immunobiochemical and molecular data on the differentiation-linked expression of the bcl-2 proto-oncogene in normal and neoplastic myeloid cells. Using a recently developed monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to the bcl-2 molecule, staining of normal bone marrow myeloblasts, promyelocytes, and myelocytes, but neither monocytes nor most polymorphonuclear cells, was demonstrated. By two-color flow cytometric analysis, bcl-2 was evidenced in CD33+ and CD33+/CD34+ myeloid cells as well as in the more primitive CD33-/CD34+ population. The leukemic cell lines HL-60, KG1, GM-1, and K562 were bcl-2 positive together with 11 of 14 acute myeloid leukemias (AML) and three of three chronic myeloid leukemias (CML) in blast crises; six of seven CML were negative. Among myelodysplastic cases, augmentation of the bcl-2 positive myeloblastic compartment was found in refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) and in transformation (RAEB-t). Western blots of myeloid leukemias and control lymphocytes extracts evidenced an anti-bcl-2 immunoreactive band of the expected size (26 Kd). Moreover, the HL-60 and KG1 cell lines, both positive for the bcl-2 protein, exhibited the appropriate size bcl-2 mRNA (7.5 Kb). These findings clearly indicate that the bcl-2 gene is operative in myeloid cells and that the anti-bcl-2 MoAb identifies its product and not a cross-reactive epitope. Induction of HL-60 differentiation toward the monocytic and granulocytic pathways was accompanied by a marked decrease in bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels; bivariate flow cytometric analysis showed that the fraction becoming bcl-2 negative was in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These data establish that the bcl-2 proto-oncogene is expressed on myeloid cells and their progenitors and is regulated in a differentiation-linked manner.

  13. Expression of the potential therapeutic target CXXC5 in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells - high expression is associated with adverse prognosis as well as altered intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bruserud, Øystein; Reikvam, Håkon; Fredly, Hanne; Skavland, Jørn; Hagen, Karen-Marie; van Hoang, Tuyen Thy; Brenner, Annette K.; Kadi, Amir; Astori, Audrey; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Pendino, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The CXXC5 gene encodes a transcriptional activator with a zinc-finger domain, and high expression in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells is associated with adverse prognosis. We now characterized the biological context of CXXC5 expression in primary human AML cells. The global gene expression profile of AML cells derived from 48 consecutive patients was analyzed; cells with high and low CXXC5 expression then showed major differences with regard to extracellular communication and intracellular signaling. We observed significant differences in the phosphorylation status of several intracellular signaling mediators (CREB, PDK1, SRC, STAT1, p38, STAT3, rpS6) that are important for PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling and/or transcriptional regulation. High CXXC5 expression was also associated with high mRNA expression of several stem cell-associated transcriptional regulators, the strongest associations being with WT1, GATA2, RUNX1, LYL1, DNMT3, SPI1, and MYB. Finally, CXXC5 knockdown in human AML cell lines caused significantly increased expression of the potential tumor suppressor gene TSC22 and genes encoding the growth factor receptor KIT, the cytokine Angiopoietin 1 and the selenium-containing glycoprotein Selenoprotein P. Thus, high CXXC5 expression seems to affect several steps in human leukemogenesis, including intracellular events as well as extracellular communication. PMID:25605239

  14. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited “host” cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8+ cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  15. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  16. Altered gp130 signalling ameliorates experimental colitis via myeloid cell-specific STAT3 activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Däbritz, Jan; Judd, Louise M.; Chalinor, Heather V.; Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 regulates the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during inflammation, infection and cancer. Hyperactivation of STAT3 in gp130757F/F mice is associated with protection from experimental colitis. This study determined mechanisms for this protection and compared this to mice with myeloid-specific STAT3-deficiency (LysMcre/STAT3flox; gp130757F/F LysMcre/STAT3flox). Acute and chronic colitis was induced and colons were removed for histological, mRNA and protein analysis. Cell populations from spleen, mesenteric lymph node and colon were analyzed for different myeloid cell populations using flow cytometry. Functions of MDSCs and LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were further characterized by in vitro and in vivo assays. Here we show that the resistance to experimental colitis in gp130757F/F mice is via myeloid-cell specific STAT3 activation, MDSC expansion and increased production of suppressive and protective cytokines. PMID:26848037

  17. Transcription factors in myeloid-derived suppressor cell recruitment and function.

    PubMed

    Sonda, Nada; Chioda, Mariacristina; Zilio, Serena; Simonato, Francesca; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2011-04-01

    In normal hematopoiesis, differentiation and maturation of cell populations belonging to various lineages are tightly regulated by the interaction of many transcription factors. The relative numbers of different myeloid cells depends on their proliferative/apoptotic rate, while their identity relates to their recruitment to the sites of action and the expression of specific genes regulating their function. Under pathological conditions, as during chronic inflammation and cancer development, an aberrant hematopoiesis occurs, with the consequent expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These cells have distinctive properties that determine their ability to tune down the immune system by principally inactivating CD8(+) T cells. Understanding the molecular networks regulating the phenotypic and functional determination of MDSCs is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets to revert immune deregulation in cancer.

  18. Polarization and reprogramming of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chin; Ma, Ge; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Pan, Ping-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have recently emerged as one of the central regulators of the immune system. In recent years, interest in understanding MDSC biology and applying MDSC for therapeutic purpose has exploded exponentially. Despite recent progress in MDSC biology, the mechanisms underlying MDSC development from expansion and activation to polarization in different diseases remain poorly understood. More recent studies have demonstrated that two MDSC subsets, M (monocytic)-MDSC and G (granulocytic)-MDSC, are able to polarize from a classically activated phenotype (M1) to an alternatively activated one (M2), or vice versa, in tumor-bearing mice. This phenotypic polarization affects MDSC function and disease progression. In this article, we summarize and discuss polarization, mechanism and therapeutic potential of MDSC. An emphasis is placed on the emerging concept of reprogramming MDSC polarization as a therapeutic strategy.

  19. Mechanisms overseeing myeloid-derived suppressor cell production in neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Netherby, Colleen S; Abrams, Scott I

    2017-02-21

    Perturbations in myeloid cell differentiation are common in neoplasia, culminating in immature populations known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs favor tumor progression due to their ability to suppress host immunity or promote invasion and metastasis. They are thought to originate from the bone marrow as a result of exposure to stromal- or circulating tumor-derived factors (TDFs). Although great interest has been placed on understanding how MDSCs function, less is known regarding how MDSCs develop at a transcriptional level. Our work explores the premise that MDSCs arise because cancer cells, through the production of certain TDFs, inhibit the expression of interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) that is ordinarily essential for controlling fundamental properties of myeloid cell differentiation. Our interest in IRF8 has been based on the following rationale. First, it is well-recognized that IRF8 is a 'master regulator' of normal myelopoiesis, critical not only for producing monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and neutrophils, but also for controlling the balance of all three major myeloid cell types. This became quite evident in IRF8(-/-) mice, whereby the loss of IRF8 leads to a disproportionate accumulation of neutrophils at the expense of monocytes and DCs. Second, we showed that such myeloid populations from IRF8(-/-) mice exhibit similar characteristics to MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice. Third, in a reciprocal fashion, we showed that enforced expression of IRF8 in the myeloid system significantly mitigates tumor-induced MDSC accumulation and improves immunotherapy efficacy. Altogether, these observations support the hypothesis that IRF8 is an integral negative regulator of MDSC biology.

  20. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  1. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  2. Myeloid antigens in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia: clinical data point to regulation of CD66c distinct from other myeloid antigens.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Tomas; Vaskova, Martina; Mejstrikova, Ester; Madzo, Jozef; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2005-04-12

    Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (MyAgs) on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells is a well-documented phenomenon, although its regulating mechanisms are unclear. MyAgs in ALL are interpreted e.g. as hallmarks of early differentiation stage and/or lineage indecisiveness. Granulocytic marker CD66c -- Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is aberrantly expressed on ALL with strong correlation to genotype (negative in TEL/AML1 and MLL/AF4, positive in BCR/ABL and hyperdiploid cases). In a cohort of 365 consecutively diagnosed Czech B-precursor ALL patients, we analyze distribution of MyAg+ cases and mutual relationship among CD13, CD15, CD33, CD65 and CD66c. The most frequent MyAg (CD66c) is studied further regarding its stability from diagnosis to relapse, prognostic significance and regulation of surface expression. For the latter, flow cytometry, Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells is used. We show CD66c is expressed in 43% patients, which is more frequent than other MyAgs studied. In addition, CD66c expression negatively correlates with CD13 (p < 0.0001), CD33 (p = 0.002) and/or CD65 (p = 0.029). Our data show that different myeloid antigens often differ in biological importance, which may be obscured by combining them into "MyAg positive ALL". We show that unlike other MyAgs, CD66c expression is not shifted from the onset of ALL to relapse (n = 39, time to relapse 0.3-5.3 years). Although opposite has previously been suggested, we show that CEACAM6 transcription is invariably followed by surface expression (by quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells) and that malignant cells containing CD66c in cytoplasm without surface expression are not found by flow cytometry nor by Western blot in vivo. We report no prognostic significance of CD66c, globally or separately in genotype subsets of B-precursor ALL, nor an association with known risk factors (n = 254). In contrast to general notion we show that different My

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: a double-edged sword?

    PubMed Central

    Pastuła, Agnieszka; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are important cell population with an immunoregulatory potential in both adaptive and innate immunity. Their immunosuppressive activity is widely accepted. However, emerging evidence suggests that this heterogeneous cell population can be, under some circumstances, immunostimulatory rather than suppressive. This finding can shed a new light on antitumour immunity which is believed to be impaired in immunosuppressive environments. PMID:21314739

  4. Deregulated expression of Cdc6 as BCR/ABL-dependent survival factor in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; He, Yan-Li; Zhu, Rui; Du, Wen; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is characterized by the presence of the reciprocal translocation t(9;22) and the BCR/ABL oncogene. The BCR/ABL oncogene activates multiple signaling pathways and involves the dysregulation of oncogenes during the progression of chronic myeloid leukemia. The cell division cycle protein 6, an essential regulator of DNA replication, is elevated in some human cancer cells. However, the expression of cell division cycle protein 6 in chronic myeloid leukemia and the underlying regulatory mechanism remain to be elucidated. In this study, our data showed that cell division cycle protein 6 expression was significantly upregulated in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells and the chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 cells, as compared to the normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitor STI571 or BCR/ABL small interfering RNA could significantly downregulate cell division cycle protein 6 messenger RNA expression in K562 cells. Moreover, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002 and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway inhibitor AG490 could downregulate cell division cycle protein 6 expression in K562 cells, but not RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor PD98059 had such effect. Cell division cycle protein 6 gene silencing by small interfering RNA effectively resulted in decrease of proliferation, increase of apoptosis, and arrest of cell cycle in K562 cells. These findings have demonstrated that cell division cycle protein 6 overexpression may contribute to the high proliferation and low apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia cells and can be regulated by BCR/ABL signal transduction through downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, suggesting cell division cycle protein 6 as a potential therapeutic target in chronic myeloid leukemia.

  5. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Geyh, S; Rodríguez-Paredes, M; Jäger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment.

  6. M-CSF instructs myeloid lineage fate in single haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mossadegh-Keller, Noushine; Sarrazin, Sandrine; Kandalla, Prashanth K.; Espinosa, Leon; Stanley, E. Richard; Nutt, Stephen L.; Moore, Jordan; Sieweke, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Under stress conditions such as infection or inflammation the body rapidly needs to generate new blood cells that are adapted to the challenge. Haematopoietic cytokines are known to increase output of specific mature cells by affecting survival, expansion and differentiation of lineage-committed progenitors1,2, but it has been debated whether long-term haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are susceptible to direct lineage-specifying effects of cytokines. Although genetic changes in transcription factor balance can sensitize HSCs to cytokine instruction3, the initiation of HSC commitment is generally thought to be triggered by stochastic fluctuation in cell-intrinsic regulators such as lineage-specific transcription factors4–7, leaving cytokines to ensure survival and proliferation of the progeny cells8,9. Here we show that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called CSF1), a myeloid cytokine released during infection and inflammation, can directly induce the myeloid master regulator PU.1 and instruct myeloid cell-fate change in mouse HSCs, independently of selective survival or proliferation. Video imaging and single-cell gene expression analysis revealed that stimulation of highly purified HSCs with M-CSF in culture resulted in activation of the PU.1 promoter and an increased number of PU.1+ cells with myeloid gene signature and differentiation potential. In vivo, high systemic levels of M-CSF directly stimulated M-CSF-receptor-dependent activation of endogenous PU.1 protein in single HSCs and induced a PU.1-dependent myeloid differentiation preference. Our data demonstrate that lineage-specific cytokines can act directly on HSCs in vitro and in vivo to instruct a change of cell identity. This fundamentally changes the current view of how HSCs respond to environmental challenge and implicates stress-induced cytokines as direct instructors of HSC fate. PMID:23575636

  7. KLF6 contributes to myeloid cell plasticity in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Wendy A.; Omenetti, Sara; Date, Dipali; Di Martino, Luca; De Salvo, Carlo; Kim, Gun-Dong; Chowdhry, Saleem; Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio; Pizarro, Theresa T.; Mahabeleshwar, Ganapati H.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with dysregulated macrophage responses, such that quiescent macrophages acquire a pro-inflammatory activation state and contribute to chronic intestinal inflammation. The transcriptional events governing macrophage activation and gene expression in the context of chronic inflammation such as IBD remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify Kruppel-like transcription factor-6 (KLF6) as a critical regulator of pathogenic myeloid cell activation in human and experimental IBD. We found that KLF6 was significantly upregulated in myeloid cells and intestinal tissue from IBD patients and experimental models of IBD, particularly in actively inflamed regions of the colon. Using complementary gain- and loss-of-function studies, we observed that KLF6 promotes pro-inflammatory gene expression through enhancement of NFκB signaling, while simultaneously suppressing anti-inflammatory gene expression through repression of STAT3 signaling. To study the in vivo role of myeloid KLF6, we treated myeloid-specific KLF6-knockout mice (Mac-KLF6-KO) with dextran sulfate-sodium (DSS) and found that Mac-KLF6-KO mice were protected against chemically-induced colitis; this highlights the central role of myeloid KLF6 in promoting intestinal inflammation. Collectively, our results point to a novel gene regulatory program underlying pathogenic, pro-inflammatory macrophage activation in the setting of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:26838049

  8. The normal flora may contribute to the quantitative preponderance of myeloid cells under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shi; LiHua, Hu

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the innate immune cells derived from myeloid lineage absolutely outnumber the lymphoid cells. At present, two theories are attributed to the maintenance of haemopoiesis: the asymmetric cell division and the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment or "niche". However, the former only explains the self-renewal of haemopoietic stem cell (HSC) and the start of haemopoietic differentiation but fails to address the inducers of cell fate decisions; the latter has to admit that the hematopoietic cytokines, despite their significance in the maintenance of haemopoiesis, have no specific effect on lineage commitment. Given these flaws, the advantageous mechanism of myeloid haemopoiesis has not yet been uncovered in the current theories. The discoveries that bacterial components (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and intestinal decontamination affect the mobilization of HSC trigger the interest in normal flora, which together with their components may have an effect on haemopoiesis. In the experiments in dogs and mice, researchers documented that the generation of myeloid cells has undergone changes in the bone marrow and periphery when antibiotics are used to regulate the normal intestinal flora and the concentration of its components. However, the same changes are not involved in lymphoid cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that in human body normal flora and its components are a driving force to maintain myeloid haemopoiesis under physiological conditions. To account for the selectiveness in haemopoiesis, these facts should be taken into consideration, such as HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) functionally expressed pattern recognition receptors (PRR), and both of them can self-migrate or be recruited by normal flora or its components into periphery. Dynamically monitoring the myeloid haemopoiesis may provide an important complementary program that precludes the abuse of antibiotics, which prevents diseases triggered by the imbalance of normal

  9. Hypoxia inducible factors are dispensable for myeloid cell migration into the inflamed mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Peter J.; Liyanage, Sidath E.; Cristante, Enrico; Sampson, Robert D.; Dick, Andrew D.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors important for cell homeostasis during dynamic oxygen levels. Myeloid specific HIFs are crucial for aspects of myeloid cell function, including their ability to migrate into inflamed tissues during autoimmune disease. This contrasts with the concept that accumulation of myeloid cells at ischemic and hypoxic sites results from a lack of chemotactic responsiveness. Here we seek to address the role of HIFs in myeloid trafficking during inflammation in a mouse model of human uveitis. We show using mice with myeloid-specific Cre-deletion of HIFs that myeloid HIFs are dispensable for leukocyte migration into the inflamed eye. Myeloid-specific deletion of Hif1a, Epas1, or both together, had no impact on the number of myeloid cells migrating into the eye. Additionally, stabilization of HIF pathways via deletion of Vhl in myeloid cells had no impact on myeloid trafficking into the inflamed eye. Finally, we chemically induce hypoxemia via hemolytic anemia resulting in HIF stabilization within circulating leukocytes to demonstrate the dispensable role of HIFs in myeloid cell migration into the inflamed eye. These data suggest, contrary to previous reports, that HIF pathways in myeloid cells during inflammation and hypoxia are dispensable for myeloid cell tissue trafficking. PMID:28112274

  10. CSF-1 Receptor Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, E. Richard; Chitu, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is activated by the homodimeric growth factors colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34). It plays important roles in development and in innate immunity by regulating the development of most tissue macrophages and osteoclasts, of Langerhans cells of the skin, of Paneth cells of the small intestine, and of brain microglia. It also regulates the differentiation of neural progenitor cells and controls functions of oocytes and trophoblastic cells in the female reproductive tract. Owing to this broad tissue expression pattern, it plays a central role in neoplastic, inflammatory, and neurological diseases. In this review we summarize the evolution, structure, and regulation of expression of the CSF-1R gene. We review, the structures of CSF-1, IL-34, and the CSF-1R and the mechanism of ligand binding to and activation of the receptor. We further describe the pathways regulating macrophage survival, proliferation, differentiation, and chemotaxis downstream from the CSF-1R. PMID:24890514

  11. Myeloid cells as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics: turning obstacles into opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kortylewski, Marcin; Moreira, Dayson

    2017-08-01

    Immunotherapies emerged as an alternative for cancer treatment, yet their clinical efficacies are still limited, especially in case of solid tumors. Myeloid immune cells, such as macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are often hijacked by tumors and become pivotal inhibitors of antitumor immunity. Immunosuppressive functions of tumor-associated myeloid cells result from the activity of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), a transcription factor with well-defined tumorigenic and tolerogenic roles in human cancers. To overcome challenges in the development of pharmacological STAT3 inhibitors, we recently developed oligonucleotide-based strategies for cell-selective, in vivo STAT3 targeting. Conjugation of a STAT3siRNA or decoy STAT3 inhibitors to synthetic Toll-like Receptor 9 (TLR9) agonists, CpG oligonucleotides, allowed for selective delivery into TLR9-positive cells. Cellular target for CpG-STAT3 inhibitors include non-malignant, tumor-associated myeloid cells, such as polymorphonuclear MDSCs, as well as cancer cells in acute myeloid leukemia, B cell lymphoma and in certain solid tumors. The chemically modified CpG-STAT3 inhibitors resist serum nucleases and thus can be administered intravenously. Their potency relies on the intracellular gain-of-function effect: release of the central immune checkpoint regulator (STAT3) to unleash proinflammatory signaling (CpG/TLR9) in the same antigen-presenting cell. At the cellular level, CpG-STAT3 inhibitors exert two-pronged effect by rescuing T cells from the immune checkpoint control while decreasing survival of cancer cells. In this article, we review the preclinical data on CpG-STAT3 inhibitors and discuss perspectives of using TLR9-targeted delivery of oligonucleotide therapeutics for the generation of novel, more effective and safer cancer immunotherapies.

  12. Immune Suppression by Myeloid Cells in HIV Infection: New Targets for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehraj, Vikram; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Vyboh, Kishanda; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Over thirty years of extensive research has not yet solved the complexity of HIV pathogenesis leading to a continued need for a successful cure. Recent immunotherapy-based approaches are aimed at controlling the infection by reverting immune dysfunction. Comparatively less appreciated than the role of T cells in the context of HIV infection, the myeloid cells including macrophages monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils contribute significantly to immune dysfunction. Host restriction factors are cellular proteins expressed in these cells which are circumvented by HIV. Guided by the recent literature, the role of myeloid cells in HIV infection will be discussed highlighting potential targets for immunotherapy. HIV infection, which is mainly characterized by CD4 T cell dysfunction, also manifests in a vicious cycle of events comprising of inflammation and immune activation. Targeting the interaction of programmed death-1 (PD-1), an important regulator of T cell function; with PD-L1 expressed mainly on myeloid cells could bring promising results. Macrophage functional polarization from pro-inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 and vice versa has significant implications in viral pathogenesis. Neutrophils, recently discovered low density granular cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and yolk sac macrophages provide new avenues of research on HIV pathogenesis and persistence. Recent evidence has also shown significant implications of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial peptides and opsonizing antibodies. Further studies aimed to understand and modify myeloid cell restriction mechanisms have the potential to contribute in the future development of more effective anti-HIV interventions that may pave the way to viral eradication. PMID:25624956

  13. Radiation combined with thermal injury induces immature myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, April Elizabeth; Neely, Crystal Judith; Charles, Anthony G; Kartchner, Laurel Briane; Brickey, Willie June; Khoury, Amal Lina; Sempowski, Gregory D; Ting, Jenny P Y; Cairns, Bruce A; Maile, Robert

    2012-11-01

    The continued development of nuclear weapons and the potential for thermonuclear injury necessitates the further understanding of the immune consequences after radiation combined with injury (RCI). We hypothesized that sublethal ionization radiation exposure combined with a full-thickness thermal injury would result in the production of immature myeloid cells. Mice underwent either a full-thickness contact burn of 20% total body surface area or sham procedure followed by a single whole-body dose of 5-Gy radiation. Serum, spleen, and peripheral lymph nodes were harvested at 3 and 14 days after injury. Flow cytometry was performed to identify and characterize adaptive and innate cell compartments. Elevated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and profound leukopenia were observed after RCI. A population of cells with dual expression of the cell surface markers Gr-1 and CD11b were identified in all experimental groups, but were significantly elevated after burn alone and RCI at 14 days after injury. In contrast to the T-cell-suppressive nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells found after trauma and sepsis, myeloid cells after RCI augmented T-cell proliferation and were associated with a weak but significant increase in interferon γ and a decrease in interleukin 10. This is consistent with previous work in burn injury indicating that a myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like population increases innate immunity. Radiation combined injury results in the increase in distinct populations of Gr-1CD11b cells within the secondary lymphoid organs, and we propose these immature inflammatory myeloid cells provide innate immunity to the severely injured and immunocompromised host.

  14. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity.

  15. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  16. TGF-β-responsive myeloid cells suppress type 2 immunity and emphysematous pathology after hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Lisa; Rani, Reena; Dawson, Lucas; Perkins, Charles; Yang, Yanfen; Downey, Jordan; Hölscher, Christoph; Herbert, De'Broski R

    2012-09-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) regulates inflammation, immunosuppression, and wound-healing cascades, but it remains unclear whether any of these functions involve regulation of myeloid cell function. The present study demonstrates that selective deletion of TGF-βRII expression in myeloid phagocytes i) impairs macrophage-mediated suppressor activity, ii) increases baseline mRNA expression of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines in the lung, and iii) enhances type 2 immunity against the hookworm parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Strikingly, TGF-β-responsive myeloid cells promote repair of hookworm-damaged lung tissue, because LysM(Cre)TGF-βRII(flox/flox) mice develop emphysema more rapidly than wild-type littermate controls. Emphysematous pathology in LysM(Cre)TGF-βRII(flox/flox) mice is characterized by excessive matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity, reduced lung elasticity, increased total lung capacity, and dysregulated respiration. Thus, TGF-β effects on myeloid cells suppress helminth immunity as a consequence of restoring lung function after infection.

  17. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  18. Myeloid-related protein-14 regulates deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunmei; Gao, Huiyun; Kessinger, Chase W; Schmaier, Alvin; Jaffer, Farouc A; Simon, Daniel I

    2017-06-02

    Using transcriptional profiling of platelets from patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction, we identified myeloid-related protein-14 (MRP-14, also known as S100A9) as an acute myocardial infarction gene and reported that platelet MRP-14 binding to platelet CD36 regulates arterial thrombosis. However, whether MRP-14 plays a role in venous thrombosis is unknown. We subjected WT and Mrp-14-deficient (Mrp-14-/-) mice to experimental models of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) by stasis ligation or partial flow restriction (stenosis) of the inferior vena cava. Thrombus weight in response to stasis ligation or stenosis was reduced significantly in Mrp-14-/- mice compared with WT mice. The adoptive transfer of WT neutrophils or platelets, or the infusion of recombinant MRP-8/14, into Mrp-14-/- mice rescued the venous thrombosis defect in Mrp-14-/- mice, indicating that neutrophil- and platelet-derived MRP-14 directly regulate venous thrombogenesis. Stimulation of neutrophils with MRP-14 induced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and NETs were reduced in venous thrombi harvested from Mrp-14-/- mice and in Mrp-14-/- neutrophils stimulated with ionomycin. Given prior evidence that MRP-14 also regulates arterial thrombosis, but not hemostasis (i.e., reduced bleeding risk), MRP-14 appears to be a particularly attractive molecular target for treating thrombotic cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism.

  19. Circulating and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Neuberger, Molly; Daurkin, Irina; Perrin, George Q; Algood, Chester; Dahm, Philipp; Rosser, Charles; Vieweg, Johannes; Gilbert, Scott M; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2012-03-01

    Both cancer-related inflammation and tumor-induced immune suppression are associated with expansion of myeloid cell subsets including myeloid-derived suppressor cells. However, little known regarding characteristics of myeloid cells in patients with bladder cancer. In this study, we analyzed myeloid cells from peripheral blood (PBMC) and tumor tissue that were collected from patients with superficial noninvasive and invasive urothelial carcinomas. Our results demonstrate that PBMC from bladder cancer patients contain two major CD11b myeloid cell subsets: granulocyte-type CD15(high) CD33(low) cells and monocyte-type CD15(low) CD33(high) cells. The number of circulating granulocytic but not monocytic myeloid cells in cancer patients was markedly increased when compared to healthy individuals. Both myeloid cell subsets from cancer patients were highly activated and produced substantial amounts of proinflammatory chemokines/cytokines including CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, G-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6. Granulocytic myeloid cells were able to inhibit in vitro T cell proliferation through induction of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells. Analysis of bladder cancer tissues revealed that tumors were infiltrated with monocyte-macrophage CD11b(+) HLA-DR(+) and granulocytic CD11b(+) CD15(+) HLA-DR(-) myeloid cells. Collectively, this study identifies myeloid cell subsets in patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that these highly activated inflammatory myeloid cells represent a source of multiple chemokines/cytokines and may contribute to inflammation and immune dysfunction in bladder cancer.

  20. Expansion of CCR8+ inflammatory myeloid cells in cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Stoffs, Taryn; Kim, Wan-Ju; Daurkin, Irina; Gilbert, Scott M.; Su, Li-Ming; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemokines are involved in cancer-related inflammation and malignant progression. In this study we evaluated expression of CCR8 and its natural cognate ligand CCL1 in patients with urothelial carcinomas of bladder and renal cell carcinomas. Experimental Design We examined CCR8 expression in peripheral blood and tumor tissues from patients with bladder and renal carcinomas. CCR8-positive myeloid cells were isolated from cancer tissues with magnetic beads and tested in vitro for cytokine production and ability to modulate T cell function. Results We demonstrate that monocytic and granulocytic myeloid cell subsets in peripheral blood of cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas display increased expression of chemokine receptor CCR8. Up-regulated expression of CCR8 is also detected within human cancer tissues and primarily limited to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). When isolated, CD11b+CCR8+ cell subset produces the highest levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic factors among intratumoral CD11b myeloid cells. Tumor-infiltrating CD11b+CCR8+ cells selectively display activated Stat3 and are capable of inducing FoxP3 expression in autologous T lymphocytes. Primary human tumors produce substantial amounts of the natural CCR8 ligand CCL1. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that CCR8+ myeloid cell subset is expanded in cancer patients. Elevated secretion of CCL1 by tumors, increased presence of CCR8+ myeloid cells in peripheral blood and cancer tissues indicate that CCL1/CCR8 axis is a component of cancer-related inflammation and may contribute to immune evasion. Obtained results also implicate that blockade of CCR8 signals may provide an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in human urothelial and renal cancers. PMID:23363815

  1. Bone Marrow Derived Myeloid Cells Orchestrate Antiangiogenic Resistance in Glioblastoma through Coordinated Molecular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Achyut, B.R.; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, ASM; Ara, Roxan; Angara, Kartik; Zeng, Peng; Knight, Robert A.; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a hypervascular and malignant form of brain tumors. Anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in clinical and preclinical studies, which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) to the tumor microenvironment (TME). In vivo animal models to track BMDCs and investigate molecular mechanisms in AAT resistance are rare. We exploited recently established chimeric mouse to develop orthotopic U251 tumor, which uses as low as 5×106 GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice and engrafted >70% GFP+ cells within 14 days. Our unpublished data and published studies have indicated the involvement of immunosuppressive myeloid cells in therapeutic resistance in glioma. Similarly, in the present study, vatalanib significantly increased CD68+ myeloid cells, and CD133+, CD34+ and Tie2+ endothelial cell signatures. Therefore, we tested inhibition of CSF1R+ myeloid cells using GW2580 that reduced tumor growth by decreasing myeloid (Gr1+ CD11b+ and F4/80+) and angiogenic (CD202b+ and VEGFR2+) cell signatures in TME. CSF1R blockade significantly decreased inflammatory, proangiogenic and immunosuppressive molecular signatures compared to vehicle, vatalanib or combination. TCK1 or CXCL7, a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophils, was observed as most significantly decreased cytokine in CSF1R blockade. ERK MAPK pathway was involved in cytokine network regulation. In conclusion, present study confirmed the contribution of myeloid cells in GBM development and therapeutic resistance using chimeric mouse model. We identified novel molecular networks including CXCL7 chemokine as a promising target for future studies. Nonetheless, survival studies are required to assess the beneficial effect of CSF1R blockade. PMID:26404753

  2. Production of soluble CD34 by human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M; Simon, V; Minguell, J J

    2000-11-01

    CD34, a glycophosphoprotein present in lymphohaematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as in other cell types, exists in both transmembrane and intracytoplasmic forms. Transmembrane CD34 expression, which is high in the earliest haematopoietic precursors, decreases as cells mature. However, to our knowledge, there is no information on whether a decrease in transmembrane CD34 can also predict a release of the molecule from the cell membrane into the extracellular fluid. To investigate the above possibility, we studied conditions (incubation time, cell density and proliferative status) in human myeloid cells (lines KG-1a, KG-1 and cord blood-derived cells) that may cause a decrease in surface CD34 and the generation of a soluble form of the molecule. The latter, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis, adds more complexity to the proposed structural features and functional properties of CD34 in myeloid cells.

  3. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  4. Myeloid cells as target of fingolimod action in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Dario, Marco; Colombo, Emanuela; Govi, Chiara; De Feo, Donatella; Messina, Maria José; Romeo, Marzia; Sangalli, Francesca; Moiola, Lucia; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Martino, Gianvito; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To track the effects of fingolimod, an approved drug for multiple sclerosis (MS), on the activation of myeloid cells from the periphery to the CNS. Methods: In vitro and ex vivo immunologic studies coupled with flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the action of fingolimod on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced expression of activation markers in human monocytes from healthy participants, participants with untreated MS, and participants with fingolimod-treated MS. In vivo administration of fingolimod during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was established to verify the activation state of splenic, CNS infiltrating, and CNS resident myeloid cells ex vivo at flow cytometer. Results: We found that in vitro exposure of human monocytes to fingolimod inhibited LPS-induced CD25 and CD150 expression and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) secretion without altering immune cell survival. Further, EAE treatment with fingolimod led to reduced amounts of TNF-α produced by myeloid cells in vivo in the spleen and CNS. Finally, while displaying normal induction of CD25 and CD150 levels at high LPS concentration, monocytes from patients with fingolimod-treated MS showed significantly higher activation threshold at suboptimal LPS stimulation than controls. Conclusions: The inhibition of myeloid cell activation may be part of the immunosuppressive action of fingolimod and take place in the periphery and in the CNS. PMID:26587553

  5. CatacLysMic specificity when targeting myeloid cells?

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas; Prinz, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The antibacterial enzyme lysozyme M (LysM) encoded by the Lyz2 gene is broadly expressed in myeloblasts, macrophages, and neutrophils, and thus has been used for a long time as a cell-specific marker for myeloid cells in mice. In order to delete loxP-site flanked genes in myeloid cells, a Cre-recombinase (Cre) expressing mouse line was created by inserting Cre-coding sequence into the translational start site of the LysM gene. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [2016. 46: 1529-1532], Orthgiess et al. verify, with the help of tdTomato and YFP reporter mouse lines, LysM-driven recombination. Unexpectedly, the authors also describe major expression of the tdTomato reporter protein in brain neurons of the central nervous system (CNS), with only a very small percentage of gene recombination in myeloid cells of the brain, called microglia. These findings cause justified concerns regarding the efficient and specific targeting of microglia and peripheral myeloid cells using LysM-Cre mice and should stimulate thoughts on conclusions drawn from past experiments on the diseased CNS employing this Cre/loxP-deleter line. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Myeloid cells are required for PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint activation and the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Velez-Delgado, Ashley; Mathew, Esha; Li, Dongjun; Mendez, Flor M; Flannagan, Kevin; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Beatty, Gregory L; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is characterised by the accumulation of a fibro-inflammatory stroma. Within this stromal reaction, myeloid cells are a predominant population. Distinct myeloid subsets have been correlated with tumour promotion and unmasking of anti-tumour immunity. Objective The goal of this study was to determine the effect of myeloid cell depletion on the onset and progression of pancreatic cancer and to understand the relationship between myeloid cells and T cell-mediated immunity within the pancreatic cancer microenvironment. Methods Primary mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transplanted into CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice. Alternatively, the iKras* mouse model of pancreatic cancer was crossed into CD11b-DTR mice. CD11b+ cells (mostly myeloid cell population) were depleted by diphtheria toxin treatment during tumour initiation or in established tumours. Results Depletion of myeloid cells prevented KrasG12D-driven pancreatic cancer initiation. In pre-established tumours, myeloid cell depletion arrested tumour growth and in some cases, induced tumour regressions that were dependent on CD8+ T cells. We found that myeloid cells inhibited CD8+ T-cell anti-tumour activity by inducing the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in tumour cells in an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results show that myeloid cells support immune evasion in pancreatic cancer through EGFR/MAPK-dependent regulation of PD-L1 expression on tumour cells. Derailing this crosstalk between myeloid cells and tumour cells is sufficient to restore anti-tumour immunity mediated by CD8+ T cells, a finding with implications for the design of immune therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27402485

  7. Myeloid cells are required for PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint activation and the establishment of an immunosuppressive environment in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaqing; Velez-Delgado, Ashley; Mathew, Esha; Li, Dongjun; Mendez, Flor M; Flannagan, Kevin; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Beatty, Gregory L; Pasca di Magliano, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by the accumulation of a fibro-inflammatory stroma. Within this stromal reaction, myeloid cells are a predominant population. Distinct myeloid subsets have been correlated with tumour promotion and unmasking of anti-tumour immunity. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of myeloid cell depletion on the onset and progression of pancreatic cancer and to understand the relationship between myeloid cells and T cell-mediated immunity within the pancreatic cancer microenvironment. Primary mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transplanted into CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) mice. Alternatively, the iKras* mouse model of pancreatic cancer was crossed into CD11b-DTR mice. CD11b(+) cells (mostly myeloid cell population) were depleted by diphtheria toxin treatment during tumour initiation or in established tumours. Depletion of myeloid cells prevented Kras(G12D)-driven pancreatic cancer initiation. In pre-established tumours, myeloid cell depletion arrested tumour growth and in some cases, induced tumour regressions that were dependent on CD8(+) T cells. We found that myeloid cells inhibited CD8(+) T-cell anti-tumour activity by inducing the expression of programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in tumour cells in an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)-dependent manner. Our results show that myeloid cells support immune evasion in pancreatic cancer through EGFR/MAPK-dependent regulation of PD-L1 expression on tumour cells. Derailing this crosstalk between myeloid cells and tumour cells is sufficient to restore anti-tumour immunity mediated by CD8(+) T cells, a finding with implications for the design of immune therapies for pancreatic cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Myeloid leukemic progenitor cells can be specifically targeted by minor histocompatibility antigen LRH-1-reactive cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Norde, Wieger J; Overes, Ingrid M; Maas, Frans; Fredrix, Hanny; Vos, Johanna C M; Kester, Michel G D; van der Voort, Robbert; Jedema, Inge; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Schattenberg, Anton V; de Witte, Theo M; Dolstra, Harry

    2009-03-05

    CD8(+) T cells recognizing minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) on leukemic stem and progenitor cells play a pivotal role in effective graft-versus-leukemia reactivity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Previously, we identified a hematopoiesis-restricted MiHA, designated LRH-1, which is presented by HLA-B7 and encoded by the P2X5 purinergic receptor gene. We found that P2X5 is significantly expressed in CD34(+) leukemic subpopulations from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Here, we demonstrate that LRH-1-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses are frequently induced in myeloid leukemia patients following donor lymphocyte infusions. Patients with high percentages of circulating LRH-1-specific CD8(+) T cells had no or only mild graft-versus-host disease. Functional analysis showed that LRH-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) isolated from 2 different patients efficiently target LRH-1-positive leukemic CD34(+) progenitor cells from both CML and AML patients, whereas mature CML cells are only marginally lysed due to down-regulation of P2X5. Furthermore, we observed that relative resistance to LRH-1 CTL-mediated cell death due to elevated levels of antiapoptotic XIAP could be overcome by IFN-gamma prestimulation and increased CTL-target ratios. These findings provide a rationale for use of LRH-1 as immunotherapeutic target antigen to treat residual or persisting myeloid malignancies after allogeneic SCT.

  9. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias

  10. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Christian M; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2013-12-31

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to "malignant" DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias.

  11. Tetraspanin CD82 Regulates the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of PKCα in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Termini, Christina M.; Lidke, Keith A.; Gillette, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have increased myeloid cells within their bone marrow that exhibit aberrant signaling. Therefore, therapeutic targets that modulate disrupted signaling cascades are of significant interest. In this study, we demonstrate that the tetraspanin membrane scaffold, CD82, regulates protein kinase c alpha (PKCα)-mediated signaling critical for AML progression. Utilizing a palmitoylation mutant form of CD82 with disrupted membrane organization, we find that the CD82 scaffold controls PKCα expression and activation. Combining single molecule and ensemble imaging measurements, we determine that CD82 stabilizes PKCα activation at the membrane and regulates the size of PKCα membrane clusters. Further evaluation of downstream effector signaling identified robust and sustained activation of ERK1/2 upon CD82 overexpression that results in enhanced AML colony formation. Together, these data propose a mechanism where CD82 membrane organization regulates sustained PKCα signaling that results in an aggressive leukemia phenotype. These observations suggest that the CD82 scaffold may be a potential therapeutic target for attenuating aberrant signal transduction in AML. PMID:27417454

  12. Dendritic cell potentials of early lymphoid and myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Manz, M G; Traver, D; Miyamoto, T; Weissman, I L; Akashi, K

    2001-06-01

    It has been proposed that there are at least 2 classes of dendritic cells (DCs), CD8alpha(+) DCs derived from the lymphoid lineage and CD8alpha(-) DCs derived from the myeloid lineage. Here, the abilities of lymphoid- and myeloid-restricted progenitors to generate DCs are compared, and their overall contributions to the DC compartment are evaluated. It has previously been shown that primitive myeloid-committed progenitors (common myeloid progenitors [CMPs]) are efficient precursors of both CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) DCs in vivo. Here it is shown that the earliest lymphoid-committed progenitors (common lymphoid progenitors [CLPs]) and CMPs and their progeny granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) can give rise to functional DCs in vitro and in vivo. CLPs are more efficient in generating DCs than their T-lineage descendants, the early thymocyte progenitors and pro-T cells, and CMPs are more efficient DC precursors than the descendant GMPs, whereas pro-B cells and megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors are incapable of generating DCs. Thus, DC developmental potential is preserved during T- but not B-lymphoid differentiation from CLP and during granulocyte-macrophage but not megakaryocyte-erythrocyte development from CMP. In vivo reconstitution experiments show that CLPs and CMPs can reconstitute CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) DCs with similar efficiency on a per cell basis. However, CMPs are 10-fold more numerous than CLPs, suggesting that at steady state, CLPs provide only a minority of splenic DCs and approximately half the DCs in thymus, whereas most DCs, including CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) subtypes, are of myeloid origin. (Blood. 2001;97:3333-3341)

  13. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  14. Blocking Notch signal in myeloid cells alleviates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by repressing the activation of NF-κB through CYLD

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Heng-Chao; Bai, Lu; Yang, Zhao-Xu; Qin, Hong-Yan; Tao, Kai-Shan; Han, Hua; Dou, Ke-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a major reason of hepatocyte injury during liver surgery and transplantation. Myeloid cells including macrophages and neutrophils play important roles in sustained tissue inflammation and damage, but the mechanisms regulating myeloid cells activity have been elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of Notch signaling in myeloid cells during hepatic I/R injury by using a mouse model of myeloid specific conditional knockout of RBP-J. Myeloid-specific RBP-J deletion alleviated hepatic I/R injury. RBP-J deletion in myeloid cells decreased hepatocytes apoptosis after hepatic I/R injury. Furthermore, myeloid-specific RBP-J deletion led to attenuated inflammation response in liver after I/R injury. Consistently, Notch blockade reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines by macrophages in vitro. We also found that blocking Notch signaling reduced NF-κB activation and increased cylindromatosis (CYLD) expression and knockdown of CYLD rescued reduction of inflammatory cytokines induced by Notch blockade in macrophages during I/R injury in vitro. On the other hand, activation of Notch signaling in macrophages led to increased inflammatory cytokine production and NF-κB activation and decreased CYLD expression in vitro. These data suggest that activation of Notch signaling in myeloid cells aggravates I/R injury, by enhancing the inflammation response by NF-κB through down regulation of CYLD. PMID:27680285

  15. Myeloid Dendritic Cells Induce HIV-1 Latency in Non-proliferating CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Vanessa A.; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A.; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K.; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C.; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4+ T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4+ T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4+ T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4+ T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4+ T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact. PMID:24339779

  16. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+) T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  17. Complexity and Challenges in Defining Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Pinton, Laura; Desantis, Giacomo; Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Study of myeloid cells endowed with suppressive activity is an active field of research which has particular importance in cancer, in view of the negative regulatory capacity of these cells to the host's immune response. The expansion of these cells, called myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), has been documented in many models of tumor-bearing mice and in patients with tumors of various origin, and their presence is associated with disease progression and reduced survival. For this reason, monitoring this type of cell expansion is of clinical importance, and flow cytometry is the technique of choice for their identification. Over the years, it has been demonstrated that MDSCs comprise a group of immature myeloid cells belonging both to monocytic and granulocytic lineages, with several stages of differentiation; their occurrence depends on tumor-derived soluble factors, which guide their expansion and determine their block of differentiation. Because of their heterogeneous composition, accurate phenotyping of these cells requires a multicolor approach, so that the expansion of all MDSC subsets can be appreciated. This review article focuses on identifying MDSCs and discusses problems associated with phenotyping circulating and tumor-associated MDSCs in humans and in mouse models. © 2014 The Authors Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25504825

  18. Characterisation of subpopulations of myeloid cells in infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Elysia M S; Chudakova, Daria A; Davis, Paul F; Brasch, Helen D; Itinteang, Tinte; Tan, Swee T

    2015-07-01

    Cells expressing markers of mast cells, macrophages and dendritic cells have previously been demonstrated within the interstitium of infantile haemangioma (IH). This study characterised these myeloid cellular subpopulations within IH. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on proliferating and involuted IHs for the expression of Nanog, tryptase, CD163, DC-SIGN and CD45. The presence of mRNA corresponding to Nanog, tryptase α/β-1, tryptase β-2, CD163 and DC-SIGN was confirmed by NanoString and RT-PCR in snap-frozen IH tissues. Immunohistochemical staining showed expression of Nanog by interstitial phenotypical mast cells within proliferating IH, which were separate from the interstitial M2-polarised macrophages that also expressed DC-SIGN, a dendritic cell marker. These two myeloid cellular subpopulations in IH did not express the pan-haematopoietic marker, CD45. There are two interstitial subpopulations of myeloid cells within IH: phenotypical mast cells which also express Nanog, indicating a primitive phenotype; and M2-polarised macrophages which also express DC-SIGN. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and the regulation of adhesion molecules in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Di Noto, R; Lo Pardo, C; Schiavone, E M; Ferrara, F; Manzo, C; Vacca, C; Del Vecchio, L

    1996-04-01

    A review of recent information on the expression and the ATRA-driven modulation of cell surface adhesion molecules of acute myelogenous leukemia blast cells is presented. Cytofluorometric studies on fresh blast cells have demonstrated that CD11a, CD11b CD11c, CD15, CD45RO and CD54 expression is significantly lower in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) than is acute myeloid leukemia of other subtypes (AML). In vitro treatment with ATRA dramatically modifies the adhesion phenotype of APL blast cells, promoting a consistently striking up-regulation of CD11b, CD11c, CD15, CD65, CD54, and CD38. Which is in general, poorly demonstrable in AML. The behaviour of CD15s is variable and fully independent from CD15 and CD65 in induction experiments, suggesting a differential enzyme regulation within the selectin ligand system. ATRA is capable, in both APL and AML, of producing a switch from the high- (RA) to the low- (RO) molecular weight isoform of CD54, Moreover, treatment with this retinoid exerts a negative regulation of the membrane expression of CD49e, CD58 and CD11a in APL as well as in AML. Of particular interest is the fact that the negative effect on CD1 1a expression generates an asynchronous phenotype in APL (CD11a-, CD11b+, CD15+), undetectable on normal maturing myeloid cells. In the last part of this review the possible implications of adhesion molecule modulation in the pathogenesis of ATRA syndrome are discussed.

  20. G-CSF induces stabilization of ETS protein Fli-1 during myeloid cell development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Garcia, Patricia; Wei, Jolyn; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that regulates the production and function of neutrophils. G-CSF has been used to treat neutropenia in neonates, pediatric cancer patients, and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. The regulation of transcription factors mediating G-CSF activity has not been well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the regulation of the ETS binding protein, Friend leukemia integration site 1 (Fli-1), in myeloid cells treated with G-CSF. Fli-1 has oncogenic properties in humans and mice, and plays a role in vascular and hematopoietic cell development. We previously reported that Fli-1 and the serum response factor bind at adjacent sites within the serum response element-1 of the early growth response gene-1 promoter in the murine myeloid leukemic cell line, NFS60. We also identified that Fli-1 DNA binding increased in G-CSF-treated cells compared with untreated cells. To determine whether the change in binding activity is due to increased Fli-1 transcription or protein stability, we examined endogenous Fli-1 expression in G-CSF-treated or -untreated NFS60 cells. Our results demonstrated that levels of Fli-1 protein, but not RNA, were higher in extracts from cells treated with G-CSF. The increase in Fli-1 protein was also dependent on protein synthesis. Finally, we showed that the half-life of Fli-1 is prolonged in G-CSF-treated cells compared with control-treated cells. These results suggest that G-CSF induces stabilization of Fli-1 protein in myeloid cells, thus proposing a novel mechanism by which hematopoietic growth factors regulate transcription factors.

  1. Kell expression on myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T; Lanzer, G; Geissler, K

    2002-03-01

    Kell is one of the major human red blood cell groups and comprises 22 antigens. These antigens are produced by alleles located on chromosome 7, including sets of antithetical antigens such as Kell (K, K1) and cellano (k, K2), which differ in a single amino acid change (T193M). It consists of a 93-Kd transmembrane glycoprotein that is surface-exposed and shares sequence and structural homology with zinc endopeptidases, which are involved in regulating bioactive peptides. Anti-Kell antibodies have been shown to suppress fetal erythropoiesis. Recently published data indicate a similar effect on myeolopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Substantial thrombocytopenia in fetuses affected with HDN due to anti-K antibodies led to the discovery of the inhibitory effect of Kell-related antibodies on CFU-MK growth. In addition to its inhibitory effect on BFU-E growth, anti-Kell antibodies significantly reduced CFU-GM colony formation from haematologically normal individuals. Moreover, anti-cellano and anti-Kp(b) antibodies also inhibited the growth of CFU-GM from antigen positive MNC. These data indicate that Kell is not restricted to erythroid blood cells, but is expressed on a broader spectrum of haematopoietic cells than previously believed.

  2. Pro-Tumoral Inflammatory Myeloid Cells as Emerging Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Szebeni, Gabor J.; Vizler, Csaba; Nagy, Lajos I.; Kitajka, Klara; Puskas, Laszlo G.

    2016-01-01

    Since the observation of Virchow, it has long been known that the tumor microenvironment constitutes the soil for the infiltration of inflammatory cells and for the release of inflammatory mediators. Under certain circumstances, inflammation remains unresolved and promotes cancer development. Here, we review some of these indisputable experimental and clinical evidences of cancer related smouldering inflammation. The most common myeloid infiltrate in solid tumors is composed of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). These cells promote tumor growth by several mechanisms, including their inherent immunosuppressive activity, promotion of neoangiogenesis, mediation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and alteration of cellular metabolism. The pro-tumoral functions of TAMs and MDSCs are further enhanced by their cross-talk offering a myriad of potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets. We highlight these main pro-tumoral mechanisms of myeloid cells and give a general overview of their phenotypical and functional diversity, offering examples of possible therapeutic targets. Pharmacological targeting of inflammatory cells and molecular mediators may result in therapies improving patient condition and prognosis. Here, we review experimental and clinical findings on cancer-related inflammation with a major focus on creating an inventory of current small molecule-based therapeutic interventions targeting cancer-related inflammatory cells: TAMs and MDSCs. PMID:27886105

  3. Logical modeling of lymphoid and myeloid cell specification and transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Collombet, Samuel; van Oevelen, Chris; Sardina Ortega, Jose Luis; Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Di Stefano, Bruno; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Graf, Thomas; Thieffry, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Blood cells are derived from a common set of hematopoietic stem cells, which differentiate into more specific progenitors of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, ultimately leading to differentiated cells. This developmental process is controlled by a complex regulatory network involving cytokines and their receptors, transcription factors, and chromatin remodelers. Using public data and data from our own molecular genetic experiments (quantitative PCR, Western blot, EMSA) or genome-wide assays (RNA-sequencing, ChIP-sequencing), we have assembled a comprehensive regulatory network encompassing the main transcription factors and signaling components involved in myeloid and lymphoid development. Focusing on B-cell and macrophage development, we defined a qualitative dynamical model recapitulating cytokine-induced differentiation of common progenitors, the effect of various reported gene knockdowns, and the reprogramming of pre-B cells into macrophages induced by the ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. The resulting network model can be used as a template for the integration of new hematopoietic differentiation and transdifferentiation data to foster our understanding of lymphoid/myeloid cell-fate decisions. PMID:28584084

  4. Logical modeling of lymphoid and myeloid cell specification and transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Collombet, Samuel; van Oevelen, Chris; Sardina Ortega, Jose Luis; Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Di Stefano, Bruno; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Graf, Thomas; Thieffry, Denis

    2017-06-06

    Blood cells are derived from a common set of hematopoietic stem cells, which differentiate into more specific progenitors of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, ultimately leading to differentiated cells. This developmental process is controlled by a complex regulatory network involving cytokines and their receptors, transcription factors, and chromatin remodelers. Using public data and data from our own molecular genetic experiments (quantitative PCR, Western blot, EMSA) or genome-wide assays (RNA-sequencing, ChIP-sequencing), we have assembled a comprehensive regulatory network encompassing the main transcription factors and signaling components involved in myeloid and lymphoid development. Focusing on B-cell and macrophage development, we defined a qualitative dynamical model recapitulating cytokine-induced differentiation of common progenitors, the effect of various reported gene knockdowns, and the reprogramming of pre-B cells into macrophages induced by the ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. The resulting network model can be used as a template for the integration of new hematopoietic differentiation and transdifferentiation data to foster our understanding of lymphoid/myeloid cell-fate decisions.

  5. Early myeloid cell-specific expression of the human cathepsin G gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Grisolano, J L; Sclar, G M; Ley, T J

    1994-09-13

    The human cathepsin G (CG) gene is expressed only in promyelocytes and encodes a neutral serine protease that is packaged in the azurophil (primary) granules of myeloid cells. To define the cis-acting DNA elements that are responsible for promyelocyte-specific "targeting," we injected a 6-kb transgene containing the entire human CG gene, including coding sequences contained in a 2.7-kb region, approximately 2.5 kb of 5' flanking sequence, and approximately 0.8 kb of 3' flanking sequence. Seven of seven "transient transgenic" murine embryos revealed human CG expression in the fetal livers at embryonic day 15. Stable transgenic founder lines were created with the same 6-kb fragment; four of five founder lines expressed human CG in the bone marrow. The level of human CG expression was relatively low per gene copy when compared with the endogenous murine CG gene, and expression was integration-site dependent; however, the level of gene expression correlated roughly with gene copy number. The human CG transgene and the endogenous murine CG gene were coordinately expressed in the bone marrow and the spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic bone marrow revealed that the human CG protein was expressed exclusively in myeloid cells. Expression of human CG protein was highest in myeloid precursors and declined in mature myeloid cells. These data suggest that the human CG gene was appropriately targeted and developmentally regulated, demonstrating that the cis-acting DNA sequences required for the early myeloid cell-specific expression of human CG are present in this small genomic fragment.

  6. Epigenetics in myeloid derived suppressor cells: a sheathed sword towards cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Yufeng; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells composed of progenitors and precursors to myeloid cells, are deemed to participate in the development of tumor-favoring immunosuppressive microenvironment. Thus, the regulatory strategies targeting MDSCs' expansion, differentiation, accumulation and function could possibly be effective “weapons” in anti-tumor immunotherapies. Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA modification, covalent histone modification and RNA interference, result in the heritable down-regulation or silencing of gene expression without a change in DNA sequences. Epigenetic modification of MDSC's functional plasticity leads to the remodeling of its characteristics, therefore reframing the microenvironment towards countering tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarized the pertinent findings on the DNA methylation, covalent histone modification, microRNAs and small interfering RNAs targeting MDSC in cancer genesis, progression and metastasis. The potentials as well as possible obstacles in translating into anti-cancer therapeutics were also discussed. PMID:27458169

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity and subset definition.

    PubMed

    Peranzoni, Elisa; Zilio, Serena; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Zanovello, Paola; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are defined in mice on the basis of CD11b and Gr-1 marker expression and the functional ability to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Nevertheless the term 'heterogeneous' remains the first, informal feature commonly attributed to this population. It is clear that CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells are part of a myeloid macropopulation, which comprises at least two subsets of polymorphonuclear and monocytic cells with different immunosuppressive properties. While recent literature shows substantial agreement on the immunoregulatory property of the monocytic MDSC subset, there is still contrasting evidence on the role of the granulocytic fraction. Moreover, this dichotomy holds true for human MDSCs. We attempt here to summarize conflicting findings in the field and provide some possible, unifying explanations.

  8. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  9. Synchronous Occurrence of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Gray, Brian Allen; May, William Stratford

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are hematologic malignancies that originate from different oligopotent progenitor stem cells, namely, common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor cells, respectively. Although blastic transformation of CML can occur in the lymphoid lineage and CML has been related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma on transformation, to our knowledge, de novo and synchronous occurrence of CML and MCL has not been reported. Herein, we report the first case of synchronous CML and MCL in an otherwise healthy 38-year-old man. Potential etiologies and pathological relationships between the two malignancies are explored, including the possibility that the downstream effects of BCR-ABL may link it to an overexpression of cyclin D1, which is inherent to the etiology of MCL. PMID:28270940

  10. Deletion of TGF-β signaling in myeloid cells enhances their anti-tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Pickup, Michael W.; Chytil, Anna; Polosukhina, Dina; Owens, Philip; Moses, Harold L.

    2012-01-01

    By crossing LysM-Cre and TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) floxed mice we achieved specific deletion of Tgfbr2 in myeloid cells (Tgfbr2MyeKO mice). S.c.-injected (LLC, EL4-OVA) and implanted (MMTV-PyMT) carcinoma cells grow slower in Tgfbr2MyeKO mice. The number of CD45+ cells in the tumor tissue was the same in both genotypes of mice, but upon analysis, the percentage of T cells (CD45+CD3+) in the KO mice was increased. By flow cytometry analysis, we did not detect any differences in the number and phenotype of TAMs, CD11b+Gr1+, and DCs in Tgfbr2MyeKO compared with Tgfbr2MyeWT mice. ELISA and qRT-PCR data showed differences in myeloid cell functions. In Tgfbr2MyeKO TAMs, TNF-α secretion was increased, basal IL-6 secretion was down-regulated, TGF-β did not induce any VEGF response, and there was decreased MMP9 and increased MMP2 and iNOS expression. TGF-β did not have any effect on CD11b+Gr1+ cells isolated from Tgfbr2MyeKO mice in the regulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, and CXCR4, and moreover, these cells have decreased suppressive activity relative to T cell proliferation. Also, we found that DCs from tumor tissue of Tgfbr2MyeKO mice have increased antigen-presented properties and an enhanced ability to stimulate antigen-specific T cell proliferation. We conclude that Tgfbr2 in myeloid cells has a negative role in the regulation of anti-tumorigenic functions of these cells, and deletion of this receptor decreases the suppressive function of CD11b+Gr1+ cells and increases antigen-presenting properties of DCs and anti-tumorigenic properties of TAMs. PMID:22685318

  11. The role of myeloid cell-derived PDGF-B in neotissue formation in a tissue-engineered vascular graft.

    PubMed

    Onwuka, Ekene; Best, Cameron; Sawyer, Andrew; Yi, Tai; Heuer, Eric; Sams, Malik; Wiet, Matthew; Zheng, Hong; Kyriakides, Themis; Breuer, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory myeloid lineage cells mediate neotissue formation in tissue-engineered vascular grafts, but the molecular mechanism is not completely understood. We examined the role of vasculogenic PDGF-B in tissue-engineered vascular graft neotissue development. Myeloid cell-specific PDGF-B knockout mice (PDGF-KO) were generated using bone marrow transplantation, and scaffolds were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition grafts in either PDGF-KO or wild-type mice. After 2 weeks, grafts from PDGF-KO mice had more remaining scaffold polymer and less intimal neotissue development. Increased macrophage apoptosis, decreased smooth muscle cell proliferation and decreased collagen content was also observed. Myeloid cell-derived PDGF contributes to vascular neotissue formation by regulating macrophage apoptosis, smooth muscle cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition.

  12. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  13. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001.

  14. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease.

  15. Systemic RNAi-mediated Gene Silencing in Nonhuman Primate and Rodent Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Borodovsky, Anna; Wong, Jamie; Klebanov, Boris; Zafari, Mohammad; Yucius, Kristina; Querbes, William; Ge, Pei; Ruda, Vera M; Milstein, Stuart; Speciner, Lauren; Duncan, Rick; Barros, Scott; Basha, Genc; Cullis, Pieter; Akinc, Akin; Donahoe, Jessica S; Narayanannair Jayaprakash, K; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Bogorad, Roman L; Love, Kevin; Whitehead, Katie; Levins, Chris; Manoharan, Muthiah; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Leukocytes are central regulators of inflammation and the target cells of therapies for key diseases, including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and malignant disorders. Efficient in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to immune cells could thus enable novel treatment strategies with broad applicability. In this report, we develop systemic delivery methods of siRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNP) for durable and potent in vivo RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing in myeloid cells. This work provides the first demonstration of siRNA-mediated silencing in myeloid cell types of nonhuman primates (NHPs) and establishes the feasibility of targeting multiple gene targets in rodent myeloid cells. The therapeutic potential of these formulations was demonstrated using siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) which induced substantial attenuation of disease progression comparable to a potent antibody treatment in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In summary, we demonstrate a broadly applicable and therapeutically relevant platform for silencing disease genes in immune cells. PMID:23344621

  16. The function of myeloid dendritic cells in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mary Beth; Langridge, William H R

    2017-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that causes joint pain, inflammation, and loss of function. Disease pathogenesis involves activation and proliferation of autoreactive pro-inflammatory effector T cells. While the details of RA onset and progression remain controversial, dendritic cell (DC) numbers dramatically increase in the synovial joint tissues of RA patients. Based on their key functions as antigen-presenting cells and inducers of T cell differentiation, DCs may play an important role in the initiation of joint inflammation. Myeloid DC contributions are likely central to the development of RA, as they are more efficient at antigen presentation in comparison with their closely related cousins, plasmacytoid DCs. Synovial fluid in the joints of RA patients is enriched with pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which may stimulate or result from DC activation. Epidemiological evidence indicates that smoking and periodontal infection are major environmental risk factors for RA development. In this review, factors in the synovial environment that contribute to altered myeloid DC functions in RA and the effects of environmental risk factors on myeloid DCs are described.

  17. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  18. Down-Regulation of the Oncogene PTTG1 via the KLF6 Tumor Suppressor during Induction of Myeloid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Yi; Yen, Jui-Hung; Kao, Ruey-Ho; Chen, Ji-Hshiung

    2013-01-01

    The aberrant expression of proto-oncogenes is involved in processes that are responsible for cellular proliferation and the inhibition of myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pituitary Tumor-Transforming gene 1 (PTTG1), an oncogenic transcription factor, is abundantly expressed in various human cancers and hematopoietic malignancies. However, its expression in normal leukocytes and most normal tissues is very low or undetectable. The mechanism by which PTTG1 overexpression modifies myeloid cell development and promotes leukemogenesis remain unclear. To investigate the mechanistic links between PTTG1 overexpression and leukemia cell differentiation, we utilized phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a well-known agent that triggers monocyte/macrophage differentiation, to analyze the expression patterns of PTTG1 in PMA-induced myeloid differentiation. We found that PTTG1 is down-regulated at the transcriptional level in PMA-treated HL-60 and THP1 cells. In addition, we identified a binding site for a tumor suppressor protein, Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6), in the PTTG1 promoter. We found that KLF6 could directly bind and repress PTTG1 expression. In HL-60 and THP1 cells, KLF6 mRNA and protein levels are up-regulated with a concordant reduction of PTTG1 expression upon treatment with PMA. Furthermore, KLF6 knockdown by shRNA abolished the suppression of PTTG1 and reduced the activation of the differentiation marker CD11b in PMA-primed cells. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor and the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor significantly blocked the potentiation of PMA-mediated KLF6 induction and the down-regulation of PTTG1, indicating that PTTG1 is suppressed via the activation of PKC/ERK/KLF6 pathway. Our findings suggest that drugs that increase the KLF6 inhibition of PTTG1 may have a therapeutic application in AML treatment strategies. PMID:23977008

  19. Myeloid ZFP36L1 Does Not Regulate Inflammation or Host Defense in Mouse Models of Acute Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, Lynnae D.; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Rah, Yoon J.; Matsuura, Kori Y.; Coleman, Fadie T.; Hilliard, Kristie L.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary Ash; Ieong, Michael; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Quinton, Lee J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Jones, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 36, C3H type-like 1 (ZFP36L1) is one of several Zinc Finger Protein 36 (Zfp36) family members, which bind AU rich elements within 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) to negatively regulate the post-transcriptional expression of targeted mRNAs. The prototypical member of the family, Tristetraprolin (TTP or ZFP36), has been well-studied in the context of inflammation and plays an important role in repressing pro-inflammatory transcripts such as TNF-α. Much less is known about the other family members, and none have been studied in the context of infection. Using macrophage cell lines and primary alveolar macrophages we demonstrated that, like ZFP36, ZFP36L1 is prominently induced by infection. To test our hypothesis that macrophage production of ZFP36L1 is necessary for regulation of the inflammatory response of the lung during pneumonia, we generated mice with a myeloid-specific deficiency of ZFP36L1. Surprisingly, we found that myeloid deficiency of ZFP36L1 did not result in alteration of lung cytokine production after infection, altered clearance of bacteria, or increased inflammatory lung injury. Although alveolar macrophages are critical components of the innate defense against respiratory pathogens, we concluded that myeloid ZFP36L1 is not essential for appropriate responses to bacteria in the lungs. Based on studies conducted with myeloid-deficient ZFP36 mice, our data indicate that, of the Zfp36 family, ZFP36 is the predominant negative regulator of cytokine expression in macrophages. In conclusion, these results imply that myeloid ZFP36 may fully compensate for loss of ZFP36L1 or that Zfp36l1-dependent mRNA expression does not play an integral role in the host defense against bacterial pneumonia. PMID:25299049

  20. LPS-stimulated human bone marrow stroma cells support myeloid cell development and progenitor cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Patrick; Boettcher, Steffen; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Manz, Markus G; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2016-01-01

    The nonhematopoietic bone marrow (BM) microenvironment provides a functional niche for hematopoietic cell maintenance, recruitment, and differentiation. It consists of multiple cell types including vasculature, bone, adipose tissue, and fibroblast-like bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC), which can be summarized under the generic term niche cells. BMSC express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and are capable to respond to TLR-agonists by changing their cytokine expression pattern in order to more efficiently support hematopoiesis. Here, we show that in addition to enhanced myeloid colony formation from human CD34+ cells, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation retains overall higher numbers of CD34+ cells in co-culture assays using BMSC, with eightfold more CD34+ cells that underwent up to three divisions as compared to non-stimulated assays. When subjected to cytokine-supplemented myeloid colony-forming unit (CFU) assays or transplanted into newborn RAG2(-/-) γc (-/-) mice, CD34(+) cells from LPS-stimulated BMSC cultures give rise to the full spectrum of myeloid colonies and T and B cells, respectively, thus supporting maintenance of myeloid and lymphoid primed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) under inflammatory conditions. Collectively, we suggest that BMSC enhance hematopoiesis during inflammatory conditions to support the replenishment of innate immune effector cells and to prevent the exhaustion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) pool.

  1. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S.

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. S-Fms signalobody enhances myeloid cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Hitomi, Azusa; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Since receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) control various cell fates in many types of cells, mimicry of RTK functions is promising for artificial control of cell fates. We have previously developed single-chain Fv (scFv)/receptor chimeras named signalobodies that can mimic receptor signaling in response to a specific antigen. While the RTK-based signalobodies enabled us to control cell growth and migration, further extension of applicability in another cell type would underlie the impact of the RTK-based signalobodies. In this study, we applied the scFv-c-Fms (S-Fms) signalobody in a murine myeloid progenitor cell line, FDC-P1. S-Fms transduced a fluorescein-conjugated BSA (BSA-FL)-dependent growth signal and activated downstream signaling molecules including MEK, ERK, Akt, and STAT3, which are major constituents of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. In addition, S-Fms transduced a migration signal as demonstrated by the transwell-based migration assay. Direct real-time observation of the cells further confirmed that FDC/S-Fms cells underwent directional cell migration toward a positive gradient of BSA-FL. These results demonstrated the utility of the S-Fms signalobody for controlling growth and migration of myeloid cells. Further extension of our approach includes economical large-scale production of practically relevant blood cells as well as artificial control of cell migration for tissue regeneration and immune response.

  3. ATM facilitates mouse gammaherpesvirus reactivation from myeloid cells during chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Darrah, Eric J; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Mboko, Wadzanai P; Mounce, Bryan C; Malherbe, Laurent P; Corbett, John A; Gauld, Stephen B; Tarakanova, Vera L

    2015-09-01

    Gammaherpesviruses are cancer-associated pathogens that establish life-long infection in most adults. Insufficiency of Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase leads to a poor control of chronic gammaherpesvirus infection via an unknown mechanism that likely involves a suboptimal antiviral response. In contrast to the phenotype in the intact host, ATM facilitates gammaherpesvirus reactivation and replication in vitro. We hypothesized that ATM mediates both pro- and antiviral activities to regulate chronic gammaherpesvirus infection in an immunocompetent host. To test the proposed proviral activity of ATM in vivo, we generated mice with ATM deficiency limited to myeloid cells. Myeloid-specific ATM deficiency attenuated gammaherpesvirus infection during the establishment of viral latency. The results of our study uncover a proviral role of ATM in the context of gammaherpesvirus infection in vivo and support a model where ATM combines pro- and antiviral functions to facilitate both gammaherpesvirus-specific T cell immune response and viral reactivation in vivo.

  4. Myeloid cell differentiation arrest by miR-125b-1 in myelodysplasic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with the t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Marina; Quelen, Cathy; Rosati, Roberto; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; La Starza, Roberta; Bastard, Christian; Lippert, Eric; Talmant, Pascaline; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Leroux, Dominique; Gervais, Carine; Viguié, Franck; Lai, Jean-Luc; Terre, Christine; Beverlo, Berna; Sambani, Costantina; Hagemeijer, Anne; Marynen, Peter; Delsol, Georges; Dastugue, Nicole; Mecucci, Cristina; Brousset, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Most chromosomal translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involve oncogenes that are either up-regulated or form part of new chimeric genes. The t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation has been cloned in 19 cases of MDS and AML. In addition to this, we have shown that this translocation is associated with a strong up-regulation of miR-125b (from 6- to 90-fold). In vitro experiments revealed that miR-125b was able to interfere with primary human CD34+ cell differentiation, and also inhibited terminal (monocytic and granulocytic) differentiation in HL60 and NB4 leukemic cell lines. Therefore, miR-125b up-regulation may represent a new mechanism of myeloid cell transformation, and myeloid neoplasms carrying the t(2;11) translocation define a new clinicopathological entity. PMID:18936236

  5. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  6. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  7. Neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells are critical mediators of aneurysm formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D; Smiley, Lucy C; Mund, Julie A; Distasi, Matthew R; Bessler, Waylan K; Sarchet, Kara N; Hinds, Daniel M; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Hingtgen, Cynthia M; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D Wade; Conway, Simon J; Stansfield, Brian K; Ingram, David A

    2014-03-18

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in the development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. With the use of an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show that loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1(+/-) aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1(+/-) mice. These data provide genetic and pharmacological evidence that Nf1(+/-) myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target.

  8. Myeloid-Specific Fos-Related Antigen-1 Regulates Cigarette Smoke–Induced Lung Inflammation, Not Emphysema, in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Michelle; Rajasekaran, Subbiah; Potteti, Haranatha R.

    2015-01-01

    Heightened lung inflammation is a cardinal feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced macrophage recruitment and activation, accompanied by abnormal secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, play a major role in the pathophysiology of COPD. The Fos-related antigen-1 (Fra-1) transcription factor differentially regulates several cellular processes that are implicated in COPD, such as inflammation and immune responses, cell proliferation and death, and extracellular remodeling. Although CS stimulates Fra-1 expression in the lung, the precise role of this transcription factor in the regulation of CS-induced lung inflammation in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report that myeloid-specific Fra-1 signaling is important for CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammatory response. In response to chronic CS exposure, mice with Fra-1 specifically deleted in myeloid cells showed reduced levels of CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation, accompanied by decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines compared with their wild-type counterparts. Consistent with this result, bone marrow–derived Fra-1–null macrophages treated with CS showed decreased levels of proinflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases. Interestingly, deletion of Fra-1 in myeloid cells did not affect the severity of emphysema. We propose that Fra-1 plays a key role in promoting chronic CS-induced lung macrophagic inflammation in vivo, and that targeting this transcription factor may be useful in dampening persistent lung inflammation in patients with COPD. PMID:25489966

  9. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Proinflammatory Cytokines as Targets for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Atretkhany, K-S N; Drutskaya, M S

    2016-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells represent a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells. Under normal conditions, these cells differentiate into macrophages, dendritic cells, and granulocytes. However, in pathological states such as inflammation, infection, or tumor growth, there is an arrest of their differentiation that results in the accumulation of immature myeloid cells in the organism. In addition, these cells acquire a suppressor phenotype, expressing anti-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and suppress T-cell immune response. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contribute to cancerogenesis by forming a favorable microenvironment for tumor growth. Proinflammatory cytokines, secreted by tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment, induce angiogenesis and metastasis and promote tumor growth. They also provide signals necessary for survival, accumulation, and function of MDSC. Understanding the mechanisms of myeloid suppressor cell development and the use of proinflammatory cytokine inhibitors may prove beneficial for tumor therapy.

  10. [Monitoring of chimerism in myeloid cells sorting of transplanted patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: a study from Lyon (France)].

    PubMed

    Mollet, I; Giannoli, C; Rigal, D; Michallet, M; Dubois, V

    2012-04-01

    Chimerism analysis after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used to document engraftment and to adapt therapy promptly. The aim of this study was to document engraftment and to detect as soon as possible relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia who underwent stem cell transplantation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction is a highly sensitive and reproducible technology. It is useful in some disease to target selected sub-populations in order to have an earlier detection of relapse on cell fractions. In the acute myeloid leukaemia (n=65), analysis of the chimerism on whole peripheral blood cells and bone marrow cells, CD3+ cells, specific myeloid CD33+ cells (from blood) and CD34+ cells (from bone marrow) is of importance. After transplant, 25 patients relapsed (38%), three massively, with chimerism detection in whole blood and bone marrow and 22 insidiously following two different schemes (GRI and GRII). In GRI, (n=13): chimerism of CD33+ and CD34+ cellular fractions allowed an early detection of relapse in 100% of cases undetected in whole cells whereas in GRII (n=9): myeloid cells could identified relapse in 89% of cases when whole blood cells and CD3+ cells expressed a mixed chimerism. This study highlighted the importance of sub-cellular population chimerism documentation enable to ascertain a stable engraftment and to detect early relapse. The selection of sub-cellular population studied with high sensitive technology allows a rapid and efficient intervention before the onset of clinical signs in patient with acute myeloid leukaemia and could improve the patient's follow-up. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Cancer stem-like cells derived from chemoresistant tumors have a unique capacity to prime tumorigenic myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Tsunaki; Baghdadi, Muhammad; Yoneda, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Suzu, Shinya; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-05-15

    Resistance to anticancer therapeutics greatly affects the phenotypic and functional properties of tumor cells, but how chemoresistance contributes to the tumorigenic activities of cancer stem-like cells remains unclear. In this study, we found that a characteristic of cancer stem-like cells from chemoresistant tumors (CSC-R) is the ability to produce a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and to generate M2-like immunoregulatory myeloid cells from CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, we identified the IFN-regulated transcription factor IRF5 as a CSC-R-specific factor critical for promoting M-CSF production and generating tumorigenic myeloid cells. Importantly, myeloid cells primed with IRF5(+) CSC-R facilitate the tumorigenic and stem cell activities of bulk tumors. Importantly, the activation of IRF5/M-CSF pathways in tumor cells were correlated with the number of tumor-associated CSF1 receptor(+) M2 macrophages in patients with non-small lung cancer. Collectively, our findings show how chemoresistance affects the properties of CSCs in their niche microenvironments.

  12. Targeting DNA Vaccines to Myeloid Cells Using a Small Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein antigens to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein, fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, that results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient antigen presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WN neutralizing antibodies that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses. PMID:25270431

  13. Targeting DNA vaccines to myeloid cells using a small peptide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-01-01

    Targeting DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs) greatly enhances immunity. Although several approaches have been used to target protein Ags to DCs, currently there is no method that targets DNA vaccines directly to DCs. Here, we show that a small peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein fused to protamine residues (RVG-P) can target DNA to myeloid cells, including DCs, which results in enhanced humoral and T-cell responses. DCs targeted with a DNA vaccine encoding the immunodominant vaccinia B8R gene via RVG-P were able to restimulate vaccinia-specific memory T cells in vitro. Importantly, a single i.v. injection of B8R gene bound to RVG-P was able to prime a vaccinia-specific T-cell response that was able to rapidly clear a subsequent vaccinia challenge in mice. Moreover, delivery of DNA in DCs was enough to induce DC maturation and efficient Ag presentation without the need for adjuvants. Finally, immunization of mice with a DNA-vaccine encoding West Nile virus (WNV) prM and E proteins via RVG-P elicited high titers of WNV-neutralizing Abs that protected mice from lethal WNV challenge. Thus, RVG-P provides a reagent to target DNA vaccines to myeloid cells and elicit robust T-cell and humoral immune responses.

  14. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, Julie A; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H; Bravo, Brandon J; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R; DeForge, Laura E; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L; Giannetti, Anthony M; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E; Lee, Wyne P; Maciejewski, Patricia M; Mitchell, Scott A; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L; Whitney, J Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S

    2011-08-29

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor–dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes FcγRIII-induced TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and FcγR-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell– or myeloid cell–driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. The MADS transcription factor Mef2c is a pivotal modulator of myeloid cell fate.

    PubMed

    Schüler, Andrea; Schwieger, Maike; Engelmann, Afra; Weber, Kristoffer; Horn, Stefan; Müller, Ursula; Arnold, Michael A; Olson, Eric N; Stocking, Carol

    2008-05-01

    Mef2c is a MADS (MCM1-agamous-deficient serum response factor) transcription factor best known for its role in muscle and cardiovascular development. A causal role of up-regulated MEF2C expression in myelomonocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has recently been demonstrated. Due to the pronounced monocytic component observed in Mef2c-induced AML, this study was designed to assess the importance of Mef2c in normal myeloid differentiation. Analysis of bone marrow (BM) cells manipulated to constitutively express Mef2c demonstrated increased monopoiesis at the expense of granulopoiesis, whereas BM isolated from Mef2c(Delta/-) mice showed reduced levels of monocytic differentiation in response to cytokines. Mechanistic studies showed that loss of Mef2c expression correlated with reduced levels of transcripts encoding c-Jun, but not PU.1, C/EBPalpha, or JunB transcription factors. Inhibiting Jun expression by short-interfering RNA impaired Mef2c-mediated inhibition of granulocyte development. Moreover, retroviral expression of c-Jun in BM cells promoted monocytic differentiation. The ability of Mef2c to modulate cell-fate decisions between monocyte and granulocyte differentiation, coupled with its functional sensitivity to extracellular stimuli, demonstrate an important role in immunity--and, consistent with findings of other myeloid transcription factors, a target of oncogenic lesions in AML.

  16. XIAP inhibitors induce differentiation and impair clonogenic capacity of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Etxabe, Amaia; Pratcorona, Marta; Tesi, Niccolò; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a neoplasia characterized by the rapid expansion of immature myeloid blasts in the bone marrow, and marked by poor prognosis and frequent relapse. As such, new therapeutic approaches are required for remission induction and prevention of relapse. Due to the higher chemotherapy sensitivity and limited life span of more differentiated AML blasts, differentiation-based therapies are a promising therapeutic approach. Based on public available gene expression profiles, a myeloid-specific differentiation-associated gene expression pattern was defined as the therapeutic target. A XIAP inhibitor (Dequalinium chloride, DQA) was identified in an in silico screening searching for small molecules that induce similar gene expression regulation. Treatment with DQA, similarly to Embelin (another XIAP inhibitor), induced cytotoxicity and differentiation in AML. XIAP inhibition differentially impaired cell viability of the most primitive AML blasts and reduced clonogenic capacity of AML cells, sparing healthy mature blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that XIAP constitutes a potential target for AML treatment and support the evaluation of XIAP inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:24952669

  17. Myeloid Cell-Specific Knockout of NFI-A Improves Sepsis Survival.

    PubMed

    McPeak, Melissa B; Youssef, Dima; Williams, Danielle A; Pritchett, Christopher; Yao, Zhi Q; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Myeloid progenitor-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) arise from myeloid progenitors and suppress both innate and adaptive immunity. MDSCs expand during the later phases of sepsis in mice, promote immunosuppression, and reduce survival. Here, we report that the myeloid differentiation-related transcription factor nuclear factor I-A (NFI-A) controls MDSC expansion during sepsis and impacts survival. Unlike MDSCs, myeloid cells with conditional deletion of the Nfia gene normally differentiated into effector cells during sepsis, cleared infecting bacteria, and did not express immunosuppressive mediators. In contrast, ectopic expression of NFI-A in myeloid progenitors from NFI-A myeloid cell-deficient mice impeded myeloid cell maturation and promoted immune repressor function. Importantly, surviving septic mice with conditionally deficient NFI-A myeloid cells were able to respond to challenge with bacterial endotoxin by mounting an acute inflammatory response. Together, these results support the concept of NFI-A as a master molecular transcriptome switch that controls myeloid cell differentiation and maturation and that malfunction of this switch during sepsis promotes MDSC expansion that adversely impacts sepsis outcome.

  18. Mechanism of all-trans retinoic acid effect on tumor-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Nefedova, Yulia; Fishman, Mayer; Sherman, Simon; Wang, Xingyu; Beg, Amer A; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2007-11-15

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) play an important role in tumor escape by suppressing T-cell responses. MDSC represent a group of cells of myeloid lineage at different stages of differentiation. Increased arginase activity and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are among the main functional characteristics of these cells. Recent studies have shown that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) had a potent activity in eliminating MDSC in cancer patients and in tumor-bearing mice. ATRA differentiates these cells into mature myeloid cells. However, the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we have shown that ATRA dramatically and specifically up-regulated gene expression and protein level of glutathione synthase (GSS) in MDSC. This resulted in accumulation of glutathione (GSH) in these cells, observed in both mice and cancer patients. Blockade of GSH synthesis cancelled the effect of ATRA on MDSC. Accumulation of GSH in these cells using N-acetyl-L-cysteine mimicked the effect of ATRA on MDSC differentiation. Analysis of potential mechanisms of ATRA effect on GSS revealed that ATRA regulates its expression not by directly binding to the promoter but primarily via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Thus, ATRA induced differentiation of MDSC primarily via neutralization of high ROS production in these cells. This novel mechanism involves specific up-regulation of GSS and accumulation of GSH and could be used in developing and monitoring therapeutic application of ATRA.

  19. Hematopoietic myeloid cell differentiation diminishes nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuki; Sato, Ayako; Mizutani, Shuki; Takagi, Masatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Myeloid cell differentiation is the process by which stem cells develop into mature monocytes or granulocytes. This process is achieved by the sequential activation of variety of genes. Disruption of this process can result in immunodeficiency, bone marrow failure syndrome, or leukemia. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17) translocation and can be treated by a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline. This treatment can induce leukemic cell differentiation, leading to extremely high remission rates. XAB2, a molecule involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER), is downregulated during granulocyte differentiation and shows reduced expression in NB4 APL-derived cells in vitro. Differentiation of APL by ATRA treatment reduced XAB2 expression levels in vivo. These observations suggest that cellular differentiation is associated with reduced NER activity and provides new insights into combined differentiation induction. NB4 cells were more susceptible than the immature myeloid leukemic cell lines, Kasumi-3 and Kasumi-1, to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent cisplatin.

  20. Myeloid cells Migrate in Response to IL-24

    PubMed Central

    Buzas, Krisztina; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Zack Howard, O. M.

    2011-01-01

    IL-24 (melanoma differentiation associated gene 7 product) is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family that has been reported to possess anti-tumor activity. IL-24 is produced by immune tissues and its expression can be induced in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by pathogen-associated molecules. While immune cells are known to produce IL-24, the response of immune cells to IL-24 is unclear. Using recombinant human IL-24, we demonstrated that IL-24 induces human monocyte and neutrophil migration, in vitro. An in vivo chemotaxis model showed that IL-24 attracted CD11b positive myeloid cells. To further characterize the chemotactic IL-24 response and type(s) of receptor(s) utilized by IL-24, we treated monocytes with signaling pathway inhibitors. IL-24-induced migration was reduced by pertussis toxin treatment, thus implicating G-protein coupled receptors in this process. Additionally, MEK and JAK inhibitors markedly decreased monocyte migration toward IL-24. These results suggest that IL-24 activates several signaling cascades in immune cells eliciting migration of myeloid cells, which may contribute to the known anti-cancer effects of IL-24. PMID:21703864

  1. Recommendations for myeloid-derived suppressor cell nomenclature and characterization standards.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Brandau, Sven; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Colombo, Mario P; Frey, Alan B; Greten, Tim F; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Murray, Peter J; Ochoa, Augusto; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Sica, Antonio; Umansky, Viktor; Vonderheide, Robert H; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-07-06

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have emerged as major regulators of immune responses in cancer and other pathological conditions. In recent years, ample evidence supports key contributions of MDSC to tumour progression through both immune-mediated mechanisms and those not directly associated with immune suppression. MDSC are the subject of intensive research with >500 papers published in 2015 alone. However, the phenotypic, morphological and functional heterogeneity of these cells generates confusion in investigation and analysis of their roles in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this communication is to suggest characterization standards in the burgeoning field of MDSC research.

  2. The nature of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major components of the tumor microenvironment. The main feature of these cells is their potent immune suppressive activity. MDSC are generated in the bone marrow, and in tumor-bearing hosts, migrate to peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor to contribute to the formation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent findings have revealed differences in the function and fate of MDSC in the tumor and peripheral lymphoid organs. We review these findings here, and in this context we discuss the current understanding as to the nature of these differences, the underlying mechanisms, and their potential impact on the regulation of tumor progression. PMID:26858199

  3. Recommendations for myeloid-derived suppressor cell nomenclature and characterization standards

    PubMed Central

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Brandau, Sven; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Colombo, Mario P.; Frey, Alan B.; Greten, Tim F.; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Murray, Peter J.; Ochoa, Augusto; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Rodriguez, Paulo C.; Sica, Antonio; Umansky, Viktor; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have emerged as major regulators of immune responses in cancer and other pathological conditions. In recent years, ample evidence supports key contributions of MDSC to tumour progression through both immune-mediated mechanisms and those not directly associated with immune suppression. MDSC are the subject of intensive research with >500 papers published in 2015 alone. However, the phenotypic, morphological and functional heterogeneity of these cells generates confusion in investigation and analysis of their roles in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this communication is to suggest characterization standards in the burgeoning field of MDSC research. PMID:27381735

  4. Immune interferon and leukocyte-conditioned medium induce normal and leukemic myeloid cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Conditioned medium from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human leukocytes contains a factor that can induce promyelocytic cell lines and certain acute myelogenous leukemia cells to differentiate along the monocytic pathway. In this report, we show that immature myeloid cells from normal bone marrow or the peripheral blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia can be induced to differentiate to monocyte-like cells by immune gamma interferon (IFN gamma). We have identified IFN gamma as the predominant differentiation factor contained in the conditioned medium. Purified or recombinant IFN gamma, but not various preparations of IFN alpha or beta, can induce monocytic differentiation in myeloid cells. In cultures containing conditioned medium, the cells fail to continue myeloid maturation, and are induced to express monocyte markers and functions, such as monocyte-specific surface antigens, HLA-DR antigens, Fc receptors for monomeric immunoglobulins, nonspecific esterase, and the ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Even myeloid cells as mature as metamyelocytes or band cells can be induced by IFN gamma to undergo monocyte differentiation, but monocyte-specific or HLA-DR antigens are not induced in mature neutrophils. These findings reveal a previously unknown, specific function of human IFN gamma and offer new insights to the regulation of monocyte recruitment and differentiation during a virus infection or immune response. PMID:6417261

  5. Differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells by plant redifferentiation-inducing hormones.

    PubMed

    Honma, Yoshio; Ishii, Yuki

    2002-09-01

    Although differentiation therapy for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has now been established, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with other than APL only show a limited clinical response to ATRA. We must consider novel therapeutic drugs against other AML to develop a differentiation therapy for leukemia. Regulators that play an important role in the differentiation and development of plants may also affect the differentiation of human leukemia cells through a common signal transduction system, and might be clinically useful for treating AML. Cytokinins are important purine derivatives that serve as hormones that control many processes in plants. Cytokinins such as kinetin, isopentenyladenine (IPA) and benzyladenine were very effective at inducing nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction and morphological changes in human myeloid leukemia cells into mature granulocytes. On the other hand, cytokinin ribosides such as kinetin riboside, isopentenyladenosine (IPAR) and benzyladenine riboside were the most potent for inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis. When the cells were incubated with cytokinin ribosides in the presence of an O2- scavenger, antioxidant or caspase inhibitor, apoptosis was significantly reduced and differentiation was greatly enhanced. These results suggest that both cytokinins and cytokinin ribosides can induce the granulocytic differentiation of HL-60 cells, but cytokinin ribosides also induce apoptosis prior to differentiation. Cotylenin A has been isolated as a plant growth regulator exhibits cytokinin-like activity. Although it has a different structure than cytokinins, it also induces the differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cells. These results suggest that there is an association between the action of plant redifferentiation-inducing hormones and the mechanism of the differentiation of human leukemia cells.

  6. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-01-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 691-695] PMID:26077028

  7. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-12-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 MAPK-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure.

  8. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: therapeutic modulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Ryan A

    2012-01-01

    Improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of adaptive immunity has been realized over the past few decades, leading to the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies capable of promoting host anti-tumor immunity. In order to achieve clinically meaningful results, further understanding of the mechanisms by which tumors suppress host immunity, and the development of therapeutic strategies which overcome tumor-associated immune suppression, will be necessary. Myeloid-derived cells with potent immunosuppressive properties are ubiquitous in human cancers. Improved mechanistic understanding of factors promoting their development, activation and mechanisms of immune suppression are being translated into novel therapeutic approaches, and will be summarized herein.

  10. Preclinical approaches in chronic myeloid leukemia: from cells to systems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Holyoake, Tessa L

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the design of targeted therapies for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have transformed the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this disease. However, leukemic stem cell persistence, drug intolerance, drug resistance, and advanced-phase disease represent unmet clinical needs demanding the attention of CML investigators worldwide. The availability of appropriate preclinical models is essential to efficiently translate findings from the bench to the clinic. Here we review the current approaches taken to preclinical work in the CML field, including examples of commonly used in vivo models and recent successes from systems biology-based methodologies.

  11. The matricellular protein CCN3 regulates NOTCH1 signalling in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Sukanya; McCallum, Lynn; Crawford, Lisa J; Lu, Wan Hua; Sharpe, Daniel J; Irvine, Alexandra E

    2013-11-01

    Deregulated NOTCH1 has been reported in lymphoid leukaemia, although its role in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is not well established. We previously reported BCR-ABL down-regulation of a novel haematopoietic regulator, CCN3, in CML; CCN3 is a non-canonical NOTCH1 ligand. This study characterizes the NOTCH1–CCN3 signalling axis in CML. In K562 cells, BCR-ABL silencing reduced full-length NOTCH1 (NOTCH1-FL) and inhibited the cleavage of NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NOTCH1-ICD), resulting in decreased expression of the NOTCH1 targets c-MYC and HES1. K562 cells stably overexpressing CCN3 (K562/CCN3) or treated with recombinant CCN3(rCCN3) showed a significant reduction in NOTCH1 signalling (> 50% reduction in NOTCH1-ICD, p < 0.05).Gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI), which blocks NOTCH1 signalling, reduced K562/CCN3 colony formation but increased that of K562/control cells. GSI combined with either rCCN3 or imatinib reduced K562 colony formation with enhanced reduction of NOTCH1 signalling observed with combination treatments. We demonstrate an oncogenic role for NOTCH1 in CML and suggest that BCR-ABL disruption of NOTCH1–CCN3 signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of CML.

  12. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; McCarthy, Mary K.; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N.; Ng, Lisa F. P.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  13. Dynamics of enhancers in myeloid antigen presenting cells upon LPS stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have underscored the role of enhancers in defining cell type-specific transcriptomes. Cell type-specific enhancers are bound by combinations of shared and cell type-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, little is known about combinatorial binding of TFs to enhancers, dynamics of TF binding following stimulation, or the downstream effects on gene expression. Here, we address these questions in two types of myeloid antigen presenting cells (APCs), macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), before and after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent stimulator of the innate immune response. Results We classified enhancers according to the combination of TFs binding them. There were significant correlations between the sets of TFs bound to enhancers prior to stimulation and expression changes of nearby genes after stimulation. Importantly, a set of enhancers pre-bound by PU.1, C/EBPβ, ATF3, IRF4, and JunB was strongly associated with induced genes and binding by stimulus-activated regulators. Our classification suggests that transient loss of ATF3 binding to a subset of these enhancers is important for regulation of early-induced genes. Changes in TF-enhancer binding after stimulation were correlated with binding by additional activated TFs and with the presence of proximally located enhancers. Conclusions The results presented in this study reveal the complexity and dynamics of TF- enhancer binding before and after stimulation in myeloid APCs. PMID:25560382

  14. Temporal Changes in Myeloid Cells in the Cervix during Pregnancy and Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Brenda C; Fairhurst, Anna–Marie; Mahendroo, Mala S

    2009-01-01

    Preterm birth occurs at a rate of 12.7% in the United States and is the primary cause of fetal morbidity in the first year of life as well as the cause of later health problems. Elucidation of mechanisms controlling cervical remodeling is critical for development of therapies to reduce the incidence of prematurity. The cervical extracellular matrix must be disorganized during labor to allow birth followed by a rapid repair postpartum. Leukocytes infiltrate the cervix prior to and after birth and are proposed to regulate matrix remodeling during cervical ripening via release of proteolytic enzymes. In the current study, flow cytometry and cell sorting were utilized to determine the role of immune cells in cervical matrix remodeling before, during, and after parturition. Markers of myeloid cell differentiation and activation were assessed to define phenotype and function. Tissue monocytes and eosinophils increased in the cervix prior to birth in a progesterone regulated fashion while macrophage numbers were unchanged. Neutrophils increased in the postpartum period. Increased mRNA expression of Csfr1 and markers of alternatively activated M2 macrophages during labor or shortly postpartum suggest a function of M2 macrophages in postpartum tissue repair. Changes in cervical myeloid cell numbers are not reflected in the peripheral blood. These data along with our previous studies suggest that myeloid derived cells do not orchestrate processes required for initiation of cervical ripening prior to birth. Additionally, macrophages with diverse phenotypes (M1 and M2) are present in the cervix and likely involved in the postpartum repair of tissue. PMID:19234164

  15. Targeting prohibitins induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Helena; Palmeri, Claudia M; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Gamundi, Enric; Arnan, Montserrat; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; González-Barca, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    Fluorizoline is a new synthetic molecule that induces apoptosis by selectively targeting prohibitins (PHBs). In this study, the pro-apoptotic effect of fluorizoline was assessed in two cell lines and 21 primary samples from patients with debut of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Fluorizoline induced apoptosis in AML cells at concentrations in the low micromolar range. All primary samples were sensitive to fluorizoline irrespectively of patients' clinical or genetic features. In addition, fluorizoline inhibited the clonogenic capacity and induced differentiation of AML cells. Fluorizoline increased the mRNA and protein levels of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member NOXA both in cell lines and primary samples analyzed. These results suggest that targeting PHBs could be a new therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:27542247

  16. VENTX induces expansion of primitive erythroid cells and contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentner, Eva; Vegi, Naidu M.; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Mandal, Tamoghna; Bamezai, Shiva; Claus, Rainer; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Grunenberg, Alexander; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars; Haferlach, Torsten; Buske, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox genes are key regulators in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. The human Vent-like homeobox gene VENTX, a putative homolog of the Xenopus laevis Xvent-2 gene, was shown to be highly expressed in normal myeloid cells and in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We now demonstrate that constitutive expression of VENTX suppresses expression of genes responsible for terminal erythroid differentiation in normal CD34+ stem and progenitor cells. Transplantation of bone marrow progenitor cells retrovirally engineered to express VENTX caused massive expansion of primitive erythroid cells and partly acute erythroleukemia in transplanted mice. The leukemogenic potential of VENTX was confirmed in the AML1-ETO transplantation model, as in contrast to AML1-ETO alone co-expression of AML1-ETO and VENTX induced acute myeloid leukemia, partly expressing erythroid markers, in all transplanted mice. VENTX was highly expressed in patients with primary human erythroleukemias and knockdown of VENTX in the erythroleukemic HEL cell line significantly blocked cell growth. In summary, these data indicate that VENTX is able to perturb erythroid differentiation and to contribute to myeloid leukemogenesis when co-expressed with appropriate AML oncogenes and point to its potential significance as a novel therapeutic target in AML. PMID:27888632

  17. Hmga2 is a direct target gene of RUNX1 and regulates expansion of myeloid progenitors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kentson; Muselman, Alexander; Du, Randal; Harada, Yuka; Scholl, Amanda G.; Yan, Ming; Matsuura, Shinobu; Weng, Stephanie; Harada, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    RUNX1 is a master transcription factor in hematopoiesis and mediates the specification and homeostasis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Disruptions in RUNX1 are well known to lead to hematologic disease. In this study, we sought to identify and characterize RUNX1 target genes in HSPCs by performing RUNX1 chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) using a murine HSPC line and complementing this data with our previously described gene expression profiling of primary wild-type and RUNX1-deficient HSPCs (Lineage–/cKit+/Sca1+). From this analysis, we identified and confirmed that Hmga2, a known oncogene, as a direct target of RUNX1. Hmga2 was strongly upregulated in RUNX1-deficient HSPCs, and the promoter of Hmga2 was responsive in a cell-type dependent manner upon coexpression of RUNX1. Conditional Runx1 knockout mice exhibit expansion of their HSPCs and myeloid progenitors as hallmark phenotypes. To further validate and establish that Hmga2 plays a role in inducing HSPC expansion, we generated mouse models of HMGA2 and RUNX1 deficiency. Although mice lacking both factors continued to display higher frequencies of HSPCs, the expansion of myeloid progenitors was effectively rescued. The data presented here establish Hmga2 as a transcriptional target of RUNX1 and a critical regulator of myeloid progenitor expansion. PMID:25150295

  18. Overexpression of Notch1 ectodomain in myeloid cells induces vascular malformations through a paracrine pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujie; Calvo, Ezequiel; Cool, Marc; Chrobak, Pavel; Kay, Denis G; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We previously reported that truncation of Notch1 (N1) by provirus insertion leads to overexpression of both the intracellular (N1(IC)) and the extracellular (N1(EC)) domains. We produced transgenic (Tg) mice expressing N1(EC) in T cells and in cells of the myeloid lineage under the regulation of the CD4 gene. These CD4C/N1(EC) Tg mice developed vascular disease, predominantly in the liver: superficial distorted vessels, cavernae, lower branching of parenchymal vessels, capillarized sinusoids, and aberrant smooth muscle/endothelial cell topography. The disease developed in lethally irradiated normal mice transplanted with Tg bone marrow or fetal liver cells as well as in Rag-/- Tg mice. In nude mice transplanted with fetal liver cells from (ROSA26 x CD4C/N1(EC)) F1 Tg mice, abnormal vessels were of recipient origin. Transplantation of Tg peritoneal macrophages into normal recipients also induced abnormal vessels. These Tg macrophages showed impaired functions, and their conditioned medium inhibited the proliferation of liver sinusoid endothelial cells in vitro. The Egr-1 gene and some of its targets (Jag1, FIII, FXIII-A, MCP-1, and MCP-5), previously implicated in hemangioma or vascular malformations, were overexpressed in Tg macrophages. These results show that myeloid cells can be reprogrammed by N1(EC) to induce vascular malformations through a paracrine pathway.

  19. L-arginine metabolism in myeloid cells controls T-lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Mazzoni, Alessandra; Segal, David M; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-06-01

    Although current attention has focused on regulatory T lymphocytes as suppressors of autoimmune responses, powerful immunosuppression is also mediated by a subset of myeloid cells that enter the lymphoid organs and peripheral tissues during times of immune stress. If these myeloid suppressor cells (MSCs) receive signals from activated T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs, they block T-cell proliferation. MSCs use two enzymes involved in arginine metabolism to control T-cell responses: inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), which generates nitric oxide (NO) and arginase 1 (Arg1), which depletes the milieu of arginine. Th1 cytokines induce NOS2, whereas Th2 cytokines upregulate Arg1. Induction of either enzyme alone results in a reversible block in T-cell proliferation. When both enzymes are induced together, peroxynitrites, generated by NOS2 under conditions of limiting arginine, cause activated T lymphocytes to undergo apoptosis. Thus, NOS2 and Arg1 might act separately or synergistically in vivo to control specific types of T-cell responses, and selective antagonists of these enzymes might prove beneficial in fighting diseases in which T-cell responses are inappropriately suppressed. This Opinion is the second in a series on the regulation of the immune system by metabolic pathways.

  20. Myeloid derived suppressor cell: A new player in periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Valero-Monroy, Omar; Garcia-Cervantes, Gabriel; Marquez-Corrales, Luis F; Leija-Montoya, Ana G; Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Martinez-Coronilla, Gustavo; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A; Serafin-Higuera, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease can be initiated by a shift from a symbiotic to a dysbiotic microbial community. An increase in the recruitment of leukocytes and production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and oxidative stress are generated by this shift. In periodontitis, an exacerbated, poorly specific and effective inflammatory response is mounted. Moreover, failure in the inflammation resolving mechanism leads to establishment of a chronic inflammatory process, resulting in the progressive destruction of bone and soft tissue. In different diseases presenting chronic inflammation some important players of immune response are defectives. Thus, an immunosuppressive environment could be induced during chronic inflammation. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC), a heterogenic group of immature myeloid cells with potent immune suppressive activity, are increased in several acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Dysbiosis-mediated inflammation can induce increased frequency of MDSC. In addition, mediators generated in diverse inflammatory diseases have demonstrated to promote expansion, activation and recruitment of MDSC, similar mediators have been described in periodontal disease. MDSC promote generation of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, MDSC can differentiate in functional osteoclasts. We hypothesize that MDSC are generated during periodontal disease. Review of literature evaluating this hypothesis and possible implications are assed in this work. It encourages the study of MDSC in this common disease.

  1. Uncaria tomentosa stimulates the proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Farias, Iria; do Carmo Araújo, Maria; Zimmermann, Estevan Sonego; Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Benedetti, Aloisio Luiz; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Asbahr, Ana Carolina Cavazzin; Bertol, Gustavo; Farias, Júlia; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2011-09-01

    The Asháninkas, indigenous people of Peru, use cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) to restore health. Uncaria tomentosa has antioxidant activity and works as an agent to repair DNA damage. It causes different effects on cell proliferation depending on the cell type involved; specifically, it can stimulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors and cause apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Neutropenia is the most common collateral effect of chemotherapy. For patients undergoing cancer treatment, the administration of a drug that stimulates the proliferation of healthy hematopoietic tissue cells is very desirable. It is important to assess the acute effects of Uncaria tomentosa on granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) and in the recovery of neutrophils after chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, by establishing the correlation with filgrastim (rhG-CSF) treatment to evaluate its possible use in clinical oncology. The in vivo assay was performed in ifosfamide-treated mice receiving oral doses of 5 and 15 mg of Uncaria tomentosa and intraperitoneal doses of 3 and 9 μg of filgrastim, respectively, for four days. Colony-forming cell (CFC) assays were performed with human hematopoietic stem/precursor cells (hHSPCs) obtained from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Bioassays showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa significantly increased the neutrophil count, and a potency of 85.2% was calculated in relation to filgrastim at the corresponding doses tested. An in vitro CFC assay showed an increase in CFU-GM size and mixed colonies (CFU-GEMM) size at the final concentrations of 100 and 200 μg extract/mL. At the tested doses, Uncaria tomentosa had a positive effect on myeloid progenitor number and is promising for use with chemotherapy to minimize the adverse effects of this treatment. These results support the belief of the Asháninkas, who have classified Uncaria tomentosa as a 'powerful plant'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of epigenetics in the regulation of apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karlic, Heidrun; Herrmann, Harald; Varga, Franz; Thaler, Roman; Reitermaier, Rene; Spitzer, Silvia; Ghanim, Viviane; Blatt, Katharina; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Pfeilstöcker, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Disordered stem cell epigenetics and apoptosis-regulating mechanisms contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and may trigger disease-progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of apoptosis-mediators FAS (CD95) and DAPK1 the latter being also known for its association with autophagy are upregulated in neoplastic cells in patients with low-risk MDS and epigenetically silenced and downregulated in high-risk MDS and AML as confirmed by a study 50 MDS and 30 AMLs complementing this review. 5-Azacytidine (AZA) and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (DAC), promoted FAS and DAPK1 gene demethylation and their (re)expression as well as apoptosis in leukemic cell lines (HL-60, KG1) which can be reversed by siRNA against FAS. Thus, promoter-demethylation of FAS and DAPK1 represents a critical mechanism of drug-induced apoptosis in neoplastic cells in MDS and AML which underscores the clinical implication of epigenetically active therapies.

  3. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:22024746

  4. E4F1 dysfunction results in autophagic cell death in myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Hatchi, Elodie; Rodier, Geneviève; Sardet, Claude; Le Cam, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    The multifunctional E4F1 protein was originally identified as a cellular target of the E1A adenoviral oncoprotein. Although E4F1 is implicated in several key oncogenic pathways, its roles in tumorigenesis remain unclear. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of myeloid leukemia (histiocytic sarcomas, HS) based on the genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Ink4a/Arf locus, we have recently unraveled an unsuspected function of E4F1 in the survival of leukemic cells. In vivo, genetic ablation of E4F1 in established myeloid tumors results in tumor regression. E4F1 inactivation results in a cascade of alterations originating from dysfunctional mitochondria that induce increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and ends in massive autophagic cell death in HS transformed, but not normal myeloid cells. E4F1 depletion also induces cell death in various human myeloid leukemic cell lines, including acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cell lines. Interestingly, the E4F1 protein is overexpressed in a large proportion of human AML samples. These data provide new insights into E4F1-associated survival functions implicated in tumorigenesis and could open the path for new therapeutic strategies.

  5. Functional screen of MSI2 interactors identifies an essential role for SYNCRIP in myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vu, Ly P; Prieto, Camila; Amin, Elianna M; Chhangawala, Sagar; Krivtsov, Andrei; Calvo-Vidal, M Nieves; Chou, Timothy; Chow, Arthur; Minuesa, Gerard; Park, Sun Mi; Barlowe, Trevor S; Taggart, James; Tivnan, Patrick; Deering, Raquel P; Chu, Lisa P; Kwon, Jeong-Ah; Meydan, Cem; Perales-Paton, Javier; Arshi, Arora; Gönen, Mithat; Famulare, Christopher; Patel, Minal; Paietta, Elisabeth; Tallman, Martin S; Lu, Yuheng; Glass, Jacob; Garret-Bakelman, Francine E; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Järås, Marcus; Hacohen, Nir; Hwang, Alexia; Garippa, Ralph; Lengner, Christopher J; Armstrong, Scott A; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cowley, Glenn S; Root, David; Doench, John; Leslie, Christina; Ebert, Benjamin L; Kharas, Michael G

    2017-06-01

    The identity of the RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that govern cancer stem cells remains poorly characterized. The MSI2 RBP is a central regulator of translation of cancer stem cell programs. Through proteomic analysis of the MSI2-interacting RBP network and functional shRNA screening, we identified 24 genes required for in vivo leukemia. Syncrip was the most differentially required gene between normal and myeloid leukemia cells. SYNCRIP depletion increased apoptosis and differentiation while delaying leukemogenesis. Gene expression profiling of SYNCRIP-depleted cells demonstrated a loss of the MLL and HOXA9 leukemia stem cell program. SYNCRIP and MSI2 interact indirectly though shared mRNA targets. SYNCRIP maintains HOXA9 translation, and MSI2 or HOXA9 overexpression rescued the effects of SYNCRIP depletion. Altogether, our data identify SYNCRIP as a new RBP that controls the myeloid leukemia stem cell program. We propose that targeting these RBP complexes might provide a novel therapeutic strategy in leukemia.

  6. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  7. Asparaginase induces apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Ye, Li; Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Zhang, Guoping; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-02-28

    The antitumor enzyme asparaginase, which targets essential amino acid L-asparagine and catalyzes it to L-aspartic acid and ammonia, has been used for years in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), subtypes of myeloid leukemia and T-cell lymphomas, whereas the anti-chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) effect of asparaginase and its underlying mechanism has not been completely elucidated. We have shown here that asparaginase induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in K562 and KU812 cells. Apart from induction of apoptosis, we reported for the first time that asparaginase induced autophagic response in K562 and KU812 cells as evidenced by the formation of autophagosome, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-positive autophagy-like vacuoles, and the upregulation of LC3-II. Further study suggested that the Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and Erk (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway were involved in asparaginase-induced autophagy in K562 cells. Moreover, blocking autophagy using pharmacological inhibitors LY294002, chloroquine (CQ) and quinacrine (QN) enhanced asparaginase-induced cell death and apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in asparaginase-treated K562 and KU812 cells. Together, these findings provide a rationale that combination of asparaginase anticancer activity and autophagic inhibition might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for CML.

  8. Granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells promote angiogenesis in the context of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, Marilène; Muller, Joséphine; Lamour, Virginie; De Veirman, Kim; De Raeve, Hendrik; Bellahcène, Akeila; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baron, Frédéric; Beguin, Yves; Caers, Jo; Heusschen, Roy

    2016-06-21

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of tumor cells in the bone marrow (BM) and is associated with immunosuppression, angiogenesis and osteolysis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of immature, immunosuppressive myeloid cells that promote tumor progression through different mechanisms.In this work, we studied the contribution of MDSC subsets to different disease-promoting aspects in MM. We observed an expansion of polymorphonuclear/granulocytic (PMN-)MDSCs in two immunocompetent murine MM models, while this was not observed for monocytic (MO-)MDSCs. Both MDSC subpopulations from MM-bearing mice were immunosuppressive, but PMN-MDSCs displayed a higher suppressive potential. Soluble factors secreted by MM cells increased the viability of MDSCs, whereas the presence of MDSCs did not affect the proliferation of MM cells in vitro or in vivo. Interestingly, we observed a pro-angiogenic effect of PMN-MDSCs in the context of MM using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Consistently, MM-derived PMN-MDSCs showed an up-regulation of angiogenesis-related factors and reduced PMN-MDSC levels were associated with less angiogenesis in vivo. Finally, we identified MO-MDSCs as osteoclast precursors.These results suggest that MDSC subpopulations play diverging roles in MM. We show for the first time that PMN-MDSCs exert a pro-angiogenic role in MM.

  9. The Emerging Understanding of Myeloid Cells as Partners and Targets in Tumor Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda L.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most prominent amongst cells capable of presenting tumor-derived antigens to T cells and thereby maintaining the latter in an activated state. Myeloid populations of the tumor microenvironment prominently include monocytes and neutrophils (sometimes loosely grouped as myeloid-derived suppressor cells), macrophages and dendritic cells. While intratumoral myeloid populations, as a whole, have long been considered non-stimulatory or suppressive, it has only recently been appreciated that not all tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells are made equal. Because of advances in high-dimensional flow cytometry as well as more robust transcriptional profiling, we now also understand that the subsets of the tumor-myeloid compartment are far more diverse and notably even contain a rare population of stimulatory dendritic cells. As all of these myeloid populations represent major T-cell interacting partners for incoming tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes, understanding the distinctions in their lineage and function reveals and guides numerous therapeutic avenues targeting these antigen-presenting cells. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads overview, we review the recent progress in this rapidly evolving field and advance the hypothesis that the antigen-presenting compartment within tumor microenvironments may contain significant numbers of potent allies to be leveraged for immune-based tumor clearance. PMID:25847968

  10. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma-Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Younis, Rania H; Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-02-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)-secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33(+) cells cultured in HNSCC cell line-derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33(+)CD11b(+)HLA-DR(-/low)). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33(+) myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4(+)T-bet(+) and CD8(+)T-bet(+)), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies.

  11. Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma–Associated Semaphorin 4D Induces Expansion of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Lee; Webb, Tonya J.

    2016-01-01

    One of the mechanisms by which malignancies can induce immune suppression is through the production of cytokines that affect the maturation and differentiation of inflammatory cells in the tumor microenvironment. Semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) is a proangiogenic cytokine produced by several malignancies, which has been described in the regulation of the immune system. In the present study, we examined the role of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)–secreted Sema4D on myeloid cell differentiation. CD33+ cells cultured in HNSCC cell line–derived conditioned medium differentiated into myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) (CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR−/low). The addition of anti-Sema4D Ab to HNSCC conditioned medium significantly reduced the expansion of the MDSC population. Similarly, knockdown of Sema4D in an HNSCC cell line resulted in a loss of MDSC function as shown by a decrease in the production of the immune-suppressive cytokines arginase-1, TGF-β, and IL-10 by MDSC, concomitant with recovery of T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production following stimulation of CD3/CD28. Importantly, CD33+ myeloid and T cells cultured in conditioned medium of HNSCC cells in which Sema4D was knocked down promoted antitumor inflammatory profile, through recovery of the effector T cells (CD4+T-bet+ and CD8+T-bet+), as well as a decrease in regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+). We also showed that Sema4D was comparable to GM-CSF in its induction of MDSC. Collectively, this study describes a novel immunosuppressive role for Sema4D in HNSCC through induction of MDSC, and it highlights Sema4D as a therapeutic target for future studies to enhance the antitumorigenic inflammatory response in HNSCC and other epithelial malignancies. PMID:26740106

  12. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  13. Use of RDA analysis of knockout mice to identify myeloid genes regulated in vivo by PU.1 and C/EBPalpha.

    PubMed Central

    Iwama, A; Zhang, P; Darlington, G J; McKercher, S R; Maki, R; Tenen, D G

    1998-01-01

    PU.1 and C/EBPalpha are transcription factors essential for normal myeloid development. Loss-of-function mutation of PU.1 leads to an absolute block in monocyte/macrophage development and abnormal granulocytic development while that of C/EBPalpha causes a selective block in neutrophilic differentiation. In order to understand these phenotypes, we studied the role of PU.1 and C/EBPalpha in the regulation of myeloid target genes in vivo . Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNAs encoding receptors for M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF, were expressed at low levels in PU.1(-/-) fetal liver compared with wild type. To identify additional myeloid genes regulated by PU.1 and C/EBPalpha, we performed representational difference analysis (RDA), a PCR-based subtractive hybridization using fetal livers from wild type and PU.1 or C/EBPalpha knockout mice. By introducing a new modification of RDA, that of tissue-specific gene suppression, we could selectively identify a set of differentially expressed genes specific to myeloid cells. Differentially expressed genes included both primary and secondary granule protein genes. In addition, eight novel genes were identified that were upregulated in expression during myeloid differentiation. These methods provide a general strategy for elucidating the genes affected in murine knockout models. PMID:9611252

  14. The Potential of Vitamin D-Regulated Intracellular Signaling Pathways as Targets for Myeloid Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Studzinski, George P.

    2015-01-01

    The current standard regimens for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are curative in less than half of patients; therefore, there is a great need for innovative new approaches to this problem. One approach is to target new treatments to the pathways that are instrumental to cell growth and survival with drugs that are less harmful to normal cells than to neoplastic cells. In this review, we focus on the MAPK family of signaling pathways and those that are known to, or potentially can, interact with MAPKs, such as PI3K/AKT/FOXO and JAK/STAT. We exemplify the recent studies in this field with specific relevance to vitamin D and its derivatives, since they have featured prominently in recent scientific literature as having anti-cancer properties. Since microRNAs also are known to be regulated by activated vitamin D, this is also briefly discussed here, as are the implications of the emerging acquisition of transcriptosome data and potentiation of the biological effects of vitamin D by other compounds. While there are ongoing clinical trials of various compounds that affect signaling pathways, more studies are needed to establish the clinical utility of vitamin D in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26239344

  15. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed.

  16. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A.; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F.; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Wood, William A.; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S.; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, N=240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MK+MDS, N=221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes compared to other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, N=3,360; MDS, N=1,373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1998 to 2011. MK+AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, p<0.01), similar transplant related mortality (TRM, HR 1.01, p=0.9) and worse survival (HR 1.67, p<0.01) compared to other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (HR 2.39, p<0.01), higher TRM (HR 1.80, p<0.01) and worse survival (HR 2.02, p<0.01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (HR 1.72, p<0.01) and MDS (HR1.79, p<0.01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  17. Drosophila as a model for the two myeloid blood cell systems in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Katrina S.; Brückner, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Fish, mice and men rely on two coexisting myeloid blood cell systems. One is sustained by hematopoietic progenitor cells, which reside in specialized microenvironments in hematopoietic organs and give rise to cells of the monocyte lineage. The other system corresponds to the independent lineage of self-renewing tissue macrophages, which colonize organs during embryonic development and are maintained during later life by proliferation in local tissue microenvironments. However, little is known about the nature of these microenvironments and their regulation. Moreover, many vertebrate tissues contain a mix of both tissue-resident and monocyte-derived macrophages, posing a challenge to the study of lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms and function. This review highlights how research in the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster can address many of these outstanding questions in the field. Drawing parallels between hematopoiesis in Drosophila and vertebrates, we illustrate the evolutionary conservation of the two myeloid systems across animal phyla. Much like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses a lineage of self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages, as well as a ‘definitive’ lineage of macrophages that derive from hematopoiesis in the progenitor-based lymph gland. We summarize key findings from Drosophila hematopoiesis that illustrate how local microenvironments, systemic signals, immune challenges and nervous inputs regulate adaptive responses of tissue-resident macrophages and progenitor-based hematopoiesis to achieve optimal fitness of the animal. PMID:24946019

  18. Hedgehog signalling in myeloid cells impacts on body weight, adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Braune, Julia; Weyer, Ulrike; Matz-Soja, Madlen; Hobusch, Constance; Kern, Matthias; Kunath, Anne; Klöting, Nora; Kralisch, Susann; Blüher, Matthias; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zavros, Yana; Bechmann, Ingo; Gericke, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Recently, hedgehog (Hh) was identified as a crucial player in adipose tissue development and energy expenditure. Therefore, we tested whether Hh ligands are regulated in obesity. Further, we aimed at identifying potential target cells of Hh signalling and studied the functional impact of Hh signalling on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism. Hh ligands and receptors were analysed in adipose tissue or serum from lean and obese mice as well as in humans. To study the impact on adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism, Hh signalling was specifically blocked in myeloid cells using a conditional knockout approach (Lys-Smo (-/-)). Desert Hh (DHH) and Indian Hh (IHH) are local Hh ligands, whereas Sonic Hh is not expressed in adipose tissue from mice or humans. In mice, obesity leads to a preferential upregulation of Hh ligands (Dhh) and signalling components (Ptch1, Smo and Gli1) in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Further, adipose tissue macrophages are Hh target cells owing to the expression of Hh receptors, such as Patched1 and 2. Conditional knockout of Smo (which encodes Smoothened, a mandatory Hh signalling component) in myeloid cells increases body weight and adipose tissue inflammation and attenuates glucose tolerance, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect of Hh signalling. In humans, adipose tissue expression of DHH and serum IHH decrease with obesity and type 2 diabetes, which might be explained by the intake of metformin. Interestingly, metformin reduced Dhh and Ihh expression in mouse adipose tissue explants. Hh signalling in myeloid cells affects adipose tissue inflammation and glucose metabolism and may be a potential target to treat type 2 diabetes.

  19. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  20. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  1. Reprint of: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  2. Myeloid Cell-Specific Lipin-1 Deficiency Stimulates Endocrine Adiponectin-FGF15 Axis and Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayou; Kim, Chunki; Jogasuria, Alvin; Han, Yoonhee; Hu, Xudong; Wu, Jiashin; Shen, Hong; Chrast, Roman; Finck, Brian N.; You, Min

    2016-01-01

    Lipin-1 is a phosphatidate phosphohydrolase (PAP) required for the generation of diacylglycerol during glycerolipid synthesis, and exhibits dual functions in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Lipin-1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the present study, we assessed lipin-1 function in myeloid cells in ALD using a myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 knockout (mLipin-1KO) mouse model. Utilizing the Gao-binge ethanol feeding protocol, matched mLipin-1KO mice and littermate loxP control (WT) mice were pair-fed with either an ethanol-containing diet or an ethanol-free diet (control). Surprisingly, deletion of lipin-1 in myeloid cells dramatically attenuated liver inflammatory responses and ameliorated liver injury that would normally occur following the ethanol feeding protocol, but slightly exacerbated the ethanol-induced steatosis in mice. Mechanistically, myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 deficiency concomitantly increased the fat-derived adiponectin and ileum-derived fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15. In concordance with concerted elevation of circulating adiponectin and FGF15, myeloid cell-specific lipin-1 deficiency diminished hepatic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, limited liver inflammatory responses, normalized serum levels of bile acids, and protected mice from liver damage after ethanol challenge. Our novel data demonstrate that myeloid cell-specific deletion of lipin-1 ameliorated inflammation and alcoholic hepatitis in mice via activation of endocrine adiponectin-FGF15 signaling. PMID:27666676

  3. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  5. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christopher N; Norden, Diana M; Faw, Timothy D; Deibert, Rochelle; Wohleb, Eric S; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Basso, D Michele

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24h and 7days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24h after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9.

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer: recent progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Yazan S; Ammori, Basil J; Elkord, Eyad

    2013-09-01

    Immunosuppressive cells, mainly myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells, downregulate antitumour immunity and cancer immunotherapy. MDSCs are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells that negatively regulate the immune responses during tumour progression, inflammation and infection. Whilst there have been extensive laboratory investigations aimed at characterising the MDSC subsets in cancer, there remains a significant gap in our understanding of their phenotypical and functional heterogeneity. In this article, we review data concerning the phenotypical and functional role of MDSCs in cancers. Importantly, we analyse the value of MDSCs as a prognostic factor in various clinical settings and the possible therapeutic approaches towards elimination of their immunosuppressive activity and enhancement of beneficial antitumour immune responses. MDSCs promote tumour immune evasion by inhibiting T-cell responses, as well as by supporting tumour progression. Accumulation of MDSCs is associated with the progression of human cancers, and their elimination was shown to improve anti-tumour immune responses. Phenotypical characterisation of MDSCs has been poorly investigated in many human cancers and lacks comprehensive clinicopathological correlation data. Although the need for effective therapeutic agents to eliminate the MDSC suppressive effect is immense, their role has been examined only in a few clinical settings.

  7. Myeloid antigens in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia:clinical data point to regulation of CD66c distinct from other myeloid antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kalina, Tomas; Vaskova, Martina; Mejstrikova, Ester; Madzo, Jozef; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2005-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (MyAgs) on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells is a well-documented phenomenon, although its regulating mechanisms are unclear. MyAgs in ALL are interpreted e.g. as hallmarks of early differentiation stage and/or lineage indecisiveness. Granulocytic marker CD66c – Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is aberrantly expressed on ALL with strong correlation to genotype (negative in TEL/AML1 and MLL/AF4, positive in BCR/ABL and hyperdiploid cases). Methods In a cohort of 365 consecutively diagnosed Czech B-precursor ALL patients, we analyze distribution of MyAg+ cases and mutual relationship among CD13, CD15, CD33, CD65 and CD66c. The most frequent MyAg (CD66c) is studied further regarding its stability from diagnosis to relapse, prognostic significance and regulation of surface expression. For the latter, flow cytometry, Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells is used. Results We show CD66c is expressed in 43% patients, which is more frequent than other MyAgs studied. In addition, CD66c expression negatively correlates with CD13 (p < 0.0001), CD33 (p = 0.002) and/or CD65 (p = 0.029). Our data show that different myeloid antigens often differ in biological importance, which may be obscured by combining them into "MyAg positive ALL". We show that unlike other MyAgs, CD66c expression is not shifted from the onset of ALL to relapse (n = 39, time to relapse 0.3–5.3 years). Although opposite has previously been suggested, we show that CEACAM6 transcription is invariably followed by surface expression (by quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells) and that malignant cells containing CD66c in cytoplasm without surface expression are not found by flow cytometry nor by Western blot in vivo. We report no prognostic significance of CD66c, globally or separately in genotype subsets of B-precursor ALL, nor an association with known risk factors (n = 254). Conclusion In contrast to

  8. Blast-derived microvesicles in sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia suppress natural killer cell function via membrane-associated transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Szczepanski, Miroslaw J; Szajnik, Marta; Welsh, Ann; Whiteside, Theresa L; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer cell cytotoxicity is decreased in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in comparison to that in normal controls. Tumor-derived microvesicles present in patients' sera exert detrimental effects on immune cells and may influence tumor progression. We investigated the microvesicle protein level, molecular profile and suppression of natural killer cell activity in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. The patients' sera contained higher levels of microvesicles compared to the levels in controls (P<0.001). Isolated microvesicles had a distinct molecular profile: in addition to conventional microvesicle markers, they contained membrane-associated transforming growth factor-β1, MICA/MICB and myeloid blasts markers, CD34, CD33 and CD117. These microvesicles decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity (P<0.002) and down-regulated expression of NKG2D in normal natural killer cells (P<0.001). Sera from patients with acute myeloid leukemia contained elevated levels of transforming growth factor-β, and urea-mediated dissociation of microvesicles further increased the levels of this protein. Neutralizing anti-transforming growth factor-β1 antibodies inhibited microvesicle-mediated suppression of natural killer cell activity and NKG2D down-regulation. Interleukin-15 protected natural killer cells from adverse effects of tumor-derived microvesicles. We provide evidence for the existence in acute myeloid leukemia of a novel mechanism of natural killer cell suppression mediated by tumor-derived microvesicles and for the ability of interleukin-15 to counteract this suppression.

  9. Clinical significance of Treg cell frequency in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjuan; Xu, Yunxiao

    2013-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical significance of peripheral blood CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127 low-regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. T(reg) cells in the peripheral blood of 80 AML patients and 35 age-matched healthy controls were counted by flow cytometry. Correlations between the frequency of circulating T(reg) cells and disease status, treatment outcome, or prognosis were evaluated. The percentages of T(reg) cells in patients at diagnosis and during refractory/relapse were significantly higher than that in healthy controls. There was no significant difference in the percentages of T(reg) cells between patients in remission and healthy controls. After six cycles of chemotherapy, the percentage of T(reg) cells in patients who achieved complete remission was significantly lower than that in patients at diagnosis, but there was no difference in T(reg) frequency between refractory/relapse patients and patients at diagnosis. T(reg) cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients may play a suppressive role in host antitumor immune response. The frequency of T(reg) cells in peripheral blood may thus be used as a biomarker for predicting sensitivity to chemotherapy and prognosis of AML patients. Additionally, T(reg) number in peripheral blood could be used to monitor disease status and evaluate disease progression.

  10. Instructive role of M-CSF on commitment of bipotent myeloid cells involves ERK-dependent positive and negative signaling.

    PubMed

    Carras, Sylvain; Valayer, Alexandre; Moratal, Claudine; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Pages, Gilles; Morlé, François; Mouchiroud, Guy; Gobert, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    M-CSF and G-CSF are instructive cytokines that specifically induce differentiation of bipotent myeloid progenitors into macrophages and granulocytes, respectively. Through morphology and colony assay studies, flow cytometry analysis of specific markers, and expression of myeloid transcription factors, we show here that the Eger/Fms cell line is composed of cells whose differentiation fate is instructed by M-CSF and G-CSF, thus representing a good in vitro model of myeloid bipotent progenitors. Consistent with the essential role of ERK1/2 during macrophage differentiation and defects of macrophagic differentiation in native ERK1(-/-) progenitors, ERK signaling is strongly activated in Eger/Fms cells upon M-CSF-induced macrophagic differentiation but only to a very small extent during G-CSF-induced granulocytic differentiation. Previous in vivo studies indicated a key role of Fli-1 in myeloid differentiation and demonstrated its weak expression during macrophagic differentiation with a strong expression during granulocytic differentiation. Here, we demonstrated that this effect could be mediated by a differential regulation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCd) on Fli-1 expression in response to M-CSF and G-CSF. With the use of knockdown of PKCd by small interfering RNA, we demonstrated that M-CSF activates PKCd, which in turn, inhibits Fli-1 expression and granulocytic differentiation. Finally, we studied the connection between ERK and PKCd and showed that in the presence of the MEK inhibitor U0126, PKCd expression is decreased, and Fli-1 expression is increased in response to M-CSF. Altogether, we demonstrated that in bipotent myeloid cells, M-CSF promotes macrophagic over granulocytic differentiation by inducing ERK activation but also PKCd expression, which in turn, down-regulates Fli-1 expression and prevents granulocytic differentiation.

  11. VCAM-1 and VAP-1 recruit myeloid cells that promote pulmonary metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferjančič, Špela; Gil-Bernabé, Ana M; Hill, Sally A; Allen, Philip D; Richardson, Peter; Sparey, Tim; Savory, Edward; McGuffog, Jane; Muschel, Ruth J

    2013-04-18

    Pulmonary metastasis is a frequent cause of poor outcome in cancer patients. The formation of pulmonary metastasis is greatly facilitated by recruitment of myeloid cells, which are crucial for tumor cell survival and extravasation. During inflammation, homing of myeloid cells is mediated by endothelial activation, raising the question of a potential role for endothelial activation in myeloid cell recruitment during pulmonary metastasis. Here, we show that metastatic tumor cell attachment causes the induction of the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1). Induction of VCAM-1 is dependent on tumor cell-clot formation, decreasing upon induction of tissue factor pathway inhibitor or treatment with hirudin. Furthermore, inhibition of endothelial activation with a VCAM-1 blocking antibody or a VAP-1 small molecule inhibitor leads to reduced myeloid cell recruitment and diminished tumor cell survival and metastasis without affecting tumor cell adhesion. Simultaneous inhibition of VCAM-1 and VAP-1 does not result in further reduction in myeloid cell recruitment and tumor cell survival, suggesting that both act through closely related mechanisms. These results establish VCAM-1 and VAP-1 as mediators of myeloid cell recruitment in metastasis and identify VAP-1 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention to combat early metastasis.

  12. Identification of a myeloid-derived suppressor cell cystatin-like protein that inhibits metastasis.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; Friedman, David B; Bogyo, Matthew; Min, Yongfen; Yang, Li; Lin, P Charles

    2011-08-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are significantly increased in cancer patients and tumor bearing-animals. MDSCs infiltrate into tumors and promote tumor invasion and metastasis. To identify the mediator responsible for the prometastatic property of MDSCs, we used proteomics. We found neutrophilic granule protein (NGP) was decreased >2-fold in MDSCs from metastatic 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to nonmetastatic 67NR controls. NGP mRNA levels were decreased in bone marrow and in tumor-infiltrating MDSCs by 45 and 66%, respectively, in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice compared to 67NR controls. Interestingly, 4T1-conditioned medium reduced myeloid cell NGP expression by ∼ 40%, suggesting that a secreted factor mediates gene reduction. Sequence analysis shows a putative cystatin domain in NGP, and biochemical analysis confirms NGP a novel cathepsin inhibitor. It inhibited cathepsin B activity by nearly 40% in vitro. NGP expression in 4T1 tumor cells suppressed cell invasion, delayed primary tumor growth, and greatly reduced lung metastasis in vivo. A 2.8-fold reduction of cathepsin activity was found in tumors expressing NGP compared to controls. NGP significantly reduced tumor angiogenesis to 12.6 from 19.6 and lymphangiogenesis to 4.6 from 9.1 vessels/field. Necrosis was detectable only in NGP-expressing tumors, and the number of apoptotic cells increased to 22.4 from 8.3 in controls. Taken together, this study identifies a negative regulator of tumor metastasis in MDSCs, NGP, which is down-regulated in metastatic conditions. The finding suggests that malignant tumors promote invasion/metastasis not only through up-regulation of proteases but also down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  13. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hoi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Yan; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2, D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. PMID:19887046

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  15. The interplay of autophagy and β-Catenin signaling regulates differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, K; Cott, C; Bohler, S; Aigal, S; Zheng, S; Villringer, S; Imberty, A; Claudinon, J; Römer, W

    2015-01-01

    The major feature of leukemic cells is an arrest of differentiation accompanied by highly active proliferation. In many subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia, these features are mediated by the aberrant Wnt/β-Catenin pathway. In our study, we established the lectin LecB as inducer of the differentiation of the acute myeloid leukemia cell line THP-1 and used it for the investigation of the involved processes. During differentiation, functional autophagy and low β-Catenin levels were essential. Corresponding to this, a high β-Catenin level stabilized proliferation and inhibited autophagy, resulting in low differentiation ability. Initiated by LecB, β-Catenin was degraded, autophagy became active and differentiation took place within hours. Remarkably, the reduction of β-Catenin sensitized THP-1 cells to the autophagy-stimulating mTOR inhibitors. As downmodulation of E-Cadherin was sufficient to significantly reduce LecB-mediated differentiation, we propose E-Cadherin as a crucial interaction partner in this signaling pathway. Upon LecB treatment, E-Cadherin colocalized with β-Catenin and thereby prevented the induction of β-Catenin target protein expression and proliferation. That way, our study provides for the first time a link between E-Cadherin, the aberrant Wnt/β-Catenin signaling, autophagy and differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia. Importantly, LecB was a valuable tool to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of acute myeloid leukemia pathogenesis and may help to identify novel therapy approaches. PMID:27551462

  16. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection Recruits and Modulates Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Hasan H.; Zhou, Benyuan; Voss, Pina; Carevic, Melanie; Schroth, Carolin; Frey, Nina; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infections mainly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Despite innate and adaptive immune responses upon infection, P. aeruginosa is capable of efficiently escaping host defenses, but the underlying immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that are functionally characterized by their potential to suppress T- and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Here we demonstrate, using an airway in vivo infection model, that P. aeruginosa recruits and activates neutrophilic MDSCs, which functionally suppress T-cell responses. We further show that the CF gene defect (CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR) modulates the functionality, but not the recruitment or generation of neutrophilic MDSCs. Collectively, we define a mechanism by which P. aeruginosa airway infection undermines host immunity by modulating neutrophilic MDSCs in vivo. PMID:27965936

  18. Inverse regulation of bridging integrator 1 and BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Trino, Stefania; De Luca, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Morano, Annalisa; Caivano, Antonella; La Rocca, Francesco; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Bianchino, Gabriella; Grieco, Vitina; Signorino, Elisabetta; Fragasso, Alberto; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Venturi, Claudia; Rosti, Gianantonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator process of tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) functional activities. Bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) is a key protein involved in RTK intracellular trafficking. Here, we report, by studying 34 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis, that BIN1 gene is downregulated in CML as compared to healthy controls, suggesting an altered endocytosis of RTKs. Rab interactor 1 (RIN1), an activator of BIN1, displayed a similar behavior. Treatment of 57 patients by tyrosine kinase inhibitors caused, along with BCR-ABL1 inactivation, an increase of BIN1 and RIN1 expression, potentially restoring endocytosis. There was a significant inverse correlation between BIN1-RIN1 and BCR-ABL1 expression. In vitro experiments on both CML and nontumorigenic cell lines treated with Imatinib confirmed these results. In order to provide another proof in favor of BIN1 and RIN1 endocytosis function in CML, we demonstrated that Imatinib induced, in K562 cell line, BIN1-RIN1 upregulation accompanied by a parallel AXL receptor internalization into cytoplasmic compartment. This study shows a novel deregulated mechanism in CML patients, indicating BIN1 and RIN1 as players in the maintenance of the abnormal RTK signaling in this hematological disease.

  19. Inhibiting autophagy potentiates the anticancer activity of IFN1@/IFNα in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Cao, Lizhi; Yu, Yan; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Liu, Ke; Huang, Jun; Kang, Rui; Livesey, Kristen M; Tang, Daolin

    2013-03-01

    IFN1@ (interferon, type 1, cluster, also called IFNα) has been extensively studied as a treatment for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The mechanism of anticancer activity of IFN1@ is complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy, a mechanism of cellular homeostasis for the removal of dysfunctional organelles and proteins, regulates IFN1@-mediated cell death. IFN1@ activated the cellular autophagic machinery in immortalized or primary CML cells. Activation of JAK1-STAT1 and RELA signaling were required for IFN1@-induced expression of BECN1, a key regulator of autophagy. Moreover, pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy enhanced IFN1@-induced apoptosis by activation of the CASP8-BID pathway. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for an important mechanism that links autophagy to immunotherapy in leukemia.

  20. A novel mouse model of conditional IRAK-M deficiency in myeloid cells: application in lung Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Di; Matsuda, Jennifer; Berman, Reena; Schaefer, Niccolette; Stevenson, Connor; Gross, James; Zhang, Bicheng; Sanchez, Amelia; Li, Liwu; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid cells such as macrophages are critical to innate defense against infection. IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a negative regulator of TLR signaling during bacterial infection, but the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M in bacterial infection is unclear. Our goal was to generate a novel conditional knockout mouse model to define the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M during bacterial infection. Myeloid cell-specific IRAK-M knockout mice were generated by crossing IRAK-M floxed mice with LysM-Cre knock-in mice. The resulting LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) and control (LysM-Cre(-)/IRAK-M(fl/wt)) mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). IRAK-M deletion, inflammation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and PA load were measured in leukocytes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lungs. PA killing assay with BAL fluid was performed to determine mechanisms of IRAK-M-mediated host defense. IRAK-M mRNA and protein levels in alveolar and lung macrophages were significantly reduced in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice compared with control mice. Following PA infection, LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice have enhanced lung neutrophilic inflammation, including MPO activity, but reduced PA load. The increased lung MPO activity in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mouse BAL fluid reduced PA load. Generation of IRAK-M conditional knockout mice will enable investigators to determine precisely the function of IRAK-M in myeloid cells and other types of cells during infection and inflammation.

  1. Decline of miR-124 in myeloid cells promotes regulatory T-cell development in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Ling; Ning, Shun B; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to attenuating immune responses during chronic viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms underlying their suppressive activities remain incompletely understood. We have recently shown marked expansion of MDSCs that promote regulatory T (Treg) cell development in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here we further investigated whether the HCV-induced expansion of MDSCs and Treg cells is regulated by an miRNA-mediated mechanism. The RNA array analysis revealed that six miRNAs were up-regulated and six miRNAs were down-regulated significantly in myeloid cells during HCV infection. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the down-regulation of miR-124 in MDSCs from HCV patients. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that miR-124 may be involved in the regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3), which was overexpressed in MDSCs from HCV patients. Notably, silencing of STAT-3 significantly increased the miR-124 expression, whereas reconstituting miR-124 decreased the levels of STAT-3, as well as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which were overexpressed in MDCSs, and reduced the frequencies of Foxp3(+) Treg cells that were developed during chronic HCV infection. These results suggest that reciprocal regulation of miR-124 and STAT-3 in MDSCs promotes Treg cell development, thus uncovering a novel mechanism for the expansion of MDSC and Treg cells during HCV infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  3. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

  4. Potential role of curcumin and taurine combination therapy on human myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro.

    PubMed

    El-Houseini, Motawa E; Refaei, Mohammed Osman; Amin, Ahmed Ibrahim; Abol-Ftouh, Mahmoud A

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and taurine are natural products that have been used in this study evaluating their therapeutic effect on myeloid leukemic cells propagated in vitro. Sixty patients with myeloid leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All patient groups were admitted to the Medical Oncology Department of the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. There were statistically significant differences between treated leukemic cells compared to normal mononuclear leukocytes in cell density, interferon-γ and immunophenotypic profile, mainly CD4+, CD8 + and CD25+. This work highlights the possibility of using curcumin and taurine as a potential useful therapy in the management of patients suffering from chronic and acute myeloid leukemias.

  5. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF(-/-)) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF(-/-) mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection.

  6. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF−/−) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF−/− mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection. PMID:28280495

  7. Natural killer cells require monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells to eradicate orthotopically engrafted glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Baker, Gregory J; Chockley, Peter; Zamler, Daniel; Castro, Maria G; Lowenstein, Pedro R

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell immune surveillance. However, the mechanisms used by these cancers to suppress antitumor NK cell activity remain poorly understood. We have recently reported on a novel mechanism of innate immune evasion characterized by the overexpression of the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-1 by both mouse and rat malignant glioma. Here, we investigate the cytokine profile of galectin-1-deficient GL26 cells and describe the process by which these tumors are targeted by the early innate immune system in RAG1(-/-) and C57BL/6J mice. Our data reveal that galectin-1 knockdown in GL26 cells heightens their inflammatory status leading to the rapid recruitment of Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells and NK1.1(+) NK cells into the brain tumor microenvironment, culminating in tumor clearance. We show that immunodepletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells in RAG1(-/-) mice permits the growth of galectin-1-deficient glioma despite the presence of NK cells, thus demonstrating an essential role for myeloid cells in the clearance of galectin-1-deficient glioma. Further characterization of tumor-infiltrating Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) cells reveals that these cells also express CCR2 and Ly-6C, markers consistent with inflammatory monocytes. Our results demonstrate that Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells, often referred to as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), are required for antitumor NK cell activity against galectin-1-deficient GL26 glioma. We conclude that glioma-derived galectin-1 represents an important factor in dictating the phenotypic behavior of monocytic Gr-1(+)/CD11b(+) myeloid cells. Galectin-1 suppression may be a valuable treatment approach for clinical glioma by promoting their innate immune-mediated recognition and clearance through the concerted effort of innate myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages.

  8. Retinoic acid-induced expression of CD38 antigen in myeloid cells is mediated through retinoic acid receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Drach, J; McQueen, T; Engel, H; Andreeff, M; Robertson, K A; Collins, S J; Malavasi, F; Mehta, K

    1994-04-01

    CD38 is a leukocyte differentiation antigen that has been thought to be a phenotypic marker of different subpopulations of T- and B-lymphocytes. In myeloid cells, CD38 is expressed during early stages of differentiation. Virtually no information is available on regulation and functions of CD38. Recently we reported that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is a potent and highly specific inducer of CD38 expression in human promyelocytic leukemia cells. Here we report that ATRA-induced expression of CD38 antigen in myeloid cells is mediated through retinoic acid-alpha receptor (RAR alpha). ATRA failed to induce CD38 expression in a mutant subclone of the HL-60 myeloid leukemia cell line (designated HL-60R) that is relatively resistant to ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation. Retroviral vector-mediated transduction of RA receptor (RAR alpha) into this HL-60R subclone completely restored the sensitivity of these cells to ATRA in terms of their ability to express CD38. In contrast, CD38 expression was not inducible by ATRA in HL-60R cells, transfected with a functional RAR beta, RAR gamma, or RXR alpha receptor. Induction of CD38 in acute promyelocytic and acute myeloblastic leukemia cells was independent of ATRA-induced cytodifferentiation. Following culture with ATRA, increased CD38 protein levels were also observed in normal CD34+ bone marrow cells, but not on normal circulating granulocytes. From these results, we conclude that CD38 is ATRA inducible in myeloid leukemia cells and normal CD34+ bone marrow cells. This effect is independent of differentiation and is mediated by RAR alpha in HL-60 cells, suggesting a similar role for RAR alpha in CD38 expression in other hematopoietic cells.

  9. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials. PMID:26928248

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: more mechanisms for inhibiting antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2010-10-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in most cancer patients and experimental animals with cancer. They accumulate in response to pro-inflammatory mediators and they use a variety of mechanisms to block both innate and adaptive antitumor immunity. Because of their critical role in obstructing immune responses, MDSC are a strategic obstacle to immunotherapies that require activation of the host's cell-mediated and innate immune responses. Following a brief description of the factors that induce MDSC accumulation, this article reviews two newly discovered mechanisms that MDSC use to suppress the activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The first mechanism is MDSC sequestration of cysteine, an amino acid that T cells are unable to synthesize de novo and that they require for activation. The second mechanism is MDSC-mediated down-regulation of L: -selectin. T cells must have an L: -selectin(high) phenotype to home to lymph nodes and inflammatory sites where they encounter antigen and are activated. By down-regulating L: -selectin on T cells, MDSC perturb T cell trafficking patterns and thereby inhibit T cell activation. Given the complexity of conditions that regulate MDSC accumulation and the variety of suppressive mechanisms used by MDSC, it is essential to understand which conditions and mechanisms are dominant so MDSC accumulation and/or activity can be targeted in individual patients to minimize MDSC-induced immune suppression.

  11. Biology and Clinical Relevance of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinisch, Andreas; Chan, Steven M.; Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for the cancer stem cell model was first demonstrated in xenotransplanted blood and bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) almost two decades ago, supporting the concept that a rare clonal and mutated leukemic stem cell (LSC) population is sufficient to drive leukemic growth. The inability to eliminate LSCs with conventional therapies is thought to be the primary cause of disease relapse in AML patients, and as such, novel therapies with the ability to target this population are required to improve patient outcomes. An important step towards this goal is the identification of common immunophenotypic surface markers and biological properties that distinguish LSCs from normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) across AML patients. This work has resulted in the development of a large number of potential LSC-selective therapies that target cell-surface molecules, intracellular signaling pathways, and the bone marrow microenvironment. Here, we will review the basic biology, immunophenotypic detection, and clinical relevance of LSCs, as well as emerging biological and small-molecule strategies that either directly target LSCs or indirectly target these cells through modulation of their microenvironment. PMID:26111462

  12. BCR-ABL-transformed GMP as myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Yosuke; Stuart, Scott A.; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jiang, Yong; Banno, Asoka; Hunton, Irina C.; Young, Dennis J.; Naoe, Tomoki; Murre, Cornelis; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.; Wang, Jean Y. J.

    2008-01-01

    During blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), abnormal granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMP) with nuclear β-catenin acquire self-renewal potential and may function as leukemic stem cells (Jamieson et al. N Engl J Med, 2004). To develop a mouse model for CML-initiating GMP, we expressed p210BCR-ABL in an established line of E2A-knockout mouse BM cells that retain pluripotency in ex vivo culture. Expression of BCR-ABL in these cells reproducibly stimulated myeloid expansion in culture and generated leukemia-initiating cells specifically in the GMP compartment. The leukemogenic GMP displayed higher levels of β-catenin activity than either the nontransformed GMP or the transformed nonGMP, both in culture and in transplanted mouse BM. Although E2A-deficiency may have contributed to the formation of leukemogenic GMP, restoration of E2A-function did not reverse BCR-ABL-induced transformation. These results provide further evidence that BCR-ABL-transformed GMP with abnormal β-catenin activity can function as leukemic stem cells. PMID:19004799

  13. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells: characterization and expansion in models of endotoxemia and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Nicolas; Le Moine, Alain

    2011-01-01

    CD11b+GR1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in several inflammatory conditions including cancer, infections, or trauma. MDSCs are found in bone marrow and lymphoid organs and suppress both innate and adaptive immune responses. Although mechanisms of suppression are not fully understood, they have been reported to require cell-cell contact and very often implicate L-arginine metabolism. We and others recently observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration, as other TLR ligands, induces MDSC. In this case, MDSC regulate immune response independently of L-arginine metabolism through heme oxygenase-1 activity. Manipulating MDSC as immunoregulators represents an attractive approach for cancer immunotherapy or transplantation. Herein, we describe methods for expanding and purifying MDSC, as well as in vitro and in vivo techniques to measure their suppressive functions.

  14. Suppression of Dendritic Cell Maturation and T Cell Proliferation by Synovial Fluid Myeloid Cells from Mice with Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Egelston, Colt; Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Tryniszewska, Beata; Rauch, Tibor A.; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether myeloid cells (such as granulocytes) present in the synovial fluid (SF) of arthritic joints have an impact on adaptive immunity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of SF cells, harvested from the joints of mice with proteoglycan (PG)-induced arthritis (PGIA), on dendritic cell (DC) maturation and antigen-specific T-cell proliferation. Methods We monitored DC maturation (MHC class II and CD86 expression) by flow cytometry upon co-culture of DCs with SF or spleen myeloid cells from mice with PGIA. The effects of these myeloid cells on T-cell proliferation were studied using T cells purified from PG-specific T cell receptor transgenic (PG-TCR-Tg) mice. Phenotypic analysis of myeloid cells was performed employing immunostaining, RT-PCR, Western blot, and biochemical assays. Results Inflammatory SF cells significantly suppressed the maturation of DCs upon co-culture. PG-TCR-Tg T cells cultured with antigen-loaded DCs showed dramatic decreases in proliferation in the presence of SF cells. Spleen myeloid cells from arthritic mice did not have suppressive effects. SF cells were unable to suppress CD3/CD28-stimulated proliferation of the same T cells, suggesting a DC-dependent mechanism. SF cells exhibited all of the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and exerted suppression primarily through production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species by granulocyte-like cells. Conclusion SF in the joints of mice with PGIA contains a population of granulocytic MDSCs that potently suppress DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These MDSCs have the potential to limit the expansion of autoreactive T cells, thus breaking the vicious cycle of autoimmunity and inflammation. PMID:22492217

  15. The oncogene EVI1 enhances transcriptional and biological responses of human myeloid cells to all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Birgit; Hackl, Hubert; Slabáková, Eva; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Smějová, Monika; Spittler, Andreas; Arbesu, Itziar; Shehata, Medhat; Souček, Karel; Wieser, Rotraud

    2014-01-01

    The product of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene, whose overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in myeloid leukemias and some epithelial tumors, regulates gene transcription both through direct DNA binding and through modulation of the activity of other sequence specific transcription factors. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that EVI1 influenced transcription regulation in response to the myeloid differentiation inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in a dual manner: it enhanced ATRA induced transcription of the RARβ gene, but repressed the ATRA induction of the EVI1 gene itself. In the present study, we asked whether EVI1 would modulate the ATRA regulation of a larger number of genes, as well as biological responses to this agent, in human myeloid cells. U937 and HL-60 cells ectopically expressing EVI1 through retroviral transduction were subjected to microarray based gene expression analysis, and to assays measuring cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These experiments showed that EVI1 modulated the ATRA response of several dozens of genes, and in fact reinforced it in the vast majority of cases. A particularly strong synergy between EVI1 and ATRA was observed for GDF15, which codes for a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines. In line with the gene expression results, EVI1 enhanced cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to ATRA, and knockdown of GDF15 counteracted some of these effects. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Myeloid DAP12-associating lectin (MDL)-1 regulates synovial inflammation and bone erosion associated with autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Bigler, Michael E; Chao, Cheng-Chi; Murphy, Erin E; Blumenschein, Wendy M; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Heyworth, Paul G; Antonenko, Svetlana; Bowman, Edward P; McClanahan, Terrill K; Phillips, Joseph H; Cua, Daniel J

    2010-03-15

    DNAX adaptor protein 12 (DAP12) is a trans-membrane adaptor molecule that transduces activating signals in NK and myeloid cells. Absence of functional Dap12 results in osteoclast defects and bone abnormalities. Because DAP12 has no extracelluar binding domains, it must pair with cell surface receptors for signal transduction. There are at least 15 known DAP12-associating cell surface receptors with distinct temporal and cell type-specific expression patterns. Our aim was to determine which receptors may be important in DAP12-associated bone pathologies. Here, we identify myeloid DAP12-associating lectin (MDL)-1 receptor (also known as CLEC5A) as a key regulator of synovial injury and bone erosion during autoimmune joint inflammation. Activation of MDL-1 leads to enhanced recruitment of inflammatory macrophages and neutrophils to the joint and promotes bone erosion. Functional blockade of MDL-1 receptor via Mdl1 deletion or treatment with MDL-1-Ig fusion protein reduces the clinical signs of autoimmune joint inflammation. These findings suggest that MDL-1 receptor may be a therapeutic target for treatment of immune-mediated skeletal disorders.

  17. MicroRNA-155 as an inducer of apoptosis and cell differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is characterised by the halt in maturation of myeloid progenitor cells, combined with uncontrolled proliferation and abnormal survival, leading to the accumulation of immature blasts. In many subtypes of AML the underlying causative genetic insults are not fully described. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated during oncogenesis. Overexpression of miR-155 is associated with some cancers, including haematological malignancies, and it has been postulated that miR-155 has an oncogenic role. This study investigated the effects of modulating miR-155 expression in human AML cells, and its mechanism of action. Results Analysis of miR-155 expression patterns in AML patients found that Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-wildtype AML has the same expression level as normal bone marrow, with increased expression restricted to AML with the FLT3-ITD mutation. Induction of apoptosis by cytarabine arabinoside or myelomonocytic differentiation by 1,23-dihydroxyvitaminD3 in FLT3-wildtype AML cells led to upregulated miR-155 expression. Knockdown of miR-155 by locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides in the FLT3-wildtype AML cells conferred resistance to cytarabine arabinoside induced apoptosis and suppressed the ability of cells to differentiate. Ectopic expression of miR-155 in FLT3-wildtype AML cells led to a significant gain of myelomonocytic markers (CD11b, CD14 and CD15), increase in apoptosis (AnnexinV binding), decrease in cell growth and clonogenic capacity. In silico target prediction identified a number of putative miR-155 target genes, and the expression changes of key transcription regulators of myeloid differentiation and apoptosis (MEIS1, GF1, cMYC, JARID2, cJUN, FOS, CTNNB1 and TRIB2) were confirmed by PCR. Assessment of expression of apoptosis-related proteins demonstrated a marked increase in cleaved caspase-3 expression confirming activation of the apoptosis cascade. Conclusions This study provides evidence for an

  18. CD45 Phosphatase Inhibits STAT3 Transcription Factor Activity in Myeloid Cells and Promotes Tumor-Associated Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinit; Cheng, Pingyan; Condamine, Thomas; Mony, Sridevi; Languino, Lucia R; McCaffrey, Judith C; Hockstein, Neil; Guarino, Michael; Masters, Gregory; Penman, Emily; Denstman, Fred; Xu, Xiaowei; Altieri, Dario C; Du, Hong; Yan, Cong; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-02-16

    Recruitment of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and differentiation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major factors contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. We demonstrated that differentiation of TAMs in tumor site from monocytic precursors was controlled by downregulation of the activity of the transcription factor STAT3. Decreased STAT3 activity was caused by hypoxia and affected all myeloid cells but was not observed in tumor cells. Upregulation of CD45 tyrosine phosphatase activity in MDSCs exposed to hypoxia in tumor site was responsible for downregulation of STAT3. This effect was mediated by the disruption of CD45 protein dimerization regulated by sialic acid. Thus, STAT3 has a unique function in the tumor environment in controlling the differentiation of MDSC into TAM, and its regulatory pathway could be a potential target for therapy.

  19. Novel combination treatments targeting chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Al Baghdadi, Tareq; Abonour, Rafat; Boswell, H Scott

    2012-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is currently considered incurable in most patients. Stem cell transplantation, an accepted curative option for which extensive experience has been gained, is limited by high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in older patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BCR-ABL are widely used and induce remission in a high proportion of patients, but resistance and incomplete response to these agents portends eventual relapse and disease progression. Although BCR-ABL inhibitors eradicate most CML cells, they are largely ineffective against the reservoir of quiescent leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Thus a strong medical need exists for therapies that effectively eradicate LSCs and is currently a focus of extensive research. To date, evidence obtained from in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical CML specimens suggests that an effective approach may be to partner existing BCR-ABL inhibitors with compounds targeting key stem cell molecular effectors, including Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog pathway components, histone deacetylase (HDAC), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Janus kinase 2, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5). Novel combinations may sensitize LSCs to BCR-ABL inhibitors, thereby overcoming resistance and creating the possibility of improving disease outcome beyond the current standard of care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The Crosstalk between Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells and Immune Cells: To Establish Immune Tolerance in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid precursor and progenitor cells and endowed with a robust immunosuppressive activity in multiple pathophysiological conditions. Recent studies have uncovered the crosstalk between MDSCs and immune cells (i.e., natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, natural killer T cells, and regulatory T cells) and its role in the establishment and maintenance of immune tolerant microenvironment in transplantation. Considering their strong immunosuppressive capability, MDSCs could become a prospective clinical regimen during transplantation tolerance induction, resulting in long-term graft survival with decreased or without immunosuppressive drugs. The review summarized recent research advances in this field and looked ahead at the research directions in the future. PMID:27868073

  1. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce tumor cell resistance to cytotoxic T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tangying; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Altiok, Soner; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Celis, Esteban; Pisarev, Vladimir; Sherman, Simon; Sporn, Michael B; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2011-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapeutic approaches induce tumor-specific immune responses, in particular CTL responses, in many patients treated. However, such approaches are clinically beneficial to only a few patients. We set out to investigate one possible explanation for the failure of CTLs to eliminate tumors, specifically, the concept that this failure is not dependent on inhibition of T cell function. In a previous study, we found that in mice, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a source of the free radical peroxynitrite (PNT). Here, we show that pre-treatment of mouse and human tumor cells with PNT or with MDSCs inhibits binding of processed peptides to tumor cell-associated MHC, and as a result, tumor cells become resistant to antigen-specific CTLs. This effect was abrogated in MDSCs treated with a PNT inhibitor. In a mouse model of tumor-associated inflammation in which the antitumor effects of antigen-specific CTLs are eradicated by expression of IL-1β in the tumor cells, we determined that therapeutic failure was not caused by more profound suppression of CTLs by IL-1β-expressing tumors than tumors not expressing this proinflammatory cytokine. Rather, therapeutic failure was a result of the presence of PNT. Clinical relevance for these data was suggested by the observation that myeloid cells were the predominant source of PNT in human lung, pancreatic, and breast cancer samples. Our data therefore suggest what we believe to be a novel mechanism of MDSC-mediated tumor cell resistance to CTLs.

  2. Label-free detection of immune complexes with myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Szittner, Z; Bentlage, A E H; Rovero, P; Migliorini, P; Lóránd, V; Prechl, J; Vidarsson, G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide proof-of-concept for quantitative and qualitative label-free detection of immune complexes through myeloid cells with imaging surface plasmon resonance. Surface plasmon resonance imaging was first applied to monitor the binding of human sera from healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to immobilized citrullinated RA-specific peptide antigens, histone citrullinated peptide 2 (HCP2) and viral citrullinated peptide 2 (VCP2). Next, the binding of monocytoid cell line U937 to the resulting immune complexes on the sensor surface was monitored. As control, binding of U937 was monitored to immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses simultaneously. Cell response results were compared to results of cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (CCP2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), clinical RA diagnosis and antigen-specific antibody distribution of the samples. Human IgG3 triggered the most pronounced response, followed by IgG1 and IgG4, while IgG2 did not result in U937 cell binding. Serum samples obtained from RA patients resulted in a significantly increased cell response to VCP2 compared to healthy controls. The strength of cell response towards VCP2 immune complexes showed significant correlation with levels of antigen-specific IgA, IgG and IgG3. Cellular responses on VCP2 immune complexes showed significant association with both CCP2-based serological positivity and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria-based clinical RA diagnosis. Immunoglobulin-triggered binding of monocytoid cells can be monitored using a label-free multiplex technology. Because these binding events are presumably initiated by Fc receptors, the system provides a tool for biological detection of autoantibodies with diagnostic value, here exemplified by anti-citrullinated antibodies. This provides added information to antibody levels, as interaction with Fc-receptor-expressing cells is also affected by post-translational modification of the immunoglobulins.

  3. [MiR-181a Promotes Proliferation of Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Targeting ATM].

    PubMed

    Hua, Jia-Ye; Feng, Ying; Pang, Ying; Zhou, Xu-Hong; Xu, Bing; Yan, Mu-Xia

    2016-04-01

    To investigate miR-181a function and regulation mechanism by identifying miR-181a target genes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The HL-60 cells of human AML was transfected by small molecular analog miR-181a, the cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 method after electroporation in HL-60 cell lines. Target genes of miR-181a were predicted and analyzed by the bioinformatics software and database. Target genes were confirmed by HL-60 cell line and the patient leukemia cells. Overexpressed miR-181a in HL-60 cell line significantly enhanced cell proliferation compared with that in control (P < 0.05). Dual luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-181a significantly suppressed the reporter gene activity containing ATM 3'-UTR by about 56.8% (P < 0.05), but it didn't suppress the reporter gene activity containing 3'-UTR ATM mutation. Western blot showed that miR-181a significantly downregulated the expression of ATM in human leukemia cells. It is also found that miR-181a was significantly increased in AML, which showed a negative correlation with ATM expression. miR-181a promotes cell proliferation in AML by regulating the tumor suppressor ATM, thus it plays the role as oncogene in pathogenesis of AML.

  4. Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0798 TITLE: Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Christa Muller-Sieburg, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center San Diego, Ca 92121-1131 REPORT DATE: September 2005 TYPE OF REPORT...2005 4, TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Myeloid-Biased Stem Cells as Potential Targets for Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81

  5. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  6. Targeting myeloid cells in the tumor microenvironment enhances vaccine efficacy in murine epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anm Nazmul H; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna; Singel, Kelly L; Grimm, Melissa J; Moysich, Kirsten B; Daudi, Sayeema; Grzankowski, Kassondra S; Lele, Sashikant; Ylagan, Lourdes; Webster, Gill A; Abrams, Scott I; Odunsi, Kunle; Segal, Brahm H

    2015-05-10

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages, and is associated with a high relapse rate. Patients in remission are ideal candidates for immunotherapy aimed at cure or prolonging disease-free periods. However, immunosuppressive pathways in the tumor microenvironment are obstacles to durable anti-tumor immunity. In a metastatic syngeneic mouse model of EOC, immunosuppressive macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the local tumor environment. In addition, resident peritoneal macrophages from non-tumor-bearing mice were highly immunosuppressive, abrogating stimulated T cell proliferation in a cell contact-dependent manner. Immunization with microparticles containing TLR9 and NOD-2 ligands (MIS416) significantly prolonged survival in tumor-bearing mice. The strategy of MIS416 immunization followed by anti-CD11b administration further delayed tumor progression, thereby establishing the proof of principle that myeloid depletion can enhance vaccine efficacy. In patients with advanced EOC, ascites analysis showed substantial heterogeneity in the relative proportions of myeloid subsets and their immunosuppressive properties. Together, these findings point to immunosuppressive myeloid cells in the EOC microenvironment as targets to enhance vaccination. Further studies of myeloid cell accumulation and functional phenotypes in the EOC microenvironment may identify patients who are likely to benefit from vaccination combined with approaches that deplete tumor-associated myeloid cells.

  7. Checkpoints to the Brain: Directing Myeloid Cell Migration to the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Brown, Meredith; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard

    2016-12-02

    Myeloid cells are a unique subset of leukocytes with a diverse array of functions within the central nervous system during health and disease. Advances in understanding of the unique properties of these cells have inspired interest in their use as delivery vehicles for therapeutic genes, proteins, and drugs, or as "assistants" in the clean-up of aggregated proteins and other molecules when existing drainage systems are no longer adequate. The trafficking of myeloid cells from the periphery to the central nervous system is subject to complex cellular and molecular controls with several 'checkpoints' from the blood to their destination in the brain parenchyma. As important components of the neurovascular unit, the functional state changes associated with lineage heterogeneity of myeloid cells are increasingly recognized as important for disease progression. In this review, we discuss some of the cellular elements associated with formation and function of the neurovascular unit, and present an update on the impact of myeloid cells on central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the laboratory and the clinic. We then discuss emerging strategies for harnessing the potential of site-directed myeloid cell homing to the CNS, and identify promising avenues for future research, with particular emphasis on the importance of untangling the functional heterogeneity within existing myeloid subsets.

  8. Checkpoints to the Brain: Directing Myeloid Cell Migration to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Brown, Meredith; Liu, Guo-Jun; Banati, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a unique subset of leukocytes with a diverse array of functions within the central nervous system during health and disease. Advances in understanding of the unique properties of these cells have inspired interest in their use as delivery vehicles for therapeutic genes, proteins, and drugs, or as “assistants” in the clean-up of aggregated proteins and other molecules when existing drainage systems are no longer adequate. The trafficking of myeloid cells from the periphery to the central nervous system is subject to complex cellular and molecular controls with several ‘checkpoints’ from the blood to their destination in the brain parenchyma. As important components of the neurovascular unit, the functional state changes associated with lineage heterogeneity of myeloid cells are increasingly recognized as important for disease progression. In this review, we discuss some of the cellular elements associated with formation and function of the neurovascular unit, and present an update on the impact of myeloid cells on central nervous system (CNS) diseases in the laboratory and the clinic. We then discuss emerging strategies for harnessing the potential of site-directed myeloid cell homing to the CNS, and identify promising avenues for future research, with particular emphasis on the importance of untangling the functional heterogeneity within existing myeloid subsets. PMID:27918464

  9. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin−Sca-1+Kit+ cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte–related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation. PMID:27259979

  10. GATA2 regulates dendritic cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tohru; Onishi, Yasushi; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2016-07-28

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical immune response regulators; however, the mechanism of DC differentiation is not fully understood. Heterozygous germ line GATA2 mutations induce GATA2-deficiency syndrome, characterized by monocytopenia, a predisposition to myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia, and a profoundly reduced DC population, which is associated with increased susceptibility to viral infections, impaired phagocytosis, and decreased cytokine production. To define the role of GATA2 in DC differentiation and function, we studied Gata2 conditional knockout and haploinsufficient mice. Gata2 conditional deficiency significantly reduced the DC count, whereas Gata2 haploinsufficiency did not affect this population. GATA2 was required for the in vitro generation of DCs from Lin(-)Sca-1(+)Kit(+) cells, common myeloid-restricted progenitors, and common dendritic cell precursors, but not common lymphoid-restricted progenitors or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, suggesting that GATA2 functions in the myeloid pathway of DC differentiation. Moreover, expression profiling demonstrated reduced expression of myeloid-related genes, including mafb, and increased expression of T-lymphocyte-related genes, including Gata3 and Tcf7, in Gata2-deficient DC progenitors. In addition, GATA2 was found to bind an enhancer element 190-kb downstream region of Gata3, and a reporter assay exhibited significantly reduced luciferase activity after adding this enhancer region to the Gata3 promoter, which was recovered by GATA sequence deletion within Gata3 +190. These results suggest that GATA2 plays an important role in cell-fate specification toward the myeloid vs T-lymphocyte lineage by regulating lineage-specific transcription factors in DC progenitors, thereby contributing to DC differentiation.

  11. Opposing roles of the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-like transcript 2 in microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Honghua; Liu, Chia-Chen; Atagi, Yuka; Chen, Xiao-Fen; Jia, Lin; Yang, Longyu; He, Wencan; Zhang, Xilin; Kang, Silvia S; Rosenberry, Terrone L; Fryer, John D; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Xu, Huaxi; Bu, Guojun

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), which has been proposed to regulate the inflammatory responses and the clearance of apoptotic neurons and/or amyloid-β, are genetically linked to increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). Interestingly, a missense variant in TREM-like transcript 2 (TREML2), a structurally similar protein encoded by the same gene cluster with TREM2 on chromosome 6, has been shown to protect against AD. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TREM2 and TREML2 regulate the pathogenesis of AD, and their functional relationship, if any, remain unclear. Here, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly suppressed TREM2 but increased TREML2 expression in mouse brain. Consistent with this in vivo result, LPS or oligomeric amyloid-β treatment down regulated TREM2 but up-regulated TREML2 expression in primary microglia. Most important, modulation of TREM2 or TREML2 levels had opposing effects on inflammatory responses with enhancement or suppression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine gene expression observed on TREM2 or TREML2 down regulation, respectively. In addition, the proliferation of primary microglia was significantly decreased when TREM2 was down regulated, whereas it was increased on TREML2 knockdown. Together, our results suggest that several microglial functions are strictly regulated by TREM2 and TREML2, whose dysfunctions likely contribute to AD pathogenesis by impairing brain innate immunity. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the functions of TREM2 and TREML2 in microglia and have implications on designing new therapeutic strategies to treat AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting survival pathways in chronic myeloid leukaemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A; Latif, A L; Holyoake, T L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the presence of a fusion oncogene BCR-ABL, which encodes a protein with constitutive TK activity. The implementation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) marked a major advance in CML therapy; however, there are problems with current treatment. For example, relapse occurs when these drugs are discontinued in the majority of patients who have achieved a complete molecular response on TKI and these agents are less effective in patients with mutations in the BCR-ABL kinase domain. Importantly, TKI can effectively target proliferating mature cells, but do not eradicate quiescent leukaemic stem cells (LSCs), therefore allowing disease persistence despite treatment. It is essential that alternative strategies are used to target the LSC population. BCR-ABL activation is responsible for the modulation of different signalling pathways, which allows the LSC fraction to evade cell death. Several pathways have been shown to be modulated by BCR-ABL, including PI3K/AKT/mTOR, JAK-STAT and autophagy signalling pathways. Targeting components of these survival pathways, alone or in combination with TKI, therefore represents an attractive potential therapeutic approach for targeting the LSC. However, many pathways are also active in normal stem cells. Therefore, potential targets must be validated to effectively eradicate CML stem cells while sparing normal counterparts. This review summarizes the main pathways modulated in CML stem cells, the recent developments and the use of novel drugs to target components in these pathways which may be used to target the LSC population. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23517124

  13. Targeting myeloid cells using nanoparticles to improve cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Zohreh; Goldberg, Michael S

    2015-08-30

    While nanoparticles have traditionally been used to deliver cytotoxic drugs directly to tumors to induce cancer cell death, emerging data suggest that nanoparticles are likely to generate a larger impact on oncology through the delivery of agents that can stimulate antitumor immunity. Tumor-targeted nanocarriers have generally been used to localize chemotherapeutics to tumors and thus decrease off-target toxicity while enhancing efficacy. Challengingly, tumor heterogeneity and evolution render tumor-intrinsic approaches likely to succumb to relapse. The immune system offers exquisite specificity, cytocidal potency, and long-term activity that leverage an adaptive memory response. For this reason, the ability to manipulate immune cell specificity and function would be desirable, and nanoparticles represent an exciting means by which to perform such manipulation. Dendritic cells and tumor-associated macrophages are cells of the myeloid lineage that function as natural phagocytes, so they naturally take up nanoparticles. Dendritic cells direct the specificity and potency of cellular immune responses that can be targeted for cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the specific criteria needed for efficient vaccine design, including but not limited to the route of administration, size, morphology, surface charge, targeting ligands, and nanoparticle composition. In contrast, tumor-associated macrophages are critical mediators of immunosuppression whose trans-migratory abilities can be exploited to localize therapeutics to the tumor core and which can be directly targeted for elimination or for repolarization to a tumor suppressive phenotype. It is likely that a combination of targeting dendritic cells to stimulate antitumor immunity and tumor-associated macrophages to reduce immune suppression will impart significant benefits and result in durable antitumor responses.

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis Comparing Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Normal Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Zvi G.; Sun, Jing; Mishalian, Inbal; Singhal, Sunil; Cheng, Guanjun; Kapoor, Veena; Horng, Wenhwai; Fridlender, Gil; Bayuh, Rachel; Worthen, G. Scott; Albelda, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN) are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN) and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC). In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst) were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes), and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β), were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages. This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations. PMID:22348096

  15. Tumor-associated myeloid cells as guiding forces of cancer cell stemness.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Porta, Chiara; Amadori, Alberto; Pastò, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Due to their ability to differentiate into various cell types and to support tissue regeneration, stem cells simultaneously became the holy grail of regenerative medicine and the evil obstacle in cancer therapy. Several studies have investigated niche-related conditions that favor stemness properties and increasingly emphasized their association with an inflammatory environment. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are major orchestrators of cancer-related inflammation, able to dynamically express different polarized inflammatory programs that promote tumor outgrowth, including tumor angiogenesis, immunosuppression, tissue remodeling and metastasis formation. In addition, these myeloid populations support cancer cell stemness, favoring tumor maintenance and progression, as well as resistance to anticancer treatments. Here, we discuss inflammatory circuits and molecules expressed by TAMs and MDSCs as guiding forces of cancer cell stemness.

  16. Increased Levels of Circulating and Tumor-Infiltrating Granulocytic Myeloid Cells in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Salman M.; Syed Khaja, Azharuddin Sajid; El Salhat, Haytham; Bekdache, Omar; Kanbar, Jihad; Jaloudi, Mohammed; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of myeloid cells, especially myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have been reported to correlate with bad prognosis and reduced survival in cancer patients. However, limited data are available on their conclusive phenotypes and their correlation with clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate levels and phenotype of myeloid cells in peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment (TME) of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, compared to blood from healthy donors (HDs) and paired, adjacent non-tumor colon tissue. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the expression of different myeloid markers in fresh peripheral blood samples from CRC patients and HDs, and tissue-infiltrating immune cells from CRC patients. We found significantly higher levels of cells expressing myeloid markers and lacking the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecule HLA-DR in blood and tumor of CRC patients. Further analysis revealed that these cells were granulocytic and expressed Arginase 1 indicative of their suppressive phenotype. These expanded cells could be neutrophils or granulocytic MDSCs, and we refer to them as granulocytic myeloid cells (GMCs) due to the phenotypical and functional overlap between these cell subsets. Interestingly, the expansion of peripheral GMCs correlated with higher stage and histological grade of cancer, thereby suggesting their role in cancer progression. Furthermore, an increase in CD33+CD11b+HLA-DR−CD14−CD15− immature myeloid cells was also observed in CRC tumor tissue. Our work shows that GMCs are expanded in circulation and TME of CRC patients, which provides further insights for developing immunotherapeutic approaches targeting these cell subsets to enhance antitumor immune and clinical responses. PMID:28008330

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are essential for maintaining feto-maternal immunotolerance via STAT3 signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ting; Liu, Yufeng; Zhong, Li Mei; Shi, Mao Hua; Duan, Xiao Bing; Wu, Kang; Yang, Qiong; Liu, Chao; Wei, Jian Yang; Ma, Xing Ru; Shi, Kun; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Maternal immune system tolerance to the semiallogeneic fetus is essential for a successful pregnancy; however, the mechanisms underlying this immunotolerance have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that myeloid-derived suppressor cells play an important role in maintaining feto-maternal tolerance. A significant expansion of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells was observed in multiple immune organs and decidual tissues from pregnant mice. Pregnancy-derived granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells suppressed T cell responses in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner and required direct cell-cell contact. Mechanistic studies showed that progesterone facilitated differentiation and activation of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, mediated through STAT3 signaling. The STAT3 inhibitor JSI-124 and a specific short hairpin RNA completely abrogated the effects of progesterone on granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. More importantly, granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell depletion dramatically enhanced the abortion rate in normal pregnant mice, whereas adoptive transfer of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells clearly reduced the abortion rate in the CBA/J X DBA/2J mouse model of spontaneous abortion. These observations collectively demonstrate that granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells play an essential role in the maintenance of fetal immunotolerance in mice. Furthermore, our study supports the notion that in addition to their well-recognized roles under pathologic conditions, myeloid-derived suppressor cells perform important functions under certain physiologic circumstances. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Enhanced generation of myeloid lineages in hematopoietic differentiation from embryonic stem cells by silencing transcriptional repressor Twist-2.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2009-12-01

    The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1(+) and F4/80(+) cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor.

  19. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  20. Spred2 is involved in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Wu, Chu-Tse; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Qing-Fang; Yan, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2010-03-19

    Spreds, a recently established class of negative regulators of the Ras-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, are involved in hematogenesises, allergic disorders and tumourigenesis. However, their role in hematologic neoplasms is largely unknown. Possible effects of Spreds on other signal pathways closely related to Ras-ERK have been poorly investigated. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of Spred2 on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In addition to inhibiting the well-established Ras-ERK cascade, adenovirus-mediated Spred2 over-expression inhibits constitutive and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) and Mcl-1 expression, as well as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in CML cells. In K562 cells and primary CML cells, imatinib induces endogenous Spred2 expression. Spred2 silencing by stable RNA interference partly protects K562 cells against imatinib-induced apoptosis. Together, these data implicate Spred2 in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in CML cells, possibly by inhibiting the Ras-ERK cascade and the pro-survival signaling molecules SPHK1 and Mcl-1. These findings reveal potential targets for selective therapy of CML.

  1. In vivo suppressive function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is limited to the inflammatory site

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, Jessica M.; Crist, Scott A.; Elzey, Bennett D.; Cimen, Cansu; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Current thinking suggests that despite the heterogeneity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), all Gr-1+CD11b+ cells can become suppressive when exposed to inflammatory stimuli. In vitro evaluation shows MDSC from multiple tissue sites have suppressive activity, and in vivo inhibition of MDSC function enhances T cell responses. However, the relative capacity of MDSC present at localized inflammatory sites or in peripheral tissues to suppress T cell responses in vivo has not been directly evaluated. We now demonstrate that during a tissue specific inflammatory response, MDSC inhibition of CD8 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production is restricted to the inflammatory site. Using a prostate specific inflammatory model and a heterotopic prostate tumor model, we show that MDSC from inflammatory sites or from tumor tissue possess immediate capacity to inhibit T cell function, whereas those isolated from peripheral tissues (spleens and liver) are not suppressive without activation of iNOS by exposure to IFN-γ. These data show MDSC are important regulators of immune responses in the prostate during acute inflammation and the chronic inflammatory setting of tumor growth and that regulation of T cell function by MDSC during a localized inflammatory response is restricted in vivo to the site of an ongoing immune response. PMID:21287554

  2. Reduction of Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells and Lymphoma Growth by a Natural Triterpenoid

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Faisal F. Y.; Hossain, Azim; God, Jason M.; Leaphart, Nathan; Elvington, Michelle; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Tomlinson, Stephen; Haque, Azizul

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a potentially life threatening disease. The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a natural triterpenoid, Ganoderic acid A (GA-A) in controlling lymphoma growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that GA-A treatment induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death characterized by a dose-dependent increase in active caspases 9 and 3, up-regulation of pro-apoptotic BIM and BAX proteins, and a subsequent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential with release of cytochrome c. In addition to GA-A’s anti-growth activity, we show that lower doses of GA-A enhance HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4+ T cell recognition of lymphoma in vitro. The therapeutic relevance of GA-A treatment was also tested in vivo using the EL4 syngeneic mouse model of metastatic lymphoma. GA-A-treatment significantly prolonged survival of EL4 challenged mice and decreased tumor metastasis to the liver, an outcome accompanied by a marked down-regulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, reduction myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and enhancement of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the host. Thus, GA-A not only selectively induces apoptosis in lymphoma cells, but also enhances cell-mediated immune responses by attenuating MDSCs, and elevating Ag presentation and T cell recognition. The demonstrated therapeutic benefit indicates that GA-A is a candidate for future drug design for the treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25142864

  3. Pam2 lipopeptides systemically increase myeloid-derived suppressor cells through TLR2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Akira; Shime, Hiroaki Takeda, Yohei; Azuma, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-02-13

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are immature myeloid cells that exhibit potent immunosuppressive activity. They are increased in tumor-bearing hosts and contribute to tumor development. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on MDSCs may modulate the tumor-supporting properties of MDSCs through pattern-recognition. Pam2 lipopeptides represented by Pam2CSK4 serve as a TLR2 agonist to exert anti-tumor function by dendritic cell (DC)-priming that leads to NK cell activation and cytotoxic T cell proliferation. On the other hand, TLR2 enhances tumor cell progression/invasion by activating tumor-infiltrating macrophages. How MDSCs respond to TLR2 agonists has not yet been determined. In this study, we found intravenous administration of Pam2CSK4 systemically up-regulated the frequency of MDSCs in EG7 tumor-bearing mice. The frequency of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs was accordingly increased in response to Pam2CSK4. MDSCs were not increased by Pam2CSK4 stimuli in TLR2 knockout (KO) mice. Adoptive transfer experiments using CFSE-labeled MDSCs revealed that the TLR2-positive MDSCs survived long in tumor-bearing mice in response to Pam2CSK4 treatment. Since the increased MDSC population sustained immune-suppressive properties, our study suggests that Pam2CSK4-triggered TLR2 activation enhances the MDSC potential and suppress antitumor immune response in tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Pam2CSK4 administration induces systemic accumulation of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs. • TLR2 is essential for Pam2CSK4-induced accumulation of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs. • Pam2CSK4 supports survival of CD11b{sup +}Gr1{sup +} MDSCs in vivo.

  4. Circulating myeloid and lymphoid precursor dendritic cells are clonally involved in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Delforge, M; van Duppen, V; Verhoef, G; Emanuel, B; Boogaerts, M; Hagemeijer, A; Vandenberghe, P

    2004-09-01

    Circulating myeloid and lymphoid precursor dendritic cell (pDC) counts were determined in peripheral blood from 22 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by a single-platform flow cytometric protocol. The absolute count of myeloid and lymphoid pDC, as well as their relative number (as proportion of mononuclear cells or total leukocytes) was significantly lower in MDS (n=22) than in healthy controls (n=41). In 11 patients with chromosomal aberrations, purified pDC were examined by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. This revealed clonal involvement of myeloid as well as lymphoid pDC in all of them. These data therefore strongly suggest that myeloid and lymphoid pDC share a common precursor. Whether reduced peripheral blood counts of pDC contribute to the immunological abnormalities observed in MDS remains to be investigated.

  5. MicroRNAs mediated regulation of MAPK signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a severe problem throughout the world and requires identification of novel targets for its treatment. This multifactorial disease accounts for about 15% of the all diagnosed leukemia cases. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is crucial for the cell survival and its dysregulation is being implicated in various types of cancers. In here, we have discussed the potential role of various miRNAs that are found involved in regulating the proteins cascades of MAPK signaling pathway associated with CML. An emphasis has been paid to summarize the influence of various miRNAs in elevating or suppressing the expression level of significant proteins such as miR-203, miR-196a, miR-196b, miR-30a, miR-29b, miR-138 in BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase; miR-126, miR-221, miR-128, miR-15a, miR-188-5p, miR-17 in CRK family proteins; miR-155, miR-181a with SOS proteins; miR-155, miR-19a, with KRAS proteins; miR-19a with RAF1 protein; and miR-17, miR-19a, miR-17-92 cluster with MAPK/ERK proteins. In light of ever-increasing importance and ever-widening regulatory roles of miRNAs in cells, we have reviewed the recent progress in the field of miRNAs and have tried to suggest them as controlling targets for various protein cascades of MAPK signaling pathway. An understanding of the supervisory mechanism of MAPK by miRNAs might provide novel targets for treating CML. PMID:26967056

  6. The promoter of the CD11b gene directs myeloid-specific and developmentally regulated expression.

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, C S; Arnaout, M A

    1991-01-01

    Human CD11b/CD18 (complement receptor type 3) is a member of the beta 2 integrin subfamily which also includes the heterodimers CD11a/CD18 and CD11c/CD18. The CD11 molecules and the common CD18 are the products of different genes that exhibit distinct though overlapping patterns of tissue- and developmental-specific expression. Whereas expression of CD11b and CD11c is almost exclusively restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage, that of CD11a and CD18 is panleukocytic. To begin to understand the mechanisms by which expression of these gene products is restricted to leukocytes and leukocyte subpopulations and to elucidate the mechanisms by which their expression is coordinated, we have cloned and characterized the promoter region of the CD11b gene. A single transcription initiation site has been identified and the region extending 242 base pairs upstream and 71 base pairs downstream of this site has been shown to be sufficient to direct tissue-, cell-, and development-specific expression in vitro, which mimics that of the CD11b gene in vivo. Within this region there are potential binding sites for transcription factors known to be involved in hematopoietic-specific and phorbol ester-inducible gene expression. Further analysis of this region of the CD11b gene and comparison with the promoters of the CD11a, CD11c, and CD18 genes should lead to significant insights into the molecular mechanisms by which these genes are regulated during hematopoietic development and upon activation. Images PMID:1683702

  7. Diminished immune response to vaccinations in obesity: role of myeloid-derived suppressor and other myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiyi; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Miyake, Teruki; Abe, Masanori; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Furukawa, Shinya; Bunzo, Matsuura; Hiasa, Yoichi; Onji, Morikazu

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with an increased production of cytokines and exacerbated immune response. However, obese subjects are susceptible to infections and respond poorly to vaccines. This study evaluated the immune responses of obese mice and the underlying mechanisms by exploring the roles of myeloid cells. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were prepared from C57BL/6J mice fed a high-calorie and high-fat diet for 12 weeks. Humoral and cellular immune responses of DIO mice to a hepatitis B vaccine containing the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were assessed in sera and via a lymphoproliferative assay, respectively. The effects of CD11b(+)GR1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and CD11b(+)GR1(-) non-MDSC on T cell proliferation and cytokine production were compared via a cell culture system. The production of cytokines, expression of activation and exhaustion markers, and proportions of apoptotic T cells were estimated with flow cytometry. Increased T and B lymphocyte proliferation and higher interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were detected in spleen cells and liver non-parenchymal cell cultures of DIO mice compared to controls (p<0.05). However, antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) levels and HBsAg-specific T cell proliferation were significantly lower in DIO mice compared to controls (p<0.05). The addition of MDSC, but not non-MDSC, induced a decrease in HBsAg-specific T cell proliferation, lower cytokine production, decrease in T cell activation, and increase in T cell exhaustion and apoptosis (p<0.05). MDSC play an important role in mediating impaired antigen-specific immunity.

  8. Src homology 2-containing 5-inositol phosphatase (SHIP) suppresses an early stage of lymphoid cell development through elevated interleukin-6 production by myeloid cells in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Kouro, Taku; Kincade, Paul W; Malykhin, Alexander; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2004-01-19

    The Src homology (SH)2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulates a variety of immune responses through inhibitory immune receptors. In SHIP(-/-) animals, we found that the number of early lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow was significantly reduced and accompanied by expansion of myeloid cells. We exploited an in vitro system using hematopoietic progenitors that reproduced the in vivo phenotype of SHIP(-/-) mice. Lineage-negative marrow (Lin(-)) cells isolated from wild-type mice failed to differentiate into B cells when cocultured with those of SHIP(-/-) mice. Furthermore, culture supernatants of SHIP(-/-) Lin(-) cells suppressed the B lineage expansion of wild-type lineage-negative cells, suggesting the presence of a suppressive cytokine. SHIP(-/-) Lin(-) cells contained more IL-6 transcripts than wild-type Lin(-) cells, and neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody rescued the B lineage expansion suppressed by the supernatants of SHIP(-/-) Lin(-) cells. Finally, we found that addition of recombinant IL-6 to cultures of wild-type Lin(-) bone marrow cells reproduced the phenotype of SHIP(-/-) bone marrow cultures: suppression of B cell development and expansion of myeloid cells. The results identify IL-6 as an important regulatory cytokine that can suppress B lineage differentiation and drive excessive myeloid development in bone marrow.

  9. Expression and functional roles of the chemokine receptor CXCR7 in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Yon; Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Deog-Young; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Yoon-Seok; Song, Ik-Chan; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Yun, Hwan-Jung; Kim, Samyong

    2015-01-01

    Background The C-X-C chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) has been shown to be a decoy receptor for CXCR4 in certain cell types. We investigated the expression status and functional roles of CXCR7 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells in vitro. Methods CXCR7 mRNA was knocked down in AML cells by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology, and subsequent biological alterations in the cells were evaluated in vitro. Results All AML cell lines examined in this study (U937, K562, KG1a, HL-60, and MO7e) and primary CD34+ cells obtained from patients with AML expressed CXCR7 mRNA at various levels. Western blotting showed that all AML cells produced CXCR7. Furthermore, all AML cells expressed CXCR7 in both the cytoplasm and on the cell surface at various levels. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1; C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12)) induced internalization of cell surface CXCR7. However, neither hypoxia nor the examined hematopoietic growth factors (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-3, IL-6, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte, macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, and stem cell factor) and proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α) were found to alter cell surface CXCR7 expression. The transfection of AML cells with CXCR4 siRNA, but not CXCR7 siRNA, significantly impaired the CXCL12-induced transmigration of the cells. The transfection of AML cells with CXCR7 siRNA did not affect the survival or proliferation of these cells. Knockdown of CXCR7, but not CXCR4, induced the upregulation of CXCL12 mRNA expression and CXCL12 production in AML cells. Conclusion CXCR7 is involved in the regulation of autocrine CXCL12 in AML cells. PMID:26770949

  10. Loss of Murine FOXO3 in Cells of the Myeloid Lineage Enhances Myelopoiesis but Protects from K/BxN-Serum Transfer-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hannah; Corr, Maripat; Mansson, Robert; Welinder, Eva; Hedrick, Stephen M.; Stone, Erica L.

    2015-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors have a highly conserved role in regulating transcription of genes involved in differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. Loss of FOXO3 in mice has previously been shown to result in a myeloproliferative disease. In agreement with this, we found that an independent Foxo3 null mouse strain, Foxo3Kca, exhibits an increase in neutrophils in the spleen, bone marrow and blood. This coincides with an expansion of myeloid progenitor cells including pre-granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (Pre-GMs) and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs). Surprisingly, despite neutrophilia, the severity of passive serum transfer arthritis was markedly attenuated in Foxo3Kca mice. These defects appear to be at least partially intrinsic to the myeloid lineage, as deleting Foxo3 specifically from myeloid cells using LysMCre also leads to an elevated number of neutrophils and protection from K/BxN-serum transfer-induced arthritis. PMID:25969990

  11. [Mechanism of cinnamic aldehyde-inducing apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemic cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Qiong; Liu, Ze-Lin; Wang, Xin; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Meng-Di; Wang, Dan-Yu; Huang, Shi-Ang

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the apoptosis-inducing effect of cinnamic aldehyde (CA) on chronic myeloid leukemic (CML) cells and its mechanism. K562 cells and primary bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) from patients with CML were treated by various concentrations of CA. Flow cytometry was employed to measure the apoptosis of K562 cells and primary CML bone marrow MNC. Western blot was used to determine the expression of C-MYC and the phosphorylation of CrkL in K562 cells, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was used to quantify the expression of BCR-ABL mRNA in K562 cells. The results indicated that CA induced the apoptosis of K562 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CA induced apoptosis of CML MNC dose-dependently. CA inhibited the expression of BCR-ABL mRNA and C-MYC, reduced CrkL phosphorylation levels in K562 cells. It is concluded that CA induces apoptosis of CML cells in vitro. Down-regulation of the expression and function of BCR-ABL may be one of its most important anti-leukemia mechanisms.

  12. Therapeutic targeting of leukemic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia - the biological background for possible strategies.

    PubMed

    Bruserud, Øystein; Aasebø, Elise; Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Tsykunova, Galina; Reikvam, Håkon

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, caused by the accumulation of immature leukemic blasts in blood and bone marrow. There is a relatively high risk of chemoresistant relapse even for the younger patients who can receive the most intensive antileukemic treatment. Treatment directed against the remaining leukemic and preleukemic stem cells will most likely reduce the risk of later relapse. Areas covered: Relevant publications were identified through literature searches. The authors searched for original articles and recent reviews describing (i) the characteristics of leukemic/preleukemic stem cells; (ii) the importance of the bone marrow stem cell niches in leukemogenesis; and (iii) possible therapeutic strategies to target the preleukemic/leukemic stem cells. Expert opinion: Leukemia relapse/progression seems to be derived from residual chemoresistant leukemic or preleukemic stem cells, and a more effective treatment directed against these cells will likely be important to improve survival both for patients receiving intensive treatment and leukemia-stabilizing therapy. Several possible strategies are now considered, including the targeting of the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, proapoptotic intracellular signaling, cell metabolism, telomere activity and the AML-supporting effects by neighboring stromal cells. Due to disease heterogeneity, the most effective stem cell-directed therapy will probably differ between individual patients.

  13. Impact of peripheral myeloid cells on amyloid-β pathology in Alzheimer’s disease–like mice

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R.; Drost, Natalia; Handrick, Susann; Mathur, Vidhu; Luo, Jian; Wegner, Anja; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Although central nervous system–resident microglia are believed to be ineffective at phagocytosing and clearing amyloid-β (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it has been suggested that peripheral myeloid cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population with greater Aβ-clearing capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the conditional ablation of resident microglia in CD11b-HSVTK (TK) mice is followed by a rapid repopulation of the brain by peripherally derived myeloid cells. We used this system to directly assess the ability of peripheral macrophages to reduce Aβ plaque pathology and therefore depleted and replaced the pool of resident microglia with peripherally derived myeloid cells in Aβ-carrying APPPS1 mice crossed to TK mice (APPPS1;TK). Despite a nearly complete exchange of resident microglia with peripheral myeloid cells, there was no significant change in Aβ burden or APP processing in APPPS1;TK mice. Importantly, however, newly recruited peripheral myeloid cells failed to cluster around Aβ deposits. Even additional anti-Aβ antibody treatment aimed at engaging myeloid cells with amyloid plaques neither directed peripherally derived myeloid cells to amyloid plaques nor altered Aβ burden. These data demonstrate that mere recruitment of peripheral myeloid cells to the brain is insufficient in substantially clearing Aβ burden and suggest that specific additional triggers appear to be required to exploit the full potential of myeloid cell–based therapies for AD. PMID:26458768

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  16. Regression Analysis of Combined Gene Expression Regulation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Liang, Minggao; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is a combinatorial function of genetic/epigenetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV), DNA methylation (DM), transcription factors (TF) occupancy, and microRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptional regulation. At the maturity of microarray/sequencing technologies, large amounts of data measuring the genome-wide signals of those factors became available from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). However, there is a lack of an integrative model to take full advantage of these rich yet heterogeneous data. To this end, we developed RACER (Regression Analysis of Combined Expression Regulation), which fits the mRNA expression as response using as explanatory variables, the TF data from ENCODE, and CNV, DM, miRNA expression signals from TCGA. Briefly, RACER first infers the sample-specific regulatory activities by TFs and miRNAs, which are then used as inputs to infer specific TF/miRNA-gene interactions. Such a two-stage regression framework circumvents a common difficulty in integrating ENCODE data measured in generic cell-line with the sample-specific TCGA measurements. As a case study, we integrated Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) data from TCGA and the related TF binding data measured in K562 from ENCODE. As a proof-of-concept, we first verified our model formalism by 10-fold cross-validation on predicting gene expression. We next evaluated RACER on recovering known regulatory interactions, and demonstrated its superior statistical power over existing methods in detecting known miRNA/TF targets. Additionally, we developed a feature selection procedure, which identified 18 regulators, whose activities clustered consistently with cytogenetic risk groups. One of the selected regulators is miR-548p, whose inferred targets were significantly enriched for leukemia-related pathway, implicating its novel role in AML pathogenesis. Moreover, survival analysis using the inferred activities identified C-Fos as a potential AML

  17. Differential mechanisms of memory CD8 T cell maintenance by individual myeloid cell types

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Loredana; Stonier, Spencer W.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Schluns, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that individual myeloid subsets have a differential ability to maintain memory CD8 T cells via IL-15. Although DCs support IL-15-mediated homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells in vivo, whether various DC subsets and other myeloid cells similarly mediate homeostasis is unknown. Therefore, we studied the ability of different myeloid cells to maintain memory CD8 T cells in vitro. Using an in vitro cocoulture system that recapitulated known roles of DCs and IL-15 on memory CD8 T cells, all in vitro-derived or ex vivo-isolated DCs maintained CD8 T cells better than rIL-15 alone, and FLT-3L-DCs are the most efficient compared with GM-DCs, BM-derived macrophages, or freshly isolated DCs. Although FLT-3L-DCs were the least effective at inducing CD8 T cell proliferation, FLT-3L-DCs promoted better CD8 T cell survival and increased Bcl-2 and MCL-2 expression in CD8 T cells. T cell maintenance correlated only partially with DC expression of IL-15Rα and IL-15, suggesting that DCs provided additional support signals. Indeed, in the absence of IL-15 signals, CD70/CD27 further supported CD8 T cell maintenance. IFN-α enhanced CD70 expression by DCs, resulting in increased proliferation of CD8 T cells. Overall, this study supports our hypothesis by demonstrating that specific DC subtypes had a greater capacity to support memory CD8 T cell maintenance and did so through different mechanisms. Furthermore, this study shows that IL-15 trans-presentation can work in conjunction with other signals, such as CD70/CD27 interactions, to mediate CD8 T cell homeostasis efficiently. PMID:20354106

  18. Role of immature myeloid cells in mechanisms of immune evasion in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2006-03-01

    Tumor affects myelopoiesis by inhibiting the process of differentiation/maturation of antigen-presenting cells from their myeloid precursors and by stimulating an accumulation of immature myeloid cells in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice. These immature myeloid cells can contribute greatly to tumor progression and promote tumor evasion from immune attack: i) by inhibiting development of adaptive immune responses against tumor in lymphoid organs; ii) by migrating into tumor site and differentiating there into highly immune suppressive tumor-associated macrophages. Immature myeloid cells and tumor-associated macrophages utilize different JAK/STAT signaling pathways and different mechanisms to control T cell responses, which include increased production of TGF-beta, reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrites, as well as enhanced L-arginine metabolism. Understanding of precise mechanisms, which tumors use to affect differentiation of APC from myeloid cell precursors and inhibit T cell responses, could help to develop new approaches for cancer therapy and substantially improve efficiency of existing cancer vaccination strategies.

  19. Role Of Immature Myeloid Cells in Mechanisms of Immune Evasion In Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2005-01-01

    Tumor affects myelopoiesis by inhibiting the process of differentiation/maturation of antigen-presenting cells from their myeloid precursors and by stimulating an accumulation of immature myeloid cells in cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice. These immature myeloid cells can contribute greatly to tumor progression and promote tumor evasion from immune attack: i) by inhibiting development of adaptive immune responses against tumor in lymphoid organs; ii) by migrating into tumor site and differentiating there into highly immune suppressive tumor-associated macrophages. Immature myeloid cells and tumor-associated macrophages utilize different JAK/STAT signaling pathways and different mechanisms to control T cell responses, which include increased production of TGF-beta, reactive oxygen species, peroxynitrites, as well as enhanced L-arginine metabolism. Understanding of precise mechanisms, which tumors use to affect differentiation of APC from myeloid cell precursors and inhibit T cell responses, could help to develop new approaches for cancer therapy and substantially improve efficiency of existing cancer vaccination strategies. PMID:16047143

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in inflammation: uncovering cell subsets with enhanced immunosuppressive functions.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo

    2009-10-01

    Although originally described in tumor-bearing hosts, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been detected under numerous pathological situations that cause enhanced demand of myeloid cells. Thus, MDSC might be part of a conserved response to different endogenous and exogenous stress signals, including inflammation. Two processes are fundamental for MDSC biology: differentiation from myeloid progenitors and full activation of their immune regulatory program by factors released from activated T cells or present in the microenvironment conditioned by either tumor growth or inflammation. How these two processes are controlled and linked is still an open question. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, a paper demonstrates that a combination of the known inflammatory molecules, IFN-gamma and LPS, sustains MDSC expansion and activation while suppressing differentiation of DC from bone marrow precursors. Moreover, this paper contributes to defining the cell subsets that possess immunoregulatory properties within the broad population of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, often altogether referred to as MDSC.

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells shape myeloid cell function within the tumor microenvironment through IFN-γ and GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Spear, Paul; Barber, Amorette; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Sentman, Charles L

    2012-06-15

    The infiltration of suppressive myeloid cells into the tumor microenvironment restrains anti-tumor immunity. However, cytokines may alter the function of myeloid lineage cells to support tumor rejection, regulating the balance between pro- and anti-tumor immunity. In this study, it is shown that effector cytokines secreted by adoptively transferred T cells expressing a chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) shape the function of myeloid cells to promote endogenous immunity and tumor destruction. Mice bearing the ovarian ID8 tumor were treated with T cells transduced with a chimeric NKG2D receptor. GM-CSF secreted by the adoptively transferred T cells recruited peripheral F4/80(lo)Ly-6C(+) myeloid cells to the tumor microenvironment in a CCR2-dependent fashion. T cell IFN-γ and GM-CSF activated local, tumor-associated macrophages, decreased expression of regulatory factors, increased IL-12p40 production, and augmented Ag processing and presentation by host macrophages to Ag-specific T cells. In addition, T cell-derived IFN-γ, but not GM-CSF, induced the production of NO by F4/80(hi) macrophages and enhanced their lysis of tumor cells. The ability of CAR T cell therapy to eliminate tumor was moderately impaired when inducible NO synthase was inhibited and greatly impaired in the absence of peritoneal macrophages after depletion with clodronate encapsulated liposomes. This study demonstrates that the activation of host macrophages by CAR T cell-derived cytokines transformed the tumor microenvironment from immunosuppressive to immunostimulatory and contributed to inhibition of ovarian tumor growth.

  2. A Myeloid Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α-Krüppel-like Factor 2 Pathway Regulates Gram-positive Endotoxin-mediated Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Mahabeleshwar, Ganapati H.; Qureshi, Muhammad Awais; Takami, Yoichi; Sharma, Nikunj; Lingrel, Jerry B.; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Although Gram-positive infections account for the majority of cases of sepsis, the molecular mechanisms underlying their effects remains poorly understood. We investigated how cell wall components of Gram-positive bacteria contribute to the development of sepsis. Experimental observations derived from cultured primary macrophages and the cell line indicate that Gram-positive bacterial endotoxins induce hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) mRNA and protein expression. Inoculation of live or heat-inactivated Gram-positive bacteria with macrophages induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity in macrophages. Concordant with these results, myeloid deficiency of HIF-1α attenuated Gram-positive bacterial endotoxin-induced cellular motility and proinflammatory gene expression in macrophages. Conversely, Gram-positive bacteria and their endotoxins reduced expression of the myeloid anti-inflammatory transcription factor Krüppel-like transcription factor 2 (KLF2). Sustained expression of KLF2 reduced and deficiency of KLF2 enhanced Gram-positive endotoxins induced HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression in macrophages. More importantly, KLF2 attenuated Gram-positive endotoxins induced cellular motility and proinflammatory gene expression in myeloid cells. Consistent with these results, mice deficient in myeloid HIF-1α were protected from Gram-positive endotoxin-induced sepsis mortality and clinical symptomatology. By contrast, myeloid KLF2-deficient mice were susceptible to Gram-positive sepsis induced mortality and clinical symptoms. Collectively, these observations identify HIF-1α and KLF2 as critical regulators of Gram-positive endotoxin-mediated sepsis. PMID:22110137

  3. TLR4 Inactivation in Myeloid Cells Accelerates Bone Healing of a Calvarial Defect Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R; Taylor, Gwen M; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J; Losee, Joseph E; Billiar, Timothy R; Cooper, Gregory M

    2017-08-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in inflammation-induced bone destruction in various chronic bone diseases; however, its direct influence on bone healing is not well understood. The authors' previous study showed accelerated bone healing with higher osteoclastogenesis gene expression in toll-like receptor 4 knockout mice (TLR4). This study aimed to further elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms during fracture healing by generating a myeloid cell-specific toll-like receptor 4 knockout model (Lyz-TLR4 mice). Calvarial defects, 1.8 mm in diameter, were created in wild-type, TLR4, and Lyz-TLR4 mice. Bone healing was investigated using micro-computed tomography and histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Primary bone marrow-derived cells were also isolated from wild-type, TLR4, and Lyz-TLR4 mice to measure their osteoclast differentiation and resorption properties. A similar faster bone healing response, with active intramembranous bone formation, intense osteopontin staining, and more osteoblast infiltration, was observed in TLR4 and Lyz-TLR4 mice. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining showed more osteoclast infiltration in Lyz-TLR4 mice than in wild-type mice at day 7. Primary bone marrow-derived cells isolated from TLR4 and Lyz-TLR4 mice presented enhanced osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity compared with those from wild-type mice. Comparable M0, M1, and M2 macrophage infiltration was found among all groups at days 1, 4, and 7. This study revealed that inactivation of toll-like receptor 4 in myeloid cells enhanced osteoclastogenesis and accelerated healing response during skull repair. Together with the role of toll-like receptor 4 in inflammation-mediated bone destruction, it suggests that toll-like receptor 4 might regulate inflammation-induced osteoclastogenesis under different clinical settings.

  4. TLR4 Inactivation in Myeloid Cells Accelerates Bone Healing of a Calvarial Defect Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gilbert, James R.; Taylor, Gwen M.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Hackam, David J.; Losee, Joseph E.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been implicated in inflammation-induced bone destruction in various chronic bone diseases; however, its direct influence on bone healing is not well understood. The authors’ previous study showed accelerated bone healing with higher osteoclastogenesis gene expression in toll-like receptor 4 knockout mice (TLR4-/-). This study aimed to further elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms during fracture healing by generating a myeloid cell-specific toll-like receptor 4 knockout model (Lyz-TLR4-/- mice). Methods: Calvarial defects, 1.8 mm in diameter, were created in wild-type, TLR4-/-, and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice. Bone healing was investigated using micro–computed tomography and histologic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Primary bone marrow–derived cells were also isolated from wild-type, TLR4-/-, and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice to measure their osteoclast differentiation and resorption properties. Results: A similar faster bone healing response, with active intramembranous bone formation, intense osteopontin staining, and more osteoblast infiltration, was observed in TLR4-/- and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining showed more osteoclast infiltration in Lyz-TLR4-/- mice than in wild-type mice at day 7. Primary bone marrow–derived cells isolated from TLR4-/- and Lyz-TLR4-/- mice presented enhanced osteoclastogenesis and resorption activity compared with those from wild-type mice. Comparable M0, M1, and M2 macrophage infiltration was found among all groups at days 1, 4, and 7. Conclusions: This study revealed that inactivation of toll-like receptor 4 in myeloid cells enhanced osteoclastogenesis and accelerated healing response during skull repair. Together with the role of toll-like receptor 4 in inflammation-mediated bone destruction, it suggests that toll-like receptor 4 might regulate inflammation-induced osteoclastogenesis under different clinical settings. PMID:28746278

  5. Novel role of immature myeloid cells in formation of new lymphatic vessels associated with inflammation and tumors.

    PubMed

    Ran, Sophia; Wilber, Andrew

    2017-04-13

    Inflammation triggers an immune cell-driven program committed to restoring homeostasis to injured tissue. Central to this process is vasculature restoration, which includes both blood and lymphatic networks. Generation of new vessels or remodeling of existing vessels are also important steps in metastasis-the major cause of death for cancer patients. Although roles of the lymphatic system in regulation of inflammation and cancer metastasis are firmly established, the mechanisms underlying the formation of new lymphatic vessels remain a subject of debate. Until recently, generation of new lymphatics in adults was thought to occur exclusively through sprouting of existing vessels without help from recruited progenitors. However, emerging findings from clinical and experimental studies show that lymphoendothelial progenitors, particularly those derived from immature myeloid cells, play an important role in this process. This review summarizes current evidence for the existence and significant roles of myeloid-derived lymphatic endothelial cell progenitors (M-LECPs) in generation of new lymphatics. We describe specific markers of M-LECPs and discuss their biologic behavior in culture and in vivo, as well as currently known molecular mechanisms of myeloid-lymphatic transition (MLT). We also discuss the implications of M-LECPs for promoting adaptive immunity, as well as cancer metastasis. We conclude that improved mechanistic understanding of M-LECP differentiation and its role in adult lymphangiogenesis may lead to new therapeutic approaches for correcting lymphatic insufficiency or excessive formation of lymphatic vessels in human disorders.

  6. Targeting distinct tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells by inhibiting CSF-1 receptor: combating tumor evasion of antiangiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Priceman, Saul J; Sung, James L; Shaposhnik, Zory; Burton, Jeremy B; Torres-Collado, Antoni X; Moughon, Diana L; Johnson, Mai; Lusis, Aldons J; Cohen, Donald A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Wu, Lily

    2010-02-18

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) support tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune responses. CSF-1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling is important for the recruitment of CD11b(+)F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and contributes to myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis. However, the impact of the CSF1R signaling pathway on other TIM subsets, including CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. Tumor-infiltrating MDSCs have also been shown to contribute to tumor angiogenesis and have recently been implicated in tumor resistance to antiangiogenic therapy, yet their precise involvement in these processes is not well understood. Here, we use the selective pharmacologic inhibitor of CSF1R signaling, GW2580, to demonstrate that CSF-1 regulates the tumor recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr-1(lo)Ly6C(hi) mononuclear MDSCs. Targeting these TIM subsets inhibits tumor angiogenesis associated with reduced expression of proangiogenic and immunosuppressive genes. Combination therapy using GW2580 with an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody synergistically suppresses tumor growth and severely impairs tumor angiogenesis along with reverting at least one TIM-mediated antiangiogenic compensatory mechanism involving MMP-9. These data highlight the importance of CSF1R signaling in the recruitment and function of distinct TIM subsets, including MDSCs, and validate the benefits of targeting CSF1R signaling in combination with antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of solid cancers.

  7. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  8. Critical and Independent Role for SOCS3 in Either Myeloid or T Cells in Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Carow, Berit; Reuschl, Ann-Kathrin; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Jenkins, Brendan J.; Ernst, Matthias; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Chambers, Benedict J.; Rottenberg, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) negatively regulates STAT3 activation in response to several cytokines such as those in the gp130-containing IL-6 receptor family. Thus, SOCS3 may play a major role in immune responses to pathogens. In the present study, the role of SOCS3 in M. tuberculosis infection was examined. All Socs3fl/fl LysM cre, Socs3fl/fl lck cre (with SOCS3-deficient myeloid and lymphoid cells, respectively) and gp130F/F mice, with a mutation in gp130 that impedes binding to SOCS3, showed increased susceptibility to infection with M. tuberculosis. SOCS3 binding to gp130 in myeloid cells conveyed resistance to M. tuberculosis infection via the regulation of IL-6/STAT3 signalling. SOCS3 was redundant for mycobacterial control by macrophages in vitro. Instead, SOCS3 expression in infected macrophages and DCs prevented the IL-6-mediated inhibition of TNF and IL-12 secretion and contributed to a timely CD4+ cell-dependent IFN-γ expression in vivo. In T cells, SOCS3 expression was essential for a gp130-independent control of infection with M. tuberculosis, but was neither required for the control of infection with attenuated M. bovis BCG nor for M. tuberculosis in BCG-vaccinated mice. Socs3fl/fl lck cre mice showed an increased frequency of γδ+ T cells in different organs and an enhanced secretion of IL-17 by γδ+ T cells in response to infection. Socs3fl/fl lck cre γδ+ T cells impaired the control of infection with M. tuberculosis. Thus, SOCS3 expression in either lymphoid or myeloid cells is essential for resistance against M. tuberculosis via discrete mechanisms. PMID:23853585

  9. Human NK cells in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: analysis of NK cell-activating receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Morgado, Sara; Gayoso, Inmaculada; Bergua, Juan M; Casado, Javier G; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bengochea, Maria Luisa; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2011-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activation is strictly regulated to ensure that healthy cells are preserved, but tumour-transformed or virus-infected cells are recognized and eliminated. To carry out this selective killing, NK cells have an ample repertoire of receptors on their surface. Signalling by inhibitory and activating receptors by interaction with their ligands will determine whether the NK cell becomes activated and kills the target cell. Here, we show reduced expression of NKp46, NKp30, DNAM-1, CD244 and CD94/NKG2C activating receptors on NK cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients. This reduction may be induced by chronic exposure to their ligands on leukaemic blasts. The analysis of ligands for NK cell-activating receptors showed that leukaemic blasts from the majority of patients express ligands for NK cell-activating receptors. DNAM-1 ligands are frequently expressed on blasts, whereas the expression of the NKG2D ligand MICA/B is found in half of the patients and CD48, a ligand for CD244, in only one-fourth of the patients. The decreased expression of NK cell-activating receptors and/or the heterogeneous expression of ligands for major receptors on leukaemic blasts can lead to an inadequate tumour immunosurveillance by NK cells. A better knowledge of the activating receptor repertoire on NK cells and their putative ligands on blasts together with the possibility to modulate their expression will open new possibilities for the use of NK cells in immunotherapy against leukaemia.

  10. Distinct myeloid progenitor differentiation pathways identified through single cell RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Drissen, Roy; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Woll, Petter; Thongjuea, Supat; Gambardella, Adriana; Giustacchini, Alice; Mancini, Elena; Zriwil, Alya; Lutteropp, Michael; Grover, Amit; Mead, Adam; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    According to current models for hematopoiesis, lymphoid-primed multi-potent progenitors (LMPPs; Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+CD34+Flt3hi) and common myeloid progenitors (CMPs; Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+CD34+CD41hi) establish an early branch point for separate lineage commitment pathways from hematopoietic stem cells, with the notable exception that both pathways are proposed to generate all myeloid innate immune cell types through the same myeloid-restricted pre-granulocyte-macrophage progenitor (pre-GM; Lin−Sca-1−c-Kit+CD41−FcγRII/III−CD150−CD105−). By single cell transcriptome profiling of pre-GMs we identify distinct myeloid differentiation pathways: a Gata1-expressing pathway generates mast cells, eosinophils, megakaryocytes and erythroid cells, and a Gata1-negative pathway that generates monocytes, neutrophils and lymphocytes. These results identify an early hematopoietic lineage bifurcation, separating the myeloid lineages prior to their segregation from other hematopoietic lineage potentials. PMID:27043410

  11. Autophagy is an important event for low-dose cytarabine treatment in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyun; Guo, Pei; Zhang, Yunxiang; Li, Xiaoyang; Jia, Peimin; Tong, Jianhua; Li, Junmin

    2017-09-01

    Cytarabine (Ara-c) has been an important agent in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment for more than 40 years. While, the mechanisms underlying low dose cytarabine (LD Ara-c) is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of LD Ara-C in vitro. U937 and HEL cell lines were treated with increasing dose of Ara-C and showed growth inhibition rates in a time and dose-dependent manner. Treatment with LD Ara-C (50nM) induced a time-dependent increase in expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) and beclin1, but degradation of sequestosome1 (p62) in both U937 and HEL cells. Characteristic of autophagosomes appeared after 24h treatment. Meanwhile, deregulation of Akt-mTOR pathway was also detected. When cultured in presence of autophagy inhibitors, autophagy and differentiation was reversed, and cell growth inhibition was also attenuated. Similar phenomenon could also be seen when beclin1 expression was down-regulated. Taken together, we concluded that LD Ara-C can induce autophagy in AML cells and appeared to play an important role in differentiation and death. Down-regulation of Akt-mTOR pathway is involved in these processes. We suggest that cytarabine-induced autophagy is not a pro-survival mechanism, but accounts for its antineoplastic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Myeloid derived suppressor cells promote cross-tolerance in B cell lymphoma by expanding regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Paolo; Mgebroff, Stephanie; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-induced T cell tolerance is a major mechanism that facilitates tumor progression and limits the efficacy of immune therapeutic interventions. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the induction of tolerance to tumor antigens yet the precise mechanisms regulating its induction in vivo remain to be elucidated. Using the A20 B cell lymphoma model, here we identify myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as the tolerogenic APCs capable of antigen uptake and presentation to tumor-specific Tregs. MDSC-mediated Treg induction requires arginase but is TGFβ independent. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of MDSC function respectively with NOHA or sildenafil abrogates Treg proliferation and tumor-induced tolerance in antigen specific T cells. These findings establish a role for MDSCs in antigen-specific tolerance induction through preferential antigen uptake mediating the recruitment and expansion of Tregs. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions such as in vivo phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5)-inhibition which effectively abrogate the immunosuppressive role of MDSCs and reduce Treg numbers, may play a critical role in delaying and/or reversing tolerance induction. PMID:18593947

  13. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary