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Sample records for myeloma cell expression

  1. Human myeloma cells express the CD38 ligand CD31.

    PubMed

    Vallario, A; Chilosi, M; Adami, F; Montagna, L; Deaglio, S; Malavasi, F; Caligaris-Cappio, F

    1999-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) plasma cells (PC) are CD38+. A ligand for CD38 is the adhesion molecule CD31. By flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry we have investigated whether malignant PC co-express CD38 and CD31. All 68 patients studied were CD38+. 14/14 monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 39/39 plasmacytic MM patients co-expressed CD38 and CD31 at high density. Only 1/11 plasmablastic MM and 1/4 plasma cell leukaemias (PCL) expressed CD31. These data indicated that PC malignancies co-expressed high levels of both CD38 and its ligand CD31, with the exception of plasmablastic MM and PCL.

  2. MYC protein expression is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruobing; Cerny, Jan; Devitt, Katherine; Dresser, Karen; Nath, Rajneesh; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Rodig, Scott J; Chen, Benjamin J; Woda, Bruce A; Yu, Hongbo

    2014-06-01

    It has been recognized that monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) precedes a diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma in most patients. Recent gene expression array analysis has revealed that an MYC activation signature is detected in plasma cell myeloma but not in MGUS. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical studies using membrane CD138 and nuclear MYC double staining on bone marrow biopsies from patients who met the diagnostic criteria of plasma cell myeloma or MGUS. Our study demonstrated nuclear MYC expression in CD138-positive plasma cells in 22 of 26 (84%) plasma cell myeloma samples and in none of the 29 bone marrow samples from patients with MGUS. In addition, our data on the follow-up biopsies from plasma cell myeloma patients with high MYC expression demonstrated that evaluation of MYC expression in plasma cells can be useful in detecting residual disease. We also demonstrated that plasma cells gained MYC expression in 5 of 8 patients (62.5%) when progressing from MGUS to plasma cell myeloma. Analysis of additional lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation, including lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma, reveals that MYC detection can be a useful tool in the diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma.

  3. HDAC inhibitor AR-42 decreases CD44 expression and sensitizes myeloma cells to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Canella, Alessandro; Cordero Nieves, Hector; Sborov, Douglas W; Cascione, Luciano; Radomska, Hanna S; Smith, Emily; Stiff, Andrew; Consiglio, Jessica; Caserta, Enrico; Rizzotto, Lara; Zanesi, Nicola; Stefano, Volinia; Kaur, Balveen; Mo, Xiaokui; Byrd, John C; Efebera, Yvonne A; Hofmeister, Craig C; Pichiorri, Flavia

    2015-10-13

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite multiple treatment options, MM is inevitably associated with drug resistance and poor outcomes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) are promising novel chemotherapeutics undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for the potential treatment of patients with MM. Although in preclinical studies HDACi's have proven anti-myeloma activity, but in the clinic single-agent HDACi treatments have been limited due to low tolerability. Improved clinical outcomes were reported only when HDACi's were combined with other drugs. Here, we show that a novel pan-HDACi AR-42 downregulates CD44, a glycoprotein that has been associated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone resistance in myeloma both in vitro and in vivo. We also show that this CD44 downregulation is in part mediated by miR-9-5p, targeting insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), which directly binds to CD44 mRNA and increases its stability. Importantly, we also demonstrate that AR-42 enhances anti-myeloma activity of lenalidomide in primary MM cells isolated from lenalidomide resistant patients and in in vivo MM mouse model. Thus, our findings shed light on potential novel combinatorial therapeutic approaches modulating CD44 expression, which may help overcome lenalidomide resistance in myeloma patients.

  4. HDAC inhibitor AR-42 decreases CD44 expression and sensitizes myeloma cells to lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Sborov, Douglas W.; Cascione, Luciano; Radomska, Hanna S.; Smith, Emily; Stiff, Andrew; Consiglio, Jessica; Caserta, Enrico; Rizzotto, Lara; Zanesi, Nicola; Stefano, Volinia; Kaur, Balveen; Mo, Xiaokui; Byrd, John C.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite multiple treatment options, MM is inevitably associated with drug resistance and poor outcomes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) are promising novel chemotherapeutics undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for the potential treatment of patients with MM. Although in preclinical studies HDACi's have proven anti-myeloma activity, but in the clinic single-agent HDACi treatments have been limited due to low tolerability. Improved clinical outcomes were reported only when HDACi's were combined with other drugs. Here, we show that a novel pan-HDACi AR-42 downregulates CD44, a glycoprotein that has been associated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone resistance in myeloma both in vitro and in vivo. We also show that this CD44 downregulation is in part mediated by miR-9–5p, targeting insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), which directly binds to CD44 mRNA and increases its stability. Importantly, we also demonstrate that AR-42 enhances anti-myeloma activity of lenalidomide in primary MM cells isolated from lenalidomide resistant patients and in in vivo MM mouse model. Thus, our findings shed light on potential novel combinatorial therapeutic approaches modulating CD44 expression, which may help overcome lenalidomide resistance in myeloma patients. PMID:26429859

  5. Lenalidomide affect expression level of cereblon protein in multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226.

    PubMed

    Yang, D Y; Ren, J H; Guo, X N; Guo, X L; Cai, X Y; Guo, X F; Zhang, J N

    2015-10-29

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of immuno-modulatory drug (lenalidomide) on the protein expression of cereblon (CRBN) and their therapeutic targets in the multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226. The multiple myeloma cell line RPMI8226 was cultured and treated with different concentrations of lenalidomide and bortezomib to determine the proliferation inhibition rate, apoptosis rate, and protein expression of CRBN. The results revealed that both lenalidomide and bortezomib inhibited the proliferation of RPMI8226 and promoted cell apoptosis. However, the protein expression of CRBN decreased signifi-cantly after treatment with lenalidomide, while bortezomib had no effect on the expression of CRBN. We confirmed that CRBN may be a target of lenalidomide.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of EPHX1, Gsk3beta, TNFSF8 and myeloma cell DKK-1 expression linked to bone disease in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Durie, B G M; Van Ness, B; Ramos, C; Stephens, O; Haznadar, M; Hoering, A; Haessler, J; Katz, M S; Mundy, G R; Kyle, R A; Morgan, G J; Crowley, J; Barlogie, B; Shaughnessy, J

    2009-10-01

    Bone disease in myeloma occurs as a result of complex interactions between myeloma cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. A custom-built DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip containing 3404 SNPs was used to test genomic DNA from myeloma patients classified by the extent of bone disease. Correlations identified with a Total Therapy 2 (TT2) (Arkansas) data set were validated with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) data sets. Univariate correlates with bone disease included: EPHX1, IGF1R, IL-4 and Gsk3beta. SNP signatures were linked to the number of bone lesions, log(2) DKK-1 myeloma cell expression levels and patient survival. Using stepwise multivariate regression analysis, the following SNPs: EPHX1 (P=0.0026); log(2) DKK-1 expression (P=0.0046); serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) (P=0.0074); Gsk3beta (P=0.02) and TNFSF8 (P=0.04) were linked to bone disease. This assessment of genetic polymorphisms identifies SNPs with both potential biological relevance and utility in prognostic models of myeloma bone disease.

  7. [Construction of eukaryotic expressing vector of multiple myeloma mucin-1 and its expression in COS-7 cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Luo, Yun-Jiao; Liu, Yue-Bo; Yao, Jin; Yang, Hong; Mou, Hong; Huang, Gui-Yun; Zhang, You

    2009-08-01

    In order to construct an eukaryotic expression vector for gene of multiple myeloma mucin1 (muc1-2vntr) gene and to express it in COS-7 cells in vitro, so to provide the basic material for further research of multiple myeloma DNA vaccine. muc1-2vntr coding gene was used as a research gene and a KOZAK sequence was inserted before the gene Hind III and XbaI restriction sites were inserted before and after the coding gene. Then the whole sequence was synthesized and inserted into pcDNA3.1/myc-his B vector, and the resulted recombinant vector was transformed into E.coil competent cells to get an engineering strain, the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B identified by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing were transfected into COS-7 cells by liposome-mediated gene transfer method. Finally, fluorescent microscopy was used to assess GFP expression and Western blot analysis using muc1 monoclonal antibody was used to recognize vntr, confirming the expression of vntr. The results showed that the full length of synthesized muc1-2vntr gene, as expected, was 140 bp. Both restriction analysis and DNA sequencing demonstrated that pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B included the whole translation frame region and muc1-2vntr gene. Furthermore, the fluorescence microscopy proved that the recombinant plasmid had been successfully transfected into COS-7 cells. The expression of mucin-1 protein was observed both in the transfected cell and the cell supernatant by Western blot. It is concluded that the pcDNA3.1-2vntr/myc-his B has been successfully constructed and expressed in COS-7 cells in vitro, which provides the basic material for further researches of mucin-1 function and possible multiple myloma DNA vaccine.

  8. Restoration of microRNA-214 expression reduces growth of myeloma cells through positive regulation of P53 and inhibition of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Misiewicz-Krzeminska, Irena; Sarasquete, María E.; Quwaider, Dalia; Krzeminski, Patryk; Ticona, Fany V.; Paíno, Teresa; Delgado, Manuel; Aires, Andreia; Ocio, Enrique M.; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA have been demonstrated to be deregulated in multiple myeloma. We have previously reported that miR-214 is down-regulated in multiple myeloma compared to in normal plasma cells. The functional role of miR-214 in myeloma pathogenesis was explored by transfecting myeloma cell lines with synthetic microRNA followed by gene expression profiling. Putative miR-214 targets were validated by luciferase reporter assay. Ectopic expression of miR-214 reduced cell growth and induced apoptosis of myeloma cells. In order to identify the potential direct target genes of miR-214 which could be involved in the biological pathways regulated by this microRNA, gene expression profiling of the H929 myeloma cell line transfected with precursor miR-214 was carried out. Functional analysis revealed significant enrichment for DNA replication, cell cycle phase and DNA binding. miR-214 directly down-regulated the expression of PSMD10, which encodes the oncoprotein gankyrin, and ASF1B, a histone chaperone required for DNA replication, by binding to their 3'-untranslated regions. In addition, gankyrin inhibition induced an increase of P53 mRNA levels and subsequent up-regulation of CDKN1A (p21Waf1/Cip1) and BAX transcripts, which are direct transcriptional targets of p53. In conclusion, MiR-214 functions as a tumor suppressor in myeloma by positive regulation of p53 and inhibition of DNA replication. PMID:23100276

  9. The hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride induces cell cycle arrest and alters gene expression in U266 multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seunghee; Jeong, Hye-Jung; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; Choi, Yeong Min; An, In-Sook; Koh, Hyea Jung; Lim, Dae Jin; Lee, Su-Jae; An, Sungkwan

    2012-11-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of tumors that occurs across a wide variety of malignancies. Multiple myeloma is an incurable malignant disorder of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Although bone marrow hypoxia is crucial for normal hematopoiesis, the effect of hypoxia on multiple myeloma is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-mediated hypoxia decreased cell viability and altered gene expression in U266 human multiple myeloma cells. CoCl2 induced the loss of cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, FACS analysis revealed that the loss of cell viability was related to apoptosis. Using microarray analysis, we identified mRNA expression profile changes in response to CoCl2 treatment in U266 cells. Four hundred and fifty-two mRNAs exhibited >2-fold changes in expression in CoCl2-treated U266 cells compared to their expression in control cells. A follow-up bioinformatics study revealed that a great number of genes with altered expression were involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, transcription and development. In conclusion, these results provide novel evidence that CoCl2-mediated hypoxia affects the expression profiles of genes that are functionally related to apoptosis and angiogenesis in U266 multiple myeloma cells.

  10. The normal counterpart of IgD myeloma cells in germinal center displays extensively mutated IgVH gene, Cmu-Cdelta switch, and lambda light chain expression.

    PubMed

    Arpin, C; de Bouteiller, O; Razanajaona, D; Fugier-Vivier, I; Brière, F; Banchereau, J; Lebecque, S; Liu, Y J

    1998-04-20

    Human myeloma are incurable hematologic cancers of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells in bone marrow. Although malignant plasma cells can be almost eradicated from the patient's bone marrow by chemotherapy, drug-resistant myeloma precursor cells persist in an apparently cryptic compartment. Controversy exists as to whether myeloma precursor cells are hematopoietic stem cells, pre-B cells, germinal center (GC) B cells, circulating memory cells, or plasma blasts. This situation reflects what has been a general problem in cancer research for years: how to compare a tumor with its normal counterpart. Although several studies have demonstrated somatically mutated immunoglobulin variable region genes in multiple myeloma, it is unclear if myeloma cells are derived from GCs or post-GC memory B cells. Immunoglobulin (Ig)D-secreting myeloma have two unique immunoglobulin features, including a biased lambda light chain expression and a Cmu-Cdelta isotype switch. Using surface markers, we have previously isolated a population of surface IgM-IgD+CD38+ GC B cells that carry the most impressive somatic mutation in their IgV genes. Here we show that this population of GC B cells displays the two molecular features of IgD-secreting myeloma cells: a biased lambda light chain expression and a C&mu-Cdelta isotype switch. The demonstration of these peculiar GC B cells to differentiate into IgD-secreting plasma cells but not memory B cells both in vivo and in vitro suggests that IgD-secreting plasma and myeloma cells are derived from GCs.

  11. Identification of the key genes connected with plasma cells of multiple myeloma using expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kefeng; Xu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To uncover the potential regulatory mechanisms of the relevant genes that contribute to the prognosis and prevention of multiple myeloma (MM). Methods Microarray data (GSE13591) were downloaded, including five plasma cell samples from normal donors and 133 plasma cell samples from MM patients. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by Student’s t-test. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for DEGs using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Transcription factors and tumor-associated genes were also explored by mapping genes in the TRANSFAC, the tumor suppressor gene (TSGene), and tumor-associated gene (TAG) databases. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) network and PPI subnetworks were constructed by Cytoscape software using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database. Results A total of 63 DEGs (42 downregulated, 21 upregulated) were identified. Functional enrichment analysis showed that HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1 might be involved in the positive regulation of immune system processes, and HLA-DRB1 might be related to the intestinal immune network for IgA production pathway. The genes CEBPD, JUND, and ATF3 were identified as transcription factors. The top ten nodal genes in the PPI network were revealed including HLA-DRB1, VCAM1, and TFRC. In addition, genes in the PPI subnetwork, such as HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1, were enriched in the cell adhesion molecules pathway, whereas CD4 and TFRC were both enriched in the hematopoietic cell pathway. Conclusion Several crucial genes correlated to MM were identified, including CD4, HLA-DRB1, TFRC, and VCAM1, which might exert their roles in MM progression via immune-mediated pathways. There might be certain regulatory correlations between HLA-DRB1, CD4, and TFRC. PMID:26229487

  12. Cx43 expressed on bone marrow stromal cells plays an essential role in multiple myeloma cell survival and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Connexin-43 (Cx43), a connexin constituent of gap junctions (GJs) is mainly expressed in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and played a important role on hematopoiesis. In this study, we explored the role of gap junctions (GJs) formed by Cx43 between BMSCs and multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Material and methods qPCR and western blot assays were employed to assay Cx43 expression in three MM cell lines (RPMI 8266, U266, and XG7), freshly isolated MM cells, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cx43 mRNA and proteins were detected in all three MM cell lines and six out of seven freshly isolated MM cells. Resuths The BMSCs from MM patients expressed Cx43 at higher levels than of normal donor (ND-BMSCs). Dye transfer assays demonstrated that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) occurring via Cx43 situated between MM and BMSCs is functional. Cytometry beads array (CBA) assays showed that cytokines production changed when the ND-BMSCs were co-cultured with MM cells, especially the levels of IL-6, SDF-1α and IL-10 were higher than those the cells cultured alone and decreased significantly in the presence of GJ inhibitor heptanol. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of BTZ to MM cells decreased significantly in the presence of BMSCs, an effect that was partially recovered in the presence of GJ inhibitor. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJIC between MM and BMSCs is a critical factor in tumor cell proliferation and drug sensitivity, and is implicated in MM pathogenesis. PMID:28144277

  13. Targeting MAGE-C1/CT7 Expression Increases Cell Sensitivity to the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Fabricio; Costa, Erico T.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Gregorio, Juliana C.; Masotti, Cibele; Andrade, Valeria C.C.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Atanackovic, Djordje; Colleoni, Gisele W.B.

    2011-01-01

    The MAGE-C1/CT7 encodes a cancer/testis antigen (CTA), is located on the chromosomal region Xq26–27 and is highly polymorphic in humans. MAGE-C1/CT7 is frequently expressed in multiple myeloma (MM) that may be a potential target for immunotherapy in this still incurable disease. MAGEC1/CT7 expression is restricted to malignant plasma cells and it has been suggested that MAGE-C1/CT7 might play a pathogenic role in MM; however, the exact function this protein in the pathophysiology of MM is not yet understood. Our objectives were (1) to clarify the role of MAGE-C1/CT7 in the control of cellular proliferation and cell cycle in myeloma and (2) to evaluate the impact of silencing MAGE-C1/CT7 on myeloma cells treated with bortezomib. Myeloma cell line SKO-007 was transduced for stable expression of shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7. Downregulation of MAGE-C1/CT7 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR and western blot. Functional assays included cell proliferation, cell invasion, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis. Western blot showed a 70–80% decrease in MAGE-C1/CT7 protein expression in inhibited cells (shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7) when compared with controls. Functional assays did not indicate a difference in cell proliferation and DNA synthesis when inhibited cells were compared with controls. However, we found a decreased percentage of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle among inhibited cells, but not in the controls (p<0.05). When myeloma cells were treated with bortezomib, we observed a 48% reduction of cells in the G2/M phase among inhibited cells while controls showed 13% (empty vector) and 9% (ineffective shRNA) reduction, respectively (p<0.01). Furthermore, inhibited cells treated with bortezomib showed an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-) in comparison with bortezomib-treated controls (p<0.001). We found that MAGE-C1/CT7 protects SKO-007 cells against bortezomib-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we could speculate that MAGE-C1/CT7 gene therapy could be

  14. Valproic Acid Upregulates NKG2D Ligand Expression through an ERK-dependent Mechanism and Potentially Enhances NK Cell-mediated Lysis of Myeloma1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaosong; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Meng, Xiuqin; Shi, Jumei

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of the antitumor immune response through the engagement of NKG2D receptors with their ligands (L) on targets represents a promising therapeutic approach against cancer. In this study, we tested the effect of valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, on the expression of NKG2D ligands in myeloma cells. We demonstrated that VPA was able to upregulate both protein and mRNA expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain (MIC) A/B and UL16-binding protein (ULBP) 2 without any significant effect on the expression of ULBP1, ULBP3, and ULBP4 or induction of other natural killer (NK) cell ligands, such as NKp30-L, NKp44-L, and NKp46-L in myeloma cells. A 51Cr release assay and degranulation assay indicated that the induction of MICA/B and ULBP2 augmented NK cell-mediated lysis of myeloma cells, which was abolished by the addition of a blocking NKG2D antibody. Activation of constitutively phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by VPA is essential for the up-regulation of MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions. Inhibition of ERK using ERK inhibitor PD98059 decreased both MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions and NK cell cytotoxicity. Furthermore, overexpression of constitutively active ERK in ARK resulted in increased MICA/B and ULBP2 expressions and enhanced NK cell lysis. These data indicate that increased sensitivity of VPA-treated myeloma cells to NK cell lysis is caused by higher NKG2D ligand expression, resulting from more active ERK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence that targeting ERK signaling pathway may be an additional mechanism supporting the antimyeloma activity of HDAC inhibitors and suggest its possible immunotherapeutic value for myeloma treatment. PMID:23308050

  15. Clinical significance of CD81 expression by clonal plasma cells in high-risk smoldering and symptomatic multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Gutiérrez, N-C; Chen, X; Vídriales, M-B; Montalbán, M-Á; Rosiñol, L; Oriol, A; Martínez-López, J; Mateos, M-V; López-Corral, L; Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Pérez, J-J; Fernández-Redondo, E; de Arriba, F; Palomera, L; Bengoechea, E; Terol, M-J; de Paz, R; Martin, A; Hernández, J; Orfao, A; Lahuerta, J-J; Bladé, J; Pandiella, A; Miguel, J-F San

    2012-08-01

    The presence of CD19 in myelomatous plasma cells (MM-PCs) correlates with adverse prognosis in multiple myeloma (MM). Although CD19 expression is upregulated by CD81, this marker has been poorly investigated and its prognostic value in MM remains unknown. We have analyzed CD81 expression by multiparameter flow cytometry in MM-PCs from 230 MM patients at diagnosis included in the Grupo Español de Mieloma (GEM)05>65 years trial as well as 56 high-risk smoldering MM (SMM). CD81 expression was detected in 45% (103/230) MM patients, and the detection of CD81(+) MM-PC was an independent prognostic factor for progression-free (hazard ratio=1.9; P=0.003) and overall survival (hazard ratio=2.0; P=0.02); this adverse impact was validated in an additional series of 325 transplant-candidate MM patients included in the GEM05 <65 years trial. Moreover, CD81(+) SMM (n=34/56, 57%) patients had a shorter time to progression to MM (P=0.02). Overall, our results show that CD81 may have a relevant role in MM pathogenesis and represent a novel adverse prognostic marker in myeloma.

  16. Lenalidomide enhances antigen-specific activity and decreases CD45RA expression of T cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Neuber, Brigitte; Herth, Isabelle; Tolliver, Claudia; Schoenland, Stefan; Hegenbart, Ute; Hose, Dirk; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-07-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the specific T cell response against the multiple myeloma Ag HM1.24 is enhanced by the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide (Revlimid). Ag-specific CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells against the HM1.24 Ag were expanded in vitro by dendritic cells in 29 healthy donors and 26 patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. Ag-specific activation was analyzed by IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin secretion using ELISA, ELISPOT assay, and intracellular staining, and generation of Ag-specific T cells was analyzed by tetramer staining. Expression of T cell maturation markers (CD45RA, CD45R0, CCR7, and CD28) was investigated by flow cytometry. We found that activation of HM1.24-specific T cells from healthy donors and patients with plasma cell dyscrasias was enhanced significantly by lenalidomide and furthermore that the impact of lenalidomide on T cells depends on the duration of the exposure. Notably, lenalidomide supports the downregulation of CD45RA on T cells upon activation, observed in healthy donors and in patients in vitro and also in patients during lenalidomide therapy in vivo. We showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that lenalidomide enhances the Ag-specific activation of T cells and the subsequent downregulation of CD45RA expression of T cells in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Role of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase in myeloma cell migration and induction of bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rakesh; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Pennisi, Angela; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Li, Xin; van Rhee, Frits; Usmani, Saad; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Myeloma cells typically grow in bone, recruit osteoclast precursors and induce their differentiation and activity in areas adjacent to tumor foci. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK), of the TEC family, is expressed in hematopoietic cells and is particularly involved in B-lymphocyte function and osteoclastogenesis. We demonstrated BTK expression in clinical myeloma plasma cells, interleukin (IL) –6– or stroma–dependent cell lines and osteoclasts. SDF-1 induced BTK activation in myeloma cells and BTK inhibition by small hairpin RNA or the small molecule inhibitor, LFM-A13, reduced their migration toward stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1). Pretreatment with LFM-A13 also reduced in vivo homing of myeloma cells to bone using bioluminescence imaging in the SCID-rab model. Enforced expression of BTK in myeloma cell line enhanced cell migration toward SDF-1 but had no effect on short-term growth. BTK expression was correlated with cell-surface CXCR4 expression in myeloma cells (n = 33, r = 0.81, P < 0.0001), and BTK gene and protein expression was more profound in cell-surface CXCR4-expressing myeloma cells. BTK was not upregulated by IL-6 while its inhibition had no effect on IL-6 signaling in myeloma cells. Human osteoclast precursors also expressed BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 and migrated toward SDF-1. LFM-A13 suppressed migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors as well as bone-resorbing activity of mature osteoclasts. In primary myeloma-bearing SCID-rab mice, LFM-A13 inhibited osteoclast activity, prevented myeloma-induced bone resorption and moderately suppressed myeloma growth. These data demonstrate BTK and cell-surface CXCR4 association in myeloma cells and that BTK plays a role in myeloma cell homing to bone and myeloma-induced bone disease. PMID:23456977

  18. Fucoidan inhibits angiogenesis induced by multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen; Luo, Guoping; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Liping; Luo, Xiaohua; Lv, Jinglong; Chen, Lixue

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological neoplasms. Our previous studies showed that Fucoidan possessed anti-myeloma effect by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting invasion of myeloma cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells and elucidated its possible mechanisms. Multiple myeloma cells were treated with Fucoidan at different concentrations, then the conditioned medium (CM) was collected. The levels of VEGF in the CM were tested by ELISA. The results showed that Fucoidan significantly decreased VEGF secretion by RPMI-8226 and U266 cells. The tube formation assay and migration test on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to examine the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells. The results showed that Fucoidan decreased HUVECs formed tube structures and inhibited HUVECs migration, and suppressed the angiogenic ability of multiple myeloma RPMI-8226 and U266 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The study also showed that Fucoidan downregulated the expression of several kinds of proteins, which may be correlated with the reduction of angiogenesis induced by myeloma cells. Moreover, results were compared from normoxic and hypoxic conditions, they showed that Fucoidan had anti-angiogenic activity. Furthermore, in a multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model, it indicated that Fucoidan negatively affected tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Fucoidan was able to interfere with angiogenesis of multiple myeloma cells both in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM.

  19. Enhancing cytokine-induced killer cell therapy of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Chen, Yun-Wen; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-06-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are in clinical testing against various tumor types, including multiple myeloma. In this study, we show that CIK cells have activity against subcutaneous and disseminated models of human myeloma (KAS-6/1), which can be enhanced by infecting the CIK cells with an oncolytic measles virus (MV) or by pretreating the myeloma cells with ionizing radiation (XRT). KAS-6/1 cells were killed by coculture with CIK or MV-infected CIK (CIK/MV) cells, and the addition of an anti-NKG2D antibody inhibited cytolysis by 50%. However, human bone marrow stromal cells can reduce CIK and CIK/MV mediated killing of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, JJN-3 and MM1). In vivo, CIK and CIK/MV prolonged the survival of mice with systemic myeloma, although CIK/MV showed enhanced antitumor activity compared with CIK. Irradiation of the KAS-6/1 cells induced mRNA and protein expression of NKG2D ligands, MICA, and MICB in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced delivery of CIK/MV to the irradiated tumors. In both subcutaneous and disseminated myeloma models, XRT at 2 Gy resulted in superior prolongation of the survival of mice given CIK/MV therapy compared with CIK/MV with no XRT. This study demonstrates the potential of CIK against myeloma and that the combination of virotherapy with radiation could be used to further enhance therapeutic outcome using CIK cells.

  20. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; De Las Rivas, Javier; Ocio, Enrique M; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-09-30

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease.

  1. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Las Rivas, Javier De; Ocio, Enrique M.; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C.; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F.; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M.; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease. PMID:25268740

  2. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  3. Identification of a novel gene product expressed by Trichinella spiralis that binds antiserum to Sp2/0 myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lingxin; Li, Jianhua; Cheng, Boqi; Lv, Qiang; Gong, Peng-tao; Su, Li-bo; Cai, Yanan; Zhang, Xichen

    2013-05-20

    To obtain novel antigen genes for use as an anti-tumor vaccine, a Trichinella spiralis cDNA expression library was constructed from muscle larvae RNA and screened with sera from Balb/C mice injected with Sp2/0 myeloma cells. One positive clone was obtained after three rounds of immunoscreening of the cDNA expression library and was subsequently excised in vivo using the ExAssist helper phage with SOLR strain. A full-length gene was amplified using 5'-RACE technology and analyzed by BLAST, Protein Analysis System of ELM, and DNAStar Software. The sequencing results showed that the fragment was 569 bp in length and contained an open reading frame. It was predicted that the full-length gene encoded 136 amino acids. This gene, TS2, contained four putative N-Arg dibasic convertase (nardilysine) cleavage sites, one peptide C-terminal amidation site, and one glycosaminoglycan attachment site. Six antibody epitopes were predicted by bioinformatic analysis.

  4. Hydroxychloroquine potentiates carfilzomib toxicity towards myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Starheim, Kristian K.; Holien, Toril; Johansson, Ida; Darvekar, Sagar; Buene, Glenn; Waage, Anders; Bjørkøy, Geir; Sundan, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Cells degrade proteins either by proteasomes that clinically are targeted by for example bortezomib or carfilzomib, or by formation of autophagosomes and lysosomal degradation that can be inhibited by hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). Multiple myeloma is unique among cancers because proteasomal inhibition has good clinical effects. However, some multiple myeloma patients display intrinsic resistance to the treatment and most patients acquire resistance over time. We hypothesized that simultaneous targeting both arms of protein degradation could be a way to improve treatment of multiple myeloma. Here we tested the combined effects of the lysosomal inhibitor HCQ and clinically relevant proteasome inhibitors on myeloma cell lines and primary cells. Carfilzomib and bortezomib both induced immunoglobulin-containing aggregates in myeloma cells. HCQ significantly potentiated the effect of carfilzomib in both cell lines and in primary myeloma cells. In contrast, HCQ had little or no effects on the toxicity of bortezomib. Furthermore, cells adapted to tolerate high levels of carfilzomib could be re-sensitized to the drug by co-treatment with HCQ. Thus, we show that inhibition of lysosomal degradation can overcome carfilzomib resistance, suggesting that the role of autophagy in myeloma cells is dependent on type of proteasome inhibitor. In conclusion, attempts should be made to combine HCQ with carfilzomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:27683126

  5. Hydroxychloroquine potentiates carfilzomib toxicity towards myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Katarzyna; Misund, Kristine; Starheim, Kristian K; Holien, Toril; Johansson, Ida; Darvekar, Sagar; Buene, Glenn; Waage, Anders; Bjørkøy, Geir; Sundan, Anders

    2016-10-25

    Cells degrade proteins either by proteasomes that clinically are targeted by for example bortezomib or carfilzomib, or by formation of autophagosomes and lysosomal degradation that can be inhibited by hydroxychloroquine (HCQ). Multiple myeloma is unique among cancers because proteasomal inhibition has good clinical effects. However, some multiple myeloma patients display intrinsic resistance to the treatment and most patients acquire resistance over time. We hypothesized that simultaneous targeting both arms of protein degradation could be a way to improve treatment of multiple myeloma. Here we tested the combined effects of the lysosomal inhibitor HCQ and clinically relevant proteasome inhibitors on myeloma cell lines and primary cells. Carfilzomib and bortezomib both induced immunoglobulin-containing aggregates in myeloma cells. HCQ significantly potentiated the effect of carfilzomib in both cell lines and in primary myeloma cells. In contrast, HCQ had little or no effects on the toxicity of bortezomib. Furthermore, cells adapted to tolerate high levels of carfilzomib could be re-sensitized to the drug by co-treatment with HCQ. Thus, we show that inhibition of lysosomal degradation can overcome carfilzomib resistance, suggesting that the role of autophagy in myeloma cells is dependent on type of proteasome inhibitor. In conclusion, attempts should be made to combine HCQ with carfilzomib in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  6. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E.; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad. PMID:26528184

  7. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  8. Myeloma cell expression of 10 candidate genes for osteolytic bone disease. Only overexpression of DKK1 correlates with clinical bone involvement at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haaber, Jacob; Abildgaard, Niels; Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard; Dahl, Inger Marie; Lodahl, Marianne; Thomassen, Mads; Kerndrup, Gitte Birk; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Osteolytic bone disease (OBD) in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by interactions between MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment and is characterized by increased osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation. Recently, the role of osteoblast inhibition has come into focus, especially the possible role of overexpression of DKK1, an inhibitor of the Wnt signalling pathway. Further, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR have also been reported as candidate genes for OBD. We studied the gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of TNFSF11 (RANKL), TNFSF11A (RANK), TNFRSF11B (OPG), CCL3 (MIP1A), CCL4 (MIP1B), PTHR1 (PTHrp), DKK1, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR in purified, immunophenotypic FACS-sorted plasma cells from 171 newly diagnosed MM patients, 20 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and 12 controls. The gene expressions of the analysed genes were correlated with radiographically assessed OBD. Only overexpression of DKK1 was correlated to the degree of OBD. Myeloma cells did not express TNFSF11A, TNFSF11, or TNFRSF11B, and very rarely expressed CCL3 and PTHR11. CCL4, CKS2, PSME2 and DHFR were variably expressed, but the expression of these genes showed no correlation with OBD. In contrast, loss of PSME2 expression in MM plasma cells was significantly correlated with OBD.

  9. PDL1 Expression on Plasma and Dendritic Cells in Myeloma Bone Marrow Suggests Benefit of Targeted anti PD1-PDL1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Moharrami, Neda Nejati; Feyzi, Emadoldin; Standal, Therese; Holth Rustad, Even; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In this study we set out to investigate whether anti PDL1 or PD-1 treatment targeting the immune system could be used against multiple myeloma. DCs are important in regulating T cell responses against tumors. We therefore determined PDL1 and PDL2 expression on DC populations in bone marrow of patients with plasma cell disorders using multicolour Flow Cytometry. We specifically looked at CD141+ and CD141- myeloid and CD303+ plasmacytoid DC. The majority of plasma cells (PC) and DC subpopulations expressed PDL1, but the proportion of positive PDL1+ cells varied among patients. A correlation between the proportion of PDL1+ PC and CD141+ mDC was found, suggesting both cell types could down-regulate the anti-tumor T cell response.

  10. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  11. HLA class I, NKG2D, and natural cytotoxicity receptors regulate multiple myeloma cell recognition by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Ennio; Neri, Paola; Mesuraca, Maria; Fulciniti, Mariateresa T; Otsuki, Takemi; Pende, Daniela; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Pollio, Giuditta; Cosman, David; Catalano, Lucio; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Rotoli, Bruno; Venuta, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in multiple myeloma is not fully understood. Here, NK susceptibility of myeloma cells derived from distinct disease stages was evaluated in relation to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA), MHC class I chain-related protein B (MICB), and UL16 binding protein (ULBP) expression. MHC class I molecules were hardly detectable on bone marrow cells of early-stage myeloma, while late-stage pleural effusion-derived cell lines showed a strong MHC class I expression. Conversely, a high MICA level was found on bone marrow myeloma cells, while it was low or not measurable on pleural effusion myeloma cells. The reciprocal surface expression of these molecules on bone marrow- and pleural effusion-derived cell was confirmed at mRNA levels. While bone marrow-derived myeloma cells were readily recognized by NK cells, pleural effusion-derived lines were resistant. NK protection of pleural effusion cells was MHC class I dependent. Receptor blocking experiments demonstrated that natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) and NK receptor member D of the lectin-like receptor family (NKG2D) were the key NK activating receptors for bone marrow-derived myeloma cell recognition. In ex vivo experiments patient's autologous fresh NK cells recognized bone marrow-derived myeloma cells. Our data support the hypothesis that NK cell cytotoxicity could sculpture myeloma and represents an important immune effector mechanism in controlling its intramedullary stages.

  12. Myeloma cells resistance to NK cell lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Xu, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaojing; Han, Ying; Zhang, Qianqiao; Zhan, Fenghuang; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2014-07-01

    The anti-multiple myeloma (MM) potential of natural killer (NK) cells has been of rising interest in recent years. However, the molecular mechanism of NK cell cytotoxicity to myeloma cells remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-G in patient myeloma cells, and determined their relevance in patient tumor-cell susceptibility to NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results showed that patient myeloma cells (n = 12) were relatively resistant to NK-92 cell lysis, compared with myeloma cell lines (n = 7, P < 0.01). Gene expression profiling and flow cytometry analysis showed that both mRNA and protein of HLA class I were highly expressed in 12 patient myeloma cells. Interestingly, no or low HLA-G surface expression was detected, although multiple HLA-G transcripts were detected in these myeloma cells. NK cell function assay showed that down-regulating HLA class I expression on patient cells by acid treatment significantly increased the susceptibility of MM cells to NK-mediated lysis. Furthermore, we found that the blocking of membrane-bound HLA class I rather than HLA-G using antibodies on myeloma samples markedly increased their susceptibility to NK-mediated killing. These results demonstrated that the resistance of patient MM cells to NK lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism, suggesting that HLA class I may be involved in protecting MM cells from NK-mediated attack and contribute to their immune escape in vivo.

  13. Multiple Myeloma Impairs Bone Marrow Localization of Effector Natural Killer Cells by Altering the Chemokine Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ponzetta, Andrea; Benigni, Giorgia; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Sanseviero, Emilio; Zingoni, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key innate immune effectors against multiple myeloma, their activity declining in multiple myeloma patients with disease progression. To identify the mechanisms underlying NK cell functional impairment, we characterized the distribution of functionally distinct NK cell subsets in the bone marrow of multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Herein we report that the number of KLRG1(-) NK cells endowed with potent effector function rapidly and selectively decreases in bone marrow during multiple myeloma growth, this correlating with decreased bone marrow NK cell degranulation in vivo. Altered NK cell subset distribution was dependent on skewed chemokine/chemokine receptor axes in the multiple myeloma microenvironment, with rapid downmodulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on NK cells, increased CXCL9 and CXCL10, and decreased CXCL12 expression in bone marrow. Similar alterations in chemokine receptor/chemokine axes were observed in patients with multiple myeloma. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that KLRG1(-) NK cell migration to the bone marrow was more efficient in healthy than multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Furthermore, bone marrow localization of transferred CXCR3-deficient NK cells with respect to wild type was enhanced in healthy and multiple myeloma-bearing mice, suggesting that CXCR3 restrains bone marrow NK cell trafficking. Our results indicate that multiple myeloma-promoted CXCR3 ligand upregulation together with CXCL12 downmodulation act as exit signals driving effector NK cells outside the bone marrow, thus weakening the antitumor immune response at the primary site of tumor growth.

  14. Phenotypic detection of clonotypic B cells in multiple myeloma by specific immunoglobulin ligands reveals their rarity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Trepel, Martin; Martens, Victoria; Doll, Christian; Rahlff, Janina; Gösch, Barbara; Loges, Sonja; Binder, Mascha

    2012-01-01

    In multiple myeloma, circulating "clonotypic" B cells, that express the immunoglobulin rearrangement of the malignant plasma cell clone, can be indirectly detected by PCR. Their role as potential "feeder" cells for the malignant plasma cell pool remains controversial. Here we established for the first time an approach that allows direct tracking of such clonotypic cells by labeling with patient-specific immunoglobulin ligands in 15 patients with myeloma. Fifty percent of patients showed evidence of clonotypic B cells in blood or bone marrow by PCR. Epitope-mimicking peptides from random libraries were selected on each patient's individual immunoglobulin and used as ligands to trace cells expressing the idiotypic immunoglobulin on their surface. We established a flow cytometry and immunofluorescence protocol to track clonotypic B cells and validated it in two independent monoclonal B cell systems. Using this method, we found clonotypic B cells in only one out of 15 myeloma patients. In view of the assay's validated sensitivity level of 10(-3), this surprising data suggests that the abundance of such cells has been vastly overestimated in the past and that they apparently represent a very rare population in myeloma. Our novel tracing approach may open perspectives to isolate and analyze clonotypic B cells and determine their role in myeloma pathobiology.

  15. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  16. By inhibiting Src, verapamil and dasatinib overcome multidrug resistance via increased expression of Bim and decreased expressions of MDR1 and survivin in human multidrug-resistant myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Komai, Makiko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Takeda, Tomoya; Ogawa, Naoki; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daiichiro; Mukai, Junji; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2014-01-01

    The calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibits the transport function of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Although verapamil acts to reverse MDR in cancer cells, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of reversing MDR by verapamil in anti-cancer drug-resistant multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. We found that verapamil suppresses MDR1 and survivin expressions and increases Bim expression via suppression of Src activation. Furthermore, dasatinib reversed the drug-resistance of the drug-resistant cell lines. These findings suggest that Src inhibitors are potentially useful as an anti-MDR agent for the treatment of malignant tumor cells.

  17. Cancer stem cells: controversies in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah K; Matsui, William

    2009-11-01

    Increasing data suggest that the initiation, relapse, and progression of human cancers are driven by specific cell populations within an individual tumor. However, inconsistencies have emerged in precisely defining phenotypic markers that can reliably identify these "cancer stem cells" in nearly every human malignancy studied to date. Multiple myeloma, one of the first tumors postulated to be driven by a rare population of cancer stem cells, is no exception. Similar to other diseases, controversy surrounds the exact phenotype and biology of multiple myeloma cells with the capacity for clonogenic growth. Here, we review the studies that have led to these controversies and discuss potential reasons for these disparate findings. Moreover, we speculate how these inconsistencies may be resolved through studies by integrating advancements in both myeloma and stem cell biology.

  18. The IMiDs targets IKZF-1/3 and IRF4 as novel negative regulators of NK cell-activating ligands expression in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fionda, Cinzia; Abruzzese, Maria Pia; Zingoni, Alessandra; Cecere, Francesca; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Soriani, Alessandra; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Cippitelli, Marco

    2015-09-15

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) have potent anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) and are able to enhance the cytotoxic function of natural killer (NK) cells, important effectors of the immune response against MM. Here, we show that these drugs can enhance the expression of the NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptor ligands MICA and PVR/CD155 in human MM cell lines and primary malignant plasma cells. Depletion of cereblon (CRBN) by shRNA interference strongly impaired upregulation of these ligands and, more interestingly, IMiDs/CRBN-mediated downregulation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1), Aiolos (IKZF3) and IRF4 was critical for these regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, shRNA knockdown of IKZF1 or IKZF3 expression was both necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 expression, suggesting that these transcription factors can repress these genes; accordingly, the direct interaction and the negative role of IKZF1 and IKZF3 proteins on MICA and PVR/CD155 promoters were demonstrated. Finally, MICA expression was enhanced in IRF4-silenced cells, indicating a specific suppressive role of this transcription factor on MICA gene expression in MM cells.Taken together, these findings describe novel molecular pathways involved in the regulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 gene expression and identify the transcription factors IKZF-1/IKZF-3 and IRF4 as repressors of these genes in MM cells.

  19. The IMiDs targets IKZF-1/3 and IRF4 as novel negative regulators of NK cell-activating ligands expression in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fionda, Cinzia; Abruzzese, Maria Pia; Zingoni, Alessandra; Cecere, Francesca; Vulpis, Elisabetta; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Soriani, Alessandra; Molfetta, Rosa; Paolini, Rossella; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) have potent anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) and are able to enhance the cytotoxic function of natural killer (NK) cells, important effectors of the immune response against MM. Here, we show that these drugs can enhance the expression of the NKG2D and DNAM-1 activating receptor ligands MICA and PVR/CD155 in human MM cell lines and primary malignant plasma cells. Depletion of cereblon (CRBN) by shRNA interference strongly impaired upregulation of these ligands and, more interestingly, IMiDs/CRBN-mediated downregulation of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1), Aiolos (IKZF3) and IRF4 was critical for these regulatory mechanisms. Indeed, shRNA knockdown of IKZF1 or IKZF3 expression was both necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 expression, suggesting that these transcription factors can repress these genes; accordingly, the direct interaction and the negative role of IKZF1 and IKZF3 proteins on MICA and PVR/CD155 promoters were demonstrated. Finally, MICA expression was enhanced in IRF4-silenced cells, indicating a specific suppressive role of this transcription factor on MICA gene expression in MM cells. Taken together, these findings describe novel molecular pathways involved in the regulation of MICA and PVR/CD155 gene expression and identify the transcription factors IKZF-1/IKZF-3 and IRF4 as repressors of these genes in MM cells. PMID:26269456

  20. Expression of cereblon protein assessed by immunohistochemicalstaining in myeloma cells is associated with superior response of thalidomide- and lenalidomide-based treatment, but not bortezomib-based treatment, in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shang-Yi; Lin, Chung-Wu; Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Yao, Ming; Tang, Jih-Luh; Wu, Shang-Ju; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lu, Hsiao-Yun; Hou, Hsin-An; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Chou, Wen-Chien; Tsay, Woei; Chou, Sheng-Je; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-08-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) is essential for the anti-myeloma (MM) activity of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide and lenalidomide. However, the clinical implications of CRBN in MM patients are unclear. Using immunohistochemical (IHC) staining on paraffin-embedded bone marrow sections, the expression of CRBN protein in myeloma cells (MCs) was assessed in 40 relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM) patients who received lenalidomide/dexamethasone (LD) and 45 and 22 newly diagnosed MM (NDMM) patients who received thalidomide/dexamethasone (TD) and melphalan/bortezomib/prednisolone (MVP), respectively. IHC staining were scored on a scale representing the diffuseness and intensity of positive-staining MCs (range, 0-8) and a score ≥4.5 was used for CRBN positivity (CRBN(+)) on a cut-point analysis of all possible scores and response of TD and LD. Compared to CRBN(+) NDMM patients, CRBN(-) NDMM patients had more international staging system (ISS) III (26 vs. 61 %, respectively; P = 0.006). In the LD and TD cohorts, the response rate (RR) was higher in CRBN(+) patients than CRBN(-) patients (LD 79 vs. 33 %, respectively; P = 0.005) (TD 75 vs. 29 %, respectively; P = 0.005); however, this trend was not observed in the MVP cohort. In the LD and TD cohorts, the positive and negative prediction value of CRBN(+) for treatment response was 79 and 67 % and 75 and 71 %, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that CRBN(+) was a significant factor associated with superior RR for LD and TD. The data suggest that expression of CRBN protein in MCs assessed using the IHC is a feasible approach to predict the response of IMiDs in MM patients.

  1. Tetraspanin 7 (TSPAN7) expression is upregulated in multiple myeloma patients and inhibits myeloma tumour development in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Chee Man; Chow, Annie W.S.; Fitter, Stephen; Hewett, Duncan R.; Martin, Sally K.; Williams, Sharon A.; To, L. Bik; and others

    2015-03-01

    Background: Increased expression of the tetraspanin TSPAN7 has been observed in a number of cancers; however, it is unclear how TSPAN7 plays a role in cancer progression. Methods: We investigated the expression of TSPAN7 in the haematological malignancy multiple myleoma (MM) and assessed the consequences of TSPAN7 expression in the adhesion, migration and growth of MM plasma cells (PC) in vitro and in bone marrow (BM) homing and tumour growth in vivo. Finally, we characterised the association of TSPAN7 with cell surface partner molecules in vitro. Results: TSPAN7 was found to be highly expressed at the RNA and protein level in CD138{sup +} MM PC from approximately 50% of MM patients. TSPAN7 overexpression in the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1 significantly reduced tumour burden in 5TGM1/KaLwRij mice 4 weeks after intravenous adminstration of 5TGM1 cells. While TSPAN7 overexpression did not affect cell proliferation in vitro, TSPAN7 increased 5TGM1 cell adhesion to BM stromal cells and transendothelial migration. In addition, TSPAN7 was found to associate with the molecular chaperone calnexin on the cell surface. Conclusion: These results suggest that elevated TSPAN7 may be associated with better outcomes for up to 50% of MM patients. - Highlights: • TSPAN7 expression is upregulated in newly-diagnosed patients with active multiple myeloma. • Overexpression of TSPAN7 inhibits myeloma tumour development in vivo. • TSPAN7 interacts with calnexin at the plasma membrane in a myeloma cell line.

  2. Extracellular matrix protein Reelin promotes myeloma progression by facilitating tumor cell proliferation and glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaodan; Lin, Liang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Xinwei; Song, Xiao; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Risheng; Huang, Xiaojun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that is crucial for neuron migration, adhesion, and positioning. We examined the expression of Reelin in a large cohort of multiple myeloma patients recorded in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and used over-expression and siRNA knockdown of Reelin to investigate the role of Reelin in myeloma cell growth. We find that Reelin expression is negatively associated with myeloma prognosis. Reelin promotes myeloma cell proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. The Warburg effect, evidenced by increased glucose uptake and lactate production, is also enhanced in Reelin-expressing cells. The activation of FAK/Syk/Akt/mTOR and STAT3 pathways contributes to Reelin-induced cancer cell growth and metabolic reprogramming. Our findings further reveal that activated Akt and STAT3 pathways induce the upregulation of HIF1α and its downstream targets (LDHA and PDK1), leading to increased glycolysis in myeloma cells. Together, our results demonstrate the critical contributions of Reelin to myeloma growth and metabolism. It presents an opportunity for myeloma therapeutic intervention by inhibiting Reelin and its signaling pathways. PMID:28345605

  3. Up-regulation of hexokinaseII in myeloma cells: targeting myeloma cells with 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ayako; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen; Harada, Takeshi; Oda, Asuka; Amou, Hiroe; Fujii, Shiro; Kagawa, Kumiko; Takeuchi, Kyoko; Ozaki, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Abe, Masahiro

    2012-02-01

    Hexokinase II (HKII), a key enzyme of glycolysis, is widely over-expressed in cancer cells. However, HKII levels and its roles in ATP production and ATP-dependent cellular process have not been well studied in hematopoietic malignant cells including multiple myeloma (MM) cells.We demonstrate herein that HKII is constitutively over-expressed in MM cells. 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA), an inhibitor of HKII, promptly and substantially suppresses ATP production and induces cell death in MM cells. Interestingly, cocultures with osteoclasts (OCs) but not bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt along with an increase in HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells. The enhancement of HKII levels and lactate production in MM cells by OCs were mostly abrogated by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, suggesting activation of glycolysis in MM cells by OCs via the PI3K-Akt-HKII pathway. Although BMSCs and OCs stimulate MM cell growth and survival, 3BrPA induces cell death in MM cells even in cocultures with OCs as well as BMSCs. Furthermore, 3BrPA was able to diminish ATP-dependent ABC transporter activity to restore drug retention in MM cells in the presence of OCs. These results may underpin possible clinical application of 3BrPA in patients with MM.

  4. IKAROS expression in distinct bone marrow cell populations as a candidate biomarker for outcome with lenalidomide-dexamethasone therapy in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bolomsky, Arnold; Hübl, Wolfgang; Spada, Stefano; Müldür, Ercan; Schlangen, Karin; Heintel, Daniel; Rocci, Alberto; Weißmann, Adalbert; Fritz, Veronique; Willheim, Martin; Zojer, Niklas; Palumbo, Antonio; Ludwig, Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are a cornerstone in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), but specific markers to predict outcome are still missing. Recent work pointed to a prognostic role for IMiD target genes (e.g. CRBN). Moreover, indirect activity of IMiDs on immune cells correlated with outcome, raising the possibility that cell populations in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment could serve as biomarkers. We therefore analysed gene expression levels of six IMiD target genes in whole BM samples of 44 myeloma patients treated with lenalidomide-dexamethasone. Expression of CRBN (R = 0.30, P = .05), IKZF1 (R = 0.31, P = .04), IRF4 (R = 0.38, P = .01), MCT-1 (R = 0.30, P = .05), and CD147 (R = 0.38, P = .01), but not IKZF3 (R = -0.15, P = .34), was significantly associated with response. Interestingly, IKZF1 expression was elevated in BM environmental cells and thus selected for further investigation by multicolor flow cytometry. High IKAROS protein levels in total BM mononuclear cells (median OS 83.4 vs. 32.2 months, P = .02), CD19(+) B cells (median OS 71.1 vs. 32.2 months, P = .05), CD3(+) CD8(+) T cells (median OS 83.4 vs 19.0 months, P = .008) as well as monocytes (median OS 53.9 vs 18.0 months, P = .009) were associated with superior overall survival (OS). In contrast, IKAROS protein expression in MM cells was not predictive for OS. Our data therefore corroborate the central role of immune cells for the clinical activity of IMiDs and built the groundwork for prospective analysis of IKAROS protein levels in distinct cell populations as a potential biomarker for IMiD based therapies.

  5. PD-1/PD-L1 expression in extra-medullary lesions of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, Anna; Annibali, Ombretta; Bianchi, Antonella; Pagano, Anastasia; Donati, Michele; Grifoni, Alba; Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma patients may develop extraosseous involvement in the course of the disease making prognosis very poor and new drugs clearly needed. The PD-1/PD-L1 axis has emerged as a master immune checkpoint in antitumor responses and recent studies investigated the role of PD-L1 in multiple myeloma cells; no data however are still available about PD-L1 expression in extramedullary localizations. We demonstrate PD-L1 expression in 4/12 cases of extraosseous myeloma suggesting that these lesions represent a specialized microenvironment. We found presence of PD-1+ infiltrating lymphocytes in all observed cases supporting the relevance of PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint in extramedullary myeloma. We also investigated the correlation in PD1/PD-L1 staining between marrow staining and EMP lesions.

  6. Multiple myeloma-derived Jagged ligands increases autocrine and paracrine interleukin-6 expression in bone marrow niche

    PubMed Central

    Bulfamante, Gaetano; Falleni, Monica; Tosi, Delfina; Todoerti, Katia; Lazzari, Elisa; Crews, Leslie A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Ravaioli, Sara; Baccianti, Francesco; Garavelli, Silvia; Platonova, Natalia; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma cell growth relies on intrinsic aggressiveness, due to a high karyotypic instability, or on the support from bone marrow (BM) niche. We and other groups have provided evidences that Notch signaling is related to tumor cell growth, pharmacological resistance, localization/recirculation in the BM and bone disease. This study indicates that high gene expression levels of Notch signaling members (JAG1, NOTCH2, HES5 and HES6) correlate with malignant progression or high-risk disease, and Notch signaling may participate in myeloma progression by increasing the BM levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a major player in myeloma cell growth and survival. Indeed, in vitro results, confirmed by correlation analysis on gene expression profiles of myeloma patients and immunohistochemical studies, demonstrated that Notch signaling controls IL-6 gene expression in those myeloma cells capable of IL-6 autonomous production as well as in surrounding BM stromal cells. In both cases Notch signaling activation may be triggered by myeloma cell-derived Jagged ligands. The evidence that Notch signaling positively controls IL-6 in the myeloma-associated BM makes this pathway a key mediator of tumor-directed reprogramming of the bone niche. This work strengthens the rationale for a novel Notch-directed therapy in multiple myeloma based on the inhibition of Jagged ligands. PMID:27463014

  7. Thymoquinone decreases F-actin polymerization and the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells by suppressing STAT3 phosphorylation and Bcl2/Bcl-XL expression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thymoquinone (TQ), the major active component of the medicinal herb Nigella sativa Linn., has been described as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compound. Methods In this study, we investigated the effect of TQ on survival, actin cytoskeletal reorganization, proliferation and signal transduction in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Results We found that TQ induces growth arrest in both MDN and XG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TQ also inhibited CXC ligand-12 (CXCL-12)-mediated actin polymerization and cellular proliferation, as shown by flow cytometry. The signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) signaling pathways may play important roles in the malignant transformation of a number of human malignancies. The constitutive activation of the STAT3 and Bcl-2 pathways is frequently observed in several cancer cell lines, including MM cells. Using flow cytometry, we found that TQ markedly decreased STAT3 phosphorylation and Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression without modulating STAT5 phosphorylation in MM cells. Using western blotting, we confirmed the inhibitory effect of TQ on STAT3 phosphorylation and Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggests that TQ could potentially be applied toward the treatment of MM and other malignancies. PMID:22177381

  8. Integrated molecular profiling of SOD2 expression in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Elaine M; Thomas, Suneetha B; Peng, Benjamin; Farrar, William L

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to be involved in several cellular processes, including cell signaling. SOD2 is a key enzyme in the conversion of reactive oxygen species and has been implicated in a host of disease states, including cancer. Using an integrated, whole-cell approach encompassing epigenetics, genomics, and proteomics, we have defined the role of SOD2 in multiple myeloma. We show that the SOD2 promoter is methylated in several cell lines and there is a correlative decrease in expression. Furthermore, myeloma patient samples have decreased SOD2 expression compared with healthy donors. Overexpression of SOD2 results in decreased proliferation and altered sensitivity to 2-methoxyestradiol-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Genomic profiling revealed regulation of 65 genes, including genes involved in tumorigenesis, and proteomic analysis identified activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Analysis of nearly 400 activated transcription factors identified 31 transcription factors with altered DNA binding activity, including XBP1, NFAT, forkhead, and GAS binding sites. Integration of data from our gestalt molecular analysis has defined a role for SOD2 in cellular proliferation, JAK/STAT signaling, and regulation of several transcription factors.

  9. Responsiveness of cytogenetically discrete human myeloma cell lines to lenalidomide: lack of correlation with cereblon and interferon regulatory factor 4 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Walters, Denise K; Kumar, Shaji K; Vincent Rajkumar, S; Jelinek, Diane F

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of novel immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) has dramatically improved the survival of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). While it has been shown that patients with specific cytogenetic subtypes, namely t(4;14), have the best outcomes when treated with bortezomib-based regimens, the relationship between cytogenetic subtypes and response to IMiDs remains unclear. Using DNA synthesis assays, we investigated the relationship between cytogenetic subtype and lenalidomide response in a representative panel of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs). We examined HMCL protein expression levels of the lenalidomide target cereblon (CRBN) and its downstream target interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4), which have previously been shown to be predictive of lenalidomide response in HMCLs. Our results reveal that lenalidomide response did not correlate with specific cytogenetic translocations. There were distinct groups of lenalidomide-responsive and non-responsive HMCLs, as defined by inhibition of cellular proliferation; notably, all of the hyperdiploid HMCLs fell into the latter category. Repeated dosing of lenalidomide significantly lowered the IC50 of the responsive HMCL ALMC-1 (IC50 = 2.6 μm vs. 0.005 μm, P < 0.0001), but did not have an effect on the IC50 of the non-responsive DP-6 HMCL (P > 0.05). Moreover, no association was found between lenalidomide responsiveness and CRBN and IRF4 expression. Our data indicate that lenalidomide sensitivity is independent of cytogenetic subtype in HMCLs. While CRBN and IRF4 have been shown to be associated with response to lenalidomide in patients, these findings do not translate back to HMCLs, which could be attributable to factors present in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  10. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D'Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells.

  11. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D’Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:24091729

  12. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  13. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  14. ABCG2 expression, function, and promoter methylation in human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Gump, Jana L.; Zhang, Chunchun; Cook, James M.; Marchion, Douglas; Hazlehurst, Lori; Munster, Pamela; Schell, Michael J.; Dalton, William S.; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the role of the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in drug resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Human MM cell lines, and MM patient plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, were evaluated for ABCG2 mRNA expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ABCG2 protein, by Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. ABCG2 function was determined by measuring topotecan and doxorubicin efflux using flow cytometry, in the presence and absence of the specific ABCG2 inhibitor, tryprostatin A. The methylation of the ABCG2 promoter was determined using bisulfite sequencing. We found that ABCG2 expression in myeloma cell lines increased after exposure to topotecan and doxorubicin, and was greater in logphase cells when compared with quiescent cells. Myeloma patients treated with topotecan had an increase in ABCG2 mRNA and protein expression after treatment with topotecan, and at relapse. Expression of ABCG2 is regulated, at least in part, by promoter methylation both in cell lines and in patient plasma cells. Demethylation of the promoter increased ABCG2 mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest that ABCG2 is expressed and functional in human myeloma cells, regulated by promoter methylation, affected by cell density, up-regulated in response to chemotherapy, and may contribute to intrinsic drug resistance. PMID:16917002

  15. Inhibitor of DASH proteases affects expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts and reduces myeloma growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Aziz, Nazneen; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2009-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV activity and/or structure homologues (DASH) are serine proteases implicated in tumourigenesis. We previously found that a DASH protease, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), was involved in osteoclast-induced myeloma growth. Here we further demonstrated expression of various adhesion molecules in osteoclasts cultured alone or cocultured with myeloma cells, and tested the effects of DASH inhibitor, PT-100, on myeloma cell growth, bone disease, osteoclast differentiation and activity, and expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts. PT-100 had no direct effects on viability of myeloma cells or mature osteoclasts, but significantly reduced survival of myeloma cells cocultured with osteoclasts. Real-time PCR array for 85 adhesion molecules revealed upregulation of 17 genes in osteoclasts after coculture with myeloma cells. Treatment of myeloma/osteoclast cocultures with PT-100 significantly downregulated 18 of 85 tested genes in osteoclasts, some of which are known to play roles in tumourigenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PT-100 also inhibited osteoclast differentiation and subsequent pit formation. Resorption activity of mature osteoclasts and differentiation of osteoblasts were not affected by PT-100. In primary myelomatous severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu mice PT-100 reduced osteoclast activity, bone resorption and tumour burden. These data demonstrated that DASH proteases are involved in myeloma bone disease and tumour growth.

  16. Bortezomib resistance can be reversed by induced expression of plasma cell maturation markers in a mouse in vitro model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stessman, Holly A F; Mansoor, Aatif; Zhan, Fenghuang; Linden, Michael A; Van Ness, Brian; Baughn, Linda B

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), the second most common hematopoietic malignancy, remains an incurable plasma cell (PC) neoplasm. While the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Bz) has increased patient survival, resistance represents a major treatment obstacle as most patients ultimately relapse becoming refractory to additional Bz therapy. Current tests fail to detect emerging resistance; by the time patients acquire resistance, their prognosis is often poor. To establish immunophenotypic signatures that predict Bz sensitivity, we utilized Bz-sensitive and -resistant cell lines derived from tumors of the Bcl-X(L)/Myc mouse model of PC malignancy. We identified significantly reduced expression of two markers (CD93, CD69) in "acquired" (Bz-selected) resistant cells. Using this phenotypic signature, we isolated a subpopulation of cells from a drug-naïve, Bz-sensitive culture that displayed "innate" resistance to Bz. Although these genes were identified as biomarkers, they may indicate a mechanism for Bz-resistance through the loss of PC maturation which may be induced and/or selected by Bz. Significantly, induction of PC maturation in both "acquired" and "innate" resistant cells restored Bz sensitivity suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for reversing Bz resistance in refractory MM.

  17. Antibody-drug conjugate targeting CD46 eliminates multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sherbenou, Daniel W.; Aftab, Blake T.; Su, Yang; Behrens, Christopher R.; Wiita, Arun; Logan, Aaron C.; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Hann, Byron C.; Walter, Peter; Shuman, Marc A.; Wu, Xiaobo; Atkinson, John P.; Wolf, Jeffrey L.; Martin, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is incurable by standard approaches because of inevitable relapse and development of treatment resistance in all patients. In our prior work, we identified a panel of macropinocytosing human monoclonal antibodies against CD46, a negative regulator of the innate immune system, and constructed antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). In this report, we show that an anti-CD46 ADC (CD46-ADC) potently inhibited proliferation in myeloma cell lines with little effect on normal cells. CD46-ADC also potently eliminated myeloma growth in orthometastatic xenograft models. In primary myeloma cells derived from bone marrow aspirates, CD46-ADC induced apoptosis and cell death, but did not affect the viability of nontumor mononuclear cells. It is of clinical interest that the CD46 gene resides on chromosome 1q, which undergoes genomic amplification in the majority of relapsed myeloma patients. We found that the cell surface expression level of CD46 was markedly higher in patient myeloma cells with 1q gain than in those with normal 1q copy number. Thus, genomic amplification of CD46 may serve as a surrogate for target amplification that could allow patient stratification for tailored CD46-targeted therapy. Overall, these findings indicate that CD46 is a promising target for antibody-based treatment of multiple myeloma, especially in patients with gain of chromosome 1q. PMID:27841764

  18. Role of metalloproteinases MMP-9 and MT1-MMP in CXCL12-promoted myeloma cell invasion across basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Parmo-Cabañas, Marisa; Molina-Ortiz, Isabel; Matías-Román, Salomón; García-Bernal, David; Carvajal-Vergara, Xonia; Valle, Inmaculada; Pandiella, Atanasio; Arroyo, Alicia G; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2006-01-01

    Malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma home to the bone marrow (BM), accumulate in different niches and, in late disease, migrate from the BM into blood. These migratory events involve cell trafficking across extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich basement membranes and interstitial tissues. Metalloproteinases (MMP) degrade ECM and facilitate tumour cell invasion. The chemokine CXCL12 is expressed in the BM, and it was previously shown that it triggers myeloma cell migration and activation. In the present work we show that CXCL12 promotes myeloma cell invasion across Matrigel-reconstituted basement membranes and type I collagen gels. MMP-9 activity was required for invasion through Matrigel towards CXCL12, whereas TIMP-1, a MMP-9 inhibitor that we found to be expressed by myeloma and BM stromal cells, impaired the invasion. In addition, we show that the membrane-bound MT1-MMP metalloproteinase is expressed by myeloma cells and contributes to CXCL12-promoted myeloma cell invasion across Matrigel. Increase in MT1-MMP expression, as well as induction of its membrane polarization by CXCL12 in myeloma cells, might represent potential mechanisms contributing to this invasion. CXCL12-promoted invasion across type I collagen involved metalloproteinases different from MT1-MMP. These data indicate that CXCL12 could contribute to myeloma cell trafficking in the BM involving MMP-9 and MT1-MMP activities.

  19. Identification of molecular vulnerabilities in human multiple myeloma cells by RNA interference lethality screening of the druggable genome.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Rodger E; Zhu, Yuan Xao; Schmidt, Jessica; Shi, Chang Xin; Sereduk, Chris; Yin, Hongwei; Mousses, Spyro; Stewart, A Keith

    2012-02-01

    Despite recent advances in targeted treatments for multiple myeloma, optimal molecular therapeutic targets have yet to be identified. To functionally identify critical molecular targets, we conducted a genome-scale lethality study in multiple myeloma cells using siRNAs. We validated the top 160 lethal hits with four siRNAs per gene in three multiple myeloma cell lines and two non-myeloma cell lines, cataloging a total of 57 potent multiple myeloma survival genes. We identified the Bcl2 family member MCL1 and several 26S proteasome subunits among the most important and selective multiple myeloma survival genes. These results provided biologic validation of our screening strategy. Other essential targets included genes involved in RNA splicing, ubiquitination, transcription, translation, and mitosis. Several of the multiple myeloma survival genes, especially MCL1, TNK2, CDK11, and WBSCR22, exhibited differential expression in primary plasma cells compared with other human primary somatic tissues. Overall, the most striking differential functional vulnerabilities between multiple myeloma and non-multiple myeloma cells were found to occur within the 20S proteasome subunits, MCL1, RRM1, USP8, and CKAP5. We propose that these genes should be investigated further as potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma.

  20. [Sorting of side population cells from multiple myeloma cell lines and analysis of their biological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Li-Na; Huang, Hong-Ming; Ding, Run-Sheng; Shi, Wei; Xu, Rui-Rong; Yu, Xiao-Tang; Jiang, Sheng-Hua

    2014-06-01

    This study was aimed to sort the side population (SP) cells from human multiple myeloma cell lines, then detect the biological characteristics of those SP cells. After Hoechst33342 staining, intracellular Hoechst33342 fluorescence staining differences of myeloma cell lines observed by the fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology was used to isolate SP cells and main population (MP) cells; proliferative capacity in vitro was determined by cell growth curve; the cell colony forming ability was compared by colony forming test. The CD138 expression was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of ABCG2 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription PCR; CCK-8 assay and colony forming test were used to evaluate the effect of bortezomib on the cell proliferation, vitality and colony forming ability of the two populations. The results showed that the myeloma cell lines had a small proportion of SP cells, especially, RPMI 8226 cells accounted for the highest proportion of SP cells (7.10 ± 2.69)%, which have also been confirmed under the fluorescence microscope; the proliferative activity and cell colony forming ability of SP cells were significantly higher than those of MP cells (P < 0.05). The expression levels of CD138 in SP and MP cells were not significantly different (P > 0.05). RT-PCR results showed that SP cells expressed the drug-resistance gene ABCG2, but MP cells hardly express these genes. The inhibition rate of bortezomib on SP cells was significantly lower than that on MP cells (P < 0.05), however, the difference was not significant (P > 0.05) at bortezomib 40 nmol/L. Bortezomib could reduce colony formation in the both two cell populations, but more severe reduction appeared in the MP cells. It is concluded that the myeloma cell line contain a small amount of SP cells with the cancer stem cell characteristics.

  1. [Multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsolt

    2016-06-06

    Multiple myeloma is the most common primary malignant disease of bone marrow. It mainly occurs among elderly people and, according to international databases, it is twice as frequent in men, however in our country this fact cannot be observed because of the high male mortality rate. The presence of this disease increased by more than one and the half times during the last 60 years. The five year survival for multiple myeloma has increased from 25% to 40% since the seventies due to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation and the new anti-myeloma drugs which were introduced in the last decade, such as immunomodulators (IMiD) like thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide and proteasome inhibitors (PI) like bortezomib, carfilzomib, ixazomib. The number of treatment options are growing fast, and not only because of using new combinations of medications, but also due to the development of investigational products which are available for the patients by participating in a clinical trial.

  2. The role of SH3GL3 in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhao, Hong; Wu, Dan; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-11-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer characterized by clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow and their egress into peripheral blood. The mechanisms of myeloma cells migration/invasion have remained unclear. Herein, we found SH3GL3 was highly expressed in the CD138-negative (CD138-) myeloma cells. The migration/invasion capability of CD138- cells was significantly higher than that in the CD138-positive (CD138+) cells. Silencing SH3GL3 using shRNA reduced myeloma cells migration/invasion. Conversely, overexpression of SH3GL3 increased myeloma cells migration/invasion. Moreover, SH3GL3 is also associated with the stemness and chemo-resistance of CD138- myeloma cells. Elevated expression of stem cell and multi-drug resistant markers were seen in the myeloma cells with overexpressed SH3GL3; while knocking-down SH3GL3 reduced the expression of these markers. A marked increase in p-PI3K and p-FAK was observed in the cells with overexpressed SH3GL3. To test if FAK/PI3K signaling pathway was involved in the SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cells migration, the cells transfected w/wo SH3GL3 cDNA were treated with FAK inhibitor 14 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Inhibition of FAK and PI3K attenuated SH3GL3-mediated migration /invasion. Our findings indicate that SH3GL3 plays an important role in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance. The SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cell migration/invasion is mediated by FAK/PI3K signaling pathway.

  3. The role of SH3GL3 in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhao, Hong; Wu, Dan; Zhao, Chen; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable cancer characterized by clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow and their egress into peripheral blood. The mechanisms of myeloma cells migration/invasion have remained unclear. Herein, we found SH3GL3 was highly expressed in the CD138-negative (CD138−) myeloma cells. The migration/invasion capability of CD138− cells was significantly higher than that in the CD138-positive (CD138+) cells. Silencing SH3GL3 using shRNA reduced myeloma cells migration/invasion. Conversely, overexpression of SH3GL3 increased myeloma cells migration/invasion. Moreover, SH3GL3 is also associated with the stemness and chemo-resistance of CD138− myeloma cells. Elevated expression of stem cell and multi-drug resistant markers were seen in the myeloma cells with overexpressed SH3GL3; while knocking-down SH3GL3 reduced the expression of these markers. A marked increase in p-PI3K and p-FAK was observed in the cells with overexpressed SH3GL3. To test if FAK/PI3K signaling pathway was involved in the SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cells migration, the cells transfected w/wo SH3GL3 cDNA were treated with FAK inhibitor 14 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Inhibition of FAK and PI3K attenuated SH3GL3-mediated migration /invasion. Our findings indicate that SH3GL3 plays an important role in myeloma cell migration/invasion, stemness and chemo-resistance. The SH3GL3-mediated myeloma cell migration/invasion is mediated by FAK/PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27683032

  4. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Er-Wen; Xue, Sheng-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Suo-Wen; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang; Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Chao

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of NOTCH1 and JAGGED1 expression in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Skrtić, Anita; Korać, Petra; Krišto, Delfa Radić; Ajduković Stojisavljević, Radmila; Ivanković, Davor; Dominis, Mara

    2010-12-01

    Notch signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma expressing high level of active Notch proteins NOTCH1 and JAGGED1 in tumor plasma cells. We investigated expression of NOTCH1 and JAGGED1 in bone marrow trephine biopsies of 80 newly diagnosed multiple myeloma and 20 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients using immunohistochemical methods. The number of positive tumor cells was counted per 1000 tumor cells and the intensity of staining was assessed semi quantitatively. Multiple myelomas expressed NOTCH1 in 92.31% (72/78) and JAGGED1 in 92.21% (71/77) cases. NOTCH1 staining was strong in the majority of cases (59.7%), whereas JAGGED1 was predominately weak (67.6% of cases). In contrast, both markers were negative in all monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases. However, upon progression of disease from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to multiple myeloma (seen in 4 patients), analysis of the subsequent bone marrow biopsy showed weak expression of both markers in tumorous plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry results were compared with the pattern of bone marrow infiltration, plasma cell differentiation, and the presence of t(11;14)(q13,q32), t(14;16)(q32;q23),and t(4;14)(p16.3;q23) and overall survival in multiple myeloma patients. A significant correlation was found between strong NOTCH1 staining in multiple myeloma plasma cells and the diffuse type of bone marrow infiltration (P = .002) and an immature morphologic type of plasma cells (P = .043). After a median follow-up of 20.3 months, in multiple myeloma patients no difference in overall survival between NOTCH1 (P = .484) and JAGGED1 (P = .822) positive and negative cases were found. In conclusion, our results indicate importance of NOTCH1 and JAGGED1 expression in plasma cell neoplasia and a possible diagnostic value of their immunohistochemical evaluation of bone marrow infiltrates for multiple myeloma.

  6. Identify multiple myeloma stem cells: Utopia?

    PubMed

    Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2015-01-26

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of monoclonal plasma cells which remains incurable despite recent advances in therapies. The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in many solid and hematologic tumors, so the idea of CSCs has been proposed for MM, even if MM CSCs have not been define yet. The existence of myeloma CSCs with clonotypic B and clonotypic non B cells was postulated by many groups. This review aims to focus on these distinct clonotypic subpopulations and on their ability to develop and sustain MM. The bone marrow microenvironment provides to MM CSCs self-renewal, survival and drug resistance thanks to the presence of normal and cancer stem cell niches. The niches and CSCs interact each other through adhesion molecules and the interplay between ligands and receptors activates stemness signaling (Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch pathways). MM CSCs are also supposed to be responsible for drug resistance that happens in three steps from the initial cancer cell homing microenvironment-mediated to development of microenvironment-independent drug resistance. In this review, we will underline all these aspects of MM CSCs.

  7. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  8. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  9. Lenalidomide enhances myeloma-specific T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Isabelle; Engelhardt, Melanie; Fichtner, Sabrina; Neuber, Brigitte; Medenhoff, Sergej; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc-Steffen; Hose, Dirk; Ho, Anthony D.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hundemer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunomodulation is an important part of lenalidomide's mode of action. We analyzed the impact of lenalidomide on T cells from patients with multiple myeloma during lenalidomide therapy in vivo and in patients with lenalidomide-refractory disease in vitro Patients enrolled in the German Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group (GMMG) MM5 trial received a consolidation therapy with two cycles of lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Half of the study population continued treatment with lenalidomide maintenance therapy for 2 y, while the other patients received lenalidomide maintenance therapy until complete remission. We analyzed 58 patients with (n = 30) or without (n = 28) lenalidomide therapy and 12 patients refractory to lenalidomide with regards to their anti-myeloma-specific T-cell responses displayed by IFNγ, Granzyme B, and Perforin secretion. The immunophenotype of T-cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Significantly, more myeloma-specific T-cell responses were observed in patients during lenalidomide therapy, compared to patients without treatment. Furthermore, we found on T-cells from patients treated with lenalidomide a decreased CD45RA expression, indicating a maturated immunophenotype and a decreased expression of CD57, indicating functional T cells. An improved myeloma-specific T-cell response was observed in 6 out of 12 heavily pretreated patients (refractory to lenalidomide) after in vitro incubation with lenalidomide. Complementary to the results in vivo, lenalidomide decreased CD45RA expression on T cells in vitro. PMID:27467960

  10. Lenalidomide enhances myeloma-specific T-cell responses in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabelle; Engelhardt, Melanie; Fichtner, Sabrina; Neuber, Brigitte; Medenhoff, Sergej; Bertsch, Uta; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc-Steffen; Hose, Dirk; Ho, Anthony D; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hundemer, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Immunomodulation is an important part of lenalidomide's mode of action. We analyzed the impact of lenalidomide on T cells from patients with multiple myeloma during lenalidomide therapy in vivo and in patients with lenalidomide-refractory disease in vitro Patients enrolled in the German Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group (GMMG) MM5 trial received a consolidation therapy with two cycles of lenalidomide after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Half of the study population continued treatment with lenalidomide maintenance therapy for 2 y, while the other patients received lenalidomide maintenance therapy until complete remission. We analyzed 58 patients with (n = 30) or without (n = 28) lenalidomide therapy and 12 patients refractory to lenalidomide with regards to their anti-myeloma-specific T-cell responses displayed by IFNγ, Granzyme B, and Perforin secretion. The immunophenotype of T-cells was investigated by flow cytometry. Significantly, more myeloma-specific T-cell responses were observed in patients during lenalidomide therapy, compared to patients without treatment. Furthermore, we found on T-cells from patients treated with lenalidomide a decreased CD45RA expression, indicating a maturated immunophenotype and a decreased expression of CD57, indicating functional T cells. An improved myeloma-specific T-cell response was observed in 6 out of 12 heavily pretreated patients (refractory to lenalidomide) after in vitro incubation with lenalidomide. Complementary to the results in vivo, lenalidomide decreased CD45RA expression on T cells in vitro.

  11. MMSA-1 expression pattern in multiple myeloma and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shan; Lu, Chenyang; Zhang, Wanggang; Shen, Wenjun; Wei, Yongchang; Su, Dan; Zhou, Fuling

    2016-11-01

    Multiple myeloma-associated antigen-1 (MMSA-1) is a novel multiple myeloma (MM)-associated antigen which has been recently identified. Herein, we have tried to examine its clinical significance by studying the relationship between its expression and selected clinicopathological features. We extracted mononuclear cells from the bone marrow of MM patients and healthy donors and compared the MMSA-1 expression by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, we also analyzed MMSA-1 expression in patients that were grouped based on selected clinical parameters. Moreover, the impact of MMSA-1 on patients' survival was also explored. MMSA-1 mRNA and protein were significantly upregulated in MM patients in comparison with healthy donors. Moreover, among the newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patients, the MMSA-1 expression was higher in relapsed/refractory patients. In addition, MMSA-1 mRNA expression not only showed significantly higher correlation with clinical parameters such as age, Durie and Salmon stage, bone lesion condition, albumin, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase but also has a close relationship with myeloma bone disease-related cytokines, genetic abnormalities and treatment response. Multivariate COX analysis predicted MMSA-1 and LDH levels to be independently associated with a poor progression-free survival and overall survival in myeloma patients. Our findings provide initial proof of concept that MMSA-1 is a potent gene that is specifically expressed in MM patients and could be a feasible biomarker and independent prognostic factor.

  12. Monitoring multiple myeloma by next-generation sequencing of V(D)J rearrangements from circulating myeloma cells and cell-free myeloma DNA.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Anna; Brandt, Anna; Voigtlaender, Minna; Thiele, Benjamin; Radloff, Janina; Schulenkorf, Anita; Alawi, Malik; Akyüz, Nuray; März, Manuela; Ford, Christopher T; Krohn-Grimberghe, Artus; Binder, Mascha

    2017-02-09

    Recent studies suggest that circulating tumor cells and cell-free DNA may represent powerful non-invasive tools for disease monitoring in patients with solid and hematological malignancies. Here, we conducted a pilot study in 27 myeloma patients to explore the clonotypic V(D)J rearrangement for monitoring of circulating myeloma cells (cmc-V(D)J) and cell-free myeloma DNA (cfm-V(D)J). Next-generation sequencing was used to define the myeloma V(D)J rearrangement and for subsequent peripheral blood tracking after treatment initiation. Positivity for cmc-/cfm-V(D)J was associated with conventional remission status (p<0.001) and 91% of non-responders/progressors versus 41% of responders had evidence of persistent cmc-/cfm-V(D)J (p<0.001). About half of the partial responders showed complete clearance of cmc-/cfm-V(D)J despite persistent M-protein, suggesting that these markers are less inert than the M-protein, rely more on cell turnover and therefore decline more rapidly after initiation of effective treatment. Positivity for cmc- and cfm-V(D)J was associated with each other (p=0.042), but in 30% discordant. This indicated that cfm-V(D)J may not be generated entirely by circulating myeloma cells and may reflect overall tumor burden. Prospective studies need to define the predictive potential of high-sensitivity determination of circulating myeloma cells and DNA in the monitoring of multiple myeloma.

  13. Soluble Rank Ligand Produced by Myeloma Cells Causes Generalised Bone Loss in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle Anne; Yong, Kwee; Rabin, Neil; Perry, Mark; Vanderkerken, Karen; Croucher, Peter Ian

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma commonly develop focal osteolytic bone disease, as well as generalised osteoporosis. The mechanisms underlying the development of osteoporosis in patients with myeloma are poorly understood. Although disruption of the RANKL/OPG pathway has been shown to underlie formation of focal osteolytic lesions, its role in the development of osteoporosis in myeloma remains unclear. Increased soluble RANKL in serum from patients with myeloma raises the possibility that this molecule plays a key role. The aim of the present study was to establish whether sRANKL produced by myeloma cells contributes directly to osteoporosis. C57BL/KaLwRij mice were injected with either 5T2MM or 5T33MM murine myeloma cells. 5T2MM-bearing mice developed osteolytic bone lesions (p<0.05) with increased osteoclast surface (p<0.01) and reduced trabecular bone volume (p<0.05). Bone volume was also reduced at sites where 5T2MM cells were not present (p<0.05). In 5T2MM-bearing mice soluble mRANKL was increased (p<0.05), whereas OPG was not altered. In contrast, 5T33MM-bearing mice had no changes in osteoclast surface or trabecular bone volume and did not develop osteolytic lesions. Soluble mRANKL was undetectable in serum from 5T33MM-bearing mice. In separate experiments, RPMI-8226 human myeloma cells were transduced with an human RANKL/eGFP construct, or eGFP alone. RPMI-8226/hRANKL/eGFP cells, but not RPMI-8226/eGFP cells, stimulated osteoclastic bone resorption (p<0.05) in vitro. Sub-cutaneous injection of NOD/SCID mice with RPMI-8226/hRANKL/eGFP or RPMI-8226/eGFP cells resulted in tumour development in all mice. RPMI-8226/hRANKL/eGFP-bearing mice exhibited increased serum soluble hRANKL (p<0.05) and a three-fold increase in osteoclast number (p<0.05) compared to RPMI-8226/eGFP-bearing mice. This was associated with reduced trabecular bone volume (27%, p<0.05), decreased trabecular number (29%, p<0.05) and increased trabecular thickness (8%, p<0.05). Our findings

  14. Plasmablastic multiple myeloma following clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Somanath; Mokkappan, Sudhagar; Varghese, Renu G’ Boy; Veerappan, Ilangovan

    2014-01-01

    We aim to describe the clinicohaematological profile of an elderly male with plasmablastic multiple myeloma (MM) (IgG λ, International System Stage II) with an unfavourable outcome following chemotherapy. The serum interleukin-6 level was found to be markedly elevated (2464 pg/mL, reference; <50 pg/mL). Thirty-six months prior to MM diagnosis, he underwent left radical nephrectomy for a stage III (pT3N0M0) clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC, Fuhrman grade 2). The unique MM-RCC association, shared risk factors, myeloma pathobiology and clinical implications are discussed with a brief literature review. PMID:25103318

  15. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  16. A patient with Multiple myeloma and Renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Farhad; Ghalamkari, Marziye; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Khatuni, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of two malignancies is rarely seen. A little association between hematologic malignancies especially multiple myeloma and renal cell carcinoma has been reported in the recent past. Several case series revealed a bidirectional association between these two malignancies which may be due to the common risk factors, similar cytokine growth requirements and clinical presentation. Here, we aim to describe a patient who had multiple myeloma and in his work up renal cell carcinoma was found out incidentally. We would like to create awareness among clinicians for the coincidence of Renal cell carcinoma and Multiple myeloma.

  17. A patient with Multiple myeloma and Renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Farhad; Ghalamkari, Marziye; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Khatuni, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of two malignancies is rarely seen. A little association between hematologic malignancies especially multiple myeloma and renal cell carcinoma has been reported in the recent past. Several case series revealed a bidirectional association between these two malignancies which may be due to the common risk factors, similar cytokine growth requirements and clinical presentation. Here, we aim to describe a patient who had multiple myeloma and in his work up renal cell carcinoma was found out incidentally. We would like to create awareness among clinicians for the coincidence of Renal cell carcinoma and Multiple myeloma. PMID:27047652

  18. Low-dose bortezomib increases the expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands and enhances induced NK and γδ T cell-mediated lysis in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shan; Zhou, Lei; Jin, Feng; Zhou, Yulai; Xu, Dongsheng; Xu, Jianting; Zhao, Lianjing; Hao, Shanshan; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematological malignancy, although bortezomib has markedly improved its outcomes. Growing clinical evidence indicates that enhancing induced natural killer (NK) or γδ T cells for infusion is useful in the treatment of MM. However, whether combination treatment with bortezomib and induced NK and γδ T cells further improves outcomes in MM, and how the treatments should be combined, remain unclear. Herein, we found that low-dose bortezomib did not suppress the viability of induced NK and γδ T cells, but did induce MM cell apoptosis. Importantly, low-dose bortezomib increased the expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands on MM cells, which sensitized the multiple myeloma cells to lysis by induced NK and γδ T cells. Our results suggested that combination treatment with low-dose bortezomib and induced NK or γδ T cells had a synergistic cytotoxic effect on MM cells. This study provided a proof of principle for the design of future trials and investigation of this combination therapeutic strategy for MM treatment. PMID:27992381

  19. Electro-acoustic fusion of erythrocytes and of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Vienken, J; Zimmermann, U; Zenner, H P; Coakley, W T; Gould, R K

    1985-11-07

    Mammalian cells can be concentrated in a sound field. A method is introduced, which combines the reversible aggregation of cells in a sound field with the electrical breakdown of cell membranes to fuse cells, which are in contact. Human red blood cells and mouse myeloma cells are fused by means of that procedure.

  20. Intracellular glutathione determines bortezomib cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Starheim, K K; Holien, T; Misund, K; Johansson, I; Baranowska, K A; Sponaas, A-M; Hella, H; Buene, G; Waage, A; Sundan, A; Bjørkøy, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (myeloma in short) is an incurable cancer of antibody-producing plasma cells that comprise 13% of all hematological malignancies. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has improved treatment significantly, but inherent and acquired resistance to the drug remains a problem. We here show that bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity was completely dampened when cells were supplemented with cysteine or its derivative, glutathione (GSH) in ANBL-6 and INA-6 myeloma cell lines. GSH is a major component of the antioxidative defense in eukaryotic cells. Increasing intracellular GSH levels fully abolished bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and transcriptional changes. Elevated intracellular GSH levels blocked bortezomib-induced nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2)-associated stress responses, including upregulation of the xCT subunit of the Xc- cystine-glutamate antiporter. INA-6 cells conditioned to increasing bortezomib doses displayed reduced bortezomib sensitivity and elevated xCT levels. Inhibiting Xc- activity potentiated bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in myeloma cell lines and primary cells, and re-established sensitivity to bortezomib in bortezomib-conditioned cells. We propose that intracellular GSH level is the main determinant of bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in a subset of myeloma cells, and that combined targeting of the proteasome and the Xc- cystine-glutamate antiporter can circumvent bortezomib resistance. PMID:27421095

  1. Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1 Blockade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0296 TITLE: Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem Cell Transplantation and PD-1...Addendum 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1May2014 - 30Apr2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vaccination with Dendritic Cell Myeloma Fusions in Conjuction with Stem...anti-PD1 antibody (CT-011) alone (Cohort 1) and in conjunction with a dendritic cell/myeloma fusion cell vaccine (Cohort 2) following autologous

  2. Targeting executioner procaspase-3 with the procaspase-activating compound B-PAC-1 induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Shadia; Wang, Rui; Gandhi, Varsha

    2015-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that has a low apoptotic index. We investigated a new class of small molecules that target the terminal apoptosis pathway, called procaspase activating compounds (PACs), in myeloma cells. PAC agents (PAC-1 and B-PAC-1) convert executioner procaspases (procaspase 3, 6, and 7) to active caspases 3, 6, and 7, which cleave target substrates to induce cellular apoptosis cascade. We hypothesized that targeting this terminal step could overcome survival and drug-resistance signals in myeloma cells and induce programmed cell death. Myeloma cells expressed executioner caspases. Additionally, our studies demonstrated that B-PAC-1 is cytotoxic to chemotherapy-resistant or sensitive myeloma cell lines (n = 7) and primary patient cells (n = 11). Exogenous zinc abrogated B-PAC-1-induced cell demise. Apoptosis induced by B-PAC-1 treatment was similar in the presence or absence of growth-promoting cytokines such as interleukin 6 and hepatocyte growth factor. Presence or absence of antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2, BCL-XL, or MCL-1 did not impact B-PAC-1-mediated programmed cell death. Collectively, our data demonstrate the proapoptotic effect of B-PAC-1 in MM and suggest that activating terminal executioner procaspases 3, 6, and 7 bypasses survival and drug-resistance signals in myeloma cells. This novel strategy has the potential to become an effective antimyeloma therapy.

  3. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

  4. Immunomodulatory drugs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases and induce PU.1 up-regulation in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shinya; Amano, Masayuki; Nishimura, Nao; Ueno, Niina; Ueno, Shikiko; Yuki, Hiromichi; Fujiwara, Shiho; Wada, Naoko; Hirata, Shinya; Hata, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Okuno, Yutaka

    2016-01-08

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide are efficacious in the treatment of multiple myeloma and significantly prolong their survival. However, the mechanisms of such effects of IMiDs have not been fully elucidated. Recently, cereblon has been identified as a target binding protein of thalidomide. Lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cell lines often lose the expression of cereblon, suggesting that IMiDs act as an anti-myeloma agent through interacting with cereblon. Cereblon binds to damaged DNA-binding protein and functions as a ubiquitin ligase, inducing degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 that are essential transcription factors for B and T cell development. Degradation of both IKZF1 and IKZF3 reportedly suppresses myeloma cell growth. Here, we found that IMiDs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DMNTs). We previously reported that PU.1, which is an ETS family transcription factor and essential for myeloid and lymphoid development, functions as a tumor suppressor in myeloma cells. PU.1 induces growth arrest and apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. In this study, we found that low-dose lenalidomide and pomalidomide up-regulate PU.1 expression through inducing demethylation of the PU.1 promoter. In addition, IMiDs inhibited DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b activities in vitro. Furthermore, lenalidomide and pomalidomide decreased the methylation status of the whole genome in myeloma cells. Collectively, IMiDs exert demethylation activity through inhibiting DNMT1, 3a, and 3b, and up-regulating PU.1 expression, which may be one of the mechanisms of the anti-myeloma activity of IMiDs.

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of bone marrow dendritic cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rettig, M B; Ma, H J; Vescio, R A; Põld, M; Schiller, G; Belson, D; Savage, A; Nishikubo, C; Wu, C; Fraser, J; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    1997-06-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was found in the bone marrow dendritic cells of multiple myeloma patients but not in malignant plasma cells or bone marrow dendritic cells from normal individuals or patients with other malignancies. In addition the virus was detected in the bone marrow dendritic cells from two out of eight patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to myeloma. Viral interleukin-6, the human homolog of which is a growth factor for myeloma, was found to be transcribed in the myeloma bone marrow dendritic cells. KSHV may be required for transformation from MGUS to myeloma and perpetuate the growth of malignant plasma cells.

  6. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peller, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a review of multiple myeloma, precursor states, and related plasma cell disorders. The clinical roles of fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) and the potential to improve the management of patients with multiple myeloma are discussed. The clinical and research data supporting the utility of PET/CT use in evaluating myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias continues to grow.

  7. Bidirectional Notch Signaling and Osteocyte-Derived Factors in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment Promote Tumor Cell Proliferation and Bone Destruction in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Calle, Jesus; Anderson, Judith; Cregor, Meloney D; Hiasa, Masahiro; Chirgwin, John M; Carlesso, Nadia; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Mohammad, Khalid S; Plotkin, Lilian I; Roodman, G David; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-03-01

    In multiple myeloma, an overabundance of monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow induces localized osteolytic lesions that rarely heal due to increased bone resorption and suppressed bone formation. Matrix-embedded osteocytes comprise more than 95% of bone cells and are major regulators of osteoclast and osteoblast activity, but their contribution to multiple myeloma growth and bone disease is unknown. Here, we report that osteocytes in a mouse model of human MM physically interact with multiple myeloma cells in vivo, undergo caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, and express higher RANKL (TNFSF11) and sclerostin levels than osteocytes in control mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that osteocyte apoptosis was initiated by multiple myeloma cell-mediated activation of Notch signaling and was further amplified by multiple myeloma cell-secreted TNF. The induction of apoptosis increased osteocytic Rankl expression, the osteocytic Rankl/Opg (TNFRSF11B) ratio, and the ability of osteocytes to attract osteoclast precursors to induce local bone resorption. Furthermore, osteocytes in contact with multiple myeloma cells expressed high levels of Sost/sclerostin, leading to a reduction in Wnt signaling and subsequent inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. Importantly, direct contact between osteocytes and multiple myeloma cells reciprocally activated Notch signaling and increased Notch receptor expression, particularly Notch3 and 4, stimulating multiple myeloma cell growth. These studies reveal a previously unknown role for bidirectional Notch signaling that enhances MM growth and bone disease, suggesting that targeting osteocyte-multiple myeloma cell interactions through specific Notch receptor blockade may represent a promising treatment strategy in multiple myeloma.

  8. Salvage Second Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Michaelis, Laura C.; Saad, Ayman; Zhong, Xiaobo; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Freytes, Cesar O.; Marks, David I.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Holmberg, Leona; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kumar, Shaji; Lill, Michael; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Saber, Wael; Schriber, Jeffrey; Tay, Jason; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Savani, Bipin N.; Gale, Robert P.; Vesole, David H.; Schiller, Gary J.; Abidi, Muneer; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Nishihori, Taiga; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Vose, Julie M.; Moreb, Jan S.; Drobyski, William; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Ghobadi, Armin; Holland, H. Kent; Nath, Rajneesh; To, L. Bik; Maiolino, Angelo; Kassim, Adetola A.; Giralt, Sergio A.; Landau, Heather; Schouten, Harry C.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mikhael, Joseph; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Stiff, Patrick J.; Gibson, John; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hari, Parameswaran

    2013-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) as initial therapy of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) improves survival. However, data to support this approach for relapsed/progressive disease after initial AHCT (AHCT1) are limited. Using Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data, we report the outcomes of 187 patients who underwent a second AHCT (AHCT2) for the treatment of relapsed/progressive MM. Planned tandem AHCT was excluded. Median age at AHCT2 was 59 years (range, 28 to 72), and median patient follow-up was 47 months (range, 3 to 97). Nonrelapse mortality after AHCT2 was 2% at 1 year and 4% at 3 years. Median interval from AHCT1 to relapse/progression was 18 months, and median interval between transplantations was 32 months. After AHCT2, the incidence of relapse/progression at 1 and 3 years was 51% and 82%, respectively. At 3 years after AHCT2, progression-free survival was 13%, and overall survival was 46%. In multivariate analyses, those relapsing ≥36 months after AHCT1 had superior progression-free (P = .045) and overall survival (P = .019). Patients who underwent AHCT2 after 2004 had superior survival (P = .026). AHCT2 is safe and feasible for disease progression after AHCT1. In this retrospective study, individuals relapsing ≥36 months from AHCT1 derived greater benefit from AHCT2 compared with those with a shorter disease-free interval. Storage of an adequate graft before AHCT1 will ensure that the option of a second autologous transplantation is retained for patients with relapsed/progressive MM. PMID:23298856

  9. A Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Dinaciclib, Impairs Homologous Recombination and Sensitizes Multiple Myeloma Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David A; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    PARP1/2 are required for single-strand break repair, and their inhibition causes DNA replication fork collapse and double-strand break (DSB) formation. These DSBs are primarily repaired via homologous recombination (HR), a high-fidelity repair pathway. Should HR be deficient, DSBs may be repaired via error-prone nonhomologous end-joining mechanisms, or may persist, ultimately resulting in cell death. The combined disruption of PARP and HR activities thus produces synthetic lethality. Multiple myeloma cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and pervasive DNA damage, implicating aberrant DNA repair. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), upstream modulators of HR, are dysregulated in multiple myeloma. Here, we show that a CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib, impairs HR repair and sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to the PARP1/2 inhibitor ABT-888. Dinaciclib abolishes ABT-888-induced BRCA1 and RAD51 foci and potentiates DNA damage, indicated by increased γH2AX foci. Dinaciclib treatment reduces expression of HR repair genes, including Rad51, and blocks BRCA1 phosphorylation, a modification required for HR repair, thus inhibiting HR repair of chromosome DSBs. Cotreatment with dinaciclib and ABT-888 in vitro resulted in synthetic lethality of multiple myeloma cells, but not normal CD19(+) B cells, and slowed growth of multiple myeloma xenografts in SCID mice almost two-fold. These findings support combining dinaciclib with PARP inhibitors for multiple myeloma therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 241-50. ©2015 AACR.

  10. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis of peripheral blood samples from 13 cancer patients, 9 pre-cancer patients, and 9 healthy individuals revealed significant differences in the frequencies of the T, B, and natural killer cell compartments. Most strikingly, we identified a novel B-cell population that normally accounts for 4.0±0.7% (mean±SD) of total B cells and is up to 13-fold expanded in multiple myeloma patients with active disease. This population expressed markers previously associated with both memory (CD27+) and naïve (CD24loCD38+) phenotypes. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene sequencing showed polyclonality, indicating that these cells are not precursors to the myeloma, and somatic mutations, a characteristic of memory cells. SYK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation responses, and the fact that most of these cells expressed isotypes other than IgM or IgD, confirmed the memory character of this population, defining it as a novel type of memory B cells. PMID:25711758

  11. Clarithromycin Synergistically Enhances Thalidomide Cytotoxicity in Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xu-Hua; Shao, Jing-Jing; Mei, Jian-Gang; Li, Han-Qing; Cao, Hong-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a macrolide antibiotic that is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and infections caused by the Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium avium complex. Recent studies showed that CAM was highly effective against multiple myeloma (MM) when used in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and dexamethasone. However, the related mechanism is still unknown. As 3 immunomodulatory agents are all effective in the respective regimen, we postulated that CAM might enhance the effect of immunomodulatory drugs. We evaluated the interaction effects of CAM and thalidomide on myeloma cells. Taking into consideration that thalidomide did not affect the proliferation of myeloma cells in vitro, we cocultured myeloma cells with peripheral blood monocytes and evaluated the effects of CAM and thalidomide on the cocultured cell model. Data showed that thalidomide and CAM synergistically inhibited the proliferation of the cells. On this same model, we also found that thalidomide and CAM synergistically decreased the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. This might be caused by the effect of the 2 drugs on inhibiting the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT. These data suggest that the efficacy of CAM against MM was partly due to its synergistic action with the immunomodulatory agents.

  12. The clinical significance of cereblon expression in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Steven R; Kortuem, K Martin; Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Braggio, Esteban; Shi, Chang-Xin; Bruins, Laura A; Schmidt, Jessica E; Ahmann, Greg; Kumar, Shaji; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Mikhael, Joseph; Laplant, Betsy; Champion, Mia D; Laumann, Kristina; Barlogie, Bart; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P Leif; Lacy, Martha; Stewart, A Keith

    2014-01-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) mediates immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) action in multiple myeloma (MM). We demonstrate here that no patient with very low CRBN expression responded to IMiD plus dexamethasone therapy. In 53 refractory MM patients treated with pomalidomide and dexamethasone, CRBN levels predict for decreased response rates and significant differences in PFS (3.0 vs. 8.9 months, p<0.001) and OS (9.1 vs. 27.2 months, p=0.01) (lowest quartile vs. highest three quartiles). While higher CRBN levels can serve as a surrogate for low risk disease, our study demonstrates that low CRBN expression can predict resistance to IMiD monotherapy and is a predictive biomarker for survival outcomes.

  13. An inhibitor of the EGF receptor family blocks myeloma cell growth factor activity of HB-EGF and potentiates dexamethasone or anti-IL-6 antibody-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mahtouk, Karène; Jourdan, Michel; De Vos, John; Hertogh, Catherine; Fiol, Geneviève; Jourdan, Eric; Rossi, Jean-François; Klein, Bernard

    2004-03-01

    We previously found that some myeloma cell lines express the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) gene. As the proteoglycan syndecan-1 is an HB-EGF coreceptor as well as a hallmark of plasma cell differentiation and a marker of myeloma cells, we studied the role of HB-EGF on myeloma cell growth. The HB-EGF gene was expressed by bone marrow mononuclear cells in 8 of 8 patients with myeloma, particularly by monocytes and stromal cells, but not by purified primary myeloma cells. Six of 9 myeloma cell lines and 9 of 9 purified primary myeloma cells expressed ErbB1 or ErbB4 genes coding for HB-EGF receptor. In the presence of a low interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration, HB-EGF stimulated the proliferation of the 6 ErbB1+ or ErbB4+ cell lines, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (PI-3K/AKT) pathway. A pan-ErbB inhibitor blocked the myeloma cell growth factor activity and the signaling induced by HB-EGF. This inhibitor induced apoptosis of patients'myeloma cells cultured with their tumor environment. It also increased patients' myeloma cell apoptosis induced by an anti-IL-6 antibody or dexamethasone. The ErbB inhibitor had no effect on the interaction between multiple myeloma cells and stromal cells. It was not toxic for nonmyeloma cells present in patients' bone marrow cultures or for the growth of hematopoietic progenitors. Altogether, these data identify ErbB receptors as putative therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma.

  14. Iron increases the susceptibility of multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Paolo; Fontana, Francesca; Frenquelli, Michela; Cenci, Simone; Marcatti, Magda; Sitia, Roberto; Tonon, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant still incurable plasma cell disorder. Pharmacological treatment based on proteasome inhibition has improved patient outcome; however, bortezomib-resistance remains a major clinical problem. Inhibition of proteasome functionality affects cellular iron homeostasis and iron is a potent inducer of reactive oxygen species and cell death, unless safely stored in ferritin. We explored the potential role of iron in bortezomib-resistance. We analyzed iron proteins, oxidative status and cell viability in 7 multiple myeloma cell lines and in plasma cells from 5 patients. Cells were treated with increasing bortezomib concentrations with or without iron supplementation. We reduced ferritin levels by both shRNA technology and by drug-induced iron starvation. Multiple myeloma cell lines are characterized by distinct ferritin levels, which directly correlate with bortezomib resistance. We observed that iron supplementation upon bortezomib promotes protein oxidation and cell death, and that iron toxicity inversely correlates with basal ferritin levels. Bortezomib prevents ferritin upregulation in response to iron, thus limiting the ability to buffer reactive oxygen species. Consequently, reduction of basal ferritin levels increases both bortezomib sensitivity and iron toxicity. In patients’ cells, we confirmed that bortezomib prevents ferritin increase, that iron supplementation upon bortezomib increases cell death and that ferritin reduction overcomes bortezomib resistance. Bortezomib affects iron homeostasis, sensitizing cells to oxidative damage. Modulation of iron status is a strategy worth exploring to improve the efficacy of proteasome inhibition therapies. PMID:23242599

  15. Clonogenic Multiple Myeloma Cells have Shared stemness Signature Associated with Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Reghunathan, Renji; Bi, Chonglei; Liu, Shaw Cheng; Loong, Koh Tze; Chung, Tae-Hoon; Huang, Gaofeng; Chng, Wee Joo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the abnormal clonal expansion of post germinal B cells in the bone marrow. It was previously reported that clonogenic myeloma cells are CD138−. Human MM cell lines RPMI8226 and NCI H929 contained 2-5% of CD138− population. In this study, we showed that CD138− cells have increased ALDH1 activity, a hallmark of normal and neoplastic stem cells. CD138−ALDH+ cells were more clonogenic than CD138+ALDH− cells and only CD138− cells differentiated into CD138+ population. In vivo tumor initiation and clonogenic potentials of the CD138− population was confirmed using NOG mice. We derived a gene expression signature from functionally validated and enriched CD138− clonogenic population from MM cell lines and validated these in patient samples. This data showed that CD138− cells had an enriched expression of genes that are expressed in normal and malignant stem cells. Differentially expressed genes included components of the polycomb repressor complex (PRC) and their targets. Inhibition of PRC by DZNep showed differential effect on CD138− and CD138+ populations. The ‘stemness’ signature derived from clonogenic CD138− cells overlap significantly with signatures of common progenitor cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and Leukemic stem cells and is associated with poorer survival in different clinical datasets. PMID:23985559

  16. Requirement of soluble factors produced by bone marrow stromal cells on the growth of novel established human myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shingo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Megumi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yasukawa, Kiyotaka; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Tsuboi, Isao; Aizawa, Shin

    2003-03-01

    The growth of myeloma cells is believed to be mediated by functional interactions between tumor cells and the marrow environment involving the action of several cytokines. We report on the establishment and characterization of a new human myeloma cell line (TAB1) that can be long-term maintained in the presence of conditioned medium of bone marrow stromal cells (BMCM) and a BMCM independent variant, C2-2. Both cell lines have plasma cell morphology and express plasma cell antigens (CD38, PCA-1 and immunoglobulin kappa light chain). In the absence of BMCM, TAB1 cells undergoing apoptosis were observed. Among the adherent molecules tested, these cells expressed VLA-4, ICAM-1 and H-CAM, but not VLA-5, suggesting that these were mostly immature plasmacytes. Introduction with exogenous IL-6 and/or GM-CSF, which were detected in BMCM, partially supported the proliferation of TAB1 cells. Treatment with anti-IL-6 antibody partially inhibited the proliferation of TAB1 cells cultured with BMCM. These findings strongly suggest that TAB1 required at least two or more factors on their growth in vitro; IL-6 was one of the factors necessary for cell growth. Further studies are required to clarify the precise molecules which support TAB1 cell growth in combination with IL-6, however, TAB1 and its variant C2-2 cells may offer an attractive model to unravel novel molecular mechanisms involved in bone marrow stroma-dependent growth of myeloma cells.

  17. Bruceantin inhibits multiple myeloma cancer stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Berndt, Sarah; Carpentier, Gilles; Pezzuto, John M; Cuendet, Muriel

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) continues to claim the lives of a majority of patients. MM cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been demonstrated to sustain tumor growth. Due to their ability to self-renew and to express detoxifying enzymes and efflux transporters, MM-CSCs are rendered highly resistant to conventional therapies. Therefore, managing MM-CSCs characteristics could have profound clinical implications. Bruceantin (BCT) is a natural product previously demonstrated to inhibit the growth of MM in RPMI 8226 cells-inoculated mouse xenograft models, and to cause regression in already established tumors. The objectives of the present study were to test the inhibitory effects of BCT on MM-CSCs growth derived from a human primary tumor, and to explore a mechanism of action underlying these effects. BCT exhibited potent antiproliferative activity in MM-CSCs starting at 25 nM. BCT induced cell cycle arrest, cell death and apoptosis in MM-CSCs as well as inhibited cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro. Using a qPCR screen, it was found that the gene expression of a number of Notch pathway members was altered. Pretreatment of MM-CSCs with the γ-secretase inhibitor RO4929097, a Notch pathway inhibitor, reversed BCT-induced effects on MM-CSCs proliferation. In this study, BCT was shown to be an effective agent in controlling the proliferation, viability and migration of MM-CSCs as well as angiogenesis in vitro. The effect on MM-CSCs proliferation may be mediated by the Notch pathway. These results warrant further investigation of BCT in a broader set of human-derived MM-CSCs and with in vivo models representative of MM.

  18. Incidence and clinical features of extramedullary multiple myeloma in patients who underwent stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Mathew; Aljawai, Yosra; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Laubach, Jacob; Gannon, Muriel; Roccaro, Aldo M; Varga, Cindy; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Paba-Prada, Claudia; Schlossman, Robert; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul P; Weller, Edie; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-06-01

    Extramedullary disease (EMD), defined as an infiltrate of clonal plasma cells at an anatomic site distant from the bone marrow, is an uncommon manifestation of multiple myeloma. Six hundred and sixty-three consecutive patients with multiple myeloma who underwent stem cell transplantation between January 2005 and December 2011 were assessed for the presence of EMD. A cohort of 55 patients with biopsy-proven EMD was identified, comprising 8·3% of the total study population. EMD was present at the time of diagnosis in 14·5% of cases and at the time of relapse in 76% of patients. The most common EMD presentations at relapse were liver involvement and pleural effusions. EMD specimens had high expression of CD44 (92%) and moderate expression of CXCR4. The median overall survival from time of myeloma diagnosis was 4·1 years (95% CI: 3·1, 5·1) and the median overall survival from time of EMD diagnosis was 1·3 years (95% CI: 0·8, 2·3). This report demonstrates that the incidence of EMD has not increased with the introduction of novel agents and stem cell transplantation. The most common EMD presentations in the relapsed setting were liver and pleural fluid. The presence of CD44 and CXCR4 expression may represent new markers of EMD that warrant further investigation.

  19. Expression Profiles of the Individual Genes Corresponding to the Genes Generated by Cytotoxicity Experiments with Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mehdi; Alpsoy, Semih; Türk, Seyhan; Malkan, Ümit Y.; Atakan, Şükrü; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim C.; Güneş, Gürsel; Gündüz, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Burak; Etgül, Sezgin; Aydın, Seda; Aslan, Tuncay; Sayınalp, Nilgün; Aksu, Salih; Demiroğlu, Haluk; Özcebe, Osman İ.; Büyükaşık, Yahya; Göker, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple myeloma (MM) is currently incurable due to refractory disease relapse even under novel anti-myeloma treatment. In silico studies are effective for key decision making during clinicopathological battles against the chronic course of MM. The aim of this present in silico study was to identify individual genes whose expression profiles match that of the one generated by cytotoxicity experiments for bortezomib. Materials and Methods: We used an in silico literature mining approach to identify potential biomarkers by creating a summarized set of metadata derived from relevant information. The E-MTAB-783 dataset containing expression data from 789 cancer cell lines including 8 myeloma cell lines with drug screening data from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute database obtained from ArrayExpress was “Robust Multi-array analysis” normalized using GeneSpring v.12.5. Drug toxicity data were obtained from the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. In order to identify individual genes whose expression profiles matched that of the one generated by cytotoxicity experiments for bortezomib, we used a linear regression-based approach, where we searched for statistically significant correlations between gene expression values and IC50 data. The intersections of the genes were identified in 8 cell lines and used for further analysis. Results: Our linear regression model identified 73 genes and some genes expression levels were found to very closely correlated with bortezomib IC50 values. When all 73 genes were used in a hierarchical cluster analysis, two major clusters of cells representing relatively sensitive and resistant cells could be identified. Pathway and molecular function analysis of all the significant genes was also investigated, as well as the genes involved in pathways. Conclusion: The findings of our present in silico study could be important not only for the understanding of the genomics of MM but also for the better arrangement of

  20. Differentiation stage of myeloma plasma cells: biological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Puig, N; Cedena, M T; de Jong, B G; Ruiz, Y; Rapado, I; Martinez-Lopez, J; Cordon, L; Alignani, D; Delgado, J A; van Zelm, M C; Van Dongen, J J M; Pascual, M; Agirre, X; Prosper, F; Martín-Subero, J I; Vidriales, M-B; Gutierrez, N C; Hernandez, M T; Oriol, A; Echeveste, M A; Gonzalez, Y; Johnson, S K; Epstein, J; Barlogie, B; Morgan, G J; Orfao, A; Blade, J; Mateos, M V; Lahuerta, J J; San-Miguel, J F

    2017-02-01

    The notion that plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated has prevented intensive research in multiple myeloma (MM) about their phenotypic plasticity and differentiation. Here, we demonstrated in healthy individuals (n=20) that the CD19-CD81 expression axis identifies three bone marrow (BM)PC subsets with distinct age-prevalence, proliferation, replication-history, immunoglobulin-production, and phenotype, consistent with progressively increased differentiation from CD19+CD81+ into CD19-CD81+ and CD19-CD81- BMPCs. Afterwards, we demonstrated in 225 newly diagnosed MM patients that, comparing to normal BMPC counterparts, 59% had fully differentiated (CD19-CD81-) clones, 38% intermediate-differentiated (CD19-CD81+) and 3% less-differentiated (CD19+CD81+) clones. The latter patients had dismal outcome, and PC differentiation emerged as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free (HR: 1.7; P=0.005) and overall survival (HR: 2.1; P=0.006). Longitudinal comparison of diagnostic vs minimal-residual-disease samples (n=40) unraveled that in 20% of patients, less-differentiated PCs subclones become enriched after therapy-induced pressure. We also revealed that CD81 expression is epigenetically regulated, that less-differentiated clonal PCs retain high expression of genes related to preceding B-cell stages (for example: PAX5), and show distinct mutation profile vs fully differentiated PC clones within individual patients. Together, we shed new light into PC plasticity and demonstrated that MM patients harbouring less-differentiated PCs have dismal survival, which might be related to higher chemoresistant potential plus different molecular and genomic profiles.

  1. Multiple Myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... myeloma is a cancer that begins in plasma cells, a type of white blood cell. These cells are part of your immune system, which helps ... germs and other harmful substances. In time, myeloma cells collect in the bone marrow and in the ...

  2. Differential Activities of Thalidomide and Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Tong, Huaxiang; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide has emerged as an effective agent for treating multiple myeloma, however the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Agents known to target the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) can have cytotoxic effects in myeloma cells. The interactions between thalidomide and IBP inhibitors in human multiple myeloma cells were evaluated. Enhanced cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis was observed in RPMI-8226 cells. Examination of intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) revealed a wide variance in basal levels and response to IBP inhibitors. These findings provide a mechanism for the differential sensitivity of myeloma cells to pharmacologic manipulation of the IBP. PMID:19646757

  3. Deazaneplanocin A Is a Promising Drug to Kill Multiple Myeloma Cells in Their Niche

    PubMed Central

    Gaudichon, Jérémie; Milano, Francesco; Cahu, Julie; DaCosta, Lætitia; Martens, Anton C.; Renoir, Jack-Michel; Sola, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Tumoral plasma cells has retained stemness features and in particular, a polycomb-silenced gene expression signature. Therefore, epigenetic therapy could be a mean to fight for multiple myeloma (MM), still an incurable pathology. Deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), a S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase inhibitor, targets enhancer of zest homolog 2 (EZH2), a component of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and is capable to induce the death of cancer cells. We show here that, in some MM cell lines, DZNep induced both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis. However, the induction of cell death was not mediated through its effect on EZH2 and the trimethylation on lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). DZNep likely acted through non-epigenetic mechanisms in myeloma cells. In vivo, in xenograft models, and in vitro DZNep showed potent antimyeloma activity alone or in combination with bortezomib. These preclinical data let us to envisage new therapeutic strategies for myeloma. PMID:25255316

  4. IKZF1 expression is a prognostic marker in newly diagnosed standard-risk multiple myeloma treated with lenalidomide and intensive chemotherapy: a study of the German Myeloma Study Group (DSMM).

    PubMed

    Krönke, J; Kuchenbauer, F; Kull, M; Teleanu, V; Bullinger, L; Bunjes, D; Greiner, A; Kolmus, S; Köpff, S; Schreder, M; Mügge, L-O; Straka, C; Engelhardt, M; Döhner, H; Einsele, H; Bassermann, F; Bargou, R; Knop, S; Langer, C

    2017-01-20

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory compound with high clinical activity in multiple myeloma. Lenalidomide binding to the Cereblon (CRBN) E3 ubiquitin ligase results in targeted ubiquitination and degradation of the lymphoid transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1) and Aiolos (IKZF3) leading to growth inhibition of multiple myeloma cells. Recently, Basigin (BSG) was identified as another protein regulated by CRBN that is involved in the activity of lenalidomide. Here, we analyzed the prognostic value of IKZF1, IKZF3, CRBN and BSG mRNA expression levels in pretreatment plasma cells from 60 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma uniformly treated with lenalidomide in combination with intensive chemotherapy within a clinical trial. We found that IKZF1 mRNA expression levels are significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS). Patients in the lowest quartile (Q1) of IKZF1 expression had a superior PFS compared with patients in the remaining quartiles (Q2-Q4; 3-year PFS of 86 vs 51%, P=0.01). This translated into a significant better overall survival (100 vs 74%, P=0.03). Subgroup analysis revealed a significant impact of IKZF1, IKZF3 and BSG expression levels on PFS in cytogenetically defined standard-risk but not high-risk patients. Our data suggest a prognostic role of IKZF1, IKZF3 and BSG expression levels in lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma.Leukemia advance online publication, 20 January 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.384.

  5. Expression Profile of BCL-2, BCL-XL, and MCL-1 Predicts Pharmacological Response to the BCL-2 Selective Antagonist Venetoclax in Multiple Myeloma Models.

    PubMed

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Leverson, Joel D; Peale, Franklin; Boghaert, Erwin R; Belmont, Lisa D; Tan, Nguyen; Young, Amy; Mitten, Michael; Ingalla, Ellen; Darbonne, Walter C; Oleksijew, Anatol; Tapang, Paul; Yue, Peng; Oeh, Jason; Lee, Leslie; Maiga, Sophie; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Amiot, Martine; Souers, Andrew J; Sampath, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    BCL-2 family proteins dictate survival of human multiple myeloma cells, making them attractive drug targets. Indeed, multiple myeloma cells are sensitive to antagonists that selectively target prosurvival proteins such as BCL-2/BCL-XL (ABT-737 and ABT-263/navitoclax) or BCL-2 only (ABT-199/GDC-0199/venetoclax). Resistance to these three drugs is mediated by expression of MCL-1. However, given the selectivity profile of venetoclax it is unclear whether coexpression of BCL-XL also affects antitumor responses to venetoclax in multiple myeloma. In multiple myeloma cell lines (n = 21), BCL-2 is expressed but sensitivity to venetoclax correlated with high BCL-2 and low BCL-XL or MCL-1 expression. Multiple myeloma cells that coexpress BCL-2 and BCL-XL were resistant to venetoclax but sensitive to a BCL-XL-selective inhibitor (A-1155463). Multiple myeloma xenograft models that coexpressed BCL-XL or MCL-1 with BCL-2 were also resistant to venetoclax. Resistance to venetoclax was mitigated by cotreatment with bortezomib in xenografts that coexpressed BCL-2 and MCL-1 due to upregulation of NOXA, a proapoptotic factor that neutralizes MCL-1. In contrast, xenografts that expressed BCL-XL, MCL-1, and BCL-2 were more sensitive to the combination of bortezomib with a BCL-XL selective inhibitor (A-1331852) but not with venetoclax cotreatment when compared with monotherapies. IHC of multiple myeloma patient bone marrow biopsies and aspirates (n = 95) revealed high levels of BCL-2 and BCL-XL in 62% and 43% of evaluable samples, respectively, while 34% were characterized as BCL-2(High)/BCL-XL (Low) In addition to MCL-1, our data suggest that BCL-XL may also be a potential resistance factor to venetoclax monotherapy and in combination with bortezomib. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1132-44. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Targeting proliferating cell nuclear antigen and its protein interactions induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rebekka; Misund, Kristine; Holien, Toril; Bachke, Siri; Gilljam, Karin M; Våtsveen, Thea K; Rø, Torstein B; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sundan, Anders; Otterlei, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM). Thus inhibiting PCNA's protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells' sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment.

  7. Non-redundant roles for Th17 and Th22 cells in multiple myeloma clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Giulia; Marcatti, Magda; Protti, Maria Pia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently reported that in multiple myeloma increased Th22 cell frequencies correlate with poor prognosis. Here we show that within the same patients' cohort Th17 cells associate with bone disease and not with prognosis. Thus, we propose that Th22 and Th17 cells play non-redundant roles in multiple myeloma and constitute independent therapeutic targets. PMID:27141378

  8. Human Multiple Myeloma Cells Are Sensitized to Topoisomerase II Inhibitors by CRM1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Marchion, Douglas C.; Dawson, Jana L.; Emmons, Michael F.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Washausen, Peter; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) is exported from the nucleus of human myeloma cells by a CRM1-dependent mechanism at cellular densities similar to those found in patient bone marrow. When topo IIα is trafficked to the cytoplasm, it is not in contact with the DNA; thus topo IIα inhibitors are unable to induce DNA-cleavable complexes and cell death. Using a CRM1 inhibitor or a CRM1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), we were able to block nuclear export of topo IIα as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Human myeloma cell lines and patient myeloma cells isolated from bone marrow were treated with a CRM1 inhibitor or CRM1-specific siRNA and exposed to doxorubicin or etoposide (VP-16) at high cell densities. CRM1-treated cell lines or myeloma patient cells were fourfold more sensitive to topo II poisons, as determined by activated caspase assay. Normal cells were not significantly affected by CRM1-topo II combination treatment. Cell death was correlated with increased DNA double-strand breaks as shown by the comet assay. Band depletion assays of CRM1 inhibitor-exposed myeloma cells demonstrated increased topo IIα covalently bound to DNA. Topo IIα knockdown by a topo IIα-specific siRNA abrogated the CRM1-topo II therapy synergistic effect. These results suggest that blocking topo IIα nuclear export sensitizes myeloma cells to topo II inhibitors. This method of sensitizing myeloma cells suggests a new therapeutic approach to multiple myeloma. PMID:19690141

  9. PD1 blockade enhances cytotoxicity of in vitro expanded natural killer cells towards myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Feng, Xiaoli; Jiang, Yang; Shi, Xiaoyun; Xing, Xiangling; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Nailin; Fadeel, Bengt; Zheng, Chengyun

    2016-01-01

    Aiming for an adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy, we have developed a novel protocol to expand NK cells from peripheral blood. With this protocol using anti-human CD16 antibody and interleukin (IL)-2, NK (CD3−CD56+) cells could be expanded about 4000-fold with over 70% purity during a 21-day culture. The expanded NK (exNK) cells were shown to be highly cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI8226) at low NK-target cell ratios. Furthermore, NK cells expanded in the presence of a blocking antibody (exNK+PD1-blockage) against programmed cell death protein-1 (PD1), a key counteracting molecule for NK and T cell activity, demonstrated more potent cytolytic activity against the RPMI8226 than the exNK cells without PD1 blocking. In parallel, the exNK cells showed significantly higher expression of NK activation receptors NKG2D, NKp44 and NKp30. In a murine model of MM, transfusion of exNK cells, exNK+PD1-blockage, and exNK plus intratumor injection of anti-PD-L2 antibody (exNK+PD-L2 blockage) all significantly suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of the myeloma mice. Importantly, exNK+PD1-blockage presented more efficient therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that the NK cell expansion protocol with PD1 blockade presented in this study has considerable potential for the clinical application of allo- and auto-NK cell-based therapies against malignancies. PMID:27356741

  10. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, Anthony W; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R; Emmons, Michael F; Argilagos, Raul F; Koomen, John M; McLaughlin, Mark L; Hazlehurst, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines. Because of the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as a single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels, and failed to activate caspase-3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach, CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in multiple myeloma cell lines, indicating that multiple myeloma cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However, ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101-induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101-induced cell death occurs via a Rip1-, Rip3-, or Drp1-dependent and -independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma.

  11. High cereblon expression is associated with better survival in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma treated with thalidomide maintenance.

    PubMed

    Broyl, Annemiek; Kuiper, Rowan; van Duin, Mark; van der Holt, Bronno; el Jarari, Laila; Bertsch, Uta; Zweegman, Sonja; Buijs, Arjan; Hose, Dirk; Lokhorst, Henk M; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Sonneveld, Pieter

    2013-01-24

    Recently, cereblon (CRBN) expression was found to be essential for the activity of thalidomide and lenalidomide. In the present study, we investigated whether the clinical efficacy of thalidomide in multiple myeloma is associated with CRBN expression in myeloma cells. Patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma were included in the HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4 trial, in which postintensification treatment in 1 arm consisted of daily thalidomide (50 mg) for 2 years. Gene-expression profiling, determined at the start of the trial, was available for 96 patients who started thalidomide maintenance. In this patient set, increase of CRBN gene expression was significantly associated with longerprogression-free survival (P = .005). In contrast, no association between CRBN expression and survival was observed in the arm with bortezomib maintenance. We conclude that CRBN expression may be associated with the clinical efficacy of thalidomide. This trial has been registered at the Nederlands Trial Register (www.trialregister.nl) as NTR213; at the European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT) as 2004-000944-26; and at the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) as 64455289.

  12. Multiple Myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. Plasma cells help you fight infections by making antibodies ... Doctors know that myeloma begins with one abnormal plasma cell in your bone marrow — the soft, blood- ...

  13. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  14. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Yan, Fan; Zhao, Dandan; Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis.

  15. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide–loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans (trial registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00698776). PMID:23100308

  16. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2013-01-17

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans.

  17. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ima N

    2015-02-01

    High-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been the standard frontline consolidative therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) for > 2 decades. This approach has resulted in higher complete response (CR) rates and increased event-free survival and overall survival (OS) compared with conventional chemotherapy. The emergence of novel agent-based therapy combined with ASCT has revolutionized MM therapy by improving the CR rates and OS, raising questions concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this setting.

  18. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells eradicate myeloma cells genetically deficient in MHC class II display

    PubMed Central

    Tveita, Anders; Fauskanger, Marte; Bogen, Bjarne; Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells have been shown to reject tumor cells with no detectable expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II). However, under certain circumstances, induction of ectopic MHC II expression on tumor cells has been reported. To confirm that CD4+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity can be successful in the complete absence of antigen display on the tumor cells themselves, we eliminated MHC II on tumor cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Our results demonstrate that ablation of the relevant MHC II (I-Ed) in multiple myeloma cells (MOPC315) does not hinder rejection by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. These findings provide conclusive evidence that CD4+ T cells specific for tumor antigens can eliminate malignant cells in the absence of endogenous MHC class II expression on the tumor cells. This occurs through antigen uptake and indirect presentation on tumor-infiltrating macrophages. PMID:27626487

  19. Downregulation of MicroRNA-152 contributes to high expression of DKK1 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yinyin; Chen, Bingda; George, Suraj K; Liu, Beizhong

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) induced bone lesion is one of the most crippling characteristics, and the MM secreted Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) has been reported to play important role in this pathologic process. However, the underlying regulation mechanisms involved in DKK1 expression are still unclear. In this study, we validated the expression patterns of microRNA (miR) 15a, 34a, 152, and 223 in MM cells and identified that miR-152 was significantly downregulated in the MM group compared with the non-MM group, and that miR-152 level was negatively correlated with the expression of DKK1 in the MM cells. Mechanistic studies showed that manipulating miR-152 artificially in MM cells led to changes in DKK-1 expression, and miR-152 blocked DKK1 transcriptional activity by binding to the 3'UTR of DKK1 mRNA. Importantly, we revealed that MM cells stably expressing miR-152 improved the chemotherapy sensitivity, and counteracted the bone disruption in an intrabone-MM mouse model. Our study contributes better understanding of the regulation mechanism of DKK-1 in MM, and opens up the potential for developing newer therapeutic strategies in the MM treatment.

  20. Whole-epigenome analysis in multiple myeloma reveals DNA hypermethylation of B cell-specific enhancers.

    PubMed

    Agirre, Xabier; Castellano, Giancarlo; Pascual, Marien; Heath, Simon; Kulis, Marta; Segura, Victor; Bergmann, Anke; Esteve, Anna; Merkel, Angelika; Raineri, Emanuele; Agueda, Lidia; Blanc, Julie; Richardson, David; Clarke, Laura; Datta, Avik; Russiñol, Nuria; Queirós, Ana C; Beekman, Renée; Rodríguez-Madoz, Juan R; San José-Enériz, Edurne; Fang, Fang; Gutiérrez, Norma C; García-Verdugo, José M; Robson, Michael I; Schirmer, Eric C; Guruceaga, Elisabeth; Martens, Joost H A; Gut, Marta; Calasanz, Maria J; Flicek, Paul; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Miguel, Jesús F San; Melnick, Ari; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Gut, Ivo G; Prosper, Felipe; Martín-Subero, José I

    2015-04-01

    While analyzing the DNA methylome of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell neoplasm, by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density arrays, we observed a highly heterogeneous pattern globally characterized by regional DNA hypermethylation embedded in extensive hypomethylation. In contrast to the widely reported DNA hypermethylation of promoter-associated CpG islands (CGIs) in cancer, hypermethylated sites in MM, as opposed to normal plasma cells, were located outside CpG islands and were unexpectedly associated with intronic enhancer regions defined in normal B cells and plasma cells. Both RNA-seq and in vitro reporter assays indicated that enhancer hypermethylation is globally associated with down-regulation of its host genes. ChIP-seq and DNase-seq further revealed that DNA hypermethylation in these regions is related to enhancer decommissioning. Hypermethylated enhancer regions overlapped with binding sites of B cell-specific transcription factors (TFs) and the degree of enhancer methylation inversely correlated with expression levels of these TFs in MM. Furthermore, hypermethylated regions in MM were methylated in stem cells and gradually became demethylated during normal B-cell differentiation, suggesting that MM cells either reacquire epigenetic features of undifferentiated cells or maintain an epigenetic signature of a putative myeloma stem cell progenitor. Overall, we have identified DNA hypermethylation of developmentally regulated enhancers as a new type of epigenetic modification associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  1. Whole-epigenome analysis in multiple myeloma reveals DNA hypermethylation of B cell-specific enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Giancarlo; Pascual, Marien; Heath, Simon; Kulis, Marta; Segura, Victor; Bergmann, Anke; Esteve, Anna; Merkel, Angelika; Raineri, Emanuele; Agueda, Lidia; Blanc, Julie; Richardson, David; Clarke, Laura; Datta, Avik; Russiñol, Nuria; Queirós, Ana C.; Beekman, Renée; Rodríguez-Madoz, Juan R.; José-Enériz, Edurne San; Fang, Fang; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; García-Verdugo, José M.; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.; Guruceaga, Elisabeth; Martens, Joost H.A.; Gut, Marta; Calasanz, Maria J.; Flicek, Paul; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Melnick, Ari; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Gut, Ivo G.

    2015-01-01

    While analyzing the DNA methylome of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell neoplasm, by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density arrays, we observed a highly heterogeneous pattern globally characterized by regional DNA hypermethylation embedded in extensive hypomethylation. In contrast to the widely reported DNA hypermethylation of promoter-associated CpG islands (CGIs) in cancer, hypermethylated sites in MM, as opposed to normal plasma cells, were located outside CpG islands and were unexpectedly associated with intronic enhancer regions defined in normal B cells and plasma cells. Both RNA-seq and in vitro reporter assays indicated that enhancer hypermethylation is globally associated with down-regulation of its host genes. ChIP-seq and DNase-seq further revealed that DNA hypermethylation in these regions is related to enhancer decommissioning. Hypermethylated enhancer regions overlapped with binding sites of B cell-specific transcription factors (TFs) and the degree of enhancer methylation inversely correlated with expression levels of these TFs in MM. Furthermore, hypermethylated regions in MM were methylated in stem cells and gradually became demethylated during normal B-cell differentiation, suggesting that MM cells either reacquire epigenetic features of undifferentiated cells or maintain an epigenetic signature of a putative myeloma stem cell progenitor. Overall, we have identified DNA hypermethylation of developmentally regulated enhancers as a new type of epigenetic modification associated with the pathogenesis of MM. PMID:25644835

  2. TCR-based therapy for multiple myeloma and other B-cell malignancies targeting intracellular transcription factor BOB1.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Lorenz; Hombrink, Pleun; Hagedoorn, Renate S; Kester, Michel G D; van der Steen, Dirk M; Rodriguez, Tania; Pentcheva-Hoang, Tsvetelina; de Ru, Arnoud H; Schoonakker, Marjolein P; Meeuwsen, Miranda H; Griffioen, Marieke; van Veelen, Peter A; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M

    2017-03-09

    Immunotherapy for hematological malignancies or solid tumors by administration of monoclonal antibodies or T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors (TCRs) has demonstrated clinical efficacy. However, antigen-loss tumor escape variants and the absence of currently targeted antigens on several malignancies hamper the widespread application of immunotherapy. We have isolated a TCR targeting a peptide of the intracellular B cell-specific transcription factor BOB1 presented in the context of HLA-B*07:02. TCR gene transfer installed BOB1 specificity and reactivity onto recipient T cells. TCR-transduced T cells efficiently lysed primary B-cell leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and multiple myeloma in vitro. We also observed recognition and lysis of healthy BOB1-expressing B cells. In addition, strong BOB1-specific proliferation could be demonstrated for TCR-modified T cells upon antigen encounter. Furthermore, clear in vivo antitumor reactivity was observed of BOB1-specific TCR-engineered T cells in a xenograft mouse model of established multiple myeloma. Absence of reactivity toward a broad panel of BOB1(-) but HLA-B*07:02(+) nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells indicated no off-target toxicity. Therefore, administration of BOB1-specific TCR-engineered T cells may provide novel cellular treatment options to patients with B-cell malignancies, including multiple myeloma.

  3. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR.

  4. Osteoclasts control reactivation of dormant myeloma cells by remodelling the endosteal niche

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle A.; McDonald, Michelle M.; Kovacic, Natasa; Hua Khoo, Weng; Terry, Rachael L.; Down, Jenny; Kaplan, Warren; Paton-Hough, Julia; Fellows, Clair; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Neil Dear, T.; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baldock, Paul A.; Rogers, Michael J.; Eaton, Colby L.; Vanderkerken, Karin; Pettit, Allison R.; Quinn, Julian M. W.; Zannettino, Andrew C. W.; Phan, Tri Giang; Croucher, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is largely incurable, despite development of therapies that target myeloma cell-intrinsic pathways. Disease relapse is thought to originate from dormant myeloma cells, localized in specialized niches, which resist therapy and repopulate the tumour. However, little is known about the niche, and how it exerts cell-extrinsic control over myeloma cell dormancy and reactivation. In this study, we track individual myeloma cells by intravital imaging as they colonize the endosteal niche, enter a dormant state and subsequently become activated to form colonies. We demonstrate that dormancy is a reversible state that is switched ‘on' by engagement with bone-lining cells or osteoblasts, and switched ‘off' by osteoclasts remodelling the endosteal niche. Dormant myeloma cells are resistant to chemotherapy that targets dividing cells. The demonstration that the endosteal niche is pivotal in controlling myeloma cell dormancy highlights the potential for targeting cell-extrinsic mechanisms to overcome cell-intrinsic drug resistance and prevent disease relapse. PMID:26632274

  5. A novel signaling pathway associated with Lyn, PI 3-kinase and Akt supports the proliferation of myeloma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Mohd S.; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Obata, Masanori; Ishikawa, Hideaki

    2010-02-12

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a growth factor for human myeloma cells. We have recently found that in myeloma cells the activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 is not sufficient for the IL-6-induced proliferation, which further requires the activation of the src family kinases, such as Lyn. Here we showed that the Lyn-overexpressed myeloma cell lines had the higher proliferative rate with IL-6 and the enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt. The IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 was not up-regulated in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, indicating that the Lyn-PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway is independent of these pathways. The PI 3-kinase was co-precipitated with Lyn in the Lyn-overexpressed cells of which proliferation with IL-6 was abrogated by the specific inhibitors for PI 3-kinase or Akt, suggesting that the activation of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway associated with Lyn is indeed related to the concomitant augmentation of myeloma cell growth. Furthermore, the decreased expression of p53 and p21{sup Cip1} proteins was observed in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, implicating a possible downstream target of Akt. This study identifies a novel IL-6-mediated signaling pathway that certainly plays a role in the proliferation of myeloma cells and this novel mechanism of MM tumor cell growth associated with Lyn would eventually contribute to the development of MM treatment.

  6. Do baseline Cereblon gene expression and IL-6 receptor expression determine the response to thalidomide-dexamethasone treatment in multiple myeloma patients?

    PubMed

    Bedewy, Ahmed M L; El-Maghraby, Shereen M

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) are key components of treatment for hematologic malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM). Cereblon (CRBN) expression was described to be essential for the activity of thalidomide. Furthermore, IMiD binding to CRBN is cytotoxic to multiple myeloma cells and absence of CRBN confers IMiDs resistance. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a potent pleiotropic cytokine that regulates plasma cell (PC) growth via the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R). IL-6/IL-6R autocrine activity is implicated in the development and progression of cancers including cervical cancer, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma. The aim of the study was to evaluate CRBN and IL-6R expressions and their impact on clinical efficacy of dexamethasone-thalidomide therapy in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, in addition to their association with other clinical and prognostic parameters. Forty-six newly diagnosed MM patients were enrolled in the study. We measured CRBN expression prior to therapy initiation by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 46 bone marrow (BM) aspiration samples of patients and controls. In addition, IL-6R expression was evaluated on BM biopsies of patients and controls by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Twenty-eight males (60.9%) and 18 females (39.1%) were enrolled. The mean age was 65.11 ± 7.3 yr (range 39-77 yr). Median CRBN expression in 46 BM samples of MM patients was significantly higher than in controls (P < 0.001). Among established prognostic parameters, international staging system (ISS), serum beta-2-microglobulin (B2M), and serum albumin correlated reversely with CRBN expression. IL-6R expression was significantly higher in patients than in controls. IL-6R expression was significantly associated with response to treatment (P < 0.001), B2M (P = 0.032), and ISS (P = 0.028). Strong intensity expression was associated with low CRBN expression (P = 0.001).In conclusion, CRBN expression may provide a biomarker to predict response to IMiD in patients

  7. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits survival and proliferation of VEGF-exposed multiple myeloma cells through its anti-oxidative properties.

    PubMed

    Seki, Ritsuko; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Yoshida, Takafumi; Torimura, Takuji; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio; Okamura, Takashi

    2013-02-22

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been reported not only to induce angiogenesis within the bone marrow, but also directly stimulate the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, thus being involved in the development and progression of this second most common hematological malignancy. We, along with others, have found that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has anti-angiogenic and anti-vasopermeability properties both in cell culture and animal models by counteracting the biological actions of VEGF. However, effects of PEDF on VEGF-exposed myeloma cells remain unknown. In this study, we examined whether and how PEDF could inhibit the VEGF-induced proliferation and survival of myeloma cells. PEDF, a glutathione peroxidase mimetic, ebselen, or an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, diphenylene iodonium significantly inhibited the VEGF-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, increase in anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor, myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) expression, and proliferation in U266 myeloma cells. VEGF blocked apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells isolated from patients, which was prevented by PEDF. PEDF also reduced p22phox levels in VEGF-exposed U266 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of dominant-negative human Rac-1 mutant mimicked the effects of PEDF on ROS generation and Mcl-1 expression in U266 cells. Our present study suggests that PEDF could block the VEGF-induced proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma U266 cells through its anti-oxidative properties via suppression of p22phox, one of the membrane components of NADPH oxidase. Suppression of VEGF signaling by PEDF may be a novel therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  8. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  9. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  10. A peptide nucleic acid targeting nuclear RAD51 sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to melphalan treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alagpulinsa, David Abasiwani; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Shmookler Reis, Robert Joseph

    2015-01-01

    RAD51-mediated recombinational repair is elevated in multiple myeloma (MM) and predicts poor prognosis. RAD51 has been targeted to selectively sensitize and/or kill tumor cells. Here, we employed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to inhibit RAD51 expression in MM cells. We constructed a PNA complementary to a unique segment of the RAD51 gene promoter, spanning the transcription start site, and conjugated it to a nuclear localization signal (PKKKRKV) to enhance cellular uptake and nuclear delivery without transfection reagents. This synthetic construct, (PNArad51_nls), significantly reduced RAD51 transcripts in MM cells, and markedly reduced the number and intensity of de novo and melphalan-induced nuclear RAD51 foci, while increasing the level of melphalan-induced γH2AX foci. Melphalan alone markedly induced the expression of 5 other genes involved in homologous-recombination repair, yet suppression of RAD51 by PNArad51_nls was sufficient to synergize with melphalan, producing significant synthetic lethality of MM cells in vitro. In a SCID-rab mouse model mimicking the MM bone marrow microenvironment, treatment with PNArad51_nls ± melphalan significantly suppressed tumor growth after 2 weeks, whereas melphalan plus control PNArad4µ_nls was ineffectual. This study highlights the importance of RAD51 in myeloma growth and is the first to demonstrate that anti-RAD51 PNA can potentiate conventional MM chemotherapy. PMID:25996477

  11. The novel JAK inhibitor AZD1480 blocks STAT3 and FGFR3 signaling, resulting in suppression of human myeloma cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Scuto, Anna; Krejci, Pavel; Popplewell, Leslie; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yan; Kujawski, Maciej; Kowolik, Claudia; Xin, Hong; Chen, Linling; Wang, Yafan; Kretzner, Leo; Yu, Hua; Wilcox, William R.; Yen, Yun; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard

    2011-01-01

    IL-6 and downstream JAK-dependent signaling pathways have critical roles in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma. We investigated the effects of a novel small-molecule JAK inhibitor (AZD1480) on IL-6/JAK signal transduction and its biological consequences on the human myeloma-derived cell lines U266 and Kms.11. At low micromolar concentrations, AZD1480 blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. These biological responses to AZD1480 are associated with concomitant inhibition of phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3 and MAPK signaling proteins. In addition, there is inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes, particularly Cyclin D2. Examination of a wider variety of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, OPM-2, NCI-H929, Kms.18, MM1.S, IM-9) as well as primary myeloma cells showed that AZD1480 has broad efficacy. By contrast, viability of normal PBMCs and CD138+ cells derived from healthy controls was not significantly inhibited. Importantly, AZD1480 induces cell death of Kms.11 cells grown in the presence of HS-5 bone marrow-derived stromal cells and inhibits tumor growth in a Kms.11 xenograft mouse model, accompanied with inhibition of phospho-FGFR3, phospho-JAK2, phospho-STAT3 and Cyclin D2 levels. In sum, AZD1480 blocks proliferation, survival, FGFR3 and JAK/STAT3 signaling in myeloma cells cultured alone or co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells and in vivo. Thus, AZD1480 represents a potential new therapeutic agent for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:21164517

  12. Targeted therapeutic effect of anti-ABCG2 antibody combined with nano silver and vincristine on mouse myeloma cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jun; He, Xiangfeng; Liu, Yunjing; Huang, Zhihai; Yang, Cuiping; Shi, Fangfang; Chen, Dengyu; Gu, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Studies from hematopoietic origin malignancies have demonstrated that multiple myeloma contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for tumor multiresistance and recurrence. The goal of this study was to investigate targeted therapeutic effect of anti-ABCG2 monoclonal antibody (McAb) combined with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and vincristine (VCR) on myeloma CSCs. The characteristics of CD44+ CD24- cells that were isolated from the SP2/0 cells using magnetic activated cell sorting system were first identified. The results showed that the CD44+ CD24- cells exhibited higher proliferation, more colony formation, more side population fraction, and stronger tumorigenicity in BALB/c mice than the control cells. Moreover, CD44+ CD24- cells markedly up-regulated the ABCG2 expression, however, anti-ABCG2 McAb combined with AgNPs and VCR effectively inhibited the CD44+ CD24- cell growth and prolonged the survival of myeloma-bearing mice. We concluded that the CD44+ CD24- cells in mouse myeloma SP2/0 cell line posses CSC properties. Anti-ABCG2 McAb combined with AgNPs and VCR provide an efficient targeted therapeutic method for inhibiting myeloma CD44+ CD24- CSC growth in mice.

  13. Myxoma virus attenuates expression of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) which has implications for the treatment of proteasome inhibitor–resistant multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Katherine M; Bartee, Mee Y; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib, has improved the outcomes of patients suffering from the plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, many patients treated with these drugs still suffer relapsing disease due to treatment-induced upregulation of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl1. We have recently demonstrated that an oncolytic poxvirus, known as myxoma, can rapidly eliminate primary myeloma cells by inducing cellular apoptosis. The efficacy of myxoma treatment on proteasome inhibitor–relapsed or –refractory myeloma, however, remains unknown. We now demonstrate that myxoma-based elimination of myeloma is not affected by cellular resistance to proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, myxoma virus infection specifically prevents expression of Mcl1 following induction of the unfolded protein response, by blocking translation of the unfolded protein response activating transcription factor (ATF)4. These results suggest that myxoma-based oncolytic therapy represents an attractive option for myeloma patients whose disease is refractory to chemotherapeutic proteasome inhibitors due to upregulation of Mcl1. PMID:27512665

  14. The myeloma stem cell concept, revisited: from phenomenology to operational terms.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bøgsted, Martin; Schmitz, Alexander; Bødker, Julie Støve; El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Johansen, Preben; Valent, Peter; Zojer, Niklas; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Vanderkerken, Karin; van Duin, Mark; Sonneveld, Pieter; Perez-Andres, Martin; Orfao, Alberto; Dybkær, Karen

    2016-12-01

    The concept of the myeloma stem cell may have important therapeutic implications, yet its demonstration has been hampered by a lack of consistency in terms and definitions. Here, we summarize the current documentation and propose single-cell in vitro studies for future translational studies. By the classical approach, a CD19(-)/CD45(low/-)/CD38(high)/CD138(+) malignant plasma cell, but not the CD19(+)/CD38(low/-) memory B cell compartment, is enriched for tumorigenic cells that initiate myeloma in xenografted immunodeficient mice, supporting that myeloma stem cells are present in the malignant PC compartment. Using a new approach, analysis of c-DNA libraries from CD19(+)/CD27(+)/CD38(-) single cells has identified clonotypic memory B cell, suggested to be the cell of origin. This is consistent with multiple myeloma being a multistep hierarchical process before or during clinical presentation. We anticipate that further characterization will require single cell geno- and phenotyping combined with clonogenic assays. To implement such technologies, we propose a revision of the concept of a myeloma stem cell by including operational in vitro assays to describe the cellular components of origin, initiation, maintenance, and evolution of multiple myeloma. These terms are in accordance with recent (2012) consensus statements on the definitions, assays, and nomenclature of cancer stem cells, which is technically precise without completely abolishing established terminology. We expect that this operational model will be useful for future reporting of parameters used to identify and characterize the multiple myeloma stem cells. We strongly recommend that these parameters include validated standard technologies, reproducible assays, and, most importantly, supervised prospective sampling of selected biomaterial which reflects clinical stages, disease spectrum, and therapeutic outcome. This framework is key to the characterization of the cellular architecture of multiple

  15. The proteasome deubiquitinase inhibitor VLX1570 shows selectivity for ubiquitin-specific protease-14 and induces apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Pierrou, Stefan; Hillertz, Per; Gullbo, Joachim; Selvaraju, Karthik; Paulus, Aneel; Akhtar, Sharoon; Bossler, Felicitas; Khan, Asher Chanan; Linder, Stig; D’Arcy, Padraig

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of deubiquitinase (DUB) activity is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. VLX1570 is an inhibitor of proteasome DUB activity currently in clinical trials for relapsed multiple myeloma. Here we show that VLX1570 binds to and inhibits the activity of ubiquitin-specific protease-14 (USP14) in vitro, with comparatively weaker inhibitory activity towards UCHL5 (ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase-5). Exposure of multiple myeloma cells to VLX1570 resulted in thermostabilization of USP14 at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Transient knockdown of USP14 or UCHL5 expression by electroporation of siRNA reduced the viability of multiple myeloma cells. Treatment of multiple myeloma cells with VLX1570 induced the accumulation of proteasome-bound high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates and an apoptotic response. Sensitivity to VLX1570 was moderately affected by altered drug uptake, but was unaffected by overexpression of BCL2-family proteins or inhibitors of caspase activity. Finally, treatment with VLX1570 was found to lead to extended survival in xenograft models of multiple myeloma. Our findings demonstrate promising antiproliferative activity of VLX1570 in multiple myeloma, primarily associated with inhibition of USP14 activity. PMID:27264969

  16. Cutaneous localization in multiple myeloma in the context of bortezomib-based treatment: how do myeloma cells escape from the bone marrow to the skin?

    PubMed

    Marchica, Valentina; Accardi, Fabrizio; Storti, Paola; Mancini, Cristina; Martella, Eugenia; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Bolzoni, Marina; Todoerti, Katia; Marcatti, Magda; Schifano, Chiara; Bonomini, Sabrina; Sammarelli, Gabriella; Neri, Antonino; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The skin is a possible site of extramedullary localization in multiple myeloma (MM) patients; however, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. We describe the case of a refractory MM patient who developed a cutaneous localization under bortezomib treatment and we further expanded observations in other eight MM patients. We focused on the expression of genes involved in plasma cell skin homing, including CCR10, which was highly expressed. Moreover, we observed a lack of CXCR4 surface expression and the down-regulation of ICAM1/CD54 throughout the progression of the disease, suggesting a possible mechanism driving the escape of MM cells from the bone marrow into the skin.

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells against CD19 for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Garfall, Alfred L.; Maus, Marcela V.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Zheng, Zhaohui; Vogl, Dan T.; Cohen, Adam D.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Dengel, Karen; Kerr, Naseem D.S.; Bagg, Adam; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A patient with refractory multiple myeloma received an infusion of CTL019 cells, a cellular therapy consisting of autologous T cells transduced with an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor, after myeloablative chemotherapy (melphalan, 140 mg per square meter of body-surface area) and autologous stem-cell transplantation. Four years earlier, autologous transplantation with a higher melphalan dose (200 mg per square meter) had induced only a partial, transient response. Autologous transplantation followed by treatment with CTL019 cells led to a complete response with no evidence of progression and no measurable serum or urine monoclonal protein at the most recent evaluation, 12 months after treatment. This response was achieved despite the absence of CD19 expression in 99.95% of the patient’s neoplastic plasma cells. (Funded by Novartis and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02135406.) PMID:26352815

  18. Cannabinoids synergize with carfilzomib, reducing multiple myeloma cells viability and migration

    PubMed Central

    Offidani, Massimo; Amantini, Consuelo; Gentili, Silvia; Soriani, Alessandra; Cardinali, Claudio; Leoni, Pietro; Santoni, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Several studies showed a potential anti-tumor role for cannabinoids, by modulating cell signaling pathways involved in cancer cell proliferation, chemo-resistance and migration. Cannabidiol (CBD) was previously noted in multiple myeloma (MM), both alone and in synergy with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, to induce cell death. In other type of human cancers, the combination of CBD with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was found to act synergistically with other chemotherapeutic drugs suggesting their use in combination therapy. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of THC alone and in combination with CBD in MM cell lines. We found that CBD and THC, mainly in combination, were able to reduce cell viability by inducing autophagic-dependent necrosis. Moreover, we showed that the CBD-THC combination was able to reduce MM cells migration by down-regulating expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and of the CD147 plasma membrane glycoprotein. Furthermore, since the immuno-proteasome is considered a new target in MM and also since carfilzomib (CFZ) is a new promising immuno-proteasome inhibitor that creates irreversible adducts with the β5i subunit of immuno-proteasome, we evaluated the effect of CBD and THC in regulating the expression of the β5i subunit and their effect in combination with CFZ. Herein, we also found that the CBD and THC combination is able to reduce expression of the β5i subunit as well as to act in synergy with CFZ to increase MM cell death and inhibits cell migration. In summary, these results proved that this combination exerts strong anti-myeloma activities. PMID:27769052

  19. Nelfinavir augments proteasome inhibition by bortezomib in myeloma cells and overcomes bortezomib and carfilzomib resistance.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Bader, J; Overkleeft, H; Driessen, C

    2013-03-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) are oral drugs for HIV treatment. HIV-PI have antitumor activity via induction of ER-stress, inhibition of phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and the proteasome, suggesting antimyeloma activity. We characterize the effects of all approved HIV-PI on myeloma cells. HIV-PI were compared regarding cytotoxicity, proteasome activity, ER-stress induction and AKT phosphorylation using myeloma cells in vitro. Nelfinavir is the HIV-PI with highest cytotoxic activity against primary myeloma cells and with an IC50 near therapeutic drug blood levels (8-14 μM), irrespective of bortezomib sensitivity. Only nelfinavir inhibited intracellular proteasome activity in situ at drug concentrations <40 μM. Ritonavir, saquinavir and lopinavir inhibited p-AKT comparable to nelfinavir, and showed similar synergistic cytotoxicity with bortezomib against bortezomib-sensitive cells. Nelfinavir had superior synergistic activity with bortezomib/carfilzomib in particular against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells. It inhibited not only the proteasomal β1/β5 active sites, similar to bortezomib/carfilzomib, but in addition the β2 proteasome activity not targeted by bortezomib/carfilzomib. Additional inhibition of β2 proteasome activity is known to sensitize cells for bortezomib and carfilzomib. Nelfinavir has unique proteasome inhibiting activity in particular on the bortezomib/carfilzomib-insensitive tryptic (β2) proteasome activity in intact myeloma cells, and is active against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells in vitro.

  20. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S.; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab’s effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8+:CD4+ and CD8+:Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8+ PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38+ immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  1. Dendritic cell immunotherapy for cancer: application to low-grade lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hart, D N; Hill, G R

    1999-10-01

    The confirmation that most cancers express one or more molecular changes, which may act as tumour-associated antigens (TAA), combined with the knowledge that T lymphocytes recognize even single amino acid differences in MHC presented peptides has stimulated renewed clinical interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Dendritic cells (DC) are now recognized as specialist antigen-presenting cells, which initiate, direct and regulate immune responses. Recent data suggest that DC are not recruited into, or activated by, cancers and that other abnormalities in DC function are associated with malignancy, including multiple myeloma. This provides a rationale for designing immunotherapeutic strategies, which exploit DC as nature's adjuvant either in vivo or in vitro. Low-grade lymphoma and multiple myeloma are slowly progressive malignancies, which generally express a unique immunoglobulin idiotype as a potential TAA. Data from animal models and clinical studies suggest that DC-based immunotherapy strategies, applied when the patient has minimal residual disease, may improve the long-term prognosis in these diseases.

  2. Multiple myeloma: Development of plasma cell sarcoma during apparently successful chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holt, J. M.; Robb-Smith, A. H. T.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients with multiple myeloma who developed a plasma cell sarcoma during apparently successful chemothapy are described. It is postulated that the chemotherapy induced the sarcomatous change. Images PMID:4584727

  3. How we manage autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dingli, David

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 22 350 patients had multiple myeloma diagnosed in 2013, representing 1.3% of all new cancers; 10 710 deaths are projected, representing 1.8% of cancer deaths. Approximately 0.7% of US men and women will have a myeloma diagnosis in their lifetime, and with advances in therapy, 77 600 US patients are living with myeloma. The 5-year survival rate was 25.6% in 1989 and was 44.9% in 2005. The median age at diagnosis is 69 years, with 62.4% of patients aged 65 or older at diagnosis. Median age at death is 75 years. The rate of new myeloma cases has been rising 0.7% per year during the past decade. The most common indication for autologous stem cell transplantation in the United States is multiple myeloma, and this article is designed to provide the specifics of organizing a transplant program for multiple myeloma. We review the data justifying use of stem cell transplantation as initial management in myeloma patients. We provide selection criteria that minimize the risks of transplantation. Specific guidelines on mobilization and supportive care through the transplant course, as done at Mayo Clinic, are given. A review of the data on tandem vs sequential autologous transplants is provided. PMID:24973360

  4. Circulating clonotypic B cells in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Thiago, Leandro S.; Perez-Andres, Martin; Balanzategui, Ana; Sarasquete, Maria E.; Paiva, Bruno; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Barcena, Paloma; Sanchez, Maria Luz; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Garcia-Sanz, Ramón; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell compartment in which multiple myeloma stem cells reside remains unclear. We investigated the potential presence of mature, surface-membrane immunoglobulin-positive B lymphocytes clonally related to the tumor bone marrow plasma cells among different subsets of peripheral blood B cells from ten patients (7 with multiple myeloma and 3 with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance). The presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements was determined in multiple highly-purified fractions of peripheral blood B-lymphocytes including surface-membrane IgM+ CD27− naïve B-lymphocytes, plus surface-membrane IgG+, IgA+ and IgM+ memory CD27+ B cells, and normal circulating plasma cells, in addition to (mono)clonal plasma cells, by a highly-specific and sensitive allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction directed to the CDR3 sequence of the rearranged IGH gene of tumor plasma cells from individual patients. Our results showed systematic absence of clonotypic rearrangements in all the different B-cell subsets analyzed, including M-component isotype-matched memory B-lymphocytes, at frequencies <0.03 cells/μL (range: 0.0003–0.08 cells/μL); the only exception were the myeloma plasma cells detected and purified from the peripheral blood of four of the seven myeloma patients. These results indicate that circulating B cells from patients with multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance are usually devoid of clonotypic B cells while the presence of immunophenotypically aberrant myeloma plasma cells in peripheral blood of myeloma patients is a relatively frequent finding. PMID:23872308

  5. Novel treatment strategy with autologous activated and expanded natural killer cells plus anti-myeloma drugs for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Leivas, Alejandra; Perez-Martinez, Antonio; Blanchard, María Jesús; Martín-Clavero, Estela; Fernández, Lucía; Lahuerta, Juan José; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This proof-of-concept single-arm open-label phase I clinical trial (NCT02481934) studied the safety and efficacy of multiple infusions of activated and expanded natural killer (NKAE) cells in combination with anti-myeloma drugs in multiple myeloma patients. It included five patients with relapsed or refractory MM who had received two to seven prior lines of therapy; NK cells were expanded for 3 weeks with K562-mb15-41BBL cells. Patients received four cycles of pharmacological treatment with two infusions of 7.5 × 106 NKAEs/kg per cycle. NKAE generation, expansion, and NK monitoring was assessed using flow cytometry. Eighteen clinical-grade NKAE cell GMP-grade products were generated to obtain 627 × 106 NKAEs (range: 315–919 × 106) for the first infusion and 943 × 106 (range: 471–1481 × 106) for the second infusion with 90% (±7%) purity. Neutropenia grade II occurred in two patients and was related to chemotherapy. Of the five patients, four showed disease stabilization before the end of NKAE treatment, and two showed a 50% reduction in bone marrow infiltration and a long-term (>1 y) response. The NKAE cells had a highly cytotoxic phenotype and high cytotoxicity in vitro. Infused NKAE cells were detected in bone marrow and peripheral blood after infusions. Ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells is feasible, NKAE cells are clinically active and the multiple infusions are well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma. PMID:28123890

  6. Selective purging of human multiple myeloma cells from autologous stem cell transplant grafts using oncolytic myxoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Eric; Chan, Winnie S.; Moreb, Jan S.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and novel therapies have improved overall survival of patients with multiple myeloma; however, most patients relapse and eventually succumb to their disease. Evidence indicates that residual cancer cells contaminate autologous grafts and may contribute to early relapses after ASCT. Here, we demonstrate that ex vivo treatment with an oncolytic poxvirus called myxoma virus results in specific elimination of human myeloma cells by inducing rapid cellular apoptosis while fully sparing normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The specificity of this elimination is based on strong binding of the virus to myeloma cells coupled with an inability of the virus to bind or infect CD34+ HSPCs. These two features allow myxoma to readily identify and distinguish even low levels of myeloma cells in complex mixtures. This ex vivo MYXV treatment also effectively inhibits systemic in vivo engraftment of human myeloma cells into immunodeficient mice and results in efficient elimination of primary CD138+ myeloma cells contaminating patient hematopoietic cell products. We conclude that ex vivo myxoma treatment represents a safe and effective method to selectively eliminate myeloma cells from hematopoietic autografts prior to reinfusion. PMID:22516053

  7. Targeting heparanase overcomes chemoresistance and diminishes relapse in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vishnu C.; Zhan, Fenghuang; He, Jianbo; Barbieri, Paola; Noseda, Alessandro; Tricot, Guido; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    In most myeloma patients, even after several rounds of intensive therapy, drug resistant tumor cells survive and proliferate aggressively leading to relapse. In the present study, gene expression profiling of tumor cells isolated from myeloma patients after sequential rounds of chemotherapy, revealed for the first time that heparanase, a potent promoter of myeloma growth and progression, was elevated in myeloma cells that survived therapy. Based on this clinical data, we hypothesized that heparanase was involved in myeloma resistance to drug therapy. In several survival and viability assays, elevated heparanase expression promoted resistance of myeloma tumor cells to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, this enhanced survival was due to heparanase-mediated ERK signaling. Importantly, use of the heparanase inhibitor Roneparstat in combination with chemotherapy clearly diminished the growth of disseminated myeloma tumors in vivo. Moreover, use of Roneparstat either during or after chemotherapy diminished regrowth of myeloma tumors in vivo following therapy. These results provide compelling evidence that heparanase is a promising, novel target for overcoming myeloma resistance to therapy and that targeting heparanase has the potential to prevent relapse in myeloma and possibly other cancers. PMID:26624982

  8. Induction of potent NK cell-dependent anti-myeloma cytotoxic T cells in response to combined mapatumumab and bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Paul J; Hsu, Andy K; Chen, Yin R; Halse, Heloise M; Loh, Joanna; Cordy, Reece; Fielding, Kate; Davis, Joanne; Noske, Josh; Davenport, Alex J; Lindqvist-Gigg, Camilla A; Humphreys, Robin; Tai, Tsin; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Smyth, Mark J; Ritchie, David S

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that some cancer therapies can promote tumor immunogenicity to boost the endogenous antitumor immune response. In this study, we used the novel combination of agonistic anti-TRAIL-R1 antibody (mapatumumab, Mapa) with low dose bortezomib (LDB) for this purpose. The combination induced profound myeloma cell apoptosis, greatly enhanced the uptake of myeloma cell apoptotic bodies by dendritic cell (DC) and induced anti-myeloma cytotoxicity by both CD8(+) T cells and NK cells. Cytotoxic lymphocyte expansion was detected within 24 h of commencing therapy and was maximized when myeloma-pulsed DC were co-treated with low dose bortezomib and mapatumumab (LDB+Mapa) in the presence of NK cells. This study shows that Mapa has two distinct but connected modes of action against multiple myeloma (MM). First, when combined with LDB, Mapa produced powerful myeloma cell apoptosis; secondly, it promoted DC priming and an NK cell-mediated expansion of anti-myeloma cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL). Overall, this study indicates that Mapa can be used to drive potent anti-MM immune responses.

  9. Autologous bone marrow Th cells can support multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in xenografted mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Fløisand, Y; Myklebust, C V; Bürgler, S; Parente-Ribes, A; Hofgaard, P O; Bogen, B; Tasken, K; Tjønnfjord, G E; Schjesvold, F; Dalgaard, J; Tveita, A; Munthe, L A

    2017-02-24

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy where MM cell growth is supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment with poorly defined cellular and molecular mechanisms. MM cells express CD40, a receptor known to activate autocrine secretion of cytokines and elicit proliferation. Activated T helper (Th) cells express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and BM Th cells are significantly increased in MM patients. We hypothesized that activated BM Th cells could support MM cell growth. We here found that activated autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in a contact- and CD40L-dependent manner in vitro. MM cells had retained the ability to activate Th cells that reciprocated and stimulated MM cell proliferation. Autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in xenografted mice and were found in close contact with MM cells. MM cells secreted chemokines that attracted Th cells, secretion was augmented by CD40-stimulation. Within 14 days of culture of whole bone marrow aspirates in autologous serum, MM cells and Th cells mutually stimulated each other, and MM cells required Th cells for further expansion in vitro and in mice. The results suggest that Th cells may support the expansion of MM cells in patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 24 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.69.

  10. Eosinophils and Megakaryocytes Support the Early Growth of Murine MOPC315 Myeloma Cells in Their Bone Marrow Niches

    PubMed Central

    Wong, David; Winter, Oliver; Hartig, Christina; Siebels, Svenja; Szyska, Martin; Tiburzy, Benjamin; Meng, Lingzhang; Kulkarni, Upasana; Fähnrich, Anke; Bommert, Kurt; Bargou, Ralf; Berek, Claudia; Chu, Van Trung; Bogen, Bjarne; Jundt, Franziska; Manz, Rudolf Armin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a bone marrow plasma cell tumor which is supported by the external growth factors APRIL and IL-6, among others. Recently, we identified eosinophils and megakaryocytes to be functional components of the micro-environmental niches of benign bone marrow plasma cells and to be important local sources of these cytokines. Here, we investigated whether eosinophils and megakaryocytes also support the growth of tumor plasma cells in the MOPC315.BM model for multiple myeloma. As it was shown for benign plasma cells and multiple myeloma cells, IL-6 and APRIL also supported MOPC315.BM cell growth in vitro, IL-5 had no effect. Depletion of eosinophils in vivo by IL-5 blockade led to a reduction of the early myeloma load. Consistent with this, myeloma growth in early stages was retarded in eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA-1 mice. Late myeloma stages were unaffected, possibly due to megakaryocytes compensating for the loss of eosinophils, since megakaryocytes were found to be in contact with myeloma cells in vivo and supported myeloma growth in vitro. We conclude that eosinophils and megakaryocytes in the niches for benign bone marrow plasma cells support the growth of malignant plasma cells. Further investigations are required to test whether perturbation of these niches represents a potential strategy for the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:25272036

  11. Eosinophils and megakaryocytes support the early growth of murine MOPC315 myeloma cells in their bone marrow niches.

    PubMed

    Wong, David; Winter, Oliver; Hartig, Christina; Siebels, Svenja; Szyska, Martin; Tiburzy, Benjamin; Meng, Lingzhang; Kulkarni, Upasana; Fähnrich, Anke; Bommert, Kurt; Bargou, Ralf; Berek, Claudia; Chu, Van Trung; Bogen, Bjarne; Jundt, Franziska; Manz, Rudolf Armin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a bone marrow plasma cell tumor which is supported by the external growth factors APRIL and IL-6, among others. Recently, we identified eosinophils and megakaryocytes to be functional components of the micro-environmental niches of benign bone marrow plasma cells and to be important local sources of these cytokines. Here, we investigated whether eosinophils and megakaryocytes also support the growth of tumor plasma cells in the MOPC315.BM model for multiple myeloma. As it was shown for benign plasma cells and multiple myeloma cells, IL-6 and APRIL also supported MOPC315.BM cell growth in vitro, IL-5 had no effect. Depletion of eosinophils in vivo by IL-5 blockade led to a reduction of the early myeloma load. Consistent with this, myeloma growth in early stages was retarded in eosinophil-deficient ΔdblGATA-1 mice. Late myeloma stages were unaffected, possibly due to megakaryocytes compensating for the loss of eosinophils, since megakaryocytes were found to be in contact with myeloma cells in vivo and supported myeloma growth in vitro. We conclude that eosinophils and megakaryocytes in the niches for benign bone marrow plasma cells support the growth of malignant plasma cells. Further investigations are required to test whether perturbation of these niches represents a potential strategy for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  12. A method for measurement of drug sensitivity of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Holien, Toril; Rampa, Christoph; Klein, Dionne C G; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders

    2013-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment can profoundly affect tumor cell survival as well as alter antitumor drug activity. However, conventional anticancer drug screening typically is performed in the absence of stromal cells. Here, we analyzed survival of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) using an automated fluorescence microscope platform, ScanR. By staining the cell nuclei with DRAQ5, we could distinguish between BMSC and myeloma cells, based on their staining intensity and nuclear shape. Using the apoptotic marker YO-PRO-1, the effects of drug treatment on the viability of the myeloma cells in the presence of stromal cells could be measured. The method does not require cell staining before incubation with drugs, and less than 5000 cells are required per condition. The method can be used for large-scale screening of anticancer drugs on primary myeloma cells. This study shows the importance of stromal cell support for primary myeloma cell survival in vitro, as half of the cell samples had a marked increase in their viability when cultured in the presence of BMSC. Stromal cell-induced protection against common myeloma drugs is also observed with this method.

  13. IgG4 plasma cell myeloma: new insights into the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Julia T; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jayabalan, David S; Mathew, Susan; Subramaniyam, Shivakumar; Geyer, Alexander I; Orazi, Attilio; Ely, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly described systemic fibroinflammatory process, characterized by increase in IgG4-positive plasma cells. Its pathogenesis, including the role of IgG4, remains poorly understood. Plasma cell myeloma is typically associated with a large monoclonal serum spike, which is frequently of IgG isotype. We sought to identify and characterize a subset of IgG4-secreting myeloma, as it may provide a biological model of disease with high serum levels of IgG4. Six out of 158 bone marrow biopsies (4%) from patients with IgG myeloma expressed IgG4. Four patients were men and two were women, with a mean age of 64 (range 53-87) years. Imaging showed fullness of pancreatic head (1), small non-metabolic lymphadenopathy (1), and bone lytic lesions (6). Two patients developed necrotizing fasciitis. All had elevated serum M-protein (mean 2.4, range 0.5-4.2 g/dl), and none had definite signs or symptoms of IgG4-related disease. Four myelomas had plasmablastic morphology. Four had kappa and two had lambda light chain expression. Three cases expressed CD56. Two patients had a complex karyotype. In conclusion, the frequency of IgG4 myeloma correlates with the normal distribution of IgG4 isoform. The patients with IgG4 myeloma appear to have a high rate of plasmablastic morphology and could be predisposed to necrotizing fasciitis. Despite high serum levels of IgG4, none had evidence of IgG4-related disease. These findings suggest that the increased number of IgG4-positive plasma cells is not the primary etiologic agent in IgG4-related disease. Elevated serum levels of IgG4 is not sufficient to produce the typical disease presentation and should not be considered diagnostic of IgG4-related disease.

  14. Curcumin induces cell death of the main molecular myeloma subtypes, particularly the poor prognosis subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Halliez, Maxime; Maïga, Sophie; Godon, Catherine; Kervoëlen, Charlotte; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Moreau, Philippe; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, remains incurable despite the development of new therapies. Curcumin anti-tumor effects were previously characterized in multiple myeloma, however only few MM cell lines were included in these studies. Since myeloma is a heterogeneous disease it is important to address the impact of myeloma molecular heterogeneity in curcumin cell death induction. In the present study, a large panel of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) (n = 29), representing the main molecular MM subgroups, was screened for curcumin sensitivity. We observed that curcumin cell death induction was heterogeneous, of note 16 HMCLs were highly sensitive to curcumin (LD50 < 20.5 μM), 6 HMCLs exhibited intermediate LD50 values (20.5 μM ≤ LD50 < 32.2 μM) and only 7 HMCLs were weakly sensitive (35 < LD50 < 56 μM). Cell lines harboring the t(11;14) translocation were less sensitive (median LD50 32.9 μM) than non-t(11;14) (median LD50 17.9 μM), which included poor prognosis t(4;14) and t(14;16) cells. Interestingly, curcumin sensitivity was not dependent on TP53 status. For the first time we showed that primary myeloma cells were also sensitive, even those displaying del(17p), another poor prognosis factor. We also unravel the contribution of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family molecules in curcumin response. We found that down-regulation of Mcl-1, an essential MM survival factor, was associated with curcumin-induced cell death and its knockdown sensitized myeloma cells to curcumin, highlighting Mcl-1 as an important target for curcumin-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results support clinical trials including curcumin in association with standard therapy. PMID:25517601

  15. The Cyclophilin A-CD147 complex promotes the proliferation and homing of multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di; Wang, Zhongqiu; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Calimeri, Teresa; Meng, Jiang; Hideshima, Teru; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Kang, Yue; Ficarro, Scott B; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hunter, Zachary; McMilin, Douglas; Tong, Haoxuan; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Wu, Catherine J; Treon, Steven P; Dorfman, David M; Pinkus, Geraldine; Munshi, Nikhil C; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Marto, Jarrod A; Anderson, Kenneth C; Carrasco, Ruben D

    2015-06-01

    B cell malignancies frequently colonize the bone marrow. The mechanisms responsible for this preferential homing are incompletely understood. Here we studied multiple myeloma (MM) as a model of a terminally differentiated B cell malignancy that selectively colonizes the bone marrow. We found that extracellular CyPA (eCyPA), secreted by bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), promoted the colonization and proliferation of MM cells in an in vivo scaffold system via binding to its receptor, CD147, on MM cells. The expression and secretion of eCyPA by BMECs was enhanced by BCL9, a Wnt-β-catenin transcriptional coactivator that is selectively expressed by these cells. eCyPA levels were higher in bone marrow serum than in peripheral blood in individuals with MM, and eCyPA-CD147 blockade suppressed MM colonization and tumor growth in the in vivo scaffold system. eCyPA also promoted the migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma cells, two other B cell malignancies that colonize the bone marrow and express CD147. These findings suggest that eCyPA-CD147 signaling promotes the bone marrow homing of B cell malignancies and offer a compelling rationale for exploring this axis as a therapeutic target for these malignancies.

  16. Cyclin D1 unbalances the redox status controlling cell adhesion, migration, and drug resistance in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustany, Sophie; Bourgeais, Jérôme; Tchakarska, Guergana; Body, Simon; Hérault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Sola, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with their microenvironment are crucial for pathogenesis. MM cells could interact differentially with their microenvironment depending on the type of cyclin D they express. We established several clones that constitutively express cyclin D1 from the parental RPMI8226 MM cell line and analyzed the impact of cyclin D1 expression on cell behavior. We performed a gene expression profiling study on cyclin D1-expressing vs. control cells and validated the results by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of cyclin D1 altered the transcription of genes that control adhesion and migration. We confirmed that cyclin D1 increases cell adhesion to stromal cells and fibronectin, stabilizes F-actin fibers, and enhances chemotaxis and inflammatory chemokine secretion. Both control and cyclin D1-expressing cells were more resistant to acute carfilzomib treatment when cultured on stromal cells than in suspension. However, this resistance was specifically reduced in cyclin D1-expressing cells after pomalidomide pre-treatment that modifies tumor cell/microenvironment interactions. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that cyclin D1 expression was also associated with changes in the expression of genes controlling metabolism. We also found that cyclin D1 expression disrupted the redox balance by producing reactive oxygen species. The resulting oxidative stress activated the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (or ERK1/2) signaling pathway, increased cell adhesion to fibronectin or stromal cells, and controlled drug sensitivity. Our results have uncovered a new function for cyclin D1 in the control of redox metabolism and interactions of cyclin D1-expressing MM cells with their bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27286258

  17. Induction of P3NS1 Myeloma Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest by Simvastatin and/or γ-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ibrahim Y; Helwa, Reham; Elkashef, Hausein; Hassan, Nagwa H A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of γ-radiation alone or combined with a cytotoxic drug, simvastatin, on viability and cell cycling of a myeloma cell line. P3NS1 myeloma cells were treated with the selected dose of simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) 24 hours prior to γ-irradiation (0.25, 0.5 and 1 Gy). The cell viability, induction of apoptosis, cell death, cell cycling, generation of ROS, and expression of P53, Bax, Bcl2, caspase3, PARP1 and Fas genes were estimated. The results indicated that simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) treatment for 24 hours prior to γ- irradiation increased cell death to 37.5% as compared to 4.81% by radiation (0.5 Gy) alone. It was found that simvastatin treatment before irradiation caused arrest of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases as assessed using flow cytometry. Interestingly, simvastatin treatment of P3NS1 cells increased the intracellular ROS production and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity with increased P53, Bax and Caspase3 gene expression while that of Bcl2 was decreased. Consequently, our results indicated that pre-treatment with simvastatin increased radio sensitivity of myeloma tumor cells in addition to apoptotic effects through an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway.

  18. MTI-101 (cyclized HYD1) binds a CD44 containing complex and induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Anthony W.; Jain, Priyesh; Nair, Rajesh R.; Emmons, Michael F.; Argilagos, Raul F.; Koomen, John M.; McLaughlin, Mark L.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that treatment with the d-amino acid containing peptide HYD1 induces necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines. Due to the intriguing biological activity and promising in vivo activity of HYD1, we pursued strategies for increasing the therapeutic efficacy of the linear peptide. These efforts led to a cyclized peptidomimetic, MTI-101, with increased in vitro activity and robust in vivo activity as single agent using two myeloma models that consider the bone marrow microenvironment. MTI-101 treatment similar to HYD1 induced reactive oxygen species, depleted ATP levels and failed to activate caspase 3. Moreover, MTI-101 is cross-resistant in H929 cells selected for acquired resistance to HYD1. Here, we pursued an unbiased chemical biology approach using biotinylated peptide affinity purification and LC-MS/MS analysis to identify binding partners of MTI-101. Using this approach CD44 was identified as a predominant binding partner. Reducing the expression of CD44 was sufficient to induce cell death in MM cell lines, indicating that MM cells require CD44 expression for survival. Ectopic expression of CD44s correlated with increased binding of the FAM-conjugated peptide. However ectopic expression of CD44s was not sufficient to increase the sensitivity to MTI-101 induced cell death. Mechanistically, we show that MTI-101 induced cell death occurs via a Rip1, Rip3 or Drp1 dependent and independent pathway. Finally, we show that MTI-101 has robust activity as a single agent in the SCID-Hu bone implant and 5TGM1 in vivo model of multiple myeloma. PMID:24048737

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell contact promotes CCN1 splicing and transcription in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dotterweich, Julia; Ebert, Regina; Kraus, Sabrina; Tower, Robert J; Jakob, Franz; Schütze, Norbert

    2014-06-25

    CCN family member 1 (CCN1), also known as cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CYR61), belongs to the extracellular matrix-associated CCN protein family. The diverse functions of these proteins include regulation of cell migration, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and survival/apoptosis, induction of angiogenesis and cellular senescence. Their functions are partly overlapping, largely non-redundant, cell-type specific, and depend on the local microenvironment. To elucidate the role of CCN1 in the crosstalk between stromal cells and myeloma cells, we performed co-culture experiments with primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-dependent myeloma cell line INA-6. Here we show that INA-6 cells display increased transcription and induction of splicing of intron-retaining CCN1 pre-mRNA when cultured in contact with MSC. Protein analyses confirmed that INA-6 cells co-cultured with MSC show increased levels of CCN1 protein consistent with the existence of a pre-mature stop codon in intron 1 that abolishes translation of unspliced mRNA. Addition of recombinant CCN1-Fc protein to INA-6 cells was also found to induce splicing of CCN1 pre-mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Only full length CCN1-Fc was able to induce mRNA splicing of all introns, whereas truncated recombinant isoforms lacking domain 4 failed to induce intron splicing. Blocking RGD-dependent integrins on INA-6 cells resulted in an inhibition of these splicing events. These findings expand knowledge on splicing of the proangiogenic, matricellular factor CCN1 in the tumor microenvironment. We propose that contact with MSC-derived CCN1 leads to splicing and enhanced transcription of CCN1 which further contributes to the translation of angiogenic factor CCN1 in myeloma cells, supporting tumor viability and myeloma bone disease.

  20. CD4⁺ T cells play a crucial role for lenalidomide in vivo anti-tumor activity in murine multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Bi, Enguang; Hong, Sungyoul; Qian, Jianfei; Zheng, Chengyun; Wang, Michael; Yi, Qing

    2015-11-03

    Lenalidomide modulates the host immune response against myeloma via multiple actions. Although these effects have been elucidated in vitro, the central action of lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo is not clear. To investigate its immune action in vivo, we selected the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which is resistant to direct tumoricidal effects of lenalidomide in vitro and in immunodeficient mice, but sensitive to lenalidomide treatment in 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not NK cells, B cells, or CD8+ T cells, deprived lenalidomide of its therapeutic effects on 5TGM1-bearing immunocompetent mice. Lenalidomide significantly increased the numbers of IFN-γ-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells but had no effects on NK cells and B cells in this mouse model. Lenalidomide slightly decreased the number of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells but increased perforin expression in CD8+ T cells in vivo. Using this mouse model for investigation of anti-tumor immune action of lenalidomide, we demonstrated that lenalidomide facilitated a type-1 anti-tumor immune response in vivo. The CD4+ T cell subset may play a critical role in the lenalidomide-mediated anti-myeloma immune response in vivo.

  1. The phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) is important for IL-6-mediated survival of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Slørdahl, Tobias S.; Abdollahi, Pegah; Vandsemb, Esten N.; Rampa, Christoph; Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A.; Westhrin, Marita; Waage, Anders; Rø, Torstein B.; Børset, Magne

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic proliferation of bone marrow plasma cells. PRL-3 is a phosphatase induced by interleukin (IL)-6 and other growth factors in MM cells and promotes MM-cell migration. PRL-3 has also been identified as a marker gene for a subgroup of patients with MM. In this study we found that forced expression of PRL-3 in the MM cell line INA-6 led to increased survival of cells that were depleted of IL-6. It also caused redistribution of cells in cell cycle, with an increased number of cells in G2M-phase. Furthermore, forced PRL-3 expression significantly increased phosphorylation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 both in the presence and the absence of IL-6. Knockdown of PRL-3 with shRNA reduced survival in MM cell line INA-6. A pharmacological inhibitor of PRL-3 reduced survival in the MM cell lines INA-6, ANBL-6, IH-1, OH-2 and RPMI8226. The inhibitor also reduced survival in 9 of 9 consecutive samples of purified primary myeloma cells. Treatment with the inhibitor down-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and led to activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Inhibition of PRL-3 also reduced IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. In conclusion, our study shows that PRL-3 is an important mediator of growth factor signaling in MM cells and hence possibly a good target for treatment of MM. PMID:27036022

  2. The phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) is important for IL-6-mediated survival of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Slørdahl, Tobias S; Abdollahi, Pegah; Vandsemb, Esten N; Rampa, Christoph; Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Westhrin, Marita; Waage, Anders; Rø, Torstein B; Børset, Magne

    2016-05-10

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic proliferation of bone marrow plasma cells. PRL-3 is a phosphatase induced by interleukin (IL)-6 and other growth factors in MM cells and promotes MM-cell migration. PRL-3 has also been identified as a marker gene for a subgroup of patients with MM. In this study we found that forced expression of PRL-3 in the MM cell line INA-6 led to increased survival of cells that were depleted of IL-6. It also caused redistribution of cells in cell cycle, with an increased number of cells in G2M-phase. Furthermore, forced PRL-3 expression significantly increased phosphorylation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 both in the presence and the absence of IL-6. Knockdown of PRL-3 with shRNA reduced survival in MM cell line INA-6. A pharmacological inhibitor of PRL-3 reduced survival in the MM cell lines INA-6, ANBL-6, IH-1, OH-2 and RPMI8226. The inhibitor also reduced survival in 9 of 9 consecutive samples of purified primary myeloma cells. Treatment with the inhibitor down-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and led to activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Inhibition of PRL-3 also reduced IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. In conclusion, our study shows that PRL-3 is an important mediator of growth factor signaling in MM cells and hence possibly a good target for treatment of MM.

  3. Expression and phosphorylation of the AS160_v2 splice variant supports GLUT4 activation and the Warburg effect in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma (MM) is a fatal plasma cell malignancy exhibiting enhanced glucose consumption associated with an aerobic glycolytic phenotype (i.e., the Warburg effect). We have previously demonstrated that myeloma cells exhibit constitutive plasma membrane (PM) localization of GLUT4, consistent with the dependence of MM cells on this transporter for maintenance of glucose consumption rates, proliferative capacity, and viability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular basis of constitutive GLUT4 plasma membrane localization in MM cells. Findings We have elucidated a novel mechanism through which myeloma cells achieve constitutive GLUT4 activation involving elevated expression of the Rab-GTPase activating protein AS160_v2 splice variant to promote the Warburg effect. AS160_v2-positive MM cell lines display constitutive Thr642 phosphorylation, known to be required for inactivation of AS160 Rab-GAP activity. Importantly, we show that enforced expression of AS160_v2 is required for GLUT4 PM translocation and activation in these select MM lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of a full-length, phospho-deficient AS160 mutant is sufficient to impair constitutive GLUT4 cell surface residence, which is characteristic of MM cells. Conclusions This is the first study to tie AS160 de-regulation to increased glucose consumption rates and the Warburg effect in cancer. Future studies investigating connections between the insulin/IGF-1/AS160_v2/GLUT4 axis and FDG-PET positivity in myeloma patients are warranted and could provide rationale for therapeutically targeting this pathway in MM patients with advanced disease. PMID:24280290

  4. MicroRNA-497 suppresses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis through targeting PBX3 in human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianhua; Zhang, Xuanhe; Zhang, Lirong; Wang, Yali; Pan, Hongjuan; Xu, Zhihua; Pang, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of microRNA-497 (miRN-497) is implicated in development and progression of multiple types of cancers. However, the biological function and underlying mechanism of miR-497 in multiple myeloma (MM) remains unclear. Thus, we studied the potential biological roles of miR-497 in MM. The expression of miR-497 was examined in multiple myeloma and normal plasma cells by qRT-PCR. Biological functions of miR-497 were analyzed using cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis and luciferase assays in vitro, as well as via tumorigenicity in vivo analysis. Here, we observed reduced expression of miR-497 in MM plasma samples and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-497 dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and clonogenicity, as well as induced cell arrest at G0/G1 stage and apoptosis in vitro. Mechanistic investigation assays showed that Pre-B-cellleukemia transcription factor 3 (PBX3) was a novel and direct downstream target of miR-497. Interestingly, overexpression of PBX3 partially reverted the effect of miR-497 in MM cells. In xenograft model, overexpression of miR-497 inhibited tumorigenicity by repressing PBX3. These findings collectively suggested that miR-497 functioned as tumor suppressor in MM by directly targeting PBX3, supporting its utility as a novel and potential therapeutic agent for MM therapy. PMID:28042507

  5. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival.

  6. Immunophenotype of normal vs. myeloma plasma cells: Toward antibody panel specifications for MRD detection in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Flores-Montero, Juan; de Tute, Ruth; Paiva, Bruno; Perez, José Juan; Böttcher, Sebastian; Wind, Henk; Sanoja, Luzalba; Puig, Noemí; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Vidriales, María Belén; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several studies on large series of multiple myeloma (MM) patients have demonstrated the clinical utility of flow cytometry monitoring of minimal residual disease (flow-MRD) in bone marrow (BM), for improved assessment of response to therapy and prognostication. However, disturbing levels of variability exist regarding the specific protocols and antibody panels used in individual laboratories. Overall, consensus exists about the utility of combined assessment of CD38 and CD138 for the identification of BM plasma cells (PC); in contrast, more heterogeneous lists of markers are used to further distinguish between normal/reactive PCs and myeloma PCs in the MRD settings. Among the later markers, CD19, CD45, CD27, and CD81, together with CD56, CD117, CD200, and CD307, have emerged as particularly informative; however, no single marker provides enough specificity for clear discrimination between clonal PCs and normal PCs. Accordingly, multivariate analyses of single PCs from large series of normal/reactive vs. myeloma BM samples have shown that combined assessment of CD138 and CD38, together with CD45, CD19, CD56, CD27, CD81, and CD117 would be ideally suited for MRD monitoring in virtually every MM patient. However, the specific antibody clones, fluorochrome conjugates and sources of the individual markers determines its optimal (vs. suboptimal or poor) performance in an eight-color staining. Assessment of clonality, via additional cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (CyIg) κ vs. CyIgλ evaluation, may contribute to further establish the normal/reactive vs. clonal nature of small suspicious PC populations at high sensitivity levels, provided that enough cells are evaluated.

  7. Loss of p53 exacerbates multiple myeloma phenotype by facilitating the reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to malignant plasma cells by MafB

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Cenador, María Begoña García; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a serious, mostly incurable human cancer of malignant plasma cells. Chromosomal translocations affecting MAFB are present in a significant percentage of multiple myeloma patients. Genetically engineered Sca1-MafB mice, in which MafB expression is limited to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/P-Cs), display the phenotypic features of MM. Contrary to many other types of cancer, it is not yet known if the p53 gene plays any essential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, we show, taking advantage of the Sca1-MafB MM mouse model, that loss of p53 does not rescue the multiple myeloma disease, but instead accelerates its development and exacerbates the MM phenotype. Therefore, the efficiency of the MafB-induced MM reprogramming of normal HS/P-Cs to terminally differentiated malignant plasma cells is enhanced by p53 deficiency, in analogy to what happens in reprogramming to pluripotency. These results raise caution about interfering with p53 function when treating multiple myeloma. PMID:22983007

  8. Lentiviral transduction of primary myeloma cells with CD80 and CD154 generates antimyeloma effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Cignetti, Alessandro; Vallario, Antonella; Follenzi, Antonia; Circosta, Paola; Capaldi, Antonio; Gottardi, Daniela; Naldini, Luigi; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico

    2005-04-01

    The development of immunotherapy approaches designed to obtain tumor-specific T cells might help eradicate residual malignant cells in multiple myeloma (MM) patients. To this end, we used autologous primary MM cells as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Gene transfer of both CD80 and CD154 by lentiviral vectors was necessary to significantly improve the APC function of human MM cells. Simultaneous CD80/CD154 expression on MM cells allowed the generation of CD8+ T cells that recognized unmodified MM cells in 11 of 16 cases, specifically in six of six patients with low-stage disease, but only in five of ten patients with advanced disease. The activity of CD8+ T cells was MHC restricted and MM specific. In seven of seven cases, CD8+ T cell activity was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies against HLA class I, and in four of four cases, CD8+ T cells recognized autologous MM cells but not autologous normal B and T lymphocytes nor bone marrow stromal cells. In addition, the activity of CD8+ T cells was directed against allogeneic MM cells that shared at least one MHC allele with the autologous counterpart, but not against MHC mismatched MM cells. These data lay the ground for the isolation of new MM antigens and for the design of vaccination protocols with primary MM cells genetically engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules.

  9. Thymoquinone Inhibits the CXCL12-Induced Chemotaxis of Multiple Myeloma Cells and Increases Their Susceptibility to Fas-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Gamal; Lefevre, Eric A.; Mohany, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    In multiple myeloma (MM), malignant plasma cells reside in the bone marrow, where they accumulate in close contact with stromal cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chemotaxis of malignant plasma cells are still poorly understood. Thus, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the chemotaxis of MDN and XG2 MM cell lines. Both cell lines strongly expressed CCR9, CXCR3 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors but only migrated toward CXCL12. Activation of CXCR4 by CXCL12 resulted in the association of CXCR4 with CD45 and activation of PLCβ3, AKT, RhoA, IκBα and ERK1/2. Using siRNA-silencing techniques, we showed CD45/CXCR4 association is essential for CXCL12-induced migration of MM cells. Thymoquinone (TQ), the major active component of the medicinal herb Nigella sativa Linn, has been described as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compound. TQ treatment strongly inhibited CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in MM cell lines as well as primary cells isolated from MM patients, but not normal PBMCs. Moreover, TQ significantly down-regulated CXCR4 expression and CXCL12-mediated CXCR4/CD45 association in MM cells. Finally, TQ also induced the relocalization of cytoplasmic Fas/CD95 to the membrane of MM cells and increased CD95-mediated apoptosis by 80%. In conclusion, we demonstrate the potent anti-myeloma activity of TQ, providing a rationale for further clinical evaluation. PMID:21912642

  10. A gene expression inflammatory signature specifically predicts multiple myeloma evolution and patients survival

    PubMed Central

    Botta, C; Di Martino, M T; Ciliberto, D; Cucè, M; Correale, P; Rossi, M; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is closely dependent on cross-talk between malignant plasma cells and cellular components of the inflammatory/immunosuppressive bone marrow milieu, which promotes disease progression, drug resistance, neo-angiogenesis, bone destruction and immune-impairment. We investigated the relevance of inflammatory genes in predicting disease evolution and patient survival. A bioinformatics study by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on gene expression profiling dataset of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering and symptomatic-MM, identified inflammatory and cytokine/chemokine pathways as the most progressively affected during disease evolution. We then selected 20 candidate genes involved in B-cell inflammation and we investigated their role in predicting clinical outcome, through univariate and multivariate analyses (log-rank test, logistic regression and Cox-regression model). We defined an 8-genes signature (IL8, IL10, IL17A, CCL3, CCL5, VEGFA, EBI3 and NOS2) identifying each condition (MGUS/smoldering/symptomatic-MM) with 84% accuracy. Moreover, six genes (IFNG, IL2, LTA, CCL2, VEGFA, CCL3) were found independently correlated with patients' survival. Patients whose MM cells expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines (IFNG/LTA/IL2/CCL2) and low levels of CCL3 and VEGFA, experienced the longest survival. On these six genes, we built a prognostic risk score that was validated in three additional independent datasets. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept that inflammation has a critical role in MM patient progression and survival. The inflammatory-gene prognostic signature validated in different datasets clearly indicates novel opportunities for personalized anti-MM treatment. PMID:27983725

  11. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed By Maintenance Therapy in Treating Elderly Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Light Chain Deposition Disease; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma

  12. Ex vivo-expanded natural killer cells demonstrate robust proliferation in vivo in high-risk relapsed multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Szmania, Susann; Lapteva, Natalia; Garg, Tarun; Greenway, Amy; Lingo, Joshuah; Nair, Bijay; Stone, Katie; Woods, Emily; Khan, Junaid; Stivers, Justin; Panozzo, Susan; Campana, Dario; Bellamy, William T; Robbins, Molly; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Waheed, Sarah; Gee, Adrian; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Rooney, Cliona; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Highly activated/expanded natural killer (NK) cells can be generated by stimulation with the human leukocyte antigen-deficient cell line K562, genetically modified to express 41BB-ligand and membrane-bound interleukin (IL)15. We tested the safety, persistence, and activity of expanded NK cells generated from myeloma patients (auto-NK) or haploidentical family donors (allo-NK) in heavily pretreated patients with high-risk relapsing myeloma. The preparative regimen comprised bortezomib only or bortezomib and immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, and fludarabine. NK cells were shipped overnight either cryopreserved or fresh. In 8 patients, up to 1×10⁸ NK cells/kg were infused on day 0 and followed by daily administrations of IL2. Significant in vivo expansion was observed only in the 5 patients receiving fresh products, peaking at or near day 7, with the highest NK-cell counts in 2 subjects who received cells produced in a high concentration of IL2 (500 U/mL). Seven days after infusion, donor NK cells comprised >90% of circulating leukocytes in fresh allo-NK cell recipients, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic myeloma targets was retained in vitro. Among the 7 evaluable patients, there were no serious adverse events that could be related to NK-cell infusion. One patient had a partial response and in another the tempo of disease progression decreased; neither patient required further therapy for 6 months. In the 5 remaining patients, disease progression was not affected by NK-cell infusion. In conclusion, infusion of large numbers of expanded NK cells was feasible and safe; infusing fresh cells was critical to their expansion in vivo.

  13. Bone marrow stromal cells from multiple myeloma patients uniquely induce bortezomib resistant NF-κB activity in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Components of the microenvironment such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are well known to support multiple myeloma (MM) disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy including the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. However, functional distinctions between BMSCs in MM patients and those in disease-free marrow are not completely understood. We and other investigators have recently reported that NF-κB activity in primary MM cells is largely resistant to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and that further enhancement of NF-κB by BMSCs is similarly resistant to bortezomib and may mediate resistance to this therapy. The mediating factor(s) of this bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity is induced by BMSCs is not currently understood. Results Here we report that BMSCs specifically derived from MM patients are capable of further activating bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity in MM cells. This induced activity is mediated by soluble proteinaceous factors secreted by MM BMSCs. Among the multiple factors evaluated, interleukin-8 was secreted by BMSCs from MM patients at significantly higher levels compared to those from non-MM sources, and we found that IL-8 contributes to BMSC-induced NF-κB activity. Conclusions BMSCs from MM patients uniquely enhance constitutive NF-κB activity in MM cells via a proteinaceous secreted factor in part in conjunction with IL-8. Since NF-κB is known to potentiate MM cell survival and confer resistance to drugs including bortezomib, further identification of the NF-κB activating factors produced specifically by MM-derived BMSCs may provide a novel biomarker and/or drug target for the treatment of this commonly fatal disease. PMID:20604947

  14. Zoom Zoom: racing CARs for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Maus, Marcela V; June, Carl H

    2013-04-15

    Chimeric antigen receptors redirect T cells to surface antigens. Discovery and validation of appropriate target antigens expand the possible indications for chimeric-antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed only on mature B cells and plasma cells and promotes their survival. BCMA is a promising target for CAR-T cells in multiple myeloma.

  15. Metabolic and proteomic study of NS0 myeloma cell line following the adaptation to protein-free medium.

    PubMed

    de la Luz-Hernández, K R; Rojas-del Calvo, L; Rabasa-Legón, Y; Lage-Castellanos, A; Castillo-Vitlloch, A; Díaz, J; Gaskell, S

    2008-07-21

    Proteomics and metabolomics technologies are potentially useful tool for the study of the very complex process of cell adaptation to protein-free medium. In this work, we used the iTRAQ technology to analyze different protein levels in adapted and non-adapted NS0 myeloma cell line. Several proteins with differential expression profile were characterized and quantified. Carbohydrate metabolism, protein synthesis and membrane transport were the principal pathways that change after the adaptation. Changes in lactate production rate with respect to glucose consumption rate were observed according to the changes observed by proteomic.

  16. Is there still a role for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Bensinger, William I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in survival for multiple myeloma patients through autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT) and the introduction of novel drugs, the disease remains incurable for all but a small fraction of patients. Only allogeneic SCT is potentially curative, due in part to a graft-versus-myeloma effect. High transplant-related mortality with allogeneic SCT is currently the major limitation to wider use of this potentially curative modality. Mortality can be reduced through the use of lower-intensity conditioning regimens which allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells, but this comes at a cost of higher rates of disease progression and relapse. Promising studies to improve outcomes of allogeneic transplants include the use of more intensive non-myeloablative conditioning regimens, tandem transplants, peripheral blood cells, graft engineering to improve the graft-versus-myeloma activity while reducing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), post-transplant maintenance, and targeted conditioning therapies such as bone-seeking radioisotopes. PMID:18070719

  17. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells.

  18. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for slightly more than 10% of all hematologic cancers. In this paper, we present a historically focused review of the disease, from the description of the first case in 1844 to the present. The evolution of drug therapy and stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of myeloma, as well as the development of new agents, is discussed. We also provide an update on current concepts of diagnosis and therapy, with an emphasis on how treatments have emerged from a historical perspective after certain important discoveries and the results of experimental studies. PMID:18332230

  19. Phenotypic, Genomic and Functional Characterization Reveals No Differences between CD138++ and CD138low Subpopulations in Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Paíno, Teresa; Sarasquete, María E.; Paiva, Bruno; Krzeminski, Patryk; San-Segundo, Laura; Corchete, Luis A.; Redondo, Alba; Garayoa, Mercedes; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; Ocio, Enrique M.; San-Miguel, Jesús F.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), it remains an incurable disease potentially due to the presence of resistant myeloma cancer stem cells (MM-CSC). Although the presence of clonogenic cells in MM was described three decades ago, the phenotype of MM-CSC is still controversial, especially with respect to the expression of syndecan-1 (CD138). Here, we demonstrate the presence of two subpopulations - CD138++ (95–99%) and CD138low (1–5%) - in eight MM cell lines. To find out possible stem-cell-like features, we have phenotypically, genomic and functionally characterized the two subpopulations. Our results show that the minor CD138low subpopulation is morphologically identical to the CD138++ fraction and does not represent a more immature B-cell compartment (with lack of CD19, CD20 and CD27 expression). Moreover, both subpopulations have similar gene expression and genomic profiles. Importantly, both CD138++ and CD138low subpopulations have similar sensitivity to bortezomib, melphalan and doxorubicin. Finally, serial engraftment in CB17-SCID mice shows that CD138++ as well as CD138low cells have self-renewal potential and they are phenotypically interconvertible. Overall, our results differ from previously published data in MM cell lines which attribute a B-cell phenotype to MM-CSC. Future characterization of clonal plasma cell subpopulations in MM patients' samples will guarantee the discovery of more reliable markers able to discriminate true clonogenic myeloma cells. PMID:24658332

  20. [Monoclonal Gammopathy in the General Practioners’s Office. Diagnosis and Treatment of Plasma Cell Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ivo; Gerber, Bernhard; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2015-10-14

    A monoclonal gammopathy is a common finding in the general practitioner’s office. An active search for a paraproteinemia is indicated in case of suspected malignancy, evidence of end organ damage (e.g. anemia, renal insufficiency) or in case of recurrent infections or prolonged fatigue. Plasma cell myeloma is an important differential diagnosis of a monoclonal gammopathy and implies a broad spectrum of diagnostic as well as therapeutic consequences for the patient. Plasma cell myeloma is still being considered an incurable disease, but its prognosis could be significantly improved with the introduction of new drugs.

  1. NY-ESO-1 specific TCR engineered T-cells mediate sustained antigen-specific antitumor effects in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Goloubeva, Olga; Vogl, Dan T.; Lacey, Simon F.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Garfall, Alfred; Weiss, Brendan; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Sinha, Sanjoy K.; Kronsberg, Shari; Gupta, Minnal; Bond, Sarah; Melchiori, Luca; Brewer, Joanna E.; Bennett, Alan D.; Gerry, Andrew B.; Pumphrey, Nicholas J.; Williams, Daniel; Tayton-Martin, Helen K.; Ribeiro, Lilliam; Holdich, Tom; Yanovich, Saul; Hardy, Nancy; Yared, Jean; Kerr, Naseem; Philip, Sunita; Westphal, Sandra; Siegel, Don L.; Levine, Bruce L.; Jakobsen, Bent K.; Kalos, Michael; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) remains largely incurable. Herein we report results of a phase I/II trial to evaluate the safety and activity of autologous T-cells engineered to express an affinity-enhanced T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing a naturally processed peptide shared by the cancer-testis antigens NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1. Twenty patients with antigen-positive MM received an average 2.4×109 engineered T cells two days after autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Infusions were well-tolerated without clinically apparent cytokine release syndrome, despite high IL-6 levels. Engineered T-cells expanded, persisted, trafficked to marrow and exhibited a cytotoxic phenotype. Persistence of engineered T cells in blood was inversely associated with NY-ESO-1 levels in the marrow. Disease progression was associated with loss of T cell persistence or antigen escape, consistent with the expected mechanism of action of the transferred T cells. Encouraging clinical responses were observed in 16 of 20 patients (80%) with advanced disease, with a median progression free survival of 19.1 months. NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1 TCR-engineered T-cells were safe, trafficked to marrow and showed extended persistence that correlated with clinical activity against antigen-positive myeloma. PMID:26193344

  2. Biclonal IgD and IgM Plasma Cell Myeloma: A Report of Two Cases and a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongchuan W; Kotsikogianni, Ioanna; Raval, Jay S; Roth, Christine G; Rollins-Raval, Marian A

    2013-01-01

    Biclonal plasma cell myelomas producing two different isotypes of immunoglobulins are extremely rare entities; to date, the combination of IgD and IgM secretion by a biclonal plasma cell myeloma has not been reported. Bone marrow biopsy immunohistochemical studies in two cases revealed neoplastic plasma cells coexpressing IgD and IgM, but serum protein electrophoresis identified only the IgM monoclonal paraprotein in both cases. Biclonal plasma cell myelomas, while currently not well characterized in terms of their clinical behavior, should be distinguished from B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation, given the different therapeutic implications. Both cases reported herein demonstrated chemotherapy-resistant clinical courses.

  3. Interleukin-6 antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the growth of human myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Y; Tsapis, A; Brouet, J C

    1991-01-01

    IL-6 has been shown to be a plasmacytoma growth factor in mice and is believed to play a key role in the development of human multiple myeloma. We investigated the IL-6 requirements for the growth of two human myeloma cell lines, U 266 and RPMI 8226. These cell lines secreted minute amounts of IL-6 (20 U/ml) and featured IL-6 mRNA. IL-6 receptors were detectable at the surface of malignant cells by immunofluorescence. Antibodies to IL-6 did not alter the proliferation of these myeloma cells. There was a dose-dependent decrease, however, in [3H]-thymidine uptake in the presence of IL-6 antisense (and not sense) oligodeoxynucleotides; in the presence of 20 microM IL-6 antisense, an 80 and 95% inhibition of the proliferation of U 266 and RPMI 8226 cells was observed, respectively. These results provide strong evidence for an IL-6 autocrine proliferation of myeloma cells which may occur via internal interaction between IL-6 and the IL-6 receptor. Images PMID:1864979

  4. Aberrantly expressed LGR4 empowers Wnt signaling in multiple myeloma by hijacking osteoblast-derived R-spondins

    PubMed Central

    van Andel, Harmen; Ren, Zemin; Koopmans, Iris; Joosten, Sander P. J.; Kocemba, Kinga A.; de Lau, Wim; Kersten, Marie José; de Bruin, Alexander M.; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Clevers, Hans; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    The unrestrained growth of tumor cells is generally attributed to mutations in essential growth control genes, but tumor cells are also affected by, or even addicted to, signals from the microenvironment. As therapeutic targets, these extrinsic signals may be equally significant as mutated oncogenes. In multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, most tumors display hallmarks of active Wnt signaling but lack activating Wnt-pathway mutations, suggesting activation by autocrine Wnt ligands and/or paracrine Wnts emanating from the bone marrow (BM) niche. Here, we report a pivotal role for the R-spondin/leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4) axis in driving aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM. We show that LGR4 is expressed by MM plasma cells, but not by normal plasma cells or B cells. This aberrant LGR4 expression is driven by IL-6/STAT3 signaling and allows MM cells to hijack R-spondins produced by (pre)osteoblasts in the BM niche, resulting in Wnt (co)receptor stabilization and a dramatically increased sensitivity to auto- and paracrine Wnts. Our study identifies aberrant R-spondin/LGR4 signaling with consequent deregulation of Wnt (co)receptor turnover as a driver of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM cells. These results advocate targeting of the LGR4/R-spondin interaction as a therapeutic strategy in MM. PMID:28028233

  5. Aberrantly expressed LGR4 empowers Wnt signaling in multiple myeloma by hijacking osteoblast-derived R-spondins.

    PubMed

    van Andel, Harmen; Ren, Zemin; Koopmans, Iris; Joosten, Sander P J; Kocemba, Kinga A; de Lau, Wim; Kersten, Marie José; de Bruin, Alexander M; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Clevers, Hans; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T

    2017-01-10

    The unrestrained growth of tumor cells is generally attributed to mutations in essential growth control genes, but tumor cells are also affected by, or even addicted to, signals from the microenvironment. As therapeutic targets, these extrinsic signals may be equally significant as mutated oncogenes. In multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, most tumors display hallmarks of active Wnt signaling but lack activating Wnt-pathway mutations, suggesting activation by autocrine Wnt ligands and/or paracrine Wnts emanating from the bone marrow (BM) niche. Here, we report a pivotal role for the R-spondin/leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (LGR4) axis in driving aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM. We show that LGR4 is expressed by MM plasma cells, but not by normal plasma cells or B cells. This aberrant LGR4 expression is driven by IL-6/STAT3 signaling and allows MM cells to hijack R-spondins produced by (pre)osteoblasts in the BM niche, resulting in Wnt (co)receptor stabilization and a dramatically increased sensitivity to auto- and paracrine Wnts. Our study identifies aberrant R-spondin/LGR4 signaling with consequent deregulation of Wnt (co)receptor turnover as a driver of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MM cells. These results advocate targeting of the LGR4/R-spondin interaction as a therapeutic strategy in MM.

  6. Tumor-associated macrophages infiltrate plasmacytomas and can serve as cell carriers for oncolytic measles virotherapy of disseminated myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kah-Whye; Dogan, Ahmet; Vrana, Julie; Liu, Chunsheng; Ong, Hooi T.; Kumar, Shaji; Dispenzieri, Angela; Dietz, Allan B.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    In multiple myeloma, some of the neoplastic plasma cells are diffusely dispersed among the normal bone marrow cells (bone marrow resident), whereas others are located in discrete, well-vascularized solid tumors (plasmacytomas) that may originate in bone or soft tissue. Interactions between bone marrow-resident myeloma cells and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are important determinants of myeloma pathogenesis. However, little is known of the factors sustaining myeloma growth and cell viability at the centers of expanding plasmacytomas, where there are no BMSCs. Histologic sections of 22 plasmacytomas from myeloma patients were examined after immunostaining. Abundant CD68+, CD163+, S100-negative macrophage infiltrates were identified in all tumors, accompanied by scattered collections of CD3+ T lymphocytes. The CD68+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) accounted for 2– 12% of nucleated cells and were evenly distributed through the parenchyma. The TAM generally had dendritic morphology, and each dendrite was in close contact with multiple plasma cells. In some cases, the TAM were strikingly clustered around CD34+ blood vessels. To determine whether cells of the monocytic lineage might be exploitable as carriers for delivery of therapeutic agents to plasmacytomas, primary human CD14+ cells were infected with oncolytic measles virus and administered intravenously to mice bearing KAS6/1 human myeloma xenografts. The cell carriers localized to KAS6/1 tumors, where they transferred MV infection to myeloma cells and prolonged the survival of mice bearing disseminated human myeloma disease. Thus, TAM are a universal stromal component of the plasmacytomas of myeloma patients and may offer a promising new target for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:19507209

  7. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myeloma: When and in Whom Does It Work.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H

    2017-03-11

    The growing list of available therapies for patients with multiple myeloma has resulted in tremendously high response rates and prolonged survival. However, the cure remains elusive. A continued effort at developing strategies to utilize all available treatment modalities in the most effective manner is needed. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is a robust platform, associated with high response rates, and provides a unique foundation on which immune therapies and novel agents can be employed to improve clinical outcomes. Patients with high-risk myeloma and those relapsing after novel agent-based therapies or early after an autologous HCT should be considered for allo-HCT, ideally in a clinical trial setting. Results from several ongoing studies are expected to provide important information that will help determine the place of allo-HCT in the myeloma treatment algorithm.

  8. Input of DNA microarrays to identify novel mechanisms in multiple myeloma biology and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Mahtouk, Karène; Hose, Dirk; De Vos, John; Moreaux, Jérôme; Jourdan, Michel; Rossi, Jean François; Rème, Thierry; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Klein, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell neoplasia characterized by the proliferation of a clone of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. We review here the input of gene expression profiling (GEP) of myeloma cells and of their tumor microenvironment to develop new tumor classifiers, to better understand the biology of myeloma cells, to identify some mechanisms of drug sensitivity and resistance, to identify new myeloma growth factors, and to depict the complex interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment. We discuss how these findings may improve the clinical outcome of this still incurable disease. PMID:18094409

  9. C3 glomerulopathy associated to multiple myeloma successfully treated by autologous stem cell transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hamzi, M. A.; Zniber, A.; Badaoui, G. E.; Mahtat, E.; Alhamany, Z.; Bayahia, R.; Ouzeddoun, N.

    2017-01-01

    A 32-year-old male presented with advanced renal failure and nephrotic proteinuria due to lambda light chain multiple myeloma. Renal biopsy showed a proliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits. Renal recovery was obtained after chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. We review previously described cases of C3 glomerulopathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:28356669

  10. Multiple myeloma cells' capacity to decompose H2O2 determines lenalidomide sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Sinto; Zhu, Yuan X; Braggio, Esteban; Shi, Chang-Xin; Panchabhai, Sonali C; Van Wier, Scott A; Ahmann, Greg J; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Stewart, A Keith; Fonseca, Rafael

    2017-02-23

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiDs) with clinical efficacy in multiple myeloma (MM) and other late B-cell neoplasms. Although cereblon (CRBN) is an essential requirement for IMiD action, the complete molecular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for lenalidomide-mediated sensitivity or resistance remain unknown. Here, we report that IMiDs work primarily via inhibition of peroxidase-mediated intracellular H2O2 decomposition in MM cells. MM cells with lower H2O2-decomposition capacity were more vulnerable to lenalidomide-induced H2O2 accumulation and associated cytotoxicity. CRBN-dependent degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 was a consequence of H2O2-mediated oxidative stress. Lenalidomide increased intracellular H2O2 levels by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in cells expressing CRBN, causing accumulation of immunoglobulin light-chain dimers, significantly increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress and inducing cytotoxicity by activation of BH3-only protein Bim in MM. Other direct inhibitors of TrxR and thioredoxin (Trx) caused similar cytotoxicity, but in a CRBN-independent fashion. Our findings could help identify patients most likely to benefit from IMiDs and suggest direct TrxR or Trx inhibitors for MM therapy.

  11. Increased effect of IMiDs by addition of cytokine-induced killer cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bullok, Katharina F; Sippel, Christoph; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-12-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide, represent the basic principle of multiple myeloma treatment. However, the development of resistance is a limiting factor. Over the last years, the efficient application of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells has been reported as an alternative strategy to treat hematological neoplasms. In this study, we tested for a potential synergistic effect by combining the IMiDs thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide with CIK cells in different myeloma cell lines in vitro. Myeloma cells tested with CIK cells were significantly reduced. In the combination, myeloma cells were significantly reduced compared with cells only tested with IMiDs but not to the cells tested with CIK cells. Otherwise, the number of CIK cells was significantly reduced when treated with IMiDs. Because IMiDs are active in patients with myeloma, these results lead to the expectation that combination of IMiDs and CIK cells achieve better results in the treatment of multiple myeloma compared with the single use of IMiDs. Therefore, further examinations in an in vivo setting are necessary to have a closer look on the cellular interactions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  13. Concise review: Defining and targeting myeloma stem cell-like cells.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masahiro; Harada, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2014-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite recent advances in the treatment of MM. Although the idea of MM cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been proposed for the drug resistance in MM, MM CSCs have not been properly defined yet. Besides clonotypic B cells, phenotypically distinct MM plasma cell fractions have been demonstrated to possess a clonogenic capacity, leading to long-lasting controversies regarding the cells of origin in MM or MM-initiating cells. However, MM CSCs may not be a static population and survive as phenotypically and functionally different cell types via the transition between stem-like and non-stem-like states in local microenvironments, as observed in other types of cancers. Targeting MM CSCs is clinically relevant, and different approaches have been suggested to target molecular, metabolic and epigenetic signatures, and the self-renewal signaling characteristic of MM CSC-like cells.

  14. Prognostic impact of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma: implications for plasma cell leukaemia definition.

    PubMed

    Granell, Miquel; Calvo, Xavier; Garcia-Guiñón, Antoni; Escoda, Lourdes; Abella, Eugènia; Martínez, Clara M; Teixidó, Montserrat; Gimenez, Maria Teresa; Senín, Alicia; Sanz, Patricia; Campoy, Desirée; Vicent, Ana; Arenillas, Leonor; Rosiñol, Laura; Sierra, Jorge; Blade, Joan; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos

    2017-03-02

    The presence of circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma is considered a marker for highly proliferative disease. In the present study, the impact of circulating plasma cells assessed by cytology on survival of patients with multiple myeloma was analysed. Wright-Giemsa stained peripheral blood smears of 482 patients with newly diagnosed myeloma or plasma cell leukaemia were reviewed and patients were classified in four categories according to the percentage of circulating plasma cells: 0%, 1-4%, 5-20% and plasma cell leukemia with the following frequencies: 382 (79.2%), 83 (17.2%), 12 (2.5%) and 5 (1.0%) respectively. Median overall survival according to the circulating plasma cells group was 47, 50, 6 and 14 months, respectively. At multivariate analysis, presence of 5 to 20% circulating plasma cells was associated with a worse overall survival (relative risk 4.9, 95%CI 2.6-9.3) independently of age, creatinine, Durie-Salmon and international stage. Patients with ≥5% circulating plasma cells had lower platelet counts (median 86x109/L vs. 214x109/L, p<0.0001) and higher bone marrow plasma cells (median 53% vs. 36%, p=0.004). The presence of ≥5% circulating plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma has similar adverse prognostic impact as plasma cell leukemia.

  15. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Multiple Myeloma: Pre-Clinical Research and Translational Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Gullà, Annamaria; Correale, Pierpaolo; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cells have been reported to play an important role in tumor-progression mainly because of their capability to promote immune-escape, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Among them, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been recently identified as immature myeloid cells, induced by tumor-associated inflammation, able to impair both innate and adaptive immunity. While murine MDSCs are usually identified by the expression of CD11b and Gr1, human MDSCs represent a more heterogeneous population characterized by the expression of CD33 and CD11b, low or no HLA-DR, and variable CD14 and CD15. In particular, the last two may alternatively identify monocyte-like or granulocyte-like MDSC subsets with different immunosuppressive properties. Recently, a substantial increase of MDSCs has been found in peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients with a role in disease progression and/or drug resistance. Pre-clinical models recapitulating the complexity of the MM-related BM microenvironment (BMM) are major tools for the study of the interactions between MM cells and cells of the BMM (including MDSCs) and for the development of new agents targeting MM-associated immune-suppressive cells. This review will focus on current strategies for human MDSCs generation and investigation of their immunosuppressive function in vitro and in vivo, taking into account the relevant relationship occurring within the MM–BMM. We will then provide trends in MDSC-associated research and suggest potential application for the treatment of MM. PMID:25538892

  16. PGC-1α integrates glucose metabolism and angiogenesis in multiple myeloma cells by regulating VEGF and GLUT-4.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dedong; Zhou, Hao; Zhao, Jikai; Jin, Lu; Yu, Wen; Yan, Han; Hu, Yu; Guo, Tao

    2014-03-01

    Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a key coactivator in the regulation of gene transcriptional activity in normal tissues. However, it is not clear whether it is involved in the angiogenesis and metabolism of multiple myeloma (MM). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of PGC-1α in MM. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to inhibit PGC-1α expression in RPMI-8226 cells. An endothelial cell migration assay was performed using transwell chambers and the expression of PGC-1α, estrogen-related receptor-α (ERR-α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) was tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein expression of PGC-1α, ERR-α and GLUT-4 was assayed by western blot analysis. Lastly, RPMI-8226 cell proliferation was evaluated using CCK-8 assay. VEGF and GLUT-4 mRNA levels were decreased in cells treated with siRNA targeting PGC-1α, as was the level of GLUT-4 protein. Endothelial cell migration was significantly reduced when these cells were cultured with culture medium from RPMI-8226 cells treated with siPGC-1α. The proliferation rates at 24 and 48 h were suppressed by PGC-1α inhibition. Our results showed that inhibition of PGC-1α suppresses cell proliferation probably by downregulation of VEGF and GLUT-4. The present study suggests that PGC-1α integrates angiogenesis and glucose metabolism in myeloma through regulation of VEGF and GLUT-4.

  17. Overexpression of KIR inhibitory ligands (HLA-I) determines that immunosurveillance of myeloma depends on diverse and strong NK cell licensing.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, María V; Periago, Adela; Legaz, Isabel; Gimeno, Lourdes; Mrowiec, Anna; Montes-Barqueros, Natividad R; Campillo, José A; Bolarin, José M; Bernardo, María V; López-Álvarez, María R; González, Consuelo; García-Garay, María C; Muro, Manuel; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Fuster, Jose L; García-Alonso, Ana M; Moraleda, José M; Álvarez-Lopez, María R; Minguela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Missing self recognition makes cancer sensitive to natural killer cell (NKc) reactivity. However, this model disregards the NKc licensing effect, which highly increases NKc reactivity through interactions of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIR) with their cognate HLA-I ligands. The influence of iKIR/HLA-ligand (HLA-C1/C2) licensing interactions on the susceptibility to and progression of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasias was evaluated in 164 Caucasian patients and 286 controls. Compared to controls, myeloma accumulates KIR2DL1(-)L2(+)L3(-) genotypes (2.8% vs. 13.2%, p < 0.01, OR = 5.29) and less diverse peripheral repertoires of NKc clones. Less diverse and weaker-affinity repertoires of iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions increased myeloma susceptibility. Thus, the complete absence of conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions (KIR2DL1(-)L2(+)L3(-)/C2C2, 2.56% vs. 0.35%; p < 0.05; OR = 15.014), single-KIR2DL3(+)/C1(+) (20.51% vs. 10.84%; p < 0.05; OR = 2.795) and single-KIR2DL2(+)/C1(+) (12.82% vs. 4.9%; p < 0.01; OR = 5.18) interactions were over-represented in myeloma, compared to controls. Additionally, KIR2DL1(-)L2(+)L3(-) (20% vs. 83%, p < 0.00001) as well as KIR3DL1(-) (23% vs. 82%, p < 0.00001) genotypes had a dramatic negative impact on the 3-y progression-free survival (PFS), particularly in patients with low-tumor burden. Remarkably, myeloma-PCs, compared to K562 and other hematological cancers, showed substantial over-expression of HLA-I ("increasing-self" instead of missing-self), including HLA-C, and mild expression of ligands for NKc activating receptors (aRec) CD112, CD155, ULBP-1 and MICA/B, which apparently renders myeloma-PCs susceptible to lysis mainly by licensed NKc. KIR2DL1(-)L2(+)L3(-)/C2C2 patients (with no conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions) lyse K562 but barely lyse myeloma-PCs (4% vs. 15%; p < 0.05, compared to controls). These results support a model where immunosurveillance of no

  18. Overexpression of KIR inhibitory ligands (HLA-I) determines that immunosurveillance of myeloma depends on diverse and strong NK cell licensing

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sánchez, María V.; Periago, Adela; Legaz, Isabel; Gimeno, Lourdes; Mrowiec, Anna; Montes-Barqueros, Natividad R.; Campillo, José A.; Bolarin, José M.; Bernardo, María V.; López-Álvarez, María R.; González, Consuelo; García-Garay, María C.; Muro, Manuel; Cabañas-Perianes, Valentin; Fuster, Jose L.; García-Alonso, Ana M.; Moraleda, José M.; Álvarez-Lopez, María R.; Minguela, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Missing self recognition makes cancer sensitive to natural killer cell (NKc) reactivity. However, this model disregards the NKc licensing effect, which highly increases NKc reactivity through interactions of inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (iKIR) with their cognate HLA-I ligands. The influence of iKIR/HLA-ligand (HLA-C1/C2) licensing interactions on the susceptibility to and progression of plasma cell (PC) dyscrasias was evaluated in 164 Caucasian patients and 286 controls. Compared to controls, myeloma accumulates KIR2DL1−L2+L3− genotypes (2.8% vs. 13.2%, p < 0.01, OR = 5.29) and less diverse peripheral repertoires of NKc clones. Less diverse and weaker-affinity repertoires of iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions increased myeloma susceptibility. Thus, the complete absence of conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions (KIR2DL1−L2+L3−/C2C2, 2.56% vs. 0.35%; p < 0.05; OR = 15.014), single-KIR2DL3+/C1+ (20.51% vs. 10.84%; p < 0.05; OR = 2.795) and single-KIR2DL2+/C1+ (12.82% vs. 4.9%; p < 0.01; OR = 5.18) interactions were over-represented in myeloma, compared to controls. Additionally, KIR2DL1−L2+L3− (20% vs. 83%, p < 0.00001) as well as KIR3DL1− (23% vs. 82%, p < 0.00001) genotypes had a dramatic negative impact on the 3-y progression-free survival (PFS), particularly in patients with low-tumor burden. Remarkably, myeloma-PCs, compared to K562 and other hematological cancers, showed substantial over-expression of HLA-I (“increasing-self” instead of missing-self), including HLA-C, and mild expression of ligands for NKc activating receptors (aRec) CD112, CD155, ULBP-1 and MICA/B, which apparently renders myeloma-PCs susceptible to lysis mainly by licensed NKc. KIR2DL1−L2+L3−/C2C2 patients (with no conventional iKIR2D/HLA-C licensing interactions) lyse K562 but barely lyse myeloma-PCs (4% vs. 15%; p < 0.05, compared to controls). These results support a model where immunosurveillance of no

  19. Insulin-like growth factor I induces migration and invasion of human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Ya-Wei; Yao, Lei; Tosato, Giovanna; Rudikoff, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable form of cancer characterized by accumulation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. During the course of this disease, tumor cells cross endothelial barriers and home to the bone marrow. In latter stages, myeloma cells extravasate through blood vessels and may seed a variety of organs. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is one of several growth factors shown to promote the growth of MM cells. In the current study, we have assessed the ability of IGF-I to serve additionally as a chemotactic factor affecting the mobility and invasive properties of these cells. Results indicate that IGF-I promotes transmigration through vascular endothelial cells and bone marrow stromal cell lines. Analysis of endogenous signaling pathways revealed that protein kinase D/protein kinase Cmicro (PKD/PKCmicro) and RhoA were both activated in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)-dependent manner. Inhibition of PI-3K, PKCs, or Rho-associated kinase by pharmacologic inhibitors abrogated migration, whereas mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Akt, and p70S6 kinase inhibitors had no effect. These results suggest that IGF-I promotes myeloma cell migration by activation of PI-3K/PKCmicro and PI-3K/RhoA pathways independent of Akt. The identification of IGF-I as both a proliferative and migratory factor provides a rational basis for the development of targeted therapeutic strategies directed at IGF-I in the treatment of MM.

  20. Gene-expression signature of benign monoclonal gammopathy evident in multiple myeloma is linked to good prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Fenghuang; Barlogie, Bart; Arzoumanian, Varant; Huang, Yongsheng; Williams, David R.; Hollmig, Klaus; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; Tricot, Guido; van Rhee, Frits; Zangari, Maurizio; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Shaughnessy, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) can progress to multiple myeloma (MM). Although these diseases share many of the same genetic features, it is still unclear whether global gene-expression profiling might identify prior genomic signatures that distinguish them. Through significance analysis of microarrays, 52 genes involved in important pathways related to cancer were differentially expressed in the plasma cells of healthy subjects (normal plasma-cell [NPC]; n = 22) and patients with stringently defined MGUS/smoldering MM (n = 24) and symptomatic MM (n = 351) (P < .001). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 351 patients with MM, 44 with MGUS (24 + 20), and 16 with MM from MGUS created 2 major cluster branches, one containing 82% of the MGUS patients and the other containing 28% of the MM patients, termed MGUS-like MM (MGUS-L MM). Using the same clustering approach on an independent cohort of 214 patients with MM, 27% were found to be MGUS-L. This molecular signature, despite its association with a lower incidence of complete remission (P = .006), was associated with low-risk clinical and molecular features and superior survival (P < .01). The MGUS-L signature was also seen in plasma cells from 15 of 20 patients surviving more than 10 years after autotransplantation. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of plasma-cell dyscrasias. PMID:17023574

  1. Towards the molecular characterization of the stable producer phenotype of recombinant antibody-producing NS0 myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Y; Rojas, L; Hinojosa, L; González, I; Aguiar, D; de la Luz, K; Castillo, A; Pérez, R

    2011-08-01

    The loss of heterologous protein expression is one of the major problems faced by industrial cell line developers and has been reported by several authors. Therefore, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the generation of stable and high producer cell lines is a critical issue, especially for those processes based on long term continuous cultures. We characterized two recombinant NS0 myeloma cell lines expressing Nimotuzumab, a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody. The hR3/H7 clone is a stable producer obtained from the unstable hR3/t16 clone. The unstable clone was characterized by a bimodal distribution of intracellular immunoglobulin staining using flow cytometry. Loss of antibody production was due to the emergence of a non-producer cell subpopulation that increased with cell generation number. Immunoglobulin heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) ratio (HC/LC) was lower for the unstable phenotype. Proteomic maps using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) were obtained for both clones, at initial cell culture time and after 40 generations. Fifteen proteins potentially associated with the phenomenon of production stability were identified. The hR3/H7 stable clone showed an up-regulated expression pattern for most of these proteins. The regulation of recombinant antibody production by the host NS0 myeloma cell line most likely involves simultaneously cellular processes such as DNA transcription, mRNA processing, protein synthesis and folding, vesicular transport, glycolysis and energy production, according to the proteins identified in the present proteomic study.

  2. What Is Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple myeloma is a cancer formed by malignant plasma cells. Normal plasma cells are found in the bone marrow and ... to an infection, they mature and change into plasma cells. Plasma cells make the antibodies (also called ...

  3. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Mark; Slade, Michael; Westervelt, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM); thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM. PMID:28316846

  4. Protein kinase CK2 inhibition down modulates the NF-κB and STAT3 survival pathways, enhances the cellular proteotoxic stress and synergistically boosts the cytotoxic effect of bortezomib on multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Manni, Sabrina; Brancalion, Alessandra; Mandato, Elisa; Tubi, Laura Quotti; Colpo, Anna; Pizzi, Marco; Cappellesso, Rocco; Zaffino, Fortunato; Di Maggio, Speranza Antonia; Cabrelle, Anna; Marino, Filippo; Zambello, Renato; Trentin, Livio; Adami, Fausto; Gurrieri, Carmela; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Piazza, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    CK2 is a pivotal pro-survival protein kinase in multiple myeloma that may likely impinge on bortezomib-regulated cellular pathways. In the present study, we investigated CK2 expression in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, two bortezomib-responsive B cell tumors, as well as its involvement in bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and signaling cascades potentially mediating bortezomib resistance. In both tumors, CK2 expression correlated with that of its activated targets NF-κB and STAT3 transcription factors. Bortezomib-induced proliferation arrest and apoptosis were significantly amplified by the simultaneous inhibition of CK2 with two inhibitors (CX-4945 and K27) in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma cell lines, in a model of multiple myeloma bone marrow microenvironment and in cells isolated from patients. CK2 inhibition empowered bortezomib-triggered mitochondrial-dependent cell death. Phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 on Ser529 (a CK2 target site) and rise of the levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1α were markedly reduced upon CK2 inhibition, as were STAT3 phospho Ser727 levels. On the contrary, CK2 inhibition increased phospho Ser51 eIF2α levels and enhanced the bortezomib-dependent accumulation of poly-ubiquitylated proteins and of the proteotoxic stress-associated chaperone Hsp70. Our data suggest that CK2 over expression in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma cells might sustain survival signaling cascades and can antagonize bortezomib-induced apoptosis at different levels. CK2 inhibitors could be useful in bortezomib-based combination therapies.

  5. Protein Kinase CK2 Inhibition Down Modulates the NF-κB and STAT3 Survival Pathways, Enhances the Cellular Proteotoxic Stress and Synergistically Boosts the Cytotoxic Effect of Bortezomib on Multiple Myeloma and Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manni, Sabrina; Brancalion, Alessandra; Mandato, Elisa; Tubi, Laura Quotti; Colpo, Anna; Pizzi, Marco; Cappellesso, Rocco; Zaffino, Fortunato; Di Maggio, Speranza Antonia; Cabrelle, Anna; Marino, Filippo; Zambello, Renato; Trentin, Livio; Adami, Fausto; Gurrieri, Carmela; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Piazza, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    CK2 is a pivotal pro-survival protein kinase in multiple myeloma that may likely impinge on bortezomib-regulated cellular pathways. In the present study, we investigated CK2 expression in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, two bortezomib-responsive B cell tumors, as well as its involvement in bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and signaling cascades potentially mediating bortezomib resistance. In both tumors, CK2 expression correlated with that of its activated targets NF-κB and STAT3 transcription factors. Bortezomib-induced proliferation arrest and apoptosis were significantly amplified by the simultaneous inhibition of CK2 with two inhibitors (CX-4945 and K27) in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma cell lines, in a model of multiple myeloma bone marrow microenvironment and in cells isolated from patients. CK2 inhibition empowered bortezomib-triggered mitochondrial-dependent cell death. Phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 on Ser529 (a CK2 target site) and rise of the levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1α were markedly reduced upon CK2 inhibition, as were STAT3 phospho Ser727 levels. On the contrary, CK2 inhibition increased phospho Ser51 eIF2α levels and enhanced the bortezomib-dependent accumulation of poly-ubiquitylated proteins and of the proteotoxic stress-associated chaperone Hsp70. Our data suggest that CK2 over expression in multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma cells might sustain survival signaling cascades and can antagonize bortezomib-induced apoptosis at different levels. CK2 inhibitors could be useful in bortezomib-based combination therapies. PMID:24086494

  6. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ballester, O F; Tummala, R; Janssen, W E; Fields, K K; Hiemenz, J W; Goldstein, S C; Perkins, J B; Sullivan, D M; Rosen, R; Sackstein, R; Zorsky, P; Saez, R; Elfenbein, G J

    1997-10-01

    Six patients with multiple myeloma and chronic renal insufficiency (serum creatinine >3.0 mg/dl), including four on dialysis, received high-dose busulfan and cyclophosphamide (BUCY) followed by autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cells were collected after priming with cyclophosphamide, etoposide and G-CSF. Patterns of engraftment and toxicities were not apparently different from those seen in myeloma patients with normal renal function. There was one toxicity-related death, resulting from a massive spontaneous subdural hematoma. One patient died of disease progression 6 months after transplant, while the remaining four patients are alive and free of myeloma progression 6 to 39 months after high-dose therapy. Two of these patients have remained in complete remission for 28 and 39 months. Our experience suggests that high-dose therapy with BUCY and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue is feasible in patients with multiple myeloma and renal failure.

  7. GCS-100, a novel galectin-3 antagonist, modulates MCL-1, NOXA, and cell cycle to induce myeloma cell death

    PubMed Central

    Streetly, Matthew J.; Maharaj, Lenushka; Joel, Simon; Schey, Steve A.; Gribben, John G.

    2010-01-01

    GCS-100 is a galectin-3 antagonist with an acceptable human safety profile that has been demonstrated to have an antimyeloma effect in the context of bortezomib resistance. In the present study, the mechanisms of action of GCS-100 are elucidated in myeloma cell lines and primary tumor cells. GCS-100 induced inhibition of proliferation, accumulation of cells in sub-G1 and G1 phases, and apoptosis with activation of both caspase-8 and -9 pathways. Dose- and time-dependent decreases in MCL-1 and BCL-XL levels also occurred, accompanied by a rapid induction of NOXA protein, whereas BCL-2, BAX, BAK, BIM, BAD, BID, and PUMA remained unchanged. The cell-cycle inhibitor p21Cip1 was up-regulated by GCS-100, whereas the procycling proteins CYCLIN E2, CYCLIN D2, and CDK6 were all reduced. Reduction in signal transduction was associated with lower levels of activated IκBα, IκB kinase, and AKT as well as lack of IκBα and AKT activation after appropriate cytokine stimulation (insulin-like growth factor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α). Primary myeloma cells showed a direct reduction in proliferation and viability. These data demonstrate that the novel therapeutic molecule, GCS-100, is a potent modifier of myeloma cell biology targeting apoptosis, cell cycle, and intracellular signaling and has potential for myeloma therapy. PMID:20190189

  8. Lenalidomide causes selective degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Krönke, Jan; Udeshi, Namrata D; Narla, Anupama; Grauman, Peter; Hurst, Slater N; McConkey, Marie; Svinkina, Tanya; Heckl, Dirk; Comer, Eamon; Li, Xiaoyu; Ciarlo, Christie; Hartman, Emily; Munshi, Nikhil; Schenone, Monica; Schreiber, Stuart L; Carr, Steven A; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-01-17

    Lenalidomide is a drug with clinical efficacy in multiple myeloma and other B cell neoplasms, but its mechanism of action is unknown. Using quantitative proteomics, we found that lenalidomide causes selective ubiquitination and degradation of two lymphoid transcription factors, IKZF1 and IKZF3, by the CRBN-CRL4 ubiquitin ligase. IKZF1 and IKZF3 are essential transcription factors in multiple myeloma. A single amino acid substitution of IKZF3 conferred resistance to lenalidomide-induced degradation and rescued lenalidomide-induced inhibition of cell growth. Similarly, we found that lenalidomide-induced interleukin-2 production in T cells is due to depletion of IKZF1 and IKZF3. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism of action for a therapeutic agent: alteration of the activity of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, leading to selective degradation of specific targets.

  9. Smenospongidine suppresses the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells by promoting CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein-mediated β-catenin degradation.

    PubMed

    Park, Seoyoung; Hwang, In Hyun; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Young-Hwa; Song, Gyu-Young; Na, MinKyun; Oh, Sangtaek

    2017-03-08

    Abnormal up-regulation of β-catenin expression is associated with the development and progression of multiple myeloma and is thus a potential therapeutic target. Here, we screened cell-based natural compounds and identified smenospongidine, a metabolite isolated from a marine sponge, as an antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Smenospongidine promoted the degradation of intracellular β-catenin that accumulated via Wnt3a or 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Consistently, smenospongidine down-regulated β-catenin expression and repressed the levels of β-catenin/T cell factor-dependent genes such as axin2, c-myc, and cyclin D1 in RPMI-8226 multiple myeloma cells. Smenospongidine suppressed proliferation and significantly induced apoptosis in RPMI-8266 cells. In addition, smenospongidine-induced β-catenin degradation was mediated by up-regulating CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). These findings indicate that smenospongidine exerts its anti-proliferative activity by blocking the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma.

  10. Importin β1 mediates nuclear factor-κB signal transduction into the nuclei of myeloma cells and affects their proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenqing; Li, Rong; He, Jie; Du, Juan; Hou, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that is currently incurable. The activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling plays a crucial role in the immortalisation of MM cells. As the most important transcription factor of the canonical NF-κB pathway, the p50/p65 heterodimer requires transportation into the nucleus for its successful signal transduction. Importin β1 is the key transport receptor that mediates p50/p65 nuclear import. Currently, it remains unclear whether the regulation of importin β1 function affects the biological behaviour of MM cells. In the present study, we investigated the changes in p65 translocation and the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells after treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an importin β1 inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. We found importin β1 over-expression and the excessive nuclear transport of p65 in myeloma cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and Western blot analysis results indicated that p65 nuclear transport was blocked after inhibiting importin β1 expression with siRNA and the importin β1-specific inhibitor importazole (IPZ). Importantly, electronic mobility shift assay results also verified that p65 nuclear transport was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the expression of the NF-κB signalling target genes involved in MM cell apoptosis, such as BCL-2, c-IAP1 and XIAP, were markedly reduced, as demonstrated by the RT-PCR results. Furthermore, the proliferation of MM cells was inhibited, as demonstrated by MTT assay results, and the MM cell apoptosis rate was higher, as demonstrated by the annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining assay results. Additionally, the percentage of S phase cells in the myeloma cell lines treated with IPZ was dramatically reduced. In conclusion, our results clearly show that importin β1 mediates the translocation of NF-κB into the nuclei of myeloma cells, thereby regulating proliferation and blocking apoptosis, which

  11. Overcoming inherent resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells by targeting pathways integral to the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Mithraprabhu, S; Khong, T; Spencer, A

    2014-03-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are novel chemotherapeutics undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for the potential treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although HDACi have demonstrable synergy when combined with proteasome inhibitors (PIs), recent evidence indicates that combination of HDACi and PI is beneficial only in a subset of patients with advanced MM, clearly indicating that other rational combinations should be explored. In this context we hypothesized that understanding the molecular signature associated with inherent resistance to HDACi would provide a basis for the identification of therapeutic combinations with improved clinical efficacy. Using human myeloma cell lines (HMCL) categorized as sensitive, intermediate or resistant to HDACi, gene expression profiling (GEP) and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed to determine if a genetic signature associated with inherent resistance to HDACi-resistance could be identified. Correlation of GEP to increasing or decreasing sensitivity to HDACi indicated a unique 35-gene signature that was significantly enriched for two pathways - regulation of actin cytoskeleton and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum. When HMCL and primary MM samples were treated with a combination of HDACi and agents targeting the signaling pathways integral to the actin cytoskeleton, synergistic cell death was observed in all instances, thus providing a rationale for combining these agents with HDACi for the treatment of MM to overcome resistance. This report validates a molecular approach for the identification of HDACi partner drugs and provides an experimental framework for the identification of novel therapeutic combinations for anti-MM treatment.

  12. Multiple Myeloma Relapse Following Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Presenting With Diffuse Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sumrall, Bradley; Diethelm, Lisa; Brown, Archie

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a common disease, accounting for about 10% of hematologic malignancies in the United States. For eligible patients, the treatment of choice includes induction therapy (usually involving newer biologic agents) followed by autologous stem cell transplant; however, this treatment is generally not considered curative, and relapses usually occur. However, extramedullary relapse is an uncommon presentation, and relapses that involve the lungs have only rarely been described. Case Report We report the case of a patient who underwent an autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma and subsequently relapsed with diffuse pulmonary nodules. She then had a rapid clinical and serologic response following initiation of salvage therapy. Conclusion This case is remarkable for both the radiographic appearance of the pulmonary involvement, as well as the rapid resolution of these findings after 2 cycles of treatment with bortezomib, dexamethasone, and lenalidomide. PMID:24358007

  13. Highly Expressed Integrin-α8 Induces Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition-Like Features in Multiple Myeloma with Early Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jiyeon; Koh, Youngil; Park, Hyejoo; Kim, Dae Yoon; Kim, Dong Chan; Byun, Ja Min; Lee, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent groundbreaking advances in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment, most MM patients ultimately experience relapse, and the relapse biology is not entirely understood. To define altered gene expression in MM relapse, gene expression profiles were examined and compared among 16 MM patients grouped by 12 months progression-free survival (PFS) after autologous stem cell transplantation. To maximize the difference between prognostic groups, patients at each end of the PFS spectrum (the four with the shortest PFS and four with the longest PFS) were chosen for additional analyses. We discovered that integrin-α8 (ITGA8) is highly expressed in MM patients with early relapse. The integrin family is well known to be involved in MM progression; however, the role of integrin-α8 is largely unknown. We functionally overexpressed integrin-α8 in MM cell lines, and surprisingly, stemness features including HIF1α, VEGF, OCT4, and Nanog, as well as epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Slug, Snail and CXCR4, were induced. These, consequently, enhanced migration and invasion abilities, which are crucial to MM pathogenesis. Moreover, the gain of integrin-α8 expression mediated drug resistance against melphalan and bortezomib, which are the main therapeutic agents in MM. The cBioPortal genomic database revealed that ITGA8 have significant tendency to co-occur with PDGFRA and PDGFRB and their mRNA expression were up-regulated in ITGA8 overexpressed MM cells. In summary, integrin-α8, which was up-regulated in MM of early relapse, mediates EMT-like phenotype, enhancing migration and invasion; therefore, it could serve as a potential marker of MM relapse and be a new therapeutic target. PMID:28008160

  14. The effect of S1P receptor signaling pathway on the survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Di; Li, Yingchun; Li, Jia; Shi, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghui; Zhong, Yuan; Wang, Huihan; Liao, Aijun

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable by conventional chemotherapy. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling has been recently demonstrated to have critical roles in cell survival and drug resistance in a number of hematological malignancies. To dissect the roles of S1P receptor pathway in MM, we systematically examined cell viability and protein expression associated with cell survival and drug resistance in MM cell lines upon treatment with either pathway activator (S1P) or inhibitor (FTY720). Our results reveal that FTY720 inhibits cell proliferation by downregulating expression of target genes, while S1P has an opposite effect. Knocking down of S1P receptor S1P5R results in a reduction of cell survival-related gene expression; however, it does not have impacts on expression of drug resistance genes. These results suggest that S1P signaling plays a role in cell proliferation and drug resistance in MM, and targeting this pathway will provide a new therapeutic direction for MM management.

  15. Stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Humberto; Giralt, Sergio

    2004-07-01

    High-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy supported with autologous stem cell transplantation is now recognized as a valid therapeutic option for patients with multiple myeloma. Results of randomized trials have established autografting as the treatment of choice for patients younger than 65 years, as part of their initial therapy. In this review, the issues of who benefits from transplant, what is the optimal procedure, and whether there is a potential role for allografting are addressed.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA induce apoptosis and enhance drug sensitivity in multiple myeloma cells but not in normal peripheral mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Abdi, J; Garssen, J; Faber, J; Redegeld, F A

    2014-12-01

    The n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been shown to enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in clinical studies in cancer patients and to induce apoptotic tumor cell death in vitro. Until now, EPA and DHA have never been investigated in multiple myeloma (MM). Human myeloma cells (L363, OPM-1, OPM-2 and U266) and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to EPA and DHA, and effects on mitochondrial function and apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, gene expression and drug toxicity were measured. Exposure to EPA and DHA induced apoptosis and increased sensitivity to bortezomib in MM cells. Importantly, they did not affect viability of normal human peripheral mononuclear cells. Messenger RNA expression arrays showed that EPA and DHA modulated genes involved in multiple signaling pathways including nuclear factor (NF) κB, Notch, Hedgehog, oxidative stress and Wnt. EPA and DHA inhibited NFκB activity and induced apoptosis through mitochondrial perturbation and caspase-3 activation. Our study suggests that EPA and DHA induce selective cytotoxic effects in MM and increase sensitivity to bortezomib and calls for further exploration into a potential application of these n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the therapy of MM.

  17. Cardiovascular toxicity and titin cross-reactivity of affinity-enhanced T cells in myeloma and melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Linette, Gerald P.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Maus, Marcela V.; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Levine, Bruce L.; Emery, Lyndsey; Litzky, Leslie; Bagg, Adam; Carreno, Beatriz M.; Cimino, Patrick J.; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn K.; Smethurst, Dominic P.; Gerry, Andrew B.; Pumphrey, Nick J.; Bennett, Alan D.; Brewer, Joanna E.; Dukes, Joseph; Harper, Jane; Tayton-Martin, Helen K.; Jakobsen, Bent K.; Hassan, Namir J.; Kalos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    An obstacle to cancer immunotherapy has been that the affinity of T-cell receptors (TCRs) for antigens expressed in tumors is generally low. We initiated clinical testing of engineered T cells expressing an affinity-enhanced TCR against HLA-A*01–restricted MAGE-A3. Open-label protocols to test the TCRs for patients with myeloma and melanoma were initiated. The first two treated patients developed cardiogenic shock and died within a few days of T-cell infusion, events not predicted by preclinical studies of the high-affinity TCRs. Gross findings at autopsy revealed severe myocardial damage, and histopathological analysis revealed T-cell infiltration. No MAGE-A3 expression was detected in heart autopsy tissues. Robust proliferation of the engineered T cells in vivo was documented in both patients. A beating cardiomyocyte culture generated from induced pluripotent stem cells triggered T-cell killing, which was due to recognition of an unrelated peptide derived from the striated muscle-specific protein titin. These patients demonstrate that TCR-engineered T cells can have serious and not readily predictable off-target and organ-specific toxicities and highlight the need for improved methods to define the specificity of engineered TCRs. PMID:23770775

  18. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Borsi, Enrica; Perrone, Giulia; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Tacchetti, Paola; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Dico, Angela Flores; Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Rocchi, Serena; Cavo, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma.

  19. Genomic analysis of high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    López-Corral, Lucía; Mateos, María Victoria; Corchete, Luis A.; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; de la Rubia, Javier; de Arriba, Felipe; Lahuerta, Juan-José; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2012-01-01

    Smoldering myeloma is an asymptomatic plasma cell dyscrasia with a heterogeneous propensity to progress to active myeloma. In order to investigate the biology of smoldering myeloma patients with high risk of progression, we analyzed the genomic characteristics by FISH, SNP-arrays and gene expression profile of a group of patients with high-risk smoldering myeloma included in a multicenter randomized trial. Chromosomal abnormalities detected by FISH and SNP-arrays at diagnosis were not associated to risk of progression to symptomatic myeloma. However, the overexpression of four SNORD genes (SNORD25, SNORD27, SNORD30 and SNORD31) was correlated with shorter time to progression (P<0.03). When plasma cells from high-risk smoldering patients who progressed to symptomatic myeloma were sequentially analyzed, newly acquired lesions together with an increase in the proportion of plasma cells carrying a given abnormality were observed. These findings suggest that gene expression profiling is a valuable technique to identify smoldering myeloma patients with high risk of progression. (Clinical Trials NCT00443235) PMID:22331267

  20. Potential crosstalk of the interleukin-6-heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism involved in resistance to lenalidomide in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weibing; Ma, Dan; Wang, Ping; Cao, Lu; Lu, Tangsheng; Fang, Qin; Zhao, Jiangyuan; Wang, Jishi

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is one of the most important survival factors in multiple myeloma (MM), and determines the poor prognosis of MM. IL-6 mainly has a paracrine bone marrow stromal cell origin and an autocrine MM cell origin. As an enzyme having cytoprotective effects, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) promotes the growth and drug resistance of various malignant tumors. HO-1 expression levels in bone marrow CD138(+) cells of MM patients were significantly higher than those in healthy donors, and positively correlated with both serum IL-6 and intracellular IL-6 mRNA expression levels. Culture of U266, RPMI8226 and CD138(+) cells with exogenous IL-6 in vitro induced high HO-1 expression levels and allowed them to resist lenalidomide. It is hypothesized that this was probably attributable to IL-6-mediated activation of the Janus kinase 2-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. In contrast, without IL-6 coculture, enhanced HO-1 expression in U266, RPMI8226 and bone marrow CD138(+) cells from MM patients significantly inreased IL-6 mRNA expression levels and facilitated autocrine IL-6 production. The findings were associated with high HO-1 expression-enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Reduced HO-1 expression sensitized MM cells to lenalidomide. Therefore, we postulated that IL-6 in the bone marrow microenvironment of MM patients stimulated high HO-1 expression in MM cells and their resistance to lenalidomide. High HO-1 expression also stimulated autocrine IL-6 production, and exacerbated drug resistance and disease. This study supports the use of HO-1 as a possible marker for both MM prognosis and drug resistance, and as a potential therapeutic target.

  1. International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Statement for the Management, Treatment, and Supportive Care of Patients With Myeloma Not Eligible for Standard Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Larocca, Alessandra; Niesvizky, Ruben; Morgan, Gareth; Landgren, Ola; Hajek, Roman; Einsele, Hermann; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Spencer, Andrew; Stewart, A. Keith; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Lonial, Sagar; Sonneveld, Pieter; Durie, Brian G.M.; Moreau, Philippe; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide an update on recent advances in the management of patients with multiple myeloma who are not eligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature on diagnostic criteria is provided, and treatment options and management of adverse events are summarized. Results Patients with symptomatic disease and organ damage (ie, hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, or bone lesions) require immediate treatment. The International Staging System and chromosomal abnormalities identify high- and standard-risk patients. Proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alkylating agents are the most active agents. The presence of concomitant diseases, frailty, or disability should be assessed and, if present, treated with reduced-dose approaches. Bone disease, renal damage, hematologic toxicities, infections, thromboembolism, and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequent disabling events requiring prompt and active supportive care. Conclusion These recommendations will help clinicians ensure the most appropriate care for patients with myeloma in everyday clinical practice. PMID:24419113

  2. Chemokines CCL2, 3, 14 stimulate macrophage bone marrow homing, proliferation, and polarization in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zheng, Yuhuan; Li, Tianshu; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Bi, Enguang; Yang, Maojie; Reu, Frederic; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2015-09-15

    We previously showed that macrophages (MΦs) infiltrate the bone marrow (BM) of patients with myeloma and may play a role in drug resistance. This study analyzed chemokines expressed by myeloma BM that are responsible for recruiting monocytes to the tumor bed. We found that chemokines CCL3, CCL14, and CCL2 were highly expressed by myeloma and BM cells, and the levels of CCL14 and CCL3 in myeloma BM positively correlated with the percentage of BM-infiltrating MΦs. In vitro, these chemokines were responsible for chemoattracting human monocytes to tumor sites and in vivo for MΦ infiltration into myeloma-bearing BM in the 5TGM1 mouse model. Surprisingly, we also found that these chemokines stimulated MΦ in vitro proliferation induced by myeloma cells and in vivo in a human myeloma xenograft SCID mouse model. The chemokines also activated normal MΦ polarization and differentiation into myeloma-associated MΦs. Western blot analysis revealed that these chemokines promoted growth and survival signaling in MΦs via activating the PI3K/Akt and ERK MAPK pathways and c-myc expression. Thus, this study provides novel insight into the mechanism of MΦ infiltration of BM and also potential targets for improving the efficacy of chemotherapy in myeloma.

  3. CD44v6-targeted T cells mediate potent antitumor effects against acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Casucci, Monica; Nicolis di Robilant, Benedetta; Falcone, Laura; Camisa, Barbara; Norelli, Margherita; Genovese, Pietro; Gentner, Bernhard; Gullotta, Fabiana; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bernardi, Massimo; Marcatti, Magda; Saudemont, Aurore; Bordignon, Claudio; Savoldo, Barbara; Ciceri, Fabio; Naldini, Luigi; Dotti, Gianpietro; Bonini, Chiara; Bondanza, Attilio

    2013-11-14

    Genetically targeted T cells promise to solve the feasibility and efficacy hurdles of adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer. Selecting a target expressed in multiple-tumor types and that is required for tumor growth would widen disease indications and prevent immune escape caused by the emergence of antigen-loss variants. The adhesive receptor CD44 is broadly expressed in hematologic and epithelial tumors, where it contributes to the cancer stem/initiating phenotype. In this study, silencing of its isoform variant 6 (CD44v6) prevented engraftment of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells in immunocompromised mice. Accordingly, T cells targeted to CD44v6 by means of a chimeric antigen receptor containing a CD28 signaling domain mediated potent antitumor effects against primary AML and MM while sparing normal hematopoietic stem cells and CD44v6-expressing keratinocytes. Importantly, in vitro activation with CD3/CD28 beads and interleukin (IL)-7/IL-15 was required for antitumor efficacy in vivo. Finally, coexpressing a suicide gene enabled fast and efficient pharmacologic ablation of CD44v6-targeted T cells and complete rescue from hyperacute xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease modeling early and generalized toxicity. These results warrant the clinical investigation of suicidal CD44v6-targeted T cells in AML and MM.

  4. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  5. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC.

  6. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the fprotein expression in unctions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM. PMID:27754828

  7. Poor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilizers in Multiple Myeloma: a Single Institution Experience.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J.; López-Otero, Avril; Hernandez-Arizpe, Ana; Ramirez-Medina, Aura; Ruiz-Argüelles., Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    In a single institution, in a group of 28 myeloma patients deemed eligible for autologous transplant, stem cell mobilization was attempted using filgrastim: 26 individuals were given 31 autografts employing 1–4 (median three) apheresis sessions, to obtain a target stem cell dose of 1 x 106 CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg of the recipient. The median number of grafted CD34 cells was 7.56 x 106 / Kg of the recipient; the range being 0.92 to 14.8. By defining as poor mobilizers individuals in which a cell collection of < 1 x 106 CD34 viable cells / Kg was obtained, a subset of eight poor mobilizers was identified; in two patients the autograft was aborted because of an extremely poor CD34 +ve cell yield (< 0.2 x 106 CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg of the recipient) after four apheresis sessions. The long-term overall survival of the patients grafted with > 1 x 106 CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg was better (80% at 80 months) than those grafted with < 1 x 106 CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg (67% at 76 months). Methods to improve stem cell mobilization are needed and may result in obtaining better results when autografting multiple myeloma patients. PMID:21415967

  8. Poor hematopoietic stem cell mobilizers in multiple myeloma: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; López-Otero, Avril; Hernandez-Arizpe, Ana; Ramirez-Medina, Aura; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2010-06-21

    In a single institution, in a group of 28 myeloma patients deemed eligible for autologous transplant, stem cell mobilization was attempted using filgrastim: 26 individuals were given 31 autografts employing 1-4 (median three) apheresis sessions, to obtain a target stem cell dose of 1 x 10(6) CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg of the recipient. The median number of grafted CD34 cells was 7.56 x 10(6) / Kg of the recipient; the range being 0.92 to 14.8. By defining as poor mobilizers individuals in which a cell collection of < 1 x 10(6) CD34 viable cells / Kg was obtained, a subset of eight poor mobilizers was identified; in two patients the autograft was aborted because of an extremely poor CD34 +ve cell yield (< 0.2 x 10(6) CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg of the recipient) after four apheresis sessions. The long-term overall survival of the patients grafted with > 1 x 10(6) CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg was better (80% at 80 months) than those grafted with < 1 x 10(6) CD34 +ve viable cells / Kg (67% at 76 months). Methods to improve stem cell mobilization are needed and may result in obtaining better results when autografting multiple myeloma patients.

  9. Cord Blood Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma: A Study from the Multiple Myeloma Working Group of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Koji; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Takashi; Komatsu, Tsunehiko; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Amano, Itsuto; Yamamoto, Go; Watanabe, Kentaro; Ohno, Yuju; Matsue, Kosei; Kouzai, Yasuji; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Ishiyama, Ken; Anzai, Naoyuki; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Sunami, Kazutaka; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2015-07-01

    Cord blood has been investigated as an alternative source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but information about its use for multiple myeloma is limited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cord blood transplantation (CBT) for patients with multiple myeloma. Eighty-six patients with multiple myeloma who underwent a first CBT between 2001 and 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Sixty-two of them had received other types of stem cell transplantation before CBT. The cumulative incidences of neutrophil engraftment at day 50, grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and chronic GVHD were 81.4%, 39.0%, and 19.5%, respectively. The incidence of nonrelapse mortality at 2 years was 39.0%, but it was only 6.2% in patients who underwent planned tandem autologous/reduced-intensity conditioning CBT (auto/RIC-CBT). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 6 years were 13.0% and 15.2%, respectively. Less than a partial response before CBT and lack of prior transplantation were independent significant adverse factors for PFS, whereas the presence of prior transplantation and planned tandem transplantation were associated with better OS. OS at 6 years in patients who underwent auto/RIC-CBT was 45.9%. In addition, the development of chronic GVHD was associated with superior PFS. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cord blood is feasible as an alternative graft source for myeloma patients. Although CBT provided long-term survival for a fraction of patients, optimal use of this graft requires further clinical studies.

  10. International Myeloma Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Series Patient Seminar videos Medical Meetings NLB Satellite Symposium Myeloma Voices 10 Steps to Better Care ... is a cancer of the bone marrow plasma cells, white blood cells that make antibodies. A cancerous ...

  11. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yuan; Chen, Yuling; Geng, Chuanying; Liu, Nian; Yang, Guangzhong; Liu, Jinwei; Li, Xin; Deng, Haiteng; Chen, Wenming

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells.

  12. Target and resistance-related proteins of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand on myeloma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    JIAN, YUAN; CHEN, YULING; GENG, CHUANYING; LIU, NIAN; YANG, GUANGZHONG; LIU, JINWEI; LI, XIN; DENG, HAITENG; CHEN, WENMING

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rmhTRAIL) has become a potential therapeutic drug for multiple myeloma (MM). However, the exact targets and resistance mechanisms of rmhTRAIL on MM cells remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the target and resistance-related proteins of rmhTRAIL on myeloma cell lines. A TRAIL-sensitive myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226, and a TRAIL-resistance one, U266, were chosen and the differentially expressed proteins between the two cell lines were analyzed prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL administration by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. The results showed that following TRAIL treatment, 6 apoptosis-related proteins, calpain small subunit 1 (CPNS1), peflin (PEF1), B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC), BAG family molecular chaperone regulator 2 (BAG2) and chromobox protein homolog 3 (CBX3), were upregulated in RPMI 8226 cells while no change was identified in the U266 cells. Furthermore, small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 and several other ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP)-related proteins expressed higher levels in TRAIL-resistant cells U266 compared to the RPMI-8226 cells prior and subsequent to rmhTRAIL treatment. These results suggested that CPNS1, PEF1, BAP31, ASC, BAG2 and CBX3 were possibly target proteins of rmhTRAIL on RPMI 8226 cells, while UPP may have a vital role in mediating TRAIL-resistance in U266 cells. PMID:27284413

  13. CRM1 inhibition induces tumor cell cytotoxicity and impairs osteoclastogenesis in multiple myeloma: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Y-T; Landesman, Y; Acharya, C; Calle, Y; Zhong, MY; Cea, M; Tannenbaum, D; Cagnetta, A; Reagan, M; Munshi, AA; Senapedis, W; Saint-Martin, J-R; Kashyap, T; Shacham, S; Kauffman, M; Gu, Y; Wu, L; Ghobrial, I; Zhan, F; Kung, AL; Schey, SA; Richardson, P; Munshi, NC; Anderson, KC

    2013-01-01

    The key nuclear export protein CRM1/XPO1 may represent a promising novel therapeutic target in human multiple myeloma (MM). Here we showed that chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1) is highly expressed in patients with MM, plasma cell leukemia cells and increased in patient cells resistant to bortezomib treatment. CRM1 expression also correlates with increased lytic bone and shorter survival. Importantly, CRM1 knockdown inhibits MM cell viability. Novel, oral, irreversible selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINEs) targeting CRM1 (KPT-185, KPT-330) induce cytotoxicity against MM cells (ED50<200 nM), alone and cocultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) or osteoclasts (OC). SINEs trigger nuclear accumulation of multiple CRM1 cargo tumor suppressor proteins followed by growth arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. They further block c-myc, Mcl-1, and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity. SINEs induce proteasome-dependent CRM1 protein degradation; concurrently, they upregulate CRM1, p53-targeted, apoptosis-related, anti-inflammatory and stress-related gene transcripts in MM cells. In SCID mice with diffuse human MM bone lesions, SINEs show strong anti-MM activity, inhibit MM-induced bone lysis and prolong survival. Moreover, SINEs directly impair osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption via blockade of RANKL-induced NF-κB and NFATc1, with minimal impact on osteoblasts and BMSCs. These results support clinical development of SINE CRM1 antagonists to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:23588715

  14. mTOR pathway activation in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumour cells: pomalidomide enhances cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling of mTOR protein

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmelli, Tommasina; Giugliano, Emilia; Brunetto, Vanessa; Rapa, Ida; Cappia, Susanna; Giorcelli, Jessica; Rrodhe, Sokol; Papotti, Mauro; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    mTOR is a protein kinase that plays a central role in regulating critical cellular processes. We evaluated the activation and cellular localization of the mTOR pathway in multiple myeloma (MM) and analyzed the role of pomalidomide in regulating mTOR. By immunohistochemistry cytoplasmic p-mTOR stained positive in 57 out 101 (57.6%) cases with a nuclear p-mTOR localization in 14 out 101 samples (13.8%). In the 70 MM samples analyzed for the entire pathway, p-mTOR expression significantly correlated with p-AKT, p-P70S6K, and p-4E-BP1 suggesting that the AKT/mTOR pathway is activated in a subset of MM patients. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that mTOR protein is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus at baseline in MM cell lines and in plasma cells of 13 MM patients and that pomalidomide facilitated the shift of the mTOR protein in the nucleus. By western blotting, treatment with pomalidomide increased nuclear mTOR and p-mTOR expression levels in the nucleus with a concomitant decrease of the cytoplasmic fractions while does not seem to affect significantly AKT phosphorylation status. In MM cells the anti-myeloma activity of pomalidomide may be mediated by the regulation of the mTOR pathway. PMID:26097872

  15. Multiple myeloma treatment at relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation: A practical analysis.

    PubMed

    Malard, F; Harousseau, J L; Mohty, M

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the field of multiple myeloma. Introduction of the so-called novel agents, proteasome inhibitors (PI) and immunomodulatory drugs (IMiD), and improved supportive care have resulted in significantly better outcome. Standard first line treatment in fit patients include PI and IMiD based induction, high dose melphalan with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and consolidation/maintenance. However, despite these progresses MM remains incurable for the majority of patients and most patients will relapse. Next generation PI (carfilzomib, ixazomib) and IMiD (pomalidomide) and new therapeutic classes: monoclonal antibody (elotuzumab, daratumumab) and pan-deacetylase inhibitors (panobinostat) have been successfully evaluated in relapse multiple myeloma. Some of these new agents are now approved for multiple myeloma treatment at relapse. However choosing the most appropriate treatment at relapse may be difficult. This review sum up the most important studies and provide evidence to choose the most relevant therapeutic strategy for relapse after ASCT, based on disease, patient and previous treatment related parameters.

  16. Immunogenic Targets for Specific Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Götz, Marlies; Hofmann, Susanne; Greiner, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease although the prognosis has been improved by novel therapeutics and agents recently. Relapse occurs in the majority of patients and becomes fatal finally. Immunotherapy might be a powerful intervention to maintain a long-lasting control of minimal residual disease or to even eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Several tumor-associated antigens have been identified in patients with multiple myeloma. These antigens are expressed in a tumor-specific or tumor-restricted pattern, are able to elicit immune response, and thus could serve as targets for immunotherapy. This review discusses immunogenic antigens with therapeutic potential for multiple myeloma. PMID:22611422

  17. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-11-10

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the functions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM.

  18. Patrinia scabiosaefolia extract suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis by inhibiting the STAT3 pathway in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Chen, Youqin; Lin, Jiumao; Zhuang, Qunchuan; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Sferra, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays an important role in tumor cell survival and proliferation and thus has become a major focus in the development of anti-cancer therapies. Patrinia scabiosaefolia has been used for the treatment of various types of cancer. However, the precise mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of Patrinia scabiosaefolia remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the ethanol extract of Patrinia scabiosaefolia (EEPS) on proliferation and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma U266 cells that persistently express phosphorylated STAT3, and investigated the possible molecular mechanisms mediating its biological effects. We found that EEPS inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT3 in U266 cells. Consequently, the inhibitory effect of EEPS on STAT3 activation resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation and the induction of cell apoptosis. Moreover, EEPS treatment inhibited the expression of cyclin D1 (a promoter of cell proliferation) and Bcl-2 (an inhibitor of apoptosis), two important target genes of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Our findings for the first time demonstrate that Patrinia scabiosaefolia inhibits proliferation and promotes the apoptosis of cancer cells via inhibition of the STAT3 pathway, which may in part explain its anti-cancer activity.

  19. Synergistic cytotoxic effects of zoledronic acid and radiation in human prostate cancer and myeloma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Algur, Ece; Macklis, Roger M.; Haefeli, Urs O. . E-mail: uhafeli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: The clinical use of the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid has increased recently, especially for the treatment of bone metastases. Synergistic effects with chemotherapeutic agents (e.g., doxorubicin, paclitaxel) have been shown. It is not known whether similar synergistic effects exist with radiation. Methods and materials: IM-9 myeloma cells and C4-2 prostate cancer cells were treated with up to 200 {mu}M concentrations of zoledronic acid, irradiated with single doses of up to 1,000 cGy, or exposed to combinations of both treatments. Cell viability was then determined via yellow dye 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and the affected fractions analyzed using the median effect principal, a method developed and validated by Chou and Talalay. Results: A statistically significant synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of zoledronic acid and radiation was documented. The extent of the effect was cell type-dependent, with the C4-2 cells showing a greater synergistic effect than the IM-9 cells. Conclusions: The combined use of zoledronic acid and radiotherapy shows enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity for two human prostate and myeloma cancer cell lines over that expected for a simple additive effect from each treatment alone. A clinical trial is under way to test this combination therapy.

  20. PSMB4 promotes multiple myeloma cell growth by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peihao; Guo, Honggang; Li, Guangchao; Han, Siqi; Luo, Fei; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-06

    Proteasomal subunit PSMB4, was recently identified as potential cancer driver genes in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanism of PSMB4 on carcinogenesis process remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of PSMB4 in multiple myeloma (MM). We found a significant up-regulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of PSMB4 promoted cell growth and colony forming ability of MM cells, whereas inhibition of PSMB4 led to a decrease of such events. Furthermore, our results demonstrated the up-regulation of miR-21 and a positive correlation between the levels of miR-21 and PSMB4 in MM. Re-expression of miR-21 markedly rescued PSMB4 knockdown-mediated suppression of cell proliferation and clone-formation. Additionally, while enforced expression of PSMB4 profoundly increased NF-κB activity and the level of miR-21, PSMB4 knockdown or NF-κB inhibition suppressed miR-21 expression in MM cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PSMB4 regulated MM cell growth in part by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling, which may represent promising targets for novel specific therapies. - Highlights: • First reported upregulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4 promoted MM cell growth and colony forming ability. • Further found miR-21 was up-regulated by PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4-induced miR-21 expression was modulated by NF-κB. • PSMB4-NF-κB-miR-21 axis may be potential therapeutic targets of MM.

  1. The natural compound forskolin synergizes with dexamethasone to induce cell death in myeloma cells via BIM.

    PubMed

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Misund, Kristine; Naderi, Elin Hallan; Ugland, Hege; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2015-08-26

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway kills multiple myeloma (MM) cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we have investigated the potential of enhancing the killing of MM cell lines and primary MM cells by combining the cAMP-elevating compound forskolin with the commonly used MM therapeutic drugs melphalan, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, bortezomib and dexamethasone. We observed that forskolin potentiated the killing induced by all the tested agents as compared to treatment with the single agents alone. In particular, forskolin had a synergistic effect on the dexamethasone-responsive cell lines H929 and OM-2. By knocking down the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM, we proved this protein to be involved in the synergistic induction of apoptosis by dexamethasone and forskolin. The ability of forskolin to maintain the killing of MM cells even at lower concentrations of the conventional agents suggests that forskolin may be used to diminish treatment-associated side effects. Our findings support a potential role of forskolin in combination with current conventional agents in the treatment of MM.

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  3. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  4. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40–70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2–5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20–24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45–184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration. PMID:28374831

  5. Multiple Myeloma and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Zeinab A.; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians. PMID:22363889

  6. Overexpression of c-maf is a frequent oncogenic event in multiple myeloma that promotes proliferation and pathological interactions with bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Elaine M; Wiestner, Adrian; Rosenwald, Andreas; Shaffer, A L; Campo, Elias; Grogan, Tom; Bergsagel, P Leif; Kuehl, W Michael; Staudt, Louis M

    2004-02-01

    The oncogene c-maf is translocated in approximately 5%-10% of multiple myelomas. Unexpectedly, we observed c-maf expression in myeloma cell lines lacking c-maf translocations and in 50% of multiple myeloma bone marrow samples. By gene expression profiling, we identified three c-maf target genes: cyclin D2, integrin beta7, and CCR1. c-maf transactivated the cyclin D2 promoter and enhanced myeloma proliferation, whereas dominant inhibition of c-maf blocked tumor formation in immunodeficient mice. c-maf-driven expression of integrin beta7 enhanced myeloma adhesion to bone marrow stroma and increased production of VEGF. We propose that c-maf transforms plasma cells by stimulating cell cycle progression and by altering bone marrow stromal interactions. The frequent overexpression of c-maf in myeloma makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  7. MiRNA-34a overexpression inhibits multiple myeloma cancer stem cell growth in mice by suppressing TGIF2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Songyan; He, Xiangfeng; Li, Miao; Shi, Fangfang; Wu, Di; Pan, Meng; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Rong; Luo, Shouhua; Gu, Ning; Dou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Hematological malignancy originated from B-cell line, multiple myeloma (MM), is a kind of plasma cells in bone marrow hyperplasia and cause of osteoclast-mediated skeletal destruction disease. MiR-34a plays an important epigenetic regulating role in malignant tumors and presents a therapeutic potential. In this study, we investigated the effects of overexpression of miR-34a in MM cancer stem cells (CSCs) on tumor growth and bone lesions. Here we showed that miR-34a overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, and increased CSC apoptosis in vitro. The apparent epigenetic modulation induced by miR-34a overexpression was found no only in MM RPMI8226 cells but also in CSC xenograft MM. Both bioinformatics prediction and dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that transforming growth interaction factor 2 (TGIF2) was sufficient to confer miR-34a regulation. The results of qRT-PCR and Western blot assays demonstrated that the expression of TGIF2 was significant decreased in tumor tissues from NOD/SCID mice injected with miR-34a-MM CSCs. We conclude that miR-34a overexpression in MM CSCs significantly suppressed the tumorigenicity and lytic bone lesions in mouse model by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting TGIF2 expression. PMID:28078014

  8. Modulation of Cell Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress Signaling Contribute to Acquired Melphalan Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zub, Kamila Anna; de Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70–80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance. PMID:25769101

  9. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70-80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance.

  10. Stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders (report from an EBMT preceptorship meeting).

    PubMed

    Bruno, Benedetto; Auner, Holger W; Gahrton, Gösta; Garderet, Laurent; Festuccia, Moreno; Ladetto, Marco; Lemoli, Roberto M; Massaia, Massimo; Morris, Curly; Palumbo, Antonio; Schönland, Stefan; Boccadoro, Mario; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Chronic Malignancies Working Party held a preceptorship meeting in Turin, Italy on 25-26 September 2014, to discuss the role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in the treatment of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders. Scientists and clinicians working in the field gathered to discuss a variety of topics including the results of recent clinical trials, basic research, the concept of minimal residual disease, and immune modulation. As individual presentations revealed, important advances have occurred in our understanding of the pathophysiology of myeloma and the role that SCT, along with other forms of immunotherapy, plays in treating it. Each presentation stimulated discussion and exchange of ideas among the attendants. We decided to summarize and, importantly, to update the meeting proceedings in this review to share stimulating discussions and ideas on potentially novel treatment strategies among clinicians.

  11. Preclinical animal models of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lwin, Seint T; Edwards, Claire M; Silbermann, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable plasma-cell malignancy characterized by osteolytic bone disease and immunosuppression. Murine models of multiple myeloma and myeloma bone disease are critical tools for an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and the development of novel therapeutic strategies. This review will cover commonly used immunocompetent and xenograft models of myeloma, describing the advantages and disadvantages of each model system. In addition, this review provides detailed protocols for establishing systemic and local models of myeloma using both murine and human myeloma cell lines. PMID:26909147

  12. Measurement of Transient Permeability of Sp2/0 Myeloma Cells: Flow Cytometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Grainys, Audrius; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Švedienė, Jurgita; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Markovskaja, Svetlana; Novickij, Jurij

    2016-12-01

    Electroporation is an electric field induced phenomenon occurring when the permeability of the cell membrane is increased due to the excess of critical transmembrane potential. Fluorescent dye assays are frequently used for evaluation of the permeabilization rate, however, the protocols vary, which negatively affects the repeatability of the results. In this work we have designed experiments to investigate the protocols and threshold concentrations of the Propidium Iodide (PI) and YO-PRO-1 (YP) fluorescent dyes for evaluation of mammalian cell permeabilization induced by electroporation. The Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells were used and the bursts of 100 μs × 8 electrical pulses of 0.8-2 kV/cm were applied. It has been shown that the dye concentration has an influence on the detectable permeabilization, and the concentrations below 30 μM for PI and 1 μM for YP should be avoided for measurement of electropermeabilization efficacy due to unreliable fluorescence signals. Further, based on the experimental data, the permeabilization curve for the Sp2/0 myeloma cells in the 0.8-2 kV/cm range has been presented.

  13. Collection of more hematopoietic progenitor cells with large volume leukapheresis in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Desikan, K R; Jagannath, S; Siegel, D; Nelson, J; Bracy, D; Barlogie, B; Tricot, G

    1998-02-01

    Reinfusion of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after high dose chemotherapy accelerates hematopoietic recovery. Because of the relatively low content of hematopoietic progenitors in the peripheral blood even after mobilization, multiple leukapheresis procedures are necessary to reach the required target number of CD34 cells to ensure prompt engraftment post-transplantation. Our previous studies have shown that the highest proportions of hematopoietic progenitors cells (CD34) are collected during the first three days of apheresis, whereas peak levels of myeloma cells are observed during subsequent days. Therefore, large volume leukapheresis (LVL), defined as processing of greater than 3 blood volumes or a total of at least 15 liters, was explored in 23 myeloma patients, undergoing 91 procedures; 14 patients were mobilized with high dose cyclophosphamide (6g/m2) and hematopoietic growth factors and 9 with G-CSF only. CD34 yields were measured separately for the first and last two hours of collection. We observed no decrease in CD34 cells/kg during the last two hours of collection and when the LVL collections were compared to historical matched controls, mobilized with the same regimen, the median quantity of CD34 cells/kg/liter collected remained equivalent during all days of apheresis. When compared to G-CSF only, mobilization with high dose cyclophosphamide appeared to result in superior hematopoietic stem cell collections. Interestingly, the G-CSF group experienced a progressive decrease in platelets during consecutive days of LVL, while the opposite was seen in the cyclophosphamide group. LVL procedures were not associated with a higher complication rate than standard volume apheresis. We conclude that LVL procedures allow collection of more CD34 cell per session while not jeopardizing progenitor cell collections during subsequent sessions. Since more CD34 cells are collected, fewer days are required to attain the optimal target of progenitor cells

  14. The Low Expression of IL-37 Involved in Multiple Myeloma – Associated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zun-chang; Sun, Ming-dong; Zheng, Yong-qing; Fu, Hong-jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis plays a significant role in complex inflammatory and angiogenic processes and is also involved in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis. IL-37 is a proinflammatory cytokine in antitumor activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the IL-37 clinical significance on MM. Material/Methods We measured serum levels of IL-37 in 45 patients with different stages of MM and 30 healthy control subjects and correlated IL-37 with numerous cytokines, such as angiogenesis factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiotensin-2 (Ang-2). We also measured the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) after pretreatment with recombinant human IL-37 (rhIL-37). Results Serum IL-37 level was lower in the patients with MM than in the healthy control subjects, whereas VEGF and Ang-2 levels were higher, depending on International Staging System stage. Serum IL-37 level had a negative correlation to VEGF and Ang-2 levels, and VEGF had a positive correlation to Ang-2 level. The tube formation of HUVECs was suppressed by the rhIL-37 pretreatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that serum level of IL-37 plays a part in the pathophysiology of MM progression. Therefore, IL-37 serum level may be a biomarker for disease stage and angiogenesis processes. PMID:27807338

  15. Investigating Effects of Proteasome Inhibitor on Multiple Myeloma Cells Using Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeon Woong; Singh, Surya P.; Nguyen, Freddy T.; Lue, Niyom; Sung, Yongjin; So, Peter T. C.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its label-free and non-destructive nature, applications of Raman spectroscopic imaging in monitoring therapeutic responses at the cellular level are growing. We have recently developed a high-speed confocal Raman microscopy system to image living biological specimens with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. In the present study, we have applied this system to monitor the effects of Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor drug, on multiple myeloma cells. Cluster imaging followed by spectral profiling suggest major differences in the nuclear and cytoplasmic contents of cells due to drug treatment that can be monitored with Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were also acquired from group of cells and feasibility of discrimination among treated and untreated cells using principal component analysis (PCA) was accessed. Findings support the feasibility of Raman technologies as an alternate, novel method for monitoring live cell dynamics with minimal external perturbation. PMID:27983660

  16. Piperlongumine induces apoptosis and reduces bortezomib resistance by inhibiting STAT3 in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Dandan; Zhao, Kai; Zeng, Lingyu; Yao, Ruosi; Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhenyu; Niu, Mingshan; Xu, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    Effective new therapies are urgently needed for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable hematological malignancy. In this study, we evaluated the effects of piperlongumine on MM cell proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Piperlongumine inhibited the proliferation of MM cells by inducing cell apoptosis and blocking osteoclastogenesis. Notably, piperlongumine also reduced bortezomib resistance in MM cells. In a disseminated MM mouse model, piperlongumine prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice without causing any obvious toxicity. Mechanistically, piperlongumine inhibited the STAT3 signal pathway in MM cells by binding directly to the STAT3 Cys712 residue. These findings suggest that the clinical use of piperlongumine to overcome bortezomib resistance in MM should be evaluated. PMID:27634873

  17. Potent induction of apoptosis by beta-lapachone in human multiple myeloma cell lines and patient cells.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Li, C. J.; Yu, D.; Pardee, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological malignancy. We have reported that beta-lapachone, a pure compound derived from a plant, can induce cell death in a variety of human carcinoma cells, including ovary, colon, lung, prostate, pancreas, and breast, suggesting a wide spectrum of anticancer activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We first studied antisurvival effects of beta-lapachone in human MM cells by colony formation assay. To determine whether the differential inhibition of colony formation occurs through antiproliferative activity, we performed MTT assays. The cytotoxicity of beta-lapachone on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also measured by MTT assay. To determine whether the cell death induced by beta-lapachone occurs through necrosis or apoptosis, we used the propidium iodide staining procedure to determine the sub-GI fraction, Annexin-V staining for externalization of phosphatidylserine, and fragmentation of cellular genomic DNA subjected to gel electrophoresis. To investigate the mechanism of anti-MM activity, we examined Bcl-2 expression, cytochrome C release, and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage by Western blot assay. RESULTS: We found that beta-lapachone (less than 4 microM) inhibits cell survival and proliferation by triggering cell death with characteristics of apoptosis in ARH-77, HS Sultan, and MM.1S cell lines, in freshly derived patient MM cells (MM.As), MM cell lines resistant to dexamethasone (MM.1R), doxorubicin (DOX.40), mitoxantrone (MR.20), and mephalan (LR5). Importantly, after treatment with beta-lapachone, we observed no apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in either quiescent or proliferative states, freshly isolated from healthy donors. In beta-lapachone treated ARH-77, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria to cytosol, and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase was cleaved, signature events of apoptosis. Finally, the apoptosis induced by beta-lapachone in MM cells was not blocked

  18. The expression of osteopontin and vascular endothelial growth factor in correlation with angiogenesis in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Babarović, Emina; Valković, Toni; Budisavljević, Ivana; Balen, Ivan; Štifter, Sanja; Duletić-Načinović, Antica; Lučin, Ksenija; Jonjić, Nives

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have shown a gradual increase in the extent of bone marrow angiogenesis in various stages of proliferative plasma cell disorders, from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to active multiple myeloma (MM). The main aim of this study was to evaluate tumor angiogenesis parameters in detail and to correlate them with the expression of osteopontin (OPN) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the bone marrow of patients with MGUS and MM. In addition, we wanted to determine their prognostic significance in active MM. Ninety-five patients were enrolled in the study: 14 diagnosed with MGUS, 13 with asymptomatic myeloma (AMM) and 68 with active MM. Computer assisted image analysis was used to determine the angiogenesis parameters, the quantity of microvessels per 1mm(2) (MVD), the area occupied by microvessels per 1mm(2) and the percentage of microvessel area in total section area (TVA). Double immunohistochemical methods CD138+VEGF and CD138+OPN were used to evaluate expression of these proteins in plasma cells, and OPN was also analyzed for its interstitial expression (iOPN). A significant positive correlation was determined between VEGF and iOPN with angiogenic parameters in the MGUS stage of the disease. In advanced stages of the disease, a significant negative correlation was recorded between OPN and iOPN with parameters of angiogenesis. Overall survival was significantly shorter for patients with negative iOPN (p=0.002) and higher angiogenic parameters, MVD (p=0.009), TVA (p=0.008) and area of microvessels per 1mm(2) (p=0.02). Positive VEGF expression in our model predicted a better three-year survival of patients with active MM (OR: 5.25, p=0.03; HR: 0.44, p=0.04). The results of our study suggested a possible key role of VEGF and OPN in the induction of angiogenesis in early-stage disease.

  19. Peroxidase-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells in multiple myeloma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; An, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Xue-Rui; Song, Jing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reports of clinical cases with Auer bodies in the plasma cells in multiple myeloma (MM) are rare; however, most of those reported contain peroxidase (POX)-negative Auer bodies rather than the POX-positive Auer bodies observed in myeloid progenitors, indicating differences in their chemical properties. Furthermore, the cases with POX-positive Auer bodies similar to those observed in myeloid cells are extremely rare in non-myeloid cells. Here, we report the clinical features, laboratory investigations, diagnosis and treatment of a case of MM with POX-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells and review related the literature to advance the prognostic evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of similar cases. PMID:26823884

  20. BH3-only proteins Noxa, Bmf, and Bim are necessary for arsenic trioxide–induced cell death in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Alejo A.; Gutman, Delia; Lee, Kelvin P.

    2008-01-01

    The use of arsenic trioxide (ATO) to treat multiple myeloma (MM) is supported by preclinical studies as well as several phase 2 studies, but the precise mechanism(s) of action of ATO has not been completely elucidated. We used gene expression profiling to determine the regulation of apoptosis-related genes by ATO in 4 MM cell lines and then focused on Bcl-2 family genes. ATO induced up-regulation of 3 proapoptotic BH3-only proteins (Noxa, Bmf, and Puma) and down-regulation of 2 antiapoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-XL. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that Noxa and Puma bind Mcl-1 to release Bak and Bim within 6 hours of ATO addition. Bak and Bim are also released from Bcl-XL. Silencing of Bmf, Noxa, and Bim significantly protected cells from ATO-induced apoptosis, while Puma silencing had no effect. Consistent with a role for Noxa inhibition of Mcl-1, the Bad-mimetic ABT-737 synergized with ATO in the killing of 2 MM lines. Finally, Noxa expression was enhanced by GSH depletion and inhibited by increasing GSH levels in the cells. Understanding the pattern of BH3-only protein response should aid in the rational design of arsenic-containing regimens. PMID:18354037

  1. Total Marrow Irradiation as Part of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Asian Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Chiang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Tien, Hui-Ju; Wang, Li-Ying

    2013-01-01

    To compare the outcomes of melphalan 200 mg/m2 (HDM200) and 8 Gy total marrow irradiation (TMI) delivered by helical tomotherapy plus melphalan 140 mg/m2 (HDM140 + TMI 8 Gy) in newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) Asian patients. Between 2007 and 2010, nine consecutive myeloma patients who were scheduled to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) were studied. The patients received three cycles of vincristine-adriamycin-dexamethasone (VAD) regimen as induction chemotherapy, and if they had a partial response, peripheral blood stem cells were collected by dexamethasone-etoposide-cyclophosphamide-cisplatin (DECP). In arm A, six patients received the HDM200. In arm B, three patients received HDM140 + TMI 8 Gy. In arm B, the neutropenic duration was slightly longer than in arm A (P = 0.048). However, hematologic recovery (except for neutrophils), transfusion requirement, median duration of hospitalization, and the dose of G-CSF were similar in both arms. The median duration of overall survival and event-free survival was similar in the two arms (P = 0.387). As a conditioning regiment, HDM140 + TMI 8 Gy provide another chance for MM Asian patients who were not feasible for HDM200. PMID:24089671

  2. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A

    2015-12-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents.

  3. Elevated Th22 as well as Th17 cells associated with therapeutic outcome and clinical stage are potential targets in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Chen, Ping; Jia, Yan; He, Na; Li, Daqi; Ji, Chunyan; Ma, Daoxin

    2015-07-20

    T helper (Th) cell imbalance plays important roles in tumor development and their effects in Multiple myeloma (MM) remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the levels and clinical significance of Th22, Th17 and Th1 cells in patients with MM. Th subsets were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma IL-22, IL-17A and IFN-γ concentrations were measured by ELISA. AHR and RORC mRNA expression was examined by RT-PCR. Here, we found that the frequency of Th22 cells was significantly elevated in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of newly-diagnosed MM patients, and recovered in complete remission patients after chemotherapy. The circulating Th17 cells accompanied by IL-17A levels were also up-regulated in MM patients and decreased after remission. We also found that there was a significantly positive correlation between Th22 and Th17 cells in MM patients. Moreover, the frequencies of Th22 and Th17 cells were higher in stage III than in stage I+II of MM. Our data demonstrated that Th22 and Th17 cells might be important therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and could facilitate the effect of antitumor immunotherapy.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Autologous Stem Cell Treatment as Compared to Conventional Chemotherapy for Treatment of Multiple Myeloma in India.

    PubMed

    Prinja, Shankar; Kaur, Gunjeet; Malhotra, Pankaj; Jyani, Gaurav; Ramachandran, Raja; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash

    2017-03-01

    Recent innovations in treatment of multiple myeloma include autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) along with high dose chemotherapy (HDC). We undertook this study to estimate incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained (QALY) with use of ASCT along with HDC as compared to conventional chemotherapy (CC) alone in treatment of multiple myeloma. A combination of decision tree and markov model was used to undertake the analysis. Incremental costs and effects of ASCT were compared against the baseline scenario of CC (based on Melphalan and Prednisolone regimen) in the patients of multiple myeloma. A lifetime study horizon was used and future costs and consequences were discounted at 5%. Consequences were valued in terms of QALYs. Incremental cost per QALY gained using ASCT as against CC for treatment of multiple myeloma was estimated using both a health system and societal perspective. The cost of providing ASCT (with HDC) for multiple myeloma patients was INR 500,631, while the cost of CC alone was INR 159,775. In the long run, cost per patient per year for ASCT and CC arms was estimated to be INR 119,740 and INR 111,565 respectively. The number of QALYs lived per patient in case of ASCT and HDC alone were found to be 4.1 and 3.5 years respectively. From a societal perspective, ASCT was found to incur an incremental cost of INR 334,433 per QALY gained. If the ASCT is initiated early to patients, the incremental cost for ASCT was found to be INR 180,434 per QALY gained. With current mix of patients, stem cell treatment for multiple myeloma is not cost effective at a threshold of GDP per capita. It becomes marginally cost-effective at 3-times the GDP per capita threshold. However, accounting for the model uncertainties, the probability of ASCT to be cost effective is 59%. Cost effectiveness of ASCT can be improved with early detection and initiation of treatment.

  5. Oligosecretory biclonal multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Nebu; Ong, Menchu G; Nordberg, Mary Lowery; Turturro, Francesco; Cotelingam, James D

    2013-01-01

    Among the plasma cell dyscrasias, non-secretory myeloma is one of the rarest. This diagnosis is based on the absence of monoclonal proteins in the serum and urine. When serum free light chains are trace and the kappa: lambda ratio normal, clonality may however be established by PCR. We present a case of an oligosecretory myeloma confirmed by PCR, which would have hitherto been classified as non-secretory.

  6. Hedgehog signaling maintains a tumor stem cell compartment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Craig D; Wang, Qiuju; Gesell, Gregory S; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M; Jones, Evan; Kim, Jynho; Devereux, Wendy L; Rhodes, Jonathan T; Huff, Carol A; Beachy, Philip A; Watkins, D Neil; Matsui, William

    2007-03-06

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that malignant growth depends on a subset of tumor cells with stem cell-like properties of self-renewal. Because hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates progenitor cell fate in normal development and homeostasis, aberrant pathway activation might be involved in the maintenance of such a population in cancer. Indeed, mutational activation of the Hh pathway is associated with medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma; pathway activity is also critical for growth of other tumors lacking such mutations, although the mechanism of pathway activation is poorly understood. Here we study the role and mechanism of Hh pathway activation in multiple myeloma (MM), a malignancy with a well defined stem cell compartment. In this model, rare malignant progenitors capable of clonal expansion resemble B cells, whereas the much larger tumor cell population manifests a differentiated plasma cell phenotype that pathologically defines the disease. We show that the subset of MM cells that manifests Hh pathway activity is markedly concentrated within the tumor stem cell compartment. The Hh ligand promotes expansion of MM stem cells without differentiation, whereas the Hh pathway blockade, while having little or no effect on malignant plasma cell growth, markedly inhibits clonal expansion accompanied by terminal differentiation of purified MM stem cells. These data reveal that Hh pathway activation is heterogeneous across the spectrum of MM tumor stem cells and their more differentiated progeny. The potential existence of similar relationships in other adult cancers may have important biologic and clinical implications for the study of aberrant Hh signaling.

  7. Natural killer T cell defects in multiple myeloma and the impact of lenalidomide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A C; Neeson, P; Leeansyah, E; Tainton, K; Quach, H; Prince, H M; Harrison, S J; Godfrey, D I; Ritchie, D; Berzins, S P

    2014-01-01

    The causes of multiple myeloma (MM) remain obscure and there are few known risk factors; however, natural killer T (NKT) cell abnormalities have been reported in patients with MM, and therapeutic targeting of NKT cells is promoted as a potential treatment. We characterized NKT cell defects in treated and untreated patients with MM and determined the impact of lenalidomide therapy on the NKT cell pool. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with co-stimulatory effects on NKT cells in vitro and is an approved treatment for MM, although its mode of action in that context is not well defined. We find that patients with relapsed/progressive MM had a marked deficiency in NKT cell numbers. In contrast, newly diagnosed patients had relatively normal NKT cell frequency and function prior to treatment, although a specific NKT cell deficiency emerged after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) regimen. This also impacted NK cells and conventional T cells, but the recovery of NKT cells was considerably delayed, resulting in a prolonged, treatment-induced NKT cell deficit. Longitudinal analysis of individual patients revealed that lenalidomide therapy had no in-vivo impact on NKT cell numbers or cytokine production, either as induction therapy, or as maintenance therapy following ASCT, indicating that its clinical benefits in this setting are independent of NKT cell modulation. PMID:24032527

  8. A novel 3D mesenchymal stem cell model of the multiple myeloma bone marrow niche: biologic and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Jakubikova, Jana; Cholujova, Danka; Hideshima, Teru; Gronesova, Paulina; Soltysova, Andrea; Harada, Takeshi; Joo, Jungnam; Kong, Sun-Young; Szalat, Raphael E; Richardson, Paul G; Munshi, Nikhil C; Dorfman, David M; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2016-11-22

    Specific niches within the tumor bone marrow (BM) microenvironment afford a sanctuary for multiple myeloma (MM) clones due to stromal cell-tumor cell interactions, which confer survival advantage and drug resistance. Defining the sequelae of tumor cell interactions within the MM niches on an individualized basis may provide the rationale for personalized therapies. To mimic the MM niche, we here describe a new 3D co-culture ex-vivo model in which primary MM patient BM cells are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in a hydrogel 3D system. In the 3D model, MSC with conserved phenotype (CD73+CD90+CD105+) formed compact clusters with active fibrous connections, and retained lineage differentiation capacity. Extracellular matrix molecules, integrins, and niche related molecules including N-cadherin and CXCL12 are expressed in 3D MSC model. Furthermore, activation of osteogenesis (MMP13, SPP1, ADAMTS4, and MGP genes) and osteoblastogenic differentiation was confirmed in 3D MSC model. Co-culture of patient-derived BM mononuclear cells with either autologous or allogeneic MSC in 3D model increased proliferation of MM cells, CXCR4 expression, and SP cells. We carried out immune profiling to show that distribution of immune cell subsets was similar in 3D and 2D MSC model systems. Importantly, resistance to novel agents (IMiDs, bortezomib, carfilzomib) and conventional agents (doxorubicin, dexamethasone, melphalan) was observed in 3D MSC system, reflective of clinical resistance. This 3D MSC model may therefore allow for studies of MM pathogenesis and drug resistance within the BM niche. Importantly, ongoing prospective trials are evaluating its utility to inform personalized targeted and immune therapy in MM.

  9. A novel 3D mesenchymal stem cell model of the multiple myeloma bone marrow niche: biologic and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Jakubikova, Jana; Cholujova, Danka; Hideshima, Teru; Gronesova, Paulina; Soltysova, Andrea; Harada, Takeshi; Joo, Jungnam; Kong, Sun-Young; Szalat, Raphael E.; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Dorfman, David M.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Specific niches within the tumor bone marrow (BM) microenvironment afford a sanctuary for multiple myeloma (MM) clones due to stromal cell-tumor cell interactions, which confer survival advantage and drug resistance. Defining the sequelae of tumor cell interactions within the MM niches on an individualized basis may provide the rationale for personalized therapies. To mimic the MM niche, we here describe a new 3D co-culture ex-vivo model in which primary MM patient BM cells are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in a hydrogel 3D system. In the 3D model, MSC with conserved phenotype (CD73+CD90+CD105+) formed compact clusters with active fibrous connections, and retained lineage differentiation capacity. Extracellular matrix molecules, integrins, and niche related molecules including N-cadherin and CXCL12 are expressed in 3D MSC model. Furthermore, activation of osteogenesis (MMP13, SPP1, ADAMTS4, and MGP genes) and osteoblastogenic differentiation was confirmed in 3D MSC model. Co-culture of patient-derived BM mononuclear cells with either autologous or allogeneic MSC in 3D model increased proliferation of MM cells, CXCR4 expression, and SP cells. We carried out immune profiling to show that distribution of immune cell subsets was similar in 3D and 2D MSC model systems. Importantly, resistance to novel agents (IMiDs, bortezomib, carfilzomib) and conventional agents (doxorubicin, dexamethasone, melphalan) was observed in 3D MSC system, reflective of clinical resistance. This 3D MSC model may therefore allow for studies of MM pathogenesis and drug resistance within the BM niche. Importantly, ongoing prospective trials are evaluating its utility to inform personalized targeted and immune therapy in MM. PMID:27764795

  10. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro.

  11. Functional regulation of D-type cyclins by insulin-like growth factor-I and serum in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Janet; Rabin, Neil; Lam, Eric W-F; Yong, Kwee L

    2007-10-01

    D-type cyclin genes are universally dysregulated in multiple myeloma (MM), but the functional consequences are unclear as D-type cyclin gene expression does not correlate with proliferation or disease progression. We examined the protein expression and regulation of D-type cyclins and other cell cycle regulators in human myeloma cell lines and primary CD138(+) plasma cells (PCs). Cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4, CDK6, p27(Kip1) p18(INK4C) and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) were absent in normal PCs, heterogeneously expressed in primary MM cells and positively correlated with disease activity/progression. Cyclins D1 and D2 complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6, suggesting that both phosphorylate pRb in MM. Furthermore, cyclin D2 expressed via either t(14;16) or t(4;14) IgH translocations was functionally upregulated by fetal calf serum or insulin-like growth factor-I, leading to pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle entry/progression, and in some cases inversely correlated with p27(Kip1). However, pRb phosphorylation and cell cycle progression mediated by cyclin D1 expressed via t(11;14) was less dependent on exogenous stimuli. These data suggest that the presence or absence of specific IgH translocations underlying aberrant D-type cyclin expression may influence their response to mitogens in the bone marrow microenvironment. We showed for the first time that D-type cyclins are functionally regulated in MM, differentially responsive to exogenous growth factors and upregulated with disease progression.

  12. Acute graft-versus-host disease and bronchiolitis obliterans after autologous stem cell transplantation in a patient with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Sara; Cabrero, Mónica; Caballero, Juan C; Dávila, Julio; de la Calle, Veronica Gonzalez; López-Godino, Oriana; López-Corral, Lucia; Pérez, Estefanía; Vázquez, Lourdes; Corral, Rocío; Caballero, Dolores; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Mateos, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Sixty-seven-year-old patient, diagnosed with multiple myeloma who had received autologous stem cell transplantation, following bortezomib, dexamethasone and thalidomide conventional regimen, achieving complete response, developed rash, diarrhea, and severe respiratory failure, 80 days after the transplantation procedure. He was diagnosed with graft-versus-host disease and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. PMID:26185631

  13. Killing multiple myeloma cells with the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Lis, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Anna; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), which has emerged recently as the first member of a new class of potent anticancer agents, was tested for its capacity to kill multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. Human MM cells (RPMI 8226) begin to lose viability significantly within 8 h of incubation in the presence of 3-BP. The Km (0.3 mmol/l) for intracellular accumulation of 3-BP in MM cells is 24 times lower than that in control cells (7.2 mmol/l). Therefore, the uptake of 3-BP by MM cells is significantly higher than that by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further, the IC50 values for human MM cells and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells are 24 and 58 µmol/l, respectively. Therefore, specificity and selectivity of 3-BP toward MM cancer cells are evident on the basis of the above. In MM cells the transcription levels of the gene encoding the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 is significantly amplified compared with control cells. The level of intracellular ATP in MM cells decreases by over 90% within 1 h after addition of 100 µmol/l 3-BP. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP, exemplified by a marked decrease in viability of MM cells, is potentiated by the inhibitor of glutathione synthesis buthionine sulfoximine. In addition, the lack of mutagenicity and its superior capacity relative to Glivec to kill MM cancer cells are presented in this study.

  14. Ciliary neurotropic factor, interleukin 11, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M are growth factors for human myeloma cell lines using the interleukin 6 signal transducer gp130

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a major growth factor for tumor plasma cells involved in human multiple myeloma (MM). In particular, human myeloma cell lines (HMCL), whose growth is completely dependent on addition of exogenous IL-6, can be obtained reproducibly from every patient with terminal disease. Four cytokines, ciliary neurotropic factor (CNTF), IL- 11, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and oncostatin M (OM), use the same transducer chain (signal transducer gp130) as IL-6 and share numerous biological activities with this IL. We found that these four cytokines stimulated proliferation and supported the long-term growth of two out of four IL-6-dependent HMCL obtained in our laboratory. Half- maximal proliferation was obtained with cytokine concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml for IL-11, LIF, and OM. CNTF worked at high concentrations only (90 ng/ml), but addition of soluble CNTF receptor increased sensitivity to CNTF 30-fold. The growth-promoting effect of these four cytokines was abrogated by anti-gp130 antibodies, contrary to results for anti-IL-6 receptor or anti-IL-6 antibodies. No detectable changes in the morphology and phenotype were found when myeloma cells were cultured with one of these four cytokines instead of IL-6. Concordant with their IL-6-dependent growth, the four HMCL expressed membrane IL-6R and gp130 detected by FACS analysis. LIF- binding chain gene (LIFR) was expressed only in the two HMCL responsive to LIF and OM. PMID:8145045

  15. Intracellular and extracellular rhomboid shaped crystalline inclusions in a case of IgG lambda restricted plasma cell myeloma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The presence of crystalline inclusions in plasma cell myeloma is a rare phenomenon and cases have been reported with rod, needle, and rectangular shaped crystals. Here, we present a case of IgG lambda restricted plasma cell myeloma with rhomboid shaped intracellular crystalline inclusions and extracellular crystal depositions in the bone marrow. Since rhomboid crystal depositions can be seen in other clinical conditions such as pseudogout, this case invites consideration of plasma cell myeloma in the differential diagnosis of patients with rhomboid crystalline deposition in the bone marrow and in sites/organs other than the bone marrow. PMID:20205792

  16. Immunohistological analysis in diagnosis of plasma cell myeloma based on cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hirata, Yuji; Iwaki, Kazuki; Akioka, Toshikazu; Miyoshi, Takuji; Nishiwaki, Uta; Masuda, Yuki; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Takayama, Ayami; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2012-11-01

    The accurate determination of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) light chain (LC) expression is important to differentiate reactive plasmacytosis from a clonal plasma cell neoplasm such as plasma cell myeloma (PCM). Through retrospective analysis, we studied the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow from 19 PCM patients and 19 controls. To demonstrate cIg LC expression, the bone marrow was immunostained for IgA, IgG, IgM, kappa, and lambda. The kappa/lambda ratio was defined as the ratio of the kappa-positive cell to the lambda-positive cell in plasma cells. PCM cells were distinguished from normal plasma cells by cut-off levels between 0.59 and 4.0, a sensitivity of 94.7%, and a specificity of 94.7%. The detection of the cytoplasmic kappa/lambda ratio of CD38-positive plasma cells may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of PCM and the correct diagnosis of PCM may be achieved more simply.

  17. A dominant-negative F-box deleted mutant of E3 ubiquitin ligase, β-TrCP1/FWD1, markedly reduces myeloma cell growth and survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anjana; McCluskey, Brandon; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Muñoz, Steve; Oyajobi, Babatunde O.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of multiple myeloma with bortezomib can result in severe adverse effects, necessitating the development of targeted inhibitors of the proteasome. We show that stable expression of a dominant-negative F-box deleted (ΔF) mutant of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, SCFβ-TrCP/FWD1, in murine 5TGM1 myeloma cells dramatically attenuated their skeletal engraftment and survival when inoculated into immunocompetent C57BL/KaLwRij mice. Similar results were obtained in immunodeficient bg-nu-xid mice, suggesting that the observed effects were independent of host recipient immune status. Bone marrow stroma offered no protection for 5TGM1-ΔF cells in cocultures treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), indicating a cell-autonomous anti-myeloma effect. Levels of p100, IκBα, Mcl-1, ATF4, total and cleaved caspase-3, and phospho-β-catenin were elevated in 5TGM1-ΔF cells whereas cIAP was down-regulated. TNF also activated caspase-3 and downregulated Bcl-2, correlating with the enhanced susceptibility of 5TGM1-ΔF cells to apoptosis. Treatment of 5TGM1 tumor-bearing mice with a β-TrCP1/FWD1 inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), significantly reduced tumor burden in bone. PDTC also increased levels of cleaved Mcl-1 and caspase-3 in U266 human myeloma cells, correlating with our murine data and validating the development of specific β-TrCP inhibitors as an alternative therapy to nonspecific proteasome inhibitors for myeloma patients. PMID:26009993

  18. Stem cell mobilization chemotherapy with gemcitabine is effective and safe in myeloma patients with bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Beatrice U; Keller, Sandra; Seipel, Katja; Mansouri Taleghani, Behrouz; Rauch, Daniel; Betticher, Daniel; Egger, Thomas; Pabst, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Vinorelbine chemotherapy with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulation is a widely applied non-myelosuppressive mobilization regimen in Switzerland for myeloma patients, but its neurotoxic potential limits its use in patients with bortezomib-induced polyneuropathy. In this single-center study, we alternatively evaluated safety and effectiveness of gemcitabine chemotherapy with G-CSF for mobilization of autologous stem cells. Between March 2012 and February 2013, all bortezomib-pretreated myeloma patients planned to undergo first-line high-dose melphalan chemotherapy received a single dose of 1250 mg/m2 gemcitabine, with G-CSF started on day 4. The 24 patients in this study had received a median of four cycles of bortezomib-dexamethason-based induction. Bortezomib-related polyneuropathy was identified in 21 patients (88%) by clinical evaluation and a standardized questionnaire. Administration of gemcitabine mobilization did not induce new or aggravate pre-existing neuropathy. Stem cell mobilization was successful in all 24 patients, with a single day of apheresis being sufficient in 19 patients (78%). The median yield was 9.51×10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Stem collection could be accomplished at day 8 in 67%. Our data suggest that single-dose gemcitabine together with G-CSF is an effective mobilization regimen in myeloma patients and a safe alternative non-myelosuppressive mobilization chemotherapy for myeloma patients with bortezomib-induced polyneuropathy.

  19. Analysis of the activation state of alpha4beta1 integrin in human B cell lines derived from myeloma, leukemia or lymphoma.

    PubMed

    García-Gila, M; Cabañas, C; García-Pardo, A

    1997-12-01

    Myeloma cells specifically localize in the bone marrow and rarely circulate in blood. To study whether this immobilization could be partially explained by the presence of constitutively activated integrins, particularly alpha4beta1, we used the activation reporter HUTS-21 anti-beta1 mAb. These analyses showed that beta1 integrins on myeloma cells were moderately active and could be upregulated similarly to integrins on lymphoma or leukemia cells. Myeloma cells were also tested for their ability to attach to RGD-containing fibronectin fragments, a property of activated (but not resting) alpha4beta1. Two cell lines adhered to these fragments and this was inhibited by anti-alpha5 but not by anti-alpha4 mAbs. These results show that myeloma cells bear low/moderately active alpha4beta1 and support the notion that multiple interactions contribute to their localization in the bone marrow.

  20. Formation of assemblies on cell membranes by secreted proteins: molecular studies of free λ light chain aggregates found on the surface of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Andrew T; Malik, Ansha; Berkahn, Mark B; Agostino, Mark; To, Joyce; Tacchi, Jessica L; Djordjevic, Steven P; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Edmundson, Allen B; Jones, Darren R; Raison, Robert L; Ramsland, Paul A

    2013-09-15

    We have described the presence of cell-membrane-associated κFLCs (free immunoglobulin light chains) on the surface of myeloma cells. Notably, the anti-κFLC mAb (monoclonal antibody) MDX-1097 is being assessed in clinical trials as a therapy for κ light chain isotype multiple myeloma. Despite the clinical potential of anti-FLC mAbs, there have been limited studies on characterizing membrane-associated FLCs at a molecular level. Furthermore, it is not known whether λFLCs can associate with cell membranes of myeloma cells. In the present paper, we describe the presence of λFLCs on the surface of myeloma cells. We found that cell-surface-associated λFLCs are bound directly to the membrane and in an aggregated form. Subsequently, membrane interaction studies revealed that λFLCs interact with saturated zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and using automated docking, we characterize a potential recognition site for these lipids. Atomic force microscopy confirmed that membrane-associated λFLCs are aggregated. Given the present findings, we propose a model whereby individual FLCs show modest affinity for zwitterionic lipids, with aggregation stabilizing the interaction due to multivalency. Notably, this is the first study to image FLCs bound to phospholipids and provides important insights into the possible mechanisms of membrane association by this unique myeloma surface antigen.

  1. MLN4924, an NAE inhibitor, suppresses AKT and mTOR signaling via upregulation of REDD1 in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yanyan; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Bernal, Leon; Torre, Claire; Matulis, Shannon M; Harvey, R Donald; Chen, Jing; Sun, Shi-Yong; Boise, Lawrence H; Lonial, Sagar

    2014-05-22

    The function and survival of normal and malignant plasma cells depends on the elaborately regulated ubiquitin proteasome system. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have proved to be highly effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and their effects are related to normal protein homeostasis which is critical for plasma cell survival. Many ubiquitin ligases are regulated by conjugation with NEDD8. Therefore, neddylation may also impact survival and proliferation of malignant plasma cells. Here, we show that MLN4924, a potent NEDD8 activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, induced cytotoxicity in MM cell lines, and its antitumor effect is associated with suppression of the AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways through increased expression of REDD1. Combining MLN4924 with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib induces synergistic apoptosis in MM cell lines which can overcome the prosurvival effects of growth factors such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1. Altogether, our findings demonstrate an important function for REDD1 in MLN4924-induced cytotoxicity in MM and also provide a promising therapeutic combination strategy for myeloma.

  2. Liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles effectively target multiple myeloma cells and demonstrate enhanced efficacy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jonathan D; Stefanick, Jared F; Schroeder, Valerie A; Suckow, Mark A; Alves, Nathan J; Suzuki, Rikio; Kikuchi, Shohei; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-12-28

    Carfilzomib, a recently FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, has remarkable anti-myeloma (MM) activity. However, its effectiveness is limited by associated severe side-effects, short circulation half-life, and limited solubility. Here, we report the engineering of liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles to overcome these problems and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of carfilzomib by increasing tumoral drug accumulation while decreasing systemic toxicity. In our design, carfilzomib was loaded into the bilayer of liposomes to yield stable and reproducible liposomal nanoparticles. Liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles were efficiently taken up by MM cells, demonstrated proteasome inhibition, induced apoptosis, and exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity against MM cells. In vivo, liposomal carfilzomib demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition and dramatically reduced overall systemic toxicity compared to free carfilzomib. Finally, liposomal carfilzomib demonstrated enhanced synergy in combination with doxorubicin. Taken together, this study establishes the successful synthesis of liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles that demonstrates improved therapeutic index and the potential to improve patient outcome in MM.

  3. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Marian F.; Otten, Henny G.; Franssen, Laurens E.; van Dorp, Suzanne; Strooisma, Theo; Lokhorst, Henk M.; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    In the course of multiple myeloma, patients may develop a M-protein band different from the original: secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. In this retrospective single center analysis, we describe the occurrence and clinical relevance of secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance). A total of 138 patients who had undergone 139 allogeneic stem cell transplantations (39.6% in the upfront setting and 60.4% for relapsed multiple myeloma) were included in the study. Sixty-seven (48.2%) patients developed secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, after a median latency of 6.9 months. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance occurred more often in patients who achieved at least very good partial response after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, compared to partial response or less (54.8% vs. 26.5%; P=0.005). The incidence was also higher in the upfront setting as compared to relapsed disease, or with a sibling donor compared to matched unrelated donor, but less often after T-cell depletion. Importantly, development of post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance as a time-dependent variable independently predicted for superior progression-free and overall survival (median progression-free survival 37.5 vs. 6.3 months, P<0.001; median overall survival 115.3 vs. 31.0 months, P=0.004). Clinicians should be aware of the benign nature of this phenomenon, and secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance should not be confused with relapse or progression of disease. (Trial registered with trialregister.nl; HOVON 108: NTR 2958.) PMID:25193963

  4. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Marian F; Otten, Henny G; Franssen, Laurens E; van Dorp, Suzanne; Strooisma, Theo; Lokhorst, Henk M; van de Donk, Niels W C J

    2014-12-01

    In the course of multiple myeloma, patients may develop a M-protein band different from the original: secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. In this retrospective single center analysis, we describe the occurrence and clinical relevance of secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance). A total of 138 patients who had undergone 139 allogeneic stem cell transplantations (39.6% in the upfront setting and 60.4% for relapsed multiple myeloma) were included in the study. Sixty-seven (48.2%) patients developed secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, after a median latency of 6.9 months. Secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance occurred more often in patients who achieved at least very good partial response after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, compared to partial response or less (54.8% vs. 26.5%; P=0.005). The incidence was also higher in the upfront setting as compared to relapsed disease, or with a sibling donor compared to matched unrelated donor, but less often after T-cell depletion. Importantly, development of post-transplant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance as a time-dependent variable independently predicted for superior progression-free and overall survival (median progression-free survival 37.5 vs. 6.3 months, P<0.001; median overall survival 115.3 vs. 31.0 months, P=0.004). Clinicians should be aware of the benign nature of this phenomenon, and secondary monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance should not be confused with relapse or progression of disease. (Trial registered with trialregister.nl; HOVON 108: NTR 2958.).

  5. Adipocytes secreted leptin is a pro-tumor factor for survival of multiple myeloma under chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiu-bai; Mei, Hui-ling; Hu, Yu; Guo, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have shown that adipokines secreted from adipocytes contributes to tumor development, especially leptin. However, underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to explore the effect of leptin on development and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma cells and the potential mechanism. Analysis of levels of adipokines including leptin and adiponectin in 28 multiple myeloma patients identified significantly higher leptin compared with 28 normal controls(P < 0.05), and leptin level was positively correlated with clinical stage, IgG, ER, and ß2MG. Next, by using co-culture system of myeloma and adipocytes, and pharmacologic enhancement of leptin, we found that increased growth of myeloma cells and reduced toxicity of bortezomib were best observed at 50 ng/ml of leptin, along with increased expression of cyclinD1, Bcl-2 and decreased caspase-3 expression. We also found that phosphorylated AKT and STAT3 but not the proteins expression reached peak after 1h and 6h treatment of leptin, respectively. By using AG490, an agent blocking the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK, the proliferation of myeloma cells was inhibited, as well as the phosphorylation of AKT and STAT3, even adding leptin. Taken together, our study demonstrated that up-regulated leptin could stimulate proliferation of myeloma and reduce the anti-tumor effect of chemotherapy possibly via activating AKT and STAT3 pathways, and leptin might be one of the potential therapeutic targets for treating myeloma. PMID:27863383

  6. VSV-hIFNbeta-NIS in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mycosis Fungoides; Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  8. SENP1 inhibition induces apoptosis and growth arrest of multiple myeloma cells through modulation of NF-κB signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Gao, Chun-Ji; Guo, Zi-Kuan; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    SUMO/sentrin specific protease 1 (Senp1) is an important regulation protease in the protein sumoylation, which affects the cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation. The role of Senp1 mediated protein desumoylation in pathophysiological progression of multiple myeloma is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. Lentivirus-mediated Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces viability, proliferation and colony forming ability of MM cells. The NF-κB family members including P65 and inhibitor protein IkBα play important roles in regulation of MM cell survival and proliferation. We further demonstrated that Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation, leading to inactivation of NF-kB signaling in MM cells. These results delineate a key role for Senp1in IL-6 induced proliferation and survival of MM cells, suggesting it may be a potential new therapeutic target in MM. - Highlights: • Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. • Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces proliferation of MM cells. • Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation.

  9. Evidence for a role of the histone deacetylase SIRT6 in DNA damage response of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Adamia, Sophia; Acharya, Chirag; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Munshi, Aditya; Acharya, Prakrati; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zhong, Lei; Carrasco, Ruben; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Ballestrero, Alberto; Richardson, Paul; Gobbi, Marco; Lemoli, Roberto M.; Munshi, Nikhil; Hideshima, Teru; Nencioni, Alessio; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a highly unstable genome, with aneuploidy observed in nearly all patients. The mechanism causing this karyotypic instability is largely unknown, but recent observations have correlated these abnormalities with dysfunctional DNA damage response. Here, we show that the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT6 is highly expressed in MM cells, as an adaptive response to genomic stability, and that high SIRT6 levels are associated with adverse prognosis. Mechanistically, SIRT6 interacts with the transcription factor ELK1 and with the ERK signaling-related gene. By binding to their promoters and deacetylating H3K9 at these sites, SIRT6 downregulates the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes, MAPK signaling, and proliferation. In addition, inactivation of ERK2/p90RSK signaling triggered by high SIRT6 levels increases DNA repair via Chk1 and confers resistance to DNA damage. Using genetic and biochemical studies in vitro and in human MM xenograft models, we show that SIRT6 depletion both enhances proliferation and confers sensitization to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings therefore provide insights into the functional interplay between SIRT6 and DNA repair mechanisms, with implications for both tumorigenesis and the treatment of MM. PMID:26675349

  10. [Expression of microRNA-221/222 in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Yang, Suwen; Wang, Wei; Jin, Hong; Zhong, Yuhong; Xie, Xinyou

    2016-05-25

    Objective: To detect the expression of miR-221/222 in serum and plasma cells in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance(MGUS) and multiple myeloma(MM), and to explore the possibility of miR-221/222 as biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis predicting of MGUS and MM. Methods: Bone marrow and serum samples from 14 patients with newly diagnosed MGUS, 81 patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed MM and 10 controls were collected from Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital of Zhejiang University and Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province during January 2013 and December 2015. The expressions of miR-221/222 in serum and in sorted CD138 positive plasma cells were detected by qRT-PCR, and the relative expression of miR-221/222 (Δct) was compared between the groups. Serum levels of miR-221 before and after treatment were compared in both remission group (n=22) and refractory group (n=13) in MM patients, and its correlation with serum level of β2-MG was assessed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results: Serum levels of miR-221/222 in MGUS and MM groups were significantly higher than those in control group (all P<0.01), while miR-221/222 levels in plasma cells were significantly lower in MGUS and MM groups than those in the control group (P<0.05 or<0.01). No significant difference in miR-221/222 levels in serum and plasma cells was observed between MGUS group and MM group (all P>0.05). There was no correlation between miR-221/222 levels in serum and plasma cells (r=0.024 and -0.127, all P>0.05), but miR-221 levels were correlated with miR-222 levels in both serum and plasma cells (r=0.534 and 0.552, all P<0.01). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves showed that the areas under the curve (AUCs) of serum miR-221/222, plasma cell miR-221/222 in diagnosis of MGUS/MM were 0.968, 0.976, 0.801 and 0.727, respectively. There was no significant difference in serum level of miR-221 among MM patients with different paraprotein isotypes (P>0.05), but serum

  11. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesus F; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138(+) microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥ 98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  12. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  13. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  14. An analysis of myeloma plasma cell phenotype using antibodies defined at the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, N; Ling, N R; Ball, J; Bromidge, E; Nathan, P D; Franklin, I M

    1988-01-01

    Fresh bone marrow from 43 cases of myeloma and three cases of plasma cell leukaemia has been phenotyped both by indirect immune-rosetting and, on fixed cytospin preparations, by indirect immunofluorescence. Both clustered and unclustered B cell associated antibodies from the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens were used. The results confirm the lack of many pan-B antigens on the surface of myeloma plasma cells, i.e. CD19-23, 37, 39, w40. Strong surface reactivity is seen with CD38 antibodies and with one CD24 antibody (HB8). Weak reactions are sometimes obtained with CD9, 10 and 45R. On cytospin preparations CD37, 39 and w40 are sometimes weakly positive, and anti-rough endoplasmic reticulum antibodies are always strongly positive. Specific and surface-reacting antiplasma cell antibodies are still lacking. PMID:3048803

  15. Cyproheptadine-induced myeloma cell apoptosis is associated with inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Cao, Biyin; Zhou, Shunye; Zhu, Jingyu; Zhang, Zubin; Hou, Tingjun; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies revealed that the anti-allergic cyproheptadine displays anti-blood cancer activity. However, its mechanism is still elusive. In this study, cyproheptadine was found to decrease the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and XIAP. More importantly, cyproheptadine-induced apoptosis was accompanied by suppressing AKT activation in myeloma cells. In the subsequent study, cyproheptadine was found to inhibit insulin-like growth factor 1-triggered AKT activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Specifically, cyproheptadine blocked AKT translocation from nuclei for phosphorylation. This inhibition led to suppressed activation of p70S6K and 4EBP1, two key downstream signaling proteins in the PI3K/AKT pathway. However, cyproheptadine did not display inhibition on activation of IGF-1R or STAT3, possible upstream signals of AKT activation. These results further demonstrated that cyproheptadine suppresses the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which is probably critical for cyproheptadine-induced MM cell apoptosis.

  16. Utility of a column-free cell sorting system for separation of plasma cells in multiple myeloma FISH testing in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Shashirekha; Siady, Marion; Mallempati, Kalyan C; Wilson, Andrew; Poarch, Jeff; Chandler, Brandon; Gray, Judy; Salama, Mohamed E

    2012-03-01

    Targeted FISH analysis is an essential component of the management of plasma cell myeloma for identification of cytogenetic abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the column-free method, RoboSep® (RS), for sorting CD138-expressing cells in bone marrow aspirates. Comparative analysis of column-based and RS methodologies was carried out on 54 paired bone marrow aspirate validation samples from patients undergoing work-up for plasma cell dyscrasia. Abnormalities detected by FISH analysis using an IGH@/CCND1 probe set were seen in 54% with RS, and 44% with column-based. We found a statistically significant difference between the yield of abnormalities detected in paired positive cases (p = 0.0001). An additional 183 consecutive post-validation samples sorted by RS showed recurrent genetic abnormalities in 85/120 (71%) of successfully sorted samples with ≥ 1% plasma cells but in none of 63 samples in which FISH analysis was completed on samples that could not be sorted due to insufficient plasma cells upon cell sorting. The column-free method successfully sorted PC, when present in ≥ 1% of cells, for detection of abnormalities by FISH. Furthermore, our data suggest that FISH analysis should not be performed on samples with an inadequate yield at the cell selection step.

  17. Shikonin, dually functions as a proteasome inhibitor and a necroptosis inducer in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    WADA, NAOKO; KAWANO, YAWARA; FUJIWARA, SHIHO; KIKUKAWA, YOSHITAKA; OKUNO, YUTAKA; TASAKI, MASAYOSHI; UEDA, MITSUHARU; ANDO, YUKIO; YOSHINAGA, KAZUYA; RI, MASAKI; IIDA, SHINSUKE; NAKASHIMA, TAKAYUKI; SHIOTSU, YUKIMASA; MITSUYA, HIROAKI; HATA, HIROYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Shikonin (SHK), a natural small agent (MW 288.3), reportedly induces cell death in various tumor cells. We have found that SHK also exerts potent cytocidal effects on human multiple myeloma (MM) cells, but its anticancer mechanism in MM cells remains to be elucidated. SHK at 2.5–5 μM induced apoptosis in seven MM cell lines, including the bortezomib-resistant cell line KMS11/BTZ. The IC50 value of SHK against KMS11/BTZ was comparable to that of a parental cell line KMS11 (1.1 and 1.56 μM, respectively). SHK induces accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and activates XBP-1 in MM cells, suggesting that SHK functions as a proteasome inhibitor, eventually inducing ER stress-associated apoptosis. SHK increases levels of HSP70/72, which protects cells from apoptosis, and exerts greater cytocidal effects in combination with the HSP70/72 inhibitor VER-155008. At higher concentrations (10–20 μM), SHK induced cell death, which was completely inhibited by a necroptosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), while the cytocidal activity was unaffected by Z-VAD-FMK, strongly suggesting that cell death is induced by SHK at high concentrations through necroptosis. The present data show for the first time that SHK induces cell death in MM cells. SHK efficiently induces apoptosis and combination of heat shock protein inhibitor with low dose SHK enhances apoptosis, while high dose SHK induces necroptosis in MM cells. These findings together support the use of SHK as a potential therapeutic agent for MM. PMID:25530098

  18. Spotlight on elotuzumab in the treatment of multiple myeloma: the evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma, it remains an incurable disease, with relapses and resistances frequently observed. Recently, immunotherapies, in particular, monoclonal antibodies, have become important treatment options in anticancer therapies. Elotuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody to signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7, which is highly expressed on myeloma cells and, to a lower extent, on selected leukocyte subsets such as natural killer cells. By directly activating natural killer cells and by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, elotuzumab exhibits a dual mechanism of action leading to myeloma cell death with minimal effects on normal tissue. In several nonclinical models of multiple myeloma, elotuzumab was effective as a single agent and in combination with standard myeloma treatments, supporting the use of elotuzumab in patients. In combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, elotuzumab showed a significant increase in tumor response rates and progression-free survival in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. This review summarizes the nonclinical and clinical development of elotuzumab as a single agent and in combination with established therapies for the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:27785050

  19. Granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells promote angiogenesis in the context of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, Marilène; Muller, Joséphine; Lamour, Virginie; De Veirman, Kim; De Raeve, Hendrik; Bellahcène, Akeila; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baron, Frédéric; Beguin, Yves; Caers, Jo; Heusschen, Roy

    2016-06-21

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by the accumulation of tumor cells in the bone marrow (BM) and is associated with immunosuppression, angiogenesis and osteolysis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of immature, immunosuppressive myeloid cells that promote tumor progression through different mechanisms.In this work, we studied the contribution of MDSC subsets to different disease-promoting aspects in MM. We observed an expansion of polymorphonuclear/granulocytic (PMN-)MDSCs in two immunocompetent murine MM models, while this was not observed for monocytic (MO-)MDSCs. Both MDSC subpopulations from MM-bearing mice were immunosuppressive, but PMN-MDSCs displayed a higher suppressive potential. Soluble factors secreted by MM cells increased the viability of MDSCs, whereas the presence of MDSCs did not affect the proliferation of MM cells in vitro or in vivo. Interestingly, we observed a pro-angiogenic effect of PMN-MDSCs in the context of MM using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Consistently, MM-derived PMN-MDSCs showed an up-regulation of angiogenesis-related factors and reduced PMN-MDSC levels were associated with less angiogenesis in vivo. Finally, we identified MO-MDSCs as osteoclast precursors.These results suggest that MDSC subpopulations play diverging roles in MM. We show for the first time that PMN-MDSCs exert a pro-angiogenic role in MM.

  20. Importance of Achieving Stringent Complete Response After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Prashant; Kumar, Shaji K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Lacy, Martha Q.; Buadi, Francis; Dingli, David; Russell, Stephen J.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Lust, John A.; Leung, Nelson; Lin, Yi; Zeldenrust, Steven R.; McCurdy, Arleigh; Greipp, Philip R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gertz, Morie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact of achieving stringent complete response (sCR), an increasingly attainable goal, after autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Maximal response rates were determined in 445 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT within 12 months of diagnosis of MM. The patients achieving varying degrees of complete response (CR) are the focus of our study. Results One hundred and nine patients (25%) achieved sCR after ASCT. The median overall survival (OS) rate from the time of transplantation for patients attaining sCR was not reached (NR), in contrast to those patients achieving conventional complete response (CR; n = 37; OS, 81 months) or near CR (nCR; n = 91; OS, 60 months; P < .001). Five-year OS rates were 80%, 53%, and 47% for sCR, CR, and nCR, respectively. The median time to progression (TTP) from ASCT of patients achieving sCR was significantly longer (50 months) than TTP of patients achieving CR or nCR (20 months and 19 months, respectively). On multivariable analysis, post-ASCT response of sCR was an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.80; versus CR; P = .008), in addition to proliferation rate, pre-ASCT cytogenetics, and performance status. OS rates of patients attaining sCR continued to remain superior at 2-year landmark (median, NR v 70 months for conventional CR group; P = .007). Conclusion Improved long-term outcome is seen after ASCT with achievement of sCR when compared with lesser degrees of responses. Myeloma trials reporting the response rates should identify patients achieving sCR and CR separately, owing to markedly disparate outcomes of the two categories. PMID:24248686

  1. Genetics Home Reference: multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... in these genes may interfere with proper control (regulation) of cell growth and division (proliferation), resulting in ... Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Educational Resources (5 links) ...

  2. Targeting the biophysical properties of the myeloma initiating cell niches: a pharmaceutical synergism analysis using multi-scale agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Wen; Choi, Dong Song; Wen, Jianguo; Jiang, Beini; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma, the second most common hematological cancer, is currently incurable due to refractory disease relapse and development of multiple drug resistance. We and others recently established the biophysical model that myeloma initiating (stem) cells (MICs) trigger the stiffening of their niches via SDF-1/CXCR4 paracrine; The stiffened niches then promote the colonogenesis of MICs and protect them from drug treatment. In this work we examined in silico the pharmaceutical potential of targeting MIC niche stiffness to facilitate cytotoxic chemotherapies. We first established a multi-scale agent-based model using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to recapitulate the niche stiffness centric, pro-oncogenetic positive feedback loop between MICs and myeloma-associated bone marrow stromal cells (MBMSCs), and investigated the effects of such intercellular chemo-physical communications on myeloma development. Then we used AMD3100 (to interrupt the interactions between MICs and their stroma) and Bortezomib (a recently developed novel therapeutic agent) as representative drugs to examine if the biophysical properties of myeloma niches are drugable. Results showed that our model recaptured the key experimental observation that the MBMSCs were more sensitive to SDF-1 secreted by MICs, and provided stiffer niches for these initiating cells and promoted their proliferation and drug resistance. Drug synergism analysis suggested that AMD3100 treatment undermined the capability of MICs to modulate the bone marrow microenvironment, and thus re-sensitized myeloma to Bortezomib treatments. This work is also the first attempt to virtually visualize in 3D the dynamics of the bone marrow stiffness during myeloma development. In summary, we established a multi-scale model to facilitate the translation of the niche-stiffness centric myeloma model as well as experimental observations to possible clinical applications. We concluded that targeting the biophysical properties of stem

  3. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  4. International Myeloma Working Group molecular classification of multiple myeloma: spotlight review.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, R; Bergsagel, P L; Drach, J; Shaughnessy, J; Gutierrez, N; Stewart, A K; Morgan, G; Van Ness, B; Chesi, M; Minvielle, S; Neri, A; Barlogie, B; Kuehl, W M; Liebisch, P; Davies, F; Chen-Kiang, S; Durie, B G M; Carrasco, R; Sezer, Orhan; Reiman, Tony; Pilarski, Linda; Avet-Loiseau, H

    2009-12-01

    Myeloma is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells. Although morphologically similar, several subtypes of the disease have been identified at the genetic and molecular level. These genetic subtypes are associated with unique clinicopathological features and dissimilar outcome. At the top hierarchical level, myeloma can be divided into hyperdiploid and non-hyperdiploid subtypes. The latter is mainly composed of cases harboring IgH translocations, generally associated with more aggressive clinical features and shorter survival. The three main IgH translocations in myeloma are the t(11;14)(q13;q32), t(4;14)(p16;q32) and t(14;16)(q32;q23). Trisomies and a more indolent form of the disease characterize hyperdiploid myeloma. A number of genetic progression factors have been identified including deletions of chromosomes 13 and 17 and abnormalities of chromosome 1 (1p deletion and 1q amplification). Other key drivers of cell survival and proliferation have also been identified such as nuclear factor- B-activating mutations and other deregulation factors for the cyclin-dependent pathways regulators. Further understanding of the biological subtypes of the disease has come from the application of novel techniques such as gene expression profiling and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. The combination of data arising from these studies and that previously elucidated through other mechanisms allows for most myeloma cases to be classified under one of several genetic subtypes. This paper proposes a framework for the classification of myeloma subtypes and provides recommendations for genetic testing. This group proposes that genetic testing needs to be incorporated into daily clinical practice and also as an essential component of all ongoing and future clinical trials.

  5. International Myeloma Working Group molecular classification of multiple myeloma: spotlight review

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, R; Bergsagel, PL; Drach, J; Shaughnessy, J.; Gutierrez, N; Stewart, AK; Morgan, G; Van Ness, B; Chesi, M; Minvielle, S; Neri, A; Barlogie, B; Kuehl, WM; Liebisch, P; Davies, F; Chen-Kiang, S; Durie, BGM; Carrasco, R; Sezer, Orhan; Reiman, Tony; Pilarski, Linda; Avet-Loiseau, H

    2010-01-01

    Myeloma is a malignant proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells. Although morphologically similar, several subtypes of the disease have been identified at the genetic and molecular level. These genetic subtypes are associated with unique clinico-pathological features and dissimilar outcome. At the top hierarchical level, myeloma can be divided into hyperdiploid and non-hyperdiploid subtypes. The latter is mainly composed of cases harboring IgH translocations, generally associated with more aggressive clinical features and shorter survival. The three main IgH translocations in myeloma are the t(11;14)(q13;q32), t(4;14)(p16;q32) and t(14;16)(q32;q23). Trisomies and a more indolent form of the disease characterize hyperdiploid myeloma. A number of genetic progression factors have been identified including deletions of chromosomes 13 and 17 and abnormalities of chromosome 1 (1p deletion and 1q amplification). Other key drivers of cell survival and proliferation have also been identified such as nuclear factor- B-activating mutations and other deregulation factors for the cyclin-dependent pathways regulators. Further understanding of the biological subtypes of the disease has come from the application of novel techniques such as gene expression profiling and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. The combination of data arising from these studies and that previously elucidated through other mechanisms allows for most myeloma cases to be classified under one of several genetic subtypes. This paper proposes a framework for the classification of myeloma subtypes and provides recommendations for genetic testing. This group proposes that genetic testing needs to be incorporated into daily clinical practice and also as an essential component of all ongoing and future clinical trials. PMID:19798094

  6. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlie the Anti-Tumor Activities Exerted by Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Combined with Silica Nanoparticles against Multiple Myeloma Cancer Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K.; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A.; Rabah, Danny M.; El-Toni, Ahmed M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that remains incurable despite the advent of several novel therapeutics. In this study, we aimed to delineate the impact of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP) on primary MM cells isolated from patients diagnosed with MM as well as on two MM cell lines, U266 and RPMI 8226. The IC50 values of WEV and WEV+NP that significantly decreased MM cell viability without affecting the viability of normal peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined to be 25 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. Although both WEV (25 ng/ml) and WEV+NP (10 ng/ml) decreased the CD54 surface expression without affecting the expression of CXCR4 (CXCL12 receptor) on MM cells, they significantly reduced the ability of CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) to induce actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and the subsequent reduction in chemotaxis. It has been established that the binding of CXCL12 to its receptor CXCR4 activates multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that regulate MM cell chemotaxis, adhesion, and proliferation. We found that WEV and WEV+NP clearly decreased the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated activation of AKT, ERK, NFκB and Rho-A using western blot analysis; abrogated the CXCL12-mediated proliferation of MM cells using the CFSE assay; and induced apoptosis in MM cell as determined by PI/annexin V double staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Monitoring the expression of B-cell CCL/Lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members and their role in apoptosis induction after treatment with WEV or WEV+NP revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic effectors Bcl-2, BclXL and Mcl-1; conversely increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic effectors Bak, Bax and Bim; and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential in MM cells. Taken together, our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP and the

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlie the anti-tumor activities exerted by Walterinnesia aegyptia venom combined with silica nanoparticles against multiple myeloma cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A; Rabah, Danny M; El-Toni, Ahmed M

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that remains incurable despite the advent of several novel therapeutics. In this study, we aimed to delineate the impact of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP) on primary MM cells isolated from patients diagnosed with MM as well as on two MM cell lines, U266 and RPMI 8226. The IC(50) values of WEV and WEV+NP that significantly decreased MM cell viability without affecting the viability of normal peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined to be 25 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. Although both WEV (25 ng/ml) and WEV+NP (10 ng/ml) decreased the CD54 surface expression without affecting the expression of CXCR4 (CXCL12 receptor) on MM cells, they significantly reduced the ability of CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) to induce actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and the subsequent reduction in chemotaxis. It has been established that the binding of CXCL12 to its receptor CXCR4 activates multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that regulate MM cell chemotaxis, adhesion, and proliferation. We found that WEV and WEV+NP clearly decreased the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated activation of AKT, ERK, NFκB and Rho-A using western blot analysis; abrogated the CXCL12-mediated proliferation of MM cells using the CFSE assay; and induced apoptosis in MM cell as determined by PI/annexin V double staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Monitoring the expression of B-cell CCL/Lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members and their role in apoptosis induction after treatment with WEV or WEV+NP revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic effectors Bcl-2, Bcl(XL) and Mcl-1; conversely increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic effectors Bak, Bax and Bim; and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential in MM cells. Taken together, our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP and

  8. Disruption by interferon-alpha of an autocrine interleukin-6 growth loop in IL-6-dependent U266 myeloma cells by homologous and heterologous down-regulation of the IL-6 receptor alpha- and beta-chains.

    PubMed Central

    Schwabe, M; Brini, A T; Bosco, M C; Rubboli, F; Egawa, M; Zhao, J; Princler, G L; Kung, H F

    1994-01-01

    IL-6 is an autocrine growth factor for U266 myeloma cells and their growth is inhibited by IFN-alpha or IL-6 mAb. We asked, therefore, whether IFN-alpha-induced growth inhibition involved IL-6. IFN-alpha and mAb against IL-6, the IL-6R alpha-(gp80) or beta-chain (gp130) potently inhibited U266 cells. Remarkably, this effect occurred despite IFN-alpha-augmented secretion of endogenous IL-6. However, examining the IL-6R revealed that IFN-alpha drastically curtailed expression of the IL-6R alpha- and beta-chain. This effect occurred on two different levels (protein and mRNA) and by two different mechanisms (directly and indirectly through IL-6). First, IFN-alpha, but not IL-6, greatly decreased gp80 and, to a lesser extent, gp130 mRNA levels which resulted in a loss of IL-6 binding sites. Second, IFN-alpha-induced IL-6 predominantly down-regulated membrane-bound gp130. IFN-alpha-mediated decrease of gp80 levels was not detected on IL-6-independent myeloma (RPMI 8226) or myeloid cells (U937). We conclude that IFN-alpha inhibited IL-6-dependent myeloma cell growth by depriving U266 cells of an essential component of their autocrine growth loop, a functional IL-6R. Images PMID:7989587

  9. Proteasome inhibition correlates with intracellular bortezomib concentrations but not with antiproliferative effects after bolus treatment in myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Susan; Theile, Dirk; Schäfer, Julia; Seckinger, Anja; Burhenne, Jürgen; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-10-01

    Although bortezomib is successfully used against multiple myeloma, the pharmacodynamics of proteasome inhibition and its association with efficacy or resistance is poorly understood. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, site-specific luminogenic substrate assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assays, effects of bortezomib on cellular drug concentrations, chymotrypsin- , caspase- , and trypsin-like activities, and cytotoxic efficacy were evaluated in eight myeloma cell lines directly after 1 h of exposure and additionally after a 23-h washout phase. Bortezomib accumulated in myeloma cells by up to 100-fold and concentration-dependently inhibited the proteasomal activities with the chymotrypsin-like activity being the most sensitive. Whereas intracellular concentrations correlated with the inhibition of the chymotrypsin- and the caspase-like activities of the proteasome, the cytotoxic efficacy of bortezomib did not correlate with either intracellular concentrations or proteasomal inhibition. However, the ratio of concentrations measured directly after the exposure and after the washout phase (indicating drug disposition) correlated with efficacy, suggesting that the cell's ability to dispose bortezomib at least in part influences bortezomib's cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this data argues against a direct association of intracellular concentration or proteasomal inhibition with cytotoxic efficacy but advocates for an important role of cellular drug disposition. Moreover, this study underlines the pleiotropic mode of action of bortezomib going beyond proteasome inhibition.

  10. Elevated Red Blood Cell Distribution Width as a Simple Prognostic Factor in Patients with Symptomatic Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyewon; Kong, Sun-Young; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Shim, Hyoeun; Youn, Hye Sun; Lee, Sangeun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Eom, Hyeon-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter reported in complete blood cell count tests, and has been reported as an inflammatory biomarker. Multiple myeloma (MM) is known to be associated with inflammatory microenvironments. However, the importance of RDW has been seldom studied in MM. For this study, 146 symptomatic myeloma patients with available RDW at diagnosis were retrospectively reviewed, and their characteristics were compared between two groups, those with high (>14.5%) and normal (≤14.5%) RDW. RDW was correlated to hemoglobin, MM stage, β2-microglobulin, M-protein, bone marrow plasma cells, and cellularity (P < 0.001). During induction, overall response rates of the two groups were similar (P = 0.195); however, complete response rate was higher in the normal-RDW group than it was in the high-RDW group (P = 0.005). With a median follow-up of 47 months, the normal-RDW group showed better progression-free survival (PFS) (24.2 versus 17.0 months, P = 0.029) compared to the high-RDW group. Overall survival was not different according to the RDW level (P = 0.236). In multivariate analysis, elevated RDW at diagnosis was a poor prognostic factor for PFS (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.24–8.32) after adjustment with other myeloma-related prognostic factors. RDW would be a simple and immediately available biomarker of symptomatic MM, reflecting the systemic inflammation. PMID:24963470

  11. In vitro migratory aberrancies of mesenchymal stem cells derived from multiple myeloma patients only partially modulated by bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xinxin; Yang, Jiao; Tang, Yu; Li, Junxia; Zhu, Yan; Lu, Hua; Fei, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) derived from multiple myeloma (MM) patients were different from those of normal subjects in a variety of aspects. However, it is largely unknown whether BM-MSCs derived from MM patients display any aberrant chemotactic migration. To this aim, we compared the chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients with those from normal subjects. Our results showed that BM-MSCs derived from MM patients migrated more vigorously to myeloma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was showed to suppress chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs whatever their origins. However, although the chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients to myeloma cell line was more significantly suppressed by bortezomib treatment, migration to SDF-1 or FBS of BM-MSCs was less compromised. Both SDF-1 and TNF-α enhanced phosphorylation of iκ-Bα in BM-MSCs. Although bortezomib significantly inhibited the iκ-Bα phosphorylation by SDF-1, it had little effect on iκ-Bα phosphorylation by TNF-α. Collectively, our results suggested that aberrant chemotactic migration of BM-MSCs derived from MM patients and the possible migration-regulatory role of bortezomib treatment. PMID:25400750

  12. Carfilzomib alters the HLA-presented peptidome of myeloma cells and impairs presentation of peptides with aromatic C-termini.

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, D J; Walz, S; Backert, L; Schuster, H; Kohlbacher, O; Weisel, K; Rittig, S M; Kanz, L; Salih, H R; Rammensee, H-G; Stevanović, S; Stickel, J S

    2016-04-08

    Recent studies suggest that multiple myeloma is an immunogenic disease, which might be effectively targeted by antigen-specific T-cell immunotherapy. As standard of care in myeloma includes proteasome inhibitor therapy, it is of great importance to characterize the effects of this treatment on HLA-restricted antigen presentation and implement only robustly presented targets for immunotherapeutic intervention. Here, we present a study that longitudinally and semi-quantitatively maps the effects of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib on HLA-restricted antigen presentation. The relative presentation levels of 4780 different HLA ligands were quantified in an in vitro model employing carfilzomib treatment of MM.1S and U266 myeloma cells, which revealed significant modulation of a substantial fraction of the HLA-presented peptidome. Strikingly, we detected selective down-modulation of HLA ligands with aromatic C-terminal anchor amino acids. This particularly manifested as a marked reduction in the presentation of HLA ligands through the HLA allotypes A*23:01 and A*24:02 on MM.1S cells. These findings implicate that carfilzomib mediates a direct, peptide motif-specific inhibitory effect on HLA ligand processing and presentation. As a substantial proportion of HLA allotypes present peptides with aromatic C-termini, our results may have broad implications for the implementation of antigen-specific treatment approaches in patients undergoing carfilzomib treatment.

  13. HYD1-induced increase in ROS leads to autophagy and necrotic cell death in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Emmons, Michael F.; Cress, Anne E; Argilagos, Raul F.; Lam, Kit; Kerr, William T.; Wang, Hong-Gong; Dalton, William S.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    HYD1 is a D-amino acid peptide that was previously shown to inhibit adhesion of prostate cancer cells to the extracellular matrix. In this study, we show that in addition to inhibiting adhesion of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to fibronectin, HYD1 induces cell death in MM cells as a single agent. HYD1-induced cell death was necrotic in nature as shown by: (a) decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm); (b) loss of total cellular ATP, and; (c) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, HYD1 treatment does not result in apoptotic cell death as it did not trigger the activation of caspases or the release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and Endonuclease G (Endo G) from the mitochondria, nor did it induce double stranded DNA breaks. HYD1 did initiate autophagy in cells; however, autophagy was found to be an adaptive response contributing to cell survival rather than the cause of cell death. We were further able to show that N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a thiol containing free radical scavenger, partially protects MM cells from HYD1-induced death. Additionally NAC blocked HYD1- induced as well as basal levels of autophagy, suggesting that ROS can potentially trigger both cell death and cell survival pathways. Taken together, our data describe an important role of ROS in HYD1-induced necrotic cell death in MM cells. PMID:19671765

  14. A novel BCMA/CD3 bispecific T-cell engager for the treatment of multiple myeloma induces selective lysis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hipp, S; Tai, Y-T; Blanset, D; Deegen, P; Wahl, J; Thomas, O; Rattel, B; Adam, P J; Anderson, K C; Friedrich, M

    2017-01-13

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a highly plasma cell-selective protein that is expressed on malignant plasma cells of multiple myeloma (MM) patients and therefore is an ideal target for T-cell redirecting therapies. We developed a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) targeting BCMA and CD3ɛ (BI 836909) and studied its therapeutic impacts on MM. BI 836909 induced selective lysis of BCMA-positive MM cells, activation of T cells, release of cytokines and T-cell proliferation; whereas BCMA-negative cells were not affected. Activity of BI 836909 was not influenced by the presence of bone marrow stromal cells, soluble BCMA or a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). In ex vivo assays, BI 836909 induced potent autologous MM cell lysis in both, newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory patient samples. In mouse xenograft studies, BI 836909 induced tumor cell depletion in a subcutaneous NCI-H929 xenograft model and prolonged survival in an orthotopic L-363 xenograft model. In a cynomolgus monkey study, administration of BI 836909 led to depletion of BCMA-positive plasma cells in the bone marrow. Taken together, these results show that BI 836909 is a highly potent and efficacious approach to selectively deplete BCMA-positive MM cells and represents a novel immunotherapeutic for the treatment of MM.Leukemia advance online publication, 13 January 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.388.

  15. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  16. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alexandra L; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Rosen, Steven T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death.

  17. Effect of HM910, a novel camptothecin derivative, on the inhibition of multiple myeloma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Ouyang, Yudan; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Wenqiang; Wang, Fang; Huang, Zhencong; Wang, Xiaokun; Chen, Yifan; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    Despite a variety of novel therapeutic agents, such as bortezomib, thalidomide and topotecan, multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease, thus the development of new chemotherapeutical agents is of high priority. We found HM910, a novel camptothecin (CPT) derivative, exhibited potent inhibition of MM cell growth in vitro and in xenografts of nude mice. Mechanistically, HM910 reduced the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) via an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), which eventually resulting in the release of cytochrome c and the activation of mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway. On the other hand, HM910 significantly triggered cell cycle arrest in G1 phase via downregulating the expressions of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6, resulting in down-regulation of cyclin D1. Therefore, HM910 maybe a promising candidate for treating MM patients and is currently in phase I clinical trial in China. PMID:26045982

  18. Comparison of SPE, IFE, and FLC in Monitoring Patients with Multiple Myeloma After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhou, Jia-Zi; Chang, Hui-Rong; Dai, Li-Jun; Zhu, Zi-Ling; Feng, Yu-Feng; Gong, Fei-Ran; Wu, De-Pei

    2015-12-01

    Conventionally, serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) and serum immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) are used as primary methods to diagnose and monitor multiple myeloma (MM). Recently, serum-free light chain (FLC) assay has been incorporated into hematological screening programs for myeloma. The purpose of this study is to compare the performance of the three methods in monitoring MM patients after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). SPE, serum IFE and serum FLC assay were performed on 38 MM patients who underwent ASCT. In total, four patients had unexpected protein bands (UPBs) and 13 patients had relapsed after ASCT. Our results indicate that IFE is more sensitive than SPE and FLC assay in detection of UPBs and relapse. The results of IFE may provide useful information in advance of patient relapse.

  19. Liposomal delivery improves the growth-inhibitory and apoptotic activity of low doses of gemcitabine in multiple myeloma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Celia, Christian; Malara, Natalia; Terracciano, Rosa; Cosco, Donato; Paolino, Donatella; Fresta, Massimo; Savino, Rocco

    2008-06-01

    Gemcitabine-loaded pegylated unilamellar liposomes (200 nm) were proposed for the treatment of multiple myeloma cancer disease. Physicochemical and technological parameters of liposomes were evaluated by using laser light scattering and gel permeation chromatography. The growth-inhibitory activity of gemcitabine-loaded liposomes compared to the free drug was assayed in vitro on U266 (autocrine, interleukin-6-independent) and INA-6 (IL-6-dependent) multiple myeloma cell lines. Liposomes noticeably improved the growth-inhibitory activity of gemcitabine in terms of both dose-dependent and incubation-time effects. Liposomal delivery of gemcitabine consistently and significantly increased induction of apoptosis and caused a complete inhibition of proliferation. Liposomes were able to interact with multiple myeloma cells as demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and hence to improve the intracellular gemcitabine delivery. Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes were much more effective in vitro than the free drug. This formulation may offer even more in vivo advantages both in terms of drug pharmacokinetic and biodistribution.

  20. Identification of Long Non-Coding RNAs Deregulated in Multiple Myeloma Cells Resistant to Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Driscoll, James J.

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment remains unchallenged, dose-limiting toxicities and the inevitable emergence of drug resistance limit their long-term utility. Disease eradication is compromised by drug resistance that is either present de novo or therapy-induced, which accounts for the majority of tumor relapses and MM-related deaths. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a broad class of RNA molecules, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), that do not encode proteins but play a major role in regulating the fundamental cellular processes that control cancer initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. While lncRNAs have recently attracted significant attention as therapeutic targets to potentially improve cancer treatment, identification of lncRNAs that are deregulated in cells resistant to PIs has not been previously addressed. We have modeled drug resistance by generating three MM cell lines with acquired resistance to either bortezomib, carfilzomib, or ixazomib. Genome-wide profiling identified lncRNAs that were significantly deregulated in all three PI-resistant cell lines relative to the drug-sensitive parental cell line. Strikingly, certain lncRNAs deregulated in the three PI-resistant cell lines were also deregulated in MM plasma cells isolated from newly diagnosed patients compared to healthy plasma cells. Taken together, these preliminary studies strongly suggest that lncRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent or overcome drug resistance. More investigations are ongoing to expand these initial studies in a greater number of MM patients to better define lncRNAs signatures that contribute to PI resistance in MM. PMID:27782060

  1. Mitochondrial-Targeted Decyl-Triphenylphosphonium Enhances 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Mediated Oxidative Stress and Clonogenic Killing of Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schibler, Jeanine; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann M.; Reedy, Jessica L.; Zhan, Fenghuang; Spitz, Douglas R.; Schultz, Michael K.; Goel, Apollina

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advances have markedly prolonged overall survival in multiple myeloma (MM) but the disease currently remains incurable. In a panel of MM cell lines (MM.1S, OPM-2, H929, and U266), using CD138 immunophenotyping, side population staining, and stem cell-related gene expression, we demonstrate the presence of stem-like tumor cells. Hypoxic culture conditions further increased CD138low stem-like cells with upregulated expression of OCT4 and NANOG. Compared to MM cells, these stem-like cells maintained lower steady-state pro-oxidant levels with increased uptake of the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog. In primary human MM samples, increased glycolytic gene expression correlated with poorer overall and event-free survival outcomes. Notably, stem-like cells showed increased mitochondrial mass, rhodamine 123 accumulation, and orthodox mitochondrial configuration while more condensed mitochondria were noted in the CD138high cells. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) induced ER stress as detected by qPCR (BiP, ATF4) and immunoblotting (BiP, CHOP) and increased dihydroethidium probe oxidation both CD138low and CD138high cells. Treatment with a mitochondrial-targeting agent decyl-triphenylphosphonium (10-TPP) increased intracellular steady-state pro-oxidant levels in stem-like and mature MM cells. Furthermore, 10-TPP mediated increases in mitochondrial oxidant production were suppressed by ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase. Relative to 2-DG or 10-TPP alone, 2-DG plus 10-TPP combination showed increased caspase 3 activation in MM cells with minimal toxicity to the normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Notably, treatment with polyethylene glycol conjugated catalase significantly reduced 2-DG and/or 10-TPP-induced apoptosis of MM cells. Also, the combination of 2-DG with 10-TPP decreased clonogenic survival of MM cells. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy of metabolic oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity of MM cells via 2-DG

  2. Activation of NK cells and disruption of PD-L1/PD-1 axis: two different ways for lenalidomide to block myeloma progression.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Massimo; Janji, Bassam; Berchem, Guy

    2017-02-09

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play a critical role against tumor cells in hematological malignancies. Their activating receptors are essential in tumor cell killing. In Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients, NK cell differentiation, activation and cytotoxic potential are strongly impaired leading to MM escape from immune surveillance in tissues and bone marrow. Mechanisms used by MM to affect NK cell functions are mediated by the release of soluble factors, the expression of activating and inhibitory NK cell ligands, and the expression of immune check-point inhibitors. Lenalidomide represents an efficient clinical approach in MM treatment to improve patients' survival. Lenalidomide does not only promotes tumor apoptosis, but also stimulates T and NK cells, thereby facilitating NK-mediated tumor recognition and killing. This occurs since Lenalidomide acts on several critical points: stimulates T cell proliferation and cytokine secretion; decreases the expression of the immune check-point inhibitor Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) on both T and NK cells in MM patients; decreases the expression of both PD-1 and PD-L1 on MM cells; promotes MM cell death and abrogates MM/stromal microenvironment cross-talk, a process known to promote the MM cell survival and proliferation. This leads to the inhibition of the negative signal induced by PD-1/PD-L1 axis on NK cells, restoring NK cell cytotoxic functions. Given the importance of an effective immune response to counteract the MM progression and the promising approaches using anti-PD-1/PD-L1 strategies, we will discuss in this review how Lenalidomide could represent an adequate approach to re-establish the recognition against MM by exhausted NK cell.

  3. Thromboxane A2 Receptor Inhibition Suppresses Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation by Inducing p38/c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated G2/M Progression Delay and Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Tao, Bo; Liu, Guizhu; Chen, Guilin; Zhu, Qian; Yu, Ying; Yu, Yu; Xiong, Hong

    2016-02-26

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy without effective therapeutics. Thromboxane A2 (TxA2)/TxA2 receptor (T prostanoid receptor (TP)) modulates the progression of some carcinomas; however, its effects on MM cell proliferation remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and downstream prostaglandin profiles in human myeloma cell lines RPMI-8226 and U-266 and analyzed the effects of COX-1/-2 inhibitors SC-560 and NS-398 on MM cell proliferation. Our observations implicate COX-2 as being involved in modulating cell proliferation. We further incubated MM cells with prostaglandin receptor antagonists or agonists and found that only the TP antagonist, SQ29548, suppressed MM cell proliferation. TP silencing and the TP agonist, U46619, further confirmed this finding. Moreover, SQ29548 and TP silencing promoted MM cell G2/M phase delay accompanied by reducing cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression. Notably, cyclin B1 overexpression rescued MM cells from G2/M arrest. We also found that the TP agonist activated JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and inhibitors of JNK and p38 MAPK depressed U46619-induced proliferation and cyclin B1/CDK1 protein expression. In addition, SQ29548 and TP silencing led to the MM cell apoptotic rate increasing with improving caspase 3 activity. The knockdown of caspase 3 reversed the apoptotic rate. Taken together, our results suggest that TxA2/TP promotes MM cell proliferation by reducing cell delay at G2/M phase via elevating p38 MAPK/JNK-mediated cyclin B1/CDK1 expression and hindering cell apoptosis. The TP inhibitor has potential as a novel agent to target kinase cascades for MM therapy.

  4. Thromboxane A2 Receptor Inhibition Suppresses Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation by Inducing p38/c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-mediated G2/M Progression Delay and Cell Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Tao, Bo; Liu, Guizhu; Chen, Guilin; Zhu, Qian; Yu, Ying; Yu, Yu; Xiong, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy without effective therapeutics. Thromboxane A2 (TxA2)/TxA2 receptor (T prostanoid receptor (TP)) modulates the progression of some carcinomas; however, its effects on MM cell proliferation remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and downstream prostaglandin profiles in human myeloma cell lines RPMI-8226 and U-266 and analyzed the effects of COX-1/-2 inhibitors SC-560 and NS-398 on MM cell proliferation. Our observations implicate COX-2 as being involved in modulating cell proliferation. We further incubated MM cells with prostaglandin receptor antagonists or agonists and found that only the TP antagonist, SQ29548, suppressed MM cell proliferation. TP silencing and the TP agonist, U46619, further confirmed this finding. Moreover, SQ29548 and TP silencing promoted MM cell G2/M phase delay accompanied by reducing cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase-1 (CDK1) mRNA and protein expression. Notably, cyclin B1 overexpression rescued MM cells from G2/M arrest. We also found that the TP agonist activated JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and inhibitors of JNK and p38 MAPK depressed U46619-induced proliferation and cyclin B1/CDK1 protein expression. In addition, SQ29548 and TP silencing led to the MM cell apoptotic rate increasing with improving caspase 3 activity. The knockdown of caspase 3 reversed the apoptotic rate. Taken together, our results suggest that TxA2/TP promotes MM cell proliferation by reducing cell delay at G2/M phase via elevating p38 MAPK/JNK-mediated cyclin B1/CDK1 expression and hindering cell apoptosis. The TP inhibitor has potential as a novel agent to target kinase cascades for MM therapy. PMID:26724804

  5. A simplified method for stem cell autografting in multiple myeloma: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    López-Otero, A; Ruiz-Delgado, G J; Ruiz-Argüelles, G J

    2009-12-01

    In a 14-year period in a single institution 31 autografts were performed in 26 patients with multiple myeloma (MM), using a simplified and affordable autografting procedure: conducting the grafts on an outpatient basis and avoiding stem cell freezing. Autografts were started on an outpatient basis in all instances, but four patients were admitted to the hospital. Median time to achieve more than 0.5 x 10(9)/l granulocytes was 27 days, whereas median time to recover above 20 x 10(9)/l plts was 37 days. CR was achieved in 19 cases and a very good partial response in 6 cases. The 100-day mortality was 9.6%. The overall median post-transplant survival has not been reached, being above 76 months, whereas the 76-month survival is 80%. The median cost of each procedure was US$ 15 000. Survival results were substantially better than those of historical control in a group of patients treated in the same institution with melphalan/prednisone. It is concluded that high-dose therapy rescued with a simplified autologous stem cell graft is a valid, useful and affordable therapeutic option for patients with MM, even with economical restraints.

  6. Enantioselective and Synergetic Toxicity of Axial Chiral Herbicide Propisochlor to SP2/0 Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Chunhong; Yang, Ruili; Xu, Zhenlin; Zhou, Lijun; Sun, Yuanming; Lei, Hongtao

    2015-09-16

    The axial chiral herbicide propisochlor is used to control weeds. Different enantiomers of a compound usually have different biological activities. It is unclear how the toxicities of the propisochlor enantiomers differ. Propisochlor enantiomers, separated by high-performance liquid chromatography, were tested on SP2/0 myeloma cells. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were measured, and interactions between the enantiomers were evaluated. The rac-propisochlor, pure R-(+) isomer, and pure S-(-) isomer inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The rac-propisochlor, R-(+) isomer, and S-(-) isomer half maximal effective concentration values after 24 h of incubation were 111 ± 0.15, 68 ± 0.09, and 99 ± 0.21 μM, respectively. R-(+) isomer induced the most apoptosis. R-(+) isomer was ∼1.63 times more cytotoxic than rac-propisochlor and ∼1.46 times more cytotoxic than S-(-) isomer. Antagonistic cytotoxic interactions were found between R-(+) and S-(-) isomers. This is the first time the toxicities of these enantiomers and antagonism between the enantiomers have been reported. The antagonism indicates that the ecotoxicological effects of the enantiomers should be investigated.

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride and Ritonavir in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Anemia; Fatigue; Fever; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphocytosis; Night Sweats; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Splenomegaly; Thrombocytopenia; Weight Loss

  8. Early Prognostic Value of Monitoring Serum Free Light Chain in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur; Sucak, Gülsan Türköz; Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Yağcı, Münci; Haznedar, Rauf

    2017-03-16

    We hypothesized the levels of free light chains obtained before and after autologous stem cell transplantation can be useful in predicting transplantation outcome. We analyzed 70 multiple myeloma patients. Abnormal free light chain ratios before stem cell transplantation were found to be associated early progression, although without any impact on overall survival. At day +30, the normalization of levels of involved free light chain related with early progression. According to these results almost one-third reduction of free light chain levels can predict favorable prognosis after autologous stem cell transplantation.

  9. Proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells are largely independent from proteasome activity and show complex proteomic changes, in particular in redox and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, G P; Besse, L; Li, N; Kraus, M; Besse, A; Meeuwenoord, N; Bader, J; Everts, B; den Dulk, H; Overkleeft, H S; Florea, B I; Driessen, C

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive resistance of myeloma to proteasome inhibition represents a clinical challenge, whose biology is poorly understood. Proteasome mutations were implicated as underlying mechanism, while an alternative hypothesis based on low activation status of the unfolded protein response was recently suggested (IRE1/XBP1-low model). We generated bortezomib- and carfilzomib-adapted, highly resistant multiple myeloma cell clones (AMO-BTZ, AMO-CFZ), which we analyzed in a combined quantitative and functional proteomic approach. We demonstrate that proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition, irrespective of a proteasome mutation, and uniformly show an 'IRE1/XBP1-low' signature. Adaptation of myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors involved quantitative changes in >600 protein species with similar patterns in AMO-BTZ and AMO-CFZ cells: proteins involved in metabolic regulation, redox homeostasis, and protein folding and destruction were upregulated, while apoptosis and transcription/translation were downregulated. The quantitatively most upregulated protein in AMO-CFZ cells was the multidrug resistance protein (MDR1) protein ABCB1, and carfilzomib resistance could be overcome by MDR1 inhibition. We propose a model where proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition owing to metabolic adaptations that favor the generation of reducing equivalents, such as NADPH, which is supported by oxidative glycolysis. Proteasome inhibitor resistance may thus be targeted by manipulating the energy and redox metabolism. PMID:27118406

  10. CD117 expression in gammopathies is associated with an altered maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid hematopoietic cell compartments and favorable disease features

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Flores-Montero, Juan; Perez, Jose J.; Gutierrez, Norma C.; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Matarraz, Sergio; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant CD117 expression is associated with a favorable outcome in multiple myeloma. We analyzed 106 patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma (n=50), smoldering multiple myeloma (n=38) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=18) to elucidate biological features of CD117+ versus CD117− monoclonal gammopathies. CD117+ (mono)clonal plasma cells were detected in 30% symptomatic multiple myeloma, 45% smoldering multiple myeloma and 72% monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients. CD117 expression was associated with higher percentages of normal bone marrow plasma cells, CD117+ myeloid precursors and CD38+ B lymphocytes in all monoclonal gammopathies. Conversely, the number of bone marrow CD34+ myeloid cells and peripheral blood neutrophils was reduced among CD117+ multiple myeloma but not monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients. CD117 expression by (mono)clonal plasma cells is associated with uniquely altered patterns of production of hematopoietic bone marrow cells with decreased peripheral blood neutrophil counts and persistence of normal residual bone marrow plasma cells. PMID:20971816

  11. Do We Know What Causes Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread to other organs. Myeloma cells also show abnormalities in their chromosomes. In human cells, DNA is packaged into chromosomes. ... one chromosome has switched with part of another chromosome in the myeloma cells. ... have important abnormalities in other bone marrow cells and that these ...

  12. Clarifying the molecular mechanism associated with carfilzomib resistance in human multiple myeloma using microarray gene expression profile and genetic interaction network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhihong; Liu, Tingbo; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a Food and Drug Administration-approved selective proteasome inhibitor for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, recent studies indicate that MM cells still develop resistance to carfilzomib, and the molecular mechanisms associated with carfilzomib resistance have not been studied in detail. In this study, to better understand its potential resistant effect and its underlying mechanisms in MM, microarray gene expression profile associated with carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 and its parental cell line was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Raw fluorescent signals were normalized and differently expressed genes were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays method. Genetic interaction network was expanded using String, a biomolecular interaction network JAVA platform. Meanwhile, molecular function, biological process and signaling pathway enrichment analysis were performed based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Totally, 27 upregulated and 36 downregulated genes were identified and a genetic interaction network associated with the resistant effect was expanded basing on String, which consisted of 100 nodes and 249 edges. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways were aberrant in carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 cells. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that carfilzomib potentially conferred drug resistance to KMS-11 cells by cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways, which may provide some potential molecular therapeutic targets for drug combination therapy against carfilzomib resistance.

  13. Clarifying the molecular mechanism associated with carfilzomib resistance in human multiple myeloma using microarray gene expression profile and genetic interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhihong; Liu, Tingbo; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a Food and Drug Administration-approved selective proteasome inhibitor for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, recent studies indicate that MM cells still develop resistance to carfilzomib, and the molecular mechanisms associated with carfilzomib resistance have not been studied in detail. In this study, to better understand its potential resistant effect and its underlying mechanisms in MM, microarray gene expression profile associated with carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 and its parental cell line was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Raw fluorescent signals were normalized and differently expressed genes were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays method. Genetic interaction network was expanded using String, a biomolecular interaction network JAVA platform. Meanwhile, molecular function, biological process and signaling pathway enrichment analysis were performed based on Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Totally, 27 upregulated and 36 downregulated genes were identified and a genetic interaction network associated with the resistant effect was expanded basing on String, which consisted of 100 nodes and 249 edges. In addition, signaling pathway enrichment analysis indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways were aberrant in carfilzomib-resistant KMS-11 cells. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that carfilzomib potentially conferred drug resistance to KMS-11 cells by cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, autophagy, ErbB signaling pathway, microRNAs in cancer and fatty acid metabolism pathways, which may provide some potential molecular therapeutic targets for drug combination therapy against carfilzomib resistance. PMID:28280367

  14. In vivo molecular imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in patients with advanced multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Herrmann, Ken; Knop, Stefan; Schottelius, Margret; Eiber, Matthias; Lückerath, Katharina; Pietschmann, Elke; Habringer, Stefan; Gerngroß, Carlos; Franke, Katharina; Rudelius, Martina; Schirbel, Andreas; Lapa, Constantin; Schwamborn, Kristina; Steidle, Sabine; Hartmann, Elena; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kropf, Saskia; Beer, Ambros J; Peschel, Christian; Einsele, Hermann; Buck, Andreas K; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 is a G-protein-coupled receptor that mediates recruitment of blood cells toward its ligand SDF-1. In cancer, high CXCR4 expression is frequently associated with tumor dissemination and poor prognosis. We evaluated the novel CXCR4 probe [68Ga]Pentixafor for in vivo mapping of CXCR4 expression density in mice xenografted with human CXCR4-positive MM cell lines and patients with advanced MM by means of positron emission tomography (PET). [68Ga]Pentixafor PET provided images with excellent specificity and contrast. In 10 of 14 patients with advanced MM [68Ga]Pentixafor PET/CT scans revealed MM manifestations, whereas only nine of 14 standard [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans were rated visually positive. Assessment of blood counts and standard CD34+ flow cytometry did not reveal significant blood count changes associated with tracer application. Based on these highly encouraging data on clinical PET imaging of CXCR4 expression in a cohort of MM patients, we conclude that [68Ga]Pentixafor PET opens a broad field for clinical investigations on CXCR4 expression and for CXCR4-directed therapeutic approaches in MM and other diseases. PMID:25736399

  15. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of snake venom combined with silica nanoparticles in a murine model of human multiple myeloma: molecular targets for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M; Badr, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that reside in the bone marrow (BM). MM is an incurable disease; thus, screening for novel anti-myeloma drugs remains critically important. We recently described a silica nanoparticle-based snake venom delivery model that targets cancer cells, but not normal cells. Using this model, we demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) in two breast carcinoma cell lines when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we aimed to delineate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in an MM-bearing experimental nude mouse model. We found that treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to treatment with NP or vehicle. WEV+NP- and WEV-treated cancer cells exhibited marked elevations in oxidative stress and robust reductions in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and B cell-activating factor (BAFF). WEV+NP also decreased the surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4 and CXCR6 to a greater extent than WEV alone, and WEV+NP subsequently reduced migration in response to the cognate ligands CXCL10, CXCL12 and CXCL16. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (EGF-1)- and IL-6-mediated MM cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle and enhanced the induction of apoptosis of MM cells. In addition, the results of treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation of AKT; increased the expression of cyclin B1; altered the mitochondrial membrane potential; increased the activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9; and sensitized MM cells to growth arrest and apoptosis. Our data reveal the therapeutic potential of the nanoparticle-sustained delivery of snake venom to fight cancer cells.

  16. Absence of spontaneous response improvement beyond day +100 after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Dávila, J; Isola, I; Ocio, E M; Rosiñol, L; García-Sanz, R; Cibeira, M T; Tovar, N; Rovira, M; Mateos, M V; Miguel, J S; Bladé, J

    2017-04-01

    The response evaluation after autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is usually performed at day +100 in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A recent report suggests that improvement in the response can be observed beyond day +100. The aim of the present study has been to evaluate the rate of improved response and outcome beyond day +100 after ASCT, with and without maintenance therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients who underwent single ASCT with chemosensitive disease and achieved less than CR at day 100 post ASCT were evaluated. Seventy-four patients (51.4%) did not receive any maintenance with only one of them showing an upgrade in the response. The remaining 70 patients (48.6%) received maintenance therapy; eleven of them (15.7%) improved their response beyond day +100. The outcome of these patients was better than those who did not upgrade their response in both progression-free survival and overall survival (P=0.019 and P=0.031, respectively). In conclusion, the improvement in response beyond day +100 after ASCT in patients not receiving any therapy is exceedingly rare. A minority of patients receiving maintenance therapy after ASCT upgrades their response and this finding is associated with better outcome.

  17. Thalidomide-based induction regimens are as effective as bortezomib-based regimens in elderly patients with multiple myeloma with cereblon expression.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Shin, Myung-Geun; Lee, Seung-Shin; Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Tae-Young; Cho, Min-Seok; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2016-10-01

    Cereblon (CRBN) has been identified as a primary target of immunomodulatory drugs and is considered a biomarker for the prediction of outcomes after thalidomide- or lenalidomide-based treatments. In this study, we evaluated CRBN expression in bone marrow (BM) tissue at diagnosis and investigated the relationship between CRBN expression and treatment outcomes after thalidomide- or bortezomib-based front-line therapies in 89 elderly patients with multiple myeloma (MM). CRBN expression at the time of diagnosis was evaluated with immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for myeloma cells in paraffin wax-embedded BM tissue. CRBN-immunostained slides were scored by intensity and diffuseness, and a total score of >6 was defined as CRBN-positive (CRBN(+)). Thirty-eight patients (45.2 %) were CRBN(+). Among patients treated with thalidomide-based regimens, CRBN(+) patients showed a better treatment response than did CRBN-negative patients (35.0 vs. 11.8 % complete response rate, respectively; HR = 4.038, P = 0.137). During a median follow-up of 31.8 months, patients treated with bortezomib-based regimens had a longer time to progression (TTP) than did patients treated with thalidomide-based regimens (15.6 vs. 13.2 months, respectively; P = 0.047), but early mortality occurred frequently in patients treated with bortezomib-based regimens. Additionally, there was no significant difference in survival outcomes between thalidomide- and bortezomib-based regimens in CRBN(+) patients (median TTP, 13.8 vs. 15.6 months, respectively; P = 0.842 and median OS, 39.3 vs. 30.1 months, respectively; P = 0.074). These data suggest that thalidomide-based regimens are as effective as bortezomib-based regimens in elderly patients with MM who are CRBN(+). Thus, CRBN positivity, by IHC staining, may be useful in deciding appropriate treatment options in elderly patients with MM.

  18. Granulocyte-like myeloid derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) are increased in multiple myeloma and are driven by dysfunctional mesenchymal stem cells (MSC).

    PubMed

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Tibullo, Daniele; Parrinello, Nunziatina L; La Cava, Piera; Di Rosa, Michelino; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Di Raimondo, Cosimo; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Avola, Roberto; Romano, Alessandra; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2016-12-27

    Granulocytic-Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) are increased in Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients but the mechanisms of G-MDSC generation are still unknown. There are many evidences of the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in promoting MM cell growth, survival and drug-resistance. We here used a specific experimental model in vitro to evaluate the ability of MSC to induce G-MDSC. We found that although MSC derived from healthy donors (HD), MGUS and MM were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only MM-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability. In addition, in comparison with MSC derived from HD, MM-MSC produce higher amount of immune-modulatory factors that could be involved in MDSC induction. Compared to G-MDSC obtained from co-culture models with MSC from healthy subjects, both MGUS and MM-MSC-educated G-MDSC showed increase of immune-modulatory factors. However, only MM-MSC educated G-MDSC 1) up-regulated immune-suppressive factors as ARG1 and TNFα, 2) expressed higher levels of PROK2, important in angiogenesis and inflammatory process, and 3) showed ability to digest bone matrix.Our data demonstrate that MM-MSC are functionally different from healthy subjects and MGUS-MSC, supporting an evolving concept regarding the contribution of MM-MSC to tumor development and progression.

  19. Granulocyte-like myeloid derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) are increased in multiple myeloma and are driven by dysfunctional mesenchymal stem cells (MSC)

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Nunziatina L.; La Cava, Piera; Di Rosa, Michelino; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Di Raimondo, Cosimo; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Palumbo, Giuseppe A.; Avola, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Granulocytic-Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSC) are increased in Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients but the mechanisms of G-MDSC generation are still unknown. There are many evidences of the role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in promoting MM cell growth, survival and drug-resistance. We here used a specific experimental model in vitro to evaluate the ability of MSC to induce G-MDSC. We found that although MSC derived from healthy donors (HD), MGUS and MM were able to generate the same amount of MDSC, only MM-MSC-educated G-MDSC exhibited suppressive ability. In addition, in comparison with MSC derived from HD, MM-MSC produce higher amount of immune-modulatory factors that could be involved in MDSC induction. Compared to G-MDSC obtained from co-culture models with MSC from healthy subjects, both MGUS and MM-MSC-educated G-MDSC showed increase of immune-modulatory factors. However, only MM-MSC educated G-MDSC 1) up-regulated immune-suppressive factors as ARG1 and TNFα, 2) expressed higher levels of PROK2, important in angiogenesis and inflammatory process, and 3) showed ability to digest bone matrix. Our data demonstrate that MM-MSC are functionally different from healthy subjects and MGUS-MSC, supporting an evolving concept regarding the contribution of MM-MSC to tumor development and progression. PMID:26967390

  20. “Occult” mastocytosis with activating c‐kit point mutation evolving into systemic mastocytosis associated with plasma cell myeloma and secondary amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sotlar, K; Saeger, W; Stellmacher, F; Stahmer, J; Jäckle, S; Valent, P; Horny, H‐P

    2006-01-01

    A case of a 70‐year‐old man presenting with exsudative enteropathy due to light‐chain‐associated amyloidosis is reported. The diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis associated with IgG/λ plasma cell myeloma and secondary generalised amyloidosis was carried out by morphological evaluation of bone marrow biopsy. The c‐kit point mutation D816Y was detected by molecular analysis. Two years before, a cystadenolymphoma of the left parotid gland had been removed. A moderate increase of loosely scattered spindle‐shaped mast cells, a subpopulation of them expressing CD25, an antigen that is not expressed by normal or reactive mast cells, was shown by retrospective analysis carried out on an intraparotideal lymph node. The c‐kit mutation D816Y was shown by the molecular analysis of the lymph node. In summary, the notion that systemic mastocytosis may very rarely be associated with B cell neoplasms and that neoplastic mast cell infiltrates may be obscured because of only a minimal increase of atypical mast cells, which are outnumbered by other non‐neoplastic cells in the same tissue, is supported by this case. This finding was preliminarily termed “occult” mastocytosis. PMID:16873565

  1. Thalidomide in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: influence of thalidomide treatment on peripheral blood stem cell collection yield.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, I; Lokhorst, H M; Raab, M S; Holt, B van der; Cremer, F W; Herrmann, D; Glasmacher, A; Schmidt-Wolf, I G H; Blau, I W; Martin, H; Salwender, H; Haenel, A; Sonneveld, P; Goldschmidt, H

    2007-06-01

    In a phase III randomized, multicenter study, the German-speaking Myeloma-Multicenter Group (GMMG) and the Dutch-Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group (HOVON) group investigated the influence of thalidomide (Thal) on the outcome of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection in multiple myeloma (MM) before peripheral autologous blood stem cell transplantation (ABSCT). We analyzed the data of 398 myeloma patients after induction with Thal, doxorubicin and dexamethasone (TAD) in comparison with vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone (VAD) followed by mobilization with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (CAD) and PBSC collection. Within both the study groups, patients treated with TAD showed to collect significantly fewer CD34(+) cells compared with VAD (GMMG, TAD: median 9.8 x 10(6)/kg; range 2.0-33.6; VAD: median 10.9 x 10(6)/kg range 3.0-36.0; P=0.02) (HOVON, TAD: median 7.4 x 10(6)/kg; range 2.0-33.0; VAD: median 9.4 x 10(6)/kg; range 0.0-48.7; P=0.009). However, engraftment after peripheral autologous stem cell transplantation showed no difference between Thal and VAD groups. We conclude that Thal as a part of induction regimen is associated with better response rates (GMMG-HD3: CR/PR 79%, VAD: CR/PR 58%; HOVON-50: TAD: CR/PR 81%, VAD: CR/PR 61%), but significantly affects the yield of PBSC collection. Nevertheless, the number of total CD34(+) cells collected was sufficient for double autologous transplantation in 82% of the Thal patients, with at least 2.5 x 10(6)/kg CD34(+) cells.

  2. Aspirin enhances the cytotoxic activity of bortezomib against myeloma cells via suppression of Bcl-2, survivin and phosphorylation of AKT

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jiang-Hua; Yuan, Li-Ya; Chen, Guo-An

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, it was found that aspirin (ASA) exerted antimyeloma actions in vivo and in vitro. The resistance to bortezomib (BTZ) in multiple myeloma (MM) is partly due to AKT activation and the upregulation of survivin induced by BTZ, which are the targets of ASA in gastric and ovarian cancer, respectively. Thus, the present study investigated the interaction between ASA and BTZ in MM and further clarified the underlying mechanisms. MM1.S and RPMI-8226 cell lines harboring the N- and K-Ras mutations, respectively, were treated with 2.5 mM ASA, 10 nM BTZ and ASA+BTZ for different durations. The proliferation and apoptosis of the cells were determined, and the underlying mechanisms governing the interaction of ASA and BTZ were examined in the MM cells. Treatment with ASA+BTZ caused higher rates of proliferative inhibition and apoptosis in the MM1.S and RPMI-8226 cells in time-dependent manner, compared with either agent alone. A drug interaction assay revealed the additive effect of ASA and BTZ on the myeloma cells. ASA alone inhibited the levels of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) and survivin, whereas BTZ alone augmented the levels of p-AKT and survivin. Of note, ASA markedly decreased the upregulation of p-AKT and survivin induced by BTZ. Treatment with ASA+BTZ significantly suppressed the level of Bcl-2, compared with either agent alone. ASA may potentiate the antimyeloma activity of BTZ against myeloma cells via suppression of AKT phosphorylation, survivin and Bcl-2, indicating the potential of ASA+BTZ in treating MM, particularly for cases of BTZ-refractory/relapsed MM. PMID:28356941

  3. Notch signaling deregulation in multiple myeloma: A rational molecular target

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Silvia; Platonova, Natalia; Paoli, Alessandro; Basile, Andrea; Taiana, Elisa; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) is still an incurable neoplasia due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to therapy. Myeloma cell localization in the bone marrow milieu allows direct interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor bone marrow cells which promote neoplastic cell growth, survival, bone disease, acquisition of drug resistance and consequent relapse. Twenty percent of MM patients are at high-risk of treatment failure as defined by tumor markers or presentation as plasma cell leukemia. Cumulative evidences indicate a key role of Notch signaling in multiple myeloma onset and progression. Unlike other Notch-related malignancies, where the majority of patients carry gain-of-function mutations in Notch pathway members, in MM cell Notch signaling is aberrantly activated due to an increased expression of Notch receptors and ligands; notably, this also results in the activation of Notch signaling in surrounding stromal cells which contributes to myeloma cell proliferation, survival and migration, as well as to bone disease and intrinsic and acquired pharmacological resistance. Here we review the last findings on the mechanisms and the effects of Notch signaling dysregulation in MM and provide a rationale for a therapeutic strategy aiming at inhibiting Notch signaling, along with a complete overview on the currently available Notch-directed approaches. PMID:26308486

  4. Identification of the source of elevated hepatocyte growth factor levels in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine which can lead to cancer cell proliferation, migration and metastasis. In multiple myeloma (MM) patients it is an abundant component of the bone marrow. HGF levels are elevated in 50% of patients and associated with poor prognosis. Here we aim to investigate its source in myeloma. Methods HGF mRNA levels in bone marrow core biopsies from healthy individuals and myeloma patients were quantified by real-time PCR. HGF gene expression profiling in CD138+ cells isolated from bone marrow aspirates of healthy individuals and MM patients was performed by microarray analysis. HGF protein concentrations present in peripheral blood of MM patients were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytogenetic status of CD138+ cells was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA sequencing of the HGF gene promoter. HGF secretion in co-cultures of human myeloma cell lines and bone marrow stromal cells was measured by ELISA. Results HGF gene expression profiling in both bone marrow core biopsies and CD138+ cells showed elevated HGF mRNA levels in myeloma patients. HGF mRNA levels in biopsies and in myeloma cells correlated. Quantification of HGF protein levels in serum also correlated with HGF mRNA levels in CD138+ cells from corresponding patients. Cytogenetic analysis showed myeloma cell clones with HGF copy numbers between 1 and 3 copies. There was no correlation between HGF copy number and HGF mRNA levels. Co-cultivation of the human myeloma cell lines ANBL-6 and JJN3 with bone marrow stromal cells or the HS-5 cell line resulted in a significant increase in secreted HGF. Conclusions We here show that in myeloma patients HGF is primarily produced by malignant plasma cells, and that HGF production by these cells might be supported by the bone marrow microenvironment. Considering the fact that elevated HGF serum and plasma levels predict poor prognosis, these findings are of

  5. Interaction between IL-6 and TNF-α genotypes associated with bacteremia in multiple myeloma patients submitted to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).

    PubMed

    Trigo, Fernanda M B; Luizon, Marcelo R; Dutra, Hélio S; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Márcio; Simões, Belinda P

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation affects patient׳s vulnerability to infections due to immunological changes related to chemotherapy. Multiple myeloma is characterized by susceptibility to infections, and IL-6 and TNF-α increased levels affect immune response (IR). Polymorphisms in promoter region of cytokine genes may alter expression levels and affect IR. We performed interaction analysis of IL-6 (-174G/C) and TNF-α (-308G/A) polymorphisms with infection susceptibility in 148 patients classified accordingly to infection status and found an interaction when compared groups with and without bacteremia (p=0.0380). The interaction may be more important than single effects for the IR associated with the infection susceptibility in ASCT.

  6. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R.

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT. PMID:27379019

  7. Icing oral mucositis: Oral cryotherapy in multiple myeloma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joey; Seabrook, Jamie; Fulford, Adrienne; Rajakumar, Irina

    2017-03-01

    Background Up to 70% of patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant develop oral mucositis as a side effect of high-dose melphalan conditioning chemotherapy. Oral cryotherapy has been documented to be potentially effective in reducing oral mucositis. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the cryotherapy protocol implemented within the hematopoietic stem cell transplant program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of adult multiple myeloma patients who received high-dose melphalan conditioning therapy for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Primary endpoints were incidence and severity of oral mucositis. Secondary endpoints included duration of oral mucositis, duration of hospital stay, parenteral narcotics use and total parenteral nutrition use. Results One hundred and forty patients were included in the study, 70 patients in both no cryotherapy and cryotherapy groups. Both oral mucositis incidence and severity were found to be significantly lower in the cryotherapy group. Fifty (71.4%) experienced mucositis post cryotherapy compared to 67 (95.7%) in the no cryotherapy group (p < 0.001). The median oral mucositis severity, assessed using the WHO oral toxicity scale from grade 0-4, experienced in the no group was 2.5 vs. 2 in the cryotherapy group (p = 0.03). Oral mucositis duration and use of parenteral narcotics were also significantly reduced. Duration of hospital stay and use of parenteral nutrition were similar between the two groups. Conclusion The cryotherapy protocol resulted in a significantly lower incidence and severity of oral mucositis. These results provide evidence for the continued use of oral cryotherapy, an inexpensive and generally well-tolerated practice.

  8. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [18F]FDG and laboratory values

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [68Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [18F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [18F]FDG was available, [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [18F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [18F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma. PMID:28042328

  9. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A.; García, Juan L.; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M.; Martín, Ana A.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; García-Sanz, Ramón; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse. PMID:27811368

  10. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse.

    PubMed

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A; García, Juan L; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M; Martín, Ana A; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-12-06

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse.

  11. Survival of multiple myeloma patients aged 65-70 years in the era of novel agents and autologous stem cell transplantation. A multicenter retrospective collaborative study of the Japanese Society of Myeloma and the European Myeloma Network.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shuji; Harada, Takeshi; Saitoh, Takayuki; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Itagaki, Mitsuhiro; Asaoku, Hideki; Kuroda, Yoshiaki; Chou, Takaaki; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Suzuki, Kenshi; Murakami, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Mina, Roberto; Palumbo, Antonio; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Novel agents such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib have dramatically changed the treatment paradigm of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it is not clear whether these agents improve the prognosis of elderly patients who have undergone autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT). We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 318 newly diagnosed patients aged 65–70 years who were treated between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. As initial therapy, 192 patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy,88 with novel agent-containing regimens, 21 with conventional chemotherapy plus auto-SCT and the remaining 17 with novel agents plus auto-SCT. The median progression-free survival was 19.1, 24.5, 26.8 and 35.2 months, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 40, 62, 63 and 87%, respectively. Initial therapy with novel agents (p < 0.001) or auto-SCT (p < 0.02) significantly improved OS compared with the group without these treatment modalities. Salvage therapy with novel agents also significantly improved survival after relapse compared with conventional chemotherapy alone (p < 0.04). In a multivariate analysis, the use of novel agents was an independent prognostic factor significantly associated with extended OS(p < 0.003). These results indicate that novel agents and auto-SCT had a major impact on OS in eligible patients in this subgroup of MM.

  12. More frequent IgD and reduced CD200 expression in Chinese patients younger than 50 years old with multiple myeloma: a multicenter analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Lu, Jing; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Jing; Huo, Yuliang; Hou, Jian; Huang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the presenting features and survival of 194 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma in the People's Republic of China. Compared with older patients, younger patients had a higher percentage of IgD isotype, lower percentage of International Staging System Stage 3 disease, higher albumin level, and lower frequency of high β2-microglobulin and CD200 expression. There was no difference in sex, Durie-Salmon stage, bone lesion degree, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and expression of other antigens. Among all 940 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, those younger than 50 years had better overall survival and progression-free survival than older patients. Of these patients, 457 were treated with a bortezomib-containing regimen, and 450 received conventional therapy. Younger patients treated with bortezomib had better overall survival and progression-free survival than older patients. However, younger patients treated with conventional therapy had the same survival as older patients.

  13. CCR10/CCL27 crosstalk contributes to failure of proteasome-inhibitors in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thangavadivel, Shanmugapriya; Zelle-Rieser, Claudia; Olivier, Angelika; Postert, Benno; Untergasser, Gerold; Kern, Johann; Brunner, Andrea; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Biedermann, Rainer; Hajek, Roman; Pour, Ludek; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Greil, Richard; Jöhrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays a decisive role in multiple myeloma progression and drug resistance. Chemokines are soluble mediators of cell migration, proliferation and survival and essentially modulate tumor progression and drug resistance. Here we investigated bone marrow-derived chemokines of naive and therapy-refractory myeloma patients and discovered that high levels of the chemokine CCL27, known so far for its role in skin inflammatory processes, correlated with worse overall survival of the patients. In addition, chemokine levels were significantly higher in samples from patients who became refractory to bortezomib at first line treatment compared to resistance at later treatment lines. In vitro as well as in an in vivo model we could show that CCL27 triggers bortezomib-resistance of myeloma cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the expression of the respective receptor, CCR10, on stroma cells and involved the modulation of IL-10 expression, activation of myeloma survival pathways, and modulation of proteasomal activity. Drug resistance could be totally reversed by blocking CCR10 by siRNA as well as blocking IL-10 and its receptor. From our data we suggest that blocking the CCR10/CCL27/IL-10 myeloma-stroma crosstalk is a novel therapeutic target that could be especially relevant in early refractory myeloma patients. PMID:27732933

  14. Sulforaphane synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide in multiple myeloma cells via stress-mediated pathways

    PubMed Central

    DOUDICAN, NICOLE A.; WEN, SHIH YA; MAZUMDER, AMITABHA; ORLOW, SETH J.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent paraprotein production in plasma cells necessitates a highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is unusually susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis. This biology is believed to account for the exquisite sensitivity of multiple myeloma (MM) to the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ). Despite remarkable response rates to BTZ in MM, BTZ carries the potential for serious side-effects and development of resistance. We, therefore, sought to identify therapeutic combinations that effectively disrupt proteostasis in order to provide new potential treatments for MM. We found that sulforaphane, a dietary isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits TNFα-induced Iκβ proteasomal degradation in a manner similar to BTZ. Like BTZ, sulforaphane synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO), an agent with clinical activity in MM. ATO and sulforaphane co-treatment augmented apoptotic induction as demonstrated by cleavage of caspase-3, -4 and PARP. The enhanced apoptotic response was dependent upon production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as demonstrated by glutathione depletion and partial inhibition of the apoptotic cascade after pretreatment with the radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Combination treatment resulted in enhanced ER stress signaling and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), indicative of perturbation of proteostasis. Specifically, combination treatment caused elevated expression of the molecular chaperone HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) along with increased PERK (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and eIF2α phosphorylation and XBP1 (X-box binding protein 1) splicing, key indicators of UPR activation. Moreover, increased splicing of XBP1 was apparent upon combination treatment compared to treatment with either agent alone. Sulforaphane in combination with ATO effectively disrupts protein homeostasis through ROS generation and induction of ER stress to

  15. Potential prognostic long non-coding RNA identification and their validation in predicting survival of patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Xin; Huang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Lin; Shen, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Multiple myeloma, a typical hematological malignancy, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells. This study was to identify differently expressed long non-coding RNAs to predict the survival of patients with multiple myeloma efficiently. Gene expressing profiles of diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, GSE24080 (559 samples) and GSE57317 (55 samples), were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. After processing, survival-related long non-coding RNAs were identified by Cox regression analysis. The prognosis of multiple myeloma patients with differently expressed long non-coding RNAs was predicted by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Meanwhile, stratified analysis was performed based on the concentrations of serum beta 2-microglobulin (S-beta 2m), albumin, and lactate dehydrogenase of multiple myeloma patients. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed to further explore the functions of identified long non-coding RNAs. A total of 176 long non-coding RNAs significantly related to the survival of multiple myeloma patients (p < 0.05) were identified. In dataset GSE24080 and GSE57317, there were 558 and 55 patients being clustered into two groups with significant differences, respectively. Stratified analysis indicated that prediction of the prognoses with these long non-coding RNAs was independent from other clinical phenotype of multiple myeloma. Gene set enrichment analysis-identified pathways of cell cycle, focal adhesion, and G2-M checkpoint were associated with these long non-coding RNAs. A total of 176 long non-coding RNAs, especially RP1-286D6.1, AC008875.2, MTMR9L, AC069360.2, and AL512791.1, were potential biomarkers to evaluate the prognosis of multiple myeloma patients. These long non-coding RNAs participated indispensably in many pathways associated to the development of multiple myeloma; however, the molecular mechanisms need to be further studied.

  16. Cost analysis of a randomized stem cell mobilization study in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Varmavuo, Ville; Silvennoinen, Raija; Anttila, Pekka; Säily, Marjaana; Sankelo, Marja; Putkonen, Mervi; Ahonen, Jouni; Mahlamäki, Eija; Mäntymaa, Pentti; Savolainen, Eeva-Riitta; Remes, Kari; Jantunen, Esa

    2016-10-01

    Upfront autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard therapy for younger multiple myeloma (MM) patients. MM patients usually undergo stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide (CY) followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), or with G-CSF alone. A limited number of randomized studies are available comparing costs of different mobilization strategies. Eighty transplant-eligible patients aged up to 70 years with untreated MM were included in this prospective study. The patients were treated with RVD induction for three 21-day cycles and randomized 1:1 at inclusion into one of the two mobilization arms CY 2 g/m(2) + G-CSF [arm A] vs. G-CSF alone [arm B]. Plerixafor was given according to a specific algorithm if needed. Sixty-nine patients who received mobilization followed by blood graft collection were included in the cost analysis. The median total costs of the mobilization phase were significantly higher in arm A than in arm B (3855 € vs. 772 €, p ≤ 0.001). The cumulative median cost of the mobilization and collection phases was significantly lower in arm B than in arm A (8524 € vs. 11,622 €, p = 0.012). There was no significant difference between the arms in the total median costs of ASCT (n = 59) (34,997 € in arm A vs. 31,981 € in arm B, p = 0.118). Mobilization with G-CSF alone seems to be a preferable mobilization method for MM patients in terms of mobilization and apheresis costs. In addition, it requires less hospital resource utilization.

  17. Contribution of chemotherapy mobilization to disease control in multiple myeloma treated with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Geoffrey L.; Costa, Luciano J.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Huang, Jia-Xing; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Callander, Natalie S.; Cornell, Robert Frank; Perez, Miguel Angel Diaz; Dispenzieri, Angela; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Garfall, Alfred; Gertz, Morie A.; Gibson, John; Hamadani, Mehdi; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Krishnan, Amrita Y.; Kumar, Shaji K.; Kyle, Robert A.; Landau, Heather J.; Lee, Cindy H.; Maiolino, Angelo; Marks, David I.; Mark, Tomer M.; Munker, Reinhold; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Rodriguez, Tulio E.; Saad, Ayman A.; Savani, Bipin N.; Schiller, Gary J.; Schouten, Harry C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Scott, Emma; Seo, Sachiko; Sharma, Manish; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Tay, Jason; To, L. Bik; Vesole, David H.; Vogl, Dan T.; Wagner, John L.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wood, William A.; D’Souza, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple myeloma (MM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT), peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) may be collected following mobilization with growth factor alone (GF) or cytotoxic chemotherapy plus GF ( (CC+GF). It is uncertain whether the method of mobilization affects post-transplant outcomes. We compared these mobilization strategies in a retrospective analysis of 968 patients with MM from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database who received an auto-HCT in the US and Canada between 2007 and 2012. The kinetics of neutrophil engraftment (≥ 0.5 × 109/L) was similar between groups (13 vs. 13 days, P=0.69) while platelet engraftment (≥ 20 × 109/L) was slightly faster with CC+GF (19 vs. 18 days, P=0.006). Adjusted 3-years PFS was 43% (95% C.I. 38–48) in GF and 40% (95% C.I. 35–45) in CC+GF, P=0.33. Adjusted 3-years OS was 82% (95% C.I. 78–86) vs. 80% (95% C.I. 75–84), P=0.43 and adjusted 5-year OS was 62% (95C.I. 54–68) vs. 60% (95% C.I. 52–67), P=0.76, for GF and CC+GF respectively. We conclude that MM patients undergoing auto-HCT have similar outcomes irrespective of the method of mobilization and found no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to mobilization contributes to disease control. PMID:26301967

  18. Myeloma cell–derived Runx2 promotes myeloma progression in bone

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Li, Mei; Pan, Qianying; Peker, Deniz; Rowan, Patrick D.; Li, Juan; Zhan, Fenghuang; Suva, Larry J.; Javed, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    The progression of multiple myeloma (MM) is governed by a network of molecular signals, the majority of which remain to be identified. Recent studies suggest that Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a well-known bone-specific transcription factor, is also expressed in solid tumors, where expression promotes both bone metastasis and osteolysis. However, the function of Runx2 in MM remains unknown. The current study demonstrated that (1) Runx2 expression in primary human MM cells is significantly greater than in plasma cells from healthy donors and patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance; (2) high levels of Runx2 expression in MM cells are associated with a high-risk population of MM patients; and (3) overexpression of Runx2 in MM cells enhanced tumor growth and disease progression in vivo. Additional studies demonstrated that MM cell–derived Runx2 promotes tumor progression through a mechanism involving the upregulation of Akt/β-catenin/Survivin signaling and enhanced expression of multiple metastatic genes/proteins, as well as the induction of a bone-resident cell-like phenotype in MM cells. Thus, Runx2 expression supports the aggressive phenotype of MM and is correlated with poor prognosis. These data implicate Runx2 expression as a major regulator of MM progression in bone and myeloma bone disease. PMID:25862559

  19. CRM1 Inhibition Sensitizes Drug Resistant Human Myeloma Cells to Topoisomerase II and Proteasome Inhibitors both In Vitro and Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Dawson, Jana; Emmons, Michael F.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Kauffman, Michael; Shacham, Sharon; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease despite improved treatments, including lenalidomide/pomalidomide and bortezomib/carfilzomib based therapies and high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue. New drug targets are needed to further improve treatment outcomes. Nuclear export of macromolecules is misregulated in many cancers, including in hematological malignancies such as MM. CRM1 (chromosome maintenance protein-1) is a ubiquitous protein that exports large proteins (>40 kDa) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. We found that small-molecule Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE) prevent CRM1-mediated export of p53 and topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα). SINE's CRM1-inhibiting activity was verified by nuclear-cytoplasmic fractionation and immunocytochemical staining of the CRM1 cargoes p53 and topo IIα in MM cells. We found that SINE molecules reduced cell viability and induced apoptosis when used as both single agents in the sub-micromolar range and when combined with doxorubicin, bortezomib, or carfilzomib but not lenalidomide, melphalan, or dexamethasone. In addition, CRM1 inhibition sensitized MM cell lines and patient myeloma cells to doxorubicin, bortezomib, and carfilzomib but did not affect peripheral blood mononuclear or non-myeloma bone marrow mononuclear cells as shown by cell viability and apoptosis assay. Drug resistance induced by co-culture of myeloma cells with bone marrow stroma cells was circumvented by the addition of SINE molecules. These results support the continued development of SINE for patients with MM. PMID:24155773

  20. Cyproheptadine displays preclinical activity in myeloma and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xinliang; Liang, Sheng-ben; Hurren, Rose; Gronda, Marcela; Chow, Sue; Xu, G Wei; Wang, Xiaoming; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Jamal, Nazir; Messner, Hans; Hedley, David W; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeff L; Zhu, Yuanxiao; Shi, Chang-xin; Lee, Kyle; Tiedemann, Rodger; Trudel, Suzanne; Stewart, A Keith; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2008-08-01

    D-cyclins are regulators of cell division that act in a complex with cyclin-dependent kinases to commit cells to a program of DNA replication. D-cyclins are overexpressed in many tumors, including multiple myeloma and leukemia, and contribute to disease progression and chemoresistance. To better understand the role and impact of D-cyclins in hematologic malignancies, we conducted a high throughput screen for inhibitors of the cyclin D2 promoter and identified the drug cyproheptadine. In myeloma and leukemia cells, cyproheptadine decreased expression of cyclins D1, D2, and D3 and arrested these cells in the G(0)/G(1) phase. After D-cyclin suppression, cyproheptadine induced apoptosis in myeloma and leukemia cell lines and primary patient samples preferentially over normal hematopoietic cells. In mouse models of myeloma and leukemia, cyproheptadine inhibited tumor growth without significant toxicity. Cyproheptadine-induced apoptosis was preceded by activation of the mitochondrial pathway of caspase activation and was independent of the drug's known activity as an H1 histamine and serotonin receptor antagonist. Thus, cyproheptadine represents a lead for a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of malignancy. Because the drug is well tolerated and already approved in multiple countries for clinical use as an antihistamine and appetite stimulant, it could be moved directly into clinical trials for cancer.

  1. Evaluation of the change in sphingolipids in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianhua; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Zhang, Guangji; Shen, Li; Zhou, Liting; Yu, Yu; Zhu, Fanfan; Chen, Zhe

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been found to display anticancer activity against many types of tumors and has been developed into an anticancer drug in clinical treatments. Sphingolipids are membrane lipids that participate in many signal transduction pathways. In this paper, the changes in sphingolipids of the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 treated with arsenic trioxide were investigated using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method. Analytes were separated by an XBridge BEH C8 column used for Cer, HexCer, LacCer and SM chromatographic separation, and a Capcell PAK MG II C18 column was used for Sph, dhSph, S1P and dhS1P chromatographic separation and gradient elution with acetonitrile-water containing 0.1% formic acid as a mobile phase. A tandem mass spectrometer QTrap in SRM mode was employed in combination with RPLC as a detector for quantitative analysis. The ceramide/sphingolipid internal standard (IS) mixture was used to quantify the levels of sphingolipids. The distributions of sphingolipids were found to be different in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and the gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Ceramide (Cer), hexosylceramide (HexCer) and dihexosylceramide (Hex2Cer) levels in U266 cell line are higher than those in MGC-803 cell line. Additionally, sphingomyelin (SM), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (dhS1P) levels in the MGC-803 cell line are higher than those in the U266 cell line. When treated with arsenic trioxide (1-5μM iAs(III)(As(III) ions)), the levels of Hex2Cer in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 decreased, and the levels of S1P and dhS1P in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 decreased. The decrease of Hex2Cer, S1P and dhS1P in the human multiple myeloma cell line U266 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 were observed when the concentration of iAs(III) is 1.0μM. Therefore, arsenic trioxide exhibits anti-cancer activity by altering the sphingolipid pathway in the

  2. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-06

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Hypodiploidy; Loss of Chromosome 17p; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; t(14;16); t(4;14); T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Overexpression of survivin via activation of ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB plays a central role in vincristine resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Ogawa, Naoki; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Ishizaka, Toshihiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-04-01

    The acquisition of anti-cancer drug resistance is a major limitation of chemotherapy for multiple myeloma (MM) and it is thus important to identify the mechanisms by which MM cells develop such drug resistance. In a previous study, we showed that multidrug resistance (MDR) involves the overexpression of MDR1 and survivin in vincristine-resistant RPMI8226/VCR cells. However, the underlying mechanism of MDR remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of MDR in RPMI8226/VCR cells, and found that RPMI8226/VCR cells exhibit increased levels of activated ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB, while the levels of activated mTOR, p38MAPK, and JNK do not differ between RPMI8226/VCR cells and their vincristine-susceptible counterparts. In addition, the inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or NF-κB by inhibitors reversed the drug-resistance of RPMI8226/VCR cells via the suppression of survivin expression, but did not affect MDR1 expression; RNA silencing of survivin expression completely reversed vincristine resistance, while MDR1 silencing only weakly suppressed vincristine resistance in RPMI8226/VCR cells. These results indicate that enhanced survivin expression via the activation of ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB plays a critical role in vincristine resistance in RPMI8226/VCR cells. Our findings suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors are potentially useful as anti-MDR agents for the treatment of vincristine-resistant MM.

  4. Plasma cell leukemia: consensus statement on diagnostic requirements, response criteria and treatment recommendations by the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M; Ludwig, H; Usmani, S; Vesole, D H; Hajek, R; San Miguel, J F; Sezer, O; Sonneveld, P; Kumar, S K; Mahindra, A; Comenzo, R; Palumbo, A; Mazumber, A; Anderson, K C; Richardson, P G; Badros, A Z; Caers, J; Cavo, M; LeLeu, X; Dimopoulos, M A; Chim, C S; Schots, R; Noeul, A; Fantl, D; Mellqvist, U-H; Landgren, O; Chanan-Khan, A; Moreau, P; Fonseca, R; Merlini, G; Lahuerta, J J; Bladé, J; Orlowski, R Z; Shah, J J

    2013-04-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be re-examined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL.

  5. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells through suppression of nuclear factor-κB and upregulation of microRNA-29b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zhu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor and is the most common primary tumor of the bone marrow in the USA. Genistein is predominantly found in Leguminosae and various lines of evidence have indicated that it suppresses cell growth, induces programmed cell death and inhibits angiogenesis. As a result of these capabilities, genistein presents as a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. However, the effect of genistein on MM remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells through the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and microRNA-29b (miR-29b). In the present study, cell proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, apoptosis was detected using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis assay and caspase-3 activation assay. The expression of NF-κB and miR-29b was analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-29b and anti-miR-29b plasmids were transfected into U266 cells to determine the effect of genistein on MM. In the present study, the results demonstrated that genistein could significantly reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and increase the activity of caspase-3 in U266 cells. Furthermore, it was found that genistein could suppress the protein level of NF-κB and promote the expression of miR-29b in U266 cells. The results also indicated that miR-29b could alter the expression of NF-κB in U266 cells. These findings suggest that genistein inhibits the proliferation of human MM cells by upregulating miR-29b resulting in suppression of NF-κB.

  6. Molecular Characteristics of High-Dose Melphalan Associated Oral Mucositis in Patients with Multiple Myeloma: A Gene Expression Study on Human Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Bødker, Julie Støve; Christensen, Heidi Søgaard; Johansen, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Christiansen, Ilse; Bergmann, Olav Jonas; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen; Vyberg, Mogens; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background Toxicity of the oral and gastrointestinal mucosa induced by high-dose melphalan is a clinical challenge with no documented prophylactic interventions or predictive tests. The aim of this study was to describe molecular changes in human oral mucosa and to identify biomarkers correlated with the grade of clinical mucositis. Methods and Findings Ten patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were included. For each patient, we acquired three buccal biopsies, one before, one at 2 days, and one at 20 days after high-dose melphalan administration. We also acquired buccal biopsies from 10 healthy individuals that served as controls. We analyzed the biopsies for global gene expression and performed an immunohistochemical analysis to determine HLA-DRB5 expression. We evaluated associations between clinical mucositis and gene expression profiles. Compared to gene expression levels before and 20 days after therapy, at two days after melphalan treatment, we found gene regulation in the p53 and TNF pathways (MDM2, INPPD5, TIGAR), which favored anti-apoptotic defense, and upregulation of immunoregulatory genes (TREM2, LAMP3) in mucosal dendritic cells. This upregulation was independent of clinical mucositis. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 (surface receptors on dendritic cells) were expressed at low levels in all patients with MM, in the subgroup of patients with ulcerative mucositis (UM), and in controls; in contrast, the subgroup with low-grade mucositis (NM) displayed 5–6 fold increases in HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DRB5 expression in the first two biopsies, independent of melphalan treatment. Moreover, different splice variants of HLA-DRB1 were expressed in the UM and NM subgroups. Conclusions Our results revealed that, among patients with MM, immunoregulatory genes and genes involved in defense against apoptosis were affected immediately after melphalan administration, independent of the presence of clinical mucositis. Furthermore, our results suggested that the expression levels of HLA

  7. Impact of genetic abnormalities on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schilling, G; Hansen, T; Shimoni, A; Zabelina, T; Pérez-Simón, J-A; Simon-Perez, J-A; Gutierrez, N C; Bethge, W; Liebisch, P; Schwerdtfeger, R; Bornhäuser, M; Otterstetter, S; Penas, E M M; Dierlamm, J; Ayuk, F; Atanackovic, D; Bacher, U; Bokemeyer, C; Zander, A; San Miguel, J; Miguel, J S; Nagler, A; Kröger, N

    2008-06-01

    We analyzed the prognostic impact of the most frequent genetic abnormalities detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 101 patients with multiple myeloma, who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after melphalan/fludarabine-based reduced conditioning. The incidences of abnormalities in the present analysis were as follows: del(13q14) (61%), t(11;14)(q13;q32) (14%), t(4;14)(p16.3;q32) (19%), MYC-gain gains (8q24) (21%), del(17p13) (16%) and t(14;16)(q32;q23) (5%). None of the patients had t(6;14)(p25;q32). The overall complete remission (CR) rate was 50% with no differences between the genetic abnormalities except for patients with del(17p13) who achieved less CR (7 vs 56%; P=0.001). Univariate analysis revealed a higher relapse rate in patients aged >50 years (P=0.002), patients with del(13q14) (P=0.006) and patients with del(17p13) (P=0.003). In multivariate analyses, only del(13q14) (HR: 2.34, P=0.03) and del(17p13) (HR: 2.24; P=0.04) significantly influenced the incidence of relapse, whereas for event-free survival, only age (HR 2.8; P=0.01) and del(17p13) (HR: 2.05; P=0.03) retained their negative prognostic value. These data show that del(17p13) is a negative prognostic factor for achieving CR as well as for event-free survival after HSCT. Translocation t(4;14) might be overcome by allogeneic HSCT, which will have implication for risk-adapted strategies.

  8. Disparities in utilization of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciano J; Huang, Jia-Xing; Hari, Parameswaran N

    2015-04-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) is an established therapy for multiple myeloma (MM), with an impact on quality of remission and survival. We analyzed the role of race, ethnicity, sex, and age disparities in AHCT utilization in the United States. We combined MM incidence derived from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program with transplantation activity reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research for the period of 2005 to 2009 to assess the impact of disparities in AHCT. Utilization (number of transplantations/new cases) was compared between groups using the relative utilization ratio (RUR), defined as [utilization for a given category]/[utilization for the entire population]. Data were obtained from 22,462 actual MM cases and 13,311 AHCT. The age-adjusted RUR was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 1.19) among non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), higher than in non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) (age-adjusted RUR, .69; 95% CI, .67 to .72; P < .0002), Hispanics (age-adjusted RUR, .64; 95% CI, .60 to .69; P < .002), and Asians (age-adjusted RUR, .65; 95% CI, .58 to .73; P < .0002]. AHCT utilization was higher in men than in women among Hispanics (age-adjusted RUR .72 versus .56, P = .007), but not among NHW, NHB, or Asians. Sex disparity prevents 1.3% of potential AHCTs in patients with MM (10.4% among Hispanics). Racial-ethnic disparities prevent 13.8% of AHCTs (44.7% in Hispanic and Asians, 39.9% in NHBs). Race-ethnicity disparity greatly affects AHCT utilization in MM. Sex disparity plays a lesser role, except among Hispanics. The ongoing decrease in age disparity will continue to drive major increase of AHCT activity. Two-year and 5-year increases in the age of the AHCT population would result in 12% and 32% increases, respectively, in volume of AHCT.

  9. Multiple myeloma: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Marilyn L

    2011-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by complex genetic aberrations and heterogeneous outcomes. Over the past 25 years, cytogenetic analysis has played a key role in the diagnosis and management of MM. This article reviews the conventional cytogenetics, molecular cytogenetics, and genomic diagnostics of MM and highlights a few recent clinical trials that demonstrate the impact of genetic risk stratification on the treatment of this plasma cell malignancy.

  10. Conditioning regimens in autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: a comparative study of efficacy and toxicity from the Spanish Registry for Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lahuerta, J J; Martinez-Lopez, J; Grande, C; Bladé, J; de la Serna, J; Alegre, A; García-Laraña, J; Caballero, D; Sureda, A; de la Rubia, J; Alvarez, A M; Marín, J; Escudero, A; Conde, E; Perez-Equiza, K; García Ruiz, J C; Moraleda, J M; León, A; Bargay, J; Cabrera, R; Hernandez-García, M T; Diaz-Mediavilla, J; Miguel, J S

    2000-04-01

    High-dose chemoradiotherapy conditioning regimens for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) are generally held to give similar results in multiple myeloma (MM), but no specific comparative study has been published. We addressed this issue by comparing the main high-dose chemoradiotherapy regimens used in the Spanish Registry. Patient cohorts included 315 cases treated with 200 mg/m2 melphalan (MEL200), 127 patients with 140 mg/m2 melphalan plus total body irradiation (MEL140 + TBI) and 121 cases with 12 mg/kg busulphan plus 140 mg/m2 melphalan (BUMEL). After ASCT, granulocyte and platelet recovery time was similar in all conditioning groups. There were no differences in transplant-related mortality. All regimens yielded a similar response in reference to pre-ASCT MM status, although BUMEL produced a slightly better overall response when compared with the other regimens (97% vs. 89% and 92%, P = 0.003). The 5-year overall survival (OS) with BUMEL was 47% [95% confidence interval (CI) 26-68] compared with 43% (CI 31-54) for MEL140 + TBI and 37% (CI: 18-56) for MEL200. The median survival for the BUMEL group was 64 months compared with 45 and 37 months for the MEL200 and MEL140 + TBI groups respectively. These differences were non-significant (P = 0.2). The median event-free survival (EFS) was better for BUMEL (32 months) than for MEL200 (22 months) or for MEL140 + TBI (20 months). The differences in EFS between BUMEL and the other conditioning regimens reached statistical significance (P = 0.01). Nevertheless, the adjusted multivariate analysis for OS and EFS revealed that the conditioning regimens had no independent prognostic value. We concluded that three different conditioning regimens, commonly used for ASCT in MM, have a similar antimyeloma effect. However, the trend for better results observed in our series with BUMEL requires a prospective trial.

  11. Haemangioendothelioma (Kupffer cell angiosarcoma), myelofibrosis, splenic atrophy, and myeloma paraproteinaemia after parenteral thorotrast administration.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R C; Priestley, S E

    1978-01-01

    A case of thorotrastosis occurred 25 years after thorotrast angiography, with the previously unrecorded association of myeloma type paraproteinaemia. The relationship between haemangioendothelioma due to thorotrast and other vascular sarcomas of the liver is briefly reviewed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:748384

  12. Inhibition of adhesive interaction between multiple myeloma and bone marrow stromal cells by PPARgamma cross talk with NF-kappaB and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Hua; Yang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Farrar, William L

    2007-12-15

    Binding of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) triggers expression of adhesive molecules and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), promoting MM cell growth, survival, drug resistance, and migration, which highlights the possibility of developing and validating novel anti-MM therapeutic strategies targeting MM cells-host BMSC interactions and their sequelae. Recently, we have found that expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands can potently inhibit IL-6-regulated MM cell growth. Here we demonstrate that PPARgamma agonists 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone significantly suppress cell-cell adhesive events, including expression of adhesion molecules and IL-6 secretion from BMSCs triggered by adhesion of MM cells, as well as overcome drug resistance by a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. The synthetic and natural PPARgamma agonists have diverging and overlapping mechanisms blocking transactivation of transcription factors NF-kappaB and 5'-CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta). Both 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone blocked C/EBPbeta transcriptional activity by forming PPARgamma complexes with C/EBPbeta. 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone also blocked NF-kappaB activation by recruiting the coactivator PGC-1 from p65/p50 complexes. In addition, 15-d-PGJ2 had a non-PPARgamma-dependent effect by inactivation of phosphorylation of IKK and IkappaB. These studies provide the framework for PPARgamma-based pharmacological strategies targeting adhesive interactions of MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment.

  13. Targeting the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway circumvents drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yarde, Danielle N; Oliveira, Vasco; Mathews, Linda; Wang, Xingyu; Villagra, Alejandro; Boulware, David; Shain, Kenneth H; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Alsina, Melissa; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Beg, Amer A; Dalton, William S

    2009-12-15

    The Fanconi anemia/BRCA (FA/BRCA) DNA damage repair pathway plays a pivotal role in the cellular response to replicative stress induced by DNA alkylating agents and greatly influences drug response in cancer treatment. We recently reported that FA/BRCA genes are overexpressed and causative for drug resistance in human melphalan-resistant multiple myeloma cell lines. However, the transcriptional regulation of the FA/BRCA pathway is not understood. In this report, we describe for the first time a novel function of the NF-kappaB subunits, RelB/p50, as transcriptional activators of the FA/BRCA pathway. Specifically, our findings point to constitutive phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase alpha and subsequent alterations in FANCD2 expression and function as underlying events leading to melphalan resistance in repeatedly exposed multiple myeloma cells. Inhibiting NF-kappaB by small interfering RNA, blocking the IkappaB kinase complex with BMS-345541, or using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically reduced FA/BRCA gene expression and FANCD2 protein expression in myeloma cells, resulting in diminished DNA damage repair and enhanced melphalan sensitivity. Importantly, we also found that bortezomib decreases FA/BRCA gene expression in multiple myeloma patients. These results show for the first time that NF-kappaB transcriptionally regulates the FA/BRCA pathway and provide evidence for targeting Fanconi anemia-mediated DNA repair to enhance chemotherapeutic response and circumvent drug resistance in myeloma patients.

  14. miR-29b sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis through the activation of a feedback loop with the transcription factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, N; Di Martino, M T; Foresta, U; Leone, E; Lionetti, M; Leotta, M; Gullà, A M; Pitari, M R; Conforti, F; Rossi, M; Agosti, V; Fulciniti, M; Misso, G; Morabito, F; Ferrarini, M; Neri, A; Caraglia, M; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) with tumor-suppressor potential might have therapeutic applications in multiple myeloma (MM) through the modulation of still undiscovered molecular pathways. Here, we investigated the effects of enforced expression of miR-29b on the apoptotic occurrence in MM and highlighted its role in the context of a new transcriptional loop that is finely tuned by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. In details, in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis of MM cells was induced by either transient expression of synthetic miR-29b or its stable lentivirus-enforced expression. We identified Sp1, a transcription factor endowed with oncogenic activity, as a negative regulator of miR-29b expression in MM cells. Since Sp1 expression and functions are regulated via the 26S proteasome, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on miR-29b-Sp1 loop, showing that miR-29b levels were indeed upregulated by the drug. At the same time, the bortezomib/miR-29b combination produced significant pro-apoptotic effects. We also demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway plays a major role in the regulation of miR-29b-Sp1 loop and induction of apoptosis in MM cells. Finally, MM xenografts constitutively expressing miR-29b showed significant reduction of their tumorigenic potential. Our findings indicate that miR-29b is involved in a regulatory loop amenable of pharmacologic intervention and modulates the anti-MM activity of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:23190608

  15. Myeloma and bone disease: "the dangerous tango".

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joshua; Walker, Ronald

    2006-04-01

    Osteolytic bone disease is the most debilitating manifestation of myeloma. However, myeloma-induced effects on the bone-active cells in the bone marrow are more than just a manifestation of disease--the myeloma derives essential support from the changed balance between bone-forming and -resorbing cells. This observation has lead to the notion that effective control of myeloma bone disease by reducing osteoclast activity and restoring osteoblast activity will contribute to long-term control of myeloma progression. Unlike osteolysis associated with other tumors that metastasize to bone, myeloma-associated lytic lesions are unique in that they do not repair even after many years in complete remission, reflecting a total loss of osteoblastic activity in areas of myeloma foci, apparently induced by the myeloma. Advances in imaging technology including positron emission tomography-computed tomography scanning allows accurate detection of lytic lesions and the monitoring of treatment effects. Effective antimyeloma therapy combined with anti-osteoclast drugs can halt the progression of osteolysis; in severe cases with vertebral compression fractures, effective physical support in the form of vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty is required for control of function, pain, and stature. Fractures of the long bones are usually treated by intramedullary rod placement. New approaches to enhance osteoblast activity while controlling osteoclast activity currently under investigation may prove effective in controlling lytic bone disease and myeloma progression.

  16. Efficacious and save use of biosimilar filgrastim for hematopoietic progenitor cell chemo-mobilization with vinorelbine in multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Maul, Julia-Tatjana; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfrommer, Sarah; Petrausch, Ulf; Kiessling, Michael K; Schanz, Urs; Nair, Gayathri; Mischo, Axel; Taverna, Christian; Schmidt, Adrian; Bargetzi, Mario; Stupp, Roger; Renner, Christoph; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    Biosimilars are increasingly being licensed as equipotent drugs, although efficacy and safety data are not available for all clinical indications. Accordingly, the efficacy of the biosimilar filgrastim Zarzio® combined with vinorelbine for chemo-mobilization of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) in patients with multiple myeloma has not been evaluated yet. We compared the efficacy of vinorelbine combined with this biosimilar filgrastim for HPC mobilization to vinorelbine plus original filgrastim (Neupogen®). Overall, 105 multiple myeloma patients received vinorelbine 35 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 and either original filgrastim (n = 61;58%) or biosimilar filgrastim (n = 44;42%) at a dose of 5 µg per kg body weight (BW) twice daily subcutaneously starting day 4 until the end of the collection procedure. Leukapheresis was scheduled to start on day 8 and performed for a maximum of three consecutive days until at least 4 × 10(6) HPC/kg BW were collected. All patients proceeded to leukapheresis. In 102 (97%) patients the leukapheresis sessions were started as planned at day 8. The median number of collected HPC was 7.3 × 10(6) /kg BW (0.2-18.3) with original filgrastim compared to 9 × 10(6) /kg BW (4.2-23.8) with the biosimilar filgrastim (P = 0.16). HPC collection was successful in 57 (93%) of 61 patients of the original group and in all 44 (100%) patients of the biosimilar group (P = 0.14). No differences were observed regarding side effects. Duration of neutrophil engraftment after autologous HPC transplantation was similar between the two groups (P = 0.17). Biosimilar and original filgrastim achieve comparable results in combination with vinorelbine regarding HPC mobilization and transplantation outcome in multiple myeloma patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:21-26, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Phase I study of cord blood-derived natural killer cells combined with autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nina; Li, Li; McCarty, Jessica; Kaur, Indreshpal; Yvon, Eric; Shaim, Hila; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Liu, Enli; Orlowski, Robert Z; Cooper, Laurence; Lee, Dean; Parmar, Simrit; Cao, Kai; Sobieiski, Catherine; Saliba, Rima; Hosing, Chitra; Ahmed, Sairah; Nieto, Yago; Bashir, Qaiser; Patel, Krina; Bollard, Catherine; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Champlin, Richard; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J

    2017-03-14

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disease with known immune dysregulation. Natural killer (NK) cells have shown preclinical activity in MM. We conducted a first-in-human study of umbilical cord blood-derived (CB) NK cells for MM patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT). Patients received lenalidomide (10 mg) on days -8 to -2, melphalan 200 mg/m(2) on day -7, CB-NK cells on day -5 and auto-HCT on day 0. Twelve patients were enrolled, three on each of four CB-NK cell dose levels: 5 × 10(6) , 1 × 10(7) , 5 × 10(7) and 1 × 10(8) CB-NK cells/kg. Ten patients had either high-risk chromosomal changes or a history of relapsed/progressed disease. There were no infusional toxicities and no graft-versus-host disease. One patient failed to engraft due to poor autologous graft quality and was rescued with a back-up autologous graft. Overall, 10 patients achieved at least a very good partial response as their best response, including eight with near complete response or better. With a median follow-up of 21 months, four patients have progressed or relapsed, two of whom have died. CB-NK cells were detected in vivo in six patients, with an activated phenotype (NKG2D(+) /NKp30(+) ). These data warrant further development of this novel cellular therapy.

  18. Solitary Bone Plasmacytoma Progressing into Retroperitoneal Plasma Cell Myeloma with No Related End Organ or Tissue Impairment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tikku, Gargi; Jain, Monica; Mridha, Asit; Grover, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Solitary bone plasmacytomas and plasma cell myeloma are clonal proliferations of plasma cells. Many patients with solitary bone plasmacytomas develop plasma cell myeloma on follow-up. We present a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with fracture and a lytic lesion in the subtrochanteric region of the left femur and was assigned a diagnosis of solitary bone plasmacytoma. He received local curative radiotherapy. However, 4 months later his serum M protein and β2-microglobulin levels increased to 2.31 g/dL and 5.965 mg/L, respectively. He complained of abdominal fullness and constipation. Ultrasound and non-contrast CT imaging revealed multiple retroperitoneal masses. Colonoscopic examination was normal. Biopsy of the a retroperitoneal mass confirmed it to be a plasmacytoma. Repeat hemogram, blood urea, serum creatinine, skeletal survey, and bone marrow examination revealed no abnormalities. This is an unusual presentation of plasma cell myeloma, which manifested as multiple huge extramedullary retroperitoneal masses and arose from a solitary bone plasmacytoma, without related end organ or tissue impairment and bone marrow plasmacytosis. The patient succumbed to his disease 8 months after the appearance of the retroperitoneal masses. This case highlights the importance of close monitoring of patients diagnosed with solitary bone plasmacytoma with increased serum M protein and serum β2-microglobulin levels, so that early therapy can be instituted to prevent conversion to plasma cell myeloma. PMID:25330522

  19. Solitary bone plasmacytoma progressing into retroperitoneal plasma cell myeloma with no related end organ or tissue impairment: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tikku, Gargi; Jain, Monica; Mridha, Asit; Grover, Rajesh

    2014-09-05

    Solitary bone plasmacytomas and plasma cell myeloma are clonal proliferations of plasma cells. Many patients with solitary bone plasmacytomas develop plasma cell myeloma on follow-up. We present a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with fracture and a lytic lesion in the subtrochanteric region of the left femur and was assigned a diagnosis of solitary bone plasmacytoma. He received local curative radiotherapy. However, 4 months later his serum M protein and β2-microglobulin levels increased to 2.31 g/dL and 5.965 mg/L, respectively. He complained of abdominal fullness and constipation. Ultrasound and non-contrast CT imaging revealed multiple retroperitoneal masses. Colonoscopic examination was normal. Biopsy of the a retroperitoneal mass confirmed it to be a plasmacytoma. Repeat hemogram, blood urea, serum creatinine, skeletal survey, and bone marrow examination revealed no abnormalities. This is an unusual presentation of plasma cell myeloma, which manifested as multiple huge extramedullary retroperitoneal masses and arose from a solitary bone plasmacytoma, without related end organ or tissue impairment and bone marrow plasmacytosis. The patient succumbed to his disease 8 months after the appearance of the retroperitoneal masses. This case highlights the importance of close monitoring of patients diagnosed with solitary bone plasmacytoma with increased serum M protein and serum β2-microglobulin levels, so that early therapy can be instituted to prevent conversion to plasma cell myeloma.

  20. [Reseach Advances on Cancer-Testis Antigens in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Rui; Yu, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTA) are a class of tumor-associated antigens, which are mainly located in X chromosome. CTA restrictively expressed in normal testis, ovary, placenta and so on. Their expression in other normal tissues is much lower, even can not be detected. However, their expressions are aberrantly high in human cancers. Based on CTA encoding immunogenic proteins, they can be regulated by epigentics, CTA provides very attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple myeloma (MM) is incurable and has a low cureative rate and a high relapse rate. CTA have been detected in many MM cell lines and primary MM cells, they may be relaled to clinical prognosis. This reviews briefly summarized the research advances of CTA in the immune therapy of multiple myeloma, so as to provide a valuable therapeutic idea for myeloma.

  1. The Role of High-Dose Chemotherapy Supported by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Anna Liza; Tariman, Joseph D.; Enecio, Toreend; Estrella, Stella Marie

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells originating from the B-cell line, is associated with deleterious complications and poor outcomes. The failure of conventional combination chemotherapies to improve the overall survival of patients with MM has led to the use of high-dose chemotherapy supported by stem cell transplantation (SCT). Although several novel therapies have emerged since the late 1990s, their survival benefits are undetermined. High-dose chemotherapy with SCT provides better response rates compared to conventional chemotherapy and yields a trend toward greater survival benefits, especially with the use of a tandem (two successive) transplantation strategy. This article discusses standard SCT in patients with MM and some of the new transplantation strategies, including tandem autologous SCTs and reduced-intensity nonmyeloablative allogeneic SCT, and their implications for nursing. PMID:17723970

  2. Synergistic Activity of Carfilzomib and Panobinostat in Multiple Myeloma Cells via Modulation of ROS Generation and ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Ruixue; Meng, Xiuqin; Ai, Gongwen; Wei, Rong; Wu, Huiqun; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of disease and subsequent resistance to established therapies remain as major challenges in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). New therapeutic options are needed for these extensively pretreated patients. To explore an optimized combinational therapy, interactions between the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib exhibiting a well-tolerated side-effect profile and histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) panobinostat (LBH589) were examined in MM cells. Coadministration of carfilzomib and LBH589 led to a synergistic inhibition of proliferation in MM cells. Further studies showed that the combined treatment synergistically increased mitochondrial injury, caspase activation, and apoptosis in MM cells. Lethality of the carfilzomib/LBH589 combination was associated with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ERK1/2 inactivation. In addition, the free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) could block carfilzomib and LBH589-induced oxidative stress and the subsequent apoptosis. Together, these findings argue that the strategy of combining carfilzomib and LBH589 warrants attention in MM.

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-based mushroom extract AndoSan in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized, double blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Jon-Magnus; Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021.

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-Based Mushroom Extract AndoSan in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing High Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized, Double Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021. PMID:25664323

  5. Multiple Myeloma: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Farsi, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a rare, largely incurable malignant disease of plasma cells. Patients usually present with hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia and/or lytic bony lesions along with a monoclonal protein in the serum and/or urine in addition to an increase in the number of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Patients with myeloma live on an average for five to seven years, with their survival dependent on the presence or absence of different prognostic markers. Treatment of younger fit patients is with induction therapy consisting of steroids with one or more novel anti-myeloma agents followed by high dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation, while older and less fit patients are treated with melphalan-based combination chemotherapy. Supportive care is of paramount importance and includes the use of bisphosphonates, prophylactic antibiotics, thrombosis prophylaxis and the use of hematopoietic growth factors along with the treatment of complications of disease and its therapy. As more progress is being made and deeper responses are being attained, the disease might turn into a potentially curable one in the near future. PMID:23386937

  6. Tipifarnib-Induced Apoptosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma Cells Depends on Ca2+ Influx through Plasma Membrane Ca2+ ChannelsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Niranjan; Buzzeo, Robert W.; Gabriel, Mark; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Mari, Yelenis; Beaupre, Darrin M.

    2011-01-01

    A major contributing factor to the high mortality rate associated with acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma is the development of resistance to chemotherapy. We have shown that the combination of tipifarnib, a nonpeptidomimetic farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), with bortezomib, a proteosome inhibitor, promotes synergistic death and overcomes de novo drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines. Experiments were undertaken to identify the molecular mechanisms by which tipifarnib produces cell death in acute myeloid leukemia and multiple myeloma cell lines (U937 and 8226, respectively). Tipifarnib, but not other FTIs tested [N-[4-[2(R)-amino-3-mercaptopropyl]amino-2-phenylbenzoyl]methionine methyl ester trifluoroacetate salt (FTI-277) and 2′-methyl-5-((((1-trityl-1H-imidazol-4-yl)methyl)amino)methyl)-[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-carboxylic acid (FTI-2153), promotes elevations in intracellular free-calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in both cell lines. These elevations in [Ca2+]i were accompanied by highly dynamic plasmalemmal blebbing and frequently resulted in membrane lysis. The tipifarnib-induced elevations in [Ca2+]i were not blocked by thapsigargin or ruthenium red, but were inhibited by application of Ca2+-free extracellular solution and by the Ca2+ channel blockers Gd3+ and La3+. Conversely, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) potentiated the tipifarnib-evoked [Ca2+]i overload. Preventing Ca2+ influx diminished tipifarnib-evoked cell death, whereas 2-APB potentiated this effect, demonstrating a link between tipifarnib-induced Ca2+ influx and apoptosis. These data suggest that tipifarnib exerts its effects by acting on a membrane channel with pharmacological properties consistent with store-operated channels containing the Orai3 subunit. It is noteworthy that Orai3 transcripts were found to be expressed at lower levels in tipifarnib-resistant 8226/R5 cells. Our results indicate tipifarnib causes cell death via a novel mechanism involving activation of

  7. Outcomes in patients with multiple myeloma with TP53 deletion after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, Sameh; Saliba, Rima M; Srour, Samer; Lu, Gary; Brammer, Jonathan E; Shah, Nina; Bashir, Qaiser; Patel, Krina; Bock, Fabian; Parmar, Simrit; Hosing, Chitra; Popat, Uday; Delgado, Ruby; Rondon, Gabriela; Shah, Jatin J; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Orlowski, Robert Z; Champlin, Richard; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H

    2016-10-01

    TP53 gene deletion is associated with poor outcomes in multiple myeloma (MM). We report the outcomes of patients with MM with and without TP53 deletion who underwent immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) and/or proteasome inhibitor (PI) induction followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (auto-HCT). We identified 34 patients with MM and TP53 deletion who underwent IMiD and/or PI induction followed by auto-HCT at our institution during 2008-2014. We compared their outcomes with those of control patients (n = 111) with MM without TP53 deletion. Median age at auto-HCT was 59 years in the TP53-deletion group and 58 years in the control group (P = 0.4). Twenty-one patients (62%) with TP53 deletion and 69 controls (62%) achieved at least partial remission before auto-HCT (P = 0.97). Twenty-three patients (68%) with TP53 deletion and 47 controls (42%) had relapsed disease at auto-HCT (P = 0.01). Median progression-free survival was 8 months for patients with TP53 deletion and 28 months for controls (P < 0.001). Median overall survival was 21 months for patients with TP53 deletion and 56 months for controls (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis of both groups, TP53 deletion (hazard ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-5.8, P < 0.001) and relapsed disease at auto-HCT (hazard ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.4, P = 0.008) were associated with a higher risk of earlier progression. In MM patients treated with PI and/or IMiD drugs, and auto-HCT, TP53 deletion and relapsed disease at the time of auto-HCT are independent predictors of progression. Novel approaches should be evaluated in this high-risk population. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E442-E447, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Outcomes of Maintenance Therapy with Bortezomib after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sivaraj, Dharshan; Green, Michael M; Li, Zhiguo; Sung, Anthony D; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Kang, Yubin; Long, Gwynn D; Horwitz, Mitchell E; Lopez, Richard D; Sullivan, Keith M; Rizzieri, David A; Chao, Nelson J; Gasparetto, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Comprehensive recommendations for maintenance therapy after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have yet to be defined. Bortezomib has been utilized as maintenance therapy after ASCT, but data attesting to the safety and efficacy of this agent compared with lenalidomide in the post-ASCT setting are limited. Therefore, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 102 patients with MM who received maintenance therapy with bortezomib after ASCT at Duke University's adult bone marrow transplant clinic between 2005 and 2015. Maintenance with bortezomib was initiated between 60 and 90 days after ASCT as a single agent 1.3 mg/m(2) once every 2 weeks (n = 92) or in combination with lenalidomide (10 mg/day) (n = 10). The median age at ASCT was 64 (range, 31 to 78). Of the 99 patients with molecular data available, 42% had high-risk cytogenetics (including d17p, t(4;14), +1q, and t(14;16) by fluorescein in situ hybridization). Overall, 46% of patients experienced side effects from maintenance therapy, with 31% of all patients experiencing peripheral neuropathy. In total, 2% of patients required discontinuation of bortezomib maintenance because of adverse events. No secondary malignancies were reported from the therapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) for patients receiving maintenance therapy with bortezomib after ASCT was 36.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.3 to not available) and median overall survival was 72.7 months (95% CI, 63.9 to not available). The PFS of patients with high-risk cytogenetics was not statistically significantly different from those with standard-risk cytogenetics, suggesting that maintenance with bortezomib may help overcome the impact of high-risk cytogenetics on early progression. These results indicate that maintenance therapy with bortezomib represents a safe, well-tolerated, and efficacious option for patients with high-risk cytogenetics, renal insufficiency, an

  9. Multiple myeloma patients receiving large volume leukapheresis efficiently yield enough CD34+ cells to allow double transplants.

    PubMed

    Zubair, A C; Rymer, R; Young, J; Keeton, U; Befort, R; Nolot, B; Evans, C; Bleach, T; Torloni, A

    2009-01-01

    Current protocols for myeloma patients require more than one autologous transplant. We performed a retrospective study to determine the cost-effectiveness of large volume leukapheresis (LVL) compared with standard volume leukapheresis (SVL) collection when two transplants are required. We evaluated 87 patients who underwent a cumulative total of 260 LVL and SVL collections. The median product volume per collection was 356 ml for LVL, and this was significantly higher than the median product volume per collection for SVL (median 149.5 ml, P < 0.001). The median total CD34+ cell yield/kg was 6.4 x 10(6) for LVL and 5.2 x 10(6) for SVL. This difference was statistically significant (P = 0.005). Because the target CD34+ cell dose for a single transplant was 3 x 10(6)/kg at our institution, overall the LVL yields enough CD34+ cells that could allow for two transplants. Therefore, more patients in the LVL group were able to undergo a potential second transplant. Because of the reserved cells for a second transplant, LVL patients received significantly less CD34+ cell/kg per transplant than the patients in SVL group (P = <0.001). As a result, LVL group had statistically significant but clinically insignificant delay in neutrophil (P = <0.001) and platelet (P = 0.02) engraftments. Additionally, using LVL instead of SVL to collect >or=6 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells may potentially save $7,497 per patient. We therefore conclude that LVL is the method of choice for collection of multiple myeloma patients when two transplants are anticipated.

  10. A p53-dependent tumor suppressor network is induced by selective miR-125a-5p inhibition in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Marzia; Biamonte, Lavinia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Ronchetti, Domenica; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Botta, Cirino; Leone, Emanuela; Pitari, Maria Rita; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Amodio, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) is emerging as a novel approach to disclose the regulation of tumor suppressor or tumor promoting pathways in tumor cells. Targeting aberrantly expressed miRNAs is therefore a promising strategy for cancer treatment. By miRNA profiling of primary plasma cells from multiple myeloma (MM) patients, we previously reported increased miR-125a-5p levels associated to specific molecular subgroups. On these premises, we aimed at investigating the biological effects triggered by miR-125a-5p modulation in MM cells. Expression of p53 pathway-related genes was down-regulated in MM cells transfected with miR-125a-5p mimics. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed specific p53 targeting at 3'UTR level by miR-125a-5p mimics. Interestingly, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) affected the miR-125a-5p/p53 axis, since adhesion of MM cells to BMSCs strongly up-regulated miR-125a-5p levels, while reduced p53 expression. Moreover, ectopic miR-125a-5p reduced, while miR-125-5p inhibitors promoted, the expression of tumor suppressor miR-192 and miR-194, transcriptionally regulated by p53. Lentiviral-mediated stable inhibition of miR-125a-5p expression in wild-type p53 MM cells dampened cell growth, increased apoptosis and reduced cell migration. Importantly, inhibition of in vitro MM cell proliferation and migration was also achieved by synthetic miR-125a-5p inhibitors and was potentiated by the co-expression of miR-192 or miR-194. Taken together, our data indicate that miR-125a-5p antagonism results in the activation of p53 pathway in MM cells, underlying the crucial role of this miRNA in the biopathology of MM and providing the molecular rationale for the combinatory use of miR-125a inhibitors and miR-192 or miR-194 mimics for MM treatment.

  11. TRIM13 (RFP2) downregulation decreases tumour cell growth in multiple myeloma through inhibition of NF Kappa B pathway and proteasome activity

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Moshe E; Takada, Kohichi; Mani, Mala; Lerner, Mikael; Pick, Marjorie; Hideshima, Teru; Carrasco, Daniel E.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Sangfelt, Olle; Grandér, Dan; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Carrasco, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable neoplasm caused by proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). MM is characterized frequently by a complete or partial deletion of chromosome 13q14, seen in more than 50% of patients at diagnosis. Within this deleted region the tripartite motif containing 13 (TRIM13, also termed RFP2) gene product has been proposed to be a tumour suppressor gene (TSG). Here, we show that low expression levels of TRIM13 in MM are associated with chromosome 13q deletion and poor clinical outcome. We present a functional analysis of TRIM13 using a loss-of-function approach, and demonstrate that TRIM13 downregulation decreases tumour cell survival as well as cell cycle progression and proliferation of MM cells. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of TRIM13 downregulation in inhibiting the NF kappa B pathway and the activity of the 20S proteasome. Although this data does not support a role of TRIM13 as a TSG, it substantiates important roles of TRIM13 in MM tumour survival and proliferation, underscoring its potential role as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23647456

  12. Impact of Prophylactic Levofloxacin on Rates of Bloodstream Infection and Fever in Neutropenic Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Satlin, Michael J; Vardhana, Santosh; Soave, Rosemary; Shore, Tsiporah B; Mark, Tomer M; Jacobs, Samantha E; Walsh, Thomas J; Gergis, Usama

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have evaluated the role of antibacterial prophylaxis during neutropenia in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At our center, levofloxacin prophylaxis was initiated in June 2006 in patients with myeloma who were undergoing autologous HSCT. We compared the incidence of bloodstream infection (BSI) and fever and neutropenia (FN) within 30 days of transplantation before (January 2003 to May 2006) and after (June 2006 to April 2010) the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients undergoing autologous HSCT for myeloma. We also compared rates of BSI and FN during the same time periods in autologous HSCT recipients with lymphoma who did not receive antibacterial prophylaxis during either time period. After the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, the BSI rate decreased from 41.2% (49 of 119) to 14.7% (23 of 156) and the rate of FN decreased from 91.6% to 60.9% in patients with myeloma (P < .001, for each). In contrast, rates of BSI (43.1% versus 47.3%; P = .50) and FN (98.8% versus 97.1%; P = .63) did not change in patients with lymphoma. Levofloxacin prophylaxis was independently associated with decreased odds of BSI (odds ratio, .27; 95% confidence interval, .14 to .51; P < .001) and FN (odds ratio, .18; 95% confidence interval, .09 to .36; P < .001) in multivariate analysis. Patients with myeloma had a nonsignificant increase in the risk of BSI due to levofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (5% versus 1%, P = .08) and Clostridium difficile infection (7% versus 3%, P = .12) after the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis but did not have higher rates of BSI due to other resistant bacteria. Levofloxacin prophylaxis is associated with decreased risk of BSI and FN in patients with myeloma undergoing autologous HSCT.

  13. Cyclophosphamide-based hematopoietic stem cell mobilization before autologous stem cell transplantation in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Sascha A; Bacon, Wendi A; Huang, Li-Wen; Long, Gwynn; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell; Chute, John P; Sullivan, Keith; Morris Engemann, Ashley; Yopp, Amanda; Li, Zhiguo; Corbet, Kelly; Chao, Nelson; Gasparetto, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) is frequently employed for peripheral blood mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells before high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in multiple myeloma (MM). The benefit of mobilization with Cy over filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; G-CSF) alone is unclear. Between 2000 and 2008, 167 patients with newly diagnosed MM underwent single ASCT after melphalan conditioning at our institution. Seventy-three patients were mobilized with G-CSF alone, and 94 patients with Cy plus G-CSF (Cy+G-CSF). We retrospectively analyzed Cy's impact on both toxicity and efficacy. Mobilization efficiency was augmented by Cy; a mean total of 12 versus 5.8 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were collected from patients mobilized with Cy+G-CSF versus G-CSF, respectively, (P < 0.01), over a mean of 1.6 versus 2.2 days of peripheral blood apheresis (p = 0.001). Mobilization-related toxicity was also, however, augmented by Cy; 14% of Cy+G-CSF patients were hospitalized because of complications versus none receiving G-CSF (P < 0.0001). Toxicity, including death, related to ASCT was similar between cohorts. Regarding long-term outcomes, multivariate analysis revealed no difference for Cy+G-CSF versus G-CSF (hazard ratio 0.8 for event-free survival [95% confidence interval {CI} 0.57-1.25] and 0.96 for overall survival [95% CI 0.61-1.54]). In summary, we show that mobilization with Cy increases toxicity without positively impacting long-term outcomes in MM. Our findings place into question Cy's benefit as a routine component of stem cell mobilization regimens in MM. Randomized trials are needed to elucidate the risks and benefits of Cy more definitively.

  14. Cellular immunotherapy in multiple myeloma: lessons from preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, M; Fostier, K; Muller, J; Baron, F; Schots, R; Beguin, Y; Heusschen, R; Caers, J

    2014-12-01

    The majority of multiple myeloma patients relapse with the current treatment strategies, raising the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Cellular immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field and currently being translated into clinical trials with encouraging results in several cancer types, including multiple myeloma. Murine multiple myeloma models are of critical importance for the development and refinement of cellular immunotherapy. In this review, we summarize the immune cell changes that occur in multiple myeloma patients and we discuss the cell-based immunotherapies that have been tested in multiple myeloma, with a focus on murine models.

  15. Synergistic combination therapy with cotylenin A and vincristine in multiple myeloma models.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Honma, Yoshio; Miyake, Takaaki; Adachi, Koji; Takami, Saki; Okada, Masahiro; Kumanomidou, Satoshi; Ikejiri, Fumiyoshi; Jo, Yumi; Onishi, Chie; Kawakami, Koshi; Moriyama, Ichiro; Inoue, Masaya; Tanaka, Junko; Suzumiya, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant proliferative disease of plasma cells in the bone marrow and remains largely incurable. Cotylenin A, a fusicoccane diterpene glycoside with a complex sugar moiety, was isolated as a plant-growth regulator. Cotylenin A has been shown to inhibit the growth of various cancer cells. Herein, we examined the anti-myeloma effects of cotylenin A using five human myeloma cell lines (RPMI-8226, KMS-11, KMS-26, KMS-12 PE and KMS-12 BM) and xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Cotylenin A and vincristine synergistically inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in myeloma cells. While other microtubule-disturbing agents also showed co-operative effects with cotylenin A, other anticancer agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, camptothecin, methotrexate, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil, did not show such co-operation with cotylenin A. These differences might be attributed to the effects on autophagic responses. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and vincristine induced autophagy (formation of LC3-II and degradation of p62 protein). However, doxorubicin did not enhance the autophagy induced by cotylenin A. A colony-forming assay indicated that the combined treatment with cotylenin A and vincristine more effectively suppressed the formation of large colonies, which have higher self-renewal activity than vincristine alone. Expression of pluripotency-associated transcription factor Sox2 mRNA in RPMI-8226 myeloma cells was significantly suppressed by treatment with cotylenin A. Combined treatment with cotylenin A and vincristine significantly inhibited the growth of KMS-26 myeloma cells as xenografts. Our results suggest that the combination of cotylenin A and vincristine may have therapeutic value. Recently, it was reported that cotylenin A modulates the 14-3-3 intracellular signaling pathway. The 14-3-3 proteins may be novel targets in treating myeloma. However, our study could not explain how the sensitization to vincristine is related to the

  16. Establishment of Cell Lines from Both Myeloma Bone Marrow and Plasmacytoma: SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC from a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-June; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We tried to establish clinically relevant human myeloma cell lines that can contribute to the understanding of multiple myeloma (MM). Materials and Methods. Mononuclear cells obtained from MM patient's bone marrow were injected via tail vein in an NRG/SCID mouse. Fourteen weeks after the injection, tumor developed at subcutis of the mouse. The engraftment of MM cells into mouse bone marrow (BM) was also observed. We separated and cultured cells from subcutis and BM. Results. After the separation and culture of cells from subcutis and BM, we established two cell lines originating from a single patient (SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC). Karyotype of the two newly established MM cell lines showed tetraploidy which is different from the karyotype of the patient (diploidy) indicating clonal evolution. In contrast to SNU_MM1393_BM, cell proliferation of SNU_MM1393_SC was IL-6 independent. SNU_MM1393_BM and SNU_MM1393_SC showed high degree of resistance against bortezomib compared to U266 cell line. SNU_MM1393_BM had the greater lethality compared to SNU_MM1393_SC. Conclusion. Two cell lines harboring different site tropisms established from a single patient showed differences in cytokine response and lethality. Our newly established cell lines could be used as a tool to understand the biology of multiple myeloma. PMID:25343143

  17. Anergic bone marrow Vγ9Vδ2 T cells as early and long-lasting markers of PD-1-targetable microenvironment-induced immune suppression in human myeloma.

    PubMed

    Castella, Barbara; Foglietta, Myriam; Sciancalepore, Patrizia; Rigoni, Micol; Coscia, Marta; Griggio, Valentina; Vitale, Candida; Ferracini, Riccardo; Saraci, Elona; Omedé, Paola; Riganti, Chiara; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Massaia, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have a natural inclination to recognize malignant B cells in vitro via receptors for stress-induced self-ligands and TCR-dependent recognition of phosphoantigens (pAgs) generated in the mevalonate (Mev) pathway. This inclination is continuously challenged in vivo by the immune suppression operated by tumor cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is a prototypic B-cell malignancy in which myeloma cells subvert the local microenvironment to reshape antitumor immune responses. In this study, we have investigated the immune competence of bone marrow (BM) Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in a large series of MM patients. We have found that the BM microenvironment significantly hampers the pAg-reactivity of BM Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, which become largely PD-1(+) and are surrounded by PD-L1(+) myeloma cells and increased numbers of PD-L1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell dysfunction is an early event that can be already detected in individuals with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and not fully reverted even when MM patients achieve clinical remission. Anti-PD-1 treatment increases the cytotoxic potential of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells by almost 5-fold after pAg stimulation, and appears to be a promising strategy for effective immune interventions in MM.

  18. Delineating the mTOR kinase pathway using a dual TORC1/2 inhibitor, AZD8055, in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cirstea, Diana; Santo, Loredana; Hideshima, Teru; Eda, Homare; Mishima, Yuko; Nemani, Neeharika; Mahindra, Anuj; Yee, Andrew; Gorgun, Gullu; Hu, Yiguo; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Suzuki, Rikio; Cottini, Francesca; Guichard, Sylvie M; Anderson, Kenneth C; Raje, Noopur

    2014-11-01

    Despite promising preclinical results with mTOR kinase inhibitors in multiple myeloma, resistance to these drugs may arise via feedback activation loops. This concern is especially true for insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R), because IGF1R signaling is downregulated by multiple AKT and mTOR feedback mechanisms. We have tested this hypothesis in multiple myeloma using the novel selective mTOR kinase inhibitor AZD8055. We evaluated p-mTOR S(2481) as the readout for mTORC2/Akt activity in multiple myeloma cells in the context of mTOR inhibition via AZD8055 or rapamycin. We next validated AZD8055 inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 functions in multiple myeloma cells alone or in culture with bone marrow stroma cells and growth factors. Unlike rapamycin, AZD8055 resulted in apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells. AZD8055 treatment, however, induced upregulation of IGF1R phosphorylation in p-Akt S(473)-expressing multiple myeloma cell lines. Furthermore, exposure of AZD8055-treated cells to IGF1 induced p-Akt S(473) and rescued multiple myeloma cells from apoptosis despite mTOR kinase inhibition and TORC2/Akt blockage. The addition of blocking IGF1R antibody resulted in reversing this effect and increased AZD8055-induced apoptosis. Our study suggests that combination treatment with AZD8055 and IGF1R-blocking agents is a promising strategy in multiple myeloma with potential IGF1R/Akt signaling-mediated survival.

  19. Successful Treatment of Gastric Relapse in Multiple Myeloma with Bortezomib after Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (autoHSCT)

    PubMed Central

    Sivgin, Serdar; Baldane, Suleyman; Kaynar, Leylagul; Kurnaz, Fatih; Baskol, Mevlut; Kula, Mustafa; Eroglu, Celalettin; Deniz, Kemal; Eser, Bulent; Unal, Ali; Cetin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of 59-year-old Turkish man with history of mitral valve replacement (MVR) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who was diagnosed with stage IIIA IgG lambda multiple myeloma (MM) in 1997. He underwent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after a conditioning regimen with melphalan 200mg per body area (m2) in February 2006. On February 2011, he was admitted to the emergency service of university hospital with complaints of hematemesis and melena. Pathological evaluation of gastric biopsy, obtained from a lesion of small gastric curvature, showed the gastric mucosa infiltrated by neoplastic plasma cells, monoclonal lambda light chain positive. The patient was considered as having local gastric relapsed disease and was treated with 2 cycles of bortezomib. He achieved an excellent local response after 2 cycles of bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and prednisone (BEP) regimen, with healing of gastric ulcer and no recurrence of the hematemesis or melena. PMID:23350019

  20. The PD-1/PD-L1 axis modulates the natural killer cell versus multiple myeloma effect: a therapeutic target for CT-011, a novel monoclonal anti–PD-1 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Bakan, Courtney E.; Mishra, Anjali; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Efebera, Yvonne; Becknell, Brian; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Jianhua; Smith, Megan K.; Greenfield, Carli N.; Porcu, Pierluigi; Devine, Steven M.; Rotem-Yehudar, Rinat; Lozanski, Gerard; Byrd, John C.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    T-cell expression of programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1) down-regulates the immune response against malignancy by interacting with cognate ligands (eg, PD-L1) on tumor cells; however, little is known regarding PD-1 and natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells exert cytotoxicity against multiple myeloma (MM), an effect enhanced through novel therapies. We show that NK cells from MM patients express PD-1 whereas normal NK cells do not and confirm PD-L1 on primary MM cells. Engagement of PD-1 with PD-L1 should down-modulate the NK-cell versus MM effect. We demonstrate that CT-011, a novel anti–PD-1 antibody, enhances human NK-cell function against autologous, primary MM cells, seemingly through effects on NK-cell trafficking, immune complex formation with MM cells, and cytotoxicity specifically toward PD-L1+ MM tumor cells but not normal cells. We show that lenalidomide down-regulates PD-L1 on primary MM cells and may augment CT-011's enhancement of NK-cell function against MM. We demonstrate a role for the PD-1/PD-L1 signaling axis in the NK-cell immune response against MM and a role for CT-011 in enhancing the NK-cell versus MM effect. A phase 2 clinical trial of CT-011 in combination with lenalidomide for patients with MM should be considered. PMID:20460501

  1. UCHL1 is a biomarker of aggressive multiple myeloma required for disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sajjad; Bedekovics, Tibor; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Galardy, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    The success of proteasome inhibition in multiple myeloma highlights the critical role for the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in this disease. However, there has been little progress in finding more specific targets within the UPS involved in myeloma pathogenesis. We previously found the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 to be frequently over-expressed in B-cell malignancies, including myeloma, and showed it to be a potent oncogene in mice. Here we show that UCH-L1 is a poor prognostic factor that is essential for the progression of myeloma. We found high levels of UCHL1 to predict early progression in newly diagnosed patients; a finding reversed by the inclusion of bortezomib. We also found high UCHL1 levels to be a critical factor in the superiority of bortezomib over high-dose dexamethasone in relapsed patients. High UCHL1 partially overlaps with, but is distinct from, known genetic risks including 4p16 rearrangement and 1q21 amplification. Using an orthotopic mouse model, we found UCH-L1 depletion delays myeloma dissemination and causes regression of established disease. We conclude that UCH-L1 is a biomarker of aggressive myeloma that may be an important marker of bortezomib response, and may itself be an effective target in disseminated disease. PMID:26513019

  2. Whole-genome sequencing of multiple myeloma from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia reveals genomic initiating events, evolution, and clonal tides

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Jan B.; Shi, Chang-Xin; Tembe, Waibhav; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Sinari, Shripad; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Schmidt, Jessica; Braggio, Esteban; Keats, Jonathan J.; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Craig, David W.; Carpten, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal evolution of a myeloma genome from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia has not previously been reported. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 4 purified tumor samples and patient germline DNA drawn over a 5-year period in a t(4;14) multiple myeloma patient. Tumor samples were acquired at diagnosis, first relapse, second relapse, and end-stage secondary plasma cell leukemia (sPCL). In addition to the t(4;14), all tumor time points also shared 10 common single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) on WGS comprising shared initiating events. Interestingly, we observed genomic sequence variants that waxed and waned with time in progressive tumors, suggesting the presence of multiple independent, yet related, clones at diagnosis that rose and fell in dominance. Five newly acquired SNVs, including truncating mutations of RB1 and ZKSCAN3, were observed only in the final sPCL sample suggesting leukemic transformation events. This longitudinal WGS characterization of the natural history of a high-risk myeloma patient demonstrated tumor heterogeneity at diagnosis with shifting dominance of tumor clones over time and has also identified potential mutations contributing to myelomagenesis as well as transformation from myeloma to overt extramedullary disease such as sPCL. PMID:22529291

  3. Targeting glucose consumption and autophagy in myeloma with the novel nucleoside analogue 8-aminoadenosine.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mala; McBrayer, Samuel K; Qian, Jun; Raikoff, Kiril; Avram, Michael J; Singhal, Seema; Gandhi, Varsha; Schumacker, Paul T; Krett, Nancy L; Rosen, Steven T

    2009-09-25

    Multiple myeloma, an incurable plasma cell malignancy, is characterized by altered cellular metabolism and resistance to apoptosis. Recent connections between glucose metabolism and resistance to apoptosis provide a compelling rationale for targeting metabolic changes in cancer. In this study, we have examined the ability of the purine analogue 8-aminoadenosine to acutely reduce glucose consumption by regulating localization and expression of key glucose transporters. Myeloma cells counteracted the metabolic stress by activating autophagy. Co-treatment with inhibitors of autophagy results in marked enhancement of cell death. Glucose consumption by drug-resistant myeloma cells was unaffected by 8-aminoadenosine, and accordingly, no activation of autophagy was observed. However, these cells can be sensitized to 8-aminoadenosine under glucose-limiting conditions. The prosurvival autophagic response of myeloma to nutrient deprivation or to nucleoside analogue treatment has not been described previously. This study establishes the potential of metabolic targeting as a broader means to kill and sensitize myeloma and identifies a compound that can achieve this goal.

  4. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  6. Tris DBA palladium overcomes hypoxia-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Muz, Barbara; Luderer, Micah; Arbiser, Jack; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent progress in novel and targeted therapies, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a therapeutically challenging incurable disease. The regulation of important cellular processes and its link to cancer presented Src as an attractive target for MM. We suggest a novel strategy to improve the treatment of MM and overcome the drug resistance for the current therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of Src in MM cells by Tris (Dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium (Tris DBA). Tris DBA reduces proliferation, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. Tris DBA showed additive effect with proteasome inhibitors reducing proliferation, cell cycle signaling, and increasing apoptosis more than each drug alone. Tris DBA overcame hypoxia-induced effects such as enhanced chemotaxis or drug resistance to proteasome inhibitors by inhibition of HIF1α expression. Moreover, we found that Tris DBA is an effective anti-myeloma agent alone or in combination with other targeted drugs and that it reverses hypoxia-induced drug resistance in myeloma.

  7. High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation changes prognosis of IgD multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Maisnar, V; Hájek, R; Scudla, V; Gregora, E; Büchler, T; Tichý, M; Kotoucek, P; Kafková, A; Forraiová, L; Minarík, J; Radocha, J; Bláha, V; Malý, J

    2008-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a rare plasma cell disorder constituting less than 2% of all MM cases. Survival of patients with IgD MM is generally shorter than that of patients with other types of monoclonal (M-) protein. We have retrospectively analyzed patients with IgD MM participating in clinical trials of the Czech Myeloma Group. Twenty-six IgD MM patients treated between 1996 and 2006 were identified, 14 (54%) men and 12 (46%) women. The median age was 61 years (range: 37-79 years). Ten of 26 patients (39%) were treated with first-line high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) using melphalan 200 mg/m(2) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Thirteen of 26 patients (50%) received conventional chemotherapy (CHT), mostly melphalan and prednisone or a vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone (VAD) regimen. Treatment responses were evaluable for 23 of 26 (89%) patients. All HDCT patients had treatment responses, including seven patients (70%) with complete responses and three patients (30%) with partial responses. The median progression-free survival was 18 months for HDCT patients and 20 months for CHT patients. The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 34 months. The median OS for the HDCT group has not yet been reached (70% of the patients are still alive). In contrast, the median OS for CHT patients was only 16 months. The difference in OS between the two groups was statistically significant (P=0.005). In conclusion, the overall response rate for patients with IgD MM aged 65 years or less treated with HDCT and ASCT is similar to that seen in other MM types.

  8. Pterostilbene Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cells via ERK1/2 and JNK Pathway In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bingqian; Xu, Zhijian; Hu, Liangning; Chen, Gege; Wei, Rong; Yang, Guang; Li, Bo; Chang, Gaomei; Sun, Xi; Wu, Huiqun; Zhang, Yong; Dai, Bojie; Tao, Yi; Shi, Jumei; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common malignancy in the hematologic system, which is characterized by accumulation of plasma cells in bone marrow. Pterostilbene (PTE) is a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, which has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we examined the anti-tumor effect of PTE on MM cell lines both in vitro and in vivo using the cell counting kit (CCK)-8, apoptosis assays, cell cycle analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, JC-1 mitochondrial membrane potential assay, Western blotting and tumor xenograft models. The results demonstrated that PTE induces apoptosis in the H929 cell line and causes cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase by enhancing ROS generation and reducing mitochondrial membrane potential. The anti-tumor effect of PTE may be caused by the activation of the extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. Additionally, mice treated with PTE by intraperitoneal injection demonstrated reduced tumor volume. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that the anti-tumor effect of PTE on MM cells may provide a new therapeutic option for MM patients. PMID:27869675

  9. Smac mimetic LCL161 overcomes protective ER stress induced by obatoclax, synergistically causing cell death in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vivek; Kimlinger, Teresa; Painuly, Utkarsh; Mukhopadhyay, Bedabrata; Haug, Jessica; Bi, Lintao; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Kumar, Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Bcl2 and IAP families are anti-apoptotic proteins deregulated in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Pharmacological inhibition of each of these families has shown significant activity only in subgroups of MM patients. Here, we have examined a broad-spectrum Bcl2 family inhibitor Obatoclax (OBX) in combination with a Smac mimetic LCL161 in MM cell lines and patient cells. LCL161/OBX combination induced synergistic cytotoxicity and anti-proliferative effects on a broad range of human MM cell lines. The cytotoxicity was mediated through inhibition of the IAPs, activation of caspases and up regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid, Bim, Puma and Noxa by the drug combination. In addition, we observed that OBX caused ER stress and activated the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) leading to drug resistance. LCL161, however inhibited spliced Xbp-1, a pro-survival factor. In addition, we observed that OBX increased GRP78 localization to the cell surface, which then induced PI3K dependent Akt activation and resistance to cell death. LCL161 was able to block OBX induced Akt activation contributing to synergistic cell death. Our results support clinical evaluation of this combination strategy in relapsed refractory MM patients. PMID:27494845

  10. Adenosine Generated in the Bone Marrow Niche Through a CD38-Mediated Pathway Correlates With Progression of Human Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L; Quarona, Valeria; Toscani, Denise; Costa, Federica; Chillemi, Antonella; Pistoia, Vito; Giuliani, Nicola; Malavasi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Human myeloma cells express CD38 at high levels and grow in hypoxic niches inside the bone marrow. Myeloma cells respond to hypoxia with metabolic changes leading to aerobic glycolysis, thus reducing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and increasing NAD+. Our hypothesis is that these conditions favor the enzymatic pathways involved in the production of adenosine in the niche. Within the niche, NAD+ is able to activate a discontinuous adenosinergic pathway that relies upon CD38, CD203a and CD73 or TRACP, according to the environmental pH. The observed variability in adenosine concentrations in bone marrow aspirates is a result of the interactions taking place among myeloma and other cells in the bone marrow niche. A pilot study showed that adenosine profiles differ during disease progression. Adenosine levels were significantly higher in the bone marrow plasma of patients with symptomatic myeloma and correlated with ISS staging, suggesting that adenosine is produced in the myeloma niche at micromolar levels by an ectoenzymatic network centered on CD38. Adenosine levels increase with disease aggressiveness, a finding that supports adenosine as a potential marker of myeloma progression. PMID:27761584

  11. An Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptors 1 and 3 Axis Governs Cellular Senescence of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Promotes Growth and Vascularization of Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kanehira, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Tohru; Nakajima, Shinji; Okitsu, Yoko; Onishi, Yasushi; Fukuhara, Noriko; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Okada, Yoshinori; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells and there is much interest in how MSCs contribute to the regulation of the tumor microenvironment. Whether MSCs exert a supportive or suppressive effect on tumor progression is still controversial, but is likely dependent on a variety of factors that are tumor-type dependent. Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by growth of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. It has been shown that the progression of MM is governed by MSCs, which act as a stroma of the myeloma cells. Although stroma is created via mutual communication between myeloma cells and MSCs, the mechanism is poorly understood. Here we explored the role of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling in cellular events where MSCs were converted into either MM-supportive or MM-suppressive stroma. We found that myeloma cells stimulate MSCs to produce autotaxin, an indispensable enzyme for the biosynthesis of LPA, and LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) and 3 (LPA3) transduce opposite signals to MSCs to determine the fate of MSCs. LPA3-silenced MSCs (siLPA3-MSCs) exhibited cellular senescence-related phenotypes in vitro, and significantly promoted progression of MM and tumor-related angiogenesis in vivo. In contrast, siLPA1-MSCs showed resistance to cellular senescence in vitro, and efficiently delayed progression of MM and tumor-related angiogenesis in vivo. Consistently, anti-MM effects obtained by LPA1-silencing in MSCs were completely reproduced by systemic administration of Ki6425, an LPA1 antagonist. Collectively, our results indicate that LPA signaling determines the fate of MSCs and has potential as a therapeutic target in MM. Stem Cells 2017;35:739-753.

  12. Dual Targeting of CDK4 and ARK5 Using a Novel Kinase Inhibitor ON123300 Exerts Potent Anticancer Activity against Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Deepak; Kuo, Pei-Yu; Leshchenko, Violetta V; Jiang, Zewei; Divakar, Sai Krishna Athaluri; Cho, Hearn Jay; Chari, Ajai; Brody, Joshua; Reddy, M V Ramana; Zhang, Weijia; Reddy, E Premkumar; Jagannath, Sundar; Parekh, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a fatal plasma cell neoplasm accounting for over 10,000 deaths in the United States each year. Despite new therapies, multiple myeloma remains incurable, and patients ultimately develop drug resistance and succumb to the disease. The response to selective CDK4/6 inhibitors has been modest in multiple myeloma, potentially because of incomplete targeting of other critical myeloma oncogenic kinases. As a substantial number of multiple myeloma cell lines and primary samples were found to express AMPK-related protein kinase 5(ARK5), a member of the AMPK family associated with tumor growth and invasion, we examined whether dual inhibition of CDK4 and ARK5 kinases using ON123300 results in a better therapeutic outcome. Treatment of multiple myeloma cell lines and primary samples with ON123300 in vitro resulted in rapid induction of cell-cycle arrest followed by apoptosis. ON123300-mediated ARK5 inhibition or ARK5-specific siRNAs resulted in the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K pathway and upregulation of the AMPK kinase cascade. AMPK upregulation resulted in increased SIRT1 levels and destabilization of steady-state MYC protein. Furthermore, ON123300 was very effective in inhibiting tumor growth in mouse xenograft assays. In addition, multiple myeloma cells sensitive to ON123300 were found to have a unique genomic signature that can guide the clinical development of ON123300. Our study provides preclinical evidence that ON123300 is unique in simultaneously inhibiting key oncogenic pathways in multiple myeloma and supports further development of ARK5 inhibition as a therapeutic approach in multiple myeloma.

  13. Chromosomal aberrations of cancer-testis antigens in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Martin, Vittoria; Vogetseder, Alexander; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Soldini, Davide; Tinguely, Marianne

    2015-09-01

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTAgs) play a major role in the immune response against cancer, but their biological functions in germ and cancer cells is still unclear. MAGE-C1 and MAGE-C2 are two CTAgs located at the Xq27 region of chromosome X and frequently expressed in multiple myeloma. Chromosomal rearrangements often occur in myeloma. We therefore investigated whether numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations correlate with their protein expression in primary multiple myelomas. To this aim, we designed new fluorescence in situ hybridization probes specific for the MAGE region in the Xq27 region and evaluated simultaneously aberrations of the X chromosome centromere. The comparison of MAGE copy number and chromosome X status revealed that MAGE copy number changes occurred in 6/43 (14%) cases, independent of concomitant X chromosome alterations. These numerical aberrations are less frequent than the expression of MAGE-C1 and MAGE-C2 (63% and 27% of patients, respectively) and do not always correlate with MAGE-C1 and MAGE-C2 expressions, suggesting alternative regulatory mechanisms in the expression of these genes.

  14. More frequent IgD and reduced CD200 expression in Chinese patients younger than 50 years old with multiple myeloma: a multicenter analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Lu, Jing; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Jing; Huo, Yuliang; Hou, Jian; Huang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the presenting features and survival of 194 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma in the People’s Republic of China. Compared with older patients, younger patients had a higher percentage of IgD isotype, lower percentage of International Staging System Stage 3 disease, higher albumin level, and lower frequency of high β2-microglobulin and CD200 expression. There was no difference in sex, Durie–Salmon stage, bone lesion degree, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and expression of other antigens. Among all 940 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, those younger than 50 years had better overall survival and progression-free survival than older patients. Of these patients, 457 were treated with a bortezomib-containing regimen, and 450 received conventional therapy. Younger patients treated with bortezomib had better overall survival and progression-free survival than older patients. However, younger patients treated with conventional therapy had the same survival as older patients. PMID:27877018

  15. High-level production of a monoclonal antibody in murine myeloma cells by perfusion culture using a gravity settler.

    PubMed

    Choo, Chiou-Yu; Tian, Yuan; Kim, Wan-Seop; Blatter, Erich; Conary, Jon; Brady, Ciaran P

    2007-01-01

    A perfusion system is described for the production of a human monoclonal antibody in non-secreting murine myeloma (NS0) cells that was previously shown to be difficult to produce at high levels using fed-batch culture. The perfusion system was based on the use of a commercially available cell settler as the separation device to separate the cells from the culture. Separation efficiency of the cell settler was above 98%. Based on the growth and glucose consumption rates, fresh media was added to the culture and the turnover rate for the bioreactor was set at a maximum of 1.5 times the bioreactor volume per day. The perfusion process resulted in twice the maximum viable cell densities and up to three times the total protein production in a 53-day run period when compared to the fed-batch process. In addition, charge heterogeneity of the antibody as measured by ion exchange chromatography was lower for material purified from the perfusion runs compared to fed-batch. Perfusion mode of culture using a commercially available gravity settler is therefore a viable alternative to fed-batch mode for high-level production of this monoclonal antibody in NS0 cells.

  16. Synergistic targeting of Sp1, a critical transcription factor for myeloma cell growth and survival, by panobinostat and proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bat-Erdene, Ariunzaya; Miki, Hirokazu; Oda, Asuko; Nakamura, Shingen; Teramachi, Jumpei; Amachi, Ryota; Tenshin, Hirofumi; Hiasa, Masahiro; Iwasa, Masami; Harada, Takeshi; Fujii, Shiro; Sogabe, Kimiko; Kagawa, Kumiko; Yoshida, Sumiko; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Panobinostat, a pan-deacetylase inhibitor, synergistically elicits cytotoxic activity against myeloma (MM) cells in combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Because precise mechanisms for panobinostat's anti-MM action still remain elusive, we aimed to clarify the mechanisms of anti-MM effects of panobinostat and its synergism with proteasome inhibitors. Although the transcription factor Sp1 was overexpressed in MM cells, the Sp1 inhibitor terameprocol induced MM cell death in parallel with reduction of IRF4 and cMyc. Panobinostat induced activation of caspase-8, which was inversely correlated with reduction of Sp1 protein levels in MM cells. The panobinostat-mediated effects were further potentiated to effectively induce MM cell death in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib even at suboptimal concentrations as a single agent. Addition of the caspase-8 inhibitor z-IETD-FMK abolished the Sp1 reduction not only by panobinostat alone but also by its combination with bortezomib, suggesting caspase-8-mediated Sp1 degradation. The synergistic Sp1 reduction markedly suppressed Sp1-driven prosurvival factors, IRF4 and cMyc. Besides, the combinatory treatment reduced HDAC1, another Sp1 target, in MM cells, which may potentiate HDAC inhibition. Collectively, caspase-8-mediated post-translational Sp1 degradation appears to be among major mechanisms for synergistic anti-MM effects of panobinostat and proteasome inhibitors in combination. PMID:27738323

  17. Induction of Apoptosis in Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines by Ebselen via Enhancing the Endogenous Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jia; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Cheng, Yi; Peng, Yang; Xie, Jiayin; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen a selenoorganic compound showing glutathione peroxidase like activity is an anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agent. Its cytoprotective activity has been investigated in recent years. However, experimental evidence also shows that ebselen causes cell death in several cancer cell types whose mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of ebselen on multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines in vitro. The results showed that ebselen significantly enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accompanied by cell viability decrease and apoptosis rate increase. Further studies revealed that ebselen can induce Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria leading to mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm changes and cytochrome C release from the mitochondria to cytosol. Furtherly, we found that exogenous addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) completely diminished the cell damage induced by ebselen. This result suggests that relatively high concentration of ebselen can induce MM cells apoptosis in culture by enhancing the production of endogenous ROS and triggering mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:24587987

  18. Multiple myeloma risk variant at 7p15.3 creates an IRF4-binding site and interferes with CDCA7L expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ni; Johnson, David C.; Weinhold, Niels; Studd, James B.; Orlando, Giulia; Mirabella, Fabio; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Meissner, Tobias; Kaiser, Martin; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Morgan, Gareth J.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk loci for multiple myeloma (MM); however, the mechanisms by which they influence MM are unknown. Here by using genetic association data and functional characterization, we demonstrate that rs4487645 G>T, the most highly associated variant (P = 5.30 × 10−25), resides in an enhancer element 47 kb upstream of the transcription start site of c-Myc-interacting CDCA7L. The G-risk allele, associated with increased CDCA7L expression (P=1.95 × 10−36), increases IRF4 binding and the enhancer interacts with the CDCA7L promoter. We show that suppression of CDCA7L limits MM proliferation through apoptosis, and increased CDCA7L expression is associated with adverse patient survival. These findings implicate IRF4-mediated CDCA7L expression in MM biology and indicate how germline variation might confer susceptibility to MM. PMID:27882933

  19. Role for macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta in the development of osteolytic lesions in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Abe, Masahiro; Hiura, Kenji; Wilde, Javier; Moriyama, Keiji; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Ozaki, Shuji; Wakatsuki, Shingo; Kosaka, Masaaki; Kido, Shinsuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2002-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) cells cause devastating bone destruction by activating osteoclasts in the bone marrow milieu. However, the mechanism of enhanced bone resorption in patients with myeloma is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated a role of C-C chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha and MIP-1beta, in MM cell-induced osteolysis. These chemokines were produced and secreted by a majority of MM cell lines as well as primary MM cells from patients. Secretion of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta correlated well with the ability of myeloma cells to enhance osteoclastic bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo as well as in MM patients. In osteoclastogenic cultures of rabbit bone cells, cocultures with myeloma cells as well as addition of myeloma cell-conditioned media enhanced both formation of osteoclastlike cells and resorption pits to an extent comparable to the effect of recombinant MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta. Importantly, these effects were mostly reversed by neutralizing antibodies against MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, or their cognate receptor, CCR5, suggesting critical roles of these chemokines. We also demonstrated that stromal cells express CCR5 and that recombinant MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta induce expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (RANK) ligand by stromal cells, thereby stimulating osteoclast differentiation of preosteoclastic cells. These results suggest that MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta may be major osteoclast-activating factors produced by MM cells.

  20. In vitro aggregation behavior of a non-amyloidogenic λ light chain dimer deriving from U266 multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Paolo; Owczarz, Marta; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Rognoni, Paola; Beeg, Marten; Wu, Hua; Salmona, Mario; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Excessive production of monoclonal light chains due to multiple myeloma can induce aggregation-related disorders, such as light chain amyloidosis (AL) and light chain deposition diseases (LCDD). In this work, we produce a non-amyloidogenic IgE λ light chain dimer from human mammalian cells U266, which originated from a patient suffering from multiple myeloma, and we investigate the effect of several physicochemical parameters on the in vitro stability of this protein. The dimer is stable in physiological conditions and aggregation is observed only when strong denaturating conditions are applied (acidic pH with salt at large concentration or heating at melting temperature T(m) at pH 7.4). The produced aggregates are spherical, amorphous oligomers. Despite the larger β-sheet content of such oligomers with respect to the native state, they do not bind Congo Red or ThT. The impossibility to obtain fibrils from the light chain dimer suggests that the occurrence of amyloidosis in patients requires the presence of the light chain fragment in the monomer form, while dimer can form only amorphous oligomers or amorphous deposits. No aggregation is observed after denaturant addition at pH 7.4 or at pH 2.0 with low salt concentration, indicating that not a generic unfolding but specific conformational changes are necessary to trigger aggregation. A specific anion effect in increasing the aggregation rate at pH 2.0 is observed according to the following order: SO(4)(-)≫Cl(-)>H(2)PO(4)(-), confirming the peculiar role of sulfate in promoting protein aggregation. It is found that, at least for the investigated case, the mechanism of the sulfate effect is related to protein secondary structure changes induced by anion binding.

  1. In Vitro Aggregation Behavior of a Non-Amyloidogenic λ Light Chain Dimer Deriving from U266 Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Owczarz, Marta; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Rognoni, Paola; Beeg, Marten; Wu, Hua; Salmona, Mario; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Excessive production of monoclonal light chains due to multiple myeloma can induce aggregation-related disorders, such as light chain amyloidosis (AL) and light chain deposition diseases (LCDD). In this work, we produce a non-amyloidogenic IgE λ light chain dimer from human mammalian cells U266, which originated from a patient suffering from multiple myeloma, and we investigate the effect of several physicochemical parameters on the in vitro stability of this protein. The dimer is stable in physiological conditions and aggregation is observed only when strong denaturating conditions are applied (acidic pH with salt at large concentration or heating at melting temperature Tm at pH 7.4). The produced aggregates are spherical, amorphous oligomers. Despite the larger β-sheet content of such oligomers with respect to the native state, they do not bind Congo Red or ThT. The impossibility to obtain fibrils from the light chain dimer suggests that the occurrence of amyloidosis in patients requires the presence of the light chain fragment in the monomer form, while dimer can form only amorphous oligomers or amorphous deposits. No aggregation is observed after denaturant addition at pH 7.4 or at pH 2.0 with low salt concentration, indicating that not a generic unfolding but specific conformational changes are necessary to trigger aggregation. A specific anion effect in increasing the aggregation rate at pH 2.0 is observed according to the following order: SO4−≫Cl−>H2PO4−, confirming the peculiar role of sulfate in promoting protein aggregation. It is found that, at least for the investigated case, the mechanism of the sulfate effect is related to protein secondary structure changes induced by anion binding. PMID:22432016

  2. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor R115777 (Zarnestra, Tipifarnib) synergizes with paclitaxel to induce apoptosis and mitotic arrest and to inhibit tumor growth of multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kuichun; Gerbino, Elvira; Beaupre, Darrin M; Mackley, Paul A; Muro-Cacho, Carlos; Beam, Craig; Hamilton, Andrew D; Lichtenheld, Mathias G; Kerr, William G; Dalton, William; Alsina, Melissa; Sebti, Saïd M

    2005-06-15

    Despite major advances, multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable malignancy. Recently we have found that disease stabilization was achieved in 64% of patients with advanced MM treated with the farnesyltransferase inhibitor R115777 (Zarnestra) in a phase 2 clinical trial. In order to enhance R115777 antitumor activity in MM, we examined the combination of this novel agent with other anticancer drugs in MM cell lines. In this study, R115777 was found to synergize with paclitaxel and docetaxel, but not with other chemotherapy agents, including doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, cisplastin, melphalan, mitoxantrone, and dexa