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Sample records for myeloid leukemia reveals

  1. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    MedlinePlus

    ... CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people with chronic ... Myeloid Leukemia by Phase More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  3. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  4. How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Many people with CML do not have ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M.C.; Koenders, Jasper E.; Kavelaars, Francois G.; Abbas, Zabiollah G.; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W.T.; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K.; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H. Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24441149

  8. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  9. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  12. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  13. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for leukemia in ... Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms might suggest that ... of samples used to test for acute myeloid leukemia If signs and symptoms and/or the results ...

  16. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  17. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  18. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  19. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  1. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloid Leukemia (CML) About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Studies ... such as cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, with a TKI. New drugs for CML Because researchers now know the ...

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of leukemia, including AML: Blood disorders, including polycythemia vera , essential thrombocythemia , and myelodysplasia Certain chemicals (for ... More Anemia Bone marrow transplant Chemotherapy Immunodeficiency disorders Polycythemia vera Patient Instructions Bone marrow transplant - discharge Review ...

  4. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  5. Co-operative leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia and acute promyelocytic leukemia reveals C/EBPα as a common target of TRIB1 and PML/RARA

    PubMed Central

    Keeshan, Karen; Vieugué, Pauline; Chaudhury, Shahzya; Rishi, Loveena; Gaillard, Coline; Liang, Lu; Garcia, Elaine; Nakamura, Takuro; Omidvar, Nader; Kogan, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The PML/RARA fusion protein occurs as a result of the t(15;17) translocation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia subtype of human acute myeloid leukemia. Gain of chromosome 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in human acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia. We previously demonstrated that gain of chromosome 8-containing MYC is of central importance in trisomy 8, but the role of the nearby TRIB1 gene has not been experimentally addressed in this context. We have now tested the hypothesis that both MYC and TRIB1 have functional roles underlying leukemogenesis of trisomy 8 by using retroviral vectors to express MYC and TRIB1 in wild-type bone marrow and in marrow that expressed a PML/RARA transgene. Interestingly, although MYC and TRIB1 readily co-operated in leukemogenesis for wild-type bone marrow, TRIB1 provided no selective advantage to cells expressing PML/RARA. We hypothesized that this lack of co-operation between PML/RARA and TRIB1 reflected a common pathway for their effect: both proteins targeting the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPα. In support of this idea, TRIB1 expression abrogated the all-trans retinoic acid response of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data delineate the common and redundant inhibitory effects of TRIB1 and PML/RARA on C/EBPα providing a potential explanation for the lack of selection of TRIB1 in human acute promyelocytic leukemia, and highlighting the key role of C/EBPs in acute promyelocytic leukemia pathogenesis and therapeutic response. In addition, the co-operativity we observed between MYC and TRIB1 in the absence of PML/RARA show that, outside of acute promyelocytic leukemia, gain of both genes may drive selection for trisomy 8. PMID:27390356

  6. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Clonal Evolution Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis Transformed to Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Daniel A.C.; Miller, Christopher A.; McLellan, Michael D.; Fulton, Robert S.; Moore, Deborah M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Oh, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal architecture in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is poorly understood. Here we report genomic analyses of a patient with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) transformed to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on PMF and sAML diagnosis samples, with skin included as a germline surrogate. Deep sequencing validation was performed on the WGS samples and an additional sample obtained during sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Clustering analysis of 649 validated somatic single nucleotide variants revealed four distinct clonal groups, each including putative driver mutations. The first group (including JAK2 and U2AF1), representing the founding clone, included mutations with high frequency at all three disease stages. The second clonal group (including MYB) was present only in PMF, suggesting the presence of a clone that was dispensable for transformation. The third group (including ASXL1) contained mutations with low frequency in PMF and high frequency in subsequent samples, indicating evolution of the dominant clone with disease progression. The fourth clonal group (including IDH1 and RUNX1) was acquired at sAML transformation and was predominantly absent at sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Taken together, these findings illustrate the complex clonal dynamics associated with disease evolution in MPNs and sAML. PMID:25252869

  8. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Whole exome sequencing reveals a C-terminal germline variant in CEBPA-associated acute myeloid leukemia: 45-year follow up of a large family

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Anand; Seipel, Katja; Pemov, Alexander; Dewan, Ramita; Brown, Christina; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T.; Malasky, Michael; Suman, Shalabh; Yeager, Meredith; Gatti, Richard A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Mulvihill, John J.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Pabst, Thomas; McMaster, Mary L.; Stewart, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial acute myeloid leukemia is rare and linked to germline mutations in RUNX1, GATA2 or CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (CEBPA). We re-evaluated a large family with acute myeloid leukemia originally seen at NIH in 1969. We used whole exome sequencing to study this family, and conducted in silico bioinformatics analysis, protein structural modeling and laboratory experiments to assess the impact of the identified CEBPA Q311P mutation. Unlike most previously identified germline mutations in CEBPA, which were N-terminal frameshift mutations, we identified a novel Q311P variant that was located in the C-terminal bZip domain of C/EBPα. Protein structural modeling suggested that the Q311P mutation alters the ability of the CEBPA dimer to bind DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the Q311P mu-tant had attenuated binding to DNA, as predicted by the protein modeling. Consistent with these findings, we found that the Q311P mutation has reduced transactivation, consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. From 45 years of follow up, we observed incomplete penetrance (46%) of CEBPA Q311P. This study of a large multi-generational pedigree reveals that a germline mutation in the C-terminal bZip domain can alter the ability of C/EBP-α to bind DNA and reduces transactivation, leading to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26721895

  10. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  12. Bosutinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Binotto, Gianni

    In recent years the availability of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in the therapeutic armamentarium for chronic myeloid leukemia has dramatically changed the objectives and expectations of healthcare providers and patients. For many, but not all, patients the forerunner of TKI, imatinib, is still an excellent treatment option. Unfortunately, nearly 30-40% of imatinib-treated patients discontinue therapy in the long-term, because of failure and/or intolerance. Second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors are more potent drugs which are suitable for treatment of approximately 50% of patents for whom imatinib is unsuitable, and with high success and rapid responses. Bosutinib, an orally bioavailable Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has proved to be effective in vitro against resistant chronic myeloid leukemia cells that do not harbor the T315I or V299L ABL kinase domain mutations. During clinical development the manageable safety profile of bosutinib have become evident for both simple and more advanced treatment. In this review we summarize preclinical and clinical data for bosutinib and discuss its ideal field of action in comparison with other TKI.

  13. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  17. [Molecular monitoring of myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kiss, Richárd; Király, Attila Péter; Gaál-Weisinger, Júlia; Marosvári, Dóra; Gángó, Péter Ambrus; Demeter, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2017-03-08

    The last fifteen years brought a revolution both in treatment and diagnostics of chronic myeloid leukemia. Nowadays, the main method for monitoring of the disease is molecular monitoring with real-time PCR technology which can indicate treatment modification. With the development of the international scale and inter-laboratory standardization the residual tumor mass can be measured accurately and the results are comparable between the different laboratories. By the growing experience in the field of molecular responses we can now accurately predict treatment outcome early on with the so called early molecular response and BCR-ABL1 kinetics, allowing the selection of the best TKI with the treatment-free remission representing real option of the near future. Nevertheless, further advancements can be expected, including the workflow automatization and detection of even deeper molecular responses.

  18. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  20. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. [Chronic myeloid leukemia. Karyotype changes].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Atencio, A; Pineda-Del Villar, L; Avila-León, E; González-Ferrer, S; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Soto, M; González, R

    1996-09-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a clonal disease of bone marrow, citogenetically characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). Additional anomalies in the Ph cromosome have been found during the evolution of CML. This paper will show evidence of cytogenetic abnormalities during the evolution of CML in this region, and its correlation with clinical evolution. 55 samples of bone marrow, 81.3% (45/55) in chronic phase (CP), 12.7% (7/55) in an accelerated phase (AP), and 5.4% (3/55) in blastic phase (BP) were received. In 12/45 patients in CP the karyotype was repeated at least once a year during the evolution of their illness. 9/12 presented the Ph chromosome as a single anomaly at the moment of diagnosis; the other 3 presented a distinct anomaly. 4/9 presented additional abnormalities moving to the stages AP or BP between 4-8 months after initial discovery. 7/10 patients referred in AP or BP presented additional abnormalities in the Ph chromosome. It is evident that the chromosome study of each patient with CML must be carried out at least once a year in order to detect chromosomal abnormalities in addition to the Ph chromosome. Thus, a greater therapeutic control of the disease is possible.

  5. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  11. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  12. Chronic myeloid leukemia: reminiscences and dreams

    PubMed Central

    Mughal, Tariq I.; Radich, Jerald P.; Deininger, Michael W.; Apperley, Jane F.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Harrison, Christine J.; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cortes, Jorge; Daley, George Q.

    2016-01-01

    With the deaths of Janet Rowley and John Goldman in December 2013, the world lost two pioneers in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia. In 1973, Janet Rowley, unraveled the cytogenetic anatomy of the Philadelphia chromosome, which subsequently led to the identification of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene and its principal pathogenetic role in the development of chronic myeloid leukemia. This work was also of major importance to support the idea that cytogenetic changes were drivers of leukemogenesis. John Goldman originally made seminal contributions to the use of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation from the late 1970s onwards. Then, in collaboration with Brian Druker, he led efforts to develop ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in the late 1990s. He also led the global efforts to develop and harmonize methodology for molecular monitoring, and was an indefatigable organizer of international conferences. These conferences brought together clinicians and scientists, and accelerated the adoption of new therapies. The abundance of praise, tributes and testimonies expressed by many serve to illustrate the indelible impressions these two passionate and affable scholars made on so many people’s lives. This tribute provides an outline of the remarkable story of chronic myeloid leukemia, and in writing it, it is clear that the historical triumph of biomedical science over this leukemia cannot be considered without appreciating the work of both Janet Rowley and John Goldman. PMID:27132280

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

  14. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Whole-exome sequencing reveals potential molecular predictors of relapse after discontinuation of the targeted therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, Svetlana A; Lavrov, Alexander V; Chelysheva, Ekaterina Yu; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Shukhov, Oleg A; Turkina, Anna; Kutsev, Sergey I

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease well treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The aim was to identify genes with a predictive value for relapse-free survival after TKI cessation in CML patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from six CML patients in long-lasting deep molecular remission. Patients were divided into two groups with relapse (n = 3) and without relapse (n = 3) after TKI discontinuation. We found variants in genes CYP1B1, ALPK2, and IRF1 in group of patients with relapse and one variant in gene PARP9 in group of patients without relapse. We verified prognostic value of the found markers in a small group of patients with TKI discontinuation and demonstrated their high sensitivity (77%), specificity (86%), positive (85%), and negative (79%) predictive values. Thus we revealed genetic variants, which are potential markers of outcome prediction in CML patients after TKI discontinuation.

  18. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  20. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  3. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Saultz, Jennifer N.; Garzon, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by immature myeloid cell proliferation and bone marrow failure. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain a critical prognostic tool for post induction treatment. Despite rapid advances in the field including new drug targets and increased understanding of the biology, AML treatment remains unchanged for the past three decades with the majority of patients eventually relapsing and dying of the disease. Allogenic transplant remains the best chance for cure for patients with intermediate or high risk disease. In this review, we discuss the landmark genetic studies that have improved outcome prediction and novel therapies. PMID:26959069

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... one form of a cancer of the blood-forming tissue (bone marrow) called acute myeloid leukemia. In ... 1 link) PubMed Sources for This Page Döhner H. Implication of the molecular characterization of acute myeloid ...

  16. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  18. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  20. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  1. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  4. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Precision medicine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints.

  13. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  14. Three hematologic malignancies in the same patient: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fattizzo, Bruno; Radice, Tommaso; Cattaneo, Daniele; Pomati, Mauro; Barcellini, Wilma; Iurlo, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The co-existence of both chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. We report an unusual case of three he-matological malignancies in the same patient: CLL, CML, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). None of the three malignancies shared the same origin, since the marrow sample was negative for BCR-ABL1 transcript at the time of CLL diagnosis, CLL was in remission at CML diagnosis, and CML was in complete cytogenetic response at AML onset, indicating that this was not a blast crisis. Background: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are the most common proliferative disorders in Western countries, with an incidence of 4.2/100,000/year and 1-1.5/100,000/year, respectively. The co-existence of both CML and CLL is an extremely rare event, even if it has been described in a few cases, either simultaneously or subsequently presenting. Above all, the presence of more than two different hematologic neoplasms has not been described in literature so far. In the present study we report a particular case of a CLL patient, who first developed CML and then acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  15. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Molecular diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Christopher D; Bagg, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukemia is multifaceted, requiring the integration of a variety of laboratory findings, with genetic approaches now firmly established as a central component. Molecular genetic technologies continue to evolve and provide additional tiers of both clarity and complexity. Many have rapidly moved into clinical laboratories; others remain as relevant discovery tools, while some are poised to take their place in diagnostic testing menus. Here, we attempt to synthesize the role of various testing modalities and exciting nascent fundamental discoveries, with a view as to how these might be integrated into the contemporary and future evaluation of this group of aggressive hematologic malignancies.

  18. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission. PMID:28127141

  19. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  2. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Parallel targeted next generation sequencing of childhood and adult acute myeloid leukemia patients reveals uniform genomic profile of the disease.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Irena; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Janic, Dragana; Dokmanovic, Lidija; Jankovic, Srdja; Vukovic, Nada Suvajdzic; Tomin, Dragica; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2016-10-01

    The age-specific differences in the genetic mechanisms of myeloid leukemogenesis have been observed and studied previously. However, NGS technology has provided a possibility to obtain a large amount of mutation data. We analyzed DNA samples from 20 childhood (cAML) and 20 adult AML (aAML) patients, using NGS targeted sequencing. The average coverage of high-quality sequences was 2981 × per amplicon. A total of 412 (207 cAML, 205 aAML) variants in the coding regions were detected; out of which, only 122 (62 cAML and 60 aAML) were potentially protein-changing. Our results confirmed that AML contains small number of genetic alterations (median 3 mutations/patient in both groups). The prevalence of the most frequent single gene AML associated mutations differed in cAML and aAML patient cohorts: IDH1 (0 % cAML, 5 % aAML), IDH2 (0 % cAML, 10 % aAML), NPM1 (10 % cAML, 35 % aAML). Additionally, potentially protein-changing variants were found in tyrosine kinase genes or genes encoding tyrosine kinase associated proteins (JAK3, ABL1, GNAQ, and EGFR) in cAML, while among aAML, the prevalence is directed towards variants in the methylation and histone modifying genes (IDH1, IDH2, and SMARCB1). Besides uniform genomic profile of AML, specific genetic characteristic was exclusively detected in cAML and aAML.

  11. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A.; Barrett, Christian L.; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C.; Isquith, Jane M.; Zipeto, Maria A.; Goff, Daniel J.; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M.; Dao, Kim-Hien T.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Marra, Marco A.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies. PMID:23275297

  14. ADAR1 promotes malignant progenitor reprogramming in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qingfei; Crews, Leslie A; Barrett, Christian L; Chun, Hye-Jung; Court, Angela C; Isquith, Jane M; Zipeto, Maria A; Goff, Daniel J; Minden, Mark; Sadarangani, Anil; Rusert, Jessica M; Dao, Kim-Hien T; Morris, Sheldon R; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Marra, Marco A; Frazer, Kelly A; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-01-15

    The molecular etiology of human progenitor reprogramming into self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSC) has remained elusive. Although DNA sequencing has uncovered spliceosome gene mutations that promote alternative splicing and portend leukemic transformation, isoform diversity also may be generated by RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes that regulate stem cell maintenance. In this study, whole-transcriptome sequencing of normal, chronic phase, and serially transplantable blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors revealed increased IFN-γ pathway gene expression in concert with BCR-ABL amplification, enhanced expression of the IFN-responsive ADAR1 p150 isoform, and a propensity for increased adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing during CML progression. Lentiviral overexpression experiments demonstrate that ADAR1 p150 promotes expression of the myeloid transcription factor PU.1 and induces malignant reprogramming of myeloid progenitors. Moreover, enforced ADAR1 p150 expression was associated with production of a misspliced form of GSK3β implicated in LSC self-renewal. Finally, functional serial transplantation and shRNA studies demonstrate that ADAR1 knockdown impaired in vivo self-renewal capacity of blast crisis CML progenitors. Together these data provide a compelling rationale for developing ADAR1-based LSC detection and eradication strategies.

  15. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  17. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar;49(3):237-41. doi: 10.1002/gcc. ... EBPalpha), in acute myeloid leukemia. Nat Genet. 2001 Mar;27(3):263-70. Citation on PubMed Renneville ...

  20. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Total body irradiation in chronic myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Advani, S.H.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Nair, C.N.; Ramakrishnan, G.

    1983-04-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI), given as 10 rad daily for five days a week for a total dose of 150 rad has been used in an attempt to control the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Thirteen patients with CML received fractionated TBI leading to rapid and good control of WBC count without any adverse reaction. The chronic phase of CML could also be controlled with TBI, even in three patients who were resistant to busulfan. Following TBI, WBC count remained under control for a period of 32 weeks as compared to 40 weeks following vusulfan alone. Repeat TBI was also well tolerated with good response. It appears that TBI is an effective and safe therapy for controlling the chronic phase of CML.

  2. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Targeted alpha particle immunotherapy for myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Larson, Steven M; Sgouros, George; McDevitt, Michael R; Finn, Ronald D; Divgi, Chaitanya R; Ballangrud, Ase M; Hamacher, Klaus A; Ma, Dangshe; Humm, John L; Brechbiel, Martin W; Molinet, Roger; Scheinberg, David A

    2002-08-15

    Unlike beta particle-emitting isotopes, alpha emitters can selectively kill individual cancer cells with a single atomic decay. HuM195, a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody, specifically targets myeloid leukemia cells and has activity against minimal disease. When labeled with the beta-emitters (131)I and (90)Y, HuM195 can eliminate large leukemic burdens in patients, but it produces prolonged myelosuppression requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at high doses. To enhance the potency of native HuM195 yet avoid the nonspecific cytotoxicity of beta-emitting constructs, the alpha-emitting isotope (213)Bi was conjugated to HuM195. Eighteen patients with relapsed and refractory acute myelogenous leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia were treated with 10.36 to 37.0 MBq/kg (213)Bi-HuM195. No significant extramedullary toxicity was seen. All 17 evaluable patients developed myelosuppression, with a median time to recovery of 22 days. Nearly all the (213)Bi-HuM195 rapidly localized to and was retained in areas of leukemic involvement, including the bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Absorbed dose ratios between these sites and the whole body were 1000-fold greater than those seen with beta-emitting constructs in this antigen system and patient population. Fourteen (93%) of 15 evaluable patients had reductions in circulating blasts, and 14 (78%) of 18 patients had reductions in the percentage of bone marrow blasts. This study demonstrates the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of (213)Bi-HuM195, and it is the first proof-of-concept for systemic targeted alpha particle immunotherapy in humans.

  9. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  11. Report of an Unusual Case: Testicular Involvement of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia 10 Years after the Complete Response

    PubMed Central

    Ozgur, Berat Cem; Sarici, Hasmet; Borcek, Pelin; Telli, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Testicular extra-medullary myeloid cell tumours are rare tumours presenting in most cases with painless testicular swelling. We are representing here along of a case of 21-year-old man with painless scrotal swelling. From his medical history, he was treated by allogenic bone-marrow transplantation and chemotherapy 10 years ago because of chronic myeloid leukemia. The pathology of orchiectomy specimen revealed malign cells with blastic cell infiltration means a late relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia. The patient has been in hematological remission and no evidence of any myeloid disorders by 10 years’ follow up. Although testicular involvement is a rare and an unusual event in blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia, extramedullary myeloid cell tumour should be considered in the diagnosis of intratesticular tumours. PMID:24959476

  12. The role of natural killer cells in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Danier, Anna Carolyna Araújo; de Melo, Ricardo Pereira; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Laguna-Abreu, Maria Theresa Cerávolo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasia resulting from a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 producing the BCR-ABL hybrid known as the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph). In chronic myeloid leukemia a proliferation of malignant myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow due to excessive tyrosine kinase activity. In order to maintain homeostasis, natural killer cells, by means of receptors, identify the major histocompatibility complex on the surface of tumor cells and subsequently induce apoptosis. The NKG2D receptor in the natural killer cells recognizes the transmembrane proteins related to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related genes A and B (MICA and MICB), and it is by the interaction between NKG2D and MICA that natural killer cells exert cytotoxic activity against chronic myeloid leukemia tumor cells. However, in the case of chronic exposure of the NKG2D receptor, the MICA ligand releases soluble proteins called sMICA from the tumor cell surface, which negatively modulate NKG2D and enable the tumor cells to avoid lysis mediated by the natural killer cells. Blocking the formation of sMICA may be an important antitumor strategy. Treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors induces modulation of NKG2DL expression, which could favor the activity of the natural killer cells. However this mechanism has not been fully described in chronic myeloid leukemia. In the present study, we analyze the role of natural killer cells to reduce proliferation and in the cellular death of tumor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:23049299

  13. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  14. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  15. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Myeloid Sarcoma in an Eyelid That Developed during Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Emiko; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old female presented with a mass in the left upper eyelid margin that had developed during chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. The mass was elastic, hard, and pinkish, with a relatively smooth surface but without madarosis. The histopathological findings corresponded to a myeloid sarcoma. No blast cells were shown in the peripheral blood at the time of biopsy, and she subsequently underwent an azacitidine injection regimen. The size of the eyelid tumor decreased 3 months after the biopsy, when the course of azacitidine injections was completed. However, acute myeloid leukemia recurred, and the patient died PMID:26889156

  18. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Chronic myeloid leukemia data from India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shweta; Prabhash, Kumar; Parikh, Purvish

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to collaborate the data of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patient from all over India,meeting was conceived by ICON (Indian Cooperative Oncology Network) in 2010. This article presents the summarized picture of the data presented in the meeting. In the meeting 8115 patients data was presented and 18 centres submitted their manuscripts comprising of 6677 patients. This data represents large series of patients from all over the country treated on day to day clinical practice and presents the actual outcomes of CML patients in India. The compilation of data confirms the younger age at presentation, increased incidence of resistance and poor outcomes in patients with late chronic phase. It also addresses the issues like Glivec versus Generic drug outcomes, safety of Imatinib during pregnancy and mutational analysis among resistant patients. It concludes that survival and quality of life of CML patients in India has improved over the years especially when treated in early chronic phase. The generic drug is a good option where original is unable to reach the patient due to various reasons. Hopefully, this effort will provide a platform to conduct systematic studies in learning the best treatment options among CML patients in Indian settings. PMID:24516297

  20. An HSEF for murine myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Bullis, J.E.; Wuu, C.S.; Marino, S.A.; Zaider, M.

    1996-10-01

    In the past decade, a large amount of effort has gone into the development of hit size effectiveness functions (HSEFs), with the ultimate aim of replacing the present absorbed dose-RBE-Q system. However, the absorbed dose determined at the tissue level is incapable of providing information on single hits on (doses to) the single cell. As a result, it is necessary to resort to microdosimetry, which is capable of providing not only the number of hits on cells, but the distribution of hit sizes as well. From this information, an HSEF can be derived. However, to date there have been no sets of data available on animals exposed to radiations of several qualities, and for which microdosimetric data were available. The objective of the present set of experiments was to remedy this situation. Large numbers of mice were exposed to radiations of several different qualities, and were observed throughout their entire lifespan for the appearance of myeloid leukemia. The HSEF developed for this neoplasm is presented and discussed.

  1. Optimized Treatment Schedules for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Qie; Dingli, David; Foo, Jasmine; Leder, Kevin Zox

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, several targeted therapies (e.g. imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) have been developed to treat Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). Despite an initial response to therapy, drug resistance remains a problem for some CML patients. Recent studies have shown that resistance mutations that preexist treatment can be detected in a substantial number of patients, and that this may be associated with eventual treatment failure. One proposed method to extend treatment efficacy is to use a combination of multiple targeted therapies. However, the design of such combination therapies (timing, sequence, etc.) remains an open challenge. In this work we mathematically model the dynamics of CML response to combination therapy and analyze the impact of combination treatment schedules on treatment efficacy in patients with preexisting resistance. We then propose an optimization problem to find the best schedule of multiple therapies based on the evolution of CML according to our ordinary differential equation model. This resulting optimization problem is nontrivial due to the presence of ordinary different equation constraints and integer variables. Our model also incorporates drug toxicity constraints by tracking the dynamics of patient neutrophil counts in response to therapy. We determine optimal combination strategies that maximize time until treatment failure on hypothetical patients, using parameters estimated from clinical data in the literature. PMID:27764087

  2. The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Dingli, David

    2009-08-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder characterized by the expression of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. This gene product is necessary and sufficient to explain the chronic phase of CML. The only known cause of CML is radiation exposure leading to a mutation of at least one HSC, although the vast majority of patients with CML do not have a history of radiation exposure. Nonetheless, in humans, significant radiation exposure (after exposure to atomic bomb fallout) leads to disease diagnosis in 3-5 years. In murine models, disease dynamics are much faster and CML is fatal over the span of a few months. Our objective is to develop a model that accounts for CML across all mammals. In the following, we combine a model of CML dynamics in humans with allometric scaling of hematopoiesis across mammals to illustrate the natural history of chronic phase CML in various mammals. We show how a single cell can lead to a fatal illness in mice and humans but a higher burden of CML stem cells is necessary to induce disease in larger mammals such as elephants. The different dynamics of the disease is rationalized in terms of mammalian mass. Our work illustrates the relevance of animal models to understand human disease and highlights the importance of considering the re-scaling of the dynamics that accrues to the same biological process when planning experiments involving different species.

  3. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Genome Wide Mapping of NR4A Binding Reveals Cooperativity with ETS Factors to Promote Epigenetic Activation of Distal Enhancers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duren, Ryan P.; Boudreaux, Seth P.; Conneely, Orla M.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the NR4A subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors regulate cell fate decisions via both genomic and non-genomic mechanisms in a cell and tissue selective manner. NR4As play a key role in maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and are critical tumor suppressors of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expression of NR4As is broadly silenced in leukemia initiating cell enriched populations from human patients relative to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Rescue of NR4A expression in human AML cells inhibits proliferation and reprograms AML gene signatures via transcriptional mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. By intersecting an acutely regulated NR4A1 dependent transcriptional profile with genome wide NR4A binding distribution, we now identify an NR4A targetome of 685 genes that are directly regulated by NR4A1. We show that NR4As regulate gene transcription primarily through interaction with distal enhancers that are co-enriched for NR4A1 and ETS transcription factor motifs. Using a subset of NR4A activated genes, we demonstrate that the ETS factors ERG and FLI-1 are required for activation of NR4A bound enhancers and NR4A target gene induction. NR4A1 dependent recruitment of ERG and FLI-1 promotes binding of p300 histone acetyltransferase to epigenetically activate NR4A bound enhancers via acetylation at histone H3K27. These findings disclose novel epigenetic mechanisms by which NR4As and ETS factors cooperate to drive NR4A dependent gene transcription in human AML cells. PMID:26938745

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tara L.; Levy, M. Yair

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, particularly the elderly. Novel agents and treatment approaches are needed in the induction, post-remission and relapsed settings. The additions of clofarabine for relapsed or refractory disease and the hypomethylating agents represent recent advances. Clinical trials of FLT3 inhibitors have yielded disappointing results to date, with ongoing collaborations attempting to identify the optimal role for these agents. Potential leukemia stem cell targeted therapies and treatments in the setting of minimal residual disease are also under investigation. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in AML treatment and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22654526

  6. DNA profiling analysis of 100 consecutive de novo acute myeloid leukemia cases reveals patterns of genomic instability that affect all cytogenetic risk groups.

    PubMed

    Suela, J; Alvarez, S; Cifuentes, F; Largo, C; Ferreira, B I; Blesa, D; Ardanaz, M; García, R; Marquez, J A; Odero, M D; Calasanz, M J; Cigudosa, J C

    2007-06-01

    We have carried out a high-resolution whole genome DNA profiling analysis on 100 bone marrow samples from a consecutive series of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. After discarding copy number changes that are known to be genetic polymorphisms, we found that genomic aberrations (GA) in the form of gains or losses of genetic material were present in 74% of the samples, with a median of 2 GA per case (range 0-35). In addition to the cytogenetically detected aberration, GA were present in cases from all cytogenetic prognostic groups: 79% in the favorable group, 60% in the intermediate group (including 59% of cases with normal karyotype) and 83% in the adverse group. Five aberrant deleted regions were recurrently associated with cases with a highly aberrant genome (e.g., a 1.5 Mb deletion at 17q11.2 and a 750 kb deletion at 5q31.1). Different degrees of genomic instability showed a statistically significant impact on survival curves, even within the normal karyotype cases. This association was independent of other clinical and genetic parameters. Our study provides, for the first time, a detailed picture of the nature and frequency of DNA copy number aberrations in de novo AML.

  7. Vertigo as the First Sign of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Hernández, Rubén; Macías-Rodríguez, Diego Hernando; Martín-Sánchez, Víctor; Cordero-Civantos, Cristina; Santa Cruz-Ruiz, Santiago; Batuecas-Caletrio, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Acute vestibular deficit as the first sign of leukemia is extremely rare. The literature shows some cases of sudden hearing loss accompanied by instability and associated with hyperviscosity syndrome. We present the case of a patient who presents a harmonic vestibular deficit of the right ear. The complementary studies revealed an abnormally high level of leukocytes. A peripheral blood cytogenetic analysis is performed due to a high suspicion of leukemia, and the results show BCR/ABL fusion gene with a cut point in the M-BCR region, which confirms the diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. In this case we detail the importance of taking hematological disorders into consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients with otoneurological symptoms, and we also review the etiopathogenic mechanisms, symptoms, diagnosis, and therapeutic options for chronic myeloid leukemia with sudden hearing loss and vertigo. PMID:23476855

  8. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  10. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia ontogeny is defined by distinct somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, R. Coleman; Mar, Brenton G.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Grauman, Peter V.; Shareef, Sarah; Allen, Steven L.; Pigneux, Arnaud; Wetzler, Meir; Stuart, Robert K.; Erba, Harry P.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Powell, Bayard L.; Lindeman, Neal; Steensma, David P.; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Neuberg, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can develop after an antecedent myeloid malignancy (secondary AML [s-AML]), after leukemogenic therapy (therapy-related AML [t-AML]), or without an identifiable prodrome or known exposure (de novo AML). The genetic basis of these distinct pathways of AML development has not been determined. We performed targeted mutational analysis of 194 patients with rigorously defined s-AML or t-AML and 105 unselected AML patients. The presence of a mutation in SRSF2, SF3B1, U2AF1, ZRSR2, ASXL1, EZH2, BCOR, or STAG2 was >95% specific for the diagnosis of s-AML. Analysis of serial samples from individual patients revealed that these mutations occur early in leukemogenesis and often persist in clonal remissions. In t-AML and elderly de novo AML populations, these alterations define a distinct genetic subtype that shares clinicopathologic properties with clinically confirmed s-AML and highlights a subset of patients with worse clinical outcomes, including a lower complete remission rate, more frequent reinduction, and decreased event-free survival. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00715637. PMID:25550361

  12. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Hadi; Baradaran, Behzad; Esfahani, Ali; Sakhinia, Masoud; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy. PMID:24754007

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia therapeutics: CARs in the driver's seat.

    PubMed

    Mardiros, Armen; Brown, Christine E; Budde, L Elizabeth; Wang, Xiuli; Forman, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia remains a difficult disease to cure and novel therapeutic approaches are needed. To this end, we developed CD123 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected T cells which exhibited potent antileukemic activity. We discuss what we learned during the development of CD123 CARs and future directions for this immunotherapy.

  14. Dasatinib-induced chylothorax in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Shabber Agha; Bhatti, Hammad; Braver, Yvonne; Ali, Sayed K.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary adverse events are common abnormalities associated with the use of dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. We present a case of a 69-year-old man who suddenly developed a rare chylothorax pulmonary adverse event following 10 months of dasatinib treatment. PMID:28127140

  15. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  16. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. cDNA cloning, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of myelodysplasia/Myeloid Leukemia Factor 2 (MLF2)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuefer, M.U.; Valentine, V.; Behm, F.G.

    1996-07-15

    A fusion gene between nucleophosmin (NPM) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) and myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1) is formed by a recurrent t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Here we report the identification of a novel gene, MLF2, which contains an open reading frame of 744 bp encoding a 248-amino-acid protein highly related to the previously identified MLF1 protein (63% similarity, 40% identity). In contrast to the tissue-restricted expression pattern of MLF1, and MLF2 messenger RNA is expressed ubiquitously. The MLF2 gene locus was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 12p13, a chromosomal region frequently involved in translocations and deletions in acute leukemias of lymphoid or myeloid lineage. In a physical map of chromosome 12, MLF2 was found to reside on the yeast artificial chromosome clone 765b9. Southern blotting analysis of malignant cell DNAs prepared from a series of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases with translocations involving chromosome arm 12p, as well as a group of acute myeloid leukemias with various cytogenetic abnormalities, failed to reveal MLF2 gene rearrangements. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Evolution of myeloid leukemia in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saida, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a markedly increased risk of leukemia. They are at particular risk of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, known as myeloid leukemia associated with DS (ML-DS), the development of which is closely linked to a preceding temporary form of neonatal leukemia called transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM). Findings from recent clinical and laboratory studies suggest that constitutional trisomy 21 and GATA1 mutation(s) cause TAM, and that additional genetic alteration(s) including those in epigenetic regulators and signaling molecules are involved in the progression from TAM to ML-DS. Thus, this disease progression represents an important model of multi-step leukemogenesis. The present review focuses on the evolutionary process of TAM to ML-DS, and advances in the understanding of perturbed hematopoiesis in DS with respect to GATA1 mutation and recent findings, including cooperating genetic events, are discussed.

  2. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia cells polarize macrophages towards a leukemia supporting state in a Growth factor independence 1 dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Al-Matary, Yahya S.; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Opalka, Bertram; Hönes, Judith M.; Lams, Robert F.; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Schütte, Judith; Köster, Renata; Lennartz, Klaus; Schroeder, Thomas; Haas, Rainer; Dührsen, Ulrich; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    The growth of malignant cells is not only driven by cell-intrinsic factors, but also by the surrounding stroma. Monocytes/Macrophages play an important role in the onset and progression of solid cancers. However, little is known about their role in the development of acute myeloid leukemia, a malignant disease characterized by an aberrant development of the myeloid compartment of the hematopoietic system. It is also unclear which factors are responsible for changing the status of macrophage polarization, thus supporting the growth of malignant cells instead of inhibiting it. We report herein that acute myeloid leukemia leads to the invasion of acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages into the bone marrow and spleen of leukemic patients and mice. In different leukemic mouse models, these macrophages support the in vitro expansion of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines better than macrophages from non-leukemic mice. The grade of macrophage infiltration correlates in vivo with the survival of the mice. We found that the transcriptional repressor Growth factor independence 1 is crucial in the process of macrophage polarization, since its absence impedes macrophage polarization towards a leukemia supporting state and favors an anti-tumor state both in vitro and in vivo. These results not only suggest that acute myeloid leukemia-associated macrophages play an important role in the progression of acute myeloid leukemia, but also implicate Growth factor independence 1 as a pivotal factor in macrophage polarization. These data may provide new insights and opportunities for novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27390361

  5. Monitoring imatinib plasma concentrations in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Darlize Hübner; Wagner, Sandrine Comparsi; dos Santos, Tamyris Vianna; Lizot, Lilian de Lima Feltraco; Antunes, Marina Venzon; Capra, Marcelo; Linden, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Imatinib has proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, but plasma levels above 1,000 ng/mL must be achieved to optimize activity. Therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib is useful for patients that do not present clinical response. There are several analytical methods to measure imatinib in biosamples, which are mainly based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric or diode array spectrophotometric detection. The former is preferred due to its lower cost and wider availability. The present manuscript presents a review of the clinical and analytical aspects of the therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. The review includes references published over the last 10 years. There is evidence that the monitoring of plasmatic levels of imatinib is an useful alternative, especially considering the wide pharmacokinetic variability of this drug. PMID:23049322

  6. MiRNA182 regulates percentage of myeloid and erythroid cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arya, Deepak; Sachithanandan, Sasikala P; Ross, Cecil; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Li, Shang; Krishna, Sudhir

    2017-01-12

    The deregulation of lineage control programs is often associated with the progression of haematological malignancies. The molecular regulators of lineage choices in the context of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance remain poorly understood in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). To find a potential molecular regulator contributing to lineage distribution and TKI resistance, we undertook an RNA-sequencing approach for identifying microRNAs (miRNAs). Following an unbiased screen, elevated miRNA182-5p levels were detected in Bcr-Abl-inhibited K562 cells (CML blast crisis cell line) and in a panel of CML patients. Earlier, miRNA182-5p upregulation was reported in several solid tumours and haematological malignancies. We undertook a strategy involving transient modulation and CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)-mediated knockout of the MIR182 locus in CML cells. The lineage contribution was assessed by methylcellulose colony formation assay. The transient modulation of miRNA182-5p revealed a biased phenotype. Strikingly, Δ182 cells (homozygous deletion of MIR182 locus) produced a marked shift in lineage distribution. The phenotype was rescued by ectopic expression of miRNA182-5p in Δ182 cells. A bioinformatic analysis and Hes1 modulation data suggested that Hes1 could be a putative target of miRNA182-5p. A reciprocal relationship between miRNA182-5p and Hes1 was seen in the context of TK inhibition. In conclusion, we reveal a key role for miRNA182-5p in restricting the myeloid development of leukemic cells. We propose that the Δ182 cell line will be valuable in designing experiments for next-generation pharmacological interventions.

  7. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  9. GATA2 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanan; Xuan, Binbin; Fan, Yingchao; Sheng, Huiming; Zhuang, Wenfang

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance constitutes one of the main obstacles for clinical recovery of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, the treatment of AML requires new strategies, such as adding a third drug. To address whether GATA2 could act as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance in human leukemia cells, we observed KG1a cells and clinical patients’ AML cells with a classic drug (Cerubidine) and Gefitinib. After utilizing chemotherapy, the expression of GATA2 and its target genes (EVI, SCL and WT1) in surviving AML cells and KG1a cells were significantly enhanced to double and quadrupled compared to its original level respectively. Furthermore, with continuous chemotherapeutics, AML cells with GATA2 knockdown or treated with GATA2 inhibitor (K1747) almost eliminated with dramatically reduced expression of WT1, SCL, EVI, and significantly increased apoptotic population. Therefore, we propose that reducing GATA2 expression or inhibition of its transcription activity can relieve the drug resistance of acute myeloid leukemia cells and it would be helpful for eliminating the leukemia cells in patients. PMID:28114350

  10. Transcription factor AP-2α regulates acute myeloid leukemia cell proliferation by influencing Hoxa gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofeng; Yang, Zijian; Zhou, Fangliang; Wang, Fangmei; Li, Xinxin; Chen, Cheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Hu, Xiang; Xiang, Shuanglin; Zhang, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Transcription factor AP-2α mediates transcription of a number of genes implicated in mammalian development, cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In the current study, we identified Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Hox cofactor Meis1 as AP-2α target genes, which are involved in myeloid leukemogenesis. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that overexpression of AP-2α activated transcription activities of Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Meis1, whereas siRNA of AP-2α inhibited their transcription activities. We found that AP-2 binding sites in regulatory regions of three genes activated their transcription by mutant analysis and AP-2α could interact with AP-2 binding sites in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Further results showed that the AP-2α shRNA efficiently inhibited mRNA and protein levels of Hoxa7, Hoxa9 and Meis1 in AML cell lines U937 and HL60. Moreover, decreased expression of AP-2α resulted in a significant reduction in the growth and proliferation of AML cells in vitro. Remarkably, AP-2α knockdown leukemia cells exhibit decreased tumorigenicity in vivo compared with controls. Finally, AP-2α and target genes in clinical acute myeloid leukemia samples of M5b subtype revealed variable expression levels and broadly paralleled expression. These data support a role of AP-2α in mediating the expression of Hoxa genes in acute myeloid leukemia to influence the proliferation and cell survival.

  11. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  12. Severe Lower Limb Ischemia by Massive Arterial Thrombosis Revealing an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Needing for Leg Amputation: Clinical and Emotional Aspects Related to the Communication with the Patient and His Family

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, Calogero; Mosa, Clara; Di Marco, Floriana; Valentino, Fabrizio; Trizzino, Angela; Guadagna, Paola; Talarico, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Large vessel thrombosis is a very rare clinical presentation of acute leukemia, generally associated with coagulopathy, usually characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia. A 13- year-old boy with a previously undiagnosed acute myeloid leukemia was referred to our hospital with acute ischemia of the right lower limb due to occlusion of the right external iliac artery, treated with emergency double surgical thromboembolectomy and chemotherapy. The thrombotic complication resulted in leg amputation. Now the boy is well in complete remission, with a good social integration and quality of life, 30 months after completing treatment. The report highlights the crucial role of early diagnosis and subsequent chemotherapy in avoiding amputation. We particularly focused critical and emotional aspects related to the communication about the leg amputation with the patient and his family. PMID:28058104

  13. Patient-tailored analysis of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Malmberg, Erik B R; Ståhlman, Sara; Rehammar, Anna; Samuelsson, Tore; Alm, Sofie J; Kristiansson, Erik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Garelius, Hege; Pettersson, Louise; Ehinger, Mats; Palmqvist, Lars; Fogelstrand, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques have revealed that leukemic cells in acute myeloid leukemia often are characterized by a limited number of somatic mutations. These mutations can be the basis for the detection of leukemic cells in follow-up samples. The aim of this study was to identify leukemia-specific mutations in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and to use these mutations as markers for minimal residual disease. Leukemic cells and normal lymphocytes were simultaneously isolated at diagnosis from 17 patients with acute myeloid leukemia using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Exome sequencing of these cells identified 240 leukemia-specific single nucleotide variations and 22 small insertions and deletions. Based on estimated allele frequencies and their accuracies, 191 of these mutations qualified as candidates for minimal residual disease analysis. Targeted deep sequencing with a significance threshold of 0.027% for single nucleotide variations and 0.006% for NPM1 type A mutation was developed for quantification of minimal residual disease. When tested on follow-up samples from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia, targeted deep sequencing of single nucleotide variations as well as NPM1 was more sensitive than minimal residual disease quantification with multiparameter flow cytometry. In conclusion, we here describe how exome sequencing can be used for identification of leukemia-specific mutations in samples already at diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. We also show that targeted deep sequencing of such mutations, including single nucleotide variations, can be used for high-sensitivity quantification of minimal residual disease in a patient-tailored manner.

  14. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in adult myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tse, W W; Zang, S L; Bunting, K D; Laughlin, M J

    2008-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a life-saving procedure for hematopoietic malignancies, marrow failure syndromes and hereditary immunodeficiency disorders. However, wide application of this procedure is limited by availability of suitable human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched adult donors. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been increasingly used as an alternative HSC source for patients lacking matched-HSC donors. The clinical experience of using UCB transplantation to treat pediatric acute leukemias has already shown that higher-level HLA-mismatched UCB can be equally as good as or even better than matched HSC. Recently, large registries and multiple single institutional studies conclusively demonstrated that UCB is an acceptable source of HSCs for adult acute leukemia patients who lack HLA-matched donors. These studies will impact the future clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is the most common acute leukemia in adults. UCB has unique advantages of easy procurement, absence of risk to donors, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability, greater tolerance of HLA disparity and lower-than-expected incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease. These features of UCB permit successful transplantation available to almost every patient who needs it. We anticipate that using UCB as a HSC source for allogeneic transplantation for adult AML will increase dramatically over the next 5 years, by expanding the available allogeneic donor pool. Clinical studies are needed with focus on disease-specific UCB transplantation outcomes, including AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma.

  16. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  17. Synchronous Occurrence of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Gray, Brian Allen; May, William Stratford

    2017-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) are hematologic malignancies that originate from different oligopotent progenitor stem cells, namely, common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor cells, respectively. Although blastic transformation of CML can occur in the lymphoid lineage and CML has been related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma on transformation, to our knowledge, de novo and synchronous occurrence of CML and MCL has not been reported. Herein, we report the first case of synchronous CML and MCL in an otherwise healthy 38-year-old man. Potential etiologies and pathological relationships between the two malignancies are explored, including the possibility that the downstream effects of BCR-ABL may link it to an overexpression of cyclin D1, which is inherent to the etiology of MCL. PMID:28270940

  18. Preclinical approaches in chronic myeloid leukemia: from cells to systems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cassie J; Holyoake, Tessa L

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the design of targeted therapies for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have transformed the prognosis for patients diagnosed with this disease. However, leukemic stem cell persistence, drug intolerance, drug resistance, and advanced-phase disease represent unmet clinical needs demanding the attention of CML investigators worldwide. The availability of appropriate preclinical models is essential to efficiently translate findings from the bench to the clinic. Here we review the current approaches taken to preclinical work in the CML field, including examples of commonly used in vivo models and recent successes from systems biology-based methodologies.

  19. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  20. Current trends in molecular diagnostics of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vinhas, Raquel; Cordeiro, Milton; Pedrosa, Pedro; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro V

    2017-08-01

    Nearly 1.5 million people worldwide suffer from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), characterized by the genetic translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11.2), involving the fusion of the Abelson oncogene (ABL1) with the breakpoint cluster region (BCR) gene. Early onset diagnosis coupled to current therapeutics allow for a treatment success rate of 90, which has focused research on the development of novel diagnostics approaches. In this review, we present a critical perspective on current strategies for CML diagnostics, comparing to gold standard methodologies and with an eye on the future trends on nanotheranostics.

  1. How I monitor residual disease in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Molecular monitoring in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a powerful tool to document treatment responses and predict relapse. Nonetheless, the proliferation of clinical trials and “guidelines” using the molecular endpoints of CML has outpaced practice norms, commercial laboratory application, and reimbursement practices, leaving some anxiety (if not confusion and despair) about molecular monitoring in the day-to-day treatment of CML. This article will try to address these issues by describing how I monitor CML, which, in summary, is with interest and without panic. PMID:19661271

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Challenges in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eleni, Lagadinou D.; Nicholas, Zoumbos C.; Alexandros, Spyridonidis

    2010-01-01

    Whereas in younger patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is straightforward and the goal is cure, the optimal treatment decision for older adults remains highly controversial. Physicians need to determine whether palliation, “something” beyond palliation, intensive therapy, or an investigational therapy is the most appropriate treatment option. This requires understanding of the biology and risk profile of the AML, clinical judgment in evaluating the functional status of the patient, communication skills in understanding the patient's wishes and social background, and medical expertise in available therapies. The physician has to accurately inform the patient about (a) the unique biological considerations of his leukemia and his prognosis; (b) the risks and benefits of all available treatment options; (c) novel therapeutic approaches and how the patient can get access to these treatments. Last but not least, he has to recommend a treatment. This paper tries to discuss each of these issues. PMID:20628485

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  6. Reprint of: Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Paresh; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Craddock, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an increasingly important treatment option in the management of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The major causes of treatment failure remain disease relapse and treatment toxicity. In this review, Dr Vyas presents an overview of important recent data defining molecular factors associated with treatment failure in AML. He also identifies the emerging importance of leukemia stem cell biology in determining both response to therapy and relapse risk in AML. Dr Appelbaum discusses advances in the design and delivery of both myeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, highlighting novel strategies with the potential to improve outcome. Dr Craddock discusses the development of both novel conditioning regimens and post-transplantation strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease relapse.

  7. [Chronic myeloid leukemia: "archetype" of the impact of targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Nasr, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a chronic blood disorder characterized by a reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, leading to the creation of a chimeric gene encoding the BCR-ABL fusion protein with a constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. Although long known as a disease with an inexorable progression to acute leukemia, CML history has been significantly improved by the use of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Imatinib has revolutionized the treatment of CML by transforming it from an invariably fatal disease to a chronic but manageable condition. In fact, the discovery of this class of targeted therapy had an impact not only on the survival of CML patients but also on other scientific and medical fields. This review illustrates the impact of imatinib, the first example of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the treatment of CML, on the treatment of other cancers, the impact on health systems and on the scientific research in general.

  8. Incidence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Fianchi, Luana; Voso, Maria Teresa; Caira, Morena; Leone, Giuseppe; Pagano, Livio

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients. PMID:22220266

  9. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations prime the all-trans retinoic acid myeloid differentiation pathway in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Boutzen, Héléna; Saland, Estelle; Larrue, Clément; de Toni, Fabienne; Gales, Lara; Castelli, Florence A.; Cathebas, Mathilde; Zaghdoudi, Sonia; Stuani, Lucille; Kaoma, Tony; Riscal, Romain; Yang, Guangli; Hirsch, Pierre; David, Marion; De Mas-Mansat, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Vallar, Laurent; Delhommeau, François; Jouanin, Isabelle; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Le Cam, Laurent; Linares, Laetitia K.; Junot, Christophe; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vergez, François; Récher, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of malignant blasts with impaired differentiation programs caused by recurrent mutations, such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations found in 15% of AML patients. These mutations result in the production of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), leading to a hypermethylation phenotype that dysregulates hematopoietic differentiation. In this study, we identified mutant R132H IDH1-specific gene signatures regulated by key transcription factors, particularly CEBPα, involved in myeloid differentiation and retinoid responsiveness. We show that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at clinically achievable doses markedly enhanced terminal granulocytic differentiation in AML cell lines, primary patient samples, and a xenograft mouse model carrying mutant IDH1. Moreover, treatment with a cell-permeable form of 2-HG sensitized wild-type IDH1 AML cells to ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation, whereas inhibition of 2-HG production significantly reduced ATRA effects in mutant IDH1 cells. ATRA treatment specifically decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis of mutant IDH1 blasts in vitro. ATRA also reduced tumor burden of mutant IDH1 AML cells xenografted in NOD–Scid–IL2rγnull mice and markedly increased overall survival, revealing a potent antileukemic effect of ATRA in the presence of IDH1 mutation. This therapeutic strategy holds promise for this AML patient subgroup in future clinical studies. PMID:26951332

  11. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  12. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  13. Ceramide as a Target of Marine Triterpene Glycosides for Treatment of Human Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Shin, Sung-Won; Stonik, Valentin A.; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous myeloid clonal disorder exhibiting the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Standard AML therapy requires intensive combination chemotherapy, which leads to significant treatment-related toxicity. The search for new, low toxic marine agents, inducing the generation of ceramide in leukemic cells is a new approach to improve the therapy of leukemia. This review focuses on the metabolism of sphingolipids, the role of ceramide in treating leukemia, and the antitumor activity, related to ceramide metabolism, of some marine metabolites, particularly stichoposides, triterpene glycosides extracted from sea cucumbers of the family Stichopodiidae. PMID:27827870

  14. Familial Aggregation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goldin, Lynn R.; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Liang, Xueying Sharon; Derolf, Åsa R.; Landgren, Ola; Björkholm, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Apart from rare pedigrees with multiple cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there is limited data on familial aggregation of AML and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in the population. Patients and Methods Swedish population-based registry data were used to evaluate risk of AML, MDS, and other malignancies among 24,573 first-degree relatives of 6,962 patients with AML and 1,388 patients with MDS compared with 106,224 first-degree relatives of matched controls. We used a marginal survival model to calculate familial aggregation. Results AML and/or MDS did not aggregate significantly in relatives of patients with AML. There was a modest risk ratio (RR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.9 to 1.8) in myeloproliferative/myeloid malignancies combined. The risks for any hematologic or any solid tumor were modestly but significantly increased. Relatives of patients with MDS did not show an increased risk for any hematologic tumors. In contrast, we found a significantly increased risk (RR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 38.0) of AML/MDS and of all myeloid malignancies combined (RR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 9.8) among relatives of patients diagnosed at younger than age 21 years. Conclusion We did not find evidence for familial aggregation of the severe end of the spectrum of myeloid malignancies (AML and MDS). The risks of myeloproliferative neoplasms were modestly increased with trends toward significance, suggesting a possible role of inheritance. In contrast, although limited in sample size, relatives of young patients with AML were at increased risk of AML/MDS, suggesting that germline genes may play a stronger role in these patients. The increased risk of all hematologic malignancies and of solid tumors among relatives of patients with AML suggests that genes for malignancy in general and/or other environmental factors may be shared. PMID:22162584

  15. Novel drugs for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Montalban-Bravo, G; Garcia-Manero, G

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second most common form of leukemia and the most frequent cause of leukemia-related deaths in the United States. The incidence of AML increases with advancing age and the prognosis for patients with AML worsens substantially with increasing age. Many older patients are ineligible for intensive treatment and require other therapeutic approaches to optimize clinical outcome. To address this treatment gap, novel agents with varying mechanisms of action targeting different cellular processes are currently in development. Hypomethylating agents (azacitidine, decitabine, SGI-110), histone deacetylase inhibitors (vorinostat, pracinostat, panobinostat), FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 inhibitors (quizartinib, sorafenib, midostaurin, crenolanib), cytotoxic agents (clofarabine, sapacitabine, vosaroxin), cell cycle inhibitors (barasertib, volasertib, rigosertib) and monoclonal antibodies (gentuzumab ozogamicin, lintuzumab-Ac225) represent some of these promising new treatments. This review provides an overview of novel agents that have either completed or are currently in ongoing phase III trials in patients with previously untreated AML for whom intensive treatment is not an option. Other potential drugs in earlier stages of development will also be addressed in this review.

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mussai, Francis; De Santo, Carmela; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Booth, Sarah; Quek, Lynn; McEwen-Smith, Rosanna M.; Qureshi, Amrana; Dazzi, Francesco; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and the second most common frequent leukemia of childhood. Patients may present with lymphopenia or pancytopenia at diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms by which AML causes pancytopenia and suppresses patients’ immune response. This study identified for the first time that AML blasts alter the immune microenvironment through enhanced arginine metabolism. Arginase II is expressed and released from AML blasts and is present at high concentrations in the plasma of patients with AML, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation. We extended these results by demonstrating an arginase-dependent ability of AML blasts to polarize surrounding monocytes into a suppressive M2-like phenotype in vitro and in engrafted nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In addition, AML blasts can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of murine granulocyte-monocyte progenitors and human CD34+ progenitors. Finally, the study showed that the immunosuppressive activity of AML blasts can be modulated through small-molecule inhibitors of arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in AML. The results strongly support the hypothesis that AML creates an immunosuppressive microenvironment that contributes to the pancytopenia observed at diagnosis. PMID:23733335

  17. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Case of Extreme Thrombocytosis Causing Syncope and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Brittany; Kadhem, Salam; Truong, Quoc

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a hematologic malignancy characterized by unregulated growth of myelogenous leukocytes, typically presents with symptoms of fatigue, anorexia, and splenomegaly. Laboratory studies often reveal a significant leukocytosis with neutrophilia. A moderate thrombocytosis may be present, but is not usually problematic. The following case discusses a patient who presented with syncope, a convulsive episode, and non ST-segment myocardial infarction secondary to symptomatic thrombocytosis of 2.5 million cells/microL. She was treated with plateletpheresis and subsequently experienced resolution of symptoms. Ultimately, a diagnosis of CML with an atypical presentation of the disease was identified in this patient. PMID:27004153

  18. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    PubMed

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  19. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ESPíRITO SANTO, ANA ESPÍRITO; CHACIM, SÉRGIO; FERREIRA, ISABEL; LEITE, LUÍS; MOREIRA, CLAUDIA; PEREIRA, DULCINEIA; DANTAS BRITO, MARGARIDA DANTAS; NUNES, MARTA; DOMINGUES, NELSON; OLIVEIRA, ISABEL; MOREIRA, ILÍDIA; MARTINS, ANGELO; VITERBO, LUÍSA; MARIZ, JOSÉ MÁRIO; MEDEIROS, RUI

    2016-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients. PMID:27347135

  20. Effect of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia on the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    ESPíRITO Santo, Ana Espírito; Chacim, Sérgio; Ferreira, Isabel; Leite, Luís; Moreira, Claudia; Pereira, Dulcineia; Dantas Brito, Margarida Dantas; Nunes, Marta; Domingues, Nelson; Oliveira, Isabel; Moreira, Ilídia; Martins, Angelo; Viterbo, Luísa; Mariz, José Mário; Medeiros, Rui

    2016-07-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) is a rare and almost always fatal late side effect of antineoplastic treatment involving chemotherapy, radiotherapy or the two combined. The present retrospective study intended to characterize t-AML patients that were diagnosed and treated in a single referral to an oncological institution in North Portugal. Over the past 10 years, 231 cases of AML were diagnosed and treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, of which 38 t-AML cases were identified. Data regarding the patient demographics, primary diagnosis and treatment, age at onset of therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, latency time of the neoplasm, cytogenetic characteristics, AML therapy and outcome were collected from medical records. A previous diagnosis with solid tumors was present in 28 patients, and 10 patients possessed a history of hematological conditions, all a lymphoproliferative disorder. Breast cancer was the most frequent solid tumor identified (39.5% of all solid tumors diagnosed). The mean latency time was 3 years. In the present study, t-AML patients were older (P<0.001) and more frequently carried cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.009) compared with de novo AML patients. The overall survival time was observed to be significantly poorer among individuals with t-AML (P<0.001). However, in younger patients (age, <50 years) there was no difference between the overall survival time of patients with t-AML and those with de novo AML (P=0.983). Additionally, patients with promyelocytic leukemia possess a good prognosis, even when AML occurs as a secondary event (P=0.98). To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to evaluate t-AML in Portugal and the results are consistent with the data published previously in other populations. The present study concludes that although t-AML demonstrates a poor prognosis, this is not observed among younger patients or promyelocytic leukemia patients.

  1. Normal karyotype is a poor prognostic factor in myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome: a retrospective, international study.

    PubMed

    Blink, Marjolein; Zimmermann, Martin; von Neuhoff, Christine; Reinhardt, Dirk; de Haas, Valerie; Hasle, Henrik; O'Brien, Maureen M; Stark, Batia; Tandonnet, Julie; Pession, Andrea; Tousovska, Katerina; Cheuk, Daniel K L; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Haltrich, Iren; Balwierz, Walentyna; Pieters, Rob; Forestier, Erik; Johansson, Bertil; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2014-02-01

    Myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome has a better prognosis than sporadic pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. Most cases of myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome are characterized by additional cytogenetic changes besides the constitutional trisomy 21, but their potential prognostic impact is not known. We, therefore, conducted an international retrospective study of clinical characteristics, cytogenetics, treatment, and outcome of 451 children with myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome. All karyotypes were centrally reviewed before assigning patients to subgroups. The overall 7-year event-free survival for the entire cohort was 78% (± 2%), with the overall survival rate being 79% (± 2%), the cumulative incidence of relapse 12% (± 2%), and the cumulative incidence of toxic death 7% (± 1%). Outcome estimates showed large differences across the different cytogenetic subgroups. Based on the cumulative incidence of relapse, we could risk-stratify patients into two groups: cases with a normal karyotype (n=103) with a higher cumulative incidence of relapse (21%± 4%) than cases with an aberrant karyotype (n=255) with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 9% (± 2%) (P=0.004). Multivariate analyses revealed that white blood cell count ≥ 20 × 10(9)/L and age >3 years were independent predictors for poor event-free survival, while normal karyotype independently predicted inferior overall survival, event-free survival, and relapse-free survival. In conclusion, this study showed large differences in outcome within patients with myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome and identified novel prognostic groups that predicted clinical outcome and hence may be used for stratification in future treatment protocols.

  2. Ciprofloxacin versus colistin prophylaxis during neutropenia in acute myeloid leukemia: two parallel patient cohorts treated in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Pohlen, Michele; Marx, Julia; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Schliemann, Christoph; Lenz, Georg; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Büchner, Thomas; Krug, Utz; Stelljes, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Peters, Georg; Gerth, Hans U.; Görlich, Dennis; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia are at high risk for bacterial infections during therapy-related neutropenia. However, the use of specific antibiotic regimens for prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenic acute myeloid leukemia patients is controversial. We report a retrospective evaluation of 172 acute myeloid leukemia patients who received 322 courses of myelosuppressive chemotherapy and had an expected duration of neutropenia of more than seven days. The patients were allocated to antibiotic prophylaxis groups and treated with colistin or ciprofloxacin through 2 different hematologic services at our hospital, as available. The infection rate was reduced from 88.6% to 74.2% through antibiotic prophylaxis (vs. without prophylaxis; P=0.04). A comparison of both antibiotic drugs revealed a trend towards fewer infections associated with ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (69.2% vs. 79.5% in the colistin group; P=0.07), as determined by univariate analysis. This result was confirmed through multivariate analysis (OR: 0.475, 95%CI: 0.236–0.958; P=0.041). The prophylactic agents did not differ with regard to the microbiological findings (P=0.6, not significant). Of note, the use of ciprofloxacin was significantly associated with an increased rate of infections with pathogens that are resistant to the antibiotic used for prophylaxis (79.5% vs. 9.5% in the colistin group; P<0.0001). The risk factors for higher infection rates were the presence of a central venous catheter (P<0.0001), mucositis grade III/IV (P=0.0039), and induction/relapse courses (vs. consolidation; P<0.0001). In conclusion, ciprofloxacin prophylaxis appears to be of particular benefit during induction and relapse chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. To prevent and control drug resistance, it may be safely replaced by colistin during consolidation cycles of acute myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:27470601

  3. Molecular study of the interferon genes in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Larripa, I; Giere, I; Slavutsky, I; Diaz, M

    1995-08-01

    The interferons alpha, beta, and w (IFNA, IFNB, IFNW), are a family of genes that have been mapped on the short arm of chromosome 9 (9p21-22). Deletions of genetic material on 9p are frequently observed in hematological diseases, particularly in lymphoid neoplasias. In this paper we have performed the molecular studies of IFNA and IFNB genes in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in order to determine if the deletions of these genes are prevalent in this pathology. Forty CML patients, Philadelphia positive or with BCR/ABL rearrangement, were studied at diagnosis. The analysis of IFNA and IFNB genes was performed by Southern and dot blot techniques. Homozygous or hemizygous deletions of IFNA and IFNB genes could not be detected, indicating that deletions of these genes would not be present or would be a very infrequent event in the chronic phase of the CML patients.

  4. The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

  5. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-12-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 MAPK-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure.

  6. Acquired pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, A M; Pathare, A V; Dennison, D; Raeburn, J A

    2009-01-01

    Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 involving the qh region is relatively common as a constitutional genetic aberration without any apparent phenotypic consequences. However, it has not been established as an acquired abnormality in cancer. Among the three patients reported so far in the literature with acquired inv(9), only one had acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we describe an unique case where both chromosomes 9 presented with an acquired pericentric inversion with breakpoints at 9p13 and 9q12 respectively, in a AML patient with aberrant CD7 and CD9 positivity. Additionally, one der(9) also showed short arm deletion at 9p21 to the centromeric region and including the p16 gene. The constitutional karyotype was normal. This is probably the first report describing an acquired inv(9) involving both chromosomes 9 in AML. The possible significance of this inversion is discussed.

  7. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  8. Future prospects of therapeutic clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maliha; Mansoor, Armaghan-E-Rehman; Kadia, Tapan M

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a markedly heterogeneous hematological malignancy that is most commonly seen in elderly adults. The response to current therapies to AML is quite variable, and very few new drugs have been recently approved for use in AML. This review aims to discuss the issues with current trial design for AML therapies, including trial end points, patient enrollment, cost of drug discovery and patient heterogeneity. We also discuss the future directions in AML therapeutics, including intensification of conventional therapy and new drug delivery mechanisms; targeted agents, including epigenetic therapies, cell cycle regulators, hypomethylating agents and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy; and detail of the possible agents that may be incorporated into the treatment of AML in the future.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia and diabetes insipidus with monosomy 7.

    PubMed

    Harb, Antoine; Tan, Wei; Wilding, Gregory E; Battiwalla, Minoo; Sait, Sheila N J; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir

    2009-04-15

    The predisposition of monosomy 7 to diabetes insipidus (DI) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) led us to ask whether AML associated with monosomy 7 and DI will differ from AML associated with other karyotype aberrations and DI and whether the outcome of patients with AML and DI will differ from those without DI. We describe 2 patients from Roswell Park Cancer Institute and discuss 29 additional cases from the literature. AML with monosomy 7 and DI (n = 25) had a trend towards a lower complete remission (p = 0.0936) and worse survival (p = 0.0480) than AML with other karyotype changes and DI (n = 6). Further, AML with monosomy 7 and DI had worse complete remission rate and overall survival than AML with monosomy 7 but without DI. In conclusion, it appears that AML with monosomy 7 and DI is a disease entity with specifically poor outcome.

  10. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  11. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia with TP53-independent vosaroxin.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher B; Ravandi, Farhad

    2017-01-01

    Vosaroxin is a quinolone compound that intercalates DNA and induces TP53-independent apoptosis, demonstrating activity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Phase I-III trials. Here, we examine vosaroxin's mechanism of action and pharmacology, and we review its use in AML to date, focusing on details of individual clinical trials. Most recently, when combined with cytarabine in a randomized Phase III trial (VALOR), vosaroxin improved outcomes versus cytarabine alone for relapsed/refractory AML in patients older than 60 years and for patients in early relapse. We consider its continued role in the context of a multifaceted strategy against AML, including its current use in clinical trials. Prospective use will define its role in the evolving landscape of AML therapy.

  12. Phytosphingosine promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Hee; Kim, Jusong; Her, Yerim; Seong, Ikjoo; Park, Sera; Bhattarai, Deepak; Jin, Guanghai; Lee, Kyeong; Chung, Gukhoon; Hwang, Sungkee; Bae, Yun Soo; Kim, Jaesang

    2015-01-01

    We report that phytosphingosine, a sphingolipid found in many organisms and implicated in cellular signaling, promotes megakaryocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Specifically, phytosphingosine induced several hallmark changes associated with megakaryopoiesis from K562 and HEL cells including cell cycle arrest, cell size increase and polyploidization. We also confirmed that cell type specific markers of megakaryocytes, CD41a and CD42b are induced by phytosphingosine. Phospholipids with highly similar structures were unable to induce similar changes, indicating that the activity of phytosphingosine is highly specific. Although phytosphingosine is known to activate p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated apoptosis, the signaling mechanisms involved in megakaryopoiesis appear to be distinct. In sum, we present another model for dissecting molecular details of megakaryocytic differentiation which in large part remains obscure. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 691-695] PMID:26077028

  13. The increasing genomic complexity of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    Therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is impacted by the increasing genomic complexity of the disease. Multiple targets as expressed by genetics and mutations and the relationships between them add another layer of intricacy to the prognosis and treatment of the disease. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the interactions between mutations are of utmost importance, particularly from a prognostic standpoint. For example, inv(16) or 6(16; 16) AML frequently involves a second genetic lesion that significantly impacts prognosis. In addition, epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation, are becoming increasingly integrated into the genetic landscape and may also have prognostic impact. Despite increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic aspects of AML, the outcome for AML patients has not changed significantly. Until it does, further inquiry into the genomic complexity of the disease and advances in drug development are needed.

  14. Management of older or unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Estey, E H

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults, for whom optimal treatment strategies remain controversial. Because of the concern for therapeutic resistance and, in particular, excessive toxicity or even treatment-related mortality, many older or medically unfit patients do not receive AML-directed therapy. Yet, evidence suggests that outcomes are improved if essentially all of these patients are offered AML therapy, ideally at a specialized cancer center. Medical fitness for tolerating intensive chemotherapy can be estimated relatively accurately with multiparameter assessment tools; this information should serve as basis for the assignment to intensive or non-intensive therapy. Until our accuracy in predicting the success of individual therapies improves, all patients should be considered for participation in a randomized controlled trial. Comparisons between individual trials will be facilitated once standardized, improved response criteria are developed, and standard treatment approaches have been defined against which novel therapies can be tested.

  15. Novel Prognostic and Therapeutic Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    MEDINGER, MICHAEL; LENGERKE, CLAUDIA; PASSWEG, JAKOB

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence increases with age. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for treatment after induction therapy. The post-induction treatment is dependent on risk stratification. Despite rapid advances in determination of gene mutations involved in the pathophysiology and biology of AML, and the rapid development of new drugs, treatment improvements changed slowly over the past 30 years, with the majority of patients eventually experiencing relapse and dying of their disease. Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the best chance of cure for patients with intermediate- or high-risk disease. This review gives an overview about advances in prognostic markers and novel treatment options for AML, focusing on new prognostic and probably therapeutic mutations, and novel drug therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27566651

  16. Pharmacogenomics and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Bosó, Virginia; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous malignancy that is primarily treated with combinations of cytarabine and anthracyclines. Although this scheme remains effective in most of the patients, variability of outcomes in patients has been partly related with their genetic variability. Several pharmacogenetic studies have analyzed the impact of polymorphisms in genes encoding transporters, metabolizers or molecular targets of chemotherapy agents. A systematic review on all eligible studies was carried out in order to estimate the effect of polymorphisms of anthracyclines and cytarabine pathways on efficacy and toxicity of AML treatment. Other emerging genes recently studied in AML, such as DNA repair genes, genes potentially related to chemotherapy response or AML prognosis, have also been included.

  17. Targeting prohibitins induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Helena; Palmeri, Claudia M; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Gamundi, Enric; Arnan, Montserrat; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; González-Barca, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    Fluorizoline is a new synthetic molecule that induces apoptosis by selectively targeting prohibitins (PHBs). In this study, the pro-apoptotic effect of fluorizoline was assessed in two cell lines and 21 primary samples from patients with debut of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Fluorizoline induced apoptosis in AML cells at concentrations in the low micromolar range. All primary samples were sensitive to fluorizoline irrespectively of patients' clinical or genetic features. In addition, fluorizoline inhibited the clonogenic capacity and induced differentiation of AML cells. Fluorizoline increased the mRNA and protein levels of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member NOXA both in cell lines and primary samples analyzed. These results suggest that targeting PHBs could be a new therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:27542247

  18. Myelogenous Leukemia in Adult Inbred MHC Defined Miniature Swine: a model for human myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Patricia S.; Teague, Alexander G.S.; Fishman, Brian; Fishman, Aaron S.; Hanekamp, John S.; Moran, Shannon G.; Wikiel, Krzysztof J.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Lo, Diana P.; Duggan, Michael; Arn, J. Scott; Billiter, Bob; Horner, Ben; Houser, Stuart; Yeap, Beow Yong; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; McMorrow, Isabel M.; Sachs, David H.; Bronson, Roderick T; Huang, Christene A.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript reports on five cases of spontaneous myelogenous leukemia, similar to human disease, occurring within highly inbred, histocompatible sublines of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) MHC-defined miniature swine. In cases where a neoplasm was suspected based on clinical observations, samples were obtained for complete blood count, peripheral blood smear, and flow cytometric analysis. Animals confirmed to have neoplasms were euthanized and underwent necropsy. Histological samples were obtained from abnormal tissues and suspect lesions. The phenotype of the malignancies was assessed by flow cytometric analysis of processed peripheral blood mononuclear cells and affected tissues. Five cases of spontaneous myeloid leukemia were identified in adult animals older than 30 months of age. All animals presented with symptoms of weight loss, lethargy, and marked leukocytosis. At autopsy, all animals had systemic disease involvement and presented with severe hepatosplenomegaly. Three of the five myelogenous leukemias have successfully been expanded in vitro. The clustered incidence of disease in this closed herd suggests that genetic factors may be contributing to disease development. Myelogenous leukemia cell lines established from inbred sublines of MGH MHC-defined miniature swine have the potential to be utilized as a model to evaluate therapies of human leukemia. PMID:20079939

  19. Sense and nonsense of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Löwenberg, Bob

    2013-01-03

    High-dose cytarabine applied during remission induction or as consolidation after attainment of a complete remission has become an established element in the treatment of adults with acute myeloid leukemia. Recent evidence has challenged the need for these exceptionally high-dose levels of cytarabine. In this review, we present a reappraisal of the usefulness of high-dose cytarabine for acute myeloid leukemia treatment.

  20. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  1. Beginning treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: the family connection.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Paton, Mary Anne; Huff, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    There is a loud silence on psycho-oncology research in relation to pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). This article is part of a series that begins to address the psycho-social hiatus. The present article documents the less obvious, often hidden, aspect of beginning treatment for pediatric AML--the "behind the scenes" experience of the home and family connection. The findings are from the first stage of a five year longitudinal study that examines through qualitative research the experience of childhood leukemia from the perspective of the child, siblings and parents. Open-ended interviews, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, were thematically analyzed with the assistance of the Non-numerical Unstructured Data by processes of Indexing Searching and Theory-building (NUD*IST) computer program. The findings emphasize the disruption to normalcy in relation to home life, school, and work, which is exacerbated for families who relocate for specialist treatment. The findings emphasise the need for support for families coping with childhood AML.

  2. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  3. Incorporating FLT3 inhibitors into acute myeloid leukemia treatment regimens

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith; Levis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    FMS-Like-Tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) mutations are found in about 30% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia and confer an increased relapse rate and reduced overall survival. Targeting of this tyrosine kinase by direction inhibition is the focus of both preclinical and clinical research in AML. Several molecules in clinical development inhibit FLT3 with varying degrees of specificity. Preclinical models suggest that these compounds enhance the cytotoxicity of conventional chemotherapeutics against FLT3 mutant leukemia cells. The pharmacodynamic interactions between FLT3 inhibitors and chemotherapy appear to be sequence dependent. When the FLT3 inhibitor is used prior to chemotherapy, antagonism is displayed, while if FLT3 inhibition is instituted after to exposure to chemotherapy, synergistic cytotoxicity is seen. The combination of FLT3 inhibitors with chemotherapy is also complicated by potential pharmacokinetic obstacles, such as plasma protein binding and p-glycoprotein interactions. Ongoing and future studies are aimed at incorporating FLT3 inhibitors into conventional induction and consolidation therapy specifically for patients with FLT3 mutant AML. PMID:18452067

  4. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia risk by industry and occupation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Rebecca J; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Schumacher, Pam; Cress, Rosemary D; Deapen, Dennis M; Calvert, Geoffrey M

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia found in adults. Identifying jobs that pose a risk for AML may be useful for identifying new risk factors. A matched case-control analysis was conducted using California Cancer Registry data from 1988 to 2007. This study included 8999 cases of AML and 24 822 controls. Industries with a statistically significant increased AML risk were construction (matched odds ratio [mOR] = 1.13); crop production (mOR = 1.41); support activities for agriculture and forestry (mOR = 2.05); and animal slaughtering and processing (mOR = 2.09). Among occupations with a statistically significant increased AML risk were miscellaneous agricultural workers (mOR = 1.76); fishers and related fishing workers (mOR = 2.02); nursing, psychiatric and home health aides (mOR = 1.65); and janitors and building cleaners (mOR = 1.54). Further investigation is needed to confirm study findings and to identify specific exposures responsible for the increased risks.

  6. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  7. Systematic review of dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Salaroli, Adriano; Molica, Matteo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Dasatinib is a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor active against ABL and Src family kinases, and is approved for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in chronic, accelerated, or blast phase with resistance or intolerance to imatinib therapy, for newly diagnosed chronic phase patients, and for adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia who have become resistant to or intolerant of other treatments. This review presents clinical data regarding different trials involving CML patients in different phases of the disease. Six-year follow-up of the Phase III dose-optimization study are described, showing overall survival of 71% with the current approved dose of 100 mg once daily. Three-year results of the randomized Phase III DASISION (DASatinib vs Imatinib Study In Treatment-Naïve CML patients) trial confirmed that dasatinib 100 mg once daily was superior to standard-dose imatinib in terms of achieving a faster and deeper molecular response, with similar activity regardless of baseline prognostic score.

  8. FLT3 inhibitors: clinical potential in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Marie-Anne; Green, Alexa S; Maciel, Thiago T; Moura, Ivan C; Leung, Anskar Y; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy that is cured in as few as 15%–40% of cases. Tremendous improvements in AML prognostication arose from a comprehensive analysis of leukemia cell genomes. Among normal karyotype AML cases, mutations in the FLT3 gene are the ones most commonly detected as having a deleterious prognostic impact. FLT3 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, and alterations of the FLT3 gene such as internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD) deregulate FLT3 downstream signaling pathways in favor of increased cell proliferation and survival. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) emerged as a new therapeutic option in FLT3-ITD AML, and clinical trials are ongoing with a variety of TKI either alone, combined with chemotherapy, or even as maintenance after allogenic stem cell transplantation. However, a wide range of molecular resistance mechanisms are activated upon TKI therapy, thus limiting their clinical impact. Massive research efforts are now ongoing to develop more efficient FLT3 TKI and/or new therapies targeting these resistance mechanisms to improve the prognosis of FLT3-ITD AML patients in the future. PMID:28223820

  9. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Keasey, Nikki; Loughran, Thomas P.; Claxton, David F.

    2017-01-01

    A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1), undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated “repressed” chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb) genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes) are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations. PMID:28301528

  10. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  11. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hoi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Yan; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2, D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. PMID:19887046

  12. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure.

  13. Identification of ILK as a novel therapeutic target for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Weisberg, Ellen; Muz, Barbara; Nonami, Atsushi; Luderer, Micah; Stone, Richard M; Melo, Junia V; Griffin, James D; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-09

    Current treatment options as well as clinical efficacy are limited for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In response to the pressing need for more efficacious treatment approaches and strategies to override drug resistance in advanced stage CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML, we investigated the effects of inhibition of ILK as a potentially novel and effective approach to treatment of these challenging malignancies. Using the small molecule ILK inhibitor, Cpd22, and ILK knockdown, we investigated the importance of ILK in the growth and viability of leukemia. Our results suggest that the ILK inhibition may be an effective treatment for CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML as a single therapy, with ILK expression levels positively correlating with the efficacy of ILK inhibition. The identification of ILK as a novel target for leukemia therapy warrants further investigation as a therapeutic approach that could be of potential clinical benefit in both acute and chronic myeloid leukemias.

  14. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  15. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Cryptic collagen IV promotes cell migration and adhesion in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Amanda J; Vary, Calvin P H; Brooks, Peter C; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we showed that discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a class of collagen-activated receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was highly upregulated on bone marrow (BM)-derived CD33+ leukemic blasts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Herein as DDR1 is a class of collagen-activated RTK, we attempt to understand the role of native and remodeled collagen IV in BM microenvironment and its functional significance in leukemic cells. Exposure to denatured collagen IV significantly increased the migration and adhesion of K562 cells, which also resulted in increased activation of DDR1 and AKT. Further, levels of MMP9 were increased in conditioned media (CM) of denatured collagen IV exposed cells. Mass spectrometric liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry QSTAR proteomic analysis revealed exclusive presence of Secretogranin 3 and InaD-like protein in the denatured collagen IV CM. Importantly, BM samples of AML patients exhibited increased levels of remodeled collagen IV compared to native as analyzed via anti-HUIV26 antibody. Taken together, for the first time, we demonstrate that remodeled collagen IV is a potent activator of DDR1 and AKT that also modulates both migration and adhesion of myeloid leukemia cells. Additionally, high levels of the HUIV26 cryptic collagen IV epitope are expressed in BM of AML patients. Further understanding of this phenomenon may lead to the development of therapeutic agents that directly modulate the BM microenvironment and attenuate leukemogenesis.

  17. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios.

  18. Exogenous IL-33 overcomes T cell tolerance in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Dominguez, Donye; Chen, Siqi; Fan, Jie; Long, Alan; Zhang, Minghui; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Yi; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies suggest that dominant peripheral tolerance is a major mechanism of immune escape in disseminated leukemia. Using an established murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, we here show that systemic administration of recombinant IL-33 dramatically inhibits the leukemia growth and prolongs the survival of leukemia-bearing mice in a CD8+ T cell dependent manner. Exogenous IL-33 treatment enhanced anti-leukemia activity by increasing the expansion and IFN-γ production of leukemia-reactive CD8+ T cells. Moreover, IL-33 promoted dendritic cell (DC) maturation and activation in favor of its cross presentation ability to evoke a vigorous anti-leukemia immune response. Finally, we found that the combination of PD-1 blockade with IL-33 further prolonged the survival, with half of the mice achieving complete regression. Our data establish a role of exogenous IL-33 in reversing T cell tolerance, and suggest its potential clinical implication into leukemia immunotherapy. PMID:27517629

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advancements in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zheng, Hu-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Among all subtypes, a lack of consensus exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patient survival rates have remained modest for the past three decades in AML. Recently, targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research papers on diagnostic development, target therapy, and other novel therapies of AML. Clinical trial information was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov. For the major purpose of this review that is to outline the latest therapeutic development of AML, we only listed the ongoing clinical trials for reference. However, the published results of complete clinical trials were also mentioned. Study Selection: This article reviewed the latest developments related to the diagnosis and treatment of AML. In the first portion, we provided some novel insights on the molecular basis of AML, as well as provided an update on the classification of AML. In the second portion, we summarized the results of research on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. We will also highlight ongoing research and clinical trials in pediatric AML. Results: We described clonal evolution and how it changes our view on leukemogenesis, treatment responses, and disease relapse. Pediatric-specific genomic mapping was discussed with a novel diagnostic method highlighted. In the later portion of this review, we summarized the researches on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/FLT3 inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. Conclusion: Gene sequencing techniques should set the basis for next-generation diagnostic

  20. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation. PMID:26622774

  1. Lipidomic approach for stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Stefanko, Adam; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; Simons, Kai; Grzybek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis and progression of many tumors, including hematologic malignancies is highly dependent on enhanced lipogenesis. De novo fatty-acid synthesis permits accelerated proliferation of tumor cells by providing membrane components but these may also alter physicochemical properties of lipid bilayers, which can impact signaling or even increase drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer type-specific lipid profiles would permit us to monitor and interpret actual effects of lipid changes, potential fingerprints of individual tumors to be explored as diagnostic markers. We have used the shotgun MS approach to identify lipid patterns in different types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients that either show no karyotype change or belong to t(8;21) or inv16 types. Differences in lipidomes of t(8;21) and inv(16) patients, as compared to AML patients without karyotype change, presented mostly as substantial modulation of ceramide/sphingolipid synthesis. Furthermore, between the t(8;21) and all other patients we observed significant changes in physicochemical membrane properties. These were related to a marked alteration in lipid saturation levels. The discovered differences in lipid profiles of various AML types improve our understanding of the pathobiochemical pathways involved and may serve in the development of diagnostic tools. PMID:28207743

  2. [Cytarabine and skin reactions in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Grille, Sofía; Guadagna, Regina; Boada, Matilde; Irigoin, Victoria; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Díaz, Lilián

    2013-01-01

    Cytarabine is an antimetabolite used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has many adverse effects as: myelosuppression, toxic reactions involving central nervous system, liver, gastrointestinal tract, eyes or skin. Dermatologic toxicity is often described as rare; nevertheless there are differences in the reported frequency. We performed a retrospective study including all AML treated with chemotherapy that involved cytarabine between 1st July of 2006 and 1st July of 2012; 46 patients were included with a median age of 55 years. The overall incidence of skin reactions was 39% (n = 18). Sex, age, history of atopy, history of drug reactions, or dose of cytarabine used, were not associated with them. Skin reactions were observed from 2 to 8 days after treatment started. Considering injury degree: 27.8% had grade 1, 38.9% grade 2 and 33.3% grade 3. We did not find any injury grade 4 or death associated with skin toxicity. As for the type of injury: 55.6% presented macules, 22.2% papules and 22.2% erythema. Lesions distribution was diffuse in 52% of patients, acral in 39.3%, and at flexural level in 8.7%. Adverse cutaneous reactions secondary to the administration of cytarabine are frequent in our service and include some cases with severe involvement. Although these reactions usually resolve spontaneously, they determine an increased risk of infection and a compromise of the patient quality of life.

  3. Patient empowerment in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Melanie

    2014-04-01

    Patient empowerment is a patient-centered approach to care in which healthcare providers nurture patients' innate abilities to self-manage and incorporate patient goals for therapy into the overall management plan. Standard care of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires lifelong medication with oral therapy and regular follow-up. The success of CML treatment, therefore, depends on a high degree of patient involvement and motivation, as well as strong collaboration between patients and healthcare providers. Oncology nurses can support patients with CML from the time of diagnosis to the end of treatment to ensure they maintain high levels of involvement in their care. At the author's center, patients who most actively collaborate with their physicians in treatment decisions take personal responsibility for the quality of their care and show good adherence to treatment. In the current article, the author discusses the potential effect of patient response to cancer diagnosis on clinical outlook and describes strategies in place at the cancer center to ensure that patients diagnosed with CML have the best chance at keeping their cancer under control.

  4. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  6. Immunotherapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: present state and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Vonka, Vladimír

    2010-03-01

    In spite of the considerable successes that have been achieved in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), cure for the disease can only be obtained by the present means in a rather small minority of patients. During the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the immunology of CML, which has raised hopes that this disease may be curable by supplementing the current targeted chemotherapy with immunotherapeutic approaches. More than ten small-scale clinical trials have been carried out with experimental vaccines predominantly based on the p210bcr-abl fusion protein. Their results suggested beneficial effects in some patients. Recent data obtained in human patients as well as in animal models indicate that the p210bcr-abl protein does not carry the immunodominant epitope(s). These observations, combined with the recognition of an ever increasing number of other immunogenic proteins in CML cells, strongly support the concept that gene-modified, cell-based vaccines containing the full spectrum of tumor antigens might be the most effective immunotherapeutic approach. Recently created mathematical models have provided important leads for the timing of the combination of targeted drug therapy with vaccine administration. A strategy of how targeted drug therapy might be combined with vaccination is outlined.

  7. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  8. Recent discoveries in molecular characterization of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khasawneh, Mohamad K; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2014-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically heterogeneous disease, yet it is one of the most molecularly well-characterized cancers. Risk stratification of patients currently involves determination of the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities in combination with molecular genetic testing in a few genes. Several new recurrent genetic molecular abnormalities have recently been identified, including TET2, ASXL1, IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, and PHF6. Mutational analyses have identified that patients with DNMT3A or NPM1 mutations or MLL translocation have improved overall survival with high-dose chemotherapy. Mutational profiling can refine prognostication, particularly for patients in the intermediate-risk group or with a normal karyotype. CD25 expression status improves prognostic risk classification in AML independent of established biomarkers. Biomarkers such as 2- hydroxyglutarate in IDH1/2-mutant AML patients predict patient responses and minimal residual disease. These recent discoveries are being incorporated into our existing molecular risk stratification as well as the exploration of new therapeutics directed to these molecular targets.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  11. TP53 mutations in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Iba, Sachiko; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Tokuda, Masutaka; Morishima, Satoko; Kanie, Tadaharu; Mizuta, Shuichi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The net benefits of induction therapy for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain controversial. Because AML in older adults is a heterogeneous disease, it is important to identify those who are unlikely to benefit from induction therapy based on information available at the initial assessment. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze TP53 mutation status in AML patients aged 60 years or older, and evaluated its effects on outcomes. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 77 patients (16 %), and there was a significant association between TP53 mutations and monosomal karyotype. Patients with TP53 mutations had significantly worse survival than those without (P = 0.009), and multivariate analysis identified TP53 mutation status as the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Neverthelsess, TP53-mutated patients had a 42 % chance of complete remission and a median survival of 8.0 months, which compares favorably with those who did not undergo induction therapy, even in the short term. These results suggest that screening for TP53 mutations at diagnosis is useful for identifying older adults with AML who are least likely to respond to chemotherapy, although the presence of this mutation alone does not seem to justify rejecting induction therapy.

  12. Evaluation of artemisinins for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Drenberg, Christina D.; Buaboonnam, Jassada; Orwick, Shelley J.; Hu, Shuiying; Li, Lie; Fan, Yiping; Shelat, Anang A.; Guy, R. Kiplin; Rubnitz, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Investigate antileukemic activity of artemisinins, artesunate (ART), and dihydroartemisinin (DHA), in combination with cytarabine, a key component of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) chemotherapy using in vitro and in vivo models. Methods Using ten human AML cell lines, we conducted a high-throughput screen to identify antimalarial agents with antileukemic activity. We evaluated effects of ART and DHA on cell viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, lysosomal integrity, and combination effects with cytarabine in cell lines and primary patient blasts. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies and efficacy of single-agent ART or combination with cytarabine were evaluated in three xenograft models. Results ART and DHA had the most potent activity in a panel of AML cell lines, with selectivity toward samples harboring MLL rearrangements and FLT3-ITD mutations. Combination of ART or DHA was synergistic with cytarabine. Single-dose ART (120 mg/kg) produced human equivalent exposures, but multiple dose daily administration required for in vivo efficacy was not tolerated. Combination treatment produced initial regression, but did not prolong survival in vivo. Conclusions The pharmacology of artemisinins is problematic and should be considered in designing AML treatment strategies with currently available agents. Artemisinins with improved pharmacokinetic properties may offer therapeutic benefit in combination with conventional therapeutic strategies in AML. PMID:27125973

  13. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  14. Targeting the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in acute myeloid leukemia: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hee-Je; Konopleva, Marina

    2017-01-01

    The interactions between the cancerous cells of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment have been postulated to be important for resistance to chemotherapy and disease relapse in AML. The chemokine receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, CXC motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), also known as stromal cell-derived factor 1α, are key mediators of this interaction. CXCL12 is produced by the BM microenvironment, binds and activates its cognate receptor CXCR4 on leukemic cells, facilitates leukemia cell trafficking and homing in the BM microenvironment, and keeps leukemic cells in close contact with the stromal cells and extracellular matrix that constitutively generate growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic signals. Indeed, a high level of CXCR4 expression on AML blasts is known to be associated with poor prognosis. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have revealed the safety and potential clinical utility of targeting the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in AML with different classes of drugs, including small molecules, peptides, and monoclonal antibodies. In this review, we describe recent evidence of targeting these leukemia-stroma interactions, focusing on the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. Related early phase clinical studies will be also introduced. PMID:28219003

  15. The human nucleophosmin 1 mutation A inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells by modulating miR-10b

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qin; Tan, Shi; Yang, Zailin; Wang, Juan; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuaishuai; Jin, Hongjun; Yang, Liyuan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) gene are the most frequent genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we showed that enforced expression of NPM1 mutation type A (NPM1-mA) inhibits myeloid differentiation of leukemia cells, whereas knockdown of NPM1-mA has the opposite effect. Our analyses of normal karyotype AML samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset revealed that miR-10b is commonly overexpressed in NPM1-mutated AMLs. We also found high expression of miR-10b in primary NPM1-mutated AML blasts and NPM1-mA positive OCI-AML3 cells. In addition, NPM1-mA knockdown enhanced myeloid differentiation, while induced expression of miR-10b reversed this effect. Finally, we showed that KLF4 is downregulated in NPM1-mutated AMLs. These results demonstrated that miR-10b exerts its effects by repressing the translation of KLF4 and that NPM1-mA inhibits myeloid differentiation through the miR-10b/KLF4 axis. This sheds new light on the effect of NPM1 mutations' on leukemogenesis. PMID:27669739

  16. Upregulation of miR-99a is associated with poor prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia and promotes myeloid leukemia cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Si, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Hao, Xing; Li, Yunan; Chen, Zizhen; Ding, Yahui; Shi, Hui; Bai, Jie; Gao, Yingdai; Cheng, Tao; Yang, Feng-Chun; Zhou, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) can resist available treatments that results in disease progression and/or relapse. To dissect the microRNA (miRNA) expression signature of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), miRNA array analysis was performed using enriched LSCs from paired bone marrow samples of an AML patient at different disease stages. We identified that miR-99a was significantly upregulated in the LSCs obtained at relapse compared to the LSCs collected at the time of initial diagnosis. We also found that miR-99a was upregulated in LSCs compared to non-LSCs in a larger cohort of AML patients, and higher expression levels of miR-99a were significantly correlated with worse overall survival and event-free survival in these AML patients. Ectopic expression of miR-99a led to increased colony forming ability and expansion in myeloid leukemia cells after exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro and in vivo, partially due to overcoming of chemotherapeutic agent-mediated cell cycle arrest. Gene profiling and bioinformatic analyses indicated that ectopic expression of miR-99a significantly upregulated genes that are critical for LSC maintenance, cell cycle, and downstream targets of E2F and MYC. This study suggests that miR-99a has a novel role and potential use as a biomarker in myeloid leukemia progression. PMID:27801668

  17. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  18. Pulmonary mucormycosis with embolism: two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Yasunori; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with hematological malignancies. The diagnosis of mucormycosis usually requires mycological evidence through tissue biopsy or autopsy because the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and there are currently no biomarkers to identify the disease. We herein present two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia with prolonged neutropenia who developed invasive mucormycosis accompanied by pulmonary artery embolism. Our cases were featured by unexplained fever and rapidly progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan detected nodular lesions or nonspecific consolidations in the lungs. Cultures, cytological study, and serum fungal markers consistently gave negative results. Autopsy revealed embolism of the pulmonary artery which consisted of fibrin clots by filamentous fungi. Genomic DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded clots and was applied to polymerase chain reaction amplification, leading to the diagnosis of infection by Rhizopus microsporus. We should carefully search for life-threatening pulmonary embolism when patients with hematological malignancies develop pulmonary mucormycosis.

  19. [Results of splenectomy with polychemotherapy in the treatment of 15 chronic myeloid leukemia patients].

    PubMed

    Mendeleev, I M; Berliner, G B; Miasnikov, A A; Polezheav, Iu N

    1986-01-01

    The results of splenectomy followed by chemotherapy are analysed. Fifteen patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were entered into the study. The maximal survival of one of the patients subjected to splenectomy was 102 months. The authors come to the conclusion that it is desirable that CML patients should be subjected to splenectomy after preliminary preparation (chemotherapy and chemoprotectors) at the early stages of the illness, which is to be followed by monochemotherapy. Provided the latter is unsuccessful, the change over to polychemotherapy similar to the treatment protocols for myeloid leukemia is suggested.

  20. Firstline treatment for chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients should be based on a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-02-01

    New selective and more potent drugs for the cure of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients are now available: physicians in some countries must decide the best option, selecting one of the drugs available. What the main prognostic factors are in order to make this selection remains a matter of discussion. Introducing a 'holistic approach' for the first time in chronic myeloid leukemia, as practiced in other diseases, and looking at the patient in a complete picture, considering several variables, such as comorbidities, age, concomitant drugs, lifestyle and patient expectations, may be of help to understand, patient by patient, the best therapeutic strategy.

  1. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  2. DNMT3A Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li; Walter, Matthew J.; McLellan, Michael D.; Lamprecht, Tamara; Larson, David E.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack; Welch, John; Harris, Christopher C.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Townsend, R. Reid; Fulton, Robert S.; Dooling, David J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Schmidt, Heather; Zhang, Qunyuan; Osborne, John R.; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; McGrath, Sean D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Conyers, Joshua J.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd; Walker, Jason; Kalicki, Joelle; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H.; Link, Daniel C.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The genetic alterations responsible for an adverse outcome in most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unknown. METHODS Using massively parallel DNA sequencing, we identified a somatic mutation in DNMT3A, encoding a DNA methyltransferase, in the genome of cells from a patient with AML with a normal karyotype. We sequenced the exons of DNMT3A in 280 additional patients with de novo AML to define recurring mutations. RESULTS A total of 62 of 281 patients (22.1%) had mutations in DNMT3A that were predicted to affect translation. We identified 18 different missense mutations, the most common of which was predicted to affect amino acid R882 (in 37 patients). We also identified six frameshift, six nonsense, and three splice-site mutations and a 1.5-Mbp deletion encompassing DNMT3A. These mutations were highly enriched in the group of patients with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile (56 of 166 patients, or 33.7%) but were absent in all 79 patients with a favorable-risk cytogenetic profile (P<0.001 for both comparisons). The median overall survival among patients with DNMT3A mutations was significantly shorter than that among patients without such mutations (12.3 months vs. 41.1 months, P<0.001). DNMT3A mutations were associated with adverse outcomes among patients with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile or FLT3 mutations, regardless of age, and were independently associated with a poor outcome in Cox proportional-hazards analysis. CONCLUSIONS DNMT3A mutations are highly recurrent in patients with de novo AML with an intermediate-risk cytogenetic profile and are independently associated with a poor outcome. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:21067377

  3. Treatment and molecular monitoring update in chronic myeloid leukemia management.

    PubMed

    Sorel, Nathalie; Cayssials, Émilie; Brizard, Françoise; Chomel, Jean-Claude

    2017-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm resulting from the t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. It is characterized by the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene encoding the BCR-ABL oncoprotein characterized by a deregulated tyrosine kinase activity. Targeted therapies using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, or ponatinib have profoundly changed the natural history of the disease with a major impact on survival. Indeed, most patients diagnosed today can enjoy a near normal life expectancy. The efficacy of TKI treatment can be accurately evaluated by a molecular monitoring based on the quantification of BCR-ABL1 mRNA transcripts and the detection of resistance mutations in the BCR-ABL kinase domain. International recommendations for an optimal management of CML using biological parameters are regularly published. They were designed to evaluate the response to the treatment and to consider, if necessary, a switch to another TKI. A sustained and deep molecular response is obtained in a significant percentage of patients. Clinical trials of TKI discontinuation were performed in such a population, and half of patients do not relapse. In the remaining patients, a rapid appearance of the malignant clone was observed, undoubtedly the consequence of the persistence of residual leukemic stem cells (LSCs). How to discriminate patients who may safely stop TKI? How to target residual LSCs, and do we have to eradicate all these cells? Additional research investigation and clinical trials are needed to answer these questions in order to consider a potential cure of CML.

  4. Targeting mitochondrial RNA polymerase in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bralha, Fernando N.; Liyanage, Sanduni U.; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiaoming; Son, Meong Hi; Fung, Thomas A.; Chingcuanco, Francine B.; Tung, Aveline Y. W.; Andreazza, Ana C.; Psarianos, Pamela; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Salmena, Leonardo; Laposa, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have high oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial mass and low respiratory chain spare reserve capacity. We reasoned that targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), which indirectly controls oxidative phosphorylation, represents a therapeutic strategy for AML. POLRMT-knockdown OCI-AML2 cells exhibited decreased mitochondrial gene expression, decreased levels of assembled complex I, decreased levels of mitochondrially-encoded Cox-II and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. POLRMT-knockdown cells exhibited an increase in complex II of the electron transport chain, a complex comprised entirely of subunits encoded by nuclear genes, and POLRMT-knockdown cells were resistant to a complex II inhibitor theonyltrifluoroacetone. POLRMT-knockdown cells showed a prominent increase in cell death. Treatment of OCI-AML2 cells with 10-50 μM 2-C-methyladenosine (2-CM), a chain terminator of mitochondrial transcription, reduced mitochondrial gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation, and increased cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of normal human hematopoietic cells with 2-CM at concentrations of up to 100 μMdid not alter clonogenic growth, suggesting a therapeutic window. In an OCI-AML2 xenograft model, treatment with 2-CM (70 mg/kg, i.p., daily) decreased the volume and mass of tumours to half that of vehicle controls. 2-CM did not cause toxicity to major organs. Overall, our results in a preclinical model contribute to the functional validation of the utility of targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase as a therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26484416

  5. Activated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma is a critical regulator of myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Si, Jutong; Collins, Steven J

    2008-05-15

    Ca(2+) signaling is an important component of signal transduction pathways regulating B and T lymphocyte proliferation, but the functional role of Ca(2+) signaling in regulating myeloid leukemia cell proliferation has been largely unexplored. We observe that the activated (autophosphorylated) Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma (CaMKIIgamma) is invariably present in myeloid leukemia cell lines as well as in the majority of primary acute myelogenous leukemia patient samples. In contrast, myeloid leukemia cells induced to terminally differentiate or undergo growth arrest display a marked reduction in this CaMKIIgamma autophosphorylation. In cells harboring the bcr-abl oncogene, the activation (autophosphorylation) of CaMKIIgamma is regulated by this oncogene. Moreover, inhibition of CaMKIIgamma activity with pharmacologic agents, dominant-negative constructs, or short hairpin RNAs inhibits the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells, and this is associated with the inactivation/down-regulation of multiple critical signal transduction networks involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3beta)/beta-catenin pathways. In myeloid leukemia cells, CaMKIIgamma directly phosphorylates Stat3 and enhances its transcriptional activity. Thus, CaMKIIgamma is a critical regulator of multiple signaling networks regulating the proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells. Inhibiting CaMKIIgamma may represent a novel approach in the targeted therapy of myeloid leukemia.

  6. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  7. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  8. Targeting Leukemia Stem Cells in vivo with AntagomiR-126 Nanoparticles in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Neviani, Paolo; Ferenchak, Greg J.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Nicolet, Deedra; Maharry, Kati S.; Ozer, Hatice G; Hoellarbauer, Pia; Khalife, Jihane; Hill, Emily B.; Yadav, Marshleen; Bolon, Brad N.; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, L.James; Croce, Carlo M.; Garzon, Ramiro; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci., Guido

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are designed to target rapidly dividing blast populations with limited success in eradicating the functionally distinct leukemia stem cell (LSC) population, which is postulated to be responsible for disease resistance and relapse. We have previously reported high miR-126 expression levels to be associated with a LSC-gene expression profile. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-126 contributes to “stemness” and is a viable target for eliminating the LSC in AML. Here we first validate the clinical relevance of miR-126 expression in AML by showing that higher expression of this microRNA (miR) is associated with worse outcome in a large cohort of older (≥60 years) cytogenetically normal AML patients treated with conventional chemotherapy. We then show that miR-126 overexpression characterizes AML LSC-enriched cell subpopulations and contributes to LSC long-term maintenance and self-renewal. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of miR-126 in LSCs with novel targeting nanoparticles (NP) containing antagomiR-126 resulting in in vivo reduction of LSCs likely by depletion of the quiescent cell subpopulation. Our findings suggest that by targeting a single miR, i.e., miR-126, it is possible to interfere with LSC activity, thereby opening potentially novel therapeutic approaches to treat AML patients. PMID:26055302

  9. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  10. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Barbara-ann; Mohamedali, Azim; Mills, Ken I.; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Schmitt, Michael; Greiner, Jochen

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs) are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX) and mass spectrometry (MS). In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel) and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease. PMID:19662193

  11. European LeukemiaNet recommendations for the management of chronic myeloid leukemia: 2013

    PubMed Central

    Deininger, Michael W.; Rosti, Gianantonio; Hochhaus, Andreas; Soverini, Simona; Apperley, Jane F.; Cervantes, Francisco; Clark, Richard E.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Guilhot, François; Hjorth-Hansen, Henrik; Hughes, Timothy P.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Larson, Richard A.; Lipton, Jeffrey H.; Mahon, François-Xavier; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mayer, Jiri; Müller, Martin C.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Pane, Fabrizio; Radich, Jerald P.; Rousselot, Philippe; Saglio, Giuseppe; Saußele, Susanne; Schiffer, Charles; Silver, Richard; Simonsson, Bengt; Steegmann, Juan-Luis; Goldman, John M.; Hehlmann, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Advances in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, particularly regarding tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mandate regular updating of concepts and management. A European LeukemiaNet expert panel reviewed prior and new studies to update recommendations made in 2009. We recommend as initial treatment imatinib, nilotinib, or dasatinib. Response is assessed with standardized real quantitative polymerase chain reaction and/or cytogenetics at 3, 6, and 12 months. BCR-ABL1 transcript levels ≤10% at 3 months, <1% at 6 months, and ≤0.1% from 12 months onward define optimal response, whereas >10% at 6 months and >1% from 12 months onward define failure, mandating a change in treatment. Similarly, partial cytogenetic response (PCyR) at 3 months and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) from 6 months onward define optimal response, whereas no CyR (Philadelphia chromosome–positive [Ph+] >95%) at 3 months, less than PCyR at 6 months, and less than CCyR from 12 months onward define failure. Between optimal and failure, there is an intermediate warning zone requiring more frequent monitoring. Similar definitions are provided for response to second-line therapy. Specific recommendations are made for patients in the accelerated and blastic phases, and for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Optimal responders should continue therapy indefinitely, with careful surveillance, or they can be enrolled in controlled studies of treatment discontinuation once a deeper molecular response is achieved. PMID:23803709

  12. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  14. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  15. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  16. Identification of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus from a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is an oncogenic virus associated with Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer with a high (>30%) mortality rate. The virus has a high incidence in patients with immunosuppressed conditions, such as AIDS or leukemia, or following organ transplantation. Here, we report the complete genomic sequence of MCPyV identified from a blood sample from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28104648

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  18. Bilineal T lymphoblastic and myeloid blast transformation in chronic myeloid leukemia with TP53 mutation—an uncommon presentation in adults

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, S.; Sabai, K.; Chuah, C.; Tan, S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bilineal blast transformation of myeloid and T lymphoid type is a rare event in chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we report a case in which an adult presented with high white cell counts and lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow studies confirmed the presence of 9 and 22 chromosomal translocation, and a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase was made. Examination of a lymph node showed both myeloid and T lymphoblastoid blast crisis. Molecular studies demonstrated the presence of BCR-ABL fusion transcripts in both the myeloid and the T lymphoblastic component, indicating that the myeloid and T lymphoid blast crisis components shared common progenitors. TP53 deletion was demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:24523612

  19. Double minute chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are associated with micronuclei, MYC or MLL amplification, and complex karyotype.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yang O; Tang, Guilin; Talwalkar, Sameer S; Khoury, Joseph D; Ohanian, Maro; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Abruzzo, Lynne V

    2016-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (dmin) are small, paired chromatin bodies that lack a centromere and represent a form of extrachromosomal gene amplification. Dmin are rare in myeloid neoplasms and are generally associated with a poor prognosis. Most studies of dmin in myeloid neoplasms are case reports or small series. In the current study, we present the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of 22 patients with myeloid neoplasms harboring dmin. These neoplasms included acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 18), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 3), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) (n = 1). The AML cases consisted of AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (n = 13) and therapy-related AML (n = 5). Dmin were detected in initial pre-therapy samples in 14 patients with AML or CMML; they were acquired during the disease course in 8 patients who had AML or MDS. The presence of dmin was associated with micronuclei (18/18; 100%), complex karyotype (17/22; 77.3%), and amplification of MYC (12/16; 75%) or MLL (4/16; 25%). Immunohistochemical staining for MYC performed on bone marrow core biopsy or clot sections revealed increased MYC protein in all 19 cases tested. Except for one patient, most patients failed to respond to risk-adapted chemotherapies. At last follow up, all patients had died of disease after a median of 5 months following dmin detection. In conclusion, dmin in myeloid neoplasms commonly harbor MYC or MLL gene amplification and manifest as micronuclei within leukemic blasts. Dmin are often associated with myelodysplasia or therapy-related disease, and complex karyotypes.

  20. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    PubMed Central

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18–60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12). PMID:25715404

  1. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial.

    PubMed

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18-60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12).

  2. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001.

  3. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome, in Adults; AML (Adult) With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; AML (Adult) With Del(5q); AML (Adult) With Inv(16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(16;16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary AML (Adult); Untreated AML (Adult)

  4. The interplay of autophagy and β-Catenin signaling regulates differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, K; Cott, C; Bohler, S; Aigal, S; Zheng, S; Villringer, S; Imberty, A; Claudinon, J; Römer, W

    2015-01-01

    The major feature of leukemic cells is an arrest of differentiation accompanied by highly active proliferation. In many subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia, these features are mediated by the aberrant Wnt/β-Catenin pathway. In our study, we established the lectin LecB as inducer of the differentiation of the acute myeloid leukemia cell line THP-1 and used it for the investigation of the involved processes. During differentiation, functional autophagy and low β-Catenin levels were essential. Corresponding to this, a high β-Catenin level stabilized proliferation and inhibited autophagy, resulting in low differentiation ability. Initiated by LecB, β-Catenin was degraded, autophagy became active and differentiation took place within hours. Remarkably, the reduction of β-Catenin sensitized THP-1 cells to the autophagy-stimulating mTOR inhibitors. As downmodulation of E-Cadherin was sufficient to significantly reduce LecB-mediated differentiation, we propose E-Cadherin as a crucial interaction partner in this signaling pathway. Upon LecB treatment, E-Cadherin colocalized with β-Catenin and thereby prevented the induction of β-Catenin target protein expression and proliferation. That way, our study provides for the first time a link between E-Cadherin, the aberrant Wnt/β-Catenin signaling, autophagy and differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia. Importantly, LecB was a valuable tool to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of acute myeloid leukemia pathogenesis and may help to identify novel therapy approaches. PMID:27551462

  5. Imatinib-induced thyroiditis in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surjit; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a case of chronic myeloid leukemia for which imatinib therapy was initated. Triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone was normal, and thyroid microsomal autoantibodies (TMA) were positive and patient was diagnosed as thyroiditis treated with corticosteroids for 1½ months which lead to resolution. PMID:27756963

  6. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Discovery of a novel Nrf2 inhibitor that induces apoptosis of human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, JinFeng; Su, Le; Ye, Qing; Zhang, ShangLi; Kung, HsiangFu; Jiang, Fan; Jiang, GuoSheng; Miao, JunYing; Zhao, BaoXiang

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is persistently activated in many human tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, inhibition of Nrf2 activity may be a promising target in leukemia therapy. Here, we used an antioxidant response element-luciferase reporter system to identify a novel pyrazolyl hydroxamic acid derivative, 1-(4-(tert-Butyl)benzyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-hydroxy-1H pyrazole-5-carboxamide (4f), that inhibited Nrf2 activity. 4f had a profound growth-inhibitory effect on three AML cell lines, THP-1, HL-60 and U937, and a similar anti-growth effect in a chick embryo model. Moreover, flow cytometry of AML cells revealed increased apoptosis with 4f (10 μM) treatment for 48 h. The protein levels of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase were enhanced in all three AML cell types. Furthermore, Nrf2 protein level was downregulated by 4f. Upregulation of Nrf2 by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) or Nrf2 overexpression could ameliorate 4f-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Treatment with 4f reduced both B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) expression and Bcl-2/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) ratio, which indicated that 4f induced apoptosis, at least in part, via mitochondrial-dependent signaling. Therefore, as an Nrf2 inhibitor, the pyrazolyl hydroxamic acid derivative 4f may be a promising agent in AML therapy.

  9. NANOG Expression as a Responsive Biomarker during Treatment with Hedgehog Signal Inhibitor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kakiuchi, Seiji; Minami, Yosuke; Miyata, Yoshiharu; Mizutani, Yu; Goto, Hideaki; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Kurata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Minami, Hironobu

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is involved in the maintenance of leukemic stem cell (LSCs) populations. PF-0444913 (PF-913) is a novel inhibitor that selectively targets Smoothened (SMO), which regulates the Hh pathway. Treatment with PF-913 has shown promising results in an early phase study of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, a detailed mode of action for PF-913 and relevant biomarkers remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined bone marrow samples derived from AML patients under PF-913 monotherapy. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that PF-913 treatment affected the self-renewal signature and cell-cycle regulation associated with LSC-like properties. We then focused on the expression of a pluripotency factor, NANOG, because previous reports showed that a downstream effector in the Hh pathway, GLI, directly binds to the NANOG promoter and that the GLI-NANOG axis promotes stemness and growth in several cancers. In this study, we found that a change in NANOG transcripts was closely associated with GLI-target genes and NANOG transcripts can be a responsive biomarker during PF-913 therapy. Additionally, the treatment of AML with PF-913 holds promise, possibly through inducing quiescent leukemia stem cells toward cell cycling. PMID:28245563

  10. Increased SYK activity is associated with unfavorable outcome among patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Back, Morgan; Alexe, Gabriela; Bassil, Christopher F.; Sinha, Papiya; Tholouli, Eleni; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Byers, Richard J.; Rodig, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the testing of novel targeted therapies for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To better inform the results of clinical trials, there is a need to identify and systematically assess biomarkers of response and pharmacodynamic markers of successful target engagement. Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) is a candidate therapeutic target in AML. Small-molecule inhibitors of SYK induce AML differentiation and impair leukemia progression in preclinical studies. However, tools to predict response to SYK inhibition and to routinely evaluate SYK activation in primary patient samples have been lacking. In this study we quantified phosphorylated SYK (P-SYK) in AML cell lines and establish that increasing levels of baseline P-SYK are correlated with an increasing sensitivity to small-molecule inhibitors targeting SYK. In addition, we found that pharmacological inhibition of SYK activity extinguishes P-SYK expression as detected by an immunohistochemical (IHC) test. Quantitative analysis of P-SYK expression by the IHC test in a series of 70 primary bone marrow biopsy specimens revealed a spectrum of P-SYK expression across AML cases and that high P-SYK expression is associated with unfavourable outcome independent of age, cytogenetics, and white blood cell count. This study thus establishes P-SYK as a critical biomarker in AML that identifies tumors sensitive to SYK inhibition, identifies an at-risk patient population, and allows for the monitoring of target inhibition during treatment. PMID:26315286

  11. Hispidulin induces mitochondrial apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells by targeting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Liu, Yongji; Li, Kan; Wu, Tianhui; Peng, Jianjun; Jing, Fanbo

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of hematological neoplasms with marked heterogeneity in response to both standard therapy and survival. Hispidulin, a flavonoid compound that is anactive ingredient in the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Salvia plebeia R. Br, has recently been reported to have anantitumor effect against solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hispidulin on the human leukemia cell line in vitro and the underlying mechanisms of its actions on these cells. Our results showed that hispidulin inhibits AML cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and induces cell apoptosis throughan intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Our results also revealed that hispidulin treatment significantly inhibits extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) expression in both tested AML cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, and that the overexpression of EMMPRIN protein markedly attenuates hispidulin-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, our results strongly indicated that the modulating effect of hispidulin on EMMPRIN is correlated with its inhibitory effect on both the Akt and STAT3 signaling pathways. PMID:27158398

  12. Translocation 2;19 in a patient with probable relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mark, H F; Gray, Y; Rintels, P

    1997-01-01

    We report the cytogenetic and hematopathologic results from a patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Although the initial specimen revealed an apparently normal male karyotype, a translocation, t(2;19)(q21;p13), was detected in the second specimen. It is not clear whether this was a primary or secondary and possibly chemotherapy-induced abnormality. In an extensive search of the recent medical literature database (Medline, 1966 to the present; CancerLit, 1983 to the present, MDX Health Digest, 1988 to the present; HealthSTAR, 1975 to the present, and CINAHL, 1982 to the present), we found no previous report of this specific translocation. This case is of interest not only because of its cytogenetic rarity and its unique clinical features, but also because of the fact that this patient worked in construction management, performing offshore drilling in oil fields for several years, and also worked with plastics and polymer film for about 4 years, although this past history of possible genotoxic exposure may or may not be of relevance. In addition, it is also of interest that one of the translocation breakpoints, 19p13, is apparently identical to that found in the 1;19 translocation associated with pre-B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. PMID:27668104

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Mutant Subclones in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Comparison of Different Methodological Approaches.

    PubMed

    Preuner, Sandra; Barna, Agnes; Frommlet, Florian; Czurda, Stefan; Konstantin, Byrgazov; Alikian, Mary; Machova Polakova, Katerina; Sacha, Tomasz; Richter, Johan; Lion, Thomas; Gabriel, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Identification and quantitative monitoring of mutant BCR-ABL1 subclones displaying resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become important tasks in patients with Ph-positive leukemias. Different technologies have been established for patient screening. Various next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms facilitating sensitive detection and quantitative monitoring of mutations in the ABL1-kinase domain (KD) have been introduced recently, and are expected to become the preferred technology in the future. However, broad clinical implementation of NGS methods has been hampered by the limited accessibility at different centers and the current costs of analysis which may not be regarded as readily affordable for routine diagnostic monitoring. It is therefore of interest to determine whether NGS platforms can be adequately substituted by other methodological approaches. We have tested three different techniques including pyrosequencing, LD (ligation-dependent)-PCR and NGS in a series of peripheral blood specimens from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients carrying single or multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 KD. The proliferation kinetics of mutant subclones in serial specimens obtained during the course of TKI-treatment revealed similar profiles via all technical approaches, but individual specimens showed statistically significant differences between NGS and the other methods tested. The observations indicate that different approaches to detection and quantification of mutant subclones may be applicable for the monitoring of clonal kinetics, but careful calibration of each method is required for accurate size assessment of mutant subclones at individual time points.

  15. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations – mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  16. Diversity of breakpoints of variant Philadelphia chromosomes in chronic myeloid leukemia in Brazilian patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes Lopes Ferrari; Bandeira, Ana Carolina de Almeida; da Silva, Aline Schiavoni Guarnieri

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome or t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2), resulting in the break-point cluster region-Abelson tyrosine kinase fusion gene, which encodes a constitutively active tyrosine kinase protein. The Philadelphia chromosome is detected by karyotyping in around 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but 5–10% may have variant types. Variant Philadelphia chromosomes are characterized by the involvement of another chromosome in addition to chromosome 9 or 22. It can be a simple type of variant when one other chromosome is involved, or complex, in which two or more chromosomes take part in the translocation. Few studies have reported the incidence of variant Philadelphia chromosomes or the breakpoints involved among Brazilian chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Objective The aim of this report is to describe the diversity of the variant Philadelphia chromosomes found and highlight some interesting breakpoint candidates for further studies. Methods the Cytogenetics Section Database was searched for all cases with diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia during a 12-year period and all the variant Philadelphia chromosomes were listed. Results Fifty (5.17%) cases out of 1071 Philadelphia-positive chronic myeloid leukemia were variants. The most frequently involved chromosome was 17, followed by chromosomes: 1, 20, 6, 11, 2, 10, 12 and 15. Conclusion Among all the breakpoints seen in this survey, six had previously been described: 11p15, 14q32, 15q11.2, 16p13.1, 17p13 and 17q21. The fact that some regions get more frequently involved in such rare rearrangements calls attention to possible predisposition that should be further studied. Nevertheless, the pathological implication of these variants remains unclear. PMID:25638762

  17. Semisynthetic homoharringtonine induces apoptosis via inhibition of protein synthesis and triggers rapid myeloid cell leukemia-1 down-regulation in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ruoping; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Majdak, Patricia; Marzac, Christophe; Dubrulle, Sabine; Marjanovic, Zora; Legrand, Ollivier; Marie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Semisynthetic homoharringtonine (ssHHT) is now being evaluated in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myelogenous leukemia patients. Here, we examined the mechanism of the apoptosis induced by ssHHT in myeloid leukemia cells. First, we have shown that ssHHT induces apoptosis in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and independently of the expression of Bax. The decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c were observed in the apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT. To unveil the relationship between ssHHT and the mitochondrial disruption, we have shown that ssHHT decreased myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) expression and induced Bcl-2 cleavage in HL60 and HL60/MRP cell lines. The Bcl-2 cleavage could be inhibited by the Z-VAD.fmk caspase inhibitor. However, Mcl-1 turnover was very rapid and occurred before caspase activation. The Mcl-1 turnover was only induced by ssHHT and cycloheximide, but not by daunorubicin and cytosine arabinoside, and could be restored by proteasome inhibitors. Second, we confirmed that ssHHT rapidly induced massive apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia patient cells. We have also confirmed the release of cytochrome c and a rapid turnover of Mcl-1 in these patient cells, taking place only in apoptotic cells induced by ssHHT but not in cells undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Finally, we have shown that ssHHT inhibits protein synthesis in both cell line and patient cells. We suggest that the inhibition of protein synthesis and resulting Mcl-1 turnover play a key role in the apoptosis induced by ssHHT. Our results encourage further clinical trials for the use of ssHHT in acute myelogenous leukemia.

  18. SIRT1 inhibition impairs non-homologous end joining DNA damage repair by increasing Ku70 acetylation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wu, Haixia; Yang, Meng; Ye, Shiguang; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiong; Wang, Xuguang; Xu, Jun; Liang, Aibin

    2016-03-22

    Most chemotherapeutic agents for leukemia are DNA damaging agents. However, DNA lesions can be repaired by activities of DNA repair systems. Increasing evidence have shown that enhanced DNA damage repair capacity contributes to chemotherapy resistance in leukemia cells. Thus, targeting DNA repair mechanisms is a promising strategy for novel leukemia treatment. SIRT1 expressions were downregulated by lentivirus-delivered SIRT1 shRNA in myeloid leukemia cells. SIRT1 mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Flow cytometry was carried out to analyze cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA damage repair efficiency. DNA damage levels were assessed by alkaline comet assay, and H2AX phosphorylation was analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. A mouse leukemia model was established by transplanting lentivirus-infected K562 cells containing SIRT1 shRNA into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, and tumorigenesis was evaluated by detecting tumor weights and mice survival. SIRT1 expressions were upregulated in myeloid leukemic patients. Downregulation of SIRT1 by RNAi promoted etoposide-induced DNA damage in myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by reduced NHEJ activity, and increased Ku70 acetylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 knockdown resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and reduction of K562 cell proliferation accompanied by enhanced p53 and FOXO1 acetylation in K562 cells after etoposide treatment. Importantly, SIRT1 downregulation reduced the tumorigenesis ability of K562 cells in mouse xenografts following chemotherapy treatment. These results revealed that SIRT1 promotes the NHEJ repair pathway by deacetylating Ku70 in K562 cells, suggesting that SIRT1 is a novel therapeutic target for treating myeloid leukemia.

  19. SIRT1 inhibition impairs non-homologous end joining DNA damage repair by increasing Ku70 acetylation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shiguang; Li, Liang; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiong; Wang, Xuguang; Xu, Jun; Liang, Aibin

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic agents for leukemia are DNA damaging agents. However, DNA lesions can be repaired by activities of DNA repair systems. Increasing evidence have shown that enhanced DNA damage repair capacity contributes to chemotherapy resistance in leukemia cells. Thus, targeting DNA repair mechanisms is a promising strategy for novel leukemia treatment. SIRT1 expressions were downregulated by lentivirus-delivered SIRT1 shRNA in myeloid leukemia cells. SIRT1 mRNA and protein levels were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Flow cytometry was carried out to analyze cell cycle progression, apoptosis and DNA damage repair efficiency. DNA damage levels were assessed by alkaline comet assay, and H2AX phosphorylation was analyzed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. A mouse leukemia model was established by transplanting lentivirus-infected K562 cells containing SIRT1 shRNA into sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice, and tumorigenesis was evaluated by detecting tumor weights and mice survival. SIRT1 expressions were upregulated in myeloid leukemic patients. Downregulation of SIRT1 by RNAi promoted etoposide-induced DNA damage in myeloid leukemia cells accompanied by reduced NHEJ activity, and increased Ku70 acetylation. Furthermore, SIRT1 knockdown resulted in cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and reduction of K562 cell proliferation accompanied by enhanced p53 and FOXO1 acetylation in K562 cells after etoposide treatment. Importantly, SIRT1 downregulation reduced the tumorigenesis ability of K562 cells in mouse xenografts following chemotherapy treatment. These results revealed that SIRT1 promotes the NHEJ repair pathway by deacetylating Ku70 in K562 cells, suggesting that SIRT1 is a novel therapeutic target for treating myeloid leukemia. PMID:26646449

  20. Addition of sargramostim (GM-CSF) to imatinib results in major cytogenetic response in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Connor, Rebecca F; Hurd, David; Pettenati, Mark J; Koty, Patrick; Molnár, István

    2006-10-01

    Imatinib mesylate, an inhibitor of BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase, has remarkable activity in chronic myeloid leukemia resulting in an 87% major cytogenetic response. We describe a woman who failed to achieve any cytogenetic response after 2.5 years of imatinib, 400mg daily. When daily sargramostim (GM-CSF) 100 microg/m2 was added, cytogenetic studies revealed a gradual increase in percentage of normal cells from start, 4, 9, and 15 months at 0%, 10%, 55%, and 85%, respectively. She became transfusion independent after starting GM-CSF. The addition of GM-CSF to imatinib resulted in a clinical benefit and a major cytogenetic response in this patient.

  1. Acute myelomonocytic leukemia with inv(16)(p13q22) complicating Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heim, S; Christensen, B E; Fioretos, T; Sørensen, A G; Pedersen, N T

    1992-03-01

    The reciprocal translocation (9;22)(q34;q11) is highly characteristic of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and the pericentric inversion inv(16)(p13q22) is almost only found in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia of the myelomonocytic subtype (ANLL M4). Only twice before have an inv(16) and a t(9;22) been found in the same cells, and both times the patients seemed to have de novo ANLL M4. We describe the case of a 21-year-old man who in July 1986 presented with a clinically and hematologically classic chronic phase CML. Treatment with busulfan led to no improvement; instead in September 1986 he developed blast crisis with ANLL M4Eo morphology. He was now cytogenetically examined and the karyotype 45,X,-Y,t(9;22)(q34;q11),inv(16)(p13q22) was found. Southern blot analysis of the bone marrow DNA sampled at this time revealed a standard rearrangement in the 3' end of the M-bcr. Intensive cytostatic treatment caused cytopenia followed by complete hematologic, clinical, and cytogenetic reversal to chronic phase CML, so that in January 1987 the bone marrow karyotype was 46,XY,t(9;22)(q34;q11). Persistent splenomegaly was treated with splenectomy, and a chloroma of the skin was removed by irradiation. In March 1987 he received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Since then his only medical problem has been mild graft-versus-host disease; he is well and is working full time as a blacksmith.

  2. Bilineal Extramedullary Blast Crisis as an Initial Presentation of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoning; Li, Jie; Wang, Lili; Lin, Ji; Jin, Hongshi; Xu, Yihan; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Daihong; Yu, Li; Wang, Quanshun

    2016-10-27

    BACKGROUND Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the Philadelphia chromosome generated by the reciprocal translocation t(9: 22)(q34;q11). CML is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Blast crisis represents an advanced phase of CML. Extramedullary blast crisis as the initial presentation of CML with bone marrow remaining in chronic phase is an unusual event. Further, extramedullary blast crisis with T lymphoid/myeloid bilineal phenotype as an initial presentation for CML is extremely unusual. CASE REPORT Here, we report the case of a 49-year-old male with rapidly enlarged submandibular lymph nodes. Biopsy specimen from the nodes revealed a characteristic appearance with morphologically and immunohistochemically distinct myeloblasts and T lymphoblasts co-localized in 2 adjacent regions, accompanied by chronic phase of the disease in bone marrow. The presence of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene within both cellular populations in this case confirmed the extramedullary disease represented a localized T lymphoid/myeloid bilineal blastic transformation of CML. After 3 courses of combined chemotherapy plus tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment, the mass was completely regressed with a 3-log decrease in BCR/ABL1 transcript from baseline. Five months after the diagnosis, the patient showed diminished vision, hand tremors, and weakness of lower extremities. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of cerebrospinal fluid revealed the presence of myeloid blasts. An isolated central nervous system relapse of leukemia was identified. Following high-dose systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy, the patient continued to do well. CONCLUSIONS The possibility of extramedullary blast crisis as an initial presentation in patients with CML should be considered. Further, an isolated central nervous system blast crisis should be considered if neurological symptoms evolve in patients who have shown a good response to therapy.

  3. Disruption of the estrogen receptor β gene in mice causes myeloproliferative disease resembling chronic myeloid leukemia with lymphoid blast crisis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Gil-Jin; Wang, Ling; Andersson, Sandra; Nagy, Noémi; Kis, Loránd Levente; Zhang, Qinghong; Mäkelä, Sari; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2003-01-01

    Proliferation of pluripotent, bone marrow stem cells, which develop to lymphoid and myeloid progenitors, is negatively regulated by estrogen. Although in estrogen deficiency and in estrogen receptor knockout mice there is significant alteration in bone marrow hematopoiesis, the effects of aging on estrogen receptor deficiencies in mice have not been investigated yet. In this study we show that by 1.5 years of age, estrogen receptor β knockout (ERβ–/–) mice develop pronounced splenomegaly that is much more severe in females than in males. Further characterization of these mice revealed myelogenous hyperplasia in bone marrow, an increase in the number of granulocytes and B lymphocytes in blood, lymphadenopathy, and infiltration of leukocytes in the liver and lung. Analysis by flow cytometry of the bone marrow cells revealed that the percentage and total number of Gr-1hi/Mac-1hi-positive granulocytes were increased by 15–30% and 100%, respectively. The numbers of B cells in the bone marrow and spleen were significantly higher in ERβ–/– mice than in WT littermates. Some of the ERβ–/– mice also had a severe lymphoproliferative phenotype. Thus the absence of ERβ results in a myeloproliferative disease resembling human chronic myeloid leukemia with lymphoid blast crisis. Our results indicate a previously unknown role for ERβ in regulating the differentiation of pluripotent hematopoietic progenitor cells and suggest that the ERβ–/– mouse is a potential model for myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. Furthermore, we suggest that ERβ agonists might have clinical value in the treatment of leukemia. PMID:12740446

  4. Chemopreventive effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation in experimental myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Emily R.; Kudva, Avinash K.; Quickel, Michael D.; Goodfield, Laura L.; Kennett, Mary J.; Whelan, Jay; Paulson, Robert F.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for treatment of myeloid leukemia do not eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSC), leading to disease relapse. In this study, we supplemented mice with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5), a polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid, at pharmacological levels, to examine if the endogenous metabolite, cyclopentenone prostaglandin delta-12 PGJ3 (Δ12-PGJ3), was effective in targeting LSCs in experimental leukemia. EPA supplementation for eight weeks resulted in enhanced endogenous production of Δ12-PGJ3 that was blocked by indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) induced by bone marrow transplantation of BCR-ABL-expressing hematopoietic stem cells, mice supplemented with EPA showed a decrease in the LSC population, reduced splenomegaly and leukocytosis, when compared to mice on an oleic acid diet. Supplementation of CML mice carrying the T315I mutation (in BCR-ABL) with EPA resulted in a similar effect. Indomethacin blocked the EPA effect and increased the severity of BCR-ABL-induced CML and decreased apoptosis. Δ12-PGJ3 rescued indomethacin-treated BCR-ABL mice and decreased LSCs. Inhibition of hematopoietic-prostaglandin D synthase (H-PGDS) by HQL-79 in EPA-supplemented CML mice also blocked the effect of EPA. In addition, EPA supplementation was effective in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia. Supplemented mice exhibited a decrease in leukemia burden and a decrease in the LSC colony-forming unit (LSC-CFU). The decrease in LSCs was confirmed through serial transplantation assays in all disease models. The results support a chemopreventive role for EPA in myeloid leukemia, which is dependent on the ability to efficiently convert EPA to endogenous cyclooxygenase-derived prostanoids, including Δ12-PGJ3. PMID:26290393

  5. Precision and prognostic value of clone-specific minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Pierre; Tang, Ruoping; Abermil, Nassera; Flandrin, Pascale; Moatti, Hannah; Favale, Fabrizia; Suner, Ludovic; Lorre, Florence; Marzac, Christophe; Fava, Fanny; Mamez, Anne-Claire; Lapusan, Simona; Isnard, Françoise; Mohty, Mohamad; Legrand, Ollivier; Douay, Luc; Bilhou-Nabera, Chrystele; Delhommeau, François

    2017-03-16

    The genetic landscape of adult acute myeloid leukemias has been recently unraveled. However, due to their genetic heterogeneity, only a handful of markers are currently used for the evaluation of minimal residual disease. Recent studies using multi-target strategies indicate that detection of residual mutations in less than 5% of cells in complete remission is associated with a better survival. Here, in a series of 69 acute myeloid leukemias with known clonal architecture, we design a clone-specific strategy based on fluorescent in situ hybridization and high-sensitivity next generation sequencing to detect chromosomal aberrations and mutations, respectively, in follow-up samples. The combination of these techniques allows tracking chromosomal and genomic lesions down to 0.5-0.4% of the cell population in remission samples. By testing all lesions in follow-up samples from 65/69 evaluable patients, we find that initiating events often persist, and appear to be, alone, inappropriate markers to predict short term relapse. In contrast, the persistence of two or more lesions in more than 0.4% of the cells from remission samples is strongly associated with lower leukemia-free and overall survivals in univariate and multivariate analyses. Although larger prospective studies are needed to extend these results, our data show that a personalized, clone-specific, minimal residual disease follow-up strategy is feasible in the vast majority of acute myeloid leukemia cases.

  6. Molecular Targeting of the Oncoprotein PLK1 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: RO3280, a Novel PLK1 Inhibitor, Induces Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, He; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Fang, Fang; Su, Guang-Hao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Gang; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Hui-Ting; Wu, Yi; Jin, Mei-Fang; Liu, Lin; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan; Zhu, Xue-Ming; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is highly expressed in many cancers and therefore a biomarker of transformation and potential target for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RO3280 was recently identified as a novel PLK1 inhibitor; however its therapeutic effects in leukemia treatment are still unknown. We found that the PLK1 protein was highly expressed in leukemia cell lines as well as 73.3% (11/15) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. PLK1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AML samples compared with control samples (82.95 ± 110.28 vs. 6.36 ± 6.35; p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that shorter survival time correlated with high tumor PLK1 expression (p = 0.002). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RO3280 for acute leukemia cells was between 74 and 797 nM. The IC50 of RO3280 in primary acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and AML cells was between 35.49 and 110.76 nM and 52.80 and 147.50 nM, respectively. RO3280 induced apoptosis and cell cycle disorder in leukemia cells. RO3280 treatment regulated several apoptosis-associated genes. The regulation of DCC, CDKN1A, BTK, and SOCS2 was verified by western blot. These results provide insights into the potential use of RO3280 for AML therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. PMID:25574601

  7. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites modulate risk of lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias and affect microRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNA dysregulation is a common event in leukemia. Polymorphisms in microRNA-binding sites (miRSNPs) in target genes may alter the strength of microRNA interaction with target transcripts thereby affecting protein levels. In this study we aimed at identifying miRSNPs associated with leukemia risk and assessing impact of these miRSNPs on miRNA binding to target transcripts. Methods We analyzed with specialized algorithms the 3′ untranslated regions of 137 leukemia-associated genes and identified 111 putative miRSNPs, of which 10 were chosen for further investigation. We genotyped patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 87), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 140), childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 101) and healthy controls (n = 471). Association between SNPs and leukemia risk was calculated by estimating odds ratios in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. For miRSNPs that were associated with leukemia risk we performed luciferase reporter assays to examine whether they influence miRNA binding. Results Here we show that variant alleles of TLX1_rs2742038 and ETV6_rs1573613 were associated with increased risk of childhood ALL (OR (95% CI) = 3.97 (1.43-11.02) and 1.9 (1.16-3.11), respectively), while PML_rs9479 was associated with decreased ALL risk (OR = 0.55 (0.36-0.86). In adult myeloid leukemias we found significant associations between the variant allele of PML_rs9479 and decreased AML risk (OR = 0.61 (0.38-0.97), and between variant alleles of IRF8_ rs10514611 and ARHGAP26_rs187729 and increased CML risk (OR = 2.4 (1.12-5.15) and 1.63 (1.07-2.47), respectively). Moreover, we observed a significant trend for an increasing ALL and CML risk with the growing number of risk genotypes with OR = 13.91 (4.38-44.11) for carriers of ≥3 risk genotypes in ALL and OR = 4.9 (1.27-18.85) for carriers of 2 risk genotypes in CML. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that the C allele of ARHGAP

  8. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  9. Chronic meningitis by histoplasmosis: report of a child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G H; Pádua, S S; Park, M V F; Muller, R P; Passos, R M A; Menezes, Y

    2008-12-01

    Meningitis is a common evolution in progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children, and is asymptomatic in many cases. In leukemia, the impaired of the T cells function can predispose to the disseminated form. The attributed mortality rate in this case is 20%-40% and the relapse rate is as high as 50%; therefore, prolonged treatment may be emphasized. We have described a child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), that developed skin lesions and asymptomatic chronic meningitis, with a good evolution after prolonged treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate followed by fluconazole.

  10. Small Molecule Inhibitors in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From the Bench to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Muneera; DiPersio, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will eventually develop refractory or relapsed disease. In the absence of standard therapy for this population, there is currently an urgent unmet need for novel therapeutic agents. Targeted therapy with small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) represents a new therapeutic intervention that has been successful for the treatment of multiple tumors (e.g., gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelogenous leukemia). Hence, there has been great interest in generating selective small molecule inhibitors targeting critical pathways of proliferation and survival in AML. This review highlights a selective group of intriguing therapeutic agents and their presumed targets in both preclinical models and in early human clinical trials. PMID:25025370

  11. Therapeutic plateletpheresis in a case of symptomatic thrombocytosis in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Beenu; Saluja, Karan; Malhotra, Pankaj; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2004-12-01

    Extreme thrombocytosis is a frequent feature in myeloproliferative disorders which can predispose a person to thrombotic complications. As opposed to other myeloproliferative disorders, symptomatic thrombocytosis is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia. We describe a second case report of chronic myeloid leukemia (Ph chromosome positive) in a patient in chronic phase on hydroxyurea who presented with sudden onset digital cyanosis of the left hand, giddiness, headache and malaise due to extreme thrombocytosis. A 67% global reduction in the platelet count from 1553 x 10(9)/L to 513 x 10(9)/L after two therapeutic plateletpheresis procedures was seen. There was simultaneous improvement in all symptoms except cyanosis on the tip of the middle finger that progressed to dry gangrene. Dramatic reduction in the platelet count and ablation of symptoms by therapeutic plateletpheresis is an effective therapy and should begin as soon as possible.

  12. Microsphere-Based Multiplex Analysis of DNA Methylation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Gerald B.W.; Smith, Catherine; Figueroa, Maria E.; Kalos, Michael; Bagg, Adam; Carroll, Martin; Master, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of DNA methylation is characteristic of cancer cells and clearly influences phenotypes of various malignancies. Despite clear correlations between DNA methylation and patient outcome, tests that directly measure multiple-locus DNA methylation are typically expensive and technically challenging. Previous studies have demonstrated that the prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be predicted by the DNA methylation pattern of 18 loci. We have developed a novel strategy, termed microsphere HpaII tiny fragment enrichment by ligation-mediated PCR (MELP), to simultaneously analyze the DNA methylation pattern at these loci using methylation-specific DNA digestion, fluorescently labeled microspheres, and branched DNA hybridization. The method uses techniques that are inexpensive and easily performed in a molecular laboratory. MELP accurately reflects the methylation levels at each locus analyzed and segregates patients with acute myeloid leukemia into prognostic subgroups. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of MELP as a platform for simultaneous evaluation of DNA methylation of multiple loci. PMID:24373919

  13. ‘Acute myeloid leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2016 update'

    PubMed Central

    De Kouchkovsky, I; Abdul-Hay, M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 20 000 cases per year in the United States alone. Large chromosomal translocations as well as mutations in the genes involved in hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation result in the accumulation of poorly differentiated myeloid cells. AML is a highly heterogeneous disease; although cases can be stratified into favorable, intermediate and adverse-risk groups based on their cytogenetic profile, prognosis within these categories varies widely. The identification of recurrent genetic mutations, such as FLT3-ITD, NMP1 and CEBPA, has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in supportive care, the backbone of therapy remains a combination of cytarabine- and anthracycline-based regimens with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens, and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of AML. PMID:27367478

  14. [History, current status, and future prospects in clinical study of myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2009-10-01

    The fundamental principle of the treatment of AML (acute myeloid leukemia) is "total cell kill. " For remission induction, "response-oriented individualized therapy" was developed in Japan. However, the similar response rate was obtained by "set therapy," which became the present standard regimen. Regarding the post-remission therapy, consolidation therapy is conducted without further long-term maintenance/intensification therapy. For poor-risk patients, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation should be considered. To improve the therapeutic efficacy, the development of molecular targeted therapy will be indispensable. As for CML (chronic myeloid leukemia), the development of imatinib has completely changed the treatment strategy. The eradication of CML stem cells is the next challenging issue.

  15. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  16. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in a child with acute myeloid leukemia: successful treatment with daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Büyükcam, Ayşe; Karadağ Öncel, Eda; Özsürekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali B; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Sancak, Banu

    2016-12-01

    Multiple-drug-resistant enterococcal infections canbe a serious problem in pediatric patients particularly concomitance with severe underlying diseases and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment options in children are limited compared with adults. We report a 3-year old-boy with acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7 and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia successfully treated with daptomycin. Daptomycin may be an alternative therapy for VRE infections in children; more studies are needed for extended usage.

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation in a 3-year-old Standardbred gelding

    PubMed Central

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Setlakwe, Emile; Sallaway, John; Wood, Darren; Fromstein, Jordan; Arroyo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old Standardbred gelding with a history of pyrexia, persistent hemorrhage from the oral cavity, and a large, soft swelling at the junction of the caudal aspect of the mandibular rami and proximal neck was evaluated. The horse had neutropenia and anemia, with atypical granulated cells in a blood smear. Additional tests confirmed acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation, which has been reported in humans, cats, dogs, and cattle but not horses. PMID:27708445

  18. Acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation in a 3-year-old Standardbred gelding.

    PubMed

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Setlakwe, Emile; Sallaway, John; Wood, Darren; Fromstein, Jordan; Arroyo, Luis G

    2016-10-01

    A 3-year-old Standardbred gelding with a history of pyrexia, persistent hemorrhage from the oral cavity, and a large, soft swelling at the junction of the caudal aspect of the mandibular rami and proximal neck was evaluated. The horse had neutropenia and anemia, with atypical granulated cells in a blood smear. Additional tests confirmed acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation, which has been reported in humans, cats, dogs, and cattle but not horses.

  19. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia (mixed myeloid/B-cell) with Myeloid Sarcoma of the Thyroid Gland: A Rare Entity with Rarer Asssociation - Detected on FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Gaurav; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Agarwal, Shipra; Roy, Maitrayee; Jain, Deepali; Mallick, Soumyaranjan; Ahmed, Shamim; Tripathi, Madhavi; Gogia, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    Mixed phenotypic acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare clinical entity. MPAL associated with myeloidsarcoma (MS) is still rarer with only three cases mentioned in English literature. MS has been described in myriads of location, most commonly in skin, gums and lymph nodes. Although theoritically possible, it is very rare to find MS involving the thyroid gland. The diagnosis of MS can be elusive, very often masquerades and mislabeled as lymphoma. A high index of clinical suspicion coupled with PET/CT findings along with morphological clues and thorough peripheral blood, and bone marrow evaluation is mandatory for arriving at the definitive diagnosis. We report the case of a 58-year-old female presenting with thyroid swelling that was subsequently diagnosed to be MS of the thyroid with underlying MPAL (mixed myeloid/B-cell) only after 18F-FDG PET/CT, which revealed an unusual abnormal pattern of multifocal intense FDG uptake in the thyroid gland. PMID:28242986

  20. Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R.; Greipp, Patricia T.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after HCT that developed a BCR/ABL-1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to acute myeloid leukemia and relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: a deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias. PMID:25074248

  1. Patient- versus physician-reporting of symptoms and health status in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, Fabio; Rosti, Gianantonio; Aaronson, Neil; Cottone, Francesco; Angelucci, Emanuele; Molica, Stefano; Vignetti, Marco; Mandelli, Franco; Baccarani, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the reporting of health status and symptom severity, for a set of core symptoms related to imatinib therapy, between chronic myeloid leukemia patients and their treating physicians. Patients were asked to complete a questionnaire including questions on symptom severity and health status. The symptoms assessed were: abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, edema, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps, musculoskeletal pain, nausea and skin problems. The physicians were asked to complete a questionnaire for each of their patients entering the study. Four hundred twenty-two patients were included in the study. All respective paired physicians (n=29) completed the questionnaire, and thus the analyses are based on 422 patient-physician dyads. Agreement on symptom ratings ranged from 34% (for muscle cramps) to 66% (for nausea). For all symptoms, patients reported higher severity more often than their physicians. The three symptoms whose severity was most frequently underestimated by physicians were fatigue (51%), muscle cramps (49%) and musculoskeletal pain (42%). Health status was overestimated by physicians in 67% of the cases. Physicians and their patients with chronic myeloid leukemia often disagree in their ratings of the patients’ symptom severity. Most typically, physicians tend to underestimate symptom severity and overestimate the overall health status of their patients. Current findings support the use of patient-reported outcome measures as a possible means to enhance the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24241488

  2. p53 causes butein-mediated apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    WOO, SANG-MI; CHOI, YOUN KYNUG; KIM, AH JEONG; CHO, SUNG-GOOK; KO, SEONG-GYU

    2016-01-01

    Progression of chronic myeloid leukemia, marked by the oncogenic Bcr-Abl mutation, is tightly associated with an alteration of the p53 pathway. It is known that butein extracted from various plants represses cancer growth. Although the anticancer effects of butein are widely accepted, the mechanisms by which butein induces apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that butein-induced apoptosis was mediated by p53. KBM5 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells expressing wild-type p53 were more sensitive to butein compared with p53-null K562 CML cells in terms of apoptotic cell death. In addition, butein arrested KBM5 cells at S-phase and altered the expression levels of certain cyclins and the p53-downstream targets, MDM2 and p21. In addition, while butein reduced the protein expression of MDM2 in the KBM5 and K562 cells, it resulted in proteasome-independent MDM2 degradation in p53-expressing KBM5 cells, however, not in p53-null K562 cells. Therefore, the present study suggested that p53 causes the butein-mediated apoptosis of leukemic cells. PMID:26676515

  3. Improving the outcomes of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia in a Brazilian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sandes, Alex Freire; da Costa Ribeiro, Juliana Correa; Barroso, Rodrigo S.; Silva, Maria R.R.; Chauffaille, Maria L.L.F.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were older than 60 years of age at the time of diagnosis following the implementation of a treatment algorithm based on age, performance status, and cytogenetic results. METHODS: We retrospectively compared the results of 31 elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients (median age of 74 years) who were treated according to the new algorithm. RESULTS: Fifteen patients with a good performance status and no unfavorable karyotypes were treated with either intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy (<70 years, nine cases) or adapted etoposide, 6-thioguanine and idarubicine (>70 years, six cases); 16 cases with a poor performance status or unfavorable cytogenetics received supportive care only. Six patients achieved a complete remission and two achieved a partial remission after chemotherapy. There were three toxic deaths during induction, two in the adapted etoposide, 6-thioguanine and idarubicine group and one in the intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy group. The overall median survival time was 2.96 months, 1.3 months in the supportive care group, and 4.6 months in the treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate the importance of treatment guidelines adapted to local resources in an attempt to improve the survival of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients in developing countries. PMID:21915480

  4. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  5. Myeloid cell differentiation arrest by miR-125b-1 in myelodysplasic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with the t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Marina; Quelen, Cathy; Rosati, Roberto; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; La Starza, Roberta; Bastard, Christian; Lippert, Eric; Talmant, Pascaline; Lafage-Pochitaloff, Marina; Leroux, Dominique; Gervais, Carine; Viguié, Franck; Lai, Jean-Luc; Terre, Christine; Beverlo, Berna; Sambani, Costantina; Hagemeijer, Anne; Marynen, Peter; Delsol, Georges; Dastugue, Nicole; Mecucci, Cristina; Brousset, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Most chromosomal translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involve oncogenes that are either up-regulated or form part of new chimeric genes. The t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation has been cloned in 19 cases of MDS and AML. In addition to this, we have shown that this translocation is associated with a strong up-regulation of miR-125b (from 6- to 90-fold). In vitro experiments revealed that miR-125b was able to interfere with primary human CD34+ cell differentiation, and also inhibited terminal (monocytic and granulocytic) differentiation in HL60 and NB4 leukemic cell lines. Therefore, miR-125b up-regulation may represent a new mechanism of myeloid cell transformation, and myeloid neoplasms carrying the t(2;11) translocation define a new clinicopathological entity. PMID:18936236

  6. Differential Effects of Polyphenols on Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human Myeloid and Lymphoid Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahbub, Amani A; Le Maitre, Christine L.; Haywood-Small, Sarah L.; McDougall, Gordon J.; Cross, Neil A.; Jordan-Mahy, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mortality rates for leukemia are high despite considerable improvements in treatment. Since polyphenols exert pro-apoptotic effects in solid tumors, our study investigated the effects of polyphenols in haematological malignancies. The effect of eight polyphenols (quercetin, chrysin, apigenin, emodin, aloe-emodin, rhein, cis-stilbene and trans-stilbene) were studied on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in four lymphoid and four myeloid leukemic cells lines, together with normal haematopoietic control cells. Methods: Cellular proliferation was measured by CellTiter-Glo® luminescent assay; and cell cycle arrest was assessed using flow cytometry of propidium iodide stained cells. Apoptosis was investigated by caspase-3 activity assay using flow cytometry and apoptotic morphology was confirmed by Hoescht 33342 staining. Results: Emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene were the most effective polyphenols at decreasing cell viability (IC50 values of 5-22 µM, 8-33 µM, and 25-85 µM respectively) and inducing apoptosis (AP50 values (the concentration which 50% of cells undergo apoptosis) of 2-27 µM, 19-50 µM, and 8-50 µM respectively). Generally, lymphoid cell lines were more sensitive to polyphenol treatment compared to myeloid cell lines, however the most resistant myeloid (KG-1a and K562) cell lines were still found to respond to emodin and quercetin treatment at low micromolar levels. Non-tumor cells were less sensitive to all polyphenols compared to the leukemia cells. Conclusions: These findings suggest that polyphenols have anti-tumor activity against leukemia cells with differential effects. Importantly, the differential sensitivity of emodin, quercetin, and cis-stilbene between leukemia and normal cells suggests that polyphenols are potential therapeutic agents for leukemia. PMID:23796248

  7. Obatoclax potentiates the cytotoxic effect of cytarabine on acute myeloid leukemia cells by enhancing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chengzhi; Edwards, Holly; Caldwell, J Timothy; Wang, Guan; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ge, Yubin

    2015-02-01

    Resistance to cytarabine and anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a major cause of treatment failure for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Overexpression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and/or Mcl-1 has been associated with chemoresistance in AML cell lines and with poor clinical outcome of AML patients. Thus, inhibitors of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins could be novel therapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated how clinically achievable concentrations of obatoclax, a pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor, potentiate the antileukemic activity of cytarabine in AML cells. MTT assays in AML cell lines and diagnostic blasts, as well as flow cytometry analyses in AML cell lines revealed synergistic antileukemic activity between cytarabine and obatoclax. Bax activation was detected in the combined, but not the individual, drug treatments. This was accompanied by significantly increased loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Most importantly, in AML cells treated with the combination, enhanced early induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) preceded a decrease of Mcl-1 levels, nuclear translocation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1, and apoptosis. These results indicate that obatoclax enhances cytarabine-induced apoptosis by enhancing DNA DSBs. This novel mechanism provides compelling evidence for the clinical use of BH3 mimetics in combination with DNA-damaging agents in AML and possibly a broader range of malignancies.

  8. Cantharidin Overcomes Imatinib Resistance by Depleting BCR-ABL in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Chen, Jiao; Guo, Caixia; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Cantharidin (CTD) is an active compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine blister beetle and displayed anticancer properties against various types of cancer cells. However, little is known about its effect on human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, including imatinib-resistant CML cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether CTD could overcome imatinib resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cells and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms associated with the effect. Our results showed that CTD strongly inhibited the growth of both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant CML cells. CTD induced cell cycle arrest at mitotic phase and triggered DNA damage in CML cells. The ATM/ATR inhibitor CGK733 abrogated CTD-induced mitotic arrest but promoted the cytotoxic effects of CTD. In addition, we demonstrated that CTD downregulated the expression of the BCR-ABL protein and suppressed its downstream signal transduction. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that CTD inhibited BCR-ABL at transcriptional level. Knockdown of BCR-ABL increased the cell-killing effects of CTD in K562 cells. These findings indicated that CTD overcomes imatinib resistance through depletion of BCR-ABL. Taken together, CTD is an important new candidate agent for CML therapy. PMID:27989101

  9. Spred2 is involved in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Yue-Feng; Wu, Chu-Tse; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Qun-Wei; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Qing-Fang; Yan, Jun; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2010-03-19

    Spreds, a recently established class of negative regulators of the Ras-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway, are involved in hematogenesises, allergic disorders and tumourigenesis. However, their role in hematologic neoplasms is largely unknown. Possible effects of Spreds on other signal pathways closely related to Ras-ERK have been poorly investigated. In this study, we investigated the in vitro effects of Spred2 on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In addition to inhibiting the well-established Ras-ERK cascade, adenovirus-mediated Spred2 over-expression inhibits constitutive and stem cell factor (SCF)-stimulated sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1) and Mcl-1 expression, as well as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in CML cells. In K562 cells and primary CML cells, imatinib induces endogenous Spred2 expression. Spred2 silencing by stable RNA interference partly protects K562 cells against imatinib-induced apoptosis. Together, these data implicate Spred2 in imatinib-induced cytotoxicity in CML cells, possibly by inhibiting the Ras-ERK cascade and the pro-survival signaling molecules SPHK1 and Mcl-1. These findings reveal potential targets for selective therapy of CML.

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  11. Pretransplant HLA mistyping in diagnostic samples of acute myeloid leukemia patients due to acquired uniparental disomy.

    PubMed

    Dubois, V; Sloan-Béna, F; Cesbron, A; Hepkema, B G; Gagne, K; Gimelli, S; Heim, D; Tichelli, A; Delaunay, J; Drouet, M; Jendly, S; Villard, J; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-09-01

    Although acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been reported in relapse acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pretransplant aUPD involving chromosome 6 is poorly documented. Such events could be of interest because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from aUPD in leukemic cells may lead to erroneous results if HLA typing for hematopoietic stem cell donor searches is performed on blood samples drawn during blastic crisis. We report here six AML patients whose HLA typing was performed on DNA extracted from peripheral blood obtained at diagnosis. We observed LOH involving the entire HLA region (three patients), HLA-A, B, C (two patients) and HLA-A only (one patient). An array-comparative genomic hybridization showed that copy number was neutral for all loci, thus revealing partial aUPD of chromosome 6p21. When HLA typing was performed on remission blood samples both haplotypes were detected. A 3-4% LOH incidence was estimated in AML patients with high blast counts. Based on DNA mixing experiments, we determined by PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization on microbeads arrays a detection threshold for HLA-A, B, DRB1 heterozygosity in blood samples with <80% blasts. Because aUPD may be partial, any homozygous HLA result should be confirmed by a second typing performed on buccal swabs or on blood samples from the patient in remission.

  12. Sensitivity and engineered resistance of myeloid leukemia cells to BRD9 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Anja F.; Martin, Laetitia J.; Minder, Jessica; Roe, Jae-Seok; Shi, Junwei; Steurer, Steffen; Bader, Gerd; McConnell, Darryl; Pearson, Mark; Gerstberger, Thomas; Gottschamel, Teresa; Thompson, Diane; Suzuki, Yutaka; Koegl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells require the BRD9 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex to sustain MYC transcription, rapid cell proliferation, and a block in differentiation. Based on these observations, we derived small-molecule inhibitors of the BRD9 bromodomain, which selectively suppressed the proliferation of mouse and human AML cell lines. To establish these effects as on-target, we engineered a bromodomain-swap allele of BRD9, which retains functionality despite a radically altered bromodomain pocket. Expression of this allele in AML cells conferred resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of our compound series, thus establishing BRD9 as the relevant cellular target. Furthermore, we used an analogous domain-swap strategy to generate an inhibitor-resistant allele of EZH2. Our study provides the first evidence for a role of BRD9 in cancer and reveals a simple genetic strategy for constructing resistance alleles to demonstrate on-target activity of chemical probes in cells. PMID:27376689

  13. Next-generation sequencing identifies major DNA methylation changes during progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heller, G; Topakian, T; Altenberger, C; Cerny-Reiterer, S; Herndlhofer, S; Ziegler, B; Datlinger, P; Byrgazov, K; Bock, C; Mannhalter, C; Hörmann, G; Sperr, W R; Lion, T; Zielinski, C C; Valent, P; Zöchbauer-Müller, S

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of DNA methylation on the evolution/progression of Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We investigated the methylome of CML patients in chronic phase (CP-CML), accelerated phase (AP-CML) and blast crisis (BC-CML) as well as in controls by reduced representation bisulfite sequencing. Although only ~600 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in samples obtained from CP-CML patients compared with controls, ~6500 differentially methylated CpG sites were found in samples from BC-CML patients. In the majority of affected CpG sites, methylation was increased. In CP-CML patients who progressed to AP-CML/BC-CML, we identified up to 897 genes that were methylated at the time of progression but not at the time of diagnosis. Using RNA-sequencing, we observed downregulated expression of many of these genes in BC-CML compared with CP-CML samples. Several of them are well-known tumor-suppressor genes or regulators of cell proliferation, and gene re-expression was observed by the use of epigenetic active drugs. Together, our results demonstrate that CpG site methylation clearly increases during CML progression and that it may provide a useful basis for revealing new targets of therapy in advanced CML. PMID:27211271

  14. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Simone S.; Haladyna, Jessica N.; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Sinha, Amit U.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M.; Daigle, Scott R.; Jordan, Craig T.; Ernst, Patricia; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin–derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  15. Relative biological effectiveness of tritium for induction of myeloid leukemia in CBA/H mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J R; Myers, D K; Jackson, J S; Dunford, D W; Gragtmans, N J; Wyatt, H M; Jones, A R; Percy, D H

    1995-10-01

    To help resolve uncertainties as to the most appropriate weighting factor for tritium beta rays, a large experiment was carried out to measure the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritiated water compared to X rays for the induction of myeloid leukemia in male mice of the CBA/H strain. The study was designed to estimate the lifetime incidence of myeloid leukemia in seven groups of about 750 mice each; radiation exposures were approximately 0, 1, 2 and 3 Gy both for tritiated water and for X rays. The lifetime incidence of leukemia in these mice increased from 0.13% in the control group to 6-8% in groups exposed to higher radiation doses. The results were fitted to various equations relating leukemia incidence to radiation dose, using both the raw data and data corrected for cumulative mouse-days at risk. The calculated RBE values for tritium beta rays compared to X rays ranged from 1.0 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3. A best estimate of the RBE for this experiment was about 1.2 +/- 0.3. A wR value of 1 would thus appear to be more appropriate than a wR of 2 for tritium beta rays.

  16. Runx1 repression by histone deacetylation is critical for Setbp1-induced mouse myeloid leukemia development

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Bandana A.; Nguyen, Nhu; Makishima, Hideki; Hosono, Naoko; Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn O.; Negi, Vijay; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Du, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal activation of SETBP1 through overexpression or missense mutations is highly recurrent in various myeloid malignancies; however, it is unclear whether such activation alone is able to induce leukemia development. Here we show that Setbp1 overexpression in mouse bone marrow progenitors through retroviral transduction is capable of initiating leukemia development in irradiated recipient mice. Before leukemic transformation, Setbp1 overexpression significantly enhances the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and expands granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs). Interestingly, Setbp1 overexpression also causes transcriptional repression of critical hematopoiesis regulator gene Runx1 and this effect is crucial for Setbp1-induced transformation. Runx1 repression is induced by Setbp1-mediated recruitment of a nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) complex to Runx1 promoters and can be reversed by treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors Entinostat and Vorinostat. Moreover, treatment with these inhibitors caused efficient differentiation of Setbp1 activation-induced leukemia cells in vitro, and significantly extended the survival of mice transplanted with such leukemias, suggesting that HDAC inhibition could be an effective strategy for treating myeloid malignancies with SETBP1 activation. PMID:26205084

  17. MLL3 is a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Rappaport, Amy R; Kitzing, Thomas; Schultz, Nikolaus; Zhao, Zhen; Shroff, Aditya S; Dickins, Ross A; Vakoc, Christopher R; Bradner, James E; Stock, Wendy; LeBeau, Michelle M; Shannon, Kevin M; Kogan, Scott; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-05-12

    Recurring deletions of chromosome 7 and 7q [-7/del(7q)] occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant tumor suppressors on 7q remains unclear. Using RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, we show that an ∼50% reduction in gene dosage of the mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) gene, located on 7q36.1, cooperates with other events occurring in -7/del(7q) AMLs to promote leukemogenesis. Mll3 suppression impairs the differentiation of HSPC. Interestingly, Mll3-suppressed leukemias, like human -7/del(7q) AMLs, are refractory to conventional chemotherapy but sensitive to the BET inhibitor JQ1. Thus, our mouse model functionally validates MLL3 as a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor and suggests a therapeutic option for this aggressive disease.

  18. Histone demethylase RBP2 decreases miR-21 in blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minran; Zeng, Jiping; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiangyu; Huang, Tao; Fu, Yue; Sun, Ting; Jia, Jihui; Chen, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in the blastic phase (CML-BP) responds poorly to clinical treatments and is usually fatal. In this study, we found that the histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) demethylase RBP2 (also called JARID1A and KDM5A) is underexpressed in CML-BP. The RBP2 histone demethylase stimulates leukemia cell differentiation and inhibits cell proliferation. We identified miR-21 was directly downregulated by RBP2 and found that miR-21 downregulated PDCD4 expression in leukemia cells. By binding to miR-21 promoter and by demethylating of trimethylated H3K4 at the miR-21 locus, RBP2 downregulated miR-21 expression. This in turn activated PDCD4. In conclusion, RBP2 epigenetically downregulated miR-21 in blast transformation of CML. PMID:25575817

  19. Megakaryocytic blast crisis as a presenting manifestation of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pullarkat, Sheeja T; Vardiman, James W; Slovak, Marilyn L; Rao, Dinesh S; Rao, Nagesh P; Bedell, Victoria; Said, Jonathan W

    2008-11-01

    Acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare form of acute myelogenous leukemia and may occur either de novo or by transformation of a preexisting myelodysplastic or myeloproliferative process including blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Megakaryocytic blast crisis as the presenting manifestation of CML is extremely rare. We describe such a patient with no prior hematologic disease who presented with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia and extramedullary involvement, in whom the leukemic cells carried the BCR-ABL1 translocation as part of a complex karyotype. Using targeted sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (T-FISH) technique, we detected two copies of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene in the leukemic blasts while the neutrophils carried a single copy of BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, thereby proving the origin of the megakaryoblastic leukemia from a previously undiagnosed CML clone. Blast crisis as a presenting manifestation of CML is rare and detecting clonal evolution of acute leukemia by specialized cytogenetic techniques may have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  20. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  1. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  3. p53 loss promotes acute myeloid leukemia by enabling aberrant self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Zuber, Johannes; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Lintault, Laura; Kogan, Scott C.; Shannon, Kevin; Lowe, Scott W.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor limits proliferation in response to cellular stress through several mechanisms. Here, we test whether the recently described ability of p53 to limit stem cell self-renewal suppresses tumorigenesis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive cancer in which p53 mutations are associated with drug resistance and adverse outcome. Our approach combined mosaic mouse models, Cre-lox technology, and in vivo RNAi to disable p53 and simultaneously activate endogenous KrasG12D—a common AML lesion that promotes proliferation but not self-renewal. We show that p53 inactivation strongly cooperates with oncogenic KrasG12D to induce aggressive AML, while both lesions on their own induce T-cell malignancies with long latency. This synergy is based on a pivotal role of p53 in limiting aberrant self-renewal of myeloid progenitor cells, such that loss of p53 counters the deleterious effects of oncogenic Kras on these cells and enables them to self-renew indefinitely. Consequently, myeloid progenitor cells expressing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53 become leukemia-initiating cells, resembling cancer stem cells capable of maintaining AML in vivo. Our results establish an efficient new strategy for interrogating oncogene cooperation, and provide strong evidence that the ability of p53 to limit aberrant self-renewal contributes to its tumor suppressor activity. PMID:20595231

  4. Summary of the published Indian data on chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Manish K.; Sengar, Manju; Nair, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (LML) was recognized as a distinct entity in the mid-1800s. Since Nowell and Hunagerford initiated their research on CML in1960 our understanding in CML has been increasing. Imatinib became the preferred treatment from 2000 onwards as a result of its unprecedented success. The lack of structured Indian data on CML led to the formation of a CML data cansortuim which invited CML data albiet retro spartive form around the country including major cancer service providers both government and private. We provide a summary of published Indian data on CML here. PMID:27606306

  5. Novel Therapeutics for Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia: 2014.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    Effective treatment options for adults with therapy-related AML continues to be an area of unmet need. Genetic and molecular changes within these leukemias confer resistance to standard chemotherapy regimens. Emerging developmental therapeutics in this area has focused on several approaches. These include; novel delivery of chemotherapy as well as newer DNA-damaging agents delivered through antibody-drug conjugates, increased use of hypomethylating agents, and molecularly-directed small molecules against specific mutations commonly occurring in secondary AML. Results of this efforts are encouraging, but to date, no clear improvements have been demonstrated in this most difficult to treat population.

  6. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  7. miR-137 downregulates c-kit expression in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanping; Dong, Xiaolong; Chu, Guoming; Lai, Guangrui; Zhang, Bijun; Wang, Leitong; Zhao, Yanyan

    2017-02-16

    The oncogene c-kit plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the mechanism of microRNAs targeting c-kit in AML has not been determined in detail. Moreover, the role miR-137 in tumor cell proliferation remains controversial. The aim of this work was to verify whether miR-137 targets c-kit and to research the biological effects of restoring miR-137 expression in leukemia cells. We found that miR-137 binds specifically to the 3'-UTR of c-kit and suppresses the expression and activities of c-kit. There is a negative correlation between miR-137 and c-kit expression in both patients and cell lines determined by screening large clinical samples. We found that miR-137 can inhibit proliferation, promote apoptosis, and induce differentiation of c-kit+ AML cells. We determined that miR-137 can participate in the leukemogenesis by regulating c-kit, which could be used as a therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities in neutron-induced acute myeloid leukemias in CBA/H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Meijne, E.I.M.; Huiskamp, R.

    1996-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) induced in CBA/H mice by 1 MeV fission neutrons have been examined for chromosomal abnormalities by G-band analysis. In common with X-ray- and {alpha}-particle-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice, more than 90% (16/17) of the myeloid leukemias had chromosome 2 abnormalities, in this case, all interstitial deletions. Chromosome 2 breakpoints were not wholly consistent, but clustering in three specific G-band regions was observed. Very distal (H-region) breakpoints were more common in the neutron AMLs than in X-ray- or {alpha}-particle-induced leukemias. These data indicate that neutron-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice are not characterized by a specific chromosome deletion but that a variety of chromosome 2 deletion types are associated with the disease. Trisomy of chromosome 1 (12.5% AMLs) and aneusomy of chromosomes 6 (31% AMLs) and Y (37.5% AMLs) were noted. While chromatid breakage was observed occasionally in neutron-induced AML, no clear indications of persistent chromosomal instability or high levels of stable chromosomal change were apparent. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Asparaginase induces apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Ye, Li; Fan, Jiajun; Li, Yubin; Zeng, Xian; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Zhang, Guoping; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2015-02-28

    The antitumor enzyme asparaginase, which targets essential amino acid L-asparagine and catalyzes it to L-aspartic acid and ammonia, has been used for years in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), subtypes of myeloid leukemia and T-cell lymphomas, whereas the anti-chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) effect of asparaginase and its underlying mechanism has not been completely elucidated. We have shown here that asparaginase induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in K562 and KU812 cells. Apart from induction of apoptosis, we reported for the first time that asparaginase induced autophagic response in K562 and KU812 cells as evidenced by the formation of autophagosome, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)-positive autophagy-like vacuoles, and the upregulation of LC3-II. Further study suggested that the Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and Erk (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway were involved in asparaginase-induced autophagy in K562 cells. Moreover, blocking autophagy using pharmacological inhibitors LY294002, chloroquine (CQ) and quinacrine (QN) enhanced asparaginase-induced cell death and apoptosis, indicating the cytoprotective role of autophagy in asparaginase-treated K562 and KU812 cells. Together, these findings provide a rationale that combination of asparaginase anticancer activity and autophagic inhibition might be a promising new therapeutic strategy for CML.

  10. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  11. Isolated Hoxa9 overexpression predisposes to the development of lymphoid but not myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beachy, Sarah H; Onozawa, Masahiro; Silverman, Deborah; Chung, Yang Jo; Rivera, Mariela Martinez; Aplan, Peter D

    2013-06-01

    Hoxa9 is expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, although this expression is usually diminished as these cells undergo differentiation. In addition, aberrant expression of Hoxa9 is strongly associated with both T cell and myeloid leukemia in mice and humans. Despite this strong association, enforced expression of Hoxa9 in murine bone marrow or thymus has only shown a modest ability to transform cells. To investigate this question, we used Vav regulatory elements to generate a transgenic mouse that targets Hoxa9 overexpression to all hematopoietic tissues. High-level expression of the Hoxa9 transgene in the hematopoietic compartment was associated with embryonic lethality, as no pups from founders that expressed high levels of the transgene were born live. However, offspring of an additional founder line, which expressed lower levels of Hoxa9, developed a precursor T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, accompanied by spontaneous Notch1 mutations. In contrast to most murine models of leukemia associated with Hoxa9 overexpression, the Vav-Hoxa9 mice did not overexpress other Hoxa cluster genes, mir196b (a microRNA that is embedded in the Hoxa locus), Meis1, or Pbx3. The Hoxa9 transgenic mouse reported in this study provides a suitable system for the study of Hoxa9 collaborators that drive myeloid and lymphoid malignant transformation.

  12. Improved FRET Biosensor for the Measurement of BCR-ABL Activity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Mika; Fujioka, Mari; Kondo, Takeshi; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Li, Xinxin; Horiuchi, Kosui; O Satoh, Aya; Nepal, Prabha; Nishide, Shinya; Nanbo, Asuka; Teshima, Takanori; Ohba, Yusuke

    2017-02-02

    Although the co-development of companion diagnostics with molecular targeted drugs is desirable, truly efficient diagnostics are limited to diseases in which chromosomal translocations or overt mutations are clearly correlated with drug efficacy. Moreover, even for such diseases, few methods are available to predict whether drug administration is effective for each individual patient whose disease is expected to respond to the drug(s). We have previously developed a biosensor based on the principle of Förster resonance energy transfer to measure the activity of the tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL and its response to drug treatment in patient-derived chronic myeloid leukemia cells. The biosensor harbors CrkL, one of the major substrates of BCR-ABL, and is therefore named Pickles after phosphorylation indicator of CrkL en substrate. The efficacy of this technique as a clinical test has been demonstrated, but the number of cells available for analysis is limited in a case-dependent manner, owing to the cleavage of the biosensor in patient-derived leukemia cells. Here, we describe an improved biosensor with an amino acid substitution and a nuclear export signal being introduced. Of the two predicted cleavage positions in CrkL, the mutations inhibited one cleavage completely and the other cleavage partially, thus collectively increasing the number of cells available for drug evaluation. This improved version of the biosensor holds promise in the future development of companion diagnostics to predict responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  13. Advances in the biology and therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: proceedings from the 6th Post-ASH International Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Workshop.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, Richard A; Mauro, Michael; Radich, Jerald P; Goldman, John M; Saglio, Giuseppe; Jamieson, Catriona; Soverini, Simona; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Martinelli, Giovanni; Perrotti, Danilo; Scadden, David T; Skorski, Tomasz; Tefferi, Ayalew; Mughal, Tariq I

    2013-06-01

    Following the 53rd annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego in December 2011, a group of clinical and laboratory investigators convened for the 6th Post-ASH International Workshop on Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN). The Workshop took place on 13-14 December at the Estancia, La Jolla, California, USA. This report summarizes the most recent advances in the biology and therapy of CML that were presented at the ASH meeting and discussed at the Workshop. Preclinical studies focused on the CML stem cell and its niche, and on early results of deep sequencing of CML genomes. Clinical advances include updates on second- and third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), molecular monitoring, TKI discontinuation studies and new therapeutic agents. A report summarizing the pertinent advances in MPN has been published separately.

  14. Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors of chronic myeloid leukemia express leukemia-associated antigens: implications for the graft-versus-leukemia effect and peptide vaccine-based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Agnes S. M.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Eniafe, Rhoda; Savani, Bipin N.; Rezvani, Katayoun; Sloand, Elaine M.; Goldman, John M.; Barrett, A. John

    2008-01-01

    The cure of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is attributed to graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects targeting alloantigens and/or leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) on leukemia cells. To assess the potential of LAA-peptide vaccines in eliminating leukemia in CML patients, we measured WT1, PR3, ELA2 and PRAME expression in CD34+ progenitor subpopulations in CML patients and compared them with minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) HA1 and SMCY. All CD34+ subpopulations expressed similar levels of mHAgs irrespective of disease phase, suggesting that in the SCT setting, mHAgs are the best target for GVL. Furthermore, WT1 was consistently overexpressed in advanced phase (AdP) CML in all CD34+ subpopulations, and mature progenitors of chronic phase (CP) CML compared to healthy individuals. PRAME overexpression was limited to more mature AdP-CML progenitors only. Conversely, only CP-CML progenitors had PR3 overexpression, suggesting that PR1-peptide vaccines are only appropriate in CP-CML. Surface expression of WT1 protein in the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells in AdP-CML suggest that they could be targets for WT1 peptide-based vaccines, which in combination with PRAME, could additionally improve targeting differentiated progeny, and benefit patients responding suboptimally to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, or enhance GVL effects in SCT patients. PMID:18548092

  15. Myb expression is critical for myeloid leukemia development induced by Setbp1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nhu; Vishwakarma, Bandana A.; Oakley, Kevin; Han, Yufen; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej

    2016-01-01

    SETBP1 missense mutations have been frequently identified in multiple myeloid neoplasms; however, their oncogenic potential remains unclear. Here we show that expression of Setbp1 mutants carrying two such mutations in mouse bone marrow progenitors efficiently induced development of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) in irradiated recipient mice with significantly shorter latencies and greater penetrance than expression of wild-type Setbp1, suggesting that these mutations are highly oncogenic. The increased oncogenicity of Setbp1 missense mutants could be due in part to their capability to drive significantly higher target gene transcription. We further identify Myb as a critical mediator of Setbp1-induced self-renewal as its knockdown caused efficient differentiation of myeloid progenitors immortalized by wild-type Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants. Interestingly, Myb is also a direct transcriptional target of Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutants as they directly bind to the Myb locus in immortalized cells and dramatically activate a critical enhancer/promoter region of Myb in luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, Myb knockdown in Setbp1 and Setbp1 missense mutations-induced AML cells also efficiently induced their differentiation in culture and significantly prolonged the survival of their secondary recipient mice, suggesting that targeting MYB pathway could be a promising strategy for treating human myeloid neoplasms with SETBP1 activation. PMID:27863435

  16. Molecular involvement and prognostic importance of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Sadaf; Shamsi, Tahirs; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2012-01-01

    AML (Acute myeloid leukemia) is a form of blood cancer where growth of myeloid cells occurs in the bone marrow. The prognosis is poor in general for many reasons. One is the presence of leukaemia-specific recognition markers such as FLT3 (fms-like tyrosine kinase 3). Another name of FLT3 is stem cell tyrosine kinase-1 (STK1), which is known to take part in proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of hematopoietic cells, usually being present on haemopoietic progenitor cells in the bone marrow. FLT3 act as an independent prognostic factor for AML. Although a vast literature is available about the association of FLT3 with AML there still is a need of a brief up to date overview which draw a clear picture about this association and their effect on overall survival.

  17. Oncogenic pathways of AML1-ETO in acute myeloid leukemia: multifaceted manipulation of marrow maturation

    PubMed Central

    Elagib, Kamaleldin E.; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2007-01-01

    The leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO occurs frequently in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has received much attention over the past decade. An initial model for its pathogenetic effects emphasized the conversion of a hematopoietic transcriptional activator, RUNX1 (or AML1), into a leukemogenic repressor which blocked myeloid differentiation at the level of target gene regulation. This view has been absorbed into a larger picture of AML1-ETO pathogenesis, encompassing dysregulation of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis at several mechanistic levels. Recent reports have highlighted a multifaceted capacity of AML1-ETO directly to inhibit key hematopoietic transcription factors that function as tumor suppressors at several nodal points during hematopoietic differentiation. A new model is presented in which AML1-ETO coordinates expansion of the stem cell compartment with diminished lineage commitment and with genome instability. PMID:17125917

  18. RHAMM/HMMR (CD168) is not an ideal target antigen for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Snauwaert, Sylvia; Vanhee, Stijn; Goetgeluk, Glenn; Verstichel, Greet; Van Caeneghem, Yasmine; Velghe, Imke; Philippé, Jan; Berneman, Zwi N.; Plum, Jean; Taghon, Tom; Leclercq, Georges; Thielemans, Kris; Kerre, Tessa; Vandekerckhove, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Background Criteria for good candidate antigens for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia are high expression on leukemic stem cells in the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low or no expression in vital tissues. It was shown in vaccination trials that Receptor for Hyaluronic Acid Mediated Motility (RHAMM/HMMR) generates cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and that these responses correlate with clinical benefit. It is not clear however whether this response actually targets the leukemic stem cell, especially since it was reported that RHAMM is expressed maximally during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In addition, tumor specificity of RHAMM expression remains relatively unexplored. Design and Methods Blood, leukapheresis and bone marrow samples were collected from both acute myeloid leukemia patients and healthy controls. RHAMM expression was assessed at protein and mRNA levels on various sorted populations, either fresh or after manipulation. Results High levels of RHAMM were expressed by CD34+CD38+ and CD34- acute myeloid leukemia blasts. However, only baseline expression of RHAMM was measured in CD34+CD38- leukemic stem cells, and was not different from that in CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells from healthy controls. RHAMM was significantly up-regulated in CD34+ cells from healthy donors during in vitro expansion and during in vivo engraftment. Finally, we demonstrated an explicit increase in the expression level of RHAMM after in vitro activation of T cells. Conclusions RHAMM does not fulfill the criteria of an ideal target antigen for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia. RHAMM expression in leukemic stem cells does not differ significantly from the expression in hematopoietic stem cells from healthy controls. RHAMM expression in proliferating CD34+ cells of healthy donors and activated T cells further compromises RHAMM-specific T-cell-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:22532518

  19. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  20. Platelet Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Does Imatinib Mesylate Improve It?

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Olga Meltem; Mutlu, Fezan; Gülbaş, Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of imatinib mesylate on platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release in chronic myeloid leukemia patients. Materials and Methods: Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by 5.0 mM adenosine diphosphate, 0.5 mM arachidonic acid, 1.0 mg/mL ristocetin, and 2 µg/mL collagen were studied by whole blood platelet lumi-aggregometer in 20 newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients before and after imatinib mesylate treatment. Results: At the time of diagnosis, 17/20 patients had abnormal platelet aggregation results; 8 (40%) had hypoactivity, 6 (30%) had hyperactivity, and 3 (15%) had mixed hypo- and hyperactivity. Repeat platelet aggregation studies were performed after a mean of 19 months (min: 5 months-max: 35 months) in all patients who received imatinib mesylate during this period. After therapy, 18/20 (90%) patients had abnormal laboratory results; 12 (60%) had hypoactive platelets, 4 (20%) had mixed hypo- and hyperactive platelets, and 2 (10%) had hyperactive platelets. Three of the 8 patients with initial hypoactivity remained hypoactive, while 2 developed a mixed picture, 2 became hyperactive, and 1 normalized. Of the 6 patients with initial hyperactivity, 4 became hypoactive and 2 developed a mixed pattern. All of the 3 patients with initial hypo- and hyperactivity became hypoactive. Finally, 2 of the 3 patients with initial normal platelets became hypoactive while 1 remained normal. There was a significant decrease in ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation after therapy (p<0.001), while platelet aggregation and secretion induced by other agonists showed no difference after treatment (p>0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of chronic myeloid leukemia patients have different patterns of platelet function abnormalities and imatinib mesylate has no effect on these abnormalities, with a significant impairment in ristocetin-induced platelet

  1. Molecular landscape in acute myeloid leukemia: where do we stand in 2016

    PubMed Central

    Al-Issa, Karam; Nazha, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clonal disorder characterized by the accumulation of complex genomic alterations that define the disease pathophysiology and overall outcome. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have described the molecular landscape of AML and identified several somatic alterations that impact overall survival. Despite all these advancement, several challenges remain in translating this information into effective therapy. Herein we will review the molecular landscape of AML and discuss the impact of the most common somatic mutations on disease biology and outcome. PMID:28154779

  2. Burkholderia cepacia septicemia in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia in postchemotherapy bone marrow aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mihaila, Romeo-Gabriel; Blaga, Lucian

    2013-01-01

    The patients with hematologic malignancies are predisposed to develop infections with unusual bacteria, like Burkholderia cepacia, which is frequently resistant to many antibiotics and antiseptics. We present the case of a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia type 2 on the background of myelodysplastic syndrome, from whom Burkholderia cepacia was isolated in blood culture, after the 2nd cycle of induction. She was sensitive to ceftazidime, but its eradication was not easy. Five other patients were contaminated with this bacteria, but all of them had favourable evolution. The case is discussed in the context of those similar in literature. PMID:24353735

  3. [Dipodascus capitatus (Geotrichum capitatum): fatal systemic infection on patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Thereza Christina Sampaio; Oliveira, Loiva Therezinha Otonelli; Landell, Melissa; Valente, Patrícia; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Pereira, Waldir Veiga

    2011-10-01

    The infections caused by Dipodascus capitatus are rare, and the treatment is difficult. We reported a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. The fungus was first isolated from hemocultures, and the phenotypic identification was based on mycological methods. The genotyping was carried out by sequencing the region D1/D2 from 26 rDNA. The susceptibility tests were assayed by Etest® and by the microdilution technique. None of the antifungal treatments employed were effective. The patient died on day 17 after the mycological diagnosis. The authors discussed the emergence of such infections as well as the difficulty regarding the diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Lymphoproliferative Disorders in Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A Single-Center Case Series.

    PubMed

    Alshehry, Nawal F; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Michelis, Fotios V

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders presenting simultaneously with or subsequent to the occurrence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have rarely been reported. Herein, we report 8 cases of a variety of lymphoproliferative conditions associated with CML at different times during the course of the disease. All 8 patients were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors at some point during the course of their illness. The literature regarding the uncommon association of these apparently unrelated disorders is reviewed as well as the possible underlying mechanisms that could be associated with this phenomenon.

  5. BCL2 Inhibition by Venetoclax: Targeting the Achilles' Heel of the Acute Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cell?

    PubMed

    Pullarkat, Vinod A; Newman, Edward M

    2016-10-01

    Venetoclax is an oral drug with an excellent side-effect profile that has the potential to revolutionize acute myeloid leukemia (AML) therapy in two areas. Venetoclax-based combination therapies could be a bridge to hematopoietic cell transplant with curative intent for patients with refractory/relapsed AML, and venetoclax-based therapy could provide meaningful survival prolongation for older patients with AML who are not candidates for more aggressive therapies. Cancer Discov; 6(10); 1082-3. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Konopleva and colleagues, p. 1106.

  6. Regression Analysis of Combined Gene Expression Regulation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Liang, Minggao; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is a combinatorial function of genetic/epigenetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV), DNA methylation (DM), transcription factors (TF) occupancy, and microRNA (miRNA) post-transcriptional regulation. At the maturity of microarray/sequencing technologies, large amounts of data measuring the genome-wide signals of those factors became available from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). However, there is a lack of an integrative model to take full advantage of these rich yet heterogeneous data. To this end, we developed RACER (Regression Analysis of Combined Expression Regulation), which fits the mRNA expression as response using as explanatory variables, the TF data from ENCODE, and CNV, DM, miRNA expression signals from TCGA. Briefly, RACER first infers the sample-specific regulatory activities by TFs and miRNAs, which are then used as inputs to infer specific TF/miRNA-gene interactions. Such a two-stage regression framework circumvents a common difficulty in integrating ENCODE data measured in generic cell-line with the sample-specific TCGA measurements. As a case study, we integrated Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) data from TCGA and the related TF binding data measured in K562 from ENCODE. As a proof-of-concept, we first verified our model formalism by 10-fold cross-validation on predicting gene expression. We next evaluated RACER on recovering known regulatory interactions, and demonstrated its superior statistical power over existing methods in detecting known miRNA/TF targets. Additionally, we developed a feature selection procedure, which identified 18 regulators, whose activities clustered consistently with cytogenetic risk groups. One of the selected regulators is miR-548p, whose inferred targets were significantly enriched for leukemia-related pathway, implicating its novel role in AML pathogenesis. Moreover, survival analysis using the inferred activities identified C-Fos as a potential AML

  7. Breakthrough disseminated zygomycosis induced massive gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia receiving micafungin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Sugawara, Yumiko; Sekine, Takao; Nakase, Kazunori; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man, who had been receiving prednisolone for 11 months for treatment of interstitial pneumonia, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. During induction therapy, he developed severe pneumonia. Although meropenem and micafungin were started, he died of circulatory failure owing to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Autopsy specimens obtained from the stomach revealed fungal hyphae, which had invaded diffusely into submucosal vessels and caused the massive gastric bleeding. The same hyphae were also observed in both lungs. A diagnosis of disseminated zygomycosis was confirmed by its characteristic histopathological findings. Because zygomycetes are spontaneously resistant to the newer antifungal agents, such as voriconazole or micafungin, it seems likely that the prevalence of zygomycosis as a breakthrough infection may increase in the future. Zygomycosis is a rare, but life-threatening, deep fungal infection that appears in immunologically or metabolically compromised hosts. Its manifestations are clinically similar to those of invasive aspergillosis. In addition to the well-established epidemiology of zygomycosis, this case suggests the following new characteristics. (1) Although the gastrointestinal manifestation of zygomycosis is relatively rare, it is observed more frequently than invasive aspergillosis. (2) Gastrointestinal zygomycosis occasionally leads to the development of necrotic ulcers and may induce hemorrhagic shock.(3) We should be cautious of an occurrence of breakthrough zygomycosis when we use echinocandins for patients with known risk factors, especially steroid use and neutropenia. (4) For patients who are receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics and echinocandins, who are negative for culture studies and aspergillus antigen, and who present with unresolved fever, it is important to make a prompt clinical diagnosis of zygomycosis.

  8. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Associated Hypercalcemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Tobón, David; Agosto, Sarimar; Ahmadi, Sara; Koops, Maureen; Bruder, Jan M.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Hypercalcemia Symptoms: Confusion • dehydration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolism Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Hypercalcemia associated with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an ominous sign. Although rare, several cases have been reported and multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms have been independently proposed. We present a patient case and a literature review of the clinical presentation and mechanisms of CML-associated hypercalcemia. Case Report: A 58-year-old male with a past medical history of CML diagnosed six years earlier, presented to the emergency department with one week of acute confusion, disorientation, polyuria, and polydipsia. On physical examination, we observed tachycardia, altered mental status, and dehydration. Blood analysis revealed leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and marked hypercalcemia (18.6 mg/dL). His chest CT scan showed diffuse lytic lesions and bone destruction concerning for diffuse bone marrow involvement. The patient was diagnosed with hypercalcemia in the context of a CML blast phase. Treatment with hydration, calcitonin, and zoledronic acid lead to control of his symptoms and normalization of his serum calcium levels. After discharged, the patient was maintained on palliative treatment and zoledronic acid management without new episodes of hypercalcemia. However, eight months later, the patient died. Conclusions: Evidence from the literature demonstrates a highly variable clinical presentation of CML-associated hypercalcemia, commonly occurring during an accelerated or a blast phase, and associated with poor survival. Multiple mechanisms could be involved and are not exclusive of each other. Better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in CML-associated hypercalcemia could lead to improvement in clinical and laboratory evaluation of these patients and be the foundation for the development of

  9. lncRNA co-expression network model for the prognostic analysis of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia-Qi; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Jing-Hua; Xu, Ping; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly heterogeneous hematologic malignancy with great variability of prognostic behaviors. Previous studies have reported that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in AML and may thus be used as potential prognostic biomarkers. However, thus use of lncRNAs as prognostic biomarkers in AML and their detailed mechanisms of action in this disease have not yet been well characterized. For this purpose, in the present study, the expression levels of lncRNAs and mRNAs were calculated using the RNA-seq V2 data for AML, following which a lncRNA-lncRNA co-expression network (LLCN) was constructed. This revealed a total of 8 AML prognosis-related lncRNA modules were identified, which displayed a significant correlation with patient survival (p≤0.05). Subsequently, a prognosis-related lncRNA module pathway network was constructed to interpret the functional mechanism of the prognostic modules in AML. The results indicated that these prognostic modules were involved in the AML pathway, chemokine signaling pathway and WNT signaling pathway, all of which play important roles in AML. Furthermore, the investigation of lncRNAs in these prognostic modules suggested that an lncRNA (ZNF571-AS1) may be involved in AML via the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway by regulating KIT and STAT5. The results of the present study not only provide potential lncRNA modules as prognostic biomarkers, but also provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms of action of lncRNAs. PMID:28204819

  10. Drosophila myeloid leukemia factor acts with DREF to activate the JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, H; Yoshioka, Y; Yoshida, H; Nakao, Y; Plessis, A; Yamaguchi, M

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor (dMLF), a homolog of human MLF1, oncogene was first identified by yeast two-hybrid screen using the DNA replication-related element-binding factor (DREF) as bait. DREF is a transcription factor that regulates proliferation-related genes in Drosophila. It is known that overexpression of dMLF in the wing imaginal discs through the engrailed-GAL4 driver causes an atrophied wing phenotype associated with the induction of apoptosis. However, the precise mechanisms involved have yet to be clarified. Here, we found the atrophied phenotype to be suppressed by loss-of-function mutation of Drosophila Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), basket (bsk). Overexpression of dMLF induced ectopic JNK activation in the wing disc monitored with the puckered-lacZ reporter line, resulting in induction of apoptosis. The DREF-binding consensus DRE sequence could be shown to exist in the bsk promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in S2 cells with anti-dMLF IgG and quantitative real-time PCR revealed that dMLF binds specifically to the bsk promoter region containing the DRE sequence. Furthermore, using a transient luciferase expression assay, we provide evidence that knockdown of dMLF reduced bsk gene promoter activity in S2 cells. Finally, we show that dMLF interacts with DREF in vivo. Altogether, these data indicate that dMLF acts with DREF to stimulate the bsk promoter and consequently activates the JNK pathway to promote apoptosis. PMID:24752236

  11. Critical molecular pathways in cancer stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaoyu; Peng, Cong; Sullivan, Con; Li, Dongguang; Li, Shaoguang

    2011-01-01

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL with kinase inhibitors in the treatment of Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is highly effective in controlling but not curing the disease. This is largely due to the inability of these kinase inhibitors to kill leukemia stem cells (LSCs) responsible for disease relapse. This stem cell resistance is not associated with the BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations resistant to kinase inhibitors. Development of curative therapies for CML requires the identification of critical molecular pathways responsible for the survival and self-renewal of LSCs. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of these critical molecular pathways in LSCs and the available therapeutic strategies for targeting these stem cells in CML. PMID:20574455

  12. Inhibiting autophagy potentiates the anticancer activity of IFN1@/IFNα in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Cao, Lizhi; Yu, Yan; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Liu, Ke; Huang, Jun; Kang, Rui; Livesey, Kristen M; Tang, Daolin

    2013-03-01

    IFN1@ (interferon, type 1, cluster, also called IFNα) has been extensively studied as a treatment for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The mechanism of anticancer activity of IFN1@ is complex and not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy, a mechanism of cellular homeostasis for the removal of dysfunctional organelles and proteins, regulates IFN1@-mediated cell death. IFN1@ activated the cellular autophagic machinery in immortalized or primary CML cells. Activation of JAK1-STAT1 and RELA signaling were required for IFN1@-induced expression of BECN1, a key regulator of autophagy. Moreover, pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy enhanced IFN1@-induced apoptosis by activation of the CASP8-BID pathway. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for an important mechanism that links autophagy to immunotherapy in leukemia.

  13. Therapeutic Resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zebisch, Armin; Hatzl, Stefan; Pichler, Martin; Wölfler, Albert; Sill, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is caused by malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells and displays the most frequent acute leukemia in adults. Although some patients can be cured with high dose chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the majority still succumbs to chemoresistant disease. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-coding RNA fragments and act as key players in the regulation of both physiologic and pathologic gene expression profiles. Aberrant expression of various non-coding RNAs proved to be of seminal importance in the pathogenesis of AML, as well in the development of resistance to chemotherapy. In this review, we discuss the role of miRNAs and lncRNAs with respect to sensitivity and resistance to treatment regimens currently used in AML and provide an outlook on potential therapeutic targets emerging thereof. PMID:27973410

  14. Inhibition of glutaminase selectively suppresses the growth of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells with IDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Ashkan; Jun, Sung Ah; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Fathi, Amir T; Minden, Mark D; Dang, Chi V

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is approximately 20%. These mutations result in distinct metabolic characteristics including dependency of cancer cells on glutamine as the main source for α-ketoglutarate, which is consumed by leukemia cells to produce a cancer-derived metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate. We sought to exploit this glutamine addiction therapeutically in mutant IDH primary AML cells from patients by measuring cell growth after exposure to a small molecule glutaminase inhibitor, BPTES. We found that BPTES only suppressed the growth of AML cells expressing mutant IDH compared with those expressing wild type IDH. This study lays the groundwork for strategies to target a specific subtype of AML metabolically with IDH mutations with a unique reprogramming of intermediary metabolism that culminates in glutamine dependency of cancer cells for survival.

  15. Partial remission of acute myeloid leukemia complicating multiple myeloma following COAP chemotherapy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shen, Man; Sun, Wan-Jun; Huang, Zhong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Jia; An, Na; Li, Xin

    2015-03-01

    A 77-year-old male was admitted to hospital after complaining of fever and a cough for three days. A diagnosis of multiple myeloma was confirmed following M protein identification and a bone marrow biopsy. The patient received chemotherapy regimens of bortezomib plus dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide and dexamethasone, and thalidomide and dexamethasone, and was prescribed thalidomide (100 mg/d) to be taken orally for maintenance therapy. After a further two years the patient was subsequently diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy regimens of cytarabine, aclacinomycin and daunorubicin, homoharringtonine and etoposide, and mitoxantrone and cytarabine resulted in no remission. Partial remission was obtained with a course of ifosfamide, vindesine, cytarabine and prednisone chemotherapy. This therapy may be an alternative treatment for secondary leukemia, particularly in elderly patients.

  16. Partial remission of acute myeloid leukemia complicating multiple myeloma following COAP chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, MAN; SUN, WAN-JUN; HUANG, ZHONG-XIA; ZHANG, JIA-JIA; AN, NA; LI, XIN

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old male was admitted to hospital after complaining of fever and a cough for three days. A diagnosis of multiple myeloma was confirmed following M protein identification and a bone marrow biopsy. The patient received chemotherapy regimens of bortezomib plus dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide and dexamethasone, and thalidomide and dexamethasone, and was prescribed thalidomide (100 mg/d) to be taken orally for maintenance therapy. After a further two years the patient was subsequently diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy regimens of cytarabine, aclacinomycin and daunorubicin, homoharringtonine and etoposide, and mitoxantrone and cytarabine resulted in no remission. Partial remission was obtained with a course of ifosfamide, vindesine, cytarabine and prednisone chemotherapy. This therapy may be an alternative treatment for secondary leukemia, particularly in elderly patients. PMID:25663902

  17. Essential role for telomerase in chronic myeloid leukemia induced by BCR-ABL in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The telomerase protein is constitutively activated in malignant cells from many patients with cancer, including the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but whether telomerase is essential for the pathogenesis of this disease is not known. Here, we used telomerase deficient mice to determine the requirement for telomerase in CML induced by BCR-ABL in mouse models of CML. Loss of one telomerase allele or complete deletion of telomerase prevented the development of leukemia induced by BCR-ABL. However, BCR-ABL was expressed and active in telomerase heterozygous and null leukemic hematopoietic stem cells. These results demonstrate that telomerase is essential for oncogene-induced reprogramming of hematopoietic stem cells in CML development and validate telomerase and the genes it regulates as targets for therapy in CML. PMID:22408137

  18. Suboptimal response in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib: early identification and new therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-12-01

    In 2006 European LeukemiaNet proposed recommendations to define several categories of chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated front-line with imatinib. In 2009 an update of these recommendations was published: whereas it is clear how important is to switch rapidly to a second line of treatment in failure patients, the correct treatment of patients with sub-optimal response is still a matter of debate. Several groups have indeed shown that prognosis of patients with sub-optimal cytogenetic response is similar to that of failure patients, whereas lack of data exists for patients with sub-optimal molecular response at 18 months. In this article, we overview studies demonstrating prognostic implications of being suboptimal responders to imatinib as well as results of recent clinical trials testing new generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in this setting.

  19. Early molecular response in chronic myeloid leukemia and halving time: Latest evidences.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Molica, Matteo; Colafigli, Gioia; Massaro, Fulvio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-09-01

    Achieving a BCR-ABL/ABL ratio <10% at 3 months has become an important goal of treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Several evidences showed that this early molecular response (EMR) is associated with positive long-term outcome in terms of overall survival and progression-free survival, but a consensus has not been reached when this goal is not achieved. European LeukemiaNet recommendations defined patients as treatment failure only after the 6- month time point. Not all patients that lack EMR have similar outcome and it became important to identify patients before this time point of 3 months. Several groups introduced the concept of "halving time" or "velocity of ratio reduction" that could anticipate the possibility to recognize patients deserving a switch to another treatment. Aim of this review is to summarize all evidences reported on the significance of EMR and how this evaluation changed our perspectives and modified our therapeutic strategies.

  20. Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia in cats infected with feline leukemia virus clone33 containing a unique long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Hisasue, Masaharu; Nagashima, Naho; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Fukuzawa, Isao; Ura, Shigeyoshi; Katae, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Ryo; Yamada, Takatsugu; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2009-03-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) clone33 was obtained from a domestic cat with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The long terminal repeat (LTR) of this virus, like the LTRs present in FeLV from other cats with AML, differs from the LTRs of other known FeLV in that it has 3 tandem direct 47-bp repeats in the upstream region of the enhancer (URE). Here, we injected cats with FeLV clone33 and found 41% developed myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias and dysplastic changes in the bone marrow. Some of the cats with MDS eventually developed AML. The bone marrow of the majority of cats with FeLV clone33 induced MDS produced fewer erythroid and myeloid colonies upon being cultured with erythropoietin or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-SCF) than bone marrow from normal control cats. Furthermore, the bone marrow of some of the cats expressed high-levels of the apoptosis-related genes TNF-alpha and survivin. Analysis of the proviral sequences obtained from 13 cats with naturally occurring MDS reveal they also bear the characteristic URE repeats seen in the LTR of FeLV clone33 and other proviruses from cats with AML. Deletions and mutations within the enhancer elements are frequently observed in naturally occurring MDS as well as AML. These results suggest that FeLV variants that bear URE repeats in their LTR strongly associate with the induction of both MDS and AML in cats.

  1. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  2. SPARC promotes leukemic cell growth and predicts acute myeloid leukemia outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alachkar, Houda; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Maharry, Kati; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mendler, Jason H.; Benito, Juliana M.; Hickey, Christopher; Neviani, Paolo; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Anghelina, Mirela; Khalife, Jihane; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Volinia, Stefano; Whitman, Susan P.; Paschka, Peter; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Han, Lina; Bolon, Brad N.; Blum, William; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Perrotti, Danilo; Andreeff, Michael; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Konopleva, Marina; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) gene, which encodes a matricellular protein that participates in normal tissue remodeling, is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, but the contribution of SPARC to malignant growth remains controversial. We previously reported that SPARC was among the most upregulated genes in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients with gene-expression profiles predictive of unfavorable outcome, such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2-R172) and overexpression of the oncogenes brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic (BAALC) and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG). In contrast, SPARC was downregulated in CN-AML patients harboring mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1) that are associated with favorable prognosis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that SPARC expression is clinically relevant in AML. Here, we found that SPARC overexpression is associated with adverse outcome in CN-AML patients and promotes aggressive leukemia growth in murine models of AML. In leukemia cells, SPARC expression was mediated by the SP1/NF-κB transactivation complex. Furthermore, secreted SPARC activated the integrin-linked kinase/AKT (ILK/AKT) pathway, likely via integrin interaction, and subsequent β-catenin signaling, which is involved in leukemia cell self-renewal. Pharmacologic inhibition of the SP1/NF-κB complex resulted in SPARC downregulation and leukemia growth inhibition. Together, our data indicate that evaluation of SPARC expression has prognosticative value and SPARC is a potential therapeutic target for AML. PMID:24590286

  3. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms.

  4. Co-operating STAT5 and AKT signaling pathways in chronic myeloid leukemia and mastocytosis: possible new targets of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Siham; Arslanhan, Melis Dilara; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Tchertanov, Luba; Moriggl, Richard; Valent, Peter; Arock, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis are myeloid neoplasms sharing a number of pathogenetic and clinical features. In both conditions, an aberrantly activated oncoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, namely BCR-ABL1 in chronic myeloid leukemia, and mutant KIT, mostly KIT D816V, in systemic mastocytosis, is key to disease evolution. The appreciation of the role of such tyrosine kinases in these diseases has led to the development of improved therapies with tyrosine kinase-targeted inhibitors. However, most drugs, including new KIT D816V-blocking agents, have failed to achieve long-lasting remissions in advanced systemic mastocytosis, and there is a similar problem in chronic myeloid leukemia, where imatinib-resistant patients sometimes fail to achieve remission, even with second- or third-line BCR-ABL1 specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. During disease progression, additional signaling pathways become activated in neoplastic cells, but most converge into major downstream networks. Among these, the AKT and STAT5 pathways appear most critical and may result in drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis. Inhibition of phosphorylation of these targets has proven their crucial role in disease-evolution in both malignancies. Together, these observations suggest that STAT5 and AKT are key drivers of oncogenesis in drug-resistant forms of the diseases, and that targeting STAT5 and AKT might be an interesting approach in these malignancies. The present article provides an overview of our current knowledge about the critical role of AKT and STAT5 in the pathophysiology of chronic myeloid leukemia and systemic mastocytosis and on their potential value as therapeutic targets in these neoplasms. PMID:24598853

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Translocation t(8;16) Presents with Features Which Mimic Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia and is Associated With Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Adi; Zickl, Lynette; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Jhanwar, Suresh; Gulam, Manjit A; Panageas, Katherine S.; Patel, Jay P.; Jurcic, Joseph; Maslak, Peter; Paietta, Elisabeth; Mangan, James K.; Carroll, Martin; Fernandez, Hugo F.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Luger, Selina M.; Douer, Dan; Litzow, Mark R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Levine, Ross L.; Tallman, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Previous small series have suggested that acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;16) is a distinct morphologic and clinical entity associated with poor prognosis. We describe 18 patients with t(8;16) AML, including their clinical, cytomorphologic, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features. Half of the patients had extramedullary disease, most commonly leukemia cutis, which often preceded bone marrow involvement and six had therapy-related AML. Patients with t(8;16) AML commonly present with clinical and pathological features that mimic APL, with promyelocytes and promyeloblast-like cells and coagulopathy in most patients. Several patients also presented with marrow histiocytes with hemophagocytosis and erythrophagocytosis. Comprehensive molecular analysis for co-occurring genetic alterations revealed a somatic mutation in RUNX1 in 1 of 6 t(8;16) patients with no known AML mutation in the remaining five t(8;16) patients. This suggests that the t(8;16) translocation could be sufficient to induce hematopoietic cell transformation to AML without acquiring other genetic alteration. These data further support classifying t(8;16) AML as a clinically and molecularly defined subtype of AML marked by characteristic clinical and cytomorphologic features that mimic APL, and is associated with very poor survival. PMID:23102703

  6. FoxO1-dependent induction of acute myeloid leukemia by osteoblasts in mice.

    PubMed

    Kode, A; Mosialou, I; Manavalan, S J; Rathinam, C V; Friedman, R A; Teruya-Feldstein, J; Bhagat, G; Berman, E; Kousteni, S

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, affect self-renewal and expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), as well as homing of healthy hematopoietic cells and tumor cells into the bone marrow. Constitutive activation of β-catenin in osteoblasts is sufficient to alter the differentiation potential of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors and to initiate the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice. We show here that Notch1 is the receptor mediating the leukemogenic properties of osteoblast-activated β-catenin in HSCs. Moreover, using cell-specific gene inactivation mouse models, we show that FoxO1 expression in osteoblasts is required for and mediates the leukemogenic properties of β-catenin. At the molecular level, FoxO1 interacts with β-catenin in osteoblasts to induce expression of the Notch ligand, Jagged-1. Subsequent activation of Notch signaling in long-term repopulating HSC progenitors induces the leukemogenic transformation of HSCs and ultimately leads to the development of AML. These findings identify FoxO1 expressed in osteoblasts as a factor affecting hematopoiesis and provide a molecular mechanism whereby the FoxO1/activated β-catenin interaction results in AML. These observations support the notion that the bone marrow niche is an instigator of leukemia and raise the prospect that FoxO1 oncogenic properties may occur in other tissues.

  7. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor–Associated Cardiovascular Toxicity in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Javid J.; Deininger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For most patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have turned a fatal disease into a manageable chronic condition. Imatinib, the first BCR-ABL1 TKI granted regulatory approval, has been surpassed in terms of molecular responses by the second-generation TKIs nilotinib, dasatinib, and bosutinib. Recently, ponatinib was approved as the only TKI with activity against the T315I mutation. Although all TKIs are associated with nonhematologic adverse events (AEs), experience with imatinib suggested that toxicities are typically manageable and apparent early during drug development. Recent reports of cardiovascular AEs with nilotinib and particularly ponatinib and of pulmonary arterial hypertension with dasatinib have raised concerns about long-term sequelae of drugs that may be administered for decades. Here, we review what is currently known about the cardiovascular toxicities of BCR-ABL1 TKIs, discuss potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular AEs, and elucidate discrepancies between the reporting of such AEs between oncology and cardiovascular trials. Whenever possible, we provide practical recommendations, but we concede that cause-directed interventions will require better mechanistic understanding. We suggest that chronic myeloid leukemia heralds a fundamental shift in oncology toward effective but mostly noncurative long-term therapies. Realizing the full potential of these treatments will require a proactive rational approach to minimize long-term cardiovascular and cardiometabolic toxicities. PMID:26371140

  8. Prognostic nomogram for previously untreated adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhuojun; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Yuandong; Gu, Weiying; Xie, Xiaobao; Jiang, Jingting

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to perform an acceptable prognostic nomogram for acute myeloid leukemia. The clinical data from 311 patients from our institution and 165 patients generated with Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network were reviewed. A prognostic nomogram was designed according to the Cox's proportional hazard model to predict overall survival (OS). To compare the capacity of the nomogram with that of the current prognostic system, the concordance index (C-index) was used to validate the accuracy as well as the calibration curve. The nomogram included 6 valuable variables: age, risk stratifications based on cytogenetic abnormalities, status of FLT3-ITD mutation, status of NPM1 mutation, expression of CD34, and expression of HLA-DR. The C-indexes were 0.71 and 0.68 in the primary and validation cohort respectively, which were superior to the predictive capacity of the current prognostic systems in both cohorts. The nomogram allowed both patients with acute myeloid leukemia and physicians to make prediction of OS individually prior to treatment. PMID:27689396

  9. Systematic analysis of hematopoietic gene expression profiles for prognostic prediction in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder initiated by the leukemogenic transformation of myeloid cells into leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Preexisting gene expression programs in LSCs can be used to assess their transcriptional similarity to hematopoietic cell types. While this relationship has previously been examined on a small scale, an analysis that systematically investigates this relationship throughout the hematopoietic hierarchy has yet to be implemented. We developed an integrative approach to assess the similarity between AML patient tumor profiles and a collection of 232 murine hematopoietic gene expression profiles compiled by the Immunological Genome Project. The resulting lineage similarity scores (LSS) were correlated with patient survival to assess the relationship between hematopoietic similarity and patient prognosis. This analysis demonstrated that patient tumor similarity to immature hematopoietic cell types correlated with poor survival. As a proof of concept, we highlighted one cell type identified by our analysis, the short-term reconstituting stem cell, whose LSSs were significantly correlated with patient prognosis across multiple datasets, and showed distinct patterns in patients stratified by traditional clinical variables. Finally, we validated our use of murine profiles by demonstrating similar results when applying our method to human profiles. PMID:26598031

  10. Systematic analysis of hematopoietic gene expression profiles for prognostic prediction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Varn, Frederick S; Andrews, Erik H; Cheng, Chao

    2015-11-24

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder initiated by the leukemogenic transformation of myeloid cells into leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Preexisting gene expression programs in LSCs can be used to assess their transcriptional similarity to hematopoietic cell types. While this relationship has previously been examined on a small scale, an analysis that systematically investigates this relationship throughout the hematopoietic hierarchy has yet to be implemented. We developed an integrative approach to assess the similarity between AML patient tumor profiles and a collection of 232 murine hematopoietic gene expression profiles compiled by the Immunological Genome Project. The resulting lineage similarity scores (LSS) were correlated with patient survival to assess the relationship between hematopoietic similarity and patient prognosis. This analysis demonstrated that patient tumor similarity to immature hematopoietic cell types correlated with poor survival. As a proof of concept, we highlighted one cell type identified by our analysis, the short-term reconstituting stem cell, whose LSSs were significantly correlated with patient prognosis across multiple datasets, and showed distinct patterns in patients stratified by traditional clinical variables. Finally, we validated our use of murine profiles by demonstrating similar results when applying our method to human profiles.

  11. Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R; Greipp, Patricia T

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after HCT that developed a BCR-ABL1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to AML to relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: A deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired a deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias.

  12. Tetraspanin CD82 Regulates the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of PKCα in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Termini, Christina M.; Lidke, Keith A.; Gillette, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have increased myeloid cells within their bone marrow that exhibit aberrant signaling. Therefore, therapeutic targets that modulate disrupted signaling cascades are of significant interest. In this study, we demonstrate that the tetraspanin membrane scaffold, CD82, regulates protein kinase c alpha (PKCα)-mediated signaling critical for AML progression. Utilizing a palmitoylation mutant form of CD82 with disrupted membrane organization, we find that the CD82 scaffold controls PKCα expression and activation. Combining single molecule and ensemble imaging measurements, we determine that CD82 stabilizes PKCα activation at the membrane and regulates the size of PKCα membrane clusters. Further evaluation of downstream effector signaling identified robust and sustained activation of ERK1/2 upon CD82 overexpression that results in enhanced AML colony formation. Together, these data propose a mechanism where CD82 membrane organization regulates sustained PKCα signaling that results in an aggressive leukemia phenotype. These observations suggest that the CD82 scaffold may be a potential therapeutic target for attenuating aberrant signal transduction in AML. PMID:27417454

  13. EWS/FLI-1 induces rapid onset of myeloid/erythroid leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Torchia, Enrique C; Boyd, Kelli; Rehg, Jerold E; Qu, Chunxu; Baker, Suzanne J

    2007-11-01

    EWS/FLI-1 is a chimeric oncogene generated by chromosomal translocation in Ewing tumors, a family of poorly differentiated pediatric tumors arising predominantly in bone but also in soft tissue. The fusion gene combines sequences encoding a strong transactivating domain from the EWS protein with the DNA binding domain of FLI-1, an ETS transcription factor. A related fusion, TLS/ERG, has been found in myeloid leukemia. To determine EWS/FLI-1 function in vivo, we engineered mice with Cre-inducible expression of EWS/FLI-1 from the ubiquitous Rosa26 locus. When crossed with Mx1-cre mice, Cre-mediated activation of EWS/FLI-1 resulted in the rapid development of myeloid/erythroid leukemia characterized by expansion of primitive mononuclear cells causing hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, severe anemia, and death. The disease could be transplanted serially into naïve recipients. Gene expression profiles of primary and transplanted animals were highly similar, suggesting that activation of EWS/FLI-1 was the primary event leading to disease in this model. The Cre-inducible EWS/FLI-1 mouse provides a novel model system to study the contribution of this oncogene to malignant disease in vivo.

  14. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor, nabumetone, inhibits proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vural, Filiz; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsan, Güner Hayri; Ateş, Halil; Demirkan, Fatih; Pişkin, Ozden; Undar, Bülent

    2005-05-01

    The anti-tumor effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors has been documented in several studies. COX2 inhibitors have attracted more attention because of the fewer side-effects and the more prominent anti-tumor effects. However, experience with these drugs in hematological malignancies is limited. In our study, a potent COX2 inhibitor, nabumetone (NBT), was investigated for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in K-562 and Meg-01 chronic myeloid leukemia blastic cell lines as a single agent or in combination with adriamycin (ADR) and interferon alpha (IFN-a). In these cell lines, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation was observed with NBT. We observed no significant apoptotic effect of NBT. However, NBT potentiated the apoptotic effect of ADR in the K-562 cell line. Bcl-2 expression was reduced by NBT (11% vs. 2%). The combination of NBT with IFN did not have any significant effect on the K-562 cell line. We suggest that NBT inhibits proliferation and potentiates the apoptotic effect of ADR in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

  15. Minimal PU.1 reduction induces a preleukemic state and promotes development of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Will, Britta; Vogler, Thomas O.; Narayanagari, Swathi; Bartholdy, Boris; Todorova, Tihomira I.; da Silva Ferreira, Mariana; Chen, Jiahao; Yu, Yiting; Mayer, Jillian; Barreyro, Laura; Carvajal, Luis; Ben Neriah, Daniela; Roth, Michael; van Oers, Johanna; Schaetzlein, Sonja; McMahon, Christine; Edelmann, Winfried; Verma, Amit; Steidl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Modest transcriptional changes caused by genetic or epigenetic mechanisms are frequent in human cancer. Although loss or near-complete loss of the hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice, a similar degree of PU.1 impairment is exceedingly rare in human AML; yet moderate PU.1 inhibition is common in AML patients. We assessed functional consequences of modest reduction of PU.1 expression on leukemia development in mice harboring DNA lesions resembling those acquired during human stem cell aging. Heterozygous deletion of an enhancer of PU.1, which resulted in 35% reduction of PU.1 expression, was sufficient to induce myeloid biased preleukemic stem cells and subsequent transformation to AML in a DNA mismatch repair-deficient background. AML progression was mediated by inhibition of expression of a PU.1 cooperating transcription factor, Irf8. Strikingly, we found significant molecular similarities with human myelodysplastic syndrome and AML. This study demonstrates that minimal reduction of a key lineage-specific transcription factor that commonly occurs in human disease is sufficient to initiate cancer development and provides mechanistic insight into the formation and progression of preleukemic stem cells in AML. PMID:26343801

  16. [Development of acute myeloid leukemia from donor cells after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a female patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Development of leukemia from donor cells is a rare complication of allogeneic blood stem cells (BSC). The paper describes a case of evolving acute myeloid leukemia of a graft in a patient with resistant acute monoblastic leukemia after related allogeneic peripheral BSC transplantation. The rarity of this complication, difficulties in providing evidence for the donor origin of a leukemic clone demonstrate a need for all-round careful dynamic assessment of the hematopoietic system after allogeneic transplantation, by applying the current cytogenetic (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and molecular (hypervariable genomic region amplification test using the polymerase chain reaction, hypervariable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), and short number of tandem repeats (STR)) techniques, which permits errors to be avoided in the assessment of a clinical situation and in the diagnosis of leukemia from donor cells. There is no developed policy for treatment of acute graft-versus-leukemia.

  17. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented.

  18. XIAP inhibitors induce differentiation and impair clonogenic capacity of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Etxabe, Amaia; Pratcorona, Marta; Tesi, Niccolò; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a neoplasia characterized by the rapid expansion of immature myeloid blasts in the bone marrow, and marked by poor prognosis and frequent relapse. As such, new therapeutic approaches are required for remission induction and prevention of relapse. Due to the higher chemotherapy sensitivity and limited life span of more differentiated AML blasts, differentiation-based therapies are a promising therapeutic approach. Based on public available gene expression profiles, a myeloid-specific differentiation-associated gene expression pattern was defined as the therapeutic target. A XIAP inhibitor (Dequalinium chloride, DQA) was identified in an in silico screening searching for small molecules that induce similar gene expression regulation. Treatment with DQA, similarly to Embelin (another XIAP inhibitor), induced cytotoxicity and differentiation in AML. XIAP inhibition differentially impaired cell viability of the most primitive AML blasts and reduced clonogenic capacity of AML cells, sparing healthy mature blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that XIAP constitutes a potential target for AML treatment and support the evaluation of XIAP inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:24952669

  19. Formaldehyde Exposure and Mortality Risks From Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Lymphohematopoietic Malignancies in the US National Cancer Institute Cohort Study of Workers in Formaldehyde Industries

    PubMed Central

    Dell, Linda D.; Boffetta, Paolo; Gallagher, Alexa E.; Crawford, Lori; Lees, Peter SJ.; Mundt, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate associations between cumulative and peak formaldehyde exposure and mortality from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other lymphohematopoietic malignancies. Methods: Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results: Acute myeloid leukemia was unrelated to cumulative exposure. Hodgkin lymphoma relative risk estimates in the highest exposure categories of cumulative and peak exposures were, respectively, 3.76 (Ptrend = 0.05) and 5.13 (Ptrend = 0.003). There were suggestive associations with peak exposure observed for chronic myeloid leukemia, albeit based on very small numbers. No other lymphohematopoietic malignancy was associated with either chronic or peak exposure. Conclusions: Insofar as there is no prior epidemiologic evidence supporting associations between formaldehyde and either Hodgkin leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia, any causal interpretations of the observed risk patterns are at most tentative. Findings from this re-analysis do not support the hypothesis that formaldehyde is a cause of AML. PMID:26147546

  20. Characterization of gene mutations and copy number changes in acute myeloid leukemia using a rapid target enrichment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bolli, Niccolò; Manes, Nicla; McKerrell, Thomas; Chi, Jianxiang; Park, Naomi; Gundem, Gunes; Quail, Michael A.; Sathiaseelan, Vijitha; Herman, Bram; Crawley, Charles; Craig, Jenny I. O.; Conte, Natalie; Grove, Carolyn; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Varela, Ignacio; Costeas, Paul; Vassiliou, George S.

    2015-01-01

    Prognostic stratification is critical for making therapeutic decisions and maximizing survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Advances in the genomics of acute myeloid leukemia have identified several recurrent gene mutations whose prognostic impact is being deciphered. We used HaloPlex target enrichment and Illumina-based next generation sequencing to study 24 recurrently mutated genes in 42 samples of acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype. Read depth varied between and within genes for the same sample, but was predictable and highly consistent across samples. Consequently, we were able to detect copy number changes, such as an interstitial deletion of BCOR, three MLL partial tandem duplications, and a novel KRAS amplification. With regards to coding mutations, we identified likely oncogenic variants in 41 of 42 samples. NPM1 mutations were the most frequent, followed by FLT3, DNMT3A and TET2. NPM1 and FLT3 indels were reported with good efficiency. We also showed that DNMT3A mutations can persist post-chemotherapy and in 2 cases studied at diagnosis and relapse, we were able to delineate the dynamics of tumor evolution and give insights into order of acquisition of variants. HaloPlex is a quick and reliable target enrichment method that can aid diagnosis and prognostic stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients. PMID:25381129

  1. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A.; Newton, Robert C.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479. PMID:22422826

  2. Simultaneous occurrence of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia with further evolution to lymphoid blast crisis.

    PubMed

    Esteve, J; Cervantes, F; Rives, S; Rozman, M; Zarco, M A; Montserrat, E

    1997-01-01

    The coexistence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in the same patient is rare. A 71-year-old woman developed a B-lineage lymphoid blast crisis at 18 months after diagnosis of Ph-positive CML. At this time, a lymphoid cell population with morphologic and immunophenotypic features of CLL was demonstrated. The retrospective review of the tests performed at diagnosis and thereafter disclosed the presence of lymphoid nodules in the initial bone marrow biopsy in the absence of lymphocytosis. Subsequently, there was an appearance of moderate lymphocytosis in the following months. Therefore, diagnosis of CML and coexistent CLL was established. Although a transient remission of blast crisis was achieved, blast cells reappeared two months later and the patient died shortly afterwards. Molecular studies of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IH) rearrangement pattern point to the origin of the diseases in two different cell clones. In addition, previously published cases of simultaneous CLL and CML are reviewed.

  3. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A; Newton, Robert C; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2012-05-17

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479.

  4. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells.

  5. The prognostic impact of germline 46/1 haplotype of Janus kinase 2 in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Batai, Arpad; Adam, Emma; Bors, Andras; Csomor, Judit; Gopcsa, Laszlo; Koszarska, Magdalena; Kozma, Andras; Lovas, Nora; Lueff, Sandor; Matrai, Zoltan; Meggyesi, Nora; Sinko, Janos; Sipos, Andrea; Varkonyi, Andrea; Fekete, Sandor; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Background Prognostic risk stratification according to acquired or inherited genetic alterations has received increasing attention in acute myeloid leukemia in recent years. A germline Janus kinase 2 haplotype designated as the 46/1 haplotype has been reported to be associated with an inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms, and also to acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of the 46/1 haplotype on disease characteristics and treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods Janus kinase 2 rs12343867 single nucleotide polymorphism tagging the 46/1 haplotype was genotyped by LightCycler technology applying melting curve analysis with the hybridization probe detection format in 176 patients with acute myeloid leukemia under 60 years diagnosed consecutively and treated with curative intent. Results The morphological subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with maturation was less frequent among 46/1 carriers than among non-carriers (5.6% versus 17.2%, P=0.018, cytogenetically normal subgroup: 4.3% versus 20.6%, P=0.031), while the morphological distribution shifted towards the myelomonocytoid form in 46/1 haplotype carriers (28.1% versus 14.9%, P=0.044, cytogenetically normal subgroup: 34.0% versus 11.8%, P=0.035). In cytogenetically normal cases of acute myeloid leukemia, the 46/1 carriers had a considerably lower remission rate (78.7% versus 94.1%, P=0.064) and more deaths in remission or in aplasia caused by infections (46.8% versus 23.5%, P=0.038), resulting in the 46/1 carriers having shorter disease-free survival and overall survival compared to the 46/1 non-carriers. In multivariate analysis, the 46/1 haplotype was an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival (P=0.024) and overall survival (P=0.024) in patients with a normal karyotype. Janus kinase 2 46/1 haplotype had no impact on prognosis in the subgroup with abnormal karyotype. Conclusions Janus

  6. Long noncoding RNA HULC promotes cell proliferation by regulating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinghao; Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian; Zhao, Peng; Xiong, Jie; Wang, Jishi

    2017-04-05

    Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HULC is associated with various human cancers. However, the role of HULC in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unknown. In this study, we found that HULC was remarkably overexpressed in both leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells derived from CML patients. The increase in HULC expression was positively correlated with clinical stages in CML. Moreover, the knockdown of HULC significantly inhibited CML cell proliferation and induced apoptosis by repressing c-Myc and Bcl-2. Furthermore, inhibition of HULC enhanced imatinib-induced apoptosis of CML cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HULC silencing markedly suppressed the phosphorylation of PI3K and AKT, indicating that enhancement of imatinib-induced apoptosis by HULC inhibition is related with the reduction of c-Myc expression and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway activity. Furthermore, HULC could modulate c-Myc and Bcl-2 by miR-200a as an endogenous sponge. Taken together, these results reveal that HULC promotes oncogenesis in CML and suggest a potential strategy for the CML treatment.

  7. IL-32θ gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia suppresses TNF-α production

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man Sub; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Hong, Jintae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α is highly expressed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has been demonstrated to induce rapid proliferation of leukemic blasts. Thus suppressing the production of TNF-α is important because TNF-α can auto-regulate own expression through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study, we focused on the inhibitory effect of IL-32θ on TNF-α production in acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately 38% of patients with AML express endogenous IL-32θ, which is not expressed in healthy individuals. Furthermore, plasma samples were classified into groups with or without IL-32θ; then, we measured proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels. TNF-α production was not increased in patients with IL-32θ expression than that in the no-IL-32θ group. Using an IL-32θ stable expression system in leukemia cell lines, we found that IL-32θ attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNF-α production. IL-32θ inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, inhibitor of κB (IκB), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which are key positive regulators of TNF-α expression, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Moreover, the presence of IL-32θ attenuated TNF-α promoter activity and the binding of NF-κB with the TNF-α promoter. In addition, IL-32γ-induced TNF-α production has no correlation with inhibition of TNF-α via IL-32θ expression. Thus, IL-32θ may serve as a potent inhibitor of TNF-α in patients with AML. PMID:26516703

  8. IL-32θ gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia suppresses TNF-α production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man Sub; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Hong, Jintae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2015-12-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α is highly expressed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has been demonstrated to induce rapid proliferation of leukemic blasts. Thus suppressing the production of TNF-α is important because TNF-α can auto-regulate own expression through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study, we focused on the inhibitory effect of IL-32θ on TNF-α production in acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately 38% of patients with AML express endogenous IL-32θ, which is not expressed in healthy individuals. Furthermore, plasma samples were classified into groups with or without IL-32θ; then, we measured proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels. TNF-α production was not increased in patients with IL-32θ expression than that in the no-IL-32θ group. Using an IL-32θ stable expression system in leukemia cell lines, we found that IL-32θ attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNF-α production. IL-32θ inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, inhibitor of κB (IκB), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which are key positive regulators of TNF-α expression, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Moreover, the presence of IL-32θ attenuated TNF-α promoter activity and the binding of NF-κB with the TNF-α promoter. In addition, IL-32γ-induced TNF-α production has no correlation with inhibition of TNF-α via IL-32θ expression. Thus, IL-32θ may serve as a potent inhibitor of TNF-α in patients with AML.

  9. New Recurrent Balanced Translocations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 8461

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Rao, Kathleen W.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Sterling, Lisa J.; Marcucci, Guido; Carroll, Andrew J.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are among the most valuable determinants of diagnosis and prognosis. In search of new recurrent balanced translocations we reviewed the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) cytogenetics database containing pretreatment and relapse karyotypes of 4,701 adults with AML and 565 with MDS who were treated on CALGB trials. We identified all cases with balanced structural rearrangements occurring as a sole abnormality or in addition to one other abnormality, excluded abnormalities known to be recurrent, and then reviewed the literature to determine whether any of what we considered unique, previously unknown abnormalities had been reported. As a result, we identified seven new recurrent balanced translocations in AML or MDS: t(7;11)(q22;p15.5), t(10;11)(q23;p15), t(2;12)(p13;p13), t(12;17)(p13;q12), t(2;3)(p21;p21), t(5;21)(q31;q22) and t(8;14)(q24.1;q32.2), and, additionally, t(10;12)(p11;q15), a new translocation in AML previously reported in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Herein we report hematologic and clinical characteristics, and treatment outcomes of patients with these newly recognized recurrent translocations. We also report 52 unique balanced translocations, together with the clinical data of patients harboring them, that to our knowledge have not been previously published. We hope that once the awareness of their existence is increased, some of these translocations may become recognized as novel recurring abnormalities. Identification of additional cases with both the new recurrent and the unique balanced translocations will enable determination of their prognostic significance and help to provide insights into the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in patients with these rare abnormalities. PMID:23225546

  10. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  11. Identification of a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband among patients with myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Asou, Hiroya; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Yuko; Nagamachi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Aki, Daisuke; Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-05-29

    Monosomy 7 and interstitial deletions in the long arm of chromosome 7 (-7/7q-) is a common nonrandom chromosomal abnormality found frequently in myeloid disorders including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Using a short probe-based microarray comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH) technology, we identified a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband, which is adjacent to 'hot deletion region' thus far identified by conventional methods. This common microdeletion cluster contains three poorly characterized genes; Samd9, Samd9L, and a putative gene LOC253012, which we named Miki. Gene copy number assessment of three genes by real-time PCR revealed heterozygous deletion of these three genes in adult patients with AML and MDS at high frequency, in addition to JMML patients. Miki locates to mitotic spindles and centrosomes and downregulation of Miki by RNA interference induced abnormalities in mitosis and nuclear morphology, similar to myelodysplasia. In addition, a recent report indicated Samd9 as a tumor suppressor. These findings indicate the usefulness of the short probe-based CGH to detect microdeletions. The three genes located to 7q21.3 would be candidates for myeloid tumor-suppressor genes on 7q.

  12. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aveic, Sanja; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  13. BAG1: The Guardian of Anti-Apoptotic Proteins in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aveic, Sanja; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance. PMID:22016818

  14. Characterization of a newly identified ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Characterization of novel fusion genes in acute leukemia is important for gaining information about leukemia genesis. We describe the characterization of a new ETV6 fusion gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) FAB M0 as a result of an uncommon translocation involving chromosomes 12 and 15. Methods The ETV6 locus at 12p13 was shown to be translocated and to constitute the 5' end of the fusion product by ETV6 break apart fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). To identify a fusion partner 3' rapid amplification of cDNA-ends with polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR) was performed followed by cloning and sequencing. Results The NTRK3 gene on chromosome 15 was found to constitute the 3' end of the fusion gene and the underlying ETV6-NTRK3 rearrangement was verified by reverse transcriptase PCR. No RNA of the reciprocal NTRK3-ETV6 fusion gene could be detected. Conclusion We have characterized a novel ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript which has not been previously described in AML FAB M0 by FISH and RACE PCR. ETV6-NTRK3 rearrangements have been described in secretory breast carcinoma and congenital fibrosarcoma. PMID:21401966

  15. Molecular landscape of acute myeloid leukemia in younger adults and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, David; Ivey, Adam; Huntly, Brian J P

    2016-01-07

    Recent major advances in understanding the molecular basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provide a double-edged sword. Although defining the topology and key features of the molecular landscape are fundamental to development of novel treatment approaches and provide opportunities for greater individualization of therapy, confirmation of the genetic complexity presents a huge challenge to successful translation into routine clinical practice. It is now clear that many genes are recurrently mutated in AML; moreover, individual leukemias harbor multiple mutations and are potentially composed of subclones with differing mutational composition, rendering each patient's AML genetically unique. In order to make sense of the overwhelming mutational data and capitalize on this clinically, it is important to identify (1) critical AML-defining molecular abnormalities that distinguish biological disease entities; (2) mutations, typically arising in subclones, that may influence prognosis but are unlikely to be ideal therapeutic targets; (3) mutations associated with preleukemic clones; and (4) mutations that have been robustly shown to confer independent prognostic information or are therapeutically relevant. The reward of identifying AML-defining molecular lesions present in all leukemic populations (including subclones) has been exemplified by acute promyelocytic leukemia, where successful targeting of the underlying PML-RARα oncoprotein has eliminated the need for chemotherapy for disease cure. Despite the molecular heterogeneity and recognizing that treatment options for other forms of AML are limited, this review will consider the scope for using novel molecular information to improve diagnosis, identify subsets of patients eligible for targeted therapies, refine outcome prediction, and track treatment response.

  16. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia with a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction.

    PubMed

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Dassé, Emilie; Coulibaly, Anna; Steinmann, Simone; Jakobs, Anke; Schomburg, Caroline; Trentmann, Amke; Jose, Joachim; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schmidt, Thomas J; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Frampton, Jon; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-03

    The transcription factor Myb plays a key role in the hematopoietic system and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. However, because of a lack of suitable inhibitors, the feasibility of therapeutic approaches based on Myb inhibition has not been explored. We have identified the triterpenoid Celastrol as a potent low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the interaction of Myb with its cooperation partner p300. We demonstrate that Celastrol suppresses the proliferative potential of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells while not affecting normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, Celastrol prolongs the survival of mice in a model of an aggressive AML. Overall, our work demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction for the treatment of AML and provides a starting point for the further development of Myb-inhibitory compounds for the treatment of leukemia and, possibly, other tumors driven by deregulated Myb.

  17. Alternative splicing in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML): a novel therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Adamia, Sophia; Pilarski, Patrick M; Bar-Natan, Michal; Stone, Richard M; Griffin, James D

    2013-09-01

    Although the imatinib based therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) represents a triumph of medicine, not all patients with CML benefit from this drug due to the development of resistance and intolerance. The interruption of imatinib treatment is often followed by clinical relapse, suggesting a failure in the killing of residual leukaemic stem cells. There is need to identify alternative selective molecular targets for this disease and develop more effective therapeutic approaches. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is an epigenetic process that greatly diversifies the repertoire of the transcriptome. AS orchestrates interactions between various types of proteins and between proteins and nucleic acids. Changes caused by individual splicing events in the cells are small, however, "splicing programs" typically react to these individual changes with considerable effects in cell proliferation, cell survival, and apoptosis. Current evidence suggests a pivotal role of AS in leukemias, particularly in myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS) and chronic lymphocyte leukemia (CLL). From these studies and studies in other malignances, it is clear that splicing abnormalities play a significant role in malignant transformation. Evaluation of AS events in CML can be used to identify novel disease markers and drugsensitive targets to overcome the limits of the small molecule inhibitors currently used for treating patients with CML. The use of aberrant splice variants as disease markers has been reported, however, little is known about the use of splicing abnormalities as drug targets in CML. Herein we discuss potential therapeutic approaches that can be used to target splicing abnormalities in CML.

  18. Ocular Granulocytic Sarcoma as an Initial Clinical Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Identified on Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (GS) or chloroma, rare extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia and not infrequently, can be presenting clinical feature. Multiple studies have demonstrated the clinical utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in early detection and follow-up assessment of GS after chemotherapy. Commonly involved areas include bones, lymph nodes, breasts, and skin and not uncommonly, the disease can be multifocal. We present a rare case of ocular GS, where FDG-PET/CT in addition to the identifying the ocular mass, revealed multiple clinically occult extramedullary lesions. PMID:28242990

  19. An Integrated Analysis of Heterogeneous Drug Responses in Acute Myeloid Leukemia That Enables the Discovery of Predictive Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihsu C; Yuan, Julie S; Xing, Yan; Mitchell, Amanda; Mbong, Nathan; Popescu, Andreea C; McLeod, Jessica; Gerhard, Gitte; Kennedy, James A; Bogdanoski, Goce; Lauriault, Stevan; Perdu, Sofie; Merkulova, Yulia; Minden, Mark D; Hogge, Donna E; Guidos, Cynthia; Dick, John E; Wang, Jean C Y

    2016-03-01

    Many promising new cancer drugs proceed through preclinical testing and early-phase trials only to fail in late-stage clinical testing. Thus, improved models that better predict survival outcomes and enable the development of biomarkers are needed to identify patients most likely to respond to and benefit from therapy. Here, we describe a comprehensive approach in which we incorporated biobanking, xenografting, and multiplexed phospho-flow (PF) cytometric profiling to study drug response and identify predictive biomarkers in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. To test the efficacy of our approach, we evaluated the investigational JAK2 inhibitor fedratinib (FED) in 64 patient samples. FED robustly reduced leukemia in mouse xenograft models in 59% of cases and was also effective in limiting the protumorigenic activity of leukemia stem cells as shown by serial transplantation assays. In parallel, PF profiling identified FED-mediated reduction in phospho-STAT5 (pSTAT5) levels as a predictive biomarker of in vivo drug response with high specificity (92%) and strong positive predictive value (93%). Unexpectedly, another JAK inhibitor, ruxolitinib (RUX), was ineffective in 8 of 10 FED-responsive samples. Notably, this outcome could be predicted by the status of pSTAT5 signaling, which was unaffected by RUX treatment. Consistent with this observed discrepancy, PF analysis revealed that FED exerted its effects through multiple JAK2-independent mechanisms. Collectively, this work establishes an integrated approach for testing novel anticancer agents that captures the inherent variability of response caused by disease heterogeneity and in parallel, facilitates the identification of predictive biomarkers that can help stratify patients into appropriate clinical trials.

  20. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. RAD51 and XRCC3 gene polymorphisms and the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Mona S; El-Haddad, Alaa M; Bahaa El-Din, Neveen M; Makhlouf, Manal Mohamed; Abdel-Hamid, Samah M

    2011-10-01

    RAD51 (Rec A homolog of E. coli) is a polymorphic gene and one of the central proteins in homologous recombination-DNA-double-stand breaks (HR-DNA-DSB) repair pathway, which is vital in maintaining genetic stability within a cell. The x-ray repair cross complementing (XRCC3) protein also functions in HR-DNA-DSB repair pathway and directly interacts with and stabilizes RAD51 and the closely related RAD51C. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the RAD51 and XRCC3 repair gene polymorphisms among acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and to define their role in development of AML and its correlation with the clinical presentation, laboratory data as well as treatment outcome using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay in 50 de novo AML patients as well as 30 healthy subjects as a control group. Our study revealed that RAD51 G135C and XRCC3 Thr241Met alleles were associated with increased risk of AML with odds ratio (OR) of 2.833 and 2.909 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.527 to 8.983 and 1.761 to 9.788, respectively. Moreover, when combining the 2 genes polymorphisms, a significant elevation of the risk of AML was found with OR of 3.124 and 95% CI of 1.872 to 11.243. As regards treatment outcome, a highly statistical significant difference was found between XRCC3 genotypes with P value of 0.001, whereas no significant difference was present between RAD51 genotypes with P value of 0.29. This clarifies that XRCC3 gene polymorphisms was found to have a significant impact on the risk of treatment failure with OR of 3.560 and 95% CI of 1.167 to 10.875; however, RAD51 gene polymorphism was not found to have an equivalent effect with OR of 2.813 and 95% CI of 0.933 to 10.828. So XRCC3 gene polymorphism might be considered as a prognostic marker in AML. In conclusion, RAD51 and XRCC3 genes polymorphisms may play an important role in the development of AML.

  2. Psoriasis exacerbated by interferon-alpha in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ladoyanni, E; Nambi, R

    2005-01-01

    Interferon-alpha can exacerbate existing psoriasis and induce de novo psoriasis and psoriatic arthritits. The exact underlying mechanism is not very well understood. It is not a contraindication to treat patients with pre-existing psoriasis with interferon-alpha. In these patients interferon-alpha should be used with care and only if the potential benefits justify the potential risk. Control of psoriasis prior to initiation of interferon-alpha and simultaneous antipsoriatic therapy while on interferon-alpha are essential. We would like to report a 61-year-old male patient with stable psoriasis for over 20 years, who experienced exacerbation of his psoriasis after receiving interferon-alpha for chronic myeloid leukemia. The association between the interferon-alpha therapy and the exacerbation of his psoriasis was only recognized on rechallenge at the stage he was referred to our department.

  3. [Modern therapy of chronic myeloid leukemia: an example for paradigma shift in hemato-oncology].

    PubMed

    Leitner, A A; Hehlmann, R

    2011-02-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is exceptional amongst neoplasias since its underlying pathomechanism has been elucidated, and potent well tolerated targeted drugs, the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), are available for treatment. They convincingly improve prognosis while retaining good quality of life. Aims of therapy are complete remissions as well as prolongation of life and cure. Imatinib 400 mg per day is current standard therapy. There are hints for a better outcome with a higher initial imatinib dose or with combination therapy. Even after achievement of complete molecular response continuous therapy might be necessary in most cases. In case of imatinib intolerance or failure, the second generation TKI dasatinib and nilotinib and allogeneic stem cell transplantation are available. The use of second generation TKI as first line treatment might further improve prognosis. The therapeutic response should be regularly monitored according to international recommendations.

  4. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  5. Does aberrant membrane transport contribute to poor outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia in adults is a highly heterogeneous disease. Gene expression profiling performed using unsupervised algorithms can be used to distinguish specific groups of patients within a large patient cohort. The identified gene expression signatures can offer insights into underlying physiological mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Here, the analysis of several related gene expression clusters associated with poor outcome, worst overall survival and highest rates of resistant disease and obtained from the patients at the time of diagnosis or from previously untreated individuals is presented. Surprisingly, these gene clusters appear to be enriched for genes corresponding to proteins involved in transport across membranes (transporters, carriers and channels). Several ideas describing the possible relationship of membrane transport activity and leukemic cell biology, including the “Warburg effect,” the specific role of chloride ion transport, direct “import” of metabolic energy through uptake of creatine phosphate, and modification of the bone marrow niche microenvironment are discussed. PMID:26191006

  6. Evaluation of Improved Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Inhibitors in Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Theresa; Benajiba, Lina; Göring, Stefan; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor design lies in achieving high selectivity for one isoform over the other. The therapy of certain diseases, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may require α-isoform specific targeting. The scorpion shaped GSK-3 inhibitors developed by our group achieved the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported so far, but suffered from insufficient aqueous solubility. This work presents the solubility-driven optimization of our isoform-selective inhibitors using a scorpion shaped lead. Among 15 novel compounds, compound 27 showed high activity against GSK-3α/β with the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported to date. Compound 27 was profiled for bioavailability and toxicity in a zebrafish embryo phenotype assay. Selective GSK-3α targeting in AML cell lines was achieved with compound 27, resulting in a strong differentiation phenotype and colony formation impairment, confirming the potential of GSK-3α inhibition in AML therapy. PMID:26496242

  7. Institutional experience with clofarabine and cytarabine in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lucas; Fernandez-Navarro, Jose Maria; Del Mar Andres, Maria; Bautista, Francisco; Tasso, Maria; Verdeguer, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Cytarabine (1000 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) and clofarabine (40 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) were given every 28 days to 9 children with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia at our institution. Among 19 courses, there were 18 infectious episodes. Median hospitalization time was 13 days (7.7 to 30.5 d) per cycle. Hepatobiliary abnormalities included alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase elevation and hyperbilirubinemia. Four patients achieved complete remission (one after an earlier allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant). Four patients are alive disease free. In summary, a proportion of children responded and was able to receive allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant. Side effects were tolerable, although hospitalization time was prolonged.

  8. Clonal evolution of acute myeloid leukemia highlighted by latest genome sequencing studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehong; Lv, Dekang; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Quentin; Li, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Decades of years might be required for an initiated cell to become a fully-pledged, metastasized tumor. DNA mutations are accumulated during this process including background mutations that emerge scholastically, as well as driver mutations that selectively occur in a handful of cancer genes and confer the cell a growth advantage over its neighbors. A clone of tumor cells could be superseded by another clone that acquires new mutations and grows more aggressively. Tumor evolutional patterns have been studied for years using conventional approaches that focus on the investigation of a single or a couple of genes. Latest deep sequencing technology enables a global view of tumor evolution by deciphering almost all genome aberrations in a tumor. Tumor clones and the fate of each clone during tumor evolution can be depicted with the help of the concept of variant allele frequency. Here, we summarize the new insights of cancer evolutional progression in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27474172

  9. The Interface between BCR-ABL-Dependent and -Independent Resistance Signaling Pathways in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nestal de Moraes, Gabriela; Souza, Paloma Silva; Costas, Fernanda Casal de Faria; Vasconcelos, Flavia Cunha; Reis, Flaviana Ruade Souza; Maia, Raquel Ciuvalschi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoietic disorder characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome which resulted from the reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. The pathogenesis of CML involves the constitutive activation of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, which governs malignant disease by activating multiple signal transduction pathways. The BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib, is the front-line treatment for CML, but the emergence of imatinib resistance and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has called attention for additional resistance mechanisms and has led to the search for alternative drug treatments. In this paper, we discuss our current understanding of mechanisms, related or unrelated to BCR-ABL, which have been shown to account for chemoresistance and treatment failure. We focus on the potential role of the influx and efflux transporters, the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and transcription factor-mediated signals as feasible molecular targets to overcome the development of TKIs resistance in CML. PMID:23259070

  10. Combined Population Dynamics and Entropy Modelling Supports Patient Stratification in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehme, Marc; Koschmieder, Steffen; Montazeri, Maryam; Copland, Mhairi; Oehler, Vivian G.; Radich, Jerald P.; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Schuppert, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Modelling the parameters of multistep carcinogenesis is key for a better understanding of cancer progression, biomarker identification and the design of individualized therapies. Using chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as a paradigm for hierarchical disease evolution we show that combined population dynamic modelling and CML patient biopsy genomic analysis enables patient stratification at unprecedented resolution. Linking CD34+ similarity as a disease progression marker to patient-derived gene expression entropy separated established CML progression stages and uncovered additional heterogeneity within disease stages. Importantly, our patient data informed model enables quantitative approximation of individual patients’ disease history within chronic phase (CP) and significantly separates “early” from “late” CP. Our findings provide a novel rationale for personalized and genome-informed disease progression risk assessment that is independent and complementary to conventional measures of CML disease burden and prognosis.

  11. Interferon-α in acute myeloid leukemia: an old drug revisited.

    PubMed

    Anguille, S; Lion, E; Willemen, Y; Van Tendeloo, V F I; Berneman, Z N; Smits, E L J M

    2011-05-01

    Interferon-α (IFN-α), a type I IFN, is a well-known antitumoral agent. The investigation of its clinical properties in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been prompted by its pleiotropic antiproliferative and immune effects. So far, integration of IFN-α in the therapeutic arsenal against AML has been modest in view of the divergent results of clinical trials. Recent insights into the key pharmacokinetic determinants of the clinical efficacy of IFN along with advances in its pharmaceutical formulation, have sparked renewed interest in its use. This paper reviews the possible applicability of IFN-α in the treatment of AML and provides a rational basis to re-explore its efficacy in clinical trials.

  12. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  13. Hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome transformed in acute myeloid leukemia after androgens and cyclosporin. A treatment.

    PubMed

    Gologan, R; Ostroveanu, Daniela; Dobrea, Camelia; Gioadă, Liliana

    2003-01-01

    The apparent contradiction between clonal expansion and marrow failure encountered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is more evident in hypocellular forms at presentation. Hypoplastic MDS (hMDS) appears to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity, accounting for about 15% from all MDS. The pathogeny is supposed to result from immunosupressive mechanisms and some observations on successful treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA) are reported. The case of a young female patient diagnosed by bone marrow core biopsy with hMDS - refractory anemia (FAB and WHO classification) with normal karyotype and scarce CD34(+) cells by immunohistophenotyping is presented. She was treated with androgens followed by CsA for a few months and shortly after she developed an acute myeloid leukemia (M4) which responded to low-doses of daily oral melphalan. This is one of the first few reports on such an event during the immunosuppressive therapy in MDS and the possible explanations for this unusual evolution are discussed.

  14. Drug Target Optimization in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Using Innovative Computational Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ryan; Hall, Benjamin A.; Benque, David; Cook, Byron; Ishtiaq, Samin; Piterman, Nir; Taylor, Alex; Vardi, Moshe; Koschmieder, Steffen; Gottgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) represents a paradigm for the wider cancer field. Despite the fact that tyrosine kinase inhibitors have established targeted molecular therapy in CML, patients often face the risk of developing drug resistance, caused by mutations and/or activation of alternative cellular pathways. To optimize drug development, one needs to systematically test all possible combinations of drug targets within the genetic network that regulates the disease. The BioModelAnalyzer (BMA) is a user-friendly computational tool that allows us to do exactly that. We used BMA to build a CML network-model composed of 54 nodes linked by 104 interactions that encapsulates experimental data collected from 160 publications. While previous studies were limited by their focus on a single pathway or cellular process, our executable model allowed us to probe dynamic interactions between multiple pathways and cellular outcomes, suggest new combinatorial therapeutic targets, and highlight previously unexplored sensitivities to Interleukin-3.

  15. Efficacy and Toxicity of Induction Therapy with Cladribine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine (IAC) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Woelich, Susan K; Braun, James T; Schoen, Martin W; Ramlal, Reshma; Freter, Carl E; Petruska, Paul J; Lionberger, Jack M

    2017-02-01

    We report our single-center experience with cytarabine and idarubicin for induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an additional 5 days of cladribine (IAC therapy). From July 2012 to September 2014, 38 patients completed a full course of IAC induction. Median patient age was 61 years, 61% of patients were ≥60 years old, and 71% were male. The complete remission (CR) rate was 63% following a single induction course, three patients (8%) required a second induction course to achieve CR, for an overall response rate of 71%. The median duration of severe neutropenia was 30.5 days. Thirty-two percent of patients developed mucositis, 76% experienced diarrhea, and 61% developed a rash. Incidence of CR following IAC induction therapy for AML was comparable to historical data, but with frequent diarrhea, rash, and fungal infections. This study found IAC efficacy and toxicity was similar irrespective of age.

  16. Use of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in the treatment of pediatric relapsed/ refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Elif; Sahdev, Indira

    2008-03-05

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO, MylotargTM) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent that has been studied in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at first relapse in adults. There is limited experience in pediatric patients. We report six patients with refractory/relapsed CD33+AML who were treated with GO on compassionate-use basis. One patient attained remission. One patient is still alive following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and one patient died in remission. Two patients were refractory and three patients had a response with <5% blasts in the bone marrow. Fever and chills, hypotension and hypoxia were observed as side effects. Three patients developed veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver. Two of these three patients had persistence of VOD at the time of their deaths. One patient treated postSCT had bone marrow response without VOD. GO should be used cautiously in chemotherapy-refractory AML pediatric patients due to the high incidence of VOD.

  17. Using 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in frontline management of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Choices in medicine come with responsibility. With several TKI's (Tyrosine kinase inhibitors) available for front-line management of CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia), an astute clinician has to personalise, rationalise and take a pragmatic approach towards selection of the best drug for the ‘patient in question’. Though it is hotly debated as to which TKI will triumph, the truth of this debate lies in individualising treatment rather than a general ‘all size fits all’ approach with imatinib. I personally believe that the second generation TKI's will suit most patient clinical profiles rather than prescribing imatinib to all and I have strived to make a strong case for them in front line treatment of CML. Though Imatinib may remain the first line choice for some patients, my efforts in this debate are mainly geared towards breaking the myth that imatinib is the sole ‘block buster’ on the CML landscape PMID:24665456

  18. Reversible Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Associated with Dasatinib for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Hyung; Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Bang, Ju-Hee; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Yi, Jeong-Eun; Jung, Hae Ok; Youn, Ho Joong; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    We describe two cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) that occurred under dasatinib treatment and were resolved after dasatinib discontinuation. Two patients with chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were switched to dasatinib therapy because of hematological progress while receiving imatinib. These patients had New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II dyspnea with elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), which progressed under dasatinib treatment. After dasatinib treatment was discontinued, subjective symptoms were improved to NYHA functional class I and the follow-up transthoracic Doppler echocardiography showed improved RVSP. Treatment with an alternate tyrosine kinase inhibitor was initiated and had been continued without development of dyspnea or elevation of RVSP. This report suggests that dasatinib can cause the reversible PAH, therefore, routine cardiopulmonary evaluation before and during treatment with dasatinib may be needed in CML patients with clinical manifestations. PMID:25648097

  19. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia of Adults: Determination, Prognostic Impact and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Consalvo, Maria Irno; Sarlo, Chiara; Conti, Consuelo; De Santis, Giovanna; De Bellis, Eleonora; Di Veroli, Ambra; Palomba, Patrizia; Attrotto, Cristina; Zizzari, Annagiulia; Paterno, Giovangiacinto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment assessment of cytogenetic/genetic signature of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been consistently shown to play a major prognostic role but also to fail at predicting outcome on individual basis, even in low-risk AML. Therefore, we are in need of further accurate methods to refine the patients' risk allocation process, distinguishing more adequately those who are likely to recur from those who are not. In this view, there is now evidence that the submicroscopic amounts of leukemic cells (called minimal residual disease, MRD), measured during the course of treatment, indicate the quality of response to therapy. Therefore, MRD might serve as an independent, additional biomarker to help to identify patients at higher risk of relapse. Detection of MRD requires the use of highly sensitive ancillary techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiparametric flow cytometry(MPFC). In the present manuscript, we will review the current approaches to investigate MRD and its clinical applications in AML management.

  20. Screening features to improve the class prediction of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Kaishi; Yang, Meixue; Sablok, Gaurav; Fan, Jianping; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-10

    After more than three decades of intensive investigations, the underpinning mechanism of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis still remains largely uncharacterized, and their diagnosis relies heavily on the subjective factors. Recently gene expression profiling technique showed significant improvement in classifying some subtypes of AML, but the model's discriminating power of MDS from AML is still in its infancy. Feature selection plays an important role in the classification of the samples on the basis of the gene expression profiles. Our hypothesis explains that a better choice of features could improve the classification of the diseased and normal stage samples, and the potential application of feature screening to produce feature sets, with better accuracies and lowest number of embedded features. The observed results suggest that feature selection proves to be an essential and affirmative step in the biomedical data mining models based on gene expression profiles.

  1. Current Approaches in the Treatment of Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Nestor R.; Mo, Clifton C.; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The limited sensitivity of the historical treatment response criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has resulted in a different paradigm for treatment compared with most other cancers presenting with widely disseminated disease. Initial cytotoxic induction chemotherapy is often able to reduce tumor burden to a level sufficient to meet the current criteria for “complete” remission. Nevertheless, most AML patients ultimately die from their disease, most commonly as clinically evident relapsed AML. Despite a variety of available salvage therapy options, prognosis in patients with relapsed or refractory AML is generally poor. In this review, we outline the commonly utilized salvage cytotoxic therapy interventions and then highlight novel investigational efforts currently in clinical trials using both pathway-targeted agents and immunotherapy based approaches. We conclude that there is no current standard of care for adult relapsed or refractory AML other than offering referral to an appropriate clinical trial. PMID:25932335

  2. Mcl-1 Dependence Predicts Response to Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pierceall, William E.; Lena, Ryan J.; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Blake, Noel; Doykan, Camille; Elaschoff, Michael; Cardone, Michael H.; Walter, Roland B.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are commonly considered for investigational therapies, which often only benefit subsets of patients. In this exploratory, we assessed whether BH3 profiling of apoptotic functionality could predict outcomes following treatment with vorinostat (histone deacetylase inhibitor) and gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO; CD33-targeted immunoconjugate.) Flow cytometry of BH3 peptide priming with Noxa (anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 modulator) correlated with remission induction (p=.026; AUC=0.83 [CI: 0.65–1.00; p=.00042]: AUC=0.88 [CI:0.75–1.00] with age adjustment) and overall survival (p=.027 logistic regression; AUC = 0.87 [0.64–1.00; p=.0017]). This Mcl-1-dependence suggests a pivotal role of Bcl-2 family protein-mediated apoptosis to vorinostat/GO in AML patients. PMID:24636337

  3. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  4. [Catheter associated Staphylococcus sciuri sepsis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Koçoğlu, Esra; Karabay, Oğuz

    2006-10-01

    The coagulase-negative bacterial species Staphylococcus sciuri is widely distributed in the natural environment. Although principally found in animals, S. sciuri is occasionally isolated from human samples. In this paper, S. sciuri bacteremia which was associated with an indwelling catheter of a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and neutropenia was presented. An empirical intravenous antibiotic therapy (meropenem, vancomycin) was initiated with the preliminary diagnosis of febrile neutropenia and catheter infection. The catalase and oxidase positive, tube coagulase negative strain isolated from three of the concurrent blood cultures and intravenous catheter culture has been identified as S. sciuri. The isolate was found resistant to penicilin and oxacilline. This case has emphasized the importance of identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from the cultures of patients with haematological malignancy.

  5. Prognostic impact of MYH9 expression on patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Ma, Qiuling; Li, Xia; Yin, Xiufeng; Huang, Jiansong; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Zhixin; Zhou, Yile; Li, Chenying; Chen, Feifei; Chen, Jian; Wang, Yungui; Pan, Hanzhang; Wang, Dongmei; Jin, Jie

    2017-01-01

    MYH9 expression has previously been demonstrated as an independent predictor of clinical outcome in solid tumors. However, the prognostic relevance of MYH9 expression in acute myeloid leukemia is still unclear. Here, we found high MYH9 expressers were seen more frequently in females and more frequently in M4 morphology. We also found high MYH9 expressers had lower percentage of bone marrow blasts. In addition, overexpression of MYH9 was associated with an inferior overall survival. Notably, distinct microRNA signatures were seen in high MYH9 expressers. These results were also validated in an independent cohort of AML patients using the published data. In conclusion, gene of MYH9 expression might serve as a reliable predictor for overall survival in AML patients. PMID:27437869

  6. Immunotherapy of elderly acute myeloid leukemia: light at the end of a long tunnel?

    PubMed

    Rafelson, William M; Reagan, John L; Fast, Loren D; Lim, Seah H

    2017-03-28

    Although it is possible to induce remission in the majority of the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), many patients still die due to disease relapse. Immunotherapy is an attractive option. It is more specific. The memory T cells induced by immunotherapy may also provide the long-term tumor immunosurveillance to prevent disease relapse. Although immunotherapy of AML started in the early 1970s, its clinical impact has been disappointing. Recent advances in tumor immunology and immunotherapeutic agents have rekindled interest. Here, we provide a review of the history of AML immunotherapy, discuss why AML is well suited for immunotherapeutic approaches and present the biological obstacles that affect the success of immunotherapy. Finally, we put forward a new paradigm of AML immunotherapy that utilizes a combination of immunotherapeutic agents sequentially to enhance the in vivo tumor immunogenicity and effective priming and propagation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells.

  7. Similarities and Differences Between Therapy-Related and Elderly Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    D’Alò, Francesco; Fianchi, Luana; Fabiani, Emiliano; Criscuolo, Marianna; Greco, Mariangela; Guidi, Francesco; Pagano, Livio; Leone, Giuseppe; Voso, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clonal disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell, typical of the elderly, with a median age of over 60 years at diagnosis. In AML, older age is one of the strongest independent adverse prognostic factor, associated with decreased complete response rate, worse disease-free and overall survival, with highest rates of treatment related mortality, resistant disease and relapse, compared to younger patients. Outcomes are compromised in older patients not only by increased comorbidities and susceptibility to toxicity from therapy, but it is now recognized that elderly AML has peculiar biologic characteristics with a negative impact on treatment response. In older individuals prolonged exposure to environmental carcinogens may be the basis for similarities to therapy-related myeloid malignancies (t-MN), which result from toxic effects of previous cytotoxic treatments on hematopoietic stem cells. Age is itself a risk factor for t-MN, which are more frequent in elderly patients, where also a shorter latency between treatment of primary tumor and t-MN has been reported. t-MN following chemotherapy with alkylating agents and elderly AML frequently present MDS-related cytogenetic abnormalities, including complex or monosomal karyotype, and a myelodysplastic phase preceding the diagnosis of overt leukemia. Similarly, t-MN and elderly-AML share common molecular abnormalities, such as reduced frequency of NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA mutations and increased MDR1 expression. Given the unfavorable prognosis of elderly and t-MN and the similar clinical and molecular aspects, this is a promising field for implementation of new treatment protocols including alternative biological drugs. PMID:22220249

  8. Selective Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 2 Synergize with Azacitidine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shearstone, Jeffrey R.; Quayle, Steven N.; Huang, Pengyu; van Duzer, John H.; Jarpe, Matthew B.; Jones, Simon S.; Yang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by defects in myeloid differentiation and increased proliferation of neoplastic hematopoietic precursor cells. Outcomes for patients with AML remain poor, highlighting the need for novel treatment options. Aberrant epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AML, and inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase or histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes have exhibited activity in preclinical AML models. Combination studies with HDAC inhibitors plus DNA methyltransferase inhibitors have potential beneficial clinical activity in AML, however the toxicity profiles of non-selective HDAC inhibitors in the combination setting limit their clinical utility. In this work, we describe the preclinical development of selective inhibitors of HDAC1 and HDAC2, which are hypothesized to have improved safety profiles, for combination therapy in AML. We demonstrate that selective inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 is sufficient to achieve efficacy both as a single agent and in combination with azacitidine in preclinical models of AML, including established AML cell lines, primary leukemia cells from AML patient bone marrow samples and in vivo xenograft models of human AML. Gene expression profiling of AML cells treated with either an HDAC1/2 inhibitor, azacitidine, or the combination of both have identified a list of genes involved in transcription and cell cycle regulation as potential mediators of the combinatorial effects of HDAC1/2 inhibition with azacitidine. Together, these findings support the clinical evaluation of selective HDAC1/2 inhibitors in combination with azacitidine in AML patients. PMID:28060870

  9. CD 33 as a target of therapy in acute myeloid leukemia: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sperr, Wolfgang R; Florian, Stefan; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Valent, Peter

    2005-08-01

    CD 33 is a myeloid cell surface antigen that is expressed on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a majority of all patients regardless of age or subtype of disease. The antigen is also expressed on leukemic stem cells in many cases, but is not expressed on normal hematopoietic stem cells. In an attempt to improve therapy in AML, a CD 33-targeted drug has been developed. The drug, gemtucumab ozogamicin (GO; Mylotarg), consists of a humanized CD 33 antibody (hP 67.6), a pH-dependent linker, and a highly potent chemotherapy agent, calicheamicin 1,2,-dimethyl hydrazine dichloride. Based on its clinical activity, GO has been approved for application in chemotherapy-refractory AML in various countries and is effective as a mono-substance as well as in combination with conventional chemotherapy. However, despite high efficacy and a certain specificity for leukemic (as opposed to normal) stem cells, the drug does not work in all patients, and can produce significant side-effects, including veno-occlusive disease (VOD), especially in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation. These side-effects have to be balanced against the benefit of GO therapy in patients with relapsed or refractory AML.

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia requires Hhex to enable PRC2-mediated epigenetic repression of Cdkn2a

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Benjamin J.; Jackson, Jacob T.; Metcalf, Donald; Shi, Wei; Huang, Qiutong; Garnham, Alexandra L.; Glaser, Stefan P.; Beck, Dominik; Pimanda, John E.; Bogue, Clifford W.; Smyth, Gordon K.; Alexander, Warren S.; McCormack, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike clustered HOX genes, the role of nonclustered homeobox gene family members in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis has not been extensively studied. Here we found that the hematopoietically expressed homeobox gene Hhex is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is essential for the initiation and propagation of MLL-ENL-induced AML but dispensable for normal myelopoiesis, indicating a specific requirement for Hhex for leukemic growth. Loss of Hhex leads to expression of the Cdkn2a-encoded tumor suppressors p16INK4a and p19ARF, which are required for growth arrest and myeloid differentiation following Hhex deletion. Mechanistically, we show that Hhex binds to the Cdkn2a locus and directly interacts with the Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to enable H3K27me3-mediated epigenetic repression. Thus, Hhex is a potential therapeutic target that is specifically required for AML stem cells to repress tumor suppressor pathways and enable continued self-renewal. PMID:26728554

  11. Integration of Hedgehog and mutant FLT3 signaling in myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yiting; Gondek, Lukasz; Li, Li; Wang, Qiuju; Ma, Haley; Chang, Emily; Huso, David L.; Foerster, Sarah; Marchionni, Luigi; McGovern, Karen; Watkins, D. Neil; Peacock, Craig D.; Levis, Mark; Smith, B. Douglas; Merchant, Akil A.; Small, Donald; Matsui, William

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations resulting in constitutive kinase activity are common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and carry a poor prognosis. Several agents targeting FLT3 have been developed, but their limited clinical activity suggests that the inhibition of other factors contributing to the malignant phenotype is required. We examined gene expression data sets as well as primary specimens and found that the expression of GLI2, a major effector of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, was increased in FLT3-ITD compared to wild type FLT3 AML. To examine the functional role of the Hh pathway, we studied mice in which Flt3-ITD expression results in an indolent myeloproliferative state and found that constitutive Hh signaling accelerated the development of AML by enhancing STAT5 signaling and the proliferation of bone marrow myeloid progenitors. Furthermore, combined FLT3 and Hh pathway inhibition limited leukemic growth in vitro and in vivo, and this approach may serve as a therapeutic strategy for FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:26062848

  12. Targeting the RAS/MAPK pathway with miR-181a in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Ramasamy; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Chiang, Chi-ling; Lankenau, Malori; Yu, Bo; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Jin, Yan; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Khalife, Jihane; Walker, Alison; Perrotti, Danilo; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Wang, Hongyan; Lee, Robert J.; Lee, Ly James; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of microRNAs' expression frequently occurs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Lower miR-181a expression is associated with worse outcomes, but the exact mechanisms by which miR-181a mediates this effect remain elusive. Aberrant activation of the RAS pathway contributes to myeloid leukemogenesis. Here, we report that miR-181a directly binds to 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs); downregulates KRAS, NRAS and MAPK1; and decreases AML growth. The delivery of miR-181a mimics to target AML cells using transferrin-targeting lipopolyplex nanoparticles (NP) increased mature miR-181a; downregulated KRAS, NRAS and MAPK1; and resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the downstream RAS effectors. NP-mediated upregulation of miR-181a led to reduced proliferation, impaired colony formation and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy. Ectopic expression of KRAS, NRAS and MAPK1 attenuated the anti-leukemic activity of miR-181a mimics, thereby validating the relevance of the deregulated miR-181a-RAS network in AML. Finally, treatment with miR-181a-NP in a murine AML model resulted in longer survival compared to mice treated with scramble-NP control. These data support that targeting the RAS-MAPK-pathway by miR-181a mimics represents a novel promising therapeutic approach for AML and possibly for other RAS-driven cancers. PMID:27517749

  13. Emetine induces chemosensitivity and reduces clonogenicity of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cornet-Masana, Josep Maria; Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Etxabe, Amaia; Tesi, Niccolò; Pratcorona, Marta; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an hematologic neoplasia characterized by the accumulation of transformed immature myeloid cells in bone marrow. Although the response rate to induction therapy is high, survival rate 5-year after diagnosis is still low, highlighting the necessity of new novel agents. To identify agents with the capability to abolish the self-renewal capacity of AML blasts, an in silico screening was performed to search for small molecules that induce terminal differentiation. Emetine, a hit compound, was validated for its anti-leukemic effect in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Emetine, a second-line anti-protozoa drug, differentially reduced cell viability and clonogenic capacity of AML primary patient samples, sparing healthy blood cells. Emetine treatment markedly reduced AML burden in bone marrow of xenotransplanted mice and decreased self-renewal capacity of the remaining engrafted AML cells. Emetine also synergized with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents such as ara-C. At a molecular level, emetine treatment was followed by a reduction in HIF-1α protein levels. This study validated the anti-leukemiceffect of emetine in AML cell lines, a group of diverse AML primary samples, and in a human AML-transplanted murine model, sparing healthy blood cells. The selective anti-leukemic effect of emetine together with the safety of the dose range required to exert this effect support the development of this agent in clinical practice. PMID:26992240

  14. Progenitor cell hyperplasia with rare development of myeloid leukemia in interleukin 11 bone marrow chimeras

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Post 5-fluorouracil-treated murine bone marrow cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus (murine stem cell virus-interleukin 11 [MSCV-IL- 11]) bearing a human IL-11 gene were transplanted into lethally irradiated syngeneic mice. Analysis of proviral integration sites in DNA prepared from hematopoietic tissues and purified cell populations of long-term reconstituted primary and secondary recipients demonstrated polyclonal engraftment by multipotential stem cells. High levels (100-1,500 U/ml) of IL-11 were detected in the plasma of the MSCV-IL-11 mice. Systemic effects of chronic IL-11 exposure included loss of body fat, thymus atrophy, some alterations in plasma protein levels, frequent inflammation of the eyelids, and often a hyperactive state. A sustained rise in peripheral platelet levels (approximately 1.5-fold) was seen throughout the observation period (4-17 wk). No changes were observed in the total number of circulating leukocytes in the majority of the transplanted animals (including 10 primary and 18 secondary recipients) despite a > 20-fold elevation in myeloid progenitor cell content in the spleen. The exceptions were members of one transplant pedigree which presented with myeloid leukemia during the secondary transplant phase. A clonal origin of the disease was determined, with significant expansion of the MSCV-IL-11-marked clone having occurred in the spleen of the primary host. Culturing of leukemic spleen cells from a quaternary recipient led to the establishment of a permanent cell line (denoted PGMD1). IL-11-producing PGMD1 myeloid leukemic cells are dependent on IL-3 for continuous growth in vitro and they differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages in response to granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The inability of autogenously produced IL-11 to support autonomous growth of PGMD1 cells argues against a mechanism of transformation involving a classical autocrine loop. PMID:8104229

  15. Prolonged remission in a child with chronic myeloid leukemia following Parvo virus B19 (B19V) infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Moulik, N Roy; Kishore, J; Kumar, A; Jain, A

    2015-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinico-pathological disorders in human beings depending upon the host immunity. The present report describes a child with chronic myeloid leukemia ( CML) on hydroxyurea in haematological remission, who developed profound erythroid suppression following B19V infection requiring multiple transfusions and withdrawal of hydroxyurea. Despite being off-therapy the child remained in complete clinical and haematological remission till anti B19V antibodies appeared. This case illustrates the ability of B19V infection in suppressing neoplastic myeloid clone, a phenomenon not described earlier.

  16. AMPK protects leukemia-initiating cells in myeloid leukemias from metabolic stress in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yusuke; Chapple, Richard H.; Lin, Angelique; Kitano, Ayumi; Nakada, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How cancer cells adapt to metabolically adverse conditions in patients and strive to proliferate is a fundamental question in cancer biology. Here we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic checkpoint kinase, confers metabolic stress resistance to leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) and promotes leukemogenesis. Upon dietary restriction, MLL-AF9-induced murine AML activated AMPK and maintained leukemogenic potential. AMPK deletion significantly delayed leukemogenesis and depleted LICs by reducing the expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), compromising glucose flux, and increasing oxidative stress and DNA damage. LICs were particularly dependent on AMPK to suppress oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow environment. Strikingly, AMPK inhibition synergized with physiological metabolic stress caused by dietary restriction and profoundly suppressed leukemogenesis. Our results indicate that AMPK protects LICs from metabolic stress, and that combining AMPK inhibition with physiological metabolic stress potently suppresses AML by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:26440282

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Romano, Alessandra; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) Regulate Activation of Granulocyte-Like Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (G-MDSC) in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; La Cava, Piera; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Stagno, Fabio; Vigneri, Paolo; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have a role in promotion of tumor growth, survival and drug-resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Recent reports indicated that a subpopulation of myeloid cells, defined as granulocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) is increased in these patients. So far, the role of MSC in MDSC expansion and activation into the BM microenvironment remains unexplored. To address this question, here we use a specific experimental model in vitro, co-culturing MSC with peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC) from normal individuals, in order to generate MSC-educated G-MDSC. Although MSC of healthy donors (HD) and CML patients were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability on autologous T lymphocytes. In addition, compared with HD-MSC, CML-MSC over-expressed some immunomodulatory factors including TGFβ, IL6 and IL10, that could be involved in MDSC activation. CML-MSC-educated G-MDSC expressed higher levels of ARG1, TNFα, IL1β, COX2 and IL6 than G-MDSC isolated from co-culture with HD-MSC. Our data provide evidence that CML-MSC may play a critical role in tumor microenvironment by orchestrating G-MDSC activation and regulating T lymphocytes-mediated leukemia surveillance, thus contributing to CML immune escape. PMID:27391078

  19. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  20. Specific immune responses against epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Vanessa; Egenrieder, Stephanie; Götz, Marlies; Herbst, Cornelia; Greiner, Jochen; Hofmann, Susanne

    2013-07-01

    Aurora kinases are serine/threonine kinases which play an important role in the process of mitosis and cell cycle regulation. Aurora kinase inhibitors are described to sensitize malignant cells to cytosine arabinoside and specific antibodies by mediating apoptosis. Aurora kinases are overexpressed in most acute leukemias but also in solid tumors. In this study we investigated whether epitopes derived from Aurora kinase A and B are able to elicit cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to investigate their role as potential targets for specific immunotherapy. Samples of eight patients with AML were analyzed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays and compared with immune responses of nine healthy volunteers (HVs). Specific CD8 + T cell responses were detected against the epitopes Aura A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5. Immune responses for epitopes derived from Aura B were induced more frequently compared to Aura A. The antigens with the most frequent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses were Aura B3, B4 and B5, although the number of patients tested for these antigens was low. Aura B5 did not elicit specific CTL responses in HVs. For epitope Aura B6 no immune response was detected in HVs or patients. Taken together, with the combination of Aurora kinase inhibitors and an immunotherapeutic approach, an effective blast and minimal residual disease elimination might be achieved.

  1. PI-103 sensitizes acute myeloid leukemia stem cells to daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qian; Gu, Ran; Liang, Jiayi; Zhang, Xiangzhong; Chen, Yunxian

    2013-03-01

    To date, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) shows very poor outcome for conventional chemotherapy. Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are insensitive to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and play a central role in the pathogenesis of AML. Failure to effectively ablate these cells may lead to AML relapse following chemotherapy. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is constructively activated in LSCs. This pathway can be inhibited by PI-103, a novel synthesized molecule of the pyridofuropyrimidine class, resulting in the apoptosis of LSCs. Therefore, we investigate the influences of PI-103 in combination with daunorubicin (DNR) on the LSCs. Our data indicate that PI-103 synergistically sensitizes LSCs to DNR-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, the PI-103/DNR co-treatment can induce significant apoptosis in LSCs, but sparing hematopoietic stem cells. The synergistic effect and the LSCs-specific apoptosis mechanism may be associated with the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Our results suggest that PI-103 in combination with DNR may be a potent and less toxic therapy for targeting LSCs and deserve further preclinical and clinical studies in the treatment of AML.

  2. α-Tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huarong; Chen, Shaohua; Van Doren, Jeremiah; Li, Dongli; Farichon, Chelsea; He, Yan; Zhang, Qiuyan; Zhang, Kun; Conney, Allan H; Goodin, Susan; Du, Zhiyun; Zheng, Xi

    2015-06-01

    α‑Tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α‑tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL‑60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL‑60 cells with α‑tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration‑dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL‑60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α‑tomatine in HL‑60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α‑tomatine and cell membrane‑associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α‑tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor‑κB by the phorbol ester, 12‑O‑tetradecanoylphorbol‑13‑acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL‑60 cells treated with α‑tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α‑tomatine inhibited the growth of HL‑60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α‑tomatine may have useful anti‑leukemia activities.

  3. NDRG1/2 expression is inhibited in primary acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tschan, Mario P; Shan, Deborah; Laedrach, Judith; Eyholzer, Marianne; Leibundgut, Elisabeth Oppliger; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Tobler, Andreas; Stroka, Deborah; Fey, Martin F

    2010-03-01

    Expression of N-myc downregulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is associated with growth arrest and differentiation of tumor cells. In hematopoietic cells, NDRG1 was identified in a screen for differentiation-related genes in human myelomonocytic leukemic U937 cells. In the present study, we found significantly higher NDRG1 mRNA levels in granulocytes of healthy donors than in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Another NDRG family member, NDRG2, was significantly higher expressed in normal macrophages compared to primary AML cells. Moreover, NDRG1 mRNA levels increased in two acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients as well as in NB4 and HT93 APL cells upon all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) therapy. In line with these observations, silencing of NDRG1 diminished neutrophil differentiation of leukemic cell lines. In conclusion, we found an association of low NDRG1 levels with an immature cell phenotype and provide evidence that NDRG1 is functionally involved in neutrophil maturation.

  4. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes.

    PubMed

    Matre, Polina; Velez, Juliana; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-11-29

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes.

  5. Arginine dependence of acute myeloid leukemia blast proliferation: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mussai, Francis; Egan, Sharon; Higginbotham-Jones, Joseph; Perry, Tracey; Beggs, Andrew; Odintsova, Elena; Loke, Justin; Pratt, Guy; U, Kin Pong; Lo, Anthony; Ng, Margaret; Kearns, Pamela; Cheng, Paul; De Santo, Carmela

    2015-04-09

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common acute leukemias in adults and children, yet significant numbers of patients relapse and die of disease. In this study, we identify the dependence of AML blasts on arginine for proliferation. We show that AML blasts constitutively express the arginine transporters CAT-1 and CAT-2B, and that the majority of newly diagnosed patients' blasts have deficiencies in the arginine-recycling pathway enzymes argininosuccinate synthase and ornithine transcarbamylase, making them arginine auxotrophic. BCT-100, a pegylated human recombinant arginase, leads to a rapid depletion in extracellular and intracellular arginine concentrations, resulting in arrest of AML blast proliferation and a reduction in AML engraftment in vivo. BCT-100 as a single agent causes significant death of AML blasts from adults and children, and acts synergistically in combination with cytarabine. Using RNA sequencing, 20 further candidate genes which correlated with resistance have been identified. Thus, AML blasts are dependent on arginine for survival and proliferation, as well as depletion of arginine with BCT-100 of clinical value in the treatment of AML.

  6. Induction of cancer testis antigen expression in circulating acute myeloid leukemia blasts following hypomethylating agent monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pragya; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R.; Collamat-Lai, Golda; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Ford, Laurie Ann; Naqash, Rafeh; Lübbert, Michael; Karpf, Adam R.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are promising cancer associated antigens in solid tumors, but in acute myeloid leukemia, dense promoter methylation silences their expression. Leukemia cell lines exposed to HMAs induce expression of CTAs. We hypothesized that AML patients treated with standard of care decitabine (20mg/m2 per day for 10 days) would demonstrate induced expression of CTAs. Peripheral blood blasts serially isolated from AML patients treated with decitabine were evaluated for CTA gene expression and demethylation. Induction of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6, were observed following decitabine. Re-expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 was associated with both promoter specific and global (LINE-1) hypomethylation. NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 mRNA levels were increased irrespective of clinical response, suggesting that these antigens might be applicable even in patients who are not responsive to HMA therapy. Circulating blasts harvested after decitabine demonstrate induced NY-ESO-1 expression sufficient to activate NY-ESO-1 specific CD8+ T-cells. Induction of CTA expression sufficient for recognition by T-cells occurs in AML patients receiving decitabine. Vaccination against NY-ESO-1 in this patient population is feasible. PMID:26883197

  7. Aberrant RNA splicing and mutations in spliceosome complex in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The spliceosome, the cellular splicing machinery, regulates RNA splicing of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) into maturation of protein coding RNAs. Recurrent mutations and copy number changes in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins and splicing regulatory factors have tumor promoting or suppressive functions in hematological malignancies, as well as some other cancers. Leukemia stem cell (LSC) populations, although rare, are essential contributors of treatment failure and relapse. Recent researches have provided the compelling evidence that link the erratic spicing activity to the LSC phenotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe the diverse roles of aberrant splicing in hematological malignancies, particularly in AML and their contributions to the characteristics of LSC. We review these promising strategies to exploit the addiction of aberrant spliceosomal machinery for anti-leukemic therapy with aim to eradicate LSC. However, given the complexity and plasticity of spliceosome and not fully known functions of splicing in cancer, the challenges facing the development of the therapeutic strategies targeting RAN splicing are highlighted and future directions are discussed too. PMID:28217708

  8. ELN 2013 response status criteria: relevance for de novo imatinib chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients?

    PubMed

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lascaux, Axelle; Schmitt, Anna; Bidet, Audrey; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Adiko, Didier; Hayette, Sandrine; Reiffers, Josy; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The response definitions proposed by the European Leukemia Net (ELN) have been recently modified. We evaluated the new criteria for de novo imatinib (400 mg/d) chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) patients. Response status according to the 2009 and 2013 criteria were determined in 180 unselected patients. Outcome of the subgroups of patients were then compared. The 180 patients were classified as optimal responders (OR2009; n = 113, 62.7%), suboptimal responders (SOR2009; n = 47, 26.1%) and failures (FAIL2009; n = 20, 11.1%) according to the 2009 ELN criteria and optimal responders (OR2013; n = 77, 42.7%), warnings (WAR2013; n = 59, 32.7%), and failures (FAIL2013; n = 44, 24.4%) according to the 2013 ELN criteria. No difference in terms of outcome was observed between OR2009 patients who became WAR2013 when compared with OR2013 patients. When compared with FAIL2009 patients, SOR2009 patients who became WAR2013 had better EFS, FFS, PFS, and OS. No difference was observed in PFS or OS in SOR2009 patients who became FAIL2013. The 2013 ELN response status criteria have improved patients classification in terms of response status. However, in our patient population this improvement is related to a better definition of failure rather than that of optimal response for CP-CML patients treated with IM frontline therapy.

  9. EVI1-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias are characterized by distinct molecular alterations.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Gendron, Patrick; Lemieux, Sébastien; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and transcriptional signature of EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1)-rearranged (EVI1-r) acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) remains poorly defined. We performed RNA sequencing of 12 EVI1-r AMLs and compared the results with those of other AML subtypes (n = 139) and normal CD34(+) cells (n = 17). Results confirm high frequencies of RAS and other activated signaling mutations (10/12 AMLs) and identify new recurrent mutations in splicing factors (5/12 AMLs in SF3B1 and 2/12 AMLs in U2AF1), IKZF1 (3/12 AMLs), and TP53 (3/12 AMLs). Mutations in IKZF1, a gene located on chromosome 7, and monosomy 7 are mutually exclusive in this disease. Moreover IKZF1 expression is halved in monosomy 7 leukemias. EVI-r AMLs are also characterized by a unique transcriptional signature with high expression levels of MECOM, PREX2, VIP, MYCT1, and PAWR. Our results suggest that EVI1-r AMLs could be molecularly defined by specific transcriptomic anomalies and a hitherto unseen mutational pattern. Larger patient cohorts will better determine the frequency of these events.

  10. EVI1-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias are characterized by distinct molecular alterations

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Gendron, Patrick; Lemieux, Sébastien; D’Angelo, Giovanni; Hébert, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The genetic and transcriptional signature of EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1)-rearranged (EVI1-r) acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) remains poorly defined. We performed RNA sequencing of 12 EVI1-r AMLs and compared the results with those of other AML subtypes (n = 139) and normal CD34+ cells (n = 17). Results confirm high frequencies of RAS and other activated signaling mutations (10/12 AMLs) and identify new recurrent mutations in splicing factors (5/12 AMLs in SF3B1 and 2/12 AMLs in U2AF1), IKZF1 (3/12 AMLs), and TP53 (3/12 AMLs). Mutations in IKZF1, a gene located on chromosome 7, and monosomy 7 are mutually exclusive in this disease. Moreover IKZF1 expression is halved in monosomy 7 leukemias. EVI-r AMLs are also characterized by a unique transcriptional signature with high expression levels of MECOM, PREX2, VIP, MYCT1, and PAWR. Our results suggest that EVI1-r AMLs could be molecularly defined by specific transcriptomic anomalies and a hitherto unseen mutational pattern. Larger patient cohorts will better determine the frequency of these events. PMID:25331116

  11. α-tomatine inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in HL-60 human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CHEN, SHAOHUA; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; LI, DONGLI; FARICHON, CHELSEA; HE, YAN; ZHANG, QIUYAN; ZHANG, KUN; CONNEY, ALLAN H; GOODIN, SUSAN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    α-tomatine is a glycoalkaloid that occurs naturally in tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum). In the present study, the effects of α-tomatine on human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were investigated. Treatment of HL-60 cells with α-tomatine resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Tomatidine, the aglycone of tomatine had little effect on the growth and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by α-tomatine in HL-60 cells was partially abrogated by addition of cholesterol indicating that interactions between α-tomatine and cell membrane-associated cholesterol may be important in mediating the effect of α-tomatine. Activation of nuclear factor-κB by the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate failed to prevent apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated with α-tomatine. In animal experiments, it was found that treatment of mice with α-tomatine inhibited the growth of HL-60 xenografts in vivo. Results from the present study indicated that α-tomatine may have useful anti-leukemia activities. PMID:25625536

  12. Microbiologically documented infections and infection-related mortality in children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Lange, Beverly J; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Feusner, James

    2007-11-15

    The primary objective was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of microbiologically defined infections and infection-related mortality (IRM) in 492 children with acute myeloid leukemia enrolled on CCG 2961. Secondary objectives were to determine the relationship between demographic, disease-related, and therapeutic variables, and infections and IRM. Institutions documented infections prospectively. Age, ethnicity, body mass index, leukemia karyotype, treatment, and institutional size were examined for association with infection outcomes. More than 60% of children experienced such infections in each of 3 phases of chemotherapy. There were 58 infectious deaths; cumulative incidence of IRM was 11% plus or minus 2%. Thirty-one percent of infectious deaths were associated with Aspergillus, 25.9% with Candida, and 15.5% with alpha hemolytic streptococci. Age older than 16 years (hazard ratio [HR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87-5.89; P < .001), nonwhite ethnicity (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.10-3.09; P = .02), and underweight status (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.51-6.22; P = .002) were associated with IRM, while size of the treating institution was not. Thus, age, ethnicity, and BMI were important contributors to IRM. Fungi and Gram-positive cocci were the most common organisms associated with IRM and, in particular, Aspergillus species was the largest contributor to infectious deaths.

  13. Elevated lymphocyte count at time of acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis is associated with shorter remission.

    PubMed

    Bar, Merav; Othus, Megan; Park, Hanahlyn M; Sandhu, Vicky; Chen, Xueyan; Wood, Brent L; Estey, Elihu

    2015-01-01

    In solid tumors, decreased absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) at diagnosis was found to be associated with poorer outcome, but there is only limited data on the impact of ALC in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study we evaluated the prognostic value of ALC on outcome in 259 adult patients with AML who responded to induction therapy. Higher than normal ALC at diagnosis was associated with shorter remission (HR 4.06; p < 0.001), and decreased relapse free and overall survival (HR 3.47; p < 0.001 and HR 3.85; p < 0.001 respectively). Flow cytometry showed low frequency of natural killer (NK) cells and high frequency of CD4+ T cells (which includes the subset of T regulatory cells) in the high ALC group. Low frequency of NK cells and potentially high frequency of inhibitory T regulatory cells may result in weaker immune responses against residual leukemia and may explain the poorer outcome of the high ALC group.

  14. Cooperation of imipramine blue and tyrosine kinase blockade demonstrates activity against chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Kamilla M.E.; Berhan, Samuel; Liu, Suhu; Silvestri, Giovannino; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Frank, David A.; Aggarwal, Bharat; Bonner, Michael Y.; Perrotti, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), including nilotinib, has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However current unmet clinical needs include combating activation of additional survival signaling pathways in persistent leukemia stem cells after long-term TKI therapy. A ubiquitous signaling alteration in cancer, including CML, is activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling, which may potentiate stem cell activity and mediate resistance to both conventional chemotherapy and targeted inhibitors. We have developed a novel nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, imipramine blue (IB) that targets ROS generation. ROS levels are known to be elevated in CML with respect to normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and not corrected by TKI. We demonstrate that IB has additive benefit with nilotinib in inhibiting proliferation, viability, and clonogenic function of TKI-insensitive quiescent CD34+ CML chronic phase (CP) cells while normal CD34+ cells retained their clonogenic capacity in response to this combination therapy in vitro. Mechanistically, the pro-apoptotic activity of IB likely resides in part through its dual ability to block NF-κB and re-activate the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Combining BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibition with NADPH oxidase blockade may be beneficial in eradication of CML and worthy of further investigation. PMID:27438151

  15. Functionally identifiable apoptosis-insensitive subpopulations determine chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Patrick D.; Mar, Brenton G.; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Hogdal, Leah J.; Vo, Thanh Trang; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Upfront resistance to chemotherapy and relapse following remission are critical problems in leukemia that are generally attributed to subpopulations of chemoresistant tumor cells. There are, however, limited means for prospectively identifying these subpopulations, which hinders an understanding of therapeutic resistance. BH3 profiling is a functional single-cell analysis using synthetic BCL-2 BH3 domain–like peptides that measures mitochondrial apoptotic sensitivity or “priming.” Here, we observed that the extent of apoptotic priming is heterogeneous within multiple cancer cell lines and is not the result of experimental noise. Apoptotic priming was also heterogeneous in treatment-naive primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) myeloblasts, and this heterogeneity decreased in chemotherapy-treated AML patients. The priming of the most apoptosis-resistant tumor cells, rather than the median priming of the population, best predicted patient response to induction chemotherapy. For several patients, these poorly primed subpopulations of AML tumor cells were enriched for antiapoptotic proteins. Developing techniques to identify and understand these apoptosis-insensitive subpopulations of tumor cells may yield insights into clinical chemoresistance and potentially improve therapeutic outcomes in AML. PMID:27599292

  16. FLT3-ITD Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kumsaen, Piyawan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chainansamit, Su-On; Wisanuyothin, Nittaya; Kuwatjanakul, Pichayanan; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most frequent genetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) where it is associated with a poor prognosis. The FLT3-ITD mutation could, therefore, be a potential molecular prognostic marker important for risk-stratified treatment options. We amplified the FLT3 gene at exon 14 and 15 in 52 AML patients (aged between 2 months and 74 years) from 4 referral centers (a university hospital and 3 regional hospitals in Northeast Thailand), using a simple PCR method. FLT3-ITD mutations were found in 10 patients (19.2%), being more common in adults than in children (21.1% vs. 14.3%) and more prevalent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3) than AML-non M3 (4 of 10 AML-M3 vs. 6 of 42 AML- non M3 patients). Duplication sequences varied in size-between 27 and 171 nucleotides (median=63.5) and in their location. FLT3-ITD mutations with common duplication sequences accounted for a significant percentage in AML patients in northeastern Thailand. This simple PCR method is feasible for routine laboratory practice and these data could help tailor use of the national protocol for AML.

  17. The genomic landscape of core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Faber, Zachary J; Chen, Xiang; Gedman, Amanda Larson; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Ma, Jing; Radtke, Ina; Chao, Jyh-Rong; Walsh, Michael P; Song, Guangchun; Andersson, Anna K; Dang, Jinjun; Dong, Li; Liu, Yu; Huether, Robert; Cai, Zhongling; Mulder, Heather; Wu, Gang; Edmonson, Michael; Rusch, Michael; Qu, Chunxu; Li, Yongjin; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Wang, Jianmin; Hedlund, Erin; Cao, Xueyuan; Yergeau, Donald; Nakitandwe, Joy; Pounds, Stanley B; Shurtleff, Sheila; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Easton, John; Parganas, Evan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Gruber, Tanja A; Mullighan, Charles G; Schlenk, Richard F; Paschka, Peter; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars; Zhang, Jinghui; Klco, Jeffery M; Downing, James R

    2016-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises a heterogeneous group of leukemias frequently defined by recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities, including rearrangements involving the core-binding factor (CBF) transcriptional complex. To better understand the genomic landscape of CBF-AMLs, we analyzed both pediatric (n = 87) and adult (n = 78) samples, including cases with RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (n = 85) or CBFB-MYH11 (n = 80) rearrangements, by whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing. In addition to known mutations in the Ras pathway, we identified recurrent stabilizing mutations in CCND2, suggesting a previously unappreciated cooperating pathway in CBF-AML. Outside of signaling alterations, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 AMLs demonstrated remarkably different spectra of cooperating mutations, as RUNX1-RUNX1T1 cases harbored recurrent mutations in DHX15 and ZBTB7A, as well as an enrichment of mutations in epigenetic regulators, including ASXL2 and the cohesin complex. This detailed analysis provides insights into the pathogenesis and development of CBF-AML, while highlighting dramatic differences in the landscapes of cooperating mutations for these related AML subtypes.

  18. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed against human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Majeti, R

    2011-03-03

    Accumulating evidence indicates that many human cancers are organized as a cellular hierarchy initiated and maintained by self-renewing cancer stem cells. This cancer stem cell model has been most conclusively established for human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), although controversies still exist regarding the identity of human AML stem cells (leukemia stem cell (LSC)). A major implication of this model is that, in order to eradicate the cancer and cure the patient, the cancer stem cells must be eliminated. Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective targeted therapies for the treatment of a number of human malignancies and, given their target antigen specificity and generally minimal toxicity, are well positioned as cancer stem cell-targeting therapies. One strategy for the development of monoclonal antibodies targeting human AML stem cells involves first identifying cell surface antigens preferentially expressed on AML LSC compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. In recent years, a number of such antigens have been identified, including CD123, CD44, CLL-1, CD96, CD47, CD32, and CD25. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies targeting CD44, CD123, and CD47 have demonstrated efficacy against AML LSC in xenotransplantation models. Hopefully, these antibodies will ultimately prove to be effective in the treatment of human AML.

  19. [IDH mutations activate Hoxa9/Meis1 and hypoxia pathways in acute myeloid leukemia model mice].

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Yoko; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2 are frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), glioma, and many other cancers. While wild-type IDHs mediate exchanges between isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), mutant IDHs convert α-KG to oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), which causes dysregulation of a set of α-KG-dependent dioxygenases such as TET, histone demethylase and others. Because mutant IDH has no necessary functions in normal cells, inhibitors directed against mutant IDH are not expected to have the side effects as anti-cancer agents. To determine whether mutant IDH enzymes are valid targets for cancer therapy, we created a mouse model of mutant IDH2-dependent AML. By using a combination of AML model mice with cre-loxp, we conditionally deleted mutant IDH2 from AML mice, which resulted in the loss of leukemia stem cells and significantly delayed the progression of AML. These results indicate that mutant IDHs are promising targets for anticancer therapy.

  20. Update on acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: New discoveries and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Maximilian; Kim, Tae Kon; Zeidan, Amer M

    2016-01-01

    The existence of cancer stem cells has been well established in acute myeloid leukemia. Initial proof of the existence of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) was accomplished by functional studies in xenograft models making use of the key features shared with normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) such as the capacity of self-renewal and the ability to initiate and sustain growth of progenitors in vivo. Significant progress has also been made in identifying the phenotype and signaling pathways specific for LSCs. Therapeutically, a multitude of drugs targeting LSCs are in different phases of preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on recent discoveries which have advanced our understanding of LSC biology and provided rational targets for development of novel therapeutic agents. One of the major challenges is how to target the self-renewal pathways of LSCs without affecting normal HSCs significantly therefore providing an acceptable therapeutic window. Important issues pertinent to the successful design and conduct of clinical trials evaluating drugs targeting LSCs will be discussed as well. PMID:27822339

  1. Pleural effusion as the initial extramedullary manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Nieves, José

    2012-01-01

    Leukemias rarely debut by pleural involvement as the first manifestation of the hematologic malignancy. This complication is most commonly seen in solid tumors such as carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract and lymphomas. We present a case of a 66 year old male who presented with a pleural leukemic infiltration of his undiagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia that was not a complication of the disease extension, but the acute presentation of the illness. Progressive shortness of breath for two weeks, cough, clear sputum and weight loss were the initial complaints. Serum dyscrasia suggested a hematologic abnormality. A chest x-ray performed demonstrated a buildup of fluid with layering in the left pleural cavity. Diagnostic thoracentesis suggested an exudative etiology with cytology remarkable for 62% leukemic myeloblast. The diagnosis was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy with expression of the antigens CD 34+ and CD13+, with unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis and a trisomy 21 chromosomal defect. Chemotherapy was initiated, though no remission achieved with induction chemotherapy. Complications and disease progression precludes in the patient’s death. Although rare, due to the unusual presentation of the disease, this case clearly demonstrates the importance of biochemical analysis and cytopathology specimens obtained in pleural fluid. PMID:24358836

  2. Differences in prognostic factors and outcomes in African Americans and whites with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sekeres, Mikkael A; Peterson, Bercedis; Dodge, Richard K; Mayer, Robert J; Moore, Joseph O; Lee, Edward J; Kolitz, Jonathan; Baer, Maria R; Schiffer, Charles A; Carroll, Andrew J; Vardiman, James W; Davey, Frederick R; Bloomfield, Clara D; Larson, Richard A; Stone, Richard M

    2004-06-01

    Whites have a more favorable prognosis than African Americans for a number of cancers. The relationship between race and outcome is less clear in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using data from 7 Cancer and Leukemia Group B studies initiated from 1985 to 1997, we conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 2570 patients (270 African American and 2300 white) with de novo AML who received induction chemotherapy. African Americans were younger than whites (48 versus 54 years, P <.001). African Americans also had different cytogenetic risk group distributions than whites (P <.001): they were more commonly classified in the favorable (23% versus 14%) and unfavorable (31% versus 23%) groups, and less commonly classified in the intermediate group (47% versus 63%). African American men had a lower complete remission (CR) rate (54%, compared with 64% for white men, 65% for white women, and 70% for African American women, P =.001) and a worse overall survival compared with all other patients (P =.004), when known risk factors are taken into account. African Americans and whites with AML differ with respect to important prognostic factors. African American men have worse CR rates and overall survival than whites and African American women, and should be considered a poor-risk group.

  3. p53 independent epigenetic-differentiation treatment in xenotransplant models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kwok Peng; Ebrahem, Quteba; Negrotto, Soledad; Mahfouz, Reda Z.; Link, Kevin A.; Hu, Zhenbo; Gu, Xiaorong; Advani, Anjali; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Sekeres, Mikkael; Copelan, Edward; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Mulloy, James C.; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of apoptosis by TP53 mutation contributes to resistance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to conventional cytotoxic treatment. Using differentiation to induce irreversible cell cycle exit in AML cells could be a p53-independent treatment alternative, however, this possibility requires evaluation. In vitro and in vivo regimens of the deoxycytidine analogue decitabine that deplete the chromatin modifying enzyme DNA methyl-transferase 1 (DNMT1) without phosphorylating p53 or inducing early apoptosis were determined. These decitabine regimens but not equimolar DNA-damaging cytarabine up regulated the key late differentiation factors CEBPε and p27/CDKN1B, induced cellular differentiation, and terminated AML cell-cycle, even in cytarabine-resistant p53- and p16/CDKN2A-null AML cells. Leukemia initiation by xeno-transplanted AML cells was abrogated but normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment was preserved. In vivo, the low toxicity allowed frequent drug administration to increase exposure, an important consideration for S-phase specific decitabine therapy. In xeno-transplant models of p53-null and relapsed/refractory AML, the non-cytotoxic regimen significantly extended survival compared to conventional cytotoxic cytarabine. Modifying in vivo dose and schedule to emphasize this pathway of decitabine action can bypass a mechanism of resistance to standard therapy. PMID:21701495

  4. Arginine dependence of acute myeloid leukemia blast proliferation: a novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Sharon; Higginbotham-Jones, Joseph; Perry, Tracey; Beggs, Andrew; Odintsova, Elena; Loke, Justin; Pratt, Guy; U, Kin Pong; Lo, Anthony; Ng, Margaret; Kearns, Pamela; Cheng, Paul; De Santo, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common acute leukemias in adults and children, yet significant numbers of patients relapse and die of disease. In this study, we identify the dependence of AML blasts on arginine for proliferation. We show that AML blasts constitutively express the arginine transporters CAT-1 and CAT-2B, and that the majority of newly diagnosed patients’ blasts have deficiencies in the arginine-recycling pathway enzymes argininosuccinate synthase and ornithine transcarbamylase, making them arginine auxotrophic. BCT-100, a pegylated human recombinant arginase, leads to a rapid depletion in extracellular and intracellular arginine concentrations, resulting in arrest of AML blast proliferation and a reduction in AML engraftment in vivo. BCT-100 as a single agent causes significant death of AML blasts from adults and children, and acts synergistically in combination with cytarabine. Using RNA sequencing, 20 further candidate genes which correlated with resistance have been identified. Thus, AML blasts are dependent on arginine for survival and proliferation, as well as depletion of arginine with BCT-100 of clinical value in the treatment of AML. PMID:25710880

  5. Aberrant RNA splicing and mutations in spliceosome complex in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2017-01-01

    The spliceosome, the cellular splicing machinery, regulates RNA splicing of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) into maturation of protein coding RNAs. Recurrent mutations and copy number changes in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins and splicing regulatory factors have tumor promoting or suppressive functions in hematological malignancies, as well as some other cancers. Leukemia stem cell (LSC) populations, although rare, are essential contributors of treatment failure and relapse. Recent researches have provided the compelling evidence that link the erratic spicing activity to the LSC phenotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe the diverse roles of aberrant splicing in hematological malignancies, particularly in AML and their contributions to the characteristics of LSC. We review these promising strategies to exploit the addiction of aberrant spliceosomal machinery for anti-leukemic therapy with aim to eradicate LSC. However, given the complexity and plasticity of spliceosome and not fully known functions of splicing in cancer, the challenges facing the development of the therapeutic strategies targeting RAN splicing are highlighted and future directions are discussed too.

  6. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T.; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials. PMID:27247754

  7. Molecular analysis of the apoptotic effects of BPA in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bontempo, Paola; Mita, Luigi; Doto, Antonella; Miceli, Marco; Nebbioso, Angela; Lepore, Ilaria; Franci, GianLuigi; Menafra, Roberta; Carafa, Vincenzo; Conte, Mariarosaria; De Bellis, Floriana; Manzo, Fabio; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Benedetti, Rosaria; D'Amato, Loredana; Marino, Maria; Bolli, Alessandro; Del Pozzo, Giovanna; Diano, Nadia; Portaccio, Marianna; Mita, Gustavo D; Vietri, Maria Teresa; Cioffi, Michele; Nola, Ernesto; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Sica, Vincenzo; Molinari, Anna Maria; Altucci, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Background: BPA (bisphenol A or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-phenol)propane) is present in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, which can be used in impact-resistant safety equipment and baby bottles, as protective coatings inside metal food containers, and as composites and sealants in dentistry. Recently, attention has focused on the estrogen-like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound. Methods: Cell cycle, apoptosis and differentiation analyses; western blots. Results: BPA is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in three different acute myeloid leukemias. Although some granulocytic differentiation concomitantly occurred in NB4 cells upon BPA treatment, the major action was the induction of apoptosis. BPA mediated apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred by activation of extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways modulating both FAS and TRAIL and by inducing BAD phosphorylation in NB4 cells. Finally, also non genomic actions such as the early decrease of both ERK and AKT phosphorylation were induced by BPA thus indicating that a complex intersection of regulations occur for the apoptotic action of BPA. Conclusion: BPA is able to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells via caspase activation and involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. PMID:19538739

  8. The Hasford Score May Predict Molecular Response in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients: A Single Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jaźwiec, Bożena; Haus, Olga; Urbaniak-Kujda, Donata; Kapelko-Słowik, Katarzyna; Wróbel, Tomasz; Lonc, Tomasz; Sawicki, Mateusz; Mędraś, Ewa; Kaczmar-Dybko, Agnieszka; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    The Sokal, Hasford, and EUTOS scores were established in different treatment eras of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). None of them was reported to predict molecular response. In this single center study we tried to reevaluate the usefulness of three main scores in TKI era. The study group included 88 CML patients in first chronic phase treated initially with standard imatinib dose. All of them achieved major molecular response (MMR) in time points defined by European LeukemiaNet (ELN). 42 patients lost MMR in a median time of 47 months and we found a significant difference in MMR maintenance between intermediate-risk (IR) and low-risk (LR) patients assessed by Hasford score. All 42 patients were switched to second-generation TKI (2G-TKI) treatment. At 18 months of 2G-TKI therapy we have still found a significant difference in BCR-ABL transcript levels and MMR rate between IR and LR groups. We did not find any of the described differences discriminating patients by Sokal or EUTOS score. In this retrospective single center analysis we found Hasford score to be useful in predicting molecular response in first chronic phase of CML patients. PMID:27818567

  9. HOX gene expression predicts response to BCL-2 inhibition in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kontro, M; Kumar, A; Majumder, M M; Eldfors, S; Parsons, A; Pemovska, T; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Malani, D; Fløisand, Y; Höglund, M; Remes, K; Gjertsen, B T; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C A; Porkka, K

    2017-02-01

    Inhibitors of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) such as venetoclax (ABT-199) and navitoclax (ABT-263) are clinically explored in several cancer types, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. To identify robust biomarkers for BCL-2 inhibitor sensitivity, we evaluated the ex vivo sensitivity of fresh leukemic cells from 73 diagnosed and relapsed/refractory AML patients, and then comprehensively assessed whether the responses correlated to specific mutations or gene expression signatures. Compared with samples from healthy donor controls (nonsensitive) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients (highly sensitive), AML samples exhibited variable responses to BCL-2 inhibition. Strongest CLL-like responses were observed in 15% of the AML patient samples, whereas 32% were resistant, and the remaining exhibited intermediate responses to venetoclax. BCL-2 inhibitor sensitivity was associated with genetic aberrations in chromatin modifiers, WT1 and IDH1/IDH2. A striking selective overexpression of specific HOXA and HOXB gene transcripts were detected in highly BCL-2 inhibitor sensitive samples. Ex vivo responses to venetoclax showed significant inverse correlation to β2-microglobulin expression and to a lesser degree to BCL-XL and BAX expression. As new therapy options for AML are urgently needed, the specific HOX gene expression pattern can potentially be used as a biomarker to identify venetoclax-sensitive AML patients for clinical trials.

  10. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials.

  11. Soluble mediators released by acute myeloid leukemia cells increase capillary-like networks.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Kimberley J; Evensen, Lasse; Reikvam, Håkon; Lorens, James B; Bruserud, Øystein

    2012-12-01

    Increased bone marrow angiogenesis is seen in several hematological malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used a co-culture assay of endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to investigate the effects of AML-conditioned medium on capillary networks. We investigated primary AML cells derived from 44 unselected patients and observed that for a large subset of patients, the constitutive cytokine release by the leukemic cells stimulated endothelial cell organization into capillary-like networks, while there were only minor or no effects for other patients. We analyzed the constitutive AML cell release of 31 cytokines for all the patients and performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of the cytokine profile which identified two major patient subsets that differed in their ability to enhance capillary-like networks; increased capillary-like networks was then associated with high constitutive release of several cytokines and especially high levels of several pro-angiogenic chemokines. Significantly increased network formation was not seen for any of the 11 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients investigated. The cytokine response by activated normal T cells inhibited endothelial network formation in our in vitro model of angiogenesis and activated normal monocytes had only a minor influence on tube formation. Our study shows that AML-derived cytokines can induce the organization of endothelial cells into vessel-like structures.

  12. Update on acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: New discoveries and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Maximilian; Kim, Tae Kon; Zeidan, Amer M

    2016-10-26

    The existence of cancer stem cells has been well established in acute myeloid leukemia. Initial proof of the existence of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) was accomplished by functional studies in xenograft models making use of the key features shared with normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) such as the capacity of self-renewal and the ability to initiate and sustain growth of progenitors in vivo. Significant progress has also been made in identifying the phenotype and signaling pathways specific for LSCs. Therapeutically, a multitude of drugs targeting LSCs are in different phases of preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on recent discoveries which have advanced our understanding of LSC biology and provided rational targets for development of novel therapeutic agents. One of the major challenges is how to target the self-renewal pathways of LSCs without affecting normal HSCs significantly therefore providing an acceptable therapeutic window. Important issues pertinent to the successful design and conduct of clinical trials evaluating drugs targeting LSCs will be discussed as well.

  13. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M.; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R.; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes. PMID:27806325

  14. Emerging strategies for the treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Iacoboni, Gloria; Montesinos, Pau; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, and its incidence increases with age. Clinical outcomes in younger patients have improved over the years but, unfortunately, there is little evidence for an equivalent improvement in outcome for older patients. Approximately 50 % of older patients who are able to receive intensive chemotherapy will achieve a complete remission; however, they face a much higher relapse rate than younger patients, and survival rates for this group are low. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve outcomes in older patients with AML. In this article, we discuss current treatment paradigms for older patients with AML including the challenges faced when determining which patients are eligible for intensive chemotherapy. We then highlight new treatments in development that may benefit this patient group. Cytotoxic agents, hypomethylating agents, molecularly targeted agents, and cell cycle kinase inhibitors are discussed, with a focus on novel agents that have achieved an advanced stage of development. Overall, the treatment of AML in older patients remains a challenge and, whenever possible, treatment should be offered in the context of clinical trials and should be planned with curative intent.

  15. An integrated genomic approach to the assessment and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Godley, Lucy A; Cunningham, John; Dolan, M Eileen; Huang, R Stephanie; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; McNerney, Megan E; Larson, Richard A; Leong, Hoyee; Lussier, Yves; Onel, Kenan; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Stock, Wendy; White, Kevin P; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2011-04-01

    Traditionally, new scientific advances have been applied quickly to the leukemias based on the ease with which relatively pure samples of malignant cells can be obtained. Currently, our arsenal of approaches used to characterize an individual's acute myeloid leukemia (AML) combines hematopathologic evaluation, flow cytometry, cytogenetic analysis, and molecular studies focused on a few key genes. The advent of high-throughput methods capable of full-genome evaluation presents new options for a revolutionary change in the way we diagnose, characterize, and treat AML. Next-generation DNA sequencing techniques allow full sequencing of a cancer genome or transcriptome, with the hope that this will be affordable for routine clinical care within the decade. Microarray-based testing will define gene and miRNA expression, DNA methylation patterns, chromosomal imbalances, and predisposition to disease and chemosensitivity. The vision for the future entails an integrated and automated approach to these analyses, bringing the possibility of formulating an individualized treatment plan within days of a patient's initial presentation. With these expectations comes the hope that such an approach will lead to decreased toxicities and prolonged survival for patients.

  16. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia fusion proteins deregulate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Meani, Natalia; Gelmetti, Vania; Fantozzi, Anna; Fagioli, Marta; Orleth, Annette; Riganelli, Daniela; Sebastiani, Carla; Cappelli, Enrico; Casciari, Cristina; Sciurpi, Maria Teresa; Mariano, Angela Rosa; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Luzi, Lucilla; Muller, Heiko; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Frosina, Guido; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) are genetically heterogeneous and characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that produce fusion proteins with aberrant transcriptional regulatory activities. Expression of AML fusion proteins in transgenic mice increases the risk of myeloid leukemias, suggesting that they induce a preleukemic state. The underlying molecular and biological mechanisms are, however, unknown. To address this issue, we performed a systematic analysis of fusion protein transcriptional targets. We expressed AML1/ETO, PML/RAR, and PLZF/RAR in U937 hemopoietic precursor cells and measured global gene expression using oligonucleotide chips. We identified 1,555 genes regulated concordantly by at least two fusion proteins that were further validated in patient samples and finally classified according to available functional information. Strikingly, we found that AML fusion proteins induce genes involved in the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and repress DNA repair genes, mainly of the base excision repair pathway. Functional studies confirmed that ectopic expression of fusion proteins constitutively activates pathways leading to increased stem cell renewal (e.g., the Jagged1/Notch pathway) and provokes accumulation of DNA damage. We propose that expansion of the stem cell compartment and induction of a mutator phenotype are relevant features underlying the leukemic potential of AML-associated fusion proteins. PMID:14660751

  18. [A TIM-3/galectin-9 autocrine stimulatory loop drives self-renewal of human myeloid leukemia stem cells and leukemia progression].

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) originates from self-renewing leukemic stem cells (LSCs), an ultimate therapeutic target for AML. We previously reported that the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) is expressed on the LCS surface in most types of AML. Since only the TIM-3(+), i.e. not the TIM-3(-), fraction of human AML cells can reconstitute human AML in immunodeficient mice, we hypothesized that the TIM-3 has an essential function in maintaining AML LSCs. Herein, we show that TIM-3 and its ligand, galectin-9 (Gal-9), constitute an autocrine loop critical for human AML LSC development. Serum Gal-9 was significantly elevated in primary AML patients and in mice xenografted with human AML. Neutralization of Gal-9 inhibited xenogeneic reconstitution of human AML, as well as Gal-9 ligation of TIM-3 co-activated NF-κB and β-catenin signaling, suggesting that TIM-3 signaling is necessary for LSC self-renewal. Interestingly, identical changes were found to be involved in the progressive transformation of a variety of pre-leukemic disorders into myeloid leukemia. Thus, molecules constituting the TIM-3/Gal-9 autocrine loop are potential therapeutic targets applicable to most types of myeloid leukemia.

  19. Pre-transplantation minimal residual disease with cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic features improves risk stratification in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betül; Jorgensen, Jeff L.; Marin, David; Wang, Sa; Ahmed, Sairah; Alousi, Amin M.; Andersson, Borje S.; Bashir, Qaiser; Bassett, Roland; Lyons, Genevieve; Chen, Julianne; Rezvani, Katy; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Patel, Keyur; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Champlin, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to improve outcome prediction after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia by combining cytogenetic and molecular data at diagnosis with minimal residual disease assessment by multicolor flow-cytometry at transplantation. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission in whom minimal residual disease was assessed at transplantation were included and categorized according to the European LeukemiaNet classification. The primary outcome was 1-year relapse incidence after transplantation. Of 152 patients eligible, 48 had minimal residual disease at the time of their transplant. Minimal residual disease-positive patients were older, required more therapy to achieve first remission, were more likely to have incomplete recovery of blood counts and had more adverse risk features by cytogenetics. Relapse incidence at 1 year was higher in patients with minimal residual disease (32.6% versus 14.4%, P=0.002). Leukemia-free survival (43.6% versus 64%, P=0.007) and overall survival (48.8% versus 66.9%, P=0.008) rates were also inferior in patients with minimal residual disease. In multivariable analysis, minimal residual disease status at transplantation independently predicted 1-year relapse incidence, identifying a subgroup of intermediate-risk patients, according to the European LeukemiaNet classification, with a particularly poor outcome. Assessment of minimal residual disease at transplantation in combination with cytogenetic and molecular findings provides powerful independent prognostic information in acute myeloid leukemia, lending support to the incorporation of minimal residual disease detection to refine risk stratification and develop a more individualized approach during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27540139

  20. Targeted therapy for a subset of acute myeloid leukemias that lack expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1.

    PubMed

    Gasparetto, Maura; Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Khan, Nabilah; Pollyea, Daniel A; Myers, Jason R; Ashton, John M; Becker, Michael W; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Humphries, Keith R; Jordan, Craig T; Smith, Clayton A

    2017-03-09

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 (ALDH1A1) activity is high in hematopoietic stem cells and functions in part to protect stem cells from reactive aldehydes and other toxic compounds. In contrast, we found that ~25% of all acute myeloid leukemias expressed low or undetectable levels of ALDH1A1 and that this ALDH1A1- subset of leukemias correlates with good prognosis cytogenetics. ALDH1A1- cell lines as well as primary leukemia cells were found to be sensitive to treatment with compounds that directly and indirectly generate toxic ALDH substrates including 4-hydroxynonenal and the clinically relevant compounds arsenic trioxide and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide. In contrast, normal hematopoietic stem cells were relatively resistant to these compounds. Using a murine xenotransplant model to emulate a clinical treatment strategy, established ALDH1A1- leukemias were also sensitive to in vivo treatment with cyclophosphamide combined with arsenic trioxide. These results demonstrate that targeting ALDH1A1- leukemic cells with toxic ALDH1A1 substrates such as arsenic and cyclophosphamide may be a novel targeted therapeutic strategy for this subset of acute myeloid leukemias.