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Sample records for myeloma mm cells

  1. Ectopic microRNA-150-5p transcription sensitizes glucocorticoid therapy response in MM1S multiple myeloma cells but fails to overcome hormone therapy resistance in MM1R cells.

    PubMed

    Palagani, Ajay; Op de Beeck, Ken; Naulaerts, Stefan; Diddens, Jolien; Sekhar Chirumamilla, Chandra; Van Camp, Guy; Laukens, Kris; Heyninck, Karen; Gerlo, Sarah; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Joke; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) selectively trigger cell death in the multiple myeloma cell line MM1S which express NR3C1/Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) protein, but fail to kill MM1R cells which lack GR protein. Given recent demonstrations of altered microRNA profiles in a diverse range of haematological malignancies and drug resistance, we characterized GC inducible mRNA and microRNA transcription profiles in GC sensitive MM1S as compared to GC resistant MM1R cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that GCs regulate expression of multiple genes involved in cell cycle control, cell organization, cell death and immunological disease in MM1S cells, which remain unaffected in MM1R cells. With respect to microRNAs, mir-150-5p was identified as the most time persistent GC regulated microRNA, out of 5 QPCR validated microRNAs (mir-26b, mir-125a-5p, mir-146-5p, mir-150-5p, and mir-184), which are GC inducible in MM1S but not in MM1R cells. Functional studies further revealed that ectopic transfection of a synthetic mir-150-5p mimics GR dependent gene expression changes involved in cell death and cell proliferation pathways. Remarkably, despite the gene expression changes observed, overexpression of mir-150-5p in absence of GCs did not trigger significant cytotoxicity in MM1S or MM1R cells. This suggests the requirement of additional steps in GC induced cell death, which can not be mimicked by mir-150-5p overexpression alone. Interestingly, a combination of mir-150-5p transfection with low doses GC in MM1S cells was found to sensitize therapy response, whereas opposite effects could be observed with a mir-150-5p specific antagomir. Although mir-150-5p overexpression did not substantially change GR expression levels, it was found that mir-150-5p evokes GR specific effects through indirect mRNA regulation of GR interacting transcription factors and hormone receptors, GR chaperones, as well as various effectors of unfolded protein stress and chemokine signalling. Altogether GC

  2. Ectopic MicroRNA-150-5p Transcription Sensitizes Glucocorticoid Therapy Response in MM1S Multiple Myeloma Cells but Fails to Overcome Hormone Therapy Resistance in MM1R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palagani, Ajay; Op de Beeck, Ken; Naulaerts, Stefan; Diddens, Jolien; Sekhar Chirumamilla, Chandra; Van Camp, Guy; Laukens, Kris; Heyninck, Karen; Gerlo, Sarah; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Joke; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) selectively trigger cell death in the multiple myeloma cell line MM1S which express NR3C1/Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) protein, but fail to kill MM1R cells which lack GR protein. Given recent demonstrations of altered microRNA profiles in a diverse range of haematological malignancies and drug resistance, we characterized GC inducible mRNA and microRNA transcription profiles in GC sensitive MM1S as compared to GC resistant MM1R cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that GCs regulate expression of multiple genes involved in cell cycle control, cell organization, cell death and immunological disease in MM1S cells, which remain unaffected in MM1R cells. With respect to microRNAs, mir-150-5p was identified as the most time persistent GC regulated microRNA, out of 5 QPCR validated microRNAs (mir-26b, mir-125a-5p, mir-146-5p, mir-150-5p, and mir-184), which are GC inducible in MM1S but not in MM1R cells. Functional studies further revealed that ectopic transfection of a synthetic mir-150-5p mimics GR dependent gene expression changes involved in cell death and cell proliferation pathways. Remarkably, despite the gene expression changes observed, overexpression of mir-150-5p in absence of GCs did not trigger significant cytotoxicity in MM1S or MM1R cells. This suggests the requirement of additional steps in GC induced cell death, which can not be mimicked by mir-150-5p overexpression alone. Interestingly, a combination of mir-150-5p transfection with low doses GC in MM1S cells was found to sensitize therapy response, whereas opposite effects could be observed with a mir-150-5p specific antagomir. Although mir-150-5p overexpression did not substantially change GR expression levels, it was found that mir-150-5p evokes GR specific effects through indirect mRNA regulation of GR interacting transcription factors and hormone receptors, GR chaperones, as well as various effectors of unfolded protein stress and chemokine signalling. Altogether GC

  3. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B)-cell

  4. Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects of Punica granatum Juice (PGJ) in Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    PubMed Central

    Tibullo, Daniele; Caporarello, Nunzia; Giallongo, Cesarina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Genovese, Claudia; Arlotta, Carmen; Puglisi, Fabrizio; Parrinello, Nunziatina L.; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Romano, Alessandra; Lupo, Gabriella; Toscano, Valeria; Avola, Roberto; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Raccuia, Salvatore Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells (PC) in the bone marrow (BM) leading to bone destruction and BM failure. Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, MM remains a largely incurable pathology. Therefore, novel effective and less toxic agents are urgently necessary. In the last few years, pomegranate has been studied for its potential therapeutic properties including treatment and prevention of cancer. Pomegranate juice (PGJ) contains a number of potential active compounds including organic acids, vitamins, sugars, and phenolic components that are all responsible of the pro-apoptotic effects observed in tumor cell line. The aim of present investigation is to assess the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic potential of the PGJ in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Our data demonstrate the anti-proliferative potential of PGJ in MM cells; its ability to induce G0/G1 cell cycle block and its anti-angiogenic effects. Interestingly, sequential combination of bortezomib/PGJ improved the cytotoxic effect of the proteosome inhibitor. We investigated the effect of PGJ on angiogenesis and cell migration/invasion. Interestingly, we observed an inhibitory effect on the tube formation, microvessel outgrowth aorting ring and decreased cell migration and invasion as showed by wound-healing and transwell assays, respectively. Analysis of angiogenic genes expression in endothelial cells confirmed the anti-angiogenic properties of pomegranate. Therefore, PGJ administration could represent a good tool in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for MM treatment, exploiting its anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. Finally, the present research supports the evidence that PGJ could play a key role of a future therapeutic approach for treatment of MM in order to optimize the pharmacological effect of bortezomib, especially as adjuvant after treatment. PMID:27706074

  5. Multiple Myeloma Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Carol Ann; Matsui, William

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is characterized by the clonal expansion of neoplastic plasma cells within the bone marrow, elevated serum immunoglobulin, and osteolytic bone disease. The disease is highly responsive to a wide variety of anticancer treatments including conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, corticosteroids, radiation therapy, and a growing number of agents with novel mechanisms of action. However, few if any patients are cured with these modalities and relapse remains a critical issue. A better understanding of clonogenic multiple myleoma cells is essential to ultimately improving long-term outcomes, but the nature of the cells responsible for myeloma regrowth and disease relapse is unclear. We review evidence that functional heterogeneity exists in multiple myeloma and discuss potential strategies and clinical implications of the stem-cell model of cancer in this disease. PMID:18539970

  6. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) as therapeutic targets in Multiple Myeloma (MM)

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Vijay; Painuly, Utkarsh; Kimlinger, Teresa; Haug, Jessica; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Kumar, Shaji

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins plays a critical role in the control of apoptotic machinery, and has been explored as a therapeutic target. Here, we have examined the functional importance of IAPs in multiple myeloma (MM) by using a Smac-mimetic LCL161. We observed that LCL161 was able to potently induce apoptosis in some MM cell lines but not in others. Examining the levels of XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2 post LCL161 treatment indicated clear down regulation of both XIAP activity and cIAP1 levels in both the sensitive and less sensitive (resistant) cell lines. cIAP2, however, was not down regulated in the cell line resistant to the drug. siRNA mediated silencing of cIAP2 significantly enhanced the effect of LCL161 indicating the importance of down regulating all IAPs simultaneously for induction of apopotsis in MM cells. LCL161 induced marked up regulation of the Jak2/Stat3 pathway in the resistant MM cell lines. Combining LCL161 with a Jak2 specific inhibitor resulted in synergistic cell death in MM cell lines and patient cells. In addition, combining LCL161 with death inducing ligands clearly showed that LCL161 sensitized MM cells to both FAS-L and TRAIL. PMID:24402161

  7. Identify multiple myeloma stem cells: Utopia?

    PubMed Central

    Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of monoclonal plasma cells which remains incurable despite recent advances in therapies. The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in many solid and hematologic tumors, so the idea of CSCs has been proposed for MM, even if MM CSCs have not been define yet. The existence of myeloma CSCs with clonotypic B and clonotypic non B cells was postulated by many groups. This review aims to focus on these distinct clonotypic subpopulations and on their ability to develop and sustain MM. The bone marrow microenvironment provides to MM CSCs self-renewal, survival and drug resistance thanks to the presence of normal and cancer stem cell niches. The niches and CSCs interact each other through adhesion molecules and the interplay between ligands and receptors activates stemness signaling (Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch pathways). MM CSCs are also supposed to be responsible for drug resistance that happens in three steps from the initial cancer cell homing microenvironment-mediated to development of microenvironment-independent drug resistance. In this review, we will underline all these aspects of MM CSCs. PMID:25621108

  8. Identify multiple myeloma stem cells: Utopia?

    PubMed

    Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2015-01-26

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of monoclonal plasma cells which remains incurable despite recent advances in therapies. The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in many solid and hematologic tumors, so the idea of CSCs has been proposed for MM, even if MM CSCs have not been define yet. The existence of myeloma CSCs with clonotypic B and clonotypic non B cells was postulated by many groups. This review aims to focus on these distinct clonotypic subpopulations and on their ability to develop and sustain MM. The bone marrow microenvironment provides to MM CSCs self-renewal, survival and drug resistance thanks to the presence of normal and cancer stem cell niches. The niches and CSCs interact each other through adhesion molecules and the interplay between ligands and receptors activates stemness signaling (Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch pathways). MM CSCs are also supposed to be responsible for drug resistance that happens in three steps from the initial cancer cell homing microenvironment-mediated to development of microenvironment-independent drug resistance. In this review, we will underline all these aspects of MM CSCs. PMID:25621108

  9. Identify multiple myeloma stem cells: Utopia?

    PubMed

    Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Reale, Antonia; Vacca, Angelo; Ria, Roberto

    2015-01-26

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of monoclonal plasma cells which remains incurable despite recent advances in therapies. The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been demonstrated in many solid and hematologic tumors, so the idea of CSCs has been proposed for MM, even if MM CSCs have not been define yet. The existence of myeloma CSCs with clonotypic B and clonotypic non B cells was postulated by many groups. This review aims to focus on these distinct clonotypic subpopulations and on their ability to develop and sustain MM. The bone marrow microenvironment provides to MM CSCs self-renewal, survival and drug resistance thanks to the presence of normal and cancer stem cell niches. The niches and CSCs interact each other through adhesion molecules and the interplay between ligands and receptors activates stemness signaling (Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch pathways). MM CSCs are also supposed to be responsible for drug resistance that happens in three steps from the initial cancer cell homing microenvironment-mediated to development of microenvironment-independent drug resistance. In this review, we will underline all these aspects of MM CSCs.

  10. Fucoidan inhibits angiogenesis induced by multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen; Luo, Guoping; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Liping; Luo, Xiaohua; Lv, Jinglong; Chen, Lixue

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological neoplasms. Our previous studies showed that Fucoidan possessed anti-myeloma effect by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting invasion of myeloma cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells and elucidated its possible mechanisms. Multiple myeloma cells were treated with Fucoidan at different concentrations, then the conditioned medium (CM) was collected. The levels of VEGF in the CM were tested by ELISA. The results showed that Fucoidan significantly decreased VEGF secretion by RPMI-8226 and U266 cells. The tube formation assay and migration test on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to examine the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells. The results showed that Fucoidan decreased HUVECs formed tube structures and inhibited HUVECs migration, and suppressed the angiogenic ability of multiple myeloma RPMI-8226 and U266 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The study also showed that Fucoidan downregulated the expression of several kinds of proteins, which may be correlated with the reduction of angiogenesis induced by myeloma cells. Moreover, results were compared from normoxic and hypoxic conditions, they showed that Fucoidan had anti-angiogenic activity. Furthermore, in a multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model, it indicated that Fucoidan negatively affected tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Fucoidan was able to interfere with angiogenesis of multiple myeloma cells both in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM.

  11. Multiple myeloma cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Kong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Guang; Gao, Lu; Shi, Jumei

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite much progress that has been made in the treatment of the disease. MM cancer stem cell (MMSC), a rare subpopulation of MM cells with the capacity for self-renewal and drug resistance, is considered to lead to disease relapse. Several markers such as side population (SP) and ALDH1+ have been used to identify MMSCs. However, ideally and more precisely, the identification of the MMSCs should rely on MMSCs phenotype. Unfortunately the MMSC phenotype has not been properly defined yet. Drug resistance is the most important property of MMSCs and contributes to disease relapse, but the mechanisms of drug resistance have not been fully understood. The major signaling pathways involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of MMSCs include Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wnt), Notch and PI3K/Akt/mTOR. However, the precise role of these signaling pathways needs to be clarified. It has been reported that the microRNA profile of MMSCs is remarkably different than that of non-MMSCs. Therefore, the search for targeting MMSCs has also been focused on microRNAs. Complex and mutual interactions between the MMSC and the surrounding bone marrow (BM) microenvironment sustain self-renewal and survival of MMSC. However, the required molecules for the interaction of the MMSC and the surrounding BM microenvironment need to be further identified. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of MMSCs regarding their phenotype, mechanisms of drug resistance, signaling pathways that regulate MMSCs self-renewal and differentiation, abnormal microRNAs expression, and their interactions with the BM microenvironment. PMID:27007154

  12. Sclerostin is overexpressed by plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Giacomina; Oranger, Angela; Mori, Giorgio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rinaldi, Erminia; Curci, Paola; Zallone, Alberta; Rizzi, Rita; Grano, Maria; Colucci, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    Sclerostin, an osteocyte-expressed negative regulator of bone formation, is one of the inhibitors of Wnt signaling that is a critical pathway in the correct process of osteoblast differentiation. It has been demonstrated that Wnt signaling through the secretion of Wnt inhibitors, such as DKK1, sFRP-2, and sFRP-3, plays a key role in the decreased osteoblast activity associated with multiple myeloma (MM) bone disease. We provide evidence that sclerostin is expressed by myeloma cells that are human myeloma cell lines and plasma cells (CD138(+) cells) obtained from the bone marrow (BM) of a large number of MM patients with bone disease. Moreover, we show that there are no differences in sclerostin serum levels between MM patients and controls. Thus, our data indicate that MM cells, as a sclerostin source in the BM, could create a microenvironment with high sclerostin concentration that could contribute toward inhibiting osteoblast differentiation.

  13. Heparanase promotes myeloma progression by inducing mesenchymal features and motility of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Peker, Deniz; Regal, Kellie M.; Javed, Amjad; Suva, Larry J.; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Bone dissemination and bone disease occur in approximately 80% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and are a major cause of patient mortality. We previously demonstrated that MM cell-derived heparanase (HPSE) is a major driver of MM dissemination to and progression in new bone sites. However the mechanism(s) by which HPSE promotes MM progression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of mesenchymal features in HPSE-promoted MM progression in bone. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, cellular, and in vivo approaches, we demonstrated that (1) HPSE enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers in both MM and vascular endothelial cells; (2) HPSE expression in patient myeloma cells positively correlated with the expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and fibronectin. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that the enhanced mesenchymal-like phenotype induced by HPSE in MM cells is due, at least in part, to the stimulation of the ERK signaling pathway. Finally, knockdown of vimentin in HPSE expressing MM cells resulted in significantly attenuated MM cell dissemination and tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mesenchymal features induced by HPSE in MM cells contribute to enhanced tumor cell motility and bone-dissemination. PMID:26849235

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are abnormal in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Corre, J; Mahtouk, K; Attal, M; Gadelorge, M; Huynh, A; Fleury-Cappellesso, S; Danho, C; Laharrague, P; Klein, B; Rème, T; Bourin, P

    2007-05-01

    Recent literature suggested that cells of the microenvironment of tumors could be abnormal as well. To address this hypothesis in multiple myeloma (MM), we studied bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), the only long-lived cells of the bone marrow microenvironment, by gene expression profiling and phenotypic and functional studies in three groups of individuals: patients with MM, patients with monoclonal gamopathy of undefined significance (MGUS) and healthy age-matched subjects. Gene expression profile independently classified the BMMSCs of these individuals in a normal and in an MM group. MGUS BMMSCs were interspersed between these two groups. Among the 145 distinct genes differentially expressed in MM and normal BMMSCs, 46% may account for a tumor-microenvironment cross-talk. Known soluble factors implicated in MM pathophysiologic features (i.e. IL (interleukin)-6, DKK1) were revealed and new ones were found which are involved in angiogenesis, osteogenic differentiation or tumor growth. In particular, GDF15 was found to induce dose-dependent growth of MOLP-6, a stromal cell-dependent myeloma cell line. Functionally, MM BMMSCs induced an overgrowth of MOLP-6, and their capacity to differentiate into an osteoblastic lineage was impaired. Thus, MM BMMSCs are abnormal and could create a very efficient niche to support the survival and proliferation of the myeloma cells.

  15. BCL-B (BCL2L10) is overexpressed in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and drives an MM-like disease in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Puissant, Alexandre; Richez, Valentine; Cassel, Romeo; Fenouille, Nina; Roulland, Sandrine; Gilleron, Jerome; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Dubois, Alix; Bailly-Maitre, Beatrice; Goncalves, Diogo; Mallavialle, Aude; Colosetti, Pascal; Marchetti, Sandrine; Amiot, Martine; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Rochet, Nathalie; Deckert, Marcel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hofman, Paul; Karsenti, Jean-Michel; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Nadel, Bertrand; Cluzeau, Thomas; Anderson, Kenneth C; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2016-08-22

    Multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from a premalignant condition known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, the factors underlying the malignant transformation of plasmocytes in MM are not fully characterized. We report here that Eµ-directed expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-B protein in mice drives an MM phenotype that reproduces accurately the human disease. Indeed, with age, Eµ-bcl-b transgenic mice develop the characteristic features of human MM, including bone malignant plasma cell infiltration, a monoclonal immunoglobulin peak, immunoglobulin deposit in renal tubules, and highly characteristic bone lytic lesions. In addition, the tumors are serially transplantable in irradiated wild-type mice, underlying the tumoral origin of the disease. Eµ-bcl-b plasmocytes show increased expression of a panel of genes known to be dysregulated in human MM pathogenesis. Treatment of Eµ-bcl-b mice with drugs currently used to treat patients such as melphalan and VELCADE efficiently kills malignant plasmocytes in vivo. Finally, we find that Bcl-B is overexpressed in plasmocytes from MM patients but neither in MGUS patients nor in healthy individuals, suggesting that Bcl-B may drive MM. These findings suggest that Bcl-B could be an important factor in MM disease and pinpoint Eµ-bcl-b mice as a pertinent model to validate new therapies in MM. PMID:27455953

  16. Clarithromycin Synergistically Enhances Thalidomide Cytotoxicity in Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xu-Hua; Shao, Jing-Jing; Mei, Jian-Gang; Li, Han-Qing; Cao, Hong-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a macrolide antibiotic that is widely used in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and infections caused by the Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium avium complex. Recent studies showed that CAM was highly effective against multiple myeloma (MM) when used in combination with immunomodulatory drugs and dexamethasone. However, the related mechanism is still unknown. As 3 immunomodulatory agents are all effective in the respective regimen, we postulated that CAM might enhance the effect of immunomodulatory drugs. We evaluated the interaction effects of CAM and thalidomide on myeloma cells. Taking into consideration that thalidomide did not affect the proliferation of myeloma cells in vitro, we cocultured myeloma cells with peripheral blood monocytes and evaluated the effects of CAM and thalidomide on the cocultured cell model. Data showed that thalidomide and CAM synergistically inhibited the proliferation of the cells. On this same model, we also found that thalidomide and CAM synergistically decreased the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. This might be caused by the effect of the 2 drugs on inhibiting the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT. These data suggest that the efficacy of CAM against MM was partly due to its synergistic action with the immunomodulatory agents.

  17. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ... plasma cell neoplasms that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ...

  18. Plasma cell morphology in multiple myeloma and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Ribourtout, B; Zandecki, M

    2015-06-01

    Normal and reactive plasma cells (PC) are easy to ascertain on human bone marrow films, due to their small mature-appearing nucleus and large cytoplasm, the latter usually deep blue after Giemsa staining. Cytoplasm is filled with long strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum and one large Golgi apparatus (paranuclear hof), demonstrating that PC are dedicated mainly to protein synthesis and excretion (immunoglobulin). Deregulation of the genome may induce clonal expansion of one PC that will lead to immunoglobulin overproduction and eventually to one among the so-called PC neoplasms. In multiple myeloma (MM), the number of PC is over 10% in most patients studied. Changes in the morphology of myeloma PC may be inconspicuous as compared to normal PC (30-50% patients). In other instances PC show one or several morphological changes. One is related to low amount of cytoplasm, defining lymphoplasmacytoid myeloma (10-15% patients). In other cases (40-50% patients), named immature myeloma cases, nuclear-cytoplasmic asynchrony is observed: presence of one nucleolus, finely dispersed chromatin and/or irregular nuclear contour contrast with a still large and blue (mature) cytoplasm. A peculiar morphological change, corresponding to the presence of very immature PC named plasmablasts, is observed in 10-15% cases. Several prognostic morphological classifications have been published, as mature myeloma is related to favorable outcome and immature myeloma, peculiarly plasmablastic myeloma, is related to dismal prognosis. However, such classifications are no longer included in current prognostic schemes. Changes related to the nucleus are very rare in monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). In contrast, anomalies related to the cytoplasm of PC, including color (flaming cells), round inclusions (Mott cells, Russell bodies), Auer rod-like or crystalline inclusions, are reported in myeloma cases as well as in MGUS and at times in reactive disorders. They do not correspond

  19. Immunoregulatory T Cell Function in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, H.; Han, T.; Henderson, E. S.; Nussbaum, A.; Sheedy, D.

    1981-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignancy characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal B cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production. In most instances, there is concomitant reduction in polyclonal differentiation and immunoglobulin synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. In in vitro pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell differentiation assays, proliferation and polyclonal immunoglobulin secretion optimally requires T cell help and can be inhibited both by monocytes and suppressor T cells. Helper function and monocyte-mediated suppression are relatively radio-resistant whereas T suppressor function is sensitive to 2,000 rad x-irradiation. We have examined myeloma T cell subset function in this assay using recombinations of isolated patient and normal B cells, T cells, and T cell subsets. Monocytes were removed by a carbonyl iron ingestion technique, normal and myeloma T cells were fractionated on the basis of Fc receptors for immunoglobulin (Ig) G (Tγ) or IgM (Tμ or T non-γ), and proliferation and IgG secretion after co-culture determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation and radio-immunoassay, respectively. Myeloma B cells demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively normal blastogenic responses and are appropriately regulated by either autologous or allogeneic T helper and suppressor subsets. Despite normal proliferation, however, myeloma B cells remain deficient in subsequent differentiation and immunoglobulin secretion even when co-cultured in the absence of monocytes or suppressor T cells and the presence of normal helper cells. Myeloma T cell populations, in contrast, are entirely normal in helper capacity over a range of T:B ratios but are markedly deficient in radiosensitive and concanavalin A-induced suppressor activity. T suppressor cell dysfunction in multiple myeloma is apparently due to a deficit in the T non-γ suppressor subset, whereas Tγ cells, although proportionately reduced, are functionally normal. This unique T suppressor deficit reflects the heterogeneity

  20. Outcome after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma in patients with preceding plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji K; Dingli, David; Lacy, Martha Q; Dispenzieri, Angela; Hayman, Suzanne R; Buadi, Francis K; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Litzow, Mark R; Gertz, Morie A

    2008-04-01

    A third of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have a preceding diagnosis of plasma cell proliferative disorder (PCPD), mostly monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering MM (SMM) or plasmacytoma. While autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) improves survival in MM, it is not clear if patients with preceding PCPD have a different outcome. We identified 151 patients with preceding PCPD from among 804 patients undergoing SCT, and their outcomes were compared. The response rates, including complete responses, were similar between the groups. Patients with a preceding diagnosis of MGUS had longer time to progression (TTP; 27.5 months vs. 17.2 months, P = 0.01), and longer overall survival (OS) from transplant (80.2 months vs. 48.3 months, P = 0.03) compared to those with de novo myeloma. However no differences were seen among those with a preceding diagnosis of SMM or plasmacytoma in terms of TTP or OS from transplant when compared to those with de novo myeloma. Multivariate analysis indicated that the presence of MGUS prior to myeloma was prognostic for post-transplant relapse independent of other known risk factors. Patients with pre-existing MGUS prior to myeloma diagnosis have a better outcome following HDT, reflecting more indolent disease and a favourable biology than those presenting with de novo myeloma. PMID:18318761

  1. Role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ima N

    2015-02-01

    High-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has been the standard frontline consolidative therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) for > 2 decades. This approach has resulted in higher complete response (CR) rates and increased event-free survival and overall survival (OS) compared with conventional chemotherapy. The emergence of novel agent-based therapy combined with ASCT has revolutionized MM therapy by improving the CR rates and OS, raising questions concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this setting.

  2. Purified CD34+ Lin- Thy+ stem cells do not contain clonal myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Gazitt, Y; Reading, C C; Hoffman, R; Wickrema, A; Vesole, D H; Jagannath, S; Condino, J; Lee, B; Barlogie, B; Tricot, G

    1995-07-01

    High-dose therapy with autologous marrow or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) rescue has been extensively applied in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) patients during the past 10 years resulting in improved event-free and overall survival when compared with standard chemotherapy. However, relapses are common and cure is unlikely in the majority of patients. Because both bone marrow and PBSCs are contaminated with myeloma cells it is conceivable that relapse after autotransplantation originates at least in part from autografted tumor cells. In this study, mobilized PBSCs were examined for the presence of myeloma cells based on immunophenotyping and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques. In addition, CD34+ Lin- Thy+ stem cells were purified from mobilized PBSC harvests of 10 MM patients by sequentially using counterflow elutriation centrifugation, treatment with phenylalanine methylester, and flow sorting, using 5-parameter gating (propidium iodide, forward scatter, side scatter, CD34+ v Lin- and CD34+ v Thy+). Virtually all mobilized unsorted PBSC preparations contained myeloma cells in sufficient quantities (range, < 0.01 to > 10%) potentially causing a disease relapse. Stem cell purification led to an overall enrichment by about 50-fold in all 10 patients; approximately 90% of the final cell population expressed CD34+ Lin- Thy+ with no evidence of myeloma cell contamination based on flow cytometric analysis of CD38bright cells (< 0.1%). Quantitative PCR amplification of patient-specific complementarity determining region III (CDRIII) DNA sequences showed depletion of clonal B cells by 2.7 to 7.3 logs, with the highest log reduction noted in the samples initially containing the most tumor cells. Our results show that purification of CD34+ Lin- Thy+ cells depletes myeloma cells to undetectable levels from up to 10% present in unsorted PBSCs, thus offering a tool to investigate whether MM relapse after autotransplantation can be reduced

  3. Induction of potent NK cell-dependent anti-myeloma cytotoxic T cells in response to combined mapatumumab and bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Neeson, Paul J; Hsu, Andy K; Chen, Yin R; Halse, Heloise M; Loh, Joanna; Cordy, Reece; Fielding, Kate; Davis, Joanne; Noske, Josh; Davenport, Alex J; Lindqvist-Gigg, Camilla A; Humphreys, Robin; Tai, Tsin; Prince, H Miles; Trapani, Joseph A; Smyth, Mark J; Ritchie, David S

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that some cancer therapies can promote tumor immunogenicity to boost the endogenous antitumor immune response. In this study, we used the novel combination of agonistic anti-TRAIL-R1 antibody (mapatumumab, Mapa) with low dose bortezomib (LDB) for this purpose. The combination induced profound myeloma cell apoptosis, greatly enhanced the uptake of myeloma cell apoptotic bodies by dendritic cell (DC) and induced anti-myeloma cytotoxicity by both CD8+ T cells and NK cells. Cytotoxic lymphocyte expansion was detected within 24 h of commencing therapy and was maximized when myeloma-pulsed DC were co-treated with low dose bortezomib and mapatumumab (LDB+Mapa) in the presence of NK cells. This study shows that Mapa has two distinct but connected modes of action against multiple myeloma (MM). First, when combined with LDB, Mapa produced powerful myeloma cell apoptosis; secondly, it promoted DC priming and an NK cell-mediated expansion of anti-myeloma cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL). Overall, this study indicates that Mapa can be used to drive potent anti-MM immune responses. PMID:26405606

  4. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  5. Curcumin induces cell death of the main molecular myeloma subtypes, particularly the poor prognosis subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Halliez, Maxime; Maïga, Sophie; Godon, Catherine; Kervoëlen, Charlotte; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Moreau, Philippe; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell malignancy, remains incurable despite the development of new therapies. Curcumin anti-tumor effects were previously characterized in multiple myeloma, however only few MM cell lines were included in these studies. Since myeloma is a heterogeneous disease it is important to address the impact of myeloma molecular heterogeneity in curcumin cell death induction. In the present study, a large panel of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) (n = 29), representing the main molecular MM subgroups, was screened for curcumin sensitivity. We observed that curcumin cell death induction was heterogeneous, of note 16 HMCLs were highly sensitive to curcumin (LD50 < 20.5 μM), 6 HMCLs exhibited intermediate LD50 values (20.5 μM ≤ LD50 < 32.2 μM) and only 7 HMCLs were weakly sensitive (35 < LD50 < 56 μM). Cell lines harboring the t(11;14) translocation were less sensitive (median LD50 32.9 μM) than non-t(11;14) (median LD50 17.9 μM), which included poor prognosis t(4;14) and t(14;16) cells. Interestingly, curcumin sensitivity was not dependent on TP53 status. For the first time we showed that primary myeloma cells were also sensitive, even those displaying del(17p), another poor prognosis factor. We also unravel the contribution of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family molecules in curcumin response. We found that down-regulation of Mcl-1, an essential MM survival factor, was associated with curcumin-induced cell death and its knockdown sensitized myeloma cells to curcumin, highlighting Mcl-1 as an important target for curcumin-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results support clinical trials including curcumin in association with standard therapy. PMID:25517601

  6. Decreased Ferroportin Promotes Myeloma Cell Growth and Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell–induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  7. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Er-Wen; Xue, Sheng-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Suo-Wen; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang; Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Chao

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  8. HDAC inhibitor AR-42 decreases CD44 expression and sensitizes myeloma cells to lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Sborov, Douglas W.; Cascione, Luciano; Radomska, Hanna S.; Smith, Emily; Stiff, Andrew; Consiglio, Jessica; Caserta, Enrico; Rizzotto, Lara; Zanesi, Nicola; Stefano, Volinia; Kaur, Balveen; Mo, Xiaokui; Byrd, John C.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite multiple treatment options, MM is inevitably associated with drug resistance and poor outcomes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) are promising novel chemotherapeutics undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for the potential treatment of patients with MM. Although in preclinical studies HDACi's have proven anti-myeloma activity, but in the clinic single-agent HDACi treatments have been limited due to low tolerability. Improved clinical outcomes were reported only when HDACi's were combined with other drugs. Here, we show that a novel pan-HDACi AR-42 downregulates CD44, a glycoprotein that has been associated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone resistance in myeloma both in vitro and in vivo. We also show that this CD44 downregulation is in part mediated by miR-9–5p, targeting insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), which directly binds to CD44 mRNA and increases its stability. Importantly, we also demonstrate that AR-42 enhances anti-myeloma activity of lenalidomide in primary MM cells isolated from lenalidomide resistant patients and in in vivo MM mouse model. Thus, our findings shed light on potential novel combinatorial therapeutic approaches modulating CD44 expression, which may help overcome lenalidomide resistance in myeloma patients. PMID:26429859

  9. VOLIN and KJON-Two novel hyperdiploid myeloma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Børset, Magne; Dikic, Aida; Tian, Erming; Micci, Francesca; Lid, Ana H B; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Coward, Eivind; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders; Kuehl, W Michael; Holien, Toril

    2016-11-01

    Multiple myeloma can be divided into two distinct genetic subgroups: hyperdiploid (HRD) or nonhyperdiploid (NHRD) myeloma. Myeloma cell lines are important tools to study myeloma cell biology and are commonly used for preclinical screening and testing of new drugs. With few exceptions human myeloma cell lines are derived from NHRD patients, even though about half of the patients have HRD myeloma. Thus, there is a need for cell lines of HRD origin to enable more representative preclinical studies. Here, we present two novel myeloma cell lines, VOLIN and KJON. Both of them were derived from patients with HRD disease and shared the same genotype as their corresponding primary tumors. The cell lines' chromosomal content, genetic aberrations, gene expression, immunophenotype as well as some of their growth characteristics are described. Neither of the cell lines was found to harbor immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations. The VOLIN cell line was established from a bone marrow aspirate and KJON from peripheral blood. We propose that these unique cell lines may be used as tools to increase our understanding of myeloma cell biology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311012

  10. Hexamethylene bisacetamide induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) and down-regulates BCL-2 expression in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D S; Zhang, X; Feinman, R; Teitz, T; Zelenetz, A; Richon, V M; Rifkind, R A; Marks, P A; Michaeli, J

    1998-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell malignancy characterized by the expansion of monoclonal Ig-secreting plasma cells with low proliferative activity. It is postulated that inhibition of physiologic cell death is an underlying factor in the pathophysiology of MM. The development of chemoresistance is a common feature in patients with MM. In the present studies, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), a hybrid polar compound that is a potent inducer of terminal differentiation of various transformed cells, is shown to inhibit the growth of several human myeloma cell lines (ARP-1, U266, and RPMI 8226), including doxorubicin-resistant RPMI 8226 variants that overexpress the multidrug-resistance gene, MDR-1, and its product, p-glycoprotein. In addition to growth arrest and suppression of clonogenicity, HMBA induces apoptosis both in freshly isolated human myeloma cells and in cell lines, as determined by morphologic alterations, cell cycle distribution and endonucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Further, HMBA decreases BCL-2 protein expression in myeloma cells within 12-48 hr. Overexpression of BCL-2 protein in ARP-1 cells confers resistance to HMBA-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that HMBA is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human myeloma cells, which may act through suppressing the anti-apoptotic function of the bcl-2 gene. HMBA, and related hybrid polar compounds, may prove useful in the management of this presently incurable disease.

  11. Dexamethasone-induced cell death is restricted to specific molecular subgroups of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kervoëlen, Charlotte; Ménoret, Emmanuelle; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Bataille, Régis; Godon, Catherine; Marionneau-Lambot, Séverine; Moreau, Philippe; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Amiot, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Due to its cytotoxic effect in lymphoid cells, dexamethasone is widely used in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). However, only a subset of myeloma patients responds to high-dose dexamethasone. Despite the undeniable anti-myeloma benefits of dexamethasone, significant adverse effects have been reported. We re-evaluate the anti-tumor effect of dexamethasone according to the molecular heterogeneity of MM. We demonstrated that the pro-death effect of dexamethasone is related to the genetic heterogeneity of MM because sensitive cell lines were restricted to MAF and MMSET signature subgroups, whereas all CCND1 cell lines (n = 10) were resistant to dexamethasone. We demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor expression was an important limiting factor for dexamethasone-induced cell death and we found a correlation between glucocorticoid receptor levels and the induction of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) under dexamethasone treatment. By silencing GILZ, we next demonstrated that GILZ is necessary for Dex induced apoptosis while triggering an imbalance between anti- and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Finally, the heterogeneity of the dexamethasone response was further confirmed in vivo using myeloma xenograft models. Our findings suggested that the effect of dexamethasone should be re-evaluated within molecular subgroups of myeloma patients to improve its efficacy and reduce its adverse effects. PMID:26323097

  12. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik A; Walker, Sarah R; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C; Frank, David A

    2008-12-15

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival. PMID:18824601

  13. Nifuroxazide inhibits survival of multiple myeloma cells by directly inhibiting STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Kepich, Alicia; Gashin, Laurie B.; Hideshima, Teru; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the transcription factor STAT3 contributes to the pathogenesis of many cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Since STAT3 is dispensable in most normal tissue, targeted inhibition of STAT3 is an attractive therapy for patients with these cancers. To identify STAT3 inhibitors, we developed a transcriptionally based assay and screened a library of compounds known to be safe in humans. We found the drug nifuroxazide to be an effective inhibitor of STAT3 function. Nifuroxazide inhibits the constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 in MM cells by reducing Jak kinase autophosphorylation, and leads to down-regulation of the STAT3 target gene Mcl-1. Nifuroxazide causes a decrease in viability of primary myeloma cells and myeloma cell lines containing STAT3 activation, but not normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although bone marrow stromal cells provide survival signals to myeloma cells, nifuroxazide can overcome this survival advantage. Reflecting the interaction of STAT3 with other cellular pathways, nifuroxazide shows enhanced cytotoxicity when combined with either the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide or the MEK inhibitor UO126. Therefore, using a mechanistic-based screen, we identified the clinically relevant drug nifuroxazide as a potent inhibitor of STAT signaling that shows cytotoxicity against myeloma cells that depend on STAT3 for survival. PMID:18824601

  14. Expression of GITR Enhances Multiple Myeloma Cell Sensitivity to Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghao; Zhang, Kun; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Xingyi; Shi, Donglei

    2015-01-01

    Recently tumor necrosis factor receptor super family member 18 (TNFRSF18, also called GITR) has been identified as a novel tumor suppressor gene in Multiple Myeloma (MM), undergoing aberrant DNA methylation-mediated gene expression silencing. Furthermore, the expression of GITR blocks canonical NF-κB activation in MM cells in response to TNFα. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, can induce NF-κB activation, which may significantly influence the drug response in MM patients. In this study, we aim to elucidate if GITR status is associated with response to Bortezomib in MM cells through regulating GITR mediated NF-κB blockade. We found that GITR was significantly downregulated in MM patients and cell lines. Overexpression of GITR inhibited non-canonical NF-κB activation induced by TNFα. Moreover, NF-κB inhibitor induced apoptosis in GITR-deficient MM cells in response to TNFα. In addition, overexpression of GITR could inhibit Bortezomib-induced NF-κB activation and enhance the cytotoxicity of Bortezomib in GITR-deficient MM cell line (MM1.S). In contrast, knockdown of GITR attenuated the cytotoxic effect of Bortezomib on GITR proficient MM (RPMI) cell line and increased NF-κB activation. Finally, overexpression of GITR enhanced the sensitivity to Bortezomib in co-culture with bone marrow stromal cells and significantly reduced the tumor growth in MM1.S xenograft mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that GITR expression can enhance the sensitivity to Bortezomib by inhibiting Bortezomib-induced NF-κB activation.

  15. Autoregulatory circuits in myeloma. Tumor cell cytotoxicity mediated by soluble CD16.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, R G; Lary, C; Page, R; Travis, P; Owens, R; Flick, J; Kornbluth, J; Barlogie, B

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Multiple myeloma remains an incurable malignancy due to marked resistance of the tumor to standard doses of chemotherapy. Treatment approaches, using chemotherapeutic dose escalation and hematopoietic stem cell support have resulted in significant augmentation of tumor mass reduction such that complete remissions are effected in approximately 50% of patients. These remissions are however, often not durable. In the setting of minimal residual disease, therefore, adjunctive immunotherapy may be useful. METHODS. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were studied from 28 untreated patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Mononuclear cell CD16 (FcR gamma III) expression was determined by flow cytometry. The effect of lymphocyte-derived soluble CD16, isolated by affinity chromatography, on MM cell growth and differentiation was assessed. MM cell proliferation, viability, immunoglobulin production and gene expression was studied. RESULTS. Data are presented indicating that cells expressing CD16 are increased in untreated patients with IgG-secreting myeloma. The predominant phenotype of these cells is CD8+ or CD56+. These CD16+ cells can produce a soluble form of the Fc receptor (sFcR, sCD16) that can bind to surface Ig on cultured human IgG-secreting myeloma cells and effect suppression of tumor cell growth and Ig secretion. This effector function is accompanied by concomitant suppression of c-myc as well as IgH and IgL gene transcription. Finally, prolonged exposure to sCD16 causes myeloma tumor cell cytolysis. CONCLUSIONS. sCD16 and possibly other soluble FcR are candidate molecules for adjunctive immunotherapy of myeloma, once complete responses have been effected by intensive cytotoxic therapy, now possible in up to 50% of newly diagnosed patients. Images PMID:7529259

  16. The natural products parthenolide and andrographolide exhibit anti-cancer stem cell activity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Ellen J; Williams, John T; Huynh, Daniel T; Iannotti, Michael J; Han, Changho; Barrios, Francis J; Kendall, Stephen; Glackin, Carlotta A; Colby, David A; Kirshner, Julia

    2011-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy where nearly all patients succumb to a relapse. The current preclinical models of MM target the plasma cells, constituting the bulk of the tumor, leaving the cancer stem cells to trigger a relapse. Utilizing a three-dimensional tissue culture system where cells were grown in extracellular matrix designed to reconstruct human bone marrow, we tested the anti-multiple myeloma cancer stem cell (MM-CSC) potential of two natural product inhibitors of nuclear factor κB (NFκB). Here we show that parthenolide and andrographolide are potent anti-MM-CSC agents. Both natural products demonstrated preferential toxicity toward MM-CSCs over non-tumorigenic MM cells. Addition of the bone marrow stromal compartment abrogated andrographolide activity while having no effect on parthenolide cytoxicity. This is the first report of a natural product with anti-CSC activity in myeloma, suggesting that it has the potential to improve the survival of patients with MM by eliminating the relapse-causing MM-CSCs. PMID:21417826

  17. Cancer stem cells are the cause of drug resistance in multiple myeloma: fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Janz, Siegfried; Zhan, Fenghuang; Tricot, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains a largely incurable, genetically heterogeneous plasma-cell malignancy that contains – just like many other cancers – a small fraction of clonogenic stem cell-like cells that exhibit pronounced self-renewal and differentiation capacities, but also pronounced drug resistance. These MM stem cells (MMSCs) are a controversial but highly significant issue in myeloma research because, in our opinion, they are at the root of the failure of anti-neoplastic chemotherapies to transform myeloma to a manageable chronic disease. Several markers including CD138−, ALDH1+ and SP have been used to identify MMSCs; however, no single marker is reliable for the isolation of MMSC. Nonetheless, it is now known that MMSCs depend on self-renewal and pro-survival pathways, such as AKT, Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and Hedgehog, which can be targeted with novel drugs that have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the pathways of myeloma “stemness”, the interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment that promote drug resistance, and the obstacles that must be overcome to eradicate MMSCs and make myeloma a curable disease. PMID:26415231

  18. Correlation of proliferative and clonogenic tumor cells in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, J.E.; Burke, P.J.; Saylor, P.L.; Humphrey, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    To expand on the findings from previous clinical trials that the growth of residual tumor is increased at a predictable time following initial drug administration, malignant plasma cells from bone marrows of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were examined for changes in proliferation and clonogenicity induced in vivo by cyclophosphamide and in vitro by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity. Peak plasma cell (/sup 3/H)thymidine labeling index (LI) occurred predictably following drug and paralleled changes in agar colony formation by marrow cells obtained during therapy. Colony-forming capacity of pretreatment MM marrow populations was enhanced when those cells were cultured with humoral stimulatory activity, similar to the increased colony formation detected in Day 9 postcyclophosphamide marrows at the time of peak plasma cell LI. To further define a relationship between proliferative plasma cells and colony-forming tumor cells, MM marrows were fractionated by sedimentation on an isokinetic gradient. Enrichment of a proliferative tumor cell cohort was achieved, evidenced by (/sup 3/H)thymidine LI. Colony-forming cells were also enriched by isokinetic gradient sedimentation, and agar colony formation by MM marrow cell fractions correlated with the kinetic characteristics of the isolated subpopulations. These studies of whole and fractionated human MM marrow cell populations suggest that the kinetically active cells which are induced to proliferate in vivo and in vitro are closely related to the clonogenic tumor cells which produce colonies in agar and which, like those cells measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine LI, respond to growth stimulation by drug-induced humoral stimulatory activity.

  19. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  20. Myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 30,330 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.8% Estimated Deaths in 2016 12,650 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 95,688 people living with myeloma in the ...

  1. A CD138-independent strategy to detect minimal residual disease and circulating tumour cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Muz, Barbara; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah John; King, Justin; Vij, Ravi; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-04-01

    CD138 (also termed SDC1) has been the gold-standard surface marker to detect multiple myeloma (MM) cells for decades; however, drug-resistant residual and circulating MM cells were shown to have lower expression of this marker. In this study, we have shown that residual MM cells following bortezomib treatment are hypoxic. This combination of drug exposure and hypoxia down-regulates their CD138 expression, thereby making this marker unsuitable for detecting residual or other hypoxic MM cells, such as circulating tumour cells, in MM. Hence, we developed an alternative biomarker set which detects myeloma cells independent of their hypoxic and CD138 expression status in vitro, in vivo and in primary MM patients. The new markers were able to identify a clonal CD138-negative population as minimal residual disease in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of MM patients. Further investigation to characterize the role of this population as a prognostic marker in MM is warranted.

  2. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; Del Cañizo, M Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-07-26

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy in which clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic lesions due to increased osteoclast (OC) activity and suppressed osteoblast (OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma pathophysiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of myeloma bone disease (MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients (pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts (dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibitory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and activity at various levels (i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncoupling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augmented production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents (at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  4. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; del Cañizo, M Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy in which clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic lesions due to increased osteoclast (OC) activity and suppressed osteoblast (OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma pathophysiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of myeloma bone disease (MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients (pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts (dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibitory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and activity at various levels (i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncoupling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augmented production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents (at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented. PMID:25126382

  5. Oleocanthal inhibits proliferation and MIP-1α expression in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Scotece, M; Gómez, R; Conde, J; Lopez, V; Gómez-Reino, J J; Lago, F; Smith, A B; Gualillo, O

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy that causes devastating bone destruction by activating osteoclasts in the bone marrow milieu. MM is the second of all hematological malignancies. Thus, the search for new pharmacological weapons is under intensive investigation being MM a critically important public health goal. Recently, it has been demonstrated that macrophage inflammatory protein 1- alpha (MIP-1 α) is crucially involved in the development of osteolytic bone lesions in MM. Phenolic components of extra virgin olive oil are reported to have anti tumor activity. However, the underlying mechanisms and specific targets of extra virgin olive oil remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a recently isolated novel extra virgin olive oil polyphenol, oleocanthal, on the human multiple myeloma cell line ARH-77. Here we report that this natural compound has a remarkable in vitro activity by inhibiting MIP-1 α expression and secretion in MM cells. In addition, we also demonstrated that oleocanthal inhibits MM cells proliferation by inducing the activation of apoptosis mechanisms and by down-regulating ERK1/2 and AKT signal transduction pathways. This in vitro study suggests a therapeutic potential of oleocanthal in treating multiple myeloma. PMID:23521677

  6. S-phase cells of the lymphoplasmocytic compartment in hyperdiploid multiple myeloma are diploid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haraldsdottir, V.; Haanen, C.; Kalsbeek-Batenburg, E.; Olthuis, F.

    1995-10-01

    In vivo S-phase cell labeling with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) was performed in six multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Myeloma cells from four patients were hyperploid. In three out of four patients, DNA/IdUrd flow cytometry revealed that most of the labeled cells, which had divided during the period, elapsed between flash labeling and sampling, had returned to the diploid G0/G1 compartment and not to the hyperdiploid peak. To eliminate contaminating cells belonging to the normal hematopoiesis, plasmocytic and lymphocytic cells were fractionated and analyzed separately. Cell enrichment was performed with use of murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against plasmocytic and lymphocytic cell markers and subsequent magnetic activated cell sorting with immunobeads, i.e., polystyrene magnetic particles coated with sheep anti-mouse IgG. The IdUrd-labeled cells were predominantly lymphocytic cells, returning after mitosis to the diploid G0/G1 peak. Although this pattern of S-phase cells in hyperdiploid MM, belonging to the diploid cell compartment, was observed in three out of four hyperploid cases and although the number of observations is small, S-phase cells may demonstrate an aspect of tumor cell kinetics in hyperploid MM, which has been debated for many years and which indicates the existence of a non-plasmocytic stem cell compartment that feeds the plasmocytoma. The behavior of the labeled cells as observed in a few cases of MM provides another, hitherto undescribed, argument that, at least in some MM patients, a part of the proliferating tumor cells may be diploid lymphocytic (precursor) cells. These findings should be considered when targeting and monitoring treatment of MM and also in purging procedures of bone marrow in patients to be treated by ablative cytotoxic therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. 57 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. TNFR1 and TNFR2 regulate the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in myeloma cells by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rauert, H; Stühmer, T; Bargou, R; Wajant, H; Siegmund, D

    2011-01-01

    The huge majority of myeloma cell lines express TNFR2 while a substantial subset of them failed to show TNFR1 expression. Stimulation of TNFR1 in the TNFR1-expressing subset of MM cell lines had no or only a very mild effect on cellular viability. Surprisingly, however, TNF stimulation enhanced cell death induction by CD95L and attenuated the apoptotic effect of TRAIL. The contrasting regulation of TRAIL- and CD95L-induced cell death by TNF could be traced back to the concomitant NFκB-mediated upregulation of CD95 and the antiapoptotic FLIP protein. It appeared that CD95 induction, due to its strength, overcompensated a rather moderate upregulation of FLIP so that the net effect of TNF-induced NFκB activation in the context of CD95 signaling is pro-apoptotic. TRAIL-induced cell death, however, was antagonized in response to TNF because in this context only the induction of FLIP is relevant. Stimulation of TNFR2 in myeloma cells leads to TRAF2 depletion. In line with this, we observed cell death induction in TNFR1-TNFR2-costimulated JJN3 cells. Our studies revealed that the TNF-TNF receptor system adjusts the responsiveness of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in myeloma cells by multiple mechanisms that generate a highly context-dependent net effect on myeloma cell survival. PMID:21850048

  8. CD138-negative myeloma cells regulate mechanical properties of bone marrow stromal cells through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Guo, Xinyi; Su, Jing; Chen, Ruoying; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Guthold, Martin; Bonin, Keith; Zhao, Weiling; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most prevalent hematologic malignancy, multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable and relapses due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies that target molecular mechanisms responsible for drug resistance are attractive. Interactions of tumor cells with their surrounding microenvironment impact tumor initiation, progression and metastasis, as well as patient prognosis. This cross-talk is bidirectional. Tumor cells can also attract or activate tumor-associated stromal cells by releasing cytokines to facilitate their growth, invasion and metastasis. The effect of myeloma cells on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) has not been well studied. In our study, we found that higher stiffness of BMSCs was not a unique characteristic of BMSCs from MM patients (M-BMSCs). BMSCs from MGUS (Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance) patients were also stiffer than the BMSCs from healthy volunteers (N-BMSCs). The stiffness of M-BMSCs was enhanced when cocultured with myeloma cells. In contrast, no changes were seen in myeloma cell-primed MGUS- and N-BMSCs. Interestingly, our data indicated that CD138− myeloma cells, but not CD138+ cells, regulated M-BMSC stiffness. SDF-1 was highly expressed in the CD138− myeloma subpopulation compared with that in CD138+ cells. Inhibition of SDF-1 using AMD3100 or knocking-down CXCR4 in M-BMSCs blocked CD138− myeloma cells-induced increase in M-BMSC stiffness, suggesting a crucial role of SDF-1/CXCR4. AKT inhibition attenuated SDF-1-induced increases in M-BMSC stiffness. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, CD138− myeloma cell-directed cross-talk with BMSCs and reveal that CD138− myeloma cells regulate M-BMSC stiffness through SDF-1/CXCR4/AKT signaling. PMID:25450979

  9. In vitro growth of hematopoietic progenitors and stromal bone marrow cells from patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jaramillo, Guadalupe; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Mayani, Hector

    2011-02-01

    In the present study we have determined the content of hematopoietic and stromal progenitors in multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow, and assessed their in vitro growth. Marrow cells were obtained from 17 MM patients at the time of diagnosis, and from 6 hematologically normal subjects. When mononuclear cells (MNC) from MM marrow were cultured, reduced numbers of hematopoietic progenitors were detected and their growth in long-term cultures was deficient, as compared to cultures of normal cells. When cell fractions enriched for CD34(+) Lin(-) cells were obtained, the levels of hematopoietic progenitors from MM marrow were within the normal range, and so was their growth kinetics in liquid suspension cultures. The levels of fibroblast progenitors in MM were not statistically different from those in normal marrow; however, their proliferation potential was significantly reduced. Conditioned media from MM-derived MNC and stroma cells contained factors that inhibited normal progenitor cell growth. Our observations suggest that hematopoietic progenitors in MM marrow are intrinsically normal; however, their growth in LTMC may be hampered by the presence of abnormal accessory and stroma cells. These results suggest that besides its role in the generation of osteolytic lesions and the expansion of the myeloma clone, the marrow microenvironment in MM may have a negative effect on hematopoiesis. PMID:20621354

  10. Pravastatin induces cell cycle arrest and decreased production of VEGF and bFGF in multiple myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Trojan, P J J; Bohatch-Junior, M S; Otuki, M F; Souza-Fonseca-Guimarães, F; Svidnicki, P V; Nogaroto, V; Fernandes, D; Krum, E A; Favero, G M

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell bone marrow neoplasia characterized by inflammation with an intense secretion of growth factors that promote tumor growth, cell survival, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pravastatin, a drug used to reduce cholesterol, in a MM cell line.Cell cycle and viability were determinate by Trypan Blue and Propidium Iodide. IL6, VEGF, bFGF and TGFβ were quantified by ELISA and qRT-PCR including here de HMG CoA reductase. It was observed reduction of cell viability, increase of cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and reducing the factors VEGF and bFGF without influence on 3-Methyl-Glutaryl Coenzyme A reductase expression.The results demonstrated that pravastatin induces cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and decreased production of growth factors in Multiple Myeloma cell line. PMID:26909624

  11. Immunophenotype of normal vs. myeloma plasma cells: Toward antibody panel specifications for MRD detection in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Flores-Montero, Juan; de Tute, Ruth; Paiva, Bruno; Perez, José Juan; Böttcher, Sebastian; Wind, Henk; Sanoja, Luzalba; Puig, Noemí; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Vidriales, María Belén; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several studies on large series of multiple myeloma (MM) patients have demonstrated the clinical utility of flow cytometry monitoring of minimal residual disease (flow-MRD) in bone marrow (BM), for improved assessment of response to therapy and prognostication. However, disturbing levels of variability exist regarding the specific protocols and antibody panels used in individual laboratories. Overall, consensus exists about the utility of combined assessment of CD38 and CD138 for the identification of BM plasma cells (PC); in contrast, more heterogeneous lists of markers are used to further distinguish between normal/reactive PCs and myeloma PCs in the MRD settings. Among the later markers, CD19, CD45, CD27, and CD81, together with CD56, CD117, CD200, and CD307, have emerged as particularly informative; however, no single marker provides enough specificity for clear discrimination between clonal PCs and normal PCs. Accordingly, multivariate analyses of single PCs from large series of normal/reactive vs. myeloma BM samples have shown that combined assessment of CD138 and CD38, together with CD45, CD19, CD56, CD27, CD81, and CD117 would be ideally suited for MRD monitoring in virtually every MM patient. However, the specific antibody clones, fluorochrome conjugates and sources of the individual markers determines its optimal (vs. suboptimal or poor) performance in an eight-color staining. Assessment of clonality, via additional cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (CyIg) κ vs. CyIgλ evaluation, may contribute to further establish the normal/reactive vs. clonal nature of small suspicious PC populations at high sensitivity levels, provided that enough cells are evaluated.

  12. FGF23 is elevated in multiple myeloma and increases heparanase expression by tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suvannasankha, Attaya; Tompkins, Douglas R.; Edwards, Daniel F.; Petyaykina, Katarina V.; Crean, Colin D.; Fournier, Pierrick G.; Parker, Jamie M.; Sandusky, George E.; Ichikawa, Shoji; Imel, Erik A.; Chirgwin, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiply myeloma (MM) grows in and destroys bone, where osteocytes secrete FGF23, a hormone which affects phosphate homeostasis and aging. We report that multiple myeloma (MM) cells express receptors for and respond to FGF23. FGF23 increased mRNA for EGR1 and its target heparanase, a pro-osteolytic factor in MM. FGF23 signals through a complex of klotho and a classical FGF receptor (FGFR); both were expressed by MM cell lines and patient samples. Bone marrow plasma cells from 42 MM patients stained positively for klotho, while plasma cells from 8 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and 6 controls were negative. Intact, active FGF23 was increased 2.9X in sera of MM patients compared to controls. FGF23 was not expressed by human MM cells, but co-culture with mouse bone increased its mRNA. The FGFR inhibitor NVP-BGJ398 blocked the heparanase response to FGF23. NVP-BGJ398 did not inhibit 8226 growth in vitro but significantly suppressed growth in bone and induction of the osteoclast regulator RANK ligand, while decreasing heparanase mRNA. The bone microenvironment provides resistance to some anti-tumor drugs but increased the activity of NVP-BGJ398 against 8226 cells. The FGF23/klotho/heparanase signaling axis may offer targets for treatment of MM in bone. PMID:25944690

  13. Overexpression and involvement in migration by the metastasis-associated phosphatase PRL-3 in human myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Fagerli, Unn-Merete; Holt, Randi U; Holien, Toril; Vaatsveen, Thea K; Zhan, Fenghuang; Egeberg, Kjartan W; Barlogie, Bart; Waage, Anders; Aarset, Harald; Dai, Hong Yan; Shaughnessy, John D; Sundan, Anders; Børset, Magne

    2008-01-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by accumulation and dissemination of malignant plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM). Gene expression profiling of 2 MM cell lines (OH-2 and IH-1) indicated that expression of PRL-3, a metastasis-associated tyrosine phosphatase, was induced by several mitogenic cytokines. Cytokine-driven PRL-3 expression could be shown in several myeloma cell lines at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was significantly higher expression of the PRL-3 gene in PCs from patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and myeloma than in PCs from healthy persons. Among 7 MM subgroups identified by unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis, PRL-3 gene expression was significantly higher in the 3 groups denoted as "proliferation," "low bone disease," and "MMSET/FGFR3." PRL-3 protein was detected in 18 of 20 BM biopsies from patients with MM. Silencing of the PRL-3 gene by siRNA reduced cell migration in the MM cell line INA-6, but had no detectable effect on proliferation and cell-cycle phase distribution of the cells. In conclusion, PRL-3 is a gene product specifically expressed in malignant plasma cells and may have a role in migration of these cells. PMID:17934070

  14. Whole-epigenome analysis in multiple myeloma reveals DNA hypermethylation of B cell-specific enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Giancarlo; Pascual, Marien; Heath, Simon; Kulis, Marta; Segura, Victor; Bergmann, Anke; Esteve, Anna; Merkel, Angelika; Raineri, Emanuele; Agueda, Lidia; Blanc, Julie; Richardson, David; Clarke, Laura; Datta, Avik; Russiñol, Nuria; Queirós, Ana C.; Beekman, Renée; Rodríguez-Madoz, Juan R.; José-Enériz, Edurne San; Fang, Fang; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; García-Verdugo, José M.; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.; Guruceaga, Elisabeth; Martens, Joost H.A.; Gut, Marta; Calasanz, Maria J.; Flicek, Paul; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Melnick, Ari; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Gut, Ivo G.

    2015-01-01

    While analyzing the DNA methylome of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell neoplasm, by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and high-density arrays, we observed a highly heterogeneous pattern globally characterized by regional DNA hypermethylation embedded in extensive hypomethylation. In contrast to the widely reported DNA hypermethylation of promoter-associated CpG islands (CGIs) in cancer, hypermethylated sites in MM, as opposed to normal plasma cells, were located outside CpG islands and were unexpectedly associated with intronic enhancer regions defined in normal B cells and plasma cells. Both RNA-seq and in vitro reporter assays indicated that enhancer hypermethylation is globally associated with down-regulation of its host genes. ChIP-seq and DNase-seq further revealed that DNA hypermethylation in these regions is related to enhancer decommissioning. Hypermethylated enhancer regions overlapped with binding sites of B cell-specific transcription factors (TFs) and the degree of enhancer methylation inversely correlated with expression levels of these TFs in MM. Furthermore, hypermethylated regions in MM were methylated in stem cells and gradually became demethylated during normal B-cell differentiation, suggesting that MM cells either reacquire epigenetic features of undifferentiated cells or maintain an epigenetic signature of a putative myeloma stem cell progenitor. Overall, we have identified DNA hypermethylation of developmentally regulated enhancers as a new type of epigenetic modification associated with the pathogenesis of MM. PMID:25644835

  15. HIF-1α inhibition blocks the cross talk between multiple myeloma plasma cells and tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Borsi, Enrica; Perrone, Giulia; Terragna, Carolina; Martello, Marina; Zamagni, Elena; Tacchetti, Paola; Pantani, Lucia; Brioli, Annamaria; Dico, Angela Flores; Zannetti, Beatrice Anna; Rocchi, Serena; Cavo, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder of post-germinal center B cells, characterized by the clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow (BM). The reciprocal and complex interactions that take place between the different compartments of BM and the MM cells result in tumor growth, angiogenesis, bone disease, and drug resistance. Given the importance of the BM microenvironment in MM pathogenesis, we investigated the possible involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible transcription Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) in the PCs-bone marrow stromal cells interplay. To test this hypothesis, we used EZN-2968, a 3rd generation antisense oligonucleotide against HIF-1α, to inhibit HIF-1α functions. Herein, we provide evidence that the interaction between MM cells and BM stromal cells is drastically reduced upon HIF-1α down-modulation. Notably, we showed that upon exposure to HIF-1α inhibitor, neither the incubation with IL-6 nor the co-culture with BM stromal cells were able to revert the anti-proliferative effect induced by EZN-2968. Moreover, we observed a down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades and a reduction of MM cells adhesion capability to the extracellular matrix proteins in EZN-2968-treated samples. Taken together, these results strongly support the concept that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the interactions between bone BM cells and PCs in Multiple Myeloma. - Highlights: • HIF-1α inhibition induces a mild apoptotic cell death. • Down-modulation of cytokine-induced signaling cascades upon HIF-1α inhibition. • Reduced interaction between MM cells and BMSCs upon HIF-1α down-modulation. • Reduced PCs adhesion to the extracellular matrix protein induced by EZN-2968. • HIF-1α inhibition may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for Multiple Myeloma.

  16. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

  17. Disseminated plasma cell myeloma presenting as massive pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Kanahasubramanian Anand; Sundararajan, Lakshmikanthan; Prabu, Pandurangan; Parameswaran, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma (PCM) is a hematologic malignancy of plasma cell origin and usually associated with the presence of lytic bone lesions. Pleural effusions are rarely associated with PCM and most often signify a concurrent disease process. Malignant myelomatous pleural effusions are even more unusual and carry a poor prognosis. We report a unique case of unsuspected PCM with thoracic involvement in the form of massive left side pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology revealed numerous atypical plasma cells. Subsequently on further workup, urine Bence Jones protein was positive. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen revealed features consistent with multiple myeloma. PMID:26664659

  18. Tumor cells in multiple myeloma patients inhibit myeloma-reactive T cells through carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-6.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Hose, Dirk; Jünger, Simone; Pfirschke, Christina; Khandelwal, Nisit; Umansky, Ludmila; Seckinger, Anja; Conrad, Heinke; Brackertz, Bettina; Rème, Thierry; Gueckel, Brigitte; Meißner, Tobias; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D; Rossi, Jean-Francois; Neben, Kai; Bernhard, Helga; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Beckhove, Philipp

    2013-05-30

    Although functionally competent cytotoxic, T cells are frequently observed in malignant diseases, they possess little ability to react against tumor cells. This phenomenon is particularly apparent in multiple myeloma. We here demonstrate that cytotoxic T cells reacted against myeloma antigens when presented by autologous dendritic cells, but not by myeloma cells. We further show by gene expression profiling and flow cytometry that, similar to many other malignant tumors, freshly isolated myeloma cells expressed several carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) at varying proportions. Binding and crosslinking of CEACAM-6 by cytotoxic T cells inhibited their activation and resulted in T-cell unresponsiveness. Blocking of CEACAM-6 on the surface of myeloma cells by specific monoclonal antibodies or CEACAM-6 gene knock down by short interfering RNA restored T-cell reactivity against malignant plasma cells. These findings suggest that CEACAM-6 plays an important role in the regulation of CD8+ T-cell responses against multiple myeloma; therefore, therapeutic targeting of CEACAM-6 may be a promising strategy to improve myeloma immunotherapy.

  19. Dynamic balance of multiple myeloma clonogenic side population cell percentages controlled by environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jianguo; Tao, Wenjing; Kuiatse, Isere; Lin, Pei; Feng, Yongdong; Jones, Richard J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Zu, Youli

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key drivers of tumor progression and disease recurrence in multiple myeloma (MM). However, little is known about the regulation of MM stem cells. Here, we show that a population of MM cells, known as the side population (SP), exhibits stem-like properties. Cells that constitute the SP in primary MM isolates are negative or seldom expressed for CD138 and CD20 markers. Moreover, the SP population contains stem cells that belong to the same lineage as the mature neoplastic plasma cells (MPC). Importantly, our data indicate that the side (SP) and non-side (NSP) population percentages in heterogeneous MM cells are balanced, and that this balance can be achieved through a prolonged in vitro culture. Furthermore, we show that SP cells, with confirmed molecular characteristics of MM stem cells, can be regenerated from purified NSP cell populations. We also show that the percentage of SP cells can be enhanced by the hypoxic stress, which is frequently observed within MM tumors. Finally, hypoxic stress enhanced the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and blocking the TGF-β1 signaling pathway inhibited the NSP de-differentiation. Taken together, these findings indicate that the balance between MM SP and NSP is regulated by environmental factors and TGF-β1 pathway is involved in hypoxia-induced increase of SP population. Understanding the mechanisms that facilitate SP maintenance will accelerate the design of novel therapeutics aimed at controlling these cells in MM. PMID:25042852

  20. The search for multiple myeloma stem cells: the long and winding road.

    PubMed

    Basak, Grzegorz Wladyslaw; Carrier, Ewa

    2010-05-01

    Recent years have brought significant breakthroughs in the understanding of tumor biology, related to discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in acute myelogenous leukemia as well as in a number of solid tumors. This finding revealed that not all tumor cells are able to divide indefinitely, and that the bulk of tumor cells are expanded because of divisions and differentiation of CSC fraction. Although the CSCs identified in acute leukemia have a phenotype of early hematopoietic progenitors, it seems that CSCs in multiple myeloma (MM) may resemble the memory B cell fraction. Previous studies in patients with MM have documented the existence of cells without plasma cell characteristics expressing MM-type immunoglobulin genes--so-called "clonotypic" B cells. These cells have been characterized functionally and phenotypically as chemoresistant recirculating B cells. They have been found to self-renew and to be capable of initiating MM growth in immunocompromised animals. Controversy exists as to whether these cells truly belong to an MM clone, however; they may represent only the remaining clones of premalignant B cells. The identification of MM stem cells responsible for the recurrence of MM is of primary importance in designing targeted therapies to definitely cure this disease. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge on these hypothetical "MM stem cells."

  1. SENP1 inhibition induces apoptosis and growth arrest of multiple myeloma cells through modulation of NF-κB signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yang; Wang, Lu; Gao, Chun-Ji; Guo, Zi-Kuan; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    SUMO/sentrin specific protease 1 (Senp1) is an important regulation protease in the protein sumoylation, which affects the cell cycle, proliferation and differentiation. The role of Senp1 mediated protein desumoylation in pathophysiological progression of multiple myeloma is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. Lentivirus-mediated Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces viability, proliferation and colony forming ability of MM cells. The NF-κB family members including P65 and inhibitor protein IkBα play important roles in regulation of MM cell survival and proliferation. We further demonstrated that Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation, leading to inactivation of NF-kB signaling in MM cells. These results delineate a key role for Senp1in IL-6 induced proliferation and survival of MM cells, suggesting it may be a potential new therapeutic target in MM. - Highlights: • Senp1 is overexpressed and induced by IL-6 in multiple myeloma cells. • Senp1 knockdown triggers apoptosis and reduces proliferation of MM cells. • Senp1 inhibition decreased IL-6-induced P65 and IkBα phosphorylation.

  2. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  3. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-05-30

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes.

  4. Membranous glomerulonephritis after haematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, L; Cardarelli, F; Vampa, M L; Buzio, C; Olivetti, G

    2001-07-01

    Renal involvement during graft-versus-host disease following haematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma has never been described. We report a case of a recipient who developed nephrotic syndrome and membranous glomerulonephritis 22 months after the graft and 6 months after cyclosporine withdrawal. Symptoms resolved when immunosuppressive therapy was reinstituted.

  5. Single-cell genetic analysis reveals the composition of initiating clones and phylogenetic patterns of branching and parallel evolution in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Melchor, L; Brioli, A; Wardell, C P; Murison, A; Potter, N E; Kaiser, M F; Fryer, R A; Johnson, D C; Begum, D B; Hulkki Wilson, S; Vijayaraghavan, G; Titley, I; Cavo, M; Davies, F E; Walker, B A; Morgan, G J

    2014-08-01

    Although intratumor heterogeneity has been inferred in multiple myeloma (MM), little is known about its subclonal phylogeny. To describe such phylogenetic trees in a series of patients with MM, we perform whole-exome sequencing and single-cell genetic analysis. Our results demonstrate that at presentation myeloma is composed of two to six different major clones, which are related by linear and branching phylogenies. Remarkably, the earliest myeloma-initiating clones, some of which only had the initiating t(11;14), were still present at low frequencies at the time of diagnosis. For the first time in myeloma, we demonstrate parallel evolution whereby two independent clones activate the RAS/MAPK pathway through RAS mutations and give rise subsequently to distinct subclonal lineages. We also report the co-occurrence of RAS and interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) p.K123R mutations in 4% of myeloma patients. Lastly, we describe the fluctuations of myeloma subclonal architecture in a patient analyzed at presentation and relapse and in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγ(null) xenografts, revealing clonal extinction and the emergence of new clones that acquire additional mutations. This study confirms that myeloma subclones exhibit different survival properties during treatment or mouse engraftment. We conclude that clonal diversity combined with varying selective pressures is the essential foundation for tumor progression and treatment resistance in myeloma. PMID:24480973

  6. The phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) is important for IL-6-mediated survival of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Slørdahl, Tobias S.; Abdollahi, Pegah; Vandsemb, Esten N.; Rampa, Christoph; Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A.; Westhrin, Marita; Waage, Anders; Rø, Torstein B.; Børset, Magne

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic proliferation of bone marrow plasma cells. PRL-3 is a phosphatase induced by interleukin (IL)-6 and other growth factors in MM cells and promotes MM-cell migration. PRL-3 has also been identified as a marker gene for a subgroup of patients with MM. In this study we found that forced expression of PRL-3 in the MM cell line INA-6 led to increased survival of cells that were depleted of IL-6. It also caused redistribution of cells in cell cycle, with an increased number of cells in G2M-phase. Furthermore, forced PRL-3 expression significantly increased phosphorylation of Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 both in the presence and the absence of IL-6. Knockdown of PRL-3 with shRNA reduced survival in MM cell line INA-6. A pharmacological inhibitor of PRL-3 reduced survival in the MM cell lines INA-6, ANBL-6, IH-1, OH-2 and RPMI8226. The inhibitor also reduced survival in 9 of 9 consecutive samples of purified primary myeloma cells. Treatment with the inhibitor down-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and led to activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Inhibition of PRL-3 also reduced IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. In conclusion, our study shows that PRL-3 is an important mediator of growth factor signaling in MM cells and hence possibly a good target for treatment of MM. PMID:27036022

  7. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  8. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2011-11-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138(+) MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8(+) activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4(+) T cell and naive CD8(+) T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ-interferon secretion to HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2(-) /CD138(+) or HLA-A2(+) /CD138(-) cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2(+) /CD138(+) cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138(260-268) (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  9. Novel epitope evoking CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting CD138 antigen could potentially represent a new treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM). This study evaluated the immune function of CD138 peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), generated ex vivo using an HLA-A2-specific CD138 epitope against MM cells. A novel immunogenic HLA-A2-specific CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide was identified from the full-length protein sequence of the CD138 antigen, which induced CTL specific to primary CD138+ MM cells. The peptide-induced CD138-CTL contained a high percentage of CD8+ activated/memory T cells with a low percentage of CD4+ T cell and naive CD8+ T cell subsets. The CTL displayed HLA-A2-restricted and CD138 antigen-specific cytotoxicity against MM cell lines. In addition, CD138-CTL demonstrated increased degranulation, proliferation and γ–interferon secretion to HLA-A2+/CD138+ myeloma cells, but not HLA-A2−/CD138+ or HLA-A2+/CD138− cells. The immune functional properties of the CD138-CTL were also demonstrated using primary HLA-A2+/CD138+ cells isolated from myeloma patients. In conclusion, a novel immunogenic CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) peptide can induce antigen-specific CTL, which might be useful for the treatment of MM patients with peptide-based vaccine or cellular immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21902685

  10. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma without Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered the standard of care for multiple myeloma patients who are eligible for transplantation. The process of autografting comprises the following steps: control of the primary disease by using a certain induction therapeutic protocol, mobilization of stem cells, collection of mobilized stem cells by apheresis, cryopreservation of the apheresis product, administration of high-dose pretransplant conditioning therapy, and finally infusion of the cryopreserved stem cells after thawing. However, in cancer centers that treat patients with multiple myeloma and have transplantation capabilities but lack or are in the process of acquiring cryopreservation facilities, alternatively noncryopreserved autologous stem cell therapy has been performed with remarkable success as the pretransplant conditioning therapy is usually brief. PMID:22693672

  11. Th22 cells increase in poor prognosis multiple myeloma and promote tumor cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Di Lullo, Giulia; Marcatti, Magda; Heltai, Silvia; Brunetto, Emanuela; Tresoldi, Cristina; Bondanza, Attilio; Bonini, Chiara; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Tonon, Giovanni; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Protti, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    There is increased production of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in the bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients and these favor Th22 cell differentiation. Here, we found that the frequency of interleukin (IL)-22+IL-17−IL-13+ T cells is significantly increased in peripheral blood (PB) and BM of stage III and relapsed/refractory MM patients compared with healthy donors and patients with asymptomatic or stage I/II disease. Th22 cells cloned from the BM of MM patients were CCR6+CXCR4+CCR4+CCR10− and produced IL-22 and IL-13 but not IL-17. Furthermore, polyfunctional Th22-Th2 and Th22-Th1 clones were identified based on the co-expression of additional chemokine receptors and cytokines (CRTh2 or CXCR3 and IL-5 or interferon gamma [IFNγ], respectively). A fraction of MM cell lines and primary tumors aberrantly expressed the IL-22RA1 and IL-22 induced STAT-3 phosphorylation, cell growth, and resistance to drug-induced cell death in MM cells. IL-13 treatment of normal BM mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) induced STAT-6 phosphorylation, adhesion molecule upregulation, and increased IL-6 production and significantly favored MM cell growth compared with untreated BM MSCs. Collectively, our data show that increased frequency of IL-22+IL-17−IL-13+ T cells correlates with poor prognosis in MM through IL-22 and IL-13 protumor activity and suggest that interference with IL-22 and IL-13 signaling pathways could be exploited for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26155400

  12. Constitutive activation of p38 MAPK in tumor cells contributes to osteolytic bone lesions in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; He, J; Wang, J; Cao, Y; Ling, J; Qian, J; Lu, Y; Li, H; Zheng, Y; Lan, Y; Hong, S; Matthews, J; Starbuck, M W; Navone, N M; Orlowski, R Z; Lin, P; Kwak, L W; Yi, Q

    2012-09-01

    Bone destruction is a hallmark of multiple myeloma and affects more than 80% of patients. However, current therapy is unable to completely cure and/or prevent bone lesions. Although it is accepted that myeloma cells mediate bone destruction by inhibition of osteoblasts and activation of osteoclasts, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. This study demonstrates that constitutive activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in myeloma cells is responsible for myeloma-induced osteolysis. Our results show that p38 is constitutively activated in most myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells from patients. Myeloma cells with high/detectable p38 activity, but not those with low/undetectable p38 activity, injected into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) or SCID-hu mice caused bone destruction. Inhibition or knockdown of p38 in human myeloma reduced or prevented myeloma-induced osteolytic bone lesions without affecting tumor growth, survival, or homing to bone. Mechanistic studies showed that myeloma cell p38 activity inhibited osteoblastogenesis and bone formation and activated osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in myeloma-bearing SCID mice. This study elucidates a novel molecular mechanism-activation of p38 signaling in myeloma cells-by which myeloma cells induce osteolytic bone lesions, and indicates that targeting myeloma cell p38 may be a viable approach to treating or preventing myeloma bone disease. PMID:22425892

  13. Constitutive activation of p38 MAPK in tumor cells contributes to osteolytic bone lesions in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; He, Jin; Wang, Ji; Cao, Yabing; Ling, Jianhua; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Zheng, Yuhuan; Lan, Yongsheng; Hong, Sungyoul; Matthews, Jairo; Starbuck, Michael W; Navone, Nora M; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Lin, Pei; Kwak, Larry W.; Yi, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Bone destruction is a hallmark of multiple myeloma and affects more than 80% of patients. However, current therapy is unable to completely cure and/or prevent bone lesions. Although it is accepted that myeloma cells mediate bone destruction by inhibition of osteoblasts and activation of osteoclasts, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. This study demonstrates that constitutive activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in myeloma cells is responsible for myeloma-induced osteolysis. Our results show that p38 is constitutively activated in most myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma cells from patients. Myeloma cells with high/detectable p38 activity, but not those with low/undetectable p38 activity, injected into SCID or SCID-hu mice caused bone destruction. Inhibition or knockdown of p38 in human myeloma reduced or prevented myeloma-induced osteolytic bone lesions without affecting tumor growth, survival, or homing to bone. Mechanistic studies showed that myeloma cell p38 activity inhibited osteoblastogenesis and bone formation and activated osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in myeloma-bearing SCID mice. This study elucidates a novel molecular mechanism—sactivation of p38 signaling in myeloma cells—by which myeloma cells induce osteolytic bone lesions and indicates that targeting myeloma cell p38 may be a viable approach to treating or preventing myeloma bone disease. PMID:22425892

  14. Dependence on glutamine uptake and glutamine addiction characterize myeloma cells: a new attractive target.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, Marina; Chiu, Martina; Accardi, Fabrizio; Vescovini, Rosanna; Airoldi, Irma; Storti, Paola; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Missale, Gabriele; Andreoli, Roberta; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Allegri, Manfredi; Barilli, Amelia; Nicolini, Francesco; Cavalli, Albertina; Costa, Federica; Marchica, Valentina; Toscani, Denise; Mancini, Cristina; Martella, Eugenia; Dall'Asta, Valeria; Donofrio, Gaetano; Aversa, Franco; Bussolati, Ovidio; Giuliani, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    The importance of glutamine (Gln) metabolism in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its potential role as a therapeutic target are still unknown, although it has been reported that human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) are highly sensitive to Gln depletion. In this study, we found that both HMCLs and primary bone marrow (BM) CD138(+) cells produced large amounts of ammonium in the presence of Gln. MM patients have lower BM plasma Gln with higher ammonium and glutamate than patients with indolent monoclonal gammopathies. Interestingly, HMCLs expressed glutaminase (GLS1) and were sensitive to its inhibition, whereas they exhibited negligible expression of glutamine synthetase (GS). High GLS1 and low GS expression were also observed in primary CD138(+) cells. Gln-free incubation or treatment with the glutaminolytic enzyme l-asparaginase depleted the cell contents of Gln, glutamate, and the anaplerotic substrate 2-oxoglutarate, inhibiting MM cell growth. Consistent with the dependence of MM cells on extracellular Gln, a gene expression profile analysis, on both proprietary and published datasets, showed an increased expression of the Gln transporters SNAT1, ASCT2, and LAT1 by CD138(+) cells across the progression of monoclonal gammopathies. Among these transporters, only ASCT2 inhibition in HMCLs caused a marked decrease in Gln uptake and a significant fall in cell growth. Consistently, stable ASCT2 downregulation by a lentiviral approach inhibited HMCL growth in vitro and in a murine model. In conclusion, MM cells strictly depend on extracellular Gln and show features of Gln addiction. Therefore, the inhibition of Gln uptake is a new attractive therapeutic strategy for MM. PMID:27268090

  15. FICTION-TSA analysis of the B-cell compartment in myeloma shows no significant expansion of myeloma precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, F E; Rawstron, A C; Pratt, G; O'Connor, S; Su'ut, L; Blythe, D; Fenton, J; Claydon, D; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1999-07-01

    Studies utilizing flow cytometry and PCR have shown that the B-cell compartment in myeloma contains cells which are clonally related to the myelomatous plasma cells. Current data, however, remains inconclusive regarding the extent of this involvement. By combining fluorescent immunophenotyping, tyramine signal amplification and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FICTION-TSA), we have used the presence of numerical chromosomal abnormalities within plasma cells as a clonal marker to examine the CD20+ B-cell compartment for the presence of aneuploidy. A series of 54 cases of myeloma were screened for the presence of numerical abnormalities of chromosomes 3 and 11. FICTION-TSA was performed on 13 cases with either trisomy 3 or 11 and on a control group of six cases known to be disomic for the two chromosomes. B-cell numbers were reduced in the myeloma cases compared to the normal controls (median 1.8% v 3.0%, P = 0.05). In the cases with a chromosomal marker, three signals were seen in a median of 1.88% of CD20+ B cells compared to 2.58% within the control group. Comparison of the two groups using a Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U test showed no statistical significant difference. Using this data set, it was possible to exclude a 3.03% expansion of clonally related B cells (95% confidence level). We conclude that the B-cell compartment in myeloma does not represent the major site of clonal expansion, and if clonally related cells are present then the numbers are few. PMID:10444161

  16. Hedgehog signaling maintains a tumor stem cell compartment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Craig D; Wang, Qiuju; Gesell, Gregory S; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M; Jones, Evan; Kim, Jynho; Devereux, Wendy L; Rhodes, Jonathan T; Huff, Carol A; Beachy, Philip A; Watkins, D Neil; Matsui, William

    2007-03-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that malignant growth depends on a subset of tumor cells with stem cell-like properties of self-renewal. Because hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates progenitor cell fate in normal development and homeostasis, aberrant pathway activation might be involved in the maintenance of such a population in cancer. Indeed, mutational activation of the Hh pathway is associated with medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma; pathway activity is also critical for growth of other tumors lacking such mutations, although the mechanism of pathway activation is poorly understood. Here we study the role and mechanism of Hh pathway activation in multiple myeloma (MM), a malignancy with a well defined stem cell compartment. In this model, rare malignant progenitors capable of clonal expansion resemble B cells, whereas the much larger tumor cell population manifests a differentiated plasma cell phenotype that pathologically defines the disease. We show that the subset of MM cells that manifests Hh pathway activity is markedly concentrated within the tumor stem cell compartment. The Hh ligand promotes expansion of MM stem cells without differentiation, whereas the Hh pathway blockade, while having little or no effect on malignant plasma cell growth, markedly inhibits clonal expansion accompanied by terminal differentiation of purified MM stem cells. These data reveal that Hh pathway activation is heterogeneous across the spectrum of MM tumor stem cells and their more differentiated progeny. The potential existence of similar relationships in other adult cancers may have important biologic and clinical implications for the study of aberrant Hh signaling.

  17. Tumor-host cell interactions in the bone disease of myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Jessica A.; Edwards, Claire M.; Croucher, Peter I.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy that is associated with the development of a destructive osteolytic bone disease, which is a major cause of morbidity for patients with myeloma. Interactions between myeloma cells and cells of the bone marrow microenvironment promote both tumor growth and survival and bone destruction, and the osteolytic bone disease is now recognized as a contributing component to tumor progression. Since myeloma bone disease is associated with both an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption and a suppression of osteoblastic bone formation, research to date has largely focused upon the role of the osteoclast and osteoblast. However, it is now clear that other cell types within the bone marrow, including cells of the immune system, mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow stromal cells, can contribute to the development of myeloma bone disease. This review discusses the cellular mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets that have been implicated in myeloma bone disease. PMID:20615487

  18. Inhibiting the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome induces a metaphase arrest and cell death in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lub, Susanne; Maes, Anke; Maes, Ken; De Veirman, Kim; De Bruyne, Elke; Menu, Eline; Fostier, Karel; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Hose, Dirk; Leleu, Xavier; King, Randall W.

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase involved in cell cycle. During the metaphase-anaphase transition the APC/C is activated by Cdc20. The aim of this study is to elucidate the importance and therapeutic potential of APC/C and its co-activator Cdc20 in multiple myeloma (MM). Gene expression analysis revealed that Cdc20 was expressed at higher levels in gene expression-based high-risk MM patients. Moreover, high Cdc20 expression correlated with poor prognosis. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines with proTAME, an APC/C inhibitor, resulted in an accumulation of APC/CCdc20 substrate cyclin B1 and an accumulation of cells in metaphase. Moreover we observed a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability and increase in apoptosis in MM cells upon proTAME treatment. The induction of apoptosis was accompanied with caspase 3, 8, 9 and PARP cleavage. A similar metaphase arrest and induction of apoptosis were obtained with specific knockdown of Cdc20. In addition, we demonstrated the accumulation of Bim was partially responsible for the observed cell death. Combining proTAME with another APC/C inhibitor apcin or the alkylating agent melphalan resulted in enhanced anti-MM activity. This study suggests that the APC/C and its co-activator Cdc20 could be a new and promising target especially in high-risk MM patients. PMID:26716651

  19. Multiple Myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... myeloma is a cancer that begins in plasma cells, a type of white blood cell. These cells are part of your immune system, which helps ... germs and other harmful substances. In time, myeloma cells collect in the bone marrow and in the ...

  20. A novel signaling pathway associated with Lyn, PI 3-kinase and Akt supports the proliferation of myeloma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Mohd S.; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Obata, Masanori; Ishikawa, Hideaki

    2010-02-12

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a growth factor for human myeloma cells. We have recently found that in myeloma cells the activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 is not sufficient for the IL-6-induced proliferation, which further requires the activation of the src family kinases, such as Lyn. Here we showed that the Lyn-overexpressed myeloma cell lines had the higher proliferative rate with IL-6 and the enhanced activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt. The IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 was not up-regulated in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, indicating that the Lyn-PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway is independent of these pathways. The PI 3-kinase was co-precipitated with Lyn in the Lyn-overexpressed cells of which proliferation with IL-6 was abrogated by the specific inhibitors for PI 3-kinase or Akt, suggesting that the activation of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway associated with Lyn is indeed related to the concomitant augmentation of myeloma cell growth. Furthermore, the decreased expression of p53 and p21{sup Cip1} proteins was observed in the Lyn-overexpressed cells, implicating a possible downstream target of Akt. This study identifies a novel IL-6-mediated signaling pathway that certainly plays a role in the proliferation of myeloma cells and this novel mechanism of MM tumor cell growth associated with Lyn would eventually contribute to the development of MM treatment.

  1. Subcutaneous versus intravenous bortezomib in two different induction therapies for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: an interim analysis from the prospective GMMG-MM5 trial

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Maximilian; Salwender, Hans; Haenel, Mathias; Mai, Elias K.; Bertsch, Uta; Kunz, Christina; Hielscher, Thomas; Blau, Igor W.; Scheid, Christof; Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Jauch, Anna; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc S.; Schurich, Baerbel; Munder, Markus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Gerecke, Christian; Lindemann, Hans-Walter; Zeis, Matthias; Weisel, Katja; Duerig, Jan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of subcutaneous versus intravenous bortezomib in the MM5 trial of the German-Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group which compared bortezomib, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone induction therapy in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Based on data from relapsed myeloma, the route of administration for bortezomib was changed from intravenous to subcutaneous after 314 of 604 patients had been enrolled. We analyzed 598 patients who received at least one dose of trial medication. Adverse events were reported more frequently in patients treated with intravenous bortezomib (intravenous=65%; subcutaneous=56%, P=0.02). Rates of grade 2 or more peripheral neuropathy were higher in patients treated with intravenous bortezomib during the third cycle (intravenous=8%; subcutaneous=2%, P=0.001). Overall response rates were similar in patients treated intravenously or subcutaneously. The presence of International Staging System stage III disease, renal impairment or adverse cytogenetic abnormalities did not have a negative impact on overall response rates in either group. To our knowledge this is the largest study to present data comparing subcutaneous with intravenous bortezomib in newly diagnosed myeloma. We show better tolerance and similar overall response rates for subcutaneous compared to intravenous bortezomib. The clinical trial is registered at eudract.ema.europa.eu as n. 2010-019173-16. PMID:25840597

  2. Subcutaneous versus intravenous bortezomib in two different induction therapies for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: an interim analysis from the prospective GMMG-MM5 trial.

    PubMed

    Merz, Maximilian; Salwender, Hans; Haenel, Mathias; Mai, Elias K; Bertsch, Uta; Kunz, Christina; Hielscher, Thomas; Blau, Igor W; Scheid, Christof; Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Jauch, Anna; Hillengass, Jens; Raab, Marc S; Schurich, Baerbel; Munder, Markus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H; Gerecke, Christian; Lindemann, Hans-Walter; Zeis, Matthias; Weisel, Katja; Duerig, Jan; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the impact of subcutaneous versus intravenous bortezomib in the MM5 trial of the German-Speaking Myeloma Multicenter Group which compared bortezomib, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone induction therapy in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Based on data from relapsed myeloma, the route of administration for bortezomib was changed from intravenous to subcutaneous after 314 of 604 patients had been enrolled. We analyzed 598 patients who received at least one dose of trial medication. Adverse events were reported more frequently in patients treated with intravenous bortezomib (intravenous=65%; subcutaneous=56%, P=0.02). Rates of grade 2 or more peripheral neuropathy were higher in patients treated with intravenous bortezomib during the third cycle (intravenous=8%; subcutaneous=2%, P=0.001). Overall response rates were similar in patients treated intravenously or subcutaneously. The presence of International Staging System stage III disease, renal impairment or adverse cytogenetic abnormalities did not have a negative impact on overall response rates in either group. To our knowledge this is the largest study to present data comparing subcutaneous with intravenous bortezomib in newly diagnosed myeloma. We show better tolerance and similar overall response rates for subcutaneous compared to intravenous bortezomib. The clinical trial is registered at eudract.ema.europa.eu as n. 2010-019173-16.

  3. Loss of p53 exacerbates multiple myeloma phenotype by facilitating the reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to malignant plasma cells by MafB

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Cenador, María Begoña García; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a serious, mostly incurable human cancer of malignant plasma cells. Chromosomal translocations affecting MAFB are present in a significant percentage of multiple myeloma patients. Genetically engineered Sca1-MafB mice, in which MafB expression is limited to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/P-Cs), display the phenotypic features of MM. Contrary to many other types of cancer, it is not yet known if the p53 gene plays any essential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Here, we show, taking advantage of the Sca1-MafB MM mouse model, that loss of p53 does not rescue the multiple myeloma disease, but instead accelerates its development and exacerbates the MM phenotype. Therefore, the efficiency of the MafB-induced MM reprogramming of normal HS/P-Cs to terminally differentiated malignant plasma cells is enhanced by p53 deficiency, in analogy to what happens in reprogramming to pluripotency. These results raise caution about interfering with p53 function when treating multiple myeloma. PMID:22983007

  4. Automatic recognition of myeloma cells in microscopic images using bottleneck algorithm, modified watershed and SVM classifier.

    PubMed

    Saeedizadeh, Z; Mehri Dehnavi, A; Talebi, A; Rabbani, H; Sarrafzadeh, O; Vard, A

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cells are developed from B lymphocytes, a type of white blood cells that is generated in the bone marrow. The plasma cells produce antibodies to fight with bacteria and viruses and stop infection and disease. Multiple myeloma is a cancer of plasma cells that collections of abnormal plasma cells (myeloma cells) accumulate in the bone marrow. The definitive diagnosis of multiple myeloma is done by searching for myeloma cells in the bone marrow slides through a microscope. Diagnosis of myeloma cells from bone marrow smears is a subjective and time-consuming task for pathologists. Also, because of depending on final decision on human eye and opinion, error risk in decision may occur. Sometimes, existence of infection in body causes plasma cell's increment which could be diagnosed wrongly as multiple myeloma. The computer diagnostic process will reduce the diagnostic time and also can be worked as a second opinion for pathologists. This study presents a computer-aided diagnostic method for myeloma cells diagnosis from bone marrow smears. At first, white blood cells consist of plasma cells and other marrow cells are separated from the red blood cells and background. Then, plasma cells are detected from other marrow cells by feature extraction and series of decision rules. Finally, normal plasma cells and myeloma cells could be classified easily by a classifier. This algorithm is applied on 50 digital images that are provided from bone marrow aspiration smears. These images contain 678 cells: 132 normal plasma cells, 256 myeloma cells and 290 other types of marrow cells. Applying the computer-aided diagnostic method for identifying myeloma cells on provided database showed a sensitivity of 96.52%; specificity of 93.04% and precision of 95.28%. PMID:26457371

  5. Cilengitide restrains the osteoclast-like bone resorbing activity of myeloma plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Marco; Stucci, Stefania; Felici, Claudia; Cafforio, Paola; Resta, Leonardo; Rossi, Roberta; Silvestris, Franco

    2016-04-01

    Cilengitide (CLG) is an inhibitor of both αv β3 and αv β5 integrins, with a defined anti-tumour effect in glioblastoma. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate its ability to restrain the bone resorbing property of metastatic osteotropic tumours and we have previously shown that the disablement of αv β3 in multiple myeloma (MM) plasma cells results in exhaustion of their in vitro osteoclast (OC)-like activity on bone substrate. Here, we investigated the effect of CLG on this functional property of MM cells. Both αv β3 and αv β5 were measured on primary marrow MM cells from 19 patients, and the effect of CLG on proliferation, apoptosis and adhesion was investigated in parallel with MM cell lines and OCs from healthy donors. In addition, the effect of CLG on the capability of malignant plasma cells to produce erosive lacunae on calcium phosphate was explored in relation to the activation of intracellular kinases of molecular pathways of both integrins. Ultrastructural microscopy was used to evaluate the morphological changes in MM cells due to the effect of CLG on cell adhesion. The data from our study demonstrate that CLG restrains the bone resorbing function of MM cells by disabling their adhesion properties. Further investigations in pre-clinical studies of osteotropic tumours are warranted.

  6. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC.

  7. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC. PMID:27618152

  8. Anti-β₂M monoclonal antibodies kill myeloma cells via cell- and complement-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Qian, Jianfei; Lan, Yongsheng; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Hong, Bangxing; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Yang, Jing; Yi, Qing

    2014-09-01

    Our previous studies showed that anti-β2M monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) at high doses have direct apoptotic effects on myeloma cells, suggesting that anti-β2M mAbs might be developed as a novel therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the ability of the mAbs at much lower concentrations to indirectly kill myeloma cells by utilizing immune effector cells or molecules. Our results showed that anti-β2M mAbs effectively lysed MM cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), which were correlated with and dependent on the surface expression of β2M on MM cells. The presence of MM bone marrow stromal cells or addition of IL-6 did not attenuate anti-β2M mAb-induced ADCC and CDC activities against MM cells. Furthermore, anti-β2M mAbs only showed limited cytotoxicity toward normal B cells and nontumorous mesenchymal stem cells, indicating that the ADCC and CDC activities of the anti-β2M mAbs were more prone to the tumor cells. Lenalidomide potentiated in vitro ADCC activity against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition capacity induced by the anti-β2M mAbs by enhancing the activity of NK cells. These results support clinical development of anti-β2M mAbs, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve MM patient outcome.

  9. Targeting Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen and Its Protein Interactions Induces Apoptosis in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Rebekka; Bachke, Siri; Gilljam, Karin M.; Våtsveen, Thea K.; Rø, Torstein B.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sundan, Anders; Otterlei, Marit

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological cancer that is considered incurable despite advances in treatment strategy during the last decade. Therapies targeting single pathways are unlikely to succeed due to the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a multifunctional protein essential for DNA replication and repair that is often overexpressed in cancer cells. Many proteins involved in the cellular stress response interact with PCNA through the five amino acid sequence AlkB homologue 2 PCNA-interacting motif (APIM). Thus inhibiting PCNA’s protein interactions may be a good strategy to target multiple pathways simultaneously. We initially found that overexpression of peptides containing the APIM sequence increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to contemporary therapeutics. Here we have designed a cell-penetrating APIM-containing peptide, ATX-101, that targets PCNA and show that it has anti-myeloma activity. We found that ATX-101 induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell lines and primary cancer cells, while bone marrow stromal cells and primary healthy lymphocytes were much less sensitive. ATX-101-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent and cell cycle phase-independent. ATX-101 also increased multiple myeloma cells’ sensitivity against melphalan, a DNA damaging agent commonly used for treatment of multiple myeloma. In a xenograft mouse model, ATX-101 was well tolerated and increased the anti-tumor activity of melphalan. Therefore, targeting PCNA by ATX-101 may be a novel strategy in multiple myeloma treatment. PMID:23936203

  10. Peroxidase-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells in multiple myeloma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; An, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Ren, Xue-Rui; Song, Jing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Reports of clinical cases with Auer bodies in the plasma cells in multiple myeloma (MM) are rare; however, most of those reported contain peroxidase (POX)-negative Auer bodies rather than the POX-positive Auer bodies observed in myeloid progenitors, indicating differences in their chemical properties. Furthermore, the cases with POX-positive Auer bodies similar to those observed in myeloid cells are extremely rare in non-myeloid cells. Here, we report the clinical features, laboratory investigations, diagnosis and treatment of a case of MM with POX-positive Auer bodies in plasma cells and review related the literature to advance the prognostic evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of similar cases. PMID:26823884

  11. CD229 is expressed on the surface of plasma cells carrying an aberrant phenotype and chemotherapy-resistant precursor cells in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Sara; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Salama, Mohamed E; Bhardwaj, Neelam; Steinbach, Mary; Langemo, Amanda; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Marvin, James; Binder, Mascha; Panse, Jens; Kröger, Nicolaus; Luetkens, Tim; Atanackovic, Djordje

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell (PC) malignancy, which despite significant therapeutic advances, is still considered incurable. This is due to the persistence of chemotherapy-resistant minimal residual disease in the patients' bone marrow (BM) after an effective induction therapy. Immunotherapies targeting surface molecules expressed on the bulk of tumor cells and the chemotherapy-resistant, myeloma-propagating cells could play a central role in this clinical setting. We recently described surface molecule CD229 as a potential therapeutic target for MM. In our current study we assessed the expression of CD229 on different PC subtypes and on cells with a myeloma-propagating phenotype in a total of 77 patients with PC dyscrasias independently at 2 different cancer centers. We found that CD229 was strongly and homogeneously overexpressed on the PC of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma, MM, and PC leukemia. CD229 was particularly overexpressed on those PC showing an abnormal phenotype such as expression of CD56. Most importantly, CD229 was also highly expressed on those cells in the patients' BM displaying the phenotype of chemotherapy-resistant and myeloma-propagating cells. In conclusion, our combined findings suggest that immunotherapies targeting CD229 will not only be effective for the bulk of tumor cells but will also help to eradicate chemotherapy-resistant cells remaining in the patients' BM after induction treatment. Hopefully, the design of CD229-specific monoclonal antibodies or chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells will help to achieve prolonged remissions or even cures in MM patients. PMID:26001047

  12. Lenalidomide Maintenance for High Risk Multiple Myeloma after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Melissa; Becker, Pamela S.; Zhong, Xiaobo; Adams, Alexia; Hari, Parameswaran; Rowley, Scott; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Vesole, David H.; Logan, Brent; Weisdorf, Daniel; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Popplewell, Leslie L.; McClune, Brian; Bensinger, William; Riches, Marcie; Giralt, Sergio A.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1–21 of 28 days cycles, with intra-patient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age 54 years) with high risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009–2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (66–171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%).Most common reasons for discontinuation were aGVHD (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III–IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of Len was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplant related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN post alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although associated with a 38% incidence of aGVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high risk MM population warrant further study of this approach. PMID:24769014

  13. CD4+CD25+ cells in multiple myeloma related renal impairment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xi-Dai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ cells are critical regulators in almost all of the animal models of human organ-specific autoimmune diseases, transplant rejection and allergic diseases. We aimed to explore the role of CD4+CD25+ cells in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) related renal impairment (RI). Thirty patients with MM related RI and 30 healthy volunteers were studied. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells was examined by flow cytometry. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from each subject. Glomerular injury was assessed by histopathology. Serum IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA. CD4+CD25+ cells significantly decreased in MM related RI patients compared to the controls (P<0.05). CD4+CD25+ cell number was negatively associated with blood urea nitrogen (BUN), supernatant IL-4, serum IL-6, monoclonal immunoglobulin and β2-microglobulin, as well as bone marrow plasma cell percentage and proteinuria; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (all P < 0.05). CD4+CD25+ cells gradually decreased as the Clinic Stage increased. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells reduced in MM related RI patients, and was correlated with disease severity. CD4+CD25+ cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MM related RI. PMID:26564056

  14. Proteomic and functional analyses reveal a dual molecular mechanism underlying arsenic-induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Feng; Lu, Xin-Peng; Zeng, Hui-Lan; He, Quan-Yuan; Xiong, Sheng; Jin, Lin; He, Qing-Yu

    2009-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy with a terminal phase marked by increased proliferation and resistance to therapy. Arsenic trioxide (ATO), an antitumor agent with a multifaceted mechanism of action, displayed clinical activity in patients with late-stage multiple myeloma. However, the precise mechanism(s) of action of ATO has not been completely elucidated. In the present study, we used proteomics to analyze the ATO-induced protein alterations in MM cell line U266 and then investigated the molecular pathways responsible for the anticancer actions of ATO. Several clusters of proteins altered in expression in U266 cells upon ATO treatment were identified, including down-regulated signal transduction proteins and ubiquitin/proteasome members, and up-regulated immunity and defense proteins. Significantly regulated 14-3-3zeta and heat shock proteins (HSPs) were selected for further functional studies. Overexpression of 14-3-3zeta in MM cells attenuated ATO-induced cell death, whereas RNAi-based 14-3-3zeta knock-down or the inhibition of HSP90 enhanced tumor cell sensitivity to the ATO induction. These observations implicate 14-3-3zeta and HSP90 as potential molecular targets for drug intervention of multiple myeloma and thus improve our understanding on the mechanisms of antitumor activity of ATO.

  15. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression. PMID:26601950

  16. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  17. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M.; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J.; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents. PMID:26595805

  18. Pim2 is important for regulating DNA damage response in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, J; Santo, L; Siu, K T; Panaroni, C; Raje, N

    2016-01-01

    Pan proviral integrations of Moloney virus (PIM) inhibition in multiple myeloma (MM) results in reduced cell viability in tested human-derived MM cell lines and reduces tumor burden in xenograft mouse models, making PIMs important therapeutic targets for the disease. PIM kinase inhibitors are currently being tested clinically in MM. We sought to elucidate the role of the various PIMs in MM. Our data demonstrate that Pim2 has a significant role in MM cell cytotoxicity. Our data provide evidence for a novel role for Pim2 in the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR). Knockdown of Pim2 upregulates several downstream DDR markers, mimicking the effects of doxorubicin (Dox) treatment of MM cells, and suggesting a role for the kinase as a negative regulator of this pathway. Dox-induced DNA damage results in a decrease in Pim2 levels, placing the kinase directly downstream of the site of Dox-DNA binding. Overexpression of Pim2 confers a slight survival advantage against Dox through antiapoptotic activity, further underscoring its relevance in the DDR pathway. These data provide insights into a novel mechanism of PIM kinase activity and provide the framework for designing therapeutic approaches in MM. PMID:27564460

  19. Pim2 is important for regulating DNA damage response in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, J; Santo, L; Siu, K T; Panaroni, C; Raje, N

    2016-01-01

    Pan proviral integrations of Moloney virus (PIM) inhibition in multiple myeloma (MM) results in reduced cell viability in tested human-derived MM cell lines and reduces tumor burden in xenograft mouse models, making PIMs important therapeutic targets for the disease. PIM kinase inhibitors are currently being tested clinically in MM. We sought to elucidate the role of the various PIMs in MM. Our data demonstrate that Pim2 has a significant role in MM cell cytotoxicity. Our data provide evidence for a novel role for Pim2 in the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR). Knockdown of Pim2 upregulates several downstream DDR markers, mimicking the effects of doxorubicin (Dox) treatment of MM cells, and suggesting a role for the kinase as a negative regulator of this pathway. Dox-induced DNA damage results in a decrease in Pim2 levels, placing the kinase directly downstream of the site of Dox-DNA binding. Overexpression of Pim2 confers a slight survival advantage against Dox through antiapoptotic activity, further underscoring its relevance in the DDR pathway. These data provide insights into a novel mechanism of PIM kinase activity and provide the framework for designing therapeutic approaches in MM. PMID:27564460

  20. Clinical significance of CD81 expression by clonal plasma cells in high-risk smoldering and symptomatic multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Gutiérrez, N-C; Chen, X; Vídriales, M-B; Montalbán, M-Á; Rosiñol, L; Oriol, A; Martínez-López, J; Mateos, M-V; López-Corral, L; Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Pérez, J-J; Fernández-Redondo, E; de Arriba, F; Palomera, L; Bengoechea, E; Terol, M-J; de Paz, R; Martin, A; Hernández, J; Orfao, A; Lahuerta, J-J; Bladé, J; Pandiella, A; Miguel, J-F San

    2012-08-01

    The presence of CD19 in myelomatous plasma cells (MM-PCs) correlates with adverse prognosis in multiple myeloma (MM). Although CD19 expression is upregulated by CD81, this marker has been poorly investigated and its prognostic value in MM remains unknown. We have analyzed CD81 expression by multiparameter flow cytometry in MM-PCs from 230 MM patients at diagnosis included in the Grupo Español de Mieloma (GEM)05>65 years trial as well as 56 high-risk smoldering MM (SMM). CD81 expression was detected in 45% (103/230) MM patients, and the detection of CD81(+) MM-PC was an independent prognostic factor for progression-free (hazard ratio=1.9; P=0.003) and overall survival (hazard ratio=2.0; P=0.02); this adverse impact was validated in an additional series of 325 transplant-candidate MM patients included in the GEM05 <65 years trial. Moreover, CD81(+) SMM (n=34/56, 57%) patients had a shorter time to progression to MM (P=0.02). Overall, our results show that CD81 may have a relevant role in MM pathogenesis and represent a novel adverse prognostic marker in myeloma. PMID:22333880

  1. Multiple myeloma cell-derived microvesicles are enriched in CD147 expression and enhance tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Bonnie K.; Walters, Denise K.; Wu, Xiaosheng; Tschumper, Renee C.; Jelinek, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells within the bone marrow. There is a growing literature that tumor cells release biologically active microvesicles (MVs) that modify both local and distant microenvironments. In this study, our goals were to determine if MM cells release MVs, and if so, begin to characterize their biologic activity. Herein we present clear evidence that not only do both patient MM cells and human MM cell lines (HMCLs) release MVs, but that these MVs stimulate MM cell growth. Of interest, MM-derived MVs were enriched with the biologically active form of CD147, a transmembrane molecule previously shown by us to be crucial for MM cell proliferation. Using MVs isolated from HMCLs stably transfected with a CD147-GFP fusion construct (CD147GFP), we observed binding and internalization of MV-derived CD147 with HMCLs. Cells with greater CD147GFP internalization proliferated at a higher rate than did cells with less CD147GFP association. Lastly, MVs obtained from CD147 downregulated HMCLs were attenuated in their ability to stimulate HMCL proliferation. In summary, this study demonstrates the significance of MV shedding and MV-mediated intercellular communication on malignant plasma cell proliferation, and identifies the role of MV-enriched CD147 in this process. PMID:25015330

  2. Shikonin, dually functions as a proteasome inhibitor and a necroptosis inducer in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Naoko; Kawano, Yawara; Fujiwara, Shiho; Kikukawa, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yutaka; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ando, Yukio; Yoshinaga, Kazuya; Ri, Masaki; Iida, Shinsuke; Nakashima, Takayuki; Shiotsu, Yukimasa; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Hata, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Shikonin (SHK), a natural small agent (MW 288.3), reportedly induces cell death in various tumor cells. We have found that SHK also exerts potent cytocidal effects on human multiple myeloma (MM) cells, but its anticancer mechanism in MM cells remains to be elucidated. SHK at 2.5-5 µM induced apoptosis in seven MM cell lines, including the bortezomib-resistant cell line KMS11/BTZ. The IC50 value of SHK against KMS11/BTZ was comparable to that of a parental cell line KMS11 (1.1 and 1.56 µM, respectively). SHK induces accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and activates XBP-1 in MM cells, suggesting that SHK functions as a proteasome inhibitor, eventually inducing ER stress-associated apoptosis. SHK increases levels of HSP70/72, which protects cells from apoptosis, and exerts greater cytocidal effects in combination with the HSP70/72 inhibitor VER-155008. At higher concentrations (10-20 µM), SHK induced cell death, which was completely inhibited by a necroptosis inhibitor, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), while the cytocidal activity was unaffected by Z-VAD-FMK, strongly suggesting that cell death is induced by SHK at high concentrations through necroptosis. The present data show for the first time that SHK induces cell death in MM cells. SHK efficiently induces apoptosis and combination of heat shock protein inhibitor with low dose SHK enhances apoptosis, while high dose SHK induces necroptosis in MM cells. These findings together support the use of SHK as a potential therapeutic agent for MM. PMID:25530098

  3. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells. PMID:27513630

  4. Beta(2)-microglobulin as a negative growth regulator of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Rui; Li, Zhongkui; Epstein, Joshua; Barlogie, Bart; Yi, Qing

    2002-08-01

    High beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) levels in myeloma correlate with poor prognosis. We hypothesized that beta(2)m may affect myeloma cell growth and survival. In this study, we examined the in vitro effects of beta(2)m on myeloma cells. Primary myeloma cells freshly isolated from patients and myeloma cell lines were used, cultured in the presence of beta(2)m, and monitored for growth and survival. Beta(2)m suppressed the growth of primary tumour cells and myeloma cell lines (ARK-RS, ARP-1, RPMI-8226, U266, ARH-77 and IM-9). High concentrations of beta(2)m induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Beta(2)m-induced apoptosis was dependent on activation of a caspase cascade, inhibited by interleukin 6, and did not involve the surface death receptors, as receptor-neutralizing antibodies had no inhibitory effect. Beta(2)m-induced growth arrest was associated with downregulation of cyclins A and D2. Surprisingly, anti-beta(2)m antibodies did not block the effect of beta(2)m but were synergistic with beta(2)m, resulting in 90% growth inhibition and 70% apoptosis of myeloma cells. Whereas beta(2)m treatment resulted in slight upregulation of surface beta(2)m and major histocompatibility complex class I alpha-chain expression, treatment of myeloma cells with anti-beta(2)m antibodies alone or with beta(2)m resulted in significant downregulation of surface beta(2)m and class I molecules, suggesting that class I molecules may be involved in signal transduction. Our data demonstrate that beta(2)m plays an important role in regulating the growth and survival of myeloma cells in vitro and warrants further investigation to delineate the mechanisms of beta(2)m and anti-beta(2)m antibody-induced growth regulation of myeloma cells.

  5. Myeloma-specific multiple peptides able to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes: A potential therapeutic application in multiple myeloma and other plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Smith, Robert; Daley, John; Mimura, Naoya; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of peptide vaccines may be enhanced by stimulating immune cells with multiple peptides derived from distinct tumor-associated antigens. We have evaluated the heteroclitic XBP1 US184–192 (YISPWILAV), heteroclitic XBP1 SP367–375 (YLFPQLISV), native CD138260–268 (GLVGLIFAV), and native CS1239–247 (SLFVLGLFL) peptides, which have strong HLA-A2 affinity and immunogenicity in combination, for their ability to elicit multiple myeloma antigen-specific responses. Experimental Design Multipeptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MP-CTL) were generated by the stimulation of CD3+ T lymphocytes from HLA-A2+ individuals with either autologous mature dendritic cells or T2 cells pulsed with a cocktail of these four peptides. Results The peptide cocktail did not compromise tumor antigen-specific activity of CTL. MP-CTL displayed increased total, effector memory (CCR7−CD45RO+), and activated (CD69+) CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes. In addition, MP-CTL demonstrated IFN-γ production, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity against HLA-A2+ multiple myeloma cells, including HLA-A2+ MM patients’ cells. Importantly, MP-CTL showed specific responses in functional assays to each relevant peptide, but not to an irrelevant HLA-A2 specific CMV pp65 (NLVPMVATV) peptide. Conclusions These results highlight the potential therapeutic application of vaccination with a cocktail of HLA-A2 specific peptides to induce CTL with a broad spectrum of immune responses against multiple myeloma antigens. PMID:22753586

  6. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma, Plasma Cell Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in a Single Patient Treated Simultaneously with Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, Dexamethasone and Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Peter V.; Auerbach, Herbert E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD) MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive. PMID:27103978

  7. MicroRNAs: Novel Crossroads between Myeloma Cells and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Morelli, Eugenio; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Amodio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of differentiated plasma cells that accumulate in the bone marrow, where a complex microenvironment made by different cell types supports proliferation, survival, and drug resistance of tumor cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. Emerging evidence indicates that miRNAs are aberrantly expressed or functionally deregulated in MM cells as the result of multiple genetic or epigenetic mechanisms and that also the tumor microenvironment regulates MM cell functions by miRNAs. Consistently, modulation of miRNA levels in MM cells has been demonstrated to impair their functional interaction with the bone marrow microenvironment and to produce significant antitumor activity even able to overcome the protective bone marrow milieu. This review will describe the most recent findings on miRNA function in the context of MM bone marrow microenvironment, focusing on the therapeutic potential of miRNA-based approaches. PMID:26881223

  8. Pim2 is required for maintaining multiple myeloma cell growth through modulating TSC2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Dai, Yumin; Niu, Xiao-Hong; Castillo, Joseph; Sim, Janet; Yu, Jianjun; Wang, Yingyun; Langowski, John L; Holash, Jocelyn; Shannon, Kevin; Garcia, Pablo D

    2013-08-29

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy. Despite recent treatment advances, it remains incurable. Here, we report that Pim2 kinase expression is highly elevated in MM cells and demonstrate that it is required for MM cell proliferation. Functional interference of Pim2 activity either by short hairpin RNAs or by a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor leads to significant inhibition of MM cell proliferation. Pim inhibition results in a significant decrease of mammalian target of rapamycin C1 (mTOR-C1) activity, which is critical for cell proliferation. We identify TSC2, a negative regulator of mTOR-C1, as a novel Pim2 substrate and show that Pim2 directly phosphorylates TSC2 on Ser-1798 and relieves the suppression of TSC2 on mTOR-C1. These findings support Pim2 as a promising therapeutic target for MM and define a novel Pim2-TSC2-mTOR-C1 pathway that drives MM proliferation. PMID:23818547

  9. Osteoclasts control reactivation of dormant myeloma cells by remodelling the endosteal niche

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Michelle A.; McDonald, Michelle M.; Kovacic, Natasa; Hua Khoo, Weng; Terry, Rachael L.; Down, Jenny; Kaplan, Warren; Paton-Hough, Julia; Fellows, Clair; Pettitt, Jessica A.; Neil Dear, T.; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Baldock, Paul A.; Rogers, Michael J.; Eaton, Colby L.; Vanderkerken, Karin; Pettit, Allison R.; Quinn, Julian M. W.; Zannettino, Andrew C. W.; Phan, Tri Giang; Croucher, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is largely incurable, despite development of therapies that target myeloma cell-intrinsic pathways. Disease relapse is thought to originate from dormant myeloma cells, localized in specialized niches, which resist therapy and repopulate the tumour. However, little is known about the niche, and how it exerts cell-extrinsic control over myeloma cell dormancy and reactivation. In this study, we track individual myeloma cells by intravital imaging as they colonize the endosteal niche, enter a dormant state and subsequently become activated to form colonies. We demonstrate that dormancy is a reversible state that is switched ‘on' by engagement with bone-lining cells or osteoblasts, and switched ‘off' by osteoclasts remodelling the endosteal niche. Dormant myeloma cells are resistant to chemotherapy that targets dividing cells. The demonstration that the endosteal niche is pivotal in controlling myeloma cell dormancy highlights the potential for targeting cell-extrinsic mechanisms to overcome cell-intrinsic drug resistance and prevent disease relapse. PMID:26632274

  10. B-cell Maturation Antigen is a Promising Target for Adoptive T-cell Therapy of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Robert O.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rose, Jeremy J.; Raffeld, Mark; Yang, Shicheng; Gress, Ronald E.; Hakim, Frances T.; Kochenderfer, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple myeloma (MM) is a usually incurable malignancy of plasma cells. New therapies are urgently needed for MM. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a promising new therapy for hematologic malignancies, but an ideal target antigen for CAR-expressing T cell therapies of MM has not been identified. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a protein that has been reported to be selectively expressed by B-lineage cells including MM cells. Our goal was to determine if BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells. Experimental Design We conducted an assessment of BCMA expression in normal human tissues and MM cells by flow cytometry, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We designed and tested novel anti-BCMA CARs. Results BCMA had a restricted RNA expression pattern. Except for expression on plasma cells, BCMA protein was not detected in normal human tissues. BCMA was not detected on primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We detected uniform BCMA cell-surface expression on primary MM cells from 5 of 5 patients. We designed the first anti-BCMA CARs to be reported, and we transduced T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding these CARs. The CARs gave T cells the ability to specifically recognize BCMA. The anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells exhibited BCMA-specific functions including cytokine production, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and in vivo tumor eradication. Importantly, anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells recognized and killed primary MM cells. Conclusions BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells, and adoptive transfer of anti-BCMA-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new strategy for treating MM. PMID:23344265

  11. The novel JAK inhibitor AZD1480 blocks STAT3 and FGFR3 signaling, resulting in suppression of human myeloma cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Scuto, Anna; Krejci, Pavel; Popplewell, Leslie; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yan; Kujawski, Maciej; Kowolik, Claudia; Xin, Hong; Chen, Linling; Wang, Yafan; Kretzner, Leo; Yu, Hua; Wilcox, William R.; Yen, Yun; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard

    2011-01-01

    IL-6 and downstream JAK-dependent signaling pathways have critical roles in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma. We investigated the effects of a novel small-molecule JAK inhibitor (AZD1480) on IL-6/JAK signal transduction and its biological consequences on the human myeloma-derived cell lines U266 and Kms.11. At low micromolar concentrations, AZD1480 blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. These biological responses to AZD1480 are associated with concomitant inhibition of phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3 and MAPK signaling proteins. In addition, there is inhibition of expression of STAT3 target genes, particularly Cyclin D2. Examination of a wider variety of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, OPM-2, NCI-H929, Kms.18, MM1.S, IM-9) as well as primary myeloma cells showed that AZD1480 has broad efficacy. By contrast, viability of normal PBMCs and CD138+ cells derived from healthy controls was not significantly inhibited. Importantly, AZD1480 induces cell death of Kms.11 cells grown in the presence of HS-5 bone marrow-derived stromal cells and inhibits tumor growth in a Kms.11 xenograft mouse model, accompanied with inhibition of phospho-FGFR3, phospho-JAK2, phospho-STAT3 and Cyclin D2 levels. In sum, AZD1480 blocks proliferation, survival, FGFR3 and JAK/STAT3 signaling in myeloma cells cultured alone or co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells and in vivo. Thus, AZD1480 represents a potential new therapeutic agent for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:21164517

  12. Novel anti–B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Patrick A.; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y.; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3–dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  13. Impact of the immunomodulating peptide thymosin alpha 1 on multiple myeloma and immune recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, Marilène; Hannon, Muriel; Otjacques, Eléonore; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Baudoux, Etienne; Beguin, Yves; Baron, Frédéric; Caers, Jo

    2015-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and causes several immune alterations in patients. Thymosin α1 (Tα1) is a thymic peptide that has been associated with immuno-stimulating properties. In addition, this peptide exerts anti-tumor effects in several cancer types. Beneficial effects of Tα1 administration have also been shown on immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a current treatment modality in hematological malignancies including MM. In this study, we observed a slight reduction in the proliferation of murine and human MM cell lines in the presence of Tα1 in vitro. However, using two immunocompetent murine MM models (5TGM1 and MOPC315.BM), we did not observe any impact of Tα1 administration on MM development in vivo. Furthermore, no beneficial effects of Tα1 treatment were observed on lymphocyte immune reconstitution after transfusion of human hematopoietic stem cells into immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, despite direct effects of Tα1 on human MM cell line proliferation in vitro, Tα1 did not exert anti-myeloma effects in vivo in the two murine models tested. Moreover, Tα1 failed to improve immune recovery in a xenogeneic HSCT model. PMID:25971542

  14. A mathematical model of cell equilibrium and joint cell formation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Koenders, M A; Saso, R

    2016-02-01

    In Multiple Myeloma Bone Disease healthy bone remodelling is affected by tumour cells by means of paracrine cytokinetic signalling in such a way that osteoclast formation is enhanced and the growth of osteoblast cells inhibited. The participating cytokines are described in the literature. Osteoclast-induced myeloma cell growth is also reported. Based on existing mathematical models for healthy bone remodelling a three-way equilibrium model is presented for osteoclasts, osteoblasts and myeloma cell populations to describe the progress of the illness in a scenario in which there is a secular increase in the cytokinetic interactive effectiveness of paracrine processes. The equilibrium state for the system is obtained. The paracrine interactive effectiveness is explored by parameter variation and the stable region in the parameter space is identified. Then recently-discovered joint myeloma-osteoclast cells are added to the model to describe the populations inside lytic lesions. It transpires that their presence expands the available parameter space for stable equilibrium, thus permitting a detrimental, larger population of osteoclasts and myeloma cells. A possible relapse mechanism for the illness is explored by letting joint cells dissociate. The mathematics then permits the evaluation of the evolution of the cell populations as a function of time during relapse.

  15. ANKHD1 represses p21 (WAF1/CIP1) promoter and promotes multiple myeloma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Dhyani, Anamika; Machado-Neto, João A; Favaro, Patricia; Saad, Sara T Olalla

    2015-01-01

    ANKHD1 (Ankyrin repeat and KH domain-containing protein 1) is highly expressed and plays an important role in the proliferation and cell cycle progression of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. ANKHD1 downregulation modulates cell cycle gene expression and upregulates p21 irrespective of the TP53 mutational status of MM cell lines. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of ANKHD1 in MM in vitro clonogenicity and in vivo tumourigenicity, as well as the role of ANKHD1 in p21 transcriptional regulation. ANKHD1 silencing in MM cells resulted in significantly low no. of colonies formed and in slow migration as compared to control cells (p < 0.05). Furthermore, in xenograft MM mice models, tumour growth was visibly suppressed in mice injected with ANKHD1 silenced cells compared to the control group. There was a significant decrease in tumour volume (p = 0.006) as well as in weight (p = 0.02) in the group injected with silenced cells compared to those of the control group. Co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the interaction between p21 and ANKHD1. Moreover, overexpression of ANKHD1 downregulated the activity of a p21 promoter in luciferase assays. Decrease in luciferase activity suggests a direct role of ANKHD1 in p21 transcriptional regulation. In addition confocal analysis after U266 cells were treated with Leptomycin B (LMB) for 24 h showed accumulation of ANKHD1 inside the nucleus as compared to untreated cells where ANKHD1 was found to be predominantly in cytoplasm. This suggests ANKHD1 might be shuttling between cytoplasm and nucleus. In conclusion, ANKHD1 promotes MM growth by repressing p21 a potent cell cycle regulator.

  16. Intratibial Injection of Human Multiple Myeloma Cells in NOD/SCID IL-2Rγ(Null) Mice Mimics Human Myeloma and Serves as a Valuable Tool for the Development of Anticancer Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schueler, Julia; Wider, Dagmar; Klingner, Kerstin; Siegers, Gabrielle M.; May, Annette M.; Wäsch, Ralph; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert; Engelhardt, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Background We systematically analyzed multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines and patient bone marrow cells for their engraftment capacity in immunodeficient mice and validated the response of the resulting xenografts to antimyeloma agents. Design and Methods Using flow cytometry and near infrared fluorescence in-vivo-imaging, growth kinetics of MM cell lines L363 and RPMI8226 and patient bone marrow cells were investigated with use of a murine subcutaneous bone implant, intratibial and intravenous approach in NOD/SCID, NOD/SCID treated with CD122 antibody and NOD/SCID IL-2Rγ(null) mice (NSG). Results Myeloma growth was significantly increased in the absence of natural killer cell activity (NSG or αCD122-treated NOD/SCID). Comparison of NSG and αCD122-treated NOD/SCID revealed enhanced growth kinetics in the former, especially with respect to metastatic tumor sites which were exclusively observed therein. In NSG, MM cells were more tumorigenic when injected intratibially than intravenously. In NOD/SCID in contrast, the use of juvenile long bone implants was superior to intratibial or intravenous cancer cell injection. Using the intratibial NSG model, mice developed typical disease symptoms exclusively when implanted with human MM cell lines or patient-derived bone marrow cells, but not with healthy bone marrow cells nor in mock-injected animals. Bortezomib and dexamethasone delayed myeloma progression in L363- as well as patient-derived MM cell bearing NSG. Antitumor activity could be quantified via flow cytometry and in vivo imaging analyses. Conclusions Our results suggest that the intratibial NSG MM model mimics the clinical situation of the disseminated disease and serves as a valuable tool in the development of novel anticancer strategies. PMID:24223204

  17. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  18. A plastic SQSTM1/p62-dependent autophagic reserve maintains proteostasis and determines proteasome inhibitor susceptibility in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Enrico; Perini, Tommaso; Resnati, Massimo; Orfanelli, Ugo; Oliva, Laura; Raimondi, Andrea; Cascio, Paolo; Bachi, Angela; Marcatti, Magda; Ciceri, Fabio; Cenci, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the paradigmatic proteasome inhibitor (PI) responsive cancer, but many patients fail to respond. An attractive target to enhance sensitivity is (macro)autophagy, recently found essential to bone marrow plasma cells, the normal counterpart of MM. Here, integrating proteomics with hypothesis-driven strategies, we identified the autophagic cargo receptor and adapter protein, SQSTM1/p62 as an essential component of an autophagic reserve that not only synergizes with the proteasome to maintain proteostasis, but also mediates a plastic adaptive response to PIs, and faithfully reports on inherent PI sensitivity. Lentiviral engineering revealed that SQSTM1 is essential for MM cell survival and affords specific PI protection. Under basal conditions, SQSTM1-dependent autophagy alleviates the degradative burden on the proteasome by constitutively disposing of substantial amounts of ubiquitinated proteins. Indeed, its inhibition or stimulation greatly sensitized to, or protected from, PI-induced protein aggregation and cell death. Moreover, under proteasome stress, myeloma cells selectively enhanced SQSTM1 de novo expression and reset its vast endogenous interactome, diverting SQSTM1 from signaling partners to maximize its association with ubiquitinated proteins. Saturation of such autophagic reserve, as indicated by intracellular accumulation of undigested SQSTM1-positive aggregates, specifically discriminated patient-derived myelomas inherently susceptible to PIs from primarily resistant ones. These aggregates correlated with accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which comparative proteomics identified as the main cell compartment targeted by autophagy in MM. Altogether, the data integrate autophagy into our previously established proteasome load-versus-capacity model, and reveal SQSTM1 aggregation as a faithful marker of defective proteostasis, defining a novel prognostic and therapeutic framework for MM. PMID:26043024

  19. Targeting MAGE-C1/CT7 Expression Increases Cell Sensitivity to the Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Fabricio; Costa, Erico T.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Gregorio, Juliana C.; Masotti, Cibele; Andrade, Valeria C.C.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Atanackovic, Djordje; Colleoni, Gisele W.B.

    2011-01-01

    The MAGE-C1/CT7 encodes a cancer/testis antigen (CTA), is located on the chromosomal region Xq26–27 and is highly polymorphic in humans. MAGE-C1/CT7 is frequently expressed in multiple myeloma (MM) that may be a potential target for immunotherapy in this still incurable disease. MAGEC1/CT7 expression is restricted to malignant plasma cells and it has been suggested that MAGE-C1/CT7 might play a pathogenic role in MM; however, the exact function this protein in the pathophysiology of MM is not yet understood. Our objectives were (1) to clarify the role of MAGE-C1/CT7 in the control of cellular proliferation and cell cycle in myeloma and (2) to evaluate the impact of silencing MAGE-C1/CT7 on myeloma cells treated with bortezomib. Myeloma cell line SKO-007 was transduced for stable expression of shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7. Downregulation of MAGE-C1/CT7 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR and western blot. Functional assays included cell proliferation, cell invasion, cell cycle analysis and apoptosis. Western blot showed a 70–80% decrease in MAGE-C1/CT7 protein expression in inhibited cells (shRNA-MAGE-C1/CT7) when compared with controls. Functional assays did not indicate a difference in cell proliferation and DNA synthesis when inhibited cells were compared with controls. However, we found a decreased percentage of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle among inhibited cells, but not in the controls (p<0.05). When myeloma cells were treated with bortezomib, we observed a 48% reduction of cells in the G2/M phase among inhibited cells while controls showed 13% (empty vector) and 9% (ineffective shRNA) reduction, respectively (p<0.01). Furthermore, inhibited cells treated with bortezomib showed an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-) in comparison with bortezomib-treated controls (p<0.001). We found that MAGE-C1/CT7 protects SKO-007 cells against bortezomib-induced apoptosis. Therefore, we could speculate that MAGE-C1/CT7 gene therapy could be

  20. Silica Nanoparticles Sensitize Human Multiple Myeloma Cells to Snake (Walterinnesia aegyptia) Venom-Induced Apoptosis and Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Douaa; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Multiple myeloma (MM), an almost incurable disease, is the second most common blood cancer. Initial chemotherapeutic treatment could be successful; however, resistance development urges the use of higher toxic doses accompanied by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The establishment of more effective treatments that can overcome or circumvent chemoresistance has become a priority. We recently demonstrated that venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) either alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NPs) mediated the growth arrest and apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of WEV alone and WEV+NP on proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells. Methods. The impacts of WEV alone and WEV+NP were monitored in MM cells from 70 diagnosed patients. The influences of WEV and WEV+NP were assessed with flow cytometry analysis. Results. WEV alone and WEV+NP decreased the viability of MM cells. Using a CFSE proliferation assay, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited MM cell proliferation. Furthermore, analysis of the cell cycle using the propidium iodide (PI) staining method indicated that WEV+NP strongly altered the cell cycle of MM cells and enhanced the induction of apoptosis. Conclusions. Our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP on MM cells that enable these compounds to function as effective treatments for MM. PMID:23304253

  1. Identification of Long Non-Coding RNAs Deregulated in Multiple Myeloma Cells Resistant to Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Driscoll, James J.

    2016-01-01

    While the clinical benefit of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) for multiple myeloma (MM) treatment remains unchallenged, dose-limiting toxicities and the inevitable emergence of drug resistance limit their long-term utility. Disease eradication is compromised by drug resistance that is either present de novo or therapy-induced, which accounts for the majority of tumor relapses and MM-related deaths. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a broad class of RNA molecules, including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), that do not encode proteins but play a major role in regulating the fundamental cellular processes that control cancer initiation, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. While lncRNAs have recently attracted significant attention as therapeutic targets to potentially improve cancer treatment, identification of lncRNAs that are deregulated in cells resistant to PIs has not been previously addressed. We have modeled drug resistance by generating three MM cell lines with acquired resistance to either bortezomib, carfilzomib, or ixazomib. Genome-wide profiling identified lncRNAs that were significantly deregulated in all three PI-resistant cell lines relative to the drug-sensitive parental cell line. Strikingly, certain lncRNAs deregulated in the three PI-resistant cell lines were also deregulated in MM plasma cells isolated from newly diagnosed patients compared to healthy plasma cells. Taken together, these preliminary studies strongly suggest that lncRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to prevent or overcome drug resistance. More investigations are ongoing to expand these initial studies in a greater number of MM patients to better define lncRNAs signatures that contribute to PI resistance in MM. PMID:27782060

  2. Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Melissa; Becker, Pamela S; Zhong, Xiaobo; Adams, Alexia; Hari, Parameswaran; Rowley, Scott; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Vesole, David H; Logan, Brent; Weisdorf, Daniel; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Popplewell, Leslie L; McClune, Brian; Bensinger, William; Riches, Marcie; Giralt, Sergio A; Pasquini, Marcelo C

    2014-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach. PMID:24769014

  3. Role of Flow Cytometry in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Plasma Cell Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Olteanu, Horatiu

    2016-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the role of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and follow-up of plasma cell myeloma. A brief introduction to the general immunophenotypic features of normal and myeloma plasma cells is provided, followed by a discussion of technical issues as they relate to the application of flow cytometry in this entity. The prognostic and therapeutic utility of flow cytometric immunophenotyping in myeloma is also analyzed, with an emphasis on the growing role of minimal residual analysis as potential biomarker for evaluating treatment efficacy and for tailoring risk-adapted treatment, in prospective clinical trials. PMID:26940271

  4. Involvement of the arachidonic acid cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway in the proliferation and invasion of human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jing; Wang, Hongxiang; Yuan, Guolin; Chen, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases and the metabolites epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) exert multiple biological effects in various malignancies. We have previously found EETs to be secreted by multiple myeloma (MM) cells and to be involved in MM angiogenesis, but the role of the arachidonic acid cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway in the proliferation and mobility of MM cells remains unknown. In the present study, we found that MM cell lines generated detectable levels of 11,12-EET/14,15-EET and that increased levels of EETs were found in the serum of MM patients compared to healthy donors. The addition of exogenous EETs induced significantly enhanced proliferation of MM cells, whereas 17-octadecynoic acid (17-ODYA), an inhibitor of the CYP epoxygenase pathway, inhibited the viability and proliferation of MM cells. Moreover, this inhibitory effect could be successfully reversed by exogenous EETs. 17-ODYA also inhibited the motility of MM cells in a time-dependent manner, with a reduction of the gelatinolytic activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. These results suggest the CYP epoxygenase pathway to be involved in the proliferation and invasion of MM cells, for which 17-ODYA could be a promising therapeutic drug. PMID:27077015

  5. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT. PMID:27379019

  6. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R.

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT. PMID:27379019

  7. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT.

  8. Multiple Myeloma, Version 2.2016

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kenneth C.; Alsina, Melissa; Atanackovic, Djordje; Biermann, J. Sybil; Chandler, Jason C.; Costello, Caitlin; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Fung, Henry C.; Gasparetto, Cristina; Godby, Kelly; Hofmeister, Craig; Holmberg, Leona; Holstein, Sarah; Huff, Carol Ann; Kassim, Adetola; Krishnan, Amrita Y.; Kumar, Shaji K.; Liedtke, Michaela; Lunning, Matthew; Raje, Noopur; Singhal, Seema; Smith, Clayton; Somlo, George; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith; Treon, Steven P.; Weber, Donna; Yahalom, Joachim; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells that accumulate in bone marrow, leading to bone destruction and marrow failure. Recent statistics from the American Cancer Society indicate that the incidence of MM is increasing. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) included in this issue address management of patients with solitary plasmacytoma and newly diagnosed MM. PMID:26553768

  9. Reelin promotes the adhesion and drug resistance of multiple myeloma cells via integrin β1 signaling and STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Meng; Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Hui; Qin, Xiaodan; Zhang, Yan; Hao, Jie; Sun, Xiuyuan; Yin, Yanhui; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is essential for neuron migration and positioning. The expression of reelin in multiple myeloma (MM) cells and its association with cell adhesion and survival were investigated. Overexpression, siRNA knockdown, and the addition of recombinant protein of reelin were used to examine the function of reelin in MM cells. Clinically, high expression of reelin was negatively associated with progression-free survival and overall survival. Functionally, reelin promoted the adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin via activation of α5β1 integrin. The resulting phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) led to the activation of Src/Syk/STAT3 and Akt, crucial signaling molecules involved in enhancing cell adhesion and protecting cells from drug-induced cell apoptosis. These findings indicate reelin's important role in the activation of integrin-β1 and STAT3/Akt pathways in multiple myeloma and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting reelin/integrin/FAK axis. PMID:26848618

  10. Immunophenotyping in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Kimlinger, Teresa; Morice, William

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasma cell disorders form a spectrum ranging from the asymptomatic presence of small monoclonal populations of plasma cells to conditions like plasma cell leukemia and multiple myeloma, in which the bone marrow can be replaced by the accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells. Immunophenotyping has become an invaluable tool in the management of hematological malignancies and is increasingly finding a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell disorders. Multiparameter flow cytometry has evolved considerably during the past decade with an increasing ability to screen large numbers of events and to detect multiple antigens at the same time. This, along with a better understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the clonal plasma cells in different disorders, has made immunophenotyping an indispensible tool in the diagnosis, prognostic classification and management of plasma cell disorders. This book chapter addresses the approaches taken to evaluate monoclonal plasma cell disorders, and the different markers and techniques that are important for the study of these diseases. PMID:21112041

  11. Competition between clonal plasma cells and normal cells for potentially overlapping bone marrow niches is associated with a progressively altered cellular distribution in MGUS vs myeloma.

    PubMed

    Paiva, B; Pérez-Andrés, M; Vídriales, M-B; Almeida, J; de las Heras, N; Mateos, M-V; López-Corral, L; Gutiérrez, N C; Blanco, J; Oriol, A; Hernández, M T; de Arriba, F; de Coca, A G; Terol, M-J; de la Rubia, J; González, Y; Martín, A; Sureda, A; Schmidt-Hieber, M; Schmitz, A; Johnsen, H E; Lahuerta, J-J; Bladé, J; San-Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2011-04-01

    Disappearance of normal bone marrow (BM) plasma cells (PC) predicts malignant transformation of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering myeloma (SMM) into symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). The homing, behavior and survival of normal PC, but also CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), B-cell precursors, and clonal PC largely depends on their interaction with stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) expressing, potentially overlapping BM stromal cell niches. Here, we investigate the distribution, phenotypic characteristics and competitive migration capacity of these cell populations in patients with MGUS, SMM and MM vs healthy adults (HA) aged >60 years. Our results show that BM and peripheral blood (PB) clonal PC progressively increase from MGUS to MM, the latter showing a slightly more immature immunophenotype. Of note, such increased number of clonal PC is associated with progressive depletion of normal PC, B-cell precursors and CD34(+) HSC in the BM, also with a parallel increase in PB. In an ex vivo model, normal PC, B-cell precursors and CD34(+) HSC from MGUS and SMM, but not MM patients, were able to abrogate the migration of clonal PC into serial concentrations of SDF-1. Overall, our results show that progressive competition and replacement of normal BM cells by clonal PC is associated with more advanced disease in patients with MGUS, SMM and MM. PMID:21252988

  12. Global gene expression profiling of multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and normal bone marrow plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fenghuang; Hardin, Johanna; Kordsmeier, Bob; Bumm, Klaus; Zheng, Mingzhong; Tian, Erming; Sanderson, Ralph; Yang, Yang; Wilson, Carla; Zangari, Maurizio; Anaissie, Elias; Morris, Christopher; Muwalla, Firas; van Rhee, Frits; Fassas, Athanasios; Crowley, John; Tricot, Guido; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John

    2002-03-01

    Bone marrow plasma cells (PCs) from 74 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), 5 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and 31 healthy volunteers (normal PCs) were purified by CD138(+) selection. Gene expression of purified PCs and 7 MM cell lines were profiled using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays interrogating about 6800 genes. On hierarchical clustering analysis, normal and MM PCs were differentiated and 4 distinct subgroups of MM (MM1, MM2, MM3, and MM4) were identified. The expression pattern of MM1 was similar to normal PCs and MGUS, whereas MM4 was similar to MM cell lines. Clinical parameters linked to poor prognosis, abnormal karyotype (P =.002) and high serum beta(2)-microglobulin levels (P =.0005), were most prevalent in MM4. Also, genes involved in DNA metabolism and cell cycle control were overexpressed in a comparison of MM1 and MM4. In addition, using chi(2) and Wilcoxon rank sum tests, 120 novel candidate disease genes were identified that discriminate normal and malignant PCs (P <.0001); many are involved in adhesion, apoptosis, cell cycle, drug resistance, growth arrest, oncogenesis, signaling, and transcription. A total of 156 genes, including FGFR3 and CCND1, exhibited highly elevated ("spiked") expression in at least 4 of the 74 MM cases (range, 4-25 spikes). Elevated expression of these 2 genes was caused by the translocation t(4;14)(p16;q32) or t(11;14)(q13;q32). Thus, novel candidate MM disease genes have been identified using gene expression profiling and this profiling has led to the development of a gene-based classification system for MM.

  13. How we manage autologous stem cell transplantation for patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dingli, David

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 22 350 patients had multiple myeloma diagnosed in 2013, representing 1.3% of all new cancers; 10 710 deaths are projected, representing 1.8% of cancer deaths. Approximately 0.7% of US men and women will have a myeloma diagnosis in their lifetime, and with advances in therapy, 77 600 US patients are living with myeloma. The 5-year survival rate was 25.6% in 1989 and was 44.9% in 2005. The median age at diagnosis is 69 years, with 62.4% of patients aged 65 or older at diagnosis. Median age at death is 75 years. The rate of new myeloma cases has been rising 0.7% per year during the past decade. The most common indication for autologous stem cell transplantation in the United States is multiple myeloma, and this article is designed to provide the specifics of organizing a transplant program for multiple myeloma. We review the data justifying use of stem cell transplantation as initial management in myeloma patients. We provide selection criteria that minimize the risks of transplantation. Specific guidelines on mobilization and supportive care through the transplant course, as done at Mayo Clinic, are given. A review of the data on tandem vs sequential autologous transplants is provided. PMID:24973360

  14. Evaluation of B cell maturation antigen as a target for antibody drug conjugate mediated cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Bounds, Danton; Paterson, Jennifer; Herledan, Gaelle; Sully, Katherine; Seestaller-Wehr, Laura M; Fieles, William E; Tunstead, James; McCahon, Lee; Germaschewski, Fiona M; Mayes, Patrick A; Craigen, Jenny L; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Yong, Kwee L

    2016-09-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA, also termed TNFRSF17) is an attractive therapeutic target due to its restricted expression on normal and malignant plasma cells (PC). GSK2857916 (or J6M0-MMAF) is a BCMA-specific antibody conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin F (MMAF) via a protease-resistant linker. To evaluate the clinical potential of this agent, tumour cells from seventy multiple myeloma (MM) patients were assessed for BCMA expression by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. All patients tested expressed BCMA, at varying levels, and both surface and intracellular expression were observed. BCMA expression is maintained through relapse, extramedullary spread and in residual disease post therapy. BCMA levels may also be prognostically useful as higher levels of BCMA were associated with poorer outcomes, even taking into account genetic risk. We observed rapid internalization of surface BCMA and newly expressed protein by 1 h, suggesting a mechanism for J6M0-MMAF activity even with low surface antigen. J6M0-MMAF mediated cytotoxicity of MM cells varied with dose and antigen levels, with clonogenic progenitors killed at lower doses than mature cells. In comparison, J6M0-MMAF killing of primary CD138(+) myeloma cells occurred with slower kinetics. Our observations support BCMA to be a promising therapeutic target in MM for novel therapies such as J6M0-MMAF. PMID:27313079

  15. Overcoming inherent resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells by targeting pathways integral to the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Mithraprabhu, S; Khong, T; Spencer, A

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are novel chemotherapeutics undergoing evaluation in clinical trials for the potential treatment of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Although HDACi have demonstrable synergy when combined with proteasome inhibitors (PIs), recent evidence indicates that combination of HDACi and PI is beneficial only in a subset of patients with advanced MM, clearly indicating that other rational combinations should be explored. In this context we hypothesized that understanding the molecular signature associated with inherent resistance to HDACi would provide a basis for the identification of therapeutic combinations with improved clinical efficacy. Using human myeloma cell lines (HMCL) categorized as sensitive, intermediate or resistant to HDACi, gene expression profiling (GEP) and gene ontology enrichment analyses were performed to determine if a genetic signature associated with inherent resistance to HDACi-resistance could be identified. Correlation of GEP to increasing or decreasing sensitivity to HDACi indicated a unique 35-gene signature that was significantly enriched for two pathways – regulation of actin cytoskeleton and protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum. When HMCL and primary MM samples were treated with a combination of HDACi and agents targeting the signaling pathways integral to the actin cytoskeleton, synergistic cell death was observed in all instances, thus providing a rationale for combining these agents with HDACi for the treatment of MM to overcome resistance. This report validates a molecular approach for the identification of HDACi partner drugs and provides an experimental framework for the identification of novel therapeutic combinations for anti-MM treatment. PMID:24651437

  16. Identification of MAGE-C1 (CT-7) epitopes for T-cell therapy of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Larry D.; Cook, Danielle R.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Berger, Carolina; Maloney, David G.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is incurable with standard therapies but is susceptible to a T-cell-mediated graft versus myeloma effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We sought to identify myeloma-specific antigens that might be used for T-cell immunotherapy of myeloma. MAGE-C1 (CT-7) is a cancer-testis antigen that is expressed by tumor cells in >70% of myeloma patients and elicits a humoral response in up to 93% of patients with CT-7+ myeloma. No CD8+ T-cell epitopes have been described for CT-7, so we used a combination of reverse immunology and immunization of HLA-A2 transgenic mice with a novel cell-based vaccine to identify three immunogenic epitopes of CT-7 that are recognized by human CD8+ T-cells. CT-7-specific T-cells recognizing two of these peptides are able to recognize myeloma cells as well as CT-7 gene-transduced tumor cells, demonstrating that these epitopes are naturally processed and presented by tumor cells. This is the first report of the identification of immunogenic CD8+ T-cell epitopes of MAGE-C1 (CT-7), which is the most commonly expressed cancer-testis antigen found in myeloma, and these epitopes may be promising candidate targets for vaccination or T-cell therapy of myeloma or other CT-7+ malignancies. PMID:21461886

  17. Outcome in Multiple Myeloma Patients Eligible for Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Wolfgang; Wohlfarth, Philipp; Bojic, Marija; Schörgenhofer, Christian; Drach, Johannes; Gisslinger, Heinz; Worel, Nina; Schiefer, Ana; Schulenburg, Axel; Agis, Hermine; Kalhs, Peter; Greinix, Hildegard T; Schellongowski, Peter; Rabitsch, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard of care for selected patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Many data exist on ASCT in the era of novel agents. We retrospectively analyzed 189 patients (108 males and 81 females) with biopsy-proven MM, who had received ASCT after induction therapy with either conventional chemotherapy alone or in combination with novel agents at our department. The outcomes of both groups and the risk factors for shorter survival were investigated. The most commonly used induction chemotherapy prior to ASCT was VAD (vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone, 42%), followed by PAD (bortezomib, doxorubicin and dexamethasone, 21%). One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (68%) received cyclophosphamide-recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for stem cell mobilization. No differences were observed for progression-free survival in terms of the number of transplanted CD34+ cells (p = 0.261). A trend in improved overall survival (OS) was seen for the use of novel agents when compared to conventional chemotherapy (164.3 vs. 82.0 months; p = 0.046). The International Staging System stages had a significant (p = 0.036) impact on OS. The novel agents improved OS in our patients with MM undergoing ASCT when compared to conventional chemotherapy regimens. The number of transplanted CD34+ cells had no significant impact on hematopoietic reconstitution.

  18. Signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient mouse B lymphoma and human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Shanique K E; Han, Yeming; Liu, Yingying; Kreider, Benjamin Z; Liu, Yan; Grewal, Sukhdeep; Desai, Anand; Baron, Jacqueline; Moore, Carissa R; Luo, Chang; Xie, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bortezomib, a clinical drug for multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, exhibits complex mechanisms of action, which vary depending on the cancer type and the critical genetic alterations of each cancer. Here we investigated the signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in mouse B lymphoma and human MM cells deficient in a new tumor suppressor gene, TRAF3. We found that bortezomib consistently induced up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1) and the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa as well as cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Interestingly, bortezomib induced the activation of NF-κB1 and the accumulation of the oncoprotein c-Myc, but inhibited the activation of NF-κB2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that oridonin (an inhibitor of NF-κB1 and NF-κB2) or AD 198 (a drug targeting c-Myc) drastically potentiated the anti-cancer effects of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient malignant B cells. Taken together, our findings increase the understanding of the mechanisms of action of bortezomib, which would aid the design of novel bortezomib-based combination therapies. Our results also provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of the combinations of bortezomib and oridonin (or other inhibitors of NF-κB1/2) or AD 198 (or other drugs targeting c-Myc) in the treatment of lymphoma and MM, especially in patients containing TRAF3 deletions or relevant mutations. PMID:26740054

  19. Signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient mouse B lymphoma and human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Shanique K E; Han, Yeming; Liu, Yingying; Kreider, Benjamin Z; Liu, Yan; Grewal, Sukhdeep; Desai, Anand; Baron, Jacqueline; Moore, Carissa R; Luo, Chang; Xie, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Bortezomib, a clinical drug for multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, exhibits complex mechanisms of action, which vary depending on the cancer type and the critical genetic alterations of each cancer. Here we investigated the signaling mechanisms of bortezomib in mouse B lymphoma and human MM cells deficient in a new tumor suppressor gene, TRAF3. We found that bortezomib consistently induced up-regulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(WAF1) and the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa as well as cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Interestingly, bortezomib induced the activation of NF-κB1 and the accumulation of the oncoprotein c-Myc, but inhibited the activation of NF-κB2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that oridonin (an inhibitor of NF-κB1 and NF-κB2) or AD 198 (a drug targeting c-Myc) drastically potentiated the anti-cancer effects of bortezomib in TRAF3-deficient malignant B cells. Taken together, our findings increase the understanding of the mechanisms of action of bortezomib, which would aid the design of novel bortezomib-based combination therapies. Our results also provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of the combinations of bortezomib and oridonin (or other inhibitors of NF-κB1/2) or AD 198 (or other drugs targeting c-Myc) in the treatment of lymphoma and MM, especially in patients containing TRAF3 deletions or relevant mutations.

  20. Constitutive expression of IL-12Rβ2 on human multiple myeloma cells delineates a novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Cocco, Claudia; Giuliani, Nicola; Ferrarini, Marina; Colla, Simona; Ognio, Emanuela; Taverniti, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Emma; Cutrona, Giovanna; Perfetti, Vittorio; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Ribatti, Domenico; Pistoia, Vito

    2008-01-01

    The interleukin-12 (IL-12) receptor (R) B2 gene acts as tumor suppressor in human acute and chronic B-cell leukemias/lymphomas and IL-12rb2–deficient mice develop spontaneously localized plasmacytomas. With this background, we investigated the role of IL-12Rβ2 in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis. Here we show the following: (1) IL-12Rβ2 was expressed in primary MM cells but down-regulated compared with normal polyclonal plasmablastic cells and plasma cells (PCs). IL-6 dampened IL-12Rβ2 expression on polyclonal plasmablastic cells and MM cells. (2) IL-12 reduced the proangiogenic activity of primary MM cells in vitro and decreased significantly (P = .001) the tumorigenicity of the NCI-H929 cell line in SCID/NOD mice by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis. The latter phenomenon was found to depend on abolished expression of a wide panel of proangiogenic genes and up-regulated expression of the antiangiogenic genes IFN-γ, IFN-α, platelet factor-4, and TIMP-2. Inhibition of the angiogenic potential of primary MM cells was related to down-regulated expression of the proangiogenic genes CCL11, vascular endothelial-cadherin, CD13, and AKT and to up-regulation of an IFN-γ–related antiangiogenic pathway. Thus, IL-12Rβ2 directly restrains MM cell growth, and targeting of IL-12 to tumor cells holds promise as new therapeutic strategy. PMID:18474725

  1. Gamabufotalin triggers c-Myc degradation via induction of WWP2 in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Deng, Sa; Zhang, Baojing; Huo, Xiaokui; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhong, Yuping; Ma, Xiaochi

    2016-01-01

    Deciding appropriate therapy for multiple myeloma (MM) is challenging because of the occurrence of multiple chromosomal changes and the fatal nature of the disease. In the current study, gamabufotalin (GBT) was isolated from toad venom, and its tumor-specific cytotoxicity was investigated in human MM cells. We found GBT inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis with the IC50 values <50 nM. Mechanistic studies using functional approaches identified GBT as an inhibitor of c-Myc. Further analysis showed that GBT especially evoked the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc protein, thereby globally repressing the expression of c-Myc target genes. GBT treatment inhibited ERK and AKT signals, while stimulating the activation of JNK cascade. An E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, WWP2, was upregulated following JNK activation and played an important role in c-Myc ubiquitination and degradation through direct protein-protein interaction. The antitumor effect of GBT was validated in a xenograft mouse model and the suppression of MM-induced osteolysis was verified in a SCID-hu model in vivo. Taken together, our study identified the potential of GBT as a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of MM. PMID:26894970

  2. Drug metabolism and clearance system in tumor cells of patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Wafa; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Reme, Thierry; Sahota, Surinder; Seckinger, Anja; Vincent, Laure; Cartron, Guillaume; Moreaux, Jérôme; Hose, Dirk; Klein, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major limitation of cancer treatments with several molecular mechanisms involved, in particular altered local drug metabolism and detoxification process. The role of drug metabolism and clearance system has not been satisfactorily investigated in Multiple Myeloma (MM), a malignant plasma cell cancer for which a majority of patients escapes treatment. The expression of 350 genes encoding for uptake carriers, xenobiotic receptors, phase I and II Drug Metabolizing Enzymes (DMEs) and efflux transporters was interrogated in MM cells (MMCs) of newly-diagnosed patients in relation to their event free survival. MMCs of patients with a favourable outcome have an increased expression of genes coding for xenobiotic receptors (RXRα, LXR, CAR and FXR) and accordingly of their gene targets, influx transporters and phase I/II DMEs. On the contrary, MMCs of patients with unfavourable outcome displayed a global down regulation of genes coding for xenobiotic receptors and the downstream detoxification genes but had a high expression of genes coding for ARNT and Nrf2 pathways and ABC transporters. Altogether, these data suggests ARNT and Nrf2 pathways could be involved in MM primary resistance and that targeting RXRα, PXR, LXR and FXR through agonists could open new perspectives to alleviate or reverse MM drug resistance. PMID:25669983

  3. The bone marrow microenvironment enhances multiple myeloma progression by exosome-mediated activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; De Beule, Nathan; Maes, Ken; De Bruyne, Elke; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Vanderkerken, Karin; Menu, Eline

    2015-12-22

    Exosomes, extracellular nanovesicles secreted by various cell types, modulate the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment by regulating angiogenesis, cytokine release, immune response, inflammation, and metastasis. Interactions between bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells play crucial roles in MM development. We previously reported that BMSC-derived exosomes directly promote MM cell growth, whereas the other possible mechanisms for supporting MM progression by these exosomes are still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of BMSC-derived exosomes on the MM BM cells with specific emphasis on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). BMSC-derived exosomes were able to be taken up by MM MDSCs and induced their expansion in vitro. Moreover, these exosomes directly induced the survival of MDSCs through activating STAT3 and STAT1 pathways and increasing the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Inhibition of these pathways blocked the enhancement of MDSC survival. Furthermore, these exosomes increased the nitric oxide release from MM MDSCs and enhanced their suppressive activity on T cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BMSC-derived exosomes activate MDSCs in the BM through STAT3 and STAT1 pathways, leading to increased immunosuppression which favors MM progression.

  4. The bone marrow microenvironment enhances multiple myeloma progression by exosome-mediated activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinheng; De Veirman, Kim; De Beule, Nathan; Maes, Ken; De Bruyne, Elke; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes, extracellular nanovesicles secreted by various cell types, modulate the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment by regulating angiogenesis, cytokine release, immune response, inflammation, and metastasis. Interactions between bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and multiple myeloma (MM) cells play crucial roles in MM development. We previously reported that BMSC-derived exosomes directly promote MM cell growth, whereas the other possible mechanisms for supporting MM progression by these exosomes are still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of BMSC-derived exosomes on the MM BM cells with specific emphasis on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). BMSC-derived exosomes were able to be taken up by MM MDSCs and induced their expansion in vitro. Moreover, these exosomes directly induced the survival of MDSCs through activating STAT3 and STAT1 pathways and increasing the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Inhibition of these pathways blocked the enhancement of MDSC survival. Furthermore, these exosomes increased the nitric oxide release from MM MDSCs and enhanced their suppressive activity on T cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BMSC-derived exosomes activate MDSCs in the BM through STAT3 and STAT1 pathways, leading to increased immunosuppression which favors MM progression. PMID:26556857

  5. In vitro sensitization of human lymphocytes to a myeloma cell-related antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, M.E.; Griffin, G.D.; Novelli, G.D.; Solomon, A.

    1981-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal human donors were cocultivated with cells from two established human multiple myeloma cell lines, RPMI 8226 and K-737, and with lymphoblastoid cells from a third B cell line, RAMM. After a comparison of three methods of lymphocyte sensitization, a 6-day incubation protocol with equal numbers of normal lymphocytes and mitomycin C-treated tumor cells was selected. Cells fom the RPMI 8226 myeloma line stimulated the differentiation of lymphocytes into cytotoxic effector cells as measured by /sup 51/Cr release from labeled target cells. The RPMI 8226-sensitized lymphocytes were cytotoxic for myeloma cells (RPMI 8226 and K-737) and for lymphoblastoid cells (RAMM) but not for cells from human lung tumor lines (A549, A427, MB9812), a breast carcinoma line (ALAB), a normal diploid fibroblast line (HSBP), or normal lymphocytes.

  6. Modeling Cell–Cell Interactions in Regulating Multiple Myeloma Initiating Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Peng, Huiming; Choi, Dong Soon; Su, Jing; (Jeff) Chang, Chung-Che

    2014-01-01

    Cancer initiating cells have been documented in multiple myeloma and believed to be a key factor that initiates and drives tumor growth, differentiation, metastasis, and recurrence of the diseases. Although myeloma initiating cells (MICs) are likely to share many properties of normal stem cells, the underlying mechanisms regulating the fate of MICs are largely unknown. Studies designed to explore such communication are urgently needed to enhance our ability to predict the fate decisions of MICs (self-renewal, differentiation, and proliferation). In this study, we developed a novel system to understand the intercellular communication between MICs and their niche by seamlessly integrating experimental data and mathematical model. We first designed dynamic cell culture experiments and collected three types of cells (side population cells, progenitor cells, and mature myeloma cells) under various cultural conditions with flow cytometry. Then we developed a lineage model with ordinary differential equations by considering secreted factors, self-renewal, differentiation, and other biological functions of those cells, to model the cell–cell interactions among the three cell types. Particle swarm optimization was employed to estimate the model parameters by fitting the experimental data to the lineage model. The theoretical results show that the correlation coefficient analysis can reflect the feedback loops among the three cell types, the intercellular feedback signaling can regulate cell population dynamics, and the culture strategies can decide cell growth. This study provides a basic framework of studying cell–cell interactions in regulating MICs fate. PMID:24058033

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Multiple Myeloma: Pre-Clinical Research and Translational Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Gullà, Annamaria; Correale, Pierpaolo; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cells have been reported to play an important role in tumor-progression mainly because of their capability to promote immune-escape, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Among them, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been recently identified as immature myeloid cells, induced by tumor-associated inflammation, able to impair both innate and adaptive immunity. While murine MDSCs are usually identified by the expression of CD11b and Gr1, human MDSCs represent a more heterogeneous population characterized by the expression of CD33 and CD11b, low or no HLA-DR, and variable CD14 and CD15. In particular, the last two may alternatively identify monocyte-like or granulocyte-like MDSC subsets with different immunosuppressive properties. Recently, a substantial increase of MDSCs has been found in peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients with a role in disease progression and/or drug resistance. Pre-clinical models recapitulating the complexity of the MM-related BM microenvironment (BMM) are major tools for the study of the interactions between MM cells and cells of the BMM (including MDSCs) and for the development of new agents targeting MM-associated immune-suppressive cells. This review will focus on current strategies for human MDSCs generation and investigation of their immunosuppressive function in vitro and in vivo, taking into account the relevant relationship occurring within the MM–BMM. We will then provide trends in MDSC-associated research and suggest potential application for the treatment of MM. PMID:25538892

  8. Overexpression of salivary-type amylase reduces the sensitivity to bortezomib in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Shohei; Hanamura, Ichiro; Ota, Akinobu; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Narita, Tomoko; Ri, Masaki; Mizutani, Motonori; Goto, Mineaki; Gotou, Mayuko; Tsunekawa, Norikazu; Shikami, Masato; Iida, Shinsuke; Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Miwa, Hiroshi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Nitta, Masakazu; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    Amylase-producing myeloma exhibits refractoriness to chemotherapy and a dismal prognosis. In this study, we established a human myeloma cell line, 8226/AMY1, in which a lentivirally transfected AMY1 gene was stably expressed and explored its biological characteristics. 8226/AMY1 showed a survival advantage over mock control when treated with dexamethasone, bortezomib, and lenalidomide in vitro partly through inhibition of apoptosis induced by these reagents. In a xenograft murine model, 8226/AMY1 showed rapid tumor growth and reduced sensitivity to bortezomib compared with mock. A microarray gene expression analysis identified TCL1A, which functions as a coactivator of the cell survival kinase Akt, differentially up-regulated in 8226/AMY1. The expression of phosphorylated Akt was increased in the 8226/AMY1 cells following bortezomib treatment, but not in the mock cells. In addition, treatment with perifosine, an inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, enhanced the anti-myeloma effect of bortezomib in the 8226/AMY1 cells. Our data suggest that amylase-producing myeloma reduced the sensitivity to bortezomib in vitro and in vivo, and the up-regulation of TCL1A may influence the drug susceptibility of 8226/AMY1 via the phosphorylation of Akt. These findings provide clues for developing treatment approaches for not only amylase-producing myeloma, but also relapsed and refractory myelomas.

  9. [Multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Abe, Masahiro; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the positive clinical benefits obtained with new agents, complete remission (CR) can be used as a surrogate for overall survival, and should be achieved. Although multiple myeloma is a heterogeneous disease in terms of myeloma cell- and patient-related risk factors, patients should receive the most effective combination therapy based on proteasome inhibitors and/or immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) as backbone medication irrespective of the risks encountered in the setting of induction therapy ("one-size-fits-all" therapy), followed by consolidation/maintenance therapy to achieve CR with the ultimate goal of extended survival. Myeloma-defining biomarkers have been established to identify high-risk smoldering myeloma requiring treatment. The development of salvage treatments yielding better outcomes for relapsed/refractory myeloma is urgently needed. Upcoming novel molecular targeting agents with different modes of action and immunotherapeutic agents will be integrated into myeloma treatment regimens with a great therapeutic impact, and further evolution of the treatment paradigm for multiple myeloma is eagerly anticipated. PMID:27076236

  10. What Is Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... other tissues. If someone has only a single plasma cell tumor, the disease is called an isolated (or solitary ) plasmacytoma . If someone has more than one plasmacytoma, they have multiple myeloma . Multiple myeloma is ...

  11. Negative regulation of erythroblast maturation by Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) highly malignant plasma cells: a major pathogenetic mechanism of anemia in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Franco; Cafforio, Paola; Tucci, Marco; Dammacco, Franco

    2002-02-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with severe normochromic/normocytic anemia. This study demonstrates that the abnormal up-regulation of apoptogenic receptors, including both Fas ligand (L) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), by highly malignant myeloma cells is involved in the pathogenesis of the ineffective erythropoiesis and chronic exhaustion of the erythroid matrix. By measuring Fas-L and TRAIL in plasma cells and the content of glycophorin A (GpA) in erythroblasts from a cohort of 28 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with MM and 7 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), selected in relation to their peripheral hemoglobin values, results showed that both receptors occurred at high levels in 15 severely anemic MM patients. Their marrow erythropoietic component was low and included predominantly immature GpA(+dim) erythroblasts, in contrast with the higher relative numbers of mature GpA(+bright) erythroid cells observed in the nonanemic patients and those with MGUS. In cocultures with autologous Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) myeloma cells, the expanded GpA(+dim) erythroid population underwent prompt apoptosis after direct exposure to malignant plasma cells, whereas erythroblasts from nonanemic patients were scarcely affected. The evidence that Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) malignant plasma cells prime erythroblast apoptosis by direct cytotoxicity was also supported by the increase of FLICE in fresh immature GpA(+dim) erythroid cells, whereas ICE and caspase-10 increased in subsequent maturative forms. In addition, GATA-1, a survival factor for erythroid precursors, was remarkably down-regulated in fresh erythroblasts from the severely anemic patients. These results indicate that progressive destruction of the erythroid matrix in aggressive MM is due to cytotoxic mechanisms based on the up-regulation in myeloma cells of Fas-L, TRAIL, or both. It is conceivable that the altered regulation of these receptors defines a peculiar

  12. An Organotypic High Throughput System for Characterization of Drug Sensitivity of Primary Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ariosto; Jacobson, Timothy; Meads, Mark; Distler, Allison; Shain, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    In this work we describe a novel approach that combines ex vivo drug sensitivity assays and digital image analysis to estimate chemosensitivity and heterogeneity of patient-derived multiple myeloma (MM) cells. This approach consists in seeding primary MM cells freshly extracted from bone marrow aspirates into microfluidic chambers implemented in multi-well plates, each consisting of a reconstruction of the bone marrow microenvironment, including extracellular matrix (collagen or basement membrane matrix) and stroma (patient-derived mesenchymal stem cells) or human-derived endothelial cells (HUVECs). The chambers are drugged with different agents and concentrations, and are imaged sequentially for 96 hr through bright field microscopy, in a motorized microscope equipped with a digital camera. Digital image analysis software detects live and dead cells from presence or absence of membrane motion, and generates curves of change in viability as a function of drug concentration and exposure time. We use a computational model to determine the parameters of chemosensitivity of the tumor population to each drug, as well as the number of sub-populations present as a measure of tumor heterogeneity. These patient-tailored models can then be used to simulate therapeutic regimens and estimate clinical response. PMID:26274375

  13. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  14. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Rodrigo Carlini; de Carvalho, Fabricio; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-11-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  15. A 54-Year-Old Woman with Donor Cell Origin of Multiple Myeloma after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of CML

    PubMed Central

    Maestas, Erika; Jain, Shikha; Stiff, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder that may be treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). While posttransplantation relapse of disease resulting from a failure to eradicate the patient's original leukemia could occur, patients may also rarely develop a secondary malignancy or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) of donor origin termed donor cell leukemia (DCL). Cases of donor-derived acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or MDS after HSCT or solid tumor transplantation have been published. However, very few cases of donor-derived multiple myeloma (MM) exist. We describe a patient who developed a donor-derived MM following allogeneic HSCT from a sibling donor. PMID:26989529

  16. Attenuation of dexamethasone-induced cell death in multiple myeloma is mediated by miR-125b expression

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Megan Y.; Rushworth, Stuart A.; Zaitseva, Lyubov; Bowles, Kristian M.; MacEwan, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a key front-line chemotherapeutic for B-cell malignant multiple myeloma (MM). Dexamethasone modulates MM cell survival signaling but fails to induce marked cytotoxicity when used as a monotherapy. We demonstrate here the mechanism behind this insufficient responsiveness of MM cells toward dexamethasone, revealing in MM a dramatic anti-apoptotic role for microRNA (miRNA)-125b in the insensitivity toward dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. MM cells responding to dexamethasone exhibited enhanced expression of oncogenic miR-125b. Dexamethasone also induced expression of miR-34a, which acts to suppress SIRT1 deacetylase, and thus allows maintained acetylation and inactivation of p53. p53 mRNA is also suppressed by miR-125b targeting. Reporter assays showed that both these dexamethasone-induced miRNAs act downstream of their target genes to prevent p53 tumor suppressor actions and, ultimately, resist cytotoxic responses in MM. Use of antisense miR-125b transcripts enhanced expression of pro-apoptotic p53, repressed expression of anti-apoptotic SIRT1 and, importantly, significantly enhanced dexamethasone-induced cell death responses in MM. Pharmacological manipulations showed that the key regulation enabling complete dexamethasone sensitivity in MM cells lies with miR-125b. In summary, dexamethasone-induced miR-125b induces cell death resistance mechanisms in MM cells via the p53/miR-34a/SIRT1 signaling network and provides these cells with an enhanced level of resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. Clearly, such anti-apoptotic mechanisms will need to be overcome to more effectively treat nascent, refractory and relapsed MM patients. These mechanisms provide insight into the role of miRNA regulation of apoptosis and their promotion of MM cell proliferative mechanisms. PMID:23759586

  17. Targeting MUC1-C is synergistic with bortezomib in downregulating TIGAR and inducing ROS-mediated myeloma cell death

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Kufe, Turner; Avigan, David

    2014-01-01

    The proteosome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) induces endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. The mucin 1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in most MM cells, and targeting MUC1-C with GO-203, a cell-penetrating peptide inhibitor of MUC1-C homodimerization, is effective in inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated MM cell death. The present results demonstrate that GO-203 and BTZ synergistically downregulate expression of the p53-inducible regulator of glycolysis and apoptosis (TIGAR), which promotes shunting of glucose-6-phosphate into the pentose phosphate pathway to generate reduced glutathione (GSH). In turn, GO-203 blocks BTZ-induced increases in GSH and results in synergistic increases in ROS and MM cell death. The results also demonstrate that GO-203 is effective against BTZ-resistant MM cells. We show that BTZ resistance is associated with BTZ-induced increases in TIGAR and GSH levels, and that GO-203 resensitizes BTZ-resistant cells to BTZ treatment by synergistically downregulating TIGAR and GSH. The GO-203/BTZ combination is thus highly effective in killing BTZ-resistant MM cells. These findings support a model in which targeting MUC1-C is synergistic with BTZ in suppressing TIGAR-mediated regulation of ROS levels and provide an experimental rationale for combining GO-203 with BTZ in certain settings of BTZ resistance. PMID:24632713

  18. Importance of Achieving Stringent Complete Response After Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Prashant; Kumar, Shaji K.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Lacy, Martha Q.; Buadi, Francis; Dingli, David; Russell, Stephen J.; Hayman, Suzanne R.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Lust, John A.; Leung, Nelson; Lin, Yi; Zeldenrust, Steven R.; McCurdy, Arleigh; Greipp, Philip R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Gertz, Morie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the impact of achieving stringent complete response (sCR), an increasingly attainable goal, after autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Patients and Methods Maximal response rates were determined in 445 consecutive patients who underwent ASCT within 12 months of diagnosis of MM. The patients achieving varying degrees of complete response (CR) are the focus of our study. Results One hundred and nine patients (25%) achieved sCR after ASCT. The median overall survival (OS) rate from the time of transplantation for patients attaining sCR was not reached (NR), in contrast to those patients achieving conventional complete response (CR; n = 37; OS, 81 months) or near CR (nCR; n = 91; OS, 60 months; P < .001). Five-year OS rates were 80%, 53%, and 47% for sCR, CR, and nCR, respectively. The median time to progression (TTP) from ASCT of patients achieving sCR was significantly longer (50 months) than TTP of patients achieving CR or nCR (20 months and 19 months, respectively). On multivariable analysis, post-ASCT response of sCR was an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.80; versus CR; P = .008), in addition to proliferation rate, pre-ASCT cytogenetics, and performance status. OS rates of patients attaining sCR continued to remain superior at 2-year landmark (median, NR v 70 months for conventional CR group; P = .007). Conclusion Improved long-term outcome is seen after ASCT with achievement of sCR when compared with lesser degrees of responses. Myeloma trials reporting the response rates should identify patients achieving sCR and CR separately, owing to markedly disparate outcomes of the two categories. PMID:24248686

  19. Immune Cell Inhibition by SLAMF7 Is Mediated by a Mechanism Requiring Src Kinases, CD45, and SHIP-1 That Is Defective in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huaijian; Cruz-Munoz, Mario-Ernesto; Wu, Ning; Robbins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule F7 (SLAMF7) is a receptor present on immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. It is also expressed on multiple myeloma (MM) cells. This led to development of an anti-SLAMF7 antibody, elotuzumab, showing efficacy against MM. SLAMF7 mediates activating or inhibitory effects in NK cells, depending on whether cells express or do not express the adaptor EAT-2. Since MM cells lack EAT-2, we elucidated the inhibitory effectors of SLAMF7 in EAT-2-negative NK cells and tested whether these effectors were triggered in MM cells. SLAMF7-mediated inhibition in NK cells lacking EAT-2 was mediated by SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase 1 (SHIP-1), which was recruited via tyrosine 261 of SLAMF7. Coupling of SLAMF7 to SHIP-1 required Src kinases, which phosphorylated SLAMF7. Although MM cells lack EAT-2, elotuzumab did not induce inhibitory signals in these cells. This was at least partly due to a lack of CD45, a phosphatase required for Src kinase activation. A defect in SLAMF7 function was also observed in CD45-deficient NK cells. Hence, SLAMF7-triggered inhibition is mediated by a mechanism involving Src kinases, CD45, and SHIP-1 that is defective in MM cells. This defect might explain why elotuzumab eliminates MM cells by an indirect mechanism involving the activation of NK cells. PMID:25312647

  20. Importin β1 mediates nuclear factor-κB signal transduction into the nuclei of myeloma cells and affects their proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenqing; Li, Rong; He, Jie; Du, Juan; Hou, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that is currently incurable. The activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling plays a crucial role in the immortalisation of MM cells. As the most important transcription factor of the canonical NF-κB pathway, the p50/p65 heterodimer requires transportation into the nucleus for its successful signal transduction. Importin β1 is the key transport receptor that mediates p50/p65 nuclear import. Currently, it remains unclear whether the regulation of importin β1 function affects the biological behaviour of MM cells. In the present study, we investigated the changes in p65 translocation and the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells after treatment with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an importin β1 inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. We found importin β1 over-expression and the excessive nuclear transport of p65 in myeloma cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and Western blot analysis results indicated that p65 nuclear transport was blocked after inhibiting importin β1 expression with siRNA and the importin β1-specific inhibitor importazole (IPZ). Importantly, electronic mobility shift assay results also verified that p65 nuclear transport was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the expression of the NF-κB signalling target genes involved in MM cell apoptosis, such as BCL-2, c-IAP1 and XIAP, were markedly reduced, as demonstrated by the RT-PCR results. Furthermore, the proliferation of MM cells was inhibited, as demonstrated by MTT assay results, and the MM cell apoptosis rate was higher, as demonstrated by the annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining assay results. Additionally, the percentage of S phase cells in the myeloma cell lines treated with IPZ was dramatically reduced. In conclusion, our results clearly show that importin β1 mediates the translocation of NF-κB into the nuclei of myeloma cells, thereby regulating proliferation and blocking apoptosis, which

  1. Normalizing the bone marrow microenvironment with p38 inhibitor reduces multiple myeloma cell proliferation and adhesion and suppresses osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Aaron N.; Stebbins, Elizabeth G.; Henson, Margaret; O'Young, Gilbert; Choi, Sun J.; Quon, Diana; Damm, Debby; Reddy, Mamatha; Ma, Jing Y.; Haghnazari, Edwin; Kapoun, Ann M.; Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Protter, Andy; Schreiner, George F.; Kurihara, Noriyoshi; Anderson, Judy; Roodman, G. David; Navas, Tony A.; Higgins, Linda S. . E-mail: lhiggin3@scius.jnj.com

    2006-06-10

    The multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays a critical role in supporting tumor growth and survival as well as in promoting formation of osteolytic lesions. Recent results suggest that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an important factor in maintaining this activated environment. In this report, we demonstrate that the p38{alpha} MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469, suppresses secretion of the tumor-supportive factors IL-6 and VEGF from BM stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as cocultures of BMSCs with MM cells, resulting in reduction in MM cell proliferation. Additionally, we show that SCIO-469 prevents TNF{alpha}-induced adhesion of MM cells to BMSCs through an ICAM-1- and VCAM-1-independent mechanism. Microarray analysis revealed a novel set of TNF{alpha}-induced chemokines in BMSCs that is strongly inhibited by SCIO-469. Furthermore, reintroduction of chemokines CXCL10 and CCL8 to BMSCs overcomes the inhibitory effect of SCIO-469 on TNF{alpha}-induced MM adhesion. Lastly, we show that SCIO-469 inhibits secretion and expression of the osteoclast-activating factors IL-11, RANKL, and MIP-1{alpha} as well as prevents human osteoclast formation in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that SCIO-469 treatment can suppress factors in the bone marrow microenvironment to inhibit MM cell proliferation and adhesion and also to alleviate osteolytic activation in MM.

  2. Assessment of peripheral blood and bone marrow T, NK, NKT and dendritic cells in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pasiarski, Marcin; Grywalska, Ewelina; Kosmaczewska, Agata; Góźdź, Stanisław; Steckiewicz, Paweł; Garus, Bartosz; Bilski, Mateusz; Hymos, Anna; Roliński, Jacek; Bilski, Mateusz; Roliński, Jacek

    2015-12-31

    Symptoms of multiple myeloma (MM) include bone destruction with pathological fractures, kidney failure and frequent infections, which are the major causes of patient mortality. In our recent research, we demonstrated that the degree of dendritic cell (DC) subpopulation deficit could be related to MM progression, which in consequence may contribute to the MM-related impairment of the immune responses. In the present study, we determined by flow cytometry the frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK, and NKT-like cells as well as their correlation with myeloid and lymphoid populations of DCs in patients with MM. The study involved 50 patients diagnosed with MM at the Department of Hematology in the Holycross Cancer Center in Kielce. The research samples were collected after the MM diagnosis and before the initiation of anticancer therapy. The obtained results revealed the relations between the percentages of DC subpopulations and lymphocyte subsets, especially the activated ones, in the peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM). The described role of DCs in the process of the immunological response, either adaptive or innate, leads us to conclude that the decrease of the number or percentage of these cells may have a negative impact on the process of activation of effector cells and, consequently, on the effectiveness of a response to foreign as well as neoplastic antigens in patients with MM.

  3. Naltrindole Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation In Vitro and in a Murine Xenograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [3H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  4. Induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes ex vivo by CD40-activated B cells loaded with myeloma tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Nguyen Pham, Thanh-Nhan; Nguyen Hoang, Tuyet Minh; Kang, Hyun-Kyu; Jin, Chun-Ji; Nam, Jong-Hee; Chung, Sang-Young; Choi, So-Jin-Na; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Lee, Je-Jung

    2009-11-01

    We investigated to establish CD40-activated B cells (CD40-B cells) as alternative antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for the induction of myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). To generate CD40-B cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were co-cultured with CD40L-transfected J558 cells in the presence of IL-4, insulin, transferrin, and cyclosporine for 14 days, and pulsed with myeloma lysates. The CD40-B cells consistently expressed high levels of CD80, CD86, CD54, CCR7, and HLA-DR. The CD40-B cells produced IL-12, IFN-gamma, and IL-6 during the culture period, but not IL-10. In addition, the CD40-B cells showed potent allogeneic T-cell stimulatory capacities that depended on the dose ratio and had the potential to polarize naïve T cells into Th1 subsets. The CD40-B cells loaded with tumor lysates induced strong target-specific CTLs, based on large numbers of IFN-gamma secreting cells and higher cytotoxic activity against target cells compared to the CD40-B cells without the tumor lysates. These results suggest that CD40-B cells loaded with myeloma lysates might provide alternative APCs for cellular immunotherapy in patients with myeloma. PMID:19277657

  5. Circulating plasma cells in multiple myeloma: characterization and correlation with disease stage.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Owen, R G; Davies, F E; Johnson, R J; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Evans, P A; Child, J A; Smith, G M; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric test to quantitate low levels of circulating myeloma plasma cells, and to determine the relationship of these cells with disease stage. Cells were characterized using five-parameter flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies, and results were evaluated by comparison with fluorescent consensus-primer IgH-PCR. Bone marrow myeloma plasma cells, defined by high CD38 and Syndecan-1 expression, did not express CD10, 23, 30, 34 or 45RO, and demonstrated weak expression of CD37 and CD45. 65% of patients had CD19- 56+ plasma cells, 30% CD19- 56(low), and 5% CD19+ 56+, and these two antigens discriminated myeloma from normal plasma cells, which were all CD19+ 56(low). Peripheral blood myeloma plasma cells had the same composite phenotype, but expressed significantly lower levels of CD56 and Syndecan-1, and were detected in 75% (38/51) of patients at presentation, 92% (11/12) of patients in relapse, and 40% (4/10) of stem cell harvests. Circulating plasma cells were not detectable in patients in CR (n = 9) or normals (n = 10), at a sensitivity of up to 1 in 10,000 cells. There was good correlation between the flow cytometric test and IgH-PCR results: myeloma plasma cells were detectable by flow cytometry in all PCR positive samples, and samples with no detectable myeloma plasma cells were PCR negative. Absolute numbers decreased in patients responding to treatment, remained elevated in patients with refractory disease, and increased in patients undergoing relapse. We conclude that flow cytometry can provide an effective aternative to IgH-PCR that will allow quantitative assessment of low levels of residual disease.

  6. In vitro and In vivo Antitumor Activity of a Novel Alkylating Agent Melphalan-flufenamide Against Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Dharminder; Ray, Arghya; Viktorsson, Kristina; Spira, Jack; Paba-Prada, Claudia; Munshi, Nikhil; Richardson, Paul; Lewensohn, Rolf; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The alkylating agent melphalan prolongs survival in multiple myeloma (MM) patients; however, it is associated with toxicities and development of drug-resistance. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of melphalan-flufenamide (Mel-flufen), a novel dipeptide prodrug of melphalan in MM. Experimental Design MM cell lines, primary patient cells, and the human MM xenograft animal model were utilized to study the antitumor activity of mel-flufen. Results Low doses of mel-flufen triggers a more rapid and higher intracellular concentrations of melphalan in MM cells than is achievable by free melphalan. Cytotoxicity analysis showed significantly lower IC50 of mel-flufen than melphalan in MM cells. Importantly, mel-flufen induces apoptosis even in melphalan-, and bortezomib-resistant MM cells. Mechanistic studies show that siRNA knockdown of aminopeptidase N, a key enzyme mediating intracellular conversion of mel-flufen to melphalan, attenuates anti-MM activity of mel-flufen. Furthermore, mel-flufen-induced apoptosis was associated with: 1) activation of caspases and PARP cleavage; 2) ROS generation; 3) mitochondrial dysfunction and release of cytochrome-c; and 4) induction of DNA damage. Moreover, mel-flufen inhibits MM cell migration and tumor-associated angiogenesis. Human MM xenograft studies showed a more potent inhibition of tumor growth in mice treated with mel-flufen than mice receiving equimolar doses of melphalan. Finally, combining mel-flufen with lenalidomide, bortezomib, or dexamethasone triggers synergistic anti-MM activity. Conclusion Our preclinical study supports clinical evaluation of mel-flufen to enhance therapeutic potential of melphalan, overcome drug-resistance, and improve MM patient outcome. PMID:23584492

  7. Effects of Voltage-Gated K+ Channel on Cell Proliferation in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fan, Yuying; Wang, Shuye; Wang, Lianjie; He, Wanting; Zhang, Qiu; Li, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study the effects and underlying mechanisms of voltage-gated K+ channels on the proliferation of multiple myeloma cells. Methods. RPMI-8226 MM cell line was used for the experiments. Voltage-gated K+ currents and the resting potential were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RT-PCR detected Kv channel mRNA expression. Cell viability was analyzed with MTT assay. Cell counting system was employed to monitor cell proliferation. DNA contents and cell volume were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results. Currents recorded in RPMI-8226 cells were confirmed to be voltage-gated K+ channels. A high level of Kv1.3 mRNA was detected but no Kv3.1 mRNA was detected in RPMI-8226 cells. Voltage-gated K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) (2 mM) depolarized the resting potential from −42 ± 1.7 mV to −31.8 ± 2.8 mV (P < 0.01). The results of MTT assay showed that there was no significant cytotoxicity to RPMI-8226 cells when the 4-AP concentration was lower than 4 mM. 4-AP arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. Cells were synchronized at the G1/S boundary by treatment of aphidicolin and released from the blockage by replacing the medium with normal culture medium or with culture medium containing 2 mM 4-AP. 4-AP produced no significant inhibitory effect on cell cycle compared with control cells (P > 0.05). Conclusions. In RPMI-8226, voltage-gated K+ channels are involved in proliferation and cell cycle progression its influence on the resting potential and cell volume may be responsible for this process; the inhibitory effect of the voltage-gated K+ channel blocker on RPMI-8226 cell proliferation is a phase-specific event. PMID:24995361

  8. PSMB4 promotes multiple myeloma cell growth by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peihao; Guo, Honggang; Li, Guangchao; Han, Siqi; Luo, Fei; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-06

    Proteasomal subunit PSMB4, was recently identified as potential cancer driver genes in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanism of PSMB4 on carcinogenesis process remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of PSMB4 in multiple myeloma (MM). We found a significant up-regulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. Ectopic overexpression of PSMB4 promoted cell growth and colony forming ability of MM cells, whereas inhibition of PSMB4 led to a decrease of such events. Furthermore, our results demonstrated the up-regulation of miR-21 and a positive correlation between the levels of miR-21 and PSMB4 in MM. Re-expression of miR-21 markedly rescued PSMB4 knockdown-mediated suppression of cell proliferation and clone-formation. Additionally, while enforced expression of PSMB4 profoundly increased NF-κB activity and the level of miR-21, PSMB4 knockdown or NF-κB inhibition suppressed miR-21 expression in MM cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PSMB4 regulated MM cell growth in part by activating NF-κB-miR-21 signaling, which may represent promising targets for novel specific therapies. - Highlights: • First reported upregulation of PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4 promoted MM cell growth and colony forming ability. • Further found miR-21 was up-regulated by PSMB4 in MM plasma and cell lines. • PSMB4-induced miR-21 expression was modulated by NF-κB. • PSMB4-NF-κB-miR-21 axis may be potential therapeutic targets of MM.

  9. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  10. High throughput quantitative reverse transcription PCR assays revealing over-expression of cancer testis antigen genes in multiple myeloma stem cell-like side population cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianguo; Li, Hangwen; Tao, Wenjing; Savoldo, Barbara; Foglesong, Jessica A; King, Lauren C; Zu, Youli; Chang, Chung-Che

    2014-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) stem cells, proposed to be responsible for the tumourigenesis, drug resistance and recurrence of this disease, are enriched in the cancer stem cell-like side population (SP). Cancer testis antigens (CTA) are attractive targets for immunotherapy because they are widely expressed in cancers but only in limited types of normal tissues. We designed a high throughput assay, which allowed simultaneous relative quantifying expression of 90 CTA genes associated with MM. In the three MM cell lines tested, six CTA genes were over-expressed in two and LUZP4 and ODF1 were universally up-regulated in all three cell lines. Subsequent study of primary bone marrow (BM) from eight MM patients and four healthy donors revealed that 19 CTA genes were up-regulated in SP of MM compared with mature plasma cells. In contrast, only two CTA genes showed a moderate increase in SP cells of healthy BM. Furthermore, knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) revealed that LUZP4 expression is required for colony-forming ability and drug resistance in MM cells. Our findings indicate that multiple CTA have unique expression profiles in MM SP, suggesting that CTA may serve as targets for immunotherapy that it specific for MM stem cells and which may lead to the long-term cure of MM.

  11. Small interfering RNA silencing of interleukin-6 in mesenchymal stromal cells inhibits multiple myeloma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Hoon Koon; Chong, Pei Pei; Abdullah, Maha; Sekawi, Zamberi; Tan, Geok Chin; Leong, Chooi Fun; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Studies demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from bone marrow stroma produced high concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) that promoted multiple myeloma cell growth. In view of the failure of IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy to demonstrate substantial clinical responses in early clinical trials, more effective methods are needed in order to disrupt the favourable microenvironment provided by the bone marrow stroma. In this study, we evaluated the short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of IL-6 in MSC and the efficacy of these genetically modified MSC, with IL-6 suppression, on inhibition of U266 multiple myeloma cell growth. IL-6 mRNA and protein were significantly suppressed by 72h post IL-6 siRNA transfection without affecting the biological properties of MSC. Here we show significant inhibition of cell growth and IL-6 production in U266 cells co-cultured with MSC transfected with IL-6 siRNA when compared to U266 cells co-cultured with control MSC. We also show that the tumour volume and mitotic index of tumours in nude mice co-injected with U266 and MSC transfected with IL-6 siRNA were significantly reduced compared to tumours of mice co-injected with control MSC. Our results suggest potential use of RNA interference mediated therapy for multiple myeloma.

  12. International Myeloma Working Group consensus approach to the treatment of multiple myeloma patients who are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Moreau, Philippe; Orlowski, Robert; Bladé, Joan; Sezer, Orhan; Ludwig, Heinz; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Attal, Michel; Sonneveld, Pieter; Boccadoro, Mario; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Bensinger, William; Johnsen, Hans E.; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Gahrton, Gösta; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Vesole, David H.; Einsele, Hermann; Jagannath, Sundar; Niesvizky, Ruben; Durie, Brian G. M.; San Miguel, Jesus; Lonial, Sagar

    2011-01-01

    The role of high-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) continues to evolve in the novel agent era. The choice of induction therapy has moved from conventional chemotherapy to newer regimens incorporating the immunomodulatory derivatives thalidomide or lenalidomide and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. These drugs combine well with traditional therapies and with one another to form various doublet, triplet, and quadruplet regimens. Up-front use of these induction treatments, in particular 3-drug combinations, has affected unprecedented rates of complete response that rival those previously seen with conventional chemotherapy and subsequent ASCT. Autotransplantation applied after novel-agent-based induction regimens provides further improvement in the depth of response, a gain that translates into extended progression-free survival and, potentially, overall survival. High activity shown by immunomodulatory derivatives and bortezomib before ASCT has recently led to their use as consolidation and maintenance therapies after autotransplantation. Novel agents and ASCT are complementary treatment strategies for MM. This article reviews the current literature and provides important perspectives and guidance on the major issues surrounding the optimal current management of younger, transplantation-eligible MM patients. PMID:21447828

  13. SDF-1α stiffens myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells through the activation of RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong Soon; Stark, Daniel J.; Raphael, Robert M.; Wen, Jianguo; Su, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Chang, Chung-Che; Zu, Youli

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B lymphocyte malignancy that remains incurable despite extensive research efforts. This is due, in part, to frequent disease recurrences associated with the persistence of myeloma cancer stem cells (mCSCs). Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) play critical roles in supporting mCSCs through genetic or biochemical alterations. Previously, we identified mechanical distinctions between BMSCs isolated from MM patients (mBMSCs) and those present in the BM of healthy individuals (nBMSCs). These properties of mBMSC contributed to their ability to preferentially support mCSCs. To further illustrate mechanisms underlying the differences between mBMSCs and nBMSCs, here we report that (i) mBMSCs express an abnormal, constitutively high level of phosphorylated Myosin II, which leads to stiffer membrane mechanics, (ii) mBMSCs are more sensitive to SDF-1α-induced activation of MYL2 through the G(i./o)-PI3K-RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II signaling pathway, affecting Young’s modulus in BMSCs and (iii) activated Myosin II confers increased cell contractile potential, leading to enhanced collagen matrix remodeling and promoting the cell–cell interaction between mCSCs and mBMSCs. Together, our findings suggest that interfering with SDF-1α signaling may serve as a new therapeutic approach for eliminating mCSCs by disrupting their interaction with mBMSCs. PMID:25137150

  14. Dendritic cells accumulate in the bone marrow of myeloma patients where they protect tumor plasma cells from CD8+ T-cell killing

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Patrizia; Berardi, Simona; Frassanito, Maria Antonia; Ria, Roberto; De Re, Valli; Cicco, Sebastiano; Battaglia, Stefano; Ditonno, Paolo; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have speculated that the clinical progression from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to multiple myeloma (MM) is driven by defects in dendritic cell (DC) function. However, evidence supporting this assumption is controversial, and no mechanism for the putative DC dysfunction has been demonstrated thus far. We studied DC subsets from the bone marrow of MM patients compared with those of MGUS patients and control subjects. We found that myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) accumulate in the bone marrow during the MGUS-to-MM progression. After engulfment of apoptotic tumor plasma cells via CD91, bone marrow mDCs and pDCs mature and are able to activate tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. However, by interacting directly with CD28 on live (nonapoptotic) tumor plasma cells, bone marrow mDCs downregulate the expression of proteasome subunits in these cells, thus enabling their evasion from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I–restricted CD8+ T-cell killing. These results suggest that DCs play a dual, but opposing, role in MM: for one, DCs activate CD8+ T cells against tumor plasma cells and, for the other, DCs protect tumor plasma cells from CD8+ T-cell killing. This information should be taken into account in designing immunotherapy approaches to enhance immune surveillance in MGUS and to break down immune tolerance in MM. PMID:26185130

  15. Targeting IL-17A in Multiple Myeloma: A Potential Novel Therapeutic Approach in Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Prabhala, Rao H.; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Rashid, Naim; Nigroiu, Andreea; Nanjappa, Puru; Pai, Christine; Lee, Saem; Prabhala, Nithya S.; Bandi, Rajya Lakshmi; Smith, Robert; Lazo-Kallanian, Suzan B.; Valet, Sonia; Raje, Noopur; Gold, Jason S.; Richardson, Paul G.; Daley, John F.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Ettenberg, Seth A.; Di Padova, Franco; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that interleukin-17A (IL-17) producing Th17 cells are significantly elevated in blood and bone marrow (BM) in multiple myeloma (MM) and IL-17A promotes MM cell growth via the expression of IL-17 receptor. In this study, we evaluated anti-human IL-17A human monoclonal antibody (mAb), AIN457 in MM. We observe significant inhibition of MM cell growth by AIN457 both in the presence and absence of BM stromal cells (BMSC). While IL-17A induces IL-6 production, AIN457 significantly down-regulated IL-6 production and MM cell-adhesion in MM-BMSC co-culture. AIN-457 also significantly inhibited osteoclast cell–differentiation. More importantly, in the SCIDhu model of human myeloma administration of AIN-457 weekly for 4 weeks after the first detection of tumor in mice led to a significant inhibition of tumor growth and reduced bone damage compared to isotype control mice. To understand the mechanism of action of anti-IL-17A mAb, we report here, that MM cells express IL-17A. We also observed that IL-17A knock-down inhibited MM cell growth and their ability to induce IL-6 production in co-cultures with BMSC. These pre-clinical observations suggest efficacy of AIN 457 in myeloma and provide the rationale for its clinical evaluation for anti-myeloma effects and for improvement of bone disease. PMID:26293646

  16. Withaferin A Inhibits STAT3 and Induces Tumor Cell Death in Neuroblastoma and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yco, Lisette P; Mocz, Gabor; Opoku-Ansah, John; Bachmann, André S

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic transcription factor that has been implicated in many human cancers and has emerged as an ideal target for cancer therapy. Withaferin A (WFA) is a natural product with promising antiproliferative properties through its association with a number of molecular targets including STAT3. However, the effect of WFA in pediatric neuroblastoma (NB) and its interaction with STAT3 have not been reported. In this study, we found that WFA effectively induces dose-dependent cell death in high-risk and drug-resistant NB as well as multiple myeloma (MM) tumor cells, prevented interleukin-6 (IL-6)–mediated and persistently activated STAT3 phosphorylation at Y705, and blocked the transcriptional activity of STAT3. We further provide computational models that show that WFA binds STAT3 near the Y705 phospho-tyrosine residue of the STAT3 Src homology 2 (SH2) domain, suggesting that WFA prevents STAT3 dimer formation similar to BP-1-102, a well-established STAT3 inhibitor. Our findings propose that the antitumor activity of WFA is mediated at least in part through inhibition of STAT3 and provide a rationale for further drug development and clinical use in NB and MM. PMID:25452693

  17. Logic-Based and Cellular Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Bortezomib Responses in U266 Human Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, Vaishali L.; Ovacik, Meric A.; Abernethy, Darrell R.

    2015-01-01

    Systems models of biological networks show promise for informing drug target selection/qualification, identifying lead compounds and factors regulating disease progression, rationalizing combinatorial regimens, and explaining sources of intersubject variability and adverse drug reactions. However, most models of biological systems are qualitative and are not easily coupled with dynamical models of drug exposure-response relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, logic-based modeling of signal transduction pathways in U266 multiple myeloma (MM) cells is used to guide the development of a simple dynamical model linking bortezomib exposure to cellular outcomes. Bortezomib is a commonly used first-line agent in MM treatment; however, knowledge of the signal transduction pathways regulating bortezomib-mediated cell cytotoxicity is incomplete. A Boolean network model of 66 nodes was constructed that includes major survival and apoptotic pathways and was updated using responses to several chemical probes. Simulated responses to bortezomib were in good agreement with experimental data, and a reduction algorithm was used to identify key signaling proteins. Bortezomib-mediated apoptosis was not associated with suppression of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) protein inhibition in this cell line, which contradicts a major hypothesis of bortezomib pharmacodynamics. A pharmacodynamic model was developed that included three critical proteins (phospho-NFκB, BclxL, and cleaved poly (ADP ribose) polymerase). Model-fitted protein dynamics and cell proliferation profiles agreed with experimental data, and the model-predicted IC50 (3.5 nM) is comparable to the experimental value (1.5 nM). The cell-based pharmacodynamic model successfully links bortezomib exposure to MM cellular proliferation via protein dynamics, and this model may show utility in exploring bortezomib-based combination regimens. PMID:26163548

  18. Logic-Based and Cellular Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Bortezomib Responses in U266 Human Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Vaishali L; Ovacik, Meric A; Abernethy, Darrell R; Mager, Donald E

    2015-09-01

    Systems models of biological networks show promise for informing drug target selection/qualification, identifying lead compounds and factors regulating disease progression, rationalizing combinatorial regimens, and explaining sources of intersubject variability and adverse drug reactions. However, most models of biological systems are qualitative and are not easily coupled with dynamical models of drug exposure-response relationships. In this proof-of-concept study, logic-based modeling of signal transduction pathways in U266 multiple myeloma (MM) cells is used to guide the development of a simple dynamical model linking bortezomib exposure to cellular outcomes. Bortezomib is a commonly used first-line agent in MM treatment; however, knowledge of the signal transduction pathways regulating bortezomib-mediated cell cytotoxicity is incomplete. A Boolean network model of 66 nodes was constructed that includes major survival and apoptotic pathways and was updated using responses to several chemical probes. Simulated responses to bortezomib were in good agreement with experimental data, and a reduction algorithm was used to identify key signaling proteins. Bortezomib-mediated apoptosis was not associated with suppression of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) protein inhibition in this cell line, which contradicts a major hypothesis of bortezomib pharmacodynamics. A pharmacodynamic model was developed that included three critical proteins (phospho-NFκB, BclxL, and cleaved poly (ADP ribose) polymerase). Model-fitted protein dynamics and cell proliferation profiles agreed with experimental data, and the model-predicted IC50 (3.5 nM) is comparable to the experimental value (1.5 nM). The cell-based pharmacodynamic model successfully links bortezomib exposure to MM cellular proliferation via protein dynamics, and this model may show utility in exploring bortezomib-based combination regimens.

  19. Does an NKT-cell-based immunotherapeutic approach have a future in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Mérédis; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells constitute a unique subset of innate-like T lymphocytes which differ from conventional T cells by recognizing lipid antigens presented by the non-polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-like molecule CD1d. Despite being a relatively infrequent population of lymphocytes, NKT cells can respond rapidly upon activation with glycosphingolipids by production of cytokines which aim to polarize different axes of the immune system. Due to their dual effector capacities, NKT cells can play a vital role in cancer immunity, infection, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. It is believed that modulation of their activity towards immune activation can be a useful tool in anti-tumor immunotherapeutic strategies. Here we summarize the characteristics of NKT cells and discuss their involvement in immunosurveillance. Furthermore, an update is given about their role and the progress that has been made in the field of multiple myeloma (MM). Finally, some challenges are discussed that are currently hampering further progress. PMID:26895468

  20. Is there still a role for allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in multiple myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Bensinger, William I.

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in survival for multiple myeloma patients through autologous stem-cell transplantation (SCT) and the introduction of novel drugs, the disease remains incurable for all but a small fraction of patients. Only allogeneic SCT is potentially curative, due in part to a graft-versus-myeloma effect. High transplant-related mortality with allogeneic SCT is currently the major limitation to wider use of this potentially curative modality. Mortality can be reduced through the use of lower-intensity conditioning regimens which allow engraftment of allogeneic stem cells, but this comes at a cost of higher rates of disease progression and relapse. Promising studies to improve outcomes of allogeneic transplants include the use of more intensive non-myeloablative conditioning regimens, tandem transplants, peripheral blood cells, graft engineering to improve the graft-versus-myeloma activity while reducing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), post-transplant maintenance, and targeted conditioning therapies such as bone-seeking radioisotopes. PMID:18070719

  1. Dendritic cells generated from the blood of patients with multiple myeloma are phenotypically and functionally identical to those similarly produced from healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, S; Gooding, R P; Apperley, J F; Goldschmidt, H; Samson, D

    1997-09-01

    Using a combination of GM-CSF, SCF, flk-2/flt-3 ligand, and IL-4, dendritic cells (DC) have been generated in vitro from the adherent fraction of mononuclear cells isolated from the blood of patients with MM. Analysis of cell yield showed no significant difference in DC yield (numbers or percentage of leucocytes) or total number of leucocytes generated in myeloma cultures compared to similar cultures prepared using mononuclear cells from the blood of healthy donors. The mean number of DC produced after 10d of culture were 8.19 x 10(5) and 9.87 x 10(5) cells (41% and 51% of all leucocytes) for the myeloma and normal cultures respectively. Flow cytometry investigation of phenotypic markers including CD1a, HLA-DR, CD80 (BB1/B7.1) and CD86 (B70/B7.2), and functional status (stimulatory potential in allogeneic mixed leucocyte reactions (MLR)) confirmed the generation of cells phenotypically identified as cultured DC. In addition, these cells were more effective than PBMC at stimulating allogeneic PBMC proliferation. These data demonstrate no difference between DC generated from patients with MM and healthy donors. This study was considered a prerequisite for future investigations directed towards developing effective immunotherapies for myeloma.

  2. Multiple myeloma: managing a complex blood cancer.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Maura; Kelly, Mary; Meenaghan, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    This article gives a comprehensive overview of multiple myeloma (MM), a complex blood cancer involving overproduction of plasma cells. Although MM remains incurable, patients are living longer as a result of multiple treatment options. However, MM patients are also living with a higher symptom burden. The overall aims in managing MM are therefore to control disease progression, prolong survival and improve quality of life. PMID:27615537

  3. Cost analysis of a randomized stem cell mobilization study in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Varmavuo, Ville; Silvennoinen, Raija; Anttila, Pekka; Säily, Marjaana; Sankelo, Marja; Putkonen, Mervi; Ahonen, Jouni; Mahlamäki, Eija; Mäntymaa, Pentti; Savolainen, Eeva-Riitta; Remes, Kari; Jantunen, Esa

    2016-10-01

    Upfront autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard therapy for younger multiple myeloma (MM) patients. MM patients usually undergo stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide (CY) followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), or with G-CSF alone. A limited number of randomized studies are available comparing costs of different mobilization strategies. Eighty transplant-eligible patients aged up to 70 years with untreated MM were included in this prospective study. The patients were treated with RVD induction for three 21-day cycles and randomized 1:1 at inclusion into one of the two mobilization arms CY 2 g/m(2) + G-CSF [arm A] vs. G-CSF alone [arm B]. Plerixafor was given according to a specific algorithm if needed. Sixty-nine patients who received mobilization followed by blood graft collection were included in the cost analysis. The median total costs of the mobilization phase were significantly higher in arm A than in arm B (3855 € vs. 772 €, p ≤ 0.001). The cumulative median cost of the mobilization and collection phases was significantly lower in arm B than in arm A (8524 € vs. 11,622 €, p = 0.012). There was no significant difference between the arms in the total median costs of ASCT (n = 59) (34,997 € in arm A vs. 31,981 € in arm B, p = 0.118). Mobilization with G-CSF alone seems to be a preferable mobilization method for MM patients in terms of mobilization and apheresis costs. In addition, it requires less hospital resource utilization. PMID:27485453

  4. Immunoglobulin M myeloma: evaluation of molecular features and cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Kartik; Sahota, Surinder S; Babbage, Gavin; Tong, Alex W; Kumar, Padmasini; Newman, Joseph T; Stone, Marvin J

    2005-03-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) M myeloma is a distinct entity with features of multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). The malignant cells in IgM myeloma have a distinctive chromosomal translocation that differentiates them from WM. These cells are postgerminal-center in origin with isotype-switch transcripts. They appear to be arrested at a point of maturation between that of WM and MM. Preliminary data indicate that a pattern of osteoclast-activating factor and osteoprotegerin expression similar to that observed in classic MM is present in IgM myeloma. Additional studies on patients with this rare tumor may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of bone disease in plasma cell dyscrasias.

  5. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for slightly more than 10% of all hematologic cancers. In this paper, we present a historically focused review of the disease, from the description of the first case in 1844 to the present. The evolution of drug therapy and stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of myeloma, as well as the development of new agents, is discussed. We also provide an update on current concepts of diagnosis and therapy, with an emphasis on how treatments have emerged from a historical perspective after certain important discoveries and the results of experimental studies. PMID:18332230

  6. A Peculiar Molecular Profile of Umbilical Cord-Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Drives Their Inhibitory Effects on Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarella, Sabino; Caselli, Anna; Tamma, Antonella Valentina; Savonarola, Annalisa; Loverro, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Roberto; Tucci, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are under intensive investigation in preclinical models of cytotherapies against cancer, including multiple myeloma (MM). However, the therapeutic use of stromal progenitors holds critical safety concerns due to their potential MM-supporting activity in vivo. Here, we explored whether MSCs from sources other than BM, such as adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs), affect MM cell growth in comparison to either normal (nBM-MSCs) or myelomatous marrow MSCs (MM-BM-MSCs). Results from both proliferation and clonogenic assays indicated that, in contrast to nBM- and MM-BM-MSCs, both AD and particularly UC-MSCs significantly inhibit MM cell clonogenicity and growth in vitro. Furthermore, when co-injected with UC-MSCs into mice, RPMI-8226 MM cells formed smaller subcutaneous tumor masses, while peritumoral injections of the same MSC subtype significantly delayed the tumor burden growing in subcutaneous plasmocytoma-bearing mice. Finally, both microarrays and ELISA revealed different expression of several genes and soluble factors in UC-MSCs as compared with other MSCs. Our data suggest that UC-MSCs have a distinct molecular profile that correlates with their intrinsic anti-MM activity and emphasize the UCs as ideal sources of MSCs for future cell-based therapies against MM. PMID:25758779

  7. Recent advances in antimultiple myeloma drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nuozhou; Bartlow, Patrick; Ouyang, Qin; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is characterized by the aberrant proliferation of terminally differentiated plasma B cells with impairment in apoptosis capacity. Particularly, osteolytic bone diseases and renal failure resulting from hyperparaproteinemia and hypercalcemia have been the major serious sequelae that are inextricably linked with MM tumor progression. Despite the introduction of new treatment regimens, problematic neuropathy, thrombocytopenia, drug resistance and high MM relapse rates continue to plague the current therapies. New chemical agents are in development on the basis of understanding several signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms like tumor necrosis factor-α, proteasome, PI3K and MARKs. This review focuses on the most recent patents and clinical trials in the development of new medicine for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Furthermore, the important signaling pathways involved in the proliferation, survival and apoptosis of myeloma cells will be discussed. PMID:24998287

  8. Bleeding and thrombosis in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonio; Tufano, Antonella; Di Capua, Mirko; Franchini, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    A variety of disease- and treatment-related factors affect the coagulation system and the risk of bleeding and thrombotic complications in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and related plasma cell disorders (PCD). As commonly observed in other cancer settings, the malignant clone induces a cytokine environment responsible for a hypercoagulable state. The increase of blood viscosity and impairment of platelet and coagulation function due to circulating monoclonal proteins are considered key mechanisms in the hemostatic abnormalities frequently detected in patients with PCD. However, clinically significant bleeding is relatively rare and poorly correlated with these abnormalities. Management is often challenging because of the multifactorial pathogenesis and underestimation or misdiagnosis of acquired bleeding disorders, particularly acquired von Willebrand syndrome. In recent years, growing interest in thromboembolic risk has emerged after the introduction of novel and more effective antimyeloma agents (thalidomide and lenalidomide), which was associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism, particularly when associated with dexamethasone and multiagent chemotherapy in newly diagnosed patients. The clinical impact of bleeding and thrombotic complications in patients with PCD, with emphasis on MM, will be discussed in this review, reporting the current knowledge about pathophysiologic mechanisms and implications for management.

  9. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Katja C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q.; Song, Kevin W.; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Miguel, Jesus San

    2016-01-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  10. Downregulation of myeloma-induced ICOS-L and regulatory T cell generation by lenalidomide and dexamethasone therapy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gina B; Carter, Clive; Parrish, Christopher; Wood, Philip M; Cook, Gordon

    2015-09-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) produces significant cellular and humoral immune defects. We have previously reported that MM induces CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) cells (TRegs), via tumour expression of the immune checkpoint regulator, ICOS-L. We sought to define what impact the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide, alone or with dexamethasone, has on TReg cell generation. Lenalidomide pre-treatment of MM cell lines reduced TReg generation and the concomitant TReg:TEff (CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(-): effector T cells) ratio, as a consequence of reduced ICOSL transcription. Dexamethasone did not affect surface ICOS-L expression but did induce TReg cell apoptosis without impacting on TEff cell survival. Combined lenalidomide and dexamethasone significantly reduced both TReg induction and the TReg:TEff cell ratio. In vivo, serial analysis of the TReg:TEff ratio in MM patients on lenalidomide-dexamethasone therapy revealed a progressive reduction towards age-matched control values, though not complete correction. Our data demonstrate for the first time immune synergism to explain the observed immune-modulation associated with lenalidomide-dexamethasone therapy. PMID:26051632

  11. Survival of multiple myeloma patients aged 65-70 years in the era of novel agents and autologous stem cell transplantation. A multicenter retrospective collaborative study of the Japanese Society of Myeloma and the European Myeloma Network.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Shuji; Harada, Takeshi; Saitoh, Takayuki; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Itagaki, Mitsuhiro; Asaoku, Hideki; Kuroda, Yoshiaki; Chou, Takaaki; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Suzuki, Kenshi; Murakami, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Mina, Roberto; Palumbo, Antonio; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Novel agents such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and bortezomib have dramatically changed the treatment paradigm of multiple myeloma (MM). However, it is not clear whether these agents improve the prognosis of elderly patients who have undergone autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT). We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 318 newly diagnosed patients aged 65–70 years who were treated between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009. As initial therapy, 192 patients were treated with conventional chemotherapy,88 with novel agent-containing regimens, 21 with conventional chemotherapy plus auto-SCT and the remaining 17 with novel agents plus auto-SCT. The median progression-free survival was 19.1, 24.5, 26.8 and 35.2 months, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 40, 62, 63 and 87%, respectively. Initial therapy with novel agents (p < 0.001) or auto-SCT (p < 0.02) significantly improved OS compared with the group without these treatment modalities. Salvage therapy with novel agents also significantly improved survival after relapse compared with conventional chemotherapy alone (p < 0.04). In a multivariate analysis, the use of novel agents was an independent prognostic factor significantly associated with extended OS(p < 0.003). These results indicate that novel agents and auto-SCT had a major impact on OS in eligible patients in this subgroup of MM.

  12. Contribution of chemotherapy mobilization to disease control in multiple myeloma treated with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Geoffrey L.; Costa, Luciano J.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Huang, Jia-Xing; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Callander, Natalie S.; Cornell, Robert Frank; Perez, Miguel Angel Diaz; Dispenzieri, Angela; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Garfall, Alfred; Gertz, Morie A.; Gibson, John; Hamadani, Mehdi; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Krishnan, Amrita Y.; Kumar, Shaji K.; Kyle, Robert A.; Landau, Heather J.; Lee, Cindy H.; Maiolino, Angelo; Marks, David I.; Mark, Tomer M.; Munker, Reinhold; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Rodriguez, Tulio E.; Saad, Ayman A.; Savani, Bipin N.; Schiller, Gary J.; Schouten, Harry C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Scott, Emma; Seo, Sachiko; Sharma, Manish; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Tay, Jason; To, L. Bik; Vesole, David H.; Vogl, Dan T.; Wagner, John L.; Wirk, Baldeep; Wood, William A.; D’Souza, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple myeloma (MM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT), peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) may be collected following mobilization with growth factor alone (GF) or cytotoxic chemotherapy plus GF ( (CC+GF). It is uncertain whether the method of mobilization affects post-transplant outcomes. We compared these mobilization strategies in a retrospective analysis of 968 patients with MM from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database who received an auto-HCT in the US and Canada between 2007 and 2012. The kinetics of neutrophil engraftment (≥ 0.5 × 109/L) was similar between groups (13 vs. 13 days, P=0.69) while platelet engraftment (≥ 20 × 109/L) was slightly faster with CC+GF (19 vs. 18 days, P=0.006). Adjusted 3-years PFS was 43% (95% C.I. 38–48) in GF and 40% (95% C.I. 35–45) in CC+GF, P=0.33. Adjusted 3-years OS was 82% (95% C.I. 78–86) vs. 80% (95% C.I. 75–84), P=0.43 and adjusted 5-year OS was 62% (95C.I. 54–68) vs. 60% (95% C.I. 52–67), P=0.76, for GF and CC+GF respectively. We conclude that MM patients undergoing auto-HCT have similar outcomes irrespective of the method of mobilization and found no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to mobilization contributes to disease control. PMID:26301967

  13. Inhibition of P-Selectin and PSGL-1 Using Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Increases the Sensitivity of Multiple Myeloma Cells to Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; de la Puente, Pilar; Rollins, Scott; Alvarez, Richard; Kawar, Ziad; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy localized in the bone marrow. Despite the introduction of novel therapies majority of MM patients relapse. We have previously shown that inhibition of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) play a key role in proliferation of MM and using small-molecule inhibitors of P-selectin/PSGL-1 sensitized MM cells to therapy. However, these small-molecule inhibitors had low specificity to P-selectin and showed poor pharmacokinetics. Therefore, we tested blocking of P-selectin and PSGL-1 using functional monoclonal antibodies in order to sensitize MM cells to therapy. We have demonstrated that inhibiting the interaction between MM cells and endothelial and stromal cells decreased proliferation in MM cells and in parallel induced loose-adhesion to the primary tumor site to facilitate egress. At the same time, blocking this interaction in vivo led to MM cells retention in the circulation and delayed homing to the bone marrow, thus exposing MM cells to bortezomib which contributed to reduced tumor growth and better mice survival. This study provides a better understanding of the biology of P-selectin and PSGL-1 and their roles in dissemination and resensitization of MM to treatment. PMID:26539491

  14. Inhibition of P-Selectin and PSGL-1 Using Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Increases the Sensitivity of Multiple Myeloma Cells to Bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; de la Puente, Pilar; Rollins, Scott; Alvarez, Richard; Kawar, Ziad; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy localized in the bone marrow. Despite the introduction of novel therapies majority of MM patients relapse. We have previously shown that inhibition of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) play a key role in proliferation of MM and using small-molecule inhibitors of P-selectin/PSGL-1 sensitized MM cells to therapy. However, these small-molecule inhibitors had low specificity to P-selectin and showed poor pharmacokinetics. Therefore, we tested blocking of P-selectin and PSGL-1 using functional monoclonal antibodies in order to sensitize MM cells to therapy. We have demonstrated that inhibiting the interaction between MM cells and endothelial and stromal cells decreased proliferation in MM cells and in parallel induced loose-adhesion to the primary tumor site to facilitate egress. At the same time, blocking this interaction in vivo led to MM cells retention in the circulation and delayed homing to the bone marrow, thus exposing MM cells to bortezomib which contributed to reduced tumor growth and better mice survival. This study provides a better understanding of the biology of P-selectin and PSGL-1 and their roles in dissemination and resensitization of MM to treatment.

  15. TNFα Mediated IL-6 Secretion Is Regulated by JAK/STAT Pathway but Not by MEK Phosphorylation and AKT Phosphorylation in U266 Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chansu; Oh, Jeong-In; Park, Juwon; Choi, Jee-Hye; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jung, Woo June; Lee, Dong Soon; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    IL-6 and TNFα were significantly increased in the bone marrow aspirate samples of patients with active multiple myeloma (MM) compared to those of normal controls. Furthermore, MM patients with advanced aggressive disease had significantly higher levels of IL-6 and TNFα than those with MM in plateau phase. TNFα increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) production from MM cells. However, the detailed mechanisms involved in signaling pathways by which TNFα promotes IL-6 secretion from MM cells are largely unknown. In our study, we found that TNFα treatments induce MEK and AKT phosphorylation. TNFα-stimulated IL-6 production was abolished by inhibition of JAK2 and IKKβ or by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting TNF receptors (TNFR) but not by MEK, p38, and PI3K inhibitors. Also, TNFα increased phosphorylation of STAT3 (ser727) including c-Myc and cyclin D1. Three different types of JAK inhibitors decreased the activation of the previously mentioned pathways. In conclusion, blockage of JAK/STAT-mediated NF-κB activation was highly effective in controlling the growth of MM cells and, consequently, an inhibitor of TNFα-mediated IL-6 secretion would be a potential new therapeutic agent for patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:24151609

  16. Molecular aspects of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kastrinakis, N G; Gorgoulis, V G; Foukas, P G; Dimopoulos, M A; Kittas, C

    2000-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell neoplasm characterized by bone marrow infiltration with malignant plasma cells, which synthesize and secrete monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) fragments. Despite the considerable progress in the understanding of MM biology, the molecular basis of the disease remains elusive. The initial transformation is thought to occur in a postgerminal center B-lineage cell, carrying a somatically hypermutated Ig heavy chain (IGH) gene. This plasmablastic precursor cell colonizes the bone marrow, propagates clonally and differentiates into a slowly proliferating myeloma cell population, all under the influence of specific cell adhesion molecules and cytokines. Production of interleukin-6 by stromal cells, osteoblasts and, in some cases, neoplastic cells is an essential element of myeloma cell growth, with the cytokine stimulus being delivered intracellularly via the Jack-STAT and ras signaling pathways. While karyotypic changes have been identified in up to 50% of MM patients, recent molecular cytogenetic techniques have revealed chromosomal abnormalities in the vast majority of examined cases. Translocations mostly involve illegal switch rearrangements of the IGH locus with various partner genes (CCND1, FGFR3, c-maf). Such events have been assigned a critical role in MM development. Mutations in coding and regulatory regions, as well as aberrant expression patterns of several oncogenes (c-myc, ras) and tumor suppressor genes (p16, p15) have been reported. Key regulators of programmed cell death (BCL-2, Fas), tumor expansion (metalloproteinases) and drug responsiveness (topoisomerase II alpha) have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of this hematologic malignancy. A tumorigenic role for human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) was postulated recently, following the detection of viral sequences in bone marrow dendritic cells of MM patients. However, since several research groups were unable to confirm this observation, the role of HHV8 remains unclear

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 nuclear translocation regulates bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and mediates genomic instability in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Vanella, Luca; Conticello, Concetta; Romano, Alessandra; Saccone, Salvatore; Godos, Justyna; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow leading to bone destruction and bone marrow failure. Several molecular mechanisms underlie chemoresistance among which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could play a major role. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the impact of HO-1 in MM following bortezomib (BTZ) treatment and how HO-1 is implicated in the mechanisms of chemoresistance. MM cells were treated for 24h with BTZ (15 nM), a boronic acid dipeptide inhibitor of the 26S proteasome used in the treatment of patients with MM as first-line therapy. We evaluated cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, HO-1 expression and compartmentalization and cellular genetic instability. Results showed that BTZ significantly reduced cell viability in different MM cell lines and induced ER-stress and ROS formation. Concomitantly, we observed a significant overexpression of both HO-1 gene and protein levels. This effect was abolished by concomitant treatment with 4-phenybutirric acid, a molecular chaperone, which is known to reduce ER-stress. Surprisingly, inhibition of HO activity with SnMP (10μM) failed to increase BTZ sensitivity in MM cells whereas inhibition of HO-1 nuclear translocation by E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor, increased sensitivity to BTZ and decreased genetic instability as measured by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. In conclusion, our data suggest that BTZ sensitivity depends on HO-1 nuclear compartmentalization and not on its enzymatic activity and this finding may represent an important tool to overcome BTZ chemoresistance in MM patients. PMID:26930712

  18. Cyclin D type does not influence cell cycle response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation in multiple myeloma tumours.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean; Mann, David; Yong, Kwee

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by over-expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) or D2 (CCND2), which control G1 phase cell-cycle progression. Proteolytic degradation of CCND1 (but not CCND2), resulting in G1 arrest, is reported in non-MM cells post-DNA damage, affecting DNA repair and survival. We examined the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on D-cyclin levels and cell-cycle kinetics of MM cells, exploring differences based on D-cyclin expression. We showed that CCND1 is downregulated, whereas CCND2 is not, following IR. This did not lead to hypo-phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein or G1 arrest. Both CCND1- and CCND2-expressing MM cells arrested in S/G2/M, and did not differ in other cell-cycle proteins or sensitivity to IR. When treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor, both CCND1 and CCND2 MM cells arrested in G1 and therefore are subject to physiological regulation at this checkpoint. Immunoprecipitation showed that, despite CCND1 degradation following IR, sufficient protein remains bound to CDK4/6 to prevent G1 arrest. Aberrant expression of CCND1 driven from the IGH promoter in t(11;14) MM cells maintains progression through G1 to arrest in S/G2/M. Differential expression of D-cyclin does not appear to affect cell-cycle response to IR, and is unlikely to underlie differential sensitivity to DNA damage. PMID:27146121

  19. Antigen Presenting Cell-Mediated Expansion of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Yields Log-Scale Expansion of Natural Killer Cells with Anti-Myeloma Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Martin-Antonio, Beatriz; Yang, Hong; Ku, Stephanie; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Decker, William K.; Li, Sufang; Robinson, Simon N.; Sekine, Takuya; Parmar, Simrit; Gribben, John; Wang, Michael; Rezvani, Katy; Yvon, Eric; Najjar, Amer; Burks, Jared; Kaur, Indreshpal; Champlin, Richard E.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of anti-tumor immunity and are active against several hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a promising source of allogeneic NK cells but large scale ex vivo expansion is required for generation of clinically relevant CB-derived NK (CB-NK) cell doses. Here we describe a novel strategy for expanding NK cells from cryopreserved CB units using artificial antigen presenting feeder cells (aAPC) in a gas permeable culture system. After 14 days, mean fold expansion of CB-NK cells was 1848-fold from fresh and 2389-fold from cryopreserved CB with >95% purity for NK cells (CD56+/CD3−) and less than 1% CD3+ cells. Though surface expression of some cytotoxicity receptors was decreased, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells exhibited a phenotype similar to CB-NK cells expanded with IL-2 alone with respect to various inhibitory receptors, NKG2C and CD94 and maintained strong expression of transcription factors Eomesodermin and T-bet. Furthermore, CB-NK cells formed functional immune synapses with and demonstrated cytotoxicity against various MM targets. Finally, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells showed significant in vivo activity against MM in a xenogenic mouse model. Our findings introduce a clinically applicable strategy for the generation of highly functional CB-NK cells which can be used to eradicate MM. PMID:24204673

  20. The effects of cannabidiol and its synergism with bortezomib in multiple myeloma cell lines. A role for transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Offidani, Massimo; Alesiani, Francesco; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Liberati, Sonia; Olivieri, Attilio; Santoni, Matteo; Santoni, Giorgio; Leoni, Pietro; Nabissi, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell (PC) malignancy characterised by the accumulation of a monoclonal PC population in the bone marrow (BM). Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid with antitumoural activities, and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2 (TRPV2) channel has been reported as a potential CBD receptor. TRPV2 activation by CBD decreases proliferation and increases susceptibility to drug-induced cell death in human cancer cells. However, no functional role has been ascribed to CBD and TRPV2 in MM. In this study, we identified the presence of heterogeneous CD138+TRPV2+ and CD138+TRPV2- PC populations in MM patients, whereas only the CD138+ TRPV2- population was present in RPMI8226 and U266 MM cell lines. Because bortezomib (BORT) is commonly used in MM treatment, we investigated the effects of CBD and BORT in CD138+TRPV2- MM cells and in MM cell lines transfected with TRPV2 (CD138+TRPV2+). These results showed that CBD by itself or in synergy with BORT strongly inhibited growth, arrested cell cycle progression and induced MM cells death by regulating the ERK, AKT and NF-κB pathways with major effects in TRPV2+ cells. These data provide a rationale for using CBD to increase the activity of proteasome inhibitors in MM.

  1. SAR650984 directly induces multiple myeloma cell death via lysosomal-associated and apoptotic pathways, which is further enhanced by pomalidomide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Acharya, C; An, G; Zhong, M; Feng, X; Wang, L; Dasilva, N; Song, Z; Yang, G; Adrian, F; Qiu, L; Richardson, P; Munshi, N C; Tai, Y-T; Anderson, K C

    2016-02-01

    The anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody SAR650984 (SAR) is showing promising clinical activity in treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Besides effector-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, we here define molecular mechanisms of SAR-directed MM cell death and enhanced anti-MM activity triggered by SAR with Pomalidomide (Pom). Without Fc-cross-linking agents or effector cells, SAR specifically induces homotypic aggregation (HA)-associated cell death in MM cells dependent on the level of cell surface CD38 expression, actin cytoskeleton and membrane lipid raft. SAR and its F(ab)'2 fragments trigger caspase 3/7-dependent apoptosis in MM cells highly expressing CD38, even with p53 mutation. Importantly, SAR specifically induces lysosome-dependent cell death (LCD) by enlarging lysosomes and increasing lysosomal membrane permeabilization associated with leakage of cathepsin B and LAMP-1, regardless of the presence of interleukin-6 or bone marrow stromal cells. Conversely, the lysosomal vacuolar H+-ATPase inhibitor blocks SAR-induced LCD. SAR further upregulates reactive oxygen species. Pom enhances SAR-induced direct and indirect killing even in MM cells resistant to Pom/Len. Taken together, SAR is the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody mediating direct cytotoxicity against MM cells via multiple mechanisms of action. Our data show that Pom augments both direct and effector cell-mediated MM cytotoxicity of SAR, providing the framework for combination clinical trials. PMID:26338273

  2. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes. PMID:27067049

  3. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  4. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  5. Cell-cell contact between marrow stromal cells and myeloma cells via VCAM-1 and alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin enhances production of osteoclast-stimulating activity.

    PubMed

    Michigami, T; Shimizu, N; Williams, P J; Niewolna, M; Dallas, S L; Mundy, G R; Yoneda, T

    2000-09-01

    Myeloma is a unique hematologic malignancy that exclusively homes in the bone marrow and induces massive osteoclastic bone destruction presumably by producing cytokines that promote the differentiation of the hematopoietic progenitors to osteoclasts (osteoclastogenesis). It is recognized that neighboring bone marrow stromal cells influence the expression of the malignant phenotype in myeloma cells. This study examined the role of the interactions between myeloma cells and neighboring stromal cells in the production of osteoclastogenic factors to elucidate the mechanism underlying extensive osteoclastic bone destruction. A murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1, which causes severe osteolysis, expresses alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin and tightly adheres to the mouse marrow stromal cell line ST2, which expresses the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), a ligand for alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with primary bone marrow cells generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Co-cultures of 5TGM1 with ST2 showed increased production of bone-resorbing activity and neutralizing antibodies against VCAM-1 or alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin inhibited this. The 5TGM1 cells contacting recombinant VCAM-1 produced increased osteoclastogenic and bone-resorbing activity. The activity was not blocked by the neutralizing antibody to known osteoclastogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor, or parathyroid hormone-related peptide. These data suggest that myeloma cells are responsible for producing osteoclastogenic activity and that establishment of direct contact with marrow stromal cells via alpha(4)beta(1)-integrin/VCAM-1 increases the production of this activity by myeloma cells. They also suggest that the presence of stromal cells may provide a microenvironment that allows exclusive colonization of myeloma cells in the bone marrow. (Blood. 2000;96:1953-1960) PMID:10961900

  6. Smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic precursor stage of multiple myeloma (MM) characterized by clonal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) ≥ 10% and/or M protein level ≥ 30 g/L in the absence of end organ damage. It represents an intermediate stage between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and symptomatic MM. The risk of progression to symptomatic MM is not uniform, and several parameters have been reported to predict the risk of progression. These include the level of M protein and the percentage of BMPC, the proportion of immunophenotypically aberrant plasma cells, and the presence of immunoparesis, free light-chain (FLC) ratio, peripheral blood plasma cells (PBPC), pattern of serum M protein evolution, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytogenetic abnormalities, IgA isotype, and Bence Jones proteinuria. So far treatment is still not recommended for SMM, because several trials suggested that patients with SMM do not benefit from early treatment. However, the Mateos et al. trial showed a survival benefit after early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with high-risk SMM. This trial has prompted a reevaluation of early treatment in an asymptomatic patient population. PMID:26000300

  7. Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic precursor stage of multiple myeloma (MM) characterized by clonal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) ≥ 10% and/or M protein level ≥ 30 g/L in the absence of end organ damage. It represents an intermediate stage between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and symptomatic MM. The risk of progression to symptomatic MM is not uniform, and several parameters have been reported to predict the risk of progression. These include the level of M protein and the percentage of BMPC, the proportion of immunophenotypically aberrant plasma cells, and the presence of immunoparesis, free light-chain (FLC) ratio, peripheral blood plasma cells (PBPC), pattern of serum M protein evolution, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytogenetic abnormalities, IgA isotype, and Bence Jones proteinuria. So far treatment is still not recommended for SMM, because several trials suggested that patients with SMM do not benefit from early treatment. However, the Mateos et al. trial showed a survival benefit after early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with high-risk SMM. This trial has prompted a reevaluation of early treatment in an asymptomatic patient population. PMID:26000300

  8. Poor ex vivo induction of T-cell responses to idiotype or tumor cell lysate-pulsed autologous dendritic cells in advanced pre-treated multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Garderet, Laurent; Mazurier, Christelle; Pellat-Deceunynck, Catherine; Karim, Abdul; Baudin, Bruno; Funck-Brentano, Christian; Bouchet, Sandrine; Geffroy, Alexandrine; Bataille, Régis; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Lopez, Manuel

    2006-07-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using dendritic cells (DCs) to generate, ex vivo, anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in patients with stage III multiple myeloma (MM). Nucleated cells from eight patients who had received chemotherapy (three of whom had undergone autologous hemopoeitic stem cell transplantation) were collected by apheresis. Their monocytes were enriched using counter-current centrifugation, differentiated into DCs which were further co-cultured with autologous CD8 lymphocytes to induce CTL. The DCs were pulsed either with the idiotypic paraprotein (regarded as a tumor-specific antigen) or with autologous MM cell lysate before co-culture. Specific T-cell responses were measured in IFNgamma enzyme-linked immunospot and chromium release assays of autologous plasmocyte targets. A slight increase in IFNgamma secretion by T-cells was observed for two patients (DCs pulsed with idiotypic paraprotein for one, MM cell lysate for the other). No or weak specific lysis of plasmocyte targets was observed in the chromium release assays. In conclusion, the T-cell response to pulsed DCs was very weak or absent. There are clinical and technical reasons that could explain, in part, this lack of response.

  9. Ex Vivo Maintenance of Primary Human Multiple Myeloma Cells through the Optimization of the Osteoblastic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenting; Gu, Yexin; Sun, Qiaoling; Siegel, David S.; Tolias, Peter; Yang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported a new approach for culturing difficult-to-preserve primary patient-derived multiple myeloma cells (MMC) using an osteoblast (OSB)-derived 3D tissue scaffold constructed in a perfused microfluidic environment and a culture medium supplemented with patient plasma. In the current study, we used this biomimetic model to show, for the first time, that the long-term survival of OSB is the most critical factor in maintaining the ex vivo viability and proliferative capacity of MMC. We found that the adhesion and retention of MMC to the tissue scaffold was meditated by osteoblastic N-cadherin, as one of potential mechanisms that regulate MMC-OSB interactions. However, in the presence of MMC and patient plasma, the viability and osteogenic activity of OSB became gradually compromised, and consequently MMC could not remain viable over 3 weeks. We demonstrated that the long-term survival of both OSB and MMC could be enhanced by: (1) optimizing perfusion flow rate and patient-derived plasma composition in the culture medium and (2) replenishing OSB during culture as a practical means of prolonging MMC’s viability beyond several weeks. These findings were obtained using a high-throughput well plate-based perfusion device from the perspective of optimizing the ex vivo preservation of patient-derived MM biospecimens for downstream use in biological studies and chemosensitivity analyses. PMID:25973790

  10. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  11. Systemic therapy of myeloma xenografts by an attenuated measles virus.

    PubMed

    Peng, K W; Ahmann, G J; Pham, L; Greipp, P R; Cattaneo, R; Russell, S J

    2001-10-01

    Conditionally replicating viruses are promising agents for the treatment of malignancy. Here it is shown that the live attenuated Edmonston-B vaccine strain of measles virus (MV-Edm) replicates selectively in human myeloma cells and has potent antitumor activity. In vitro, replication of MV-Edm was restricted in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) but proceeded efficiently in a panel of 6 myeloma cell lines-ARH-77, RPMI 8226, JJN-3, MM1, KAS-6/1, and KMS-11-and in primary myeloma cells isolated by CD138 sorting from the bone marrow aspirates of 6 patients. MV-Edm infection induced potent cytopathic effects in these myeloma cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleated syncytia that eventually became nonviable. In contrast, syncytial formation in PHA-stimulated PBLs was minimal after MV-Edm infection. In vivo, MV-Edm was antitumorigenic and inhibited the establishment of myeloma cells as xenografts in immunocompromised mice. When injected directly into ARH-77 myeloma xenografts in the mice, MV-Edm caused complete regression of these xenografts. MV-Edm administered intravenously into the tail veins of mice also showed significant antineoplastic activity against established RPMI 8226 and ARH-77 xenografts. In particular, the ARH-77 myeloma xenografts were exquisitely sensitive to MV-Edm therapy, and tumors in all mice regressed completely. In light of its selectivity for myeloma cells and its potent antineoplastic activity against myeloma xenografts in vivo, MV-Edm merits further development for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

  12. Clonal evolution of myeloma cells leads to quantitative changes in immunoglobulin secretion and surface antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Leibson, P J; Loken, M R; Panem, S; Schreiber, H

    1979-01-01

    We report that a cloned population of tumor cells can rapidly produce variants that differ in their quantitative expression of surface proteins and in their rate of immunoglobulin secretion. A fresh clonal isolate of S107 myeloma cells possessing large amounts of surface IgA was continuously passaged in vitro for 2 years. During this period, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicated the development of subpopulations possessing decreased amounts of surface IgA. Cells from these variant subpopulations were isolated by first using the cell sorter to enrich for cells with decreased amounts of surface IgA and then cloning the selected population in soft agar. The 50 sublines that were isolated showed heritable differences in their levels of surface IgA and H-2 antigens and in their rates of myeloma protein secretion. Sublines having either large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of surface IgA also had corresponding large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of myeloma protein secretion. In contrast, a decrease or loss of surface Ig did not correlate with a decrease or loss of viral envelope glycoprotein gp71 and H-2 antigens. The variants did not resemble the phenotypes of less-differentiated normal lymphocyte populations of the B-cell lineage. The isolation and characterization of these variants allows us to explore the mechanisms and pathways of tumor cell differentiation as well as to study the regulation and function of cell surface proteins. PMID:288078

  13. The antigenic landscape of multiple myeloma: mass spectrometry (re)defines targets for T-cell–based immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Simon; Kowalewski, Daniel Johannes; Schuster, Heiko; Weisel, Katja; Backert, Linus; Kahn, Stefan; Nelde, Annika; Stroh, Tatjana; Handel, Martin; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Direct analysis of HLA-presented antigens by mass spectrometry provides a comprehensive view on the antigenic landscape of different tissues/malignancies and enables the identification of novel, pathophysiologically relevant T-cell epitopes. Here, we present a systematic and comparative study of the HLA class I and II presented, nonmutant antigenome of multiple myeloma (MM). Quantification of HLA surface expression revealed elevated HLA molecule counts on malignant plasma cells compared with normal B cells, excluding relevant HLA downregulation in MM. Analyzing the presentation of established myeloma-associated T-cell antigens on the HLA ligandome level, we found a substantial proportion of antigens to be only infrequently presented on primary myelomas or to display suboptimal degrees of myeloma specificity. However, unsupervised analysis of our extensive HLA ligand data set delineated a panel of 58 highly specific myeloma-associated antigens (including multiple myeloma SET domain containing protein) which are characterized by frequent and exclusive presentation on myeloma samples. Functional characterization of these target antigens revealed peptide-specific, preexisting CD8+ T-cell responses exclusively in myeloma patients, which is indicative of pathophysiological relevance. Furthermore, in vitro priming experiments revealed that peptide-specific T-cell responses can be induced in response-naive myeloma patients. Together, our results serve to guide antigen selection for T-cell–based immunotherapy of MM. PMID:26138685

  14. Geranylgeranyl transferase type II inhibition prevents myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Michelle A; Coulton, Les; Ebetino, Frank H; Vanderkerken, Karin; Croucher, Peter I

    2008-12-12

    Geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGTase II) is an enzyme that plays a key role in the isoprenylation of proteins. 3-PEHPC, a novel GGTase II inhibitor, blocks bone resorption and induces myeloma cell apoptosis in vitro. Its effect on bone resorption and tumor growth in vivo is unknown. We investigated the effect of 3-PEHPC on tumor burden and bone disease in the 5T2MM model of multiple myeloma in vivo. 3-PEHPC significantly reduced osteoclast numbers and osteoclast surface. 3-PEHPC prevented the bone loss and the development of osteolytic bone lesions induced by 5T2MM myeloma cells. Treatment with 3-PEHPC also significantly reduced myeloma burden in bone. The magnitude of response was similar to that seen with the bisphosphonate, risedronate. These data show that targeting GGTase II with 3-PEHPC can prevent osteolytic bone disease and reduce tumor burden in vivo, and represents a novel approach to treating tumors that grow in bone.

  15. Smoldering multiple myeloma: present position and potential promises.

    PubMed

    Tageja, Nishant; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Mailankody, Sham; Bhutani, Manisha; Roschewski, Mark; Landgren, Ola

    2014-01-01

    Since smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was first described over three decades ago based on a case series of six patients, its definition and our understanding of the entity have evolved considerably. The risk of progression to symptomatic myeloma (MM) varies greatly among individuals diagnosed with myeloma precursor disease. Epidemiologic, molecular, flow cytometric and radiological techniques have demonstrated that this transformation to MM from precursor states is not sudden but rather a continuous overlapping series of events with evidence of end-organ damage that could manifest in the earliest stages of disease. Contemporary antimyeloma therapies can yield rapid, deep, and durable responses with manageable toxicities, and molecular-cell-based measures are now available to rule out minimal residual disease. With this information, clinical studies with correlative measures can now be developed to test the fundamental hypothesis that intervention in early myeloma may provide a measurable clinical benefit to patients by either delaying progression or eradicating plasma cell clones. PMID:24112232

  16. Lung Involvement in Multiple Myeloma - Case Study

    PubMed Central

    NIŢU, MIMI; CRIȘAN, EMILIA; OLTEANU, M.; CĂLĂRAŞU, CRISTINA; OLTEANU, MĂDĂLINA; POPESCU, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mutiple mieloma (MM) cells are rarely found in extramedullary sites. The sites of extramedullary dissemination reported in the literature are spleen, liver, lymph nodes, kidneys, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, ovary, tests, lung, pleura, pericardium, intestinal tract and skin. We report a case in which the myeloma was diagnosed after we discovered the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). Matherial and method: a case in which diagnosis was established from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid demonstrating the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in Craiova Pneumology Departament. Results: Analysis of BAL fluid for the presence of plasma cells and for cytoplasmic immunoglobulin DNA provides a noninvasive means of establishing the diagnosis. Conclusions: Pulmonary parenchyma is an uncommon site of extramedullary involvement in multiple myeloma. Interstitial lung disease as pulmonary manifestation of multiple myeloma is even rarer; only isolated cases with histological proofs have been reported in the literature. PMID:26788357

  17. A Multiepitope of XBP1, CD138 and CS1 Peptides Induces Myeloma-Specific Cytotoxic T lymphocytes in T cells of Smoldering Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jooeun; Prabhala, Rao; Voskertchian, Annie; Brown, Andrew; Maguire, Craig; Richardson, Paul; Dranoff, Glen; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Munshi, Nikhil C.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a cocktail of HLA-A2-specific peptides including heteroclitic XBP1 US184-192 (YISPWILAV), heteroclitic XBP1 SP367-375 (YLFPQLISV), native CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) and native CS1239-247 (SLFVLGLFL), for their ability to elicit multipeptide specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MP-CTL) using T cells from smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) patients. Our results demonstrate that MP-CTL generated from SMM patients’ T cells show effective anti-MM responses including CD137 (4-1BB) upregulation, CTL proliferation, IFN-γ production, and degranulation (CD107a) in an HLA-A2-restricted and peptide-specific manner. Phenotypically, we observed increased total CD3+CD8+ T cells (>80%) and cellular activation (CD69+) within the memory SMM MP-CTL (CD45RO+/CD3+CD8+) subset after repeated multipeptide stimulation. Importantly, SMM patients could be categorized into distinct groups by their level of MP-CTL expansion and anti-tumor activity. In high responders, the effector memory (CCR7-CD45RO+/CD3+CD8+) T cell subset was enriched, while the remaining responders’ CTL contained a higher frequency of the terminal effector (CCR7-CD45RO-/CD3+CD8+) subset. These results suggest that this multipeptide cocktail has the potential to induce effective and durable memory MP-CTL in SMM patients. Therefore, our findings provide the rationale for clinical evaluation of a therapeutic vaccine to prevent or delay progression of SMM to active disease. PMID:24935722

  18. A multiepitope of XBP1, CD138 and CS1 peptides induces myeloma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in T cells of smoldering myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, J; Prabhala, R; Voskertchian, A; Brown, A; Maguire, C; Richardson, P; Dranoff, G; Anderson, K C; Munshi, N C

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a cocktail of HLA-A2-specific peptides including heteroclitic XBP1 US184-192 (YISPWILAV), heteroclitic XBP1 SP367-375 (YLFPQLISV), native CD138260-268 (GLVGLIFAV) and native CS1239-247 (SLFVLGLFL), for their ability to elicit multipeptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MP-CTLs) using T cells from smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) patients. Our results demonstrate that MP-CTLs generated from SMM patients' T cells show effective anti-MM responses including CD137 (4-1BB) upregulation, CTL proliferation, interferon-γ production and degranulation (CD107a) in an HLA-A2-restricted and peptide-specific manner. Phenotypically, we observed increased total CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells (>80%) and cellular activation (CD69(+)) within the memory SMM MP-CTL (CD45RO(+)/CD3(+)CD8(+)) subset after repeated multipeptide stimulation. Importantly, SMM patients could be categorized into distinct groups by their level of MP-CTL expansion and antitumor activity. In high responders, the effector memory (CCR7(-)CD45RO(+)/CD3(+)CD8(+)) T-cell subset was enriched, whereas the remaining responders' CTL contained a higher frequency of the terminal effector (CCR7(-)CD45RO(-)/CD3(+)CD8(+)) subset. These results suggest that this multipeptide cocktail has the potential to induce effective and durable memory MP-CTL in SMM patients. Therefore, our findings provide the rationale for clinical evaluation of a therapeutic vaccine to prevent or delay progression of SMM to active disease. PMID:24935722

  19. Ex vivo evaluation of the effect of regulatory T cells on the anti-tumor activity of bortezomib in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ercetin, Ayse Pinar; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Aktas, Safiye; Yuksel, Faize; Solmaz, Serife Medeni; Sevindik, Gokmen Omur; Katgi, Abdullah; Piskin, Ozden; Undar, Bulent

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic cancer characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells and their precursors. Immunosuppressive CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are increased in the peripheral blood of patients with MM. On the basis of this finding, we sought to evaluate the ex vivo effect of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells on the anti-tumor effect of the proteosome inhibitor bortezomib on MM cells. We collected peripheral blood and bone marrow aspiration samples from 20 patients with newly diagnosed MM and isolated CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The bone marrow mononuclear cells were cultivated in RPMI at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 72 hours. The LD50 doses of bortezomib, isolated Treg cells, and their combination were added. After 24 hours, the viability of CD138+ myeloma cells was evaluated by WST-1. We compared the anti-tumor effect of bortezomib alone and in combination with Treg expansion and statistically analyzed the measured differences with respect to the clinical parameters of the patients. Treg cells had varied effects on bortezomib, increasing, decreasing, or not changing its anti-tumor effect. The increased in vitro anti-tumor effect of bortezomib after Treg cell expansion was correlated in patients who did not develop bortezomib resistance in vivo (p = 0.022). These patients with in vivo non-bortezomib-resistant MM also responded to Treg expansion with decreased cell viability (p = 0.024). Our data indicate that the ex vivo expansion of Treg cells increased the cytotoxic effect of bortezomib in clinically sensitive cases.

  20. RITA (Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis) is efficient against TP53abnormal myeloma cells independently of the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the p53-reactivating drugs RITA and nutlin3a in killing myeloma cells. Methods A large cohort of myeloma cell lines (n = 32) and primary cells (n = 21) was used for this study. This cohort contained cell lines with various TP53 statuses and primary cells with various incidences of deletion of chromosome 17. Apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry with Apo2.7 staining of the cell lines or via the loss of the myeloma-specific marker CD138 in primary cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed by the appearance of a subG1 peak and the activation of caspases 3 and 9. Activation of the p53 pathway was monitored using immunoblotting via the expression of the p53 target genes p21, Noxa, Bax and DR5. The involvement of p53 was further studied in 4 different p53-silenced cell lines. Results Both drugs induced the apoptosis of myeloma cells. The apoptosis that was induced by RITA was not related to the TP53 status of the cell lines or the del17p status of the primary samples (p = 0.52 and p = 0.80, respectively), and RITA did not commonly increase the expression level of p53 or p53 targets (Noxa, p21, Bax or DR5) in sensitive cells. Moreover, silencing of p53 in two TP53mutated cell lines failed to inhibit apoptosis that was induced by RITA, which confirmed that RITA-induced apoptosis in myeloma cells was p53 independent. In contrast, apoptosis induced by nutlin3a was directly linked to the TP53 status of the cell lines and primary samples (p < 0.001 and p = 0.034, respectively) and nutlin3a increased the level of p53 and p53 targets in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, we showed that a nutlin3a-induced DR5 increase (≥1.2-fold increase) was a specific and sensitive marker (p < 0.001) for a weak incidence of 17p deletion within the samples (≤19%). Conclusion These data show that RITA, in contrast to nutlin3a, effectively induced apoptosis in a subset of MM cells independently of p53. The findings and could be

  1. Extinction of expression of the translocated myc gene in somatic cell hybrids between mouse myeloma and L-cells.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, A; Hijazzi, M; Sharir, H; Cohen, L; Bergman, Y; Ber, R; Laskov, R

    1989-01-15

    Most murine plasma-cell tumors show a t(12;15) reciprocal chromosomal translocation which truncates the first exon of one of the myc gene alleles and fuses it to one of the switch regions of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain locus. This results in constitutive activation of the translocated myc gene and the production of smaller-sized mRNA molecules, which are initiated at new sites in the first myc intron. The normal myc allele is not expressed in these myeloma cells. We have studied the expression of the translocated myc gene in somatic cell hybrids between mouse myeloma and L-cells. Our previous findings show that Ig gene expression is extinguished in such hybrids. In the present work we found that the hybrids contain the normal and translocated myc genes. In contrast to the myeloma parental cells which express the translocated myc gene, the hybrids are similar to the L-cells in expressing only the normal myc allele. Our results suggest that the L-cell, fibroblast-like phenotype, is dominant in these hybrids, and show that the translocated myc gene is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in the context of the myeloma cell, and is not expressed when subjected to a fibroblast-like cellular environment.

  2. Blood Erythrocyte Concentrations of Cadmium and Lead and the Risk of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Miquel; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Palli, Domenico; Johansson, Ann-Sofie; Botsivali, Maria; Vineis, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are hypothesised to be risk factors for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), a group of haematological malignancies with a suspected environmental aetiology. Within the EnviroGenoMarkers study we utilised pre-diagnostic erythrocyte concentrations of Cd and Pb to determine whether exposure was associated with risk of B-cell NHL and multiple myeloma. Methods 194 incident cases of B-cell NHL and 76 cases of multiple myeloma diagnosed between 1990 and 2006 were identified from two existing cohorts; EPIC-Italy and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Cases were matched to healthy controls by centre, age, gender and date of blood collection. Cd and Pb were measured in blood samples provided at recruitment using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Logistic regression was applied to assess the association with risk. Analyses were stratified by cohort and gender and by subtype where possible. Results There was little evidence of an increased risk of B-cell NHL or multiple myeloma with exposure to Cd (B-cell NHL: OR 1.09 95%CI 0.61, 1.93, MM: OR 1.16 95% CI: 0.40, 3.40 ) or Pb (B-cell NHL: 0.93 95% CI 0.43, 2.02, multiple myeloma: OR 1.63 95%CI 0.45, 5.94) in the total population when comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of exposure. However, gender and cohort specific differences in results were observed. In females the risk of B-cell NHL was more than doubled in those with a body burden of Cd >1µg/L (OR 2.20 95%CI; 1.04, 4.65). Conclusions This nested case-control study does not support a consistent positive association between Cd or Pb and NHL, but there is some indication of a gender specific effect suggesting further research is warranted. PMID:24312375

  3. The prognostic significance of CD45 expression by clonal bone marrow plasma cells in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Wilson I; Timm, Michael M; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Morice, William G; Dispenzieri, Angela; Buadi, Francis K; Lacy, Martha Q; Dingli, David; Leung, Nelson; Kapoor, Prashant; Kyle, Robert A; Gertz, Morie A; Kumar, Shaji K

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation of clonal plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients reveals two distinct clonal PC populations based on the presence or absence of CD45 expression. We explored the prognostic significance of CD45 expression by clonal PCs in the BM of MM patients in the era of novel agent therapy. All 156 MM patients seen at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester from 2009 to 2011 who had their BM evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry were included. Patients whose BM had ≥20% of the clonal PCs expressing CD45 were classified as CD45 positive (+) and the rest as CD45 negative (-). Of these patients, the median overall survival (OS) for patients in the CD45 (+) group (n=43, 28%) was 38 months versus not reached for the CD45 (-) group (n=113, 72%) (P=0.009). In a multivariable analysis, CD45 (+) status was an independent predictor of inferior OS among newly diagnosed patients with MM. CD45 expression may be a surrogate for a more aggressive phenotype of MM and warrants further investigation.

  4. Hepatitis B virus reactivation in patients with multiple myeloma receiving bortezomib-containing regimens followed by autologous stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Huang, Beihui; Li, Ying; Zheng, Dong; Zhou, Zhenhai; Liu, Junru

    2015-06-01

    To investigate hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation and survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) receiving bortezomib-containing regimens, we analyzed 139 patients with MM receiving bortezomib-containing regimens in our hospital. Twenty-seven/139 patients were hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg+) with nine having DNA levels > 500 IU/mL, including four > 1000 IU/mL. All but five HBsAg+ patients were treated with lamivudine or entecavir before chemotherapy until at least 6 months after chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). HBV reactivation occurred in six HBsAg+ patients and two HBsAg- patients, including six who received ASCT. Overall survival and progression-free survival of HBsAg- patients were significantly longer than for HBsAg+ patients (both p < 0.01). From these results, we confirmed that the incidence of HBV reactivation was notable in patients with MM receiving bortezomib-containing regimens, especially those who underwent ASCT. HBsAg+ patients with MM had a poorer prognosis than HBsAg- patients. Prophylactic treatment should be prescribed to all patients with HBsAg+ MM for a minimum duration of 12 months.

  5. Myeloma (multiple)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Multiple myeloma is the most common primary cancer of the bones in adults, representing about 1% of all cancers diagnosed in the US in 2004, and 14% of all haematological malignancies. In the UK, multiple myeloma accounts for 1% of all new cases of cancer diagnosed each year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment in people with asymptomatic early stage multiple myeloma (stage I)? What are the effects of first-line treatments in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? What are the effect of salvage treatments, or supportive therapy, in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2004 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: allogenic transplant (non-myeloablative), autologous stem cell transplant (early or late transplantation, double or single, purging of), bisphosphonates, bone marrow stem cells, bortezomib, chemotherapy (combination, conventional dose, intermediate dose plus stem cell rescue, high-dose plus stem cell rescue), combination chemotherapy plus corticosteroids, deferred treatment (in stage I disease), early chemotherapy plus corticosteroids (in stage I disease), epoetin alpha, first-line treatments, infection prophylaxis, interferon, maintenance therapy (in advanced multiple myeloma), melphalan (normal dose

  6. Heparanase-enhanced shedding of syndecan-1 by myeloma cells promotes endothelial invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Uyama, Toru; Kobayashi, Fumi; Yamada, Shuhei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Rapraeger, Alan C.

    2010-01-01

    Heparanase enhances shedding of syndecan-1 (CD138), and high levels of heparanase and shed syndecan-1 in the tumor microenvironment are associated with elevated angiogenesis and poor prognosis in myeloma and other cancers. To explore how the heparanase/syndecan-1 axis regulates angiogenesis, we used myeloma cells expressing either high or low levels of heparanase and examined their impact on endothelial cell invasion and angiogenesis. Medium conditioned by heparanase-high cells significantly stimulated endothelial invasion in vitro compared with medium from heparanase-low cells. The stimulatory activity was traced to elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and syndecan-1 in the medium. We discovered that the heparan sulfate chains of syndecan-1 captured VEGF and also attached the syndecan-1/VEGF complex to the extracellular matrix where it then stimulated endothelial invasion. In addition to its heparan sulfate chains, the core protein of syndecan-1 was also required because endothelial invasion was blocked by addition of synstatin, a peptide mimic of the integrin activating region present on the syndecan-1 core protein. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression in myeloma cells whereby elevated levels of VEGF and shed syndecan-1 form matrix-anchored complexes that together activate integrin and VEGF receptors on adjacent endothelial cells thereby stimulating tumor angiogenesis. PMID:20097882

  7. Molecular purging of multiple myeloma cells by ex-vivo culture and retroviral transduction of mobilized-blood CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Deola, Sara; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Birolo, Roberto Sciarretta; Cergnul, Massimiliano; Ficara, Francesca; Dando, Jonathan; Voena, Claudia; Vai, Sergio; Monari, Marta; Pogliani, Enrico; Corneo, Gianmarco; Peccatori, Jacopo; Selleri, Silvia; Bordignon, Claudio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Bregni, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Tumor cell contamination of the apheresis in multiple myeloma is likely to affect disease-free and overall survival after autografting. Objective To purge myeloma aphereses from tumor contaminants with a novel culture-based purging method. Methods We cultured myeloma-positive CD34+ PB samples in conditions that retained multipotency of hematopoietic stem cells, but were unfavourable to survival of plasma cells. Moreover, we exploited the resistance of myeloma plasma cells to retroviral transduction by targeting the hematopoietic CD34+ cell population with a retroviral vector carrying a selectable marker (the truncated form of the human receptor for nerve growth factor, ΔNGFR). We performed therefore a further myeloma purging step by selecting the transduced cells at the end of the culture. Results Overall recovery of CD34+ cells after culture was 128.5%; ΔNGFR transduction rate was 28.8% for CD34+ cells and 0% for CD138-selected primary myeloma cells, respectively. Recovery of CD34+ cells after ΔNGFR selection was 22.3%. By patient-specific Ig-gene rearrangements, we assessed a decrease of 0.7–1.4 logs in tumor load after the CD34+ cell selection, and up to 2.3 logs after culture and ΔNGFR selection. Conclusion We conclude that ex-vivo culture and retroviral-mediated transduction of myeloma leukaphereses provide an efficient tumor cell purging. PMID:17626627

  8. Marine compounds inhibit growth of multiple myeloma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Normann; Ribatti, Domenico; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Jöhrer, Karin; Kern, Johann; Marinaccio, Christian; Aracil, Miguel; García-Fernández, Luis F.; Gastl, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is still dismal despite recent improvements achieved by introducing new therapeutic agents. However, there remains an urgent need for progress in myeloma drug development. We here show that novel marine-derived compounds can exert potent anti-myeloma activity. Experimental Design Nine marine-derived compounds were applied at low nM concentrations (0.1-100 nM) to MM cell lines (OPM-2, NCI-H929, U266, RPMI-8226), to primary human myeloma cells and to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. In addition, eGFP-transgenic MM cell lines growing with mesenchymal cells from bone marrow were used to visualize tumors by fluorescence stereomicroscopy. Anti-myelomaactivities were studied in vitro in 3D spheroids and in vivo in myeloma xenografts on chicken embryos. Tumor size was analyzed by measuring GFP content with a GFP ELISA. Anti-angiogenic activities of compounds were tested in an in vivo gelatin sponge assay with conditioned media from primary bone marrow-derived endothelial cells. Results We identified a subset of marine compounds with strong anti-myeloma activity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, some of the compounds inhibited myeloma-related angiogenesis in the in vivo gelatin sponge assay. They merit further drug development to improve treatment options for MM. PMID:25860931

  9. Optimal selection of natural killer cells to kill myeloma: the role of HLA-E and NKG2A.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subhashis; van Gelder, Michel; Noort, Willy; Xu, Yunping; Rouschop, Kasper M A; Groen, Richard; Schouten, Harry C; Tilanus, Marcel G J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Martens, Anton C M; Bos, Gerard M J; Wieten, Lotte

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy with allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells offers therapeutic perspectives for multiple myeloma patients. Here, we aimed to refine NK cell therapy by evaluation of the relevance of HLA-class I and HLA-E for NK anti-myeloma reactivity. We show that HLA-class I was strongly expressed on the surface of patient-derived myeloma cells and on myeloma cell lines. HLA-E was highly expressed by primary myeloma cells but only marginally by cell lines. HLA-E(low) expression on U266 cells observed in vitro was strongly upregulated after in vivo (bone marrow) growth in RAG-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice, suggesting that in vitro HLA-E levels poorly predict the in vivo situation. Concurrent analysis of inhibitory receptors (KIR2DL1, KIR2DL2/3, KIR3DL1 and NKG2A) and NK cell degranulation upon co-culture with myeloma cells revealed that KIR-ligand-mismatched NK cells degranulate more than matched subsets and that HLA-E abrogates degranulation of NKG2A+ subsets. Inhibition by HLA-class I and HLA-E was also observed with IL-2-activated NK cells and at low oxygen levels (0.6 %) mimicking hypoxic bone marrow niches where myeloma cells preferentially reside. Our study demonstrates that NKG2A-negative, KIR-ligand-mismatched NK cells are the most potent subset for clinical application. We envision that infusion of high numbers of this subclass will enhance clinical efficacy.

  10. Immunomodulatory drugs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases and induce PU.1 up-regulation in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shinya; Amano, Masayuki; Nishimura, Nao; Ueno, Niina; Ueno, Shikiko; Yuki, Hiromichi; Fujiwara, Shiho; Wada, Naoko; Hirata, Shinya; Hata, Hiroyuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Okuno, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide are efficacious in the treatment of multiple myeloma and significantly prolong their survival. However, the mechanisms of such effects of IMiDs have not been fully elucidated. Recently, cereblon has been identified as a target binding protein of thalidomide. Lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cell lines often lose the expression of cereblon, suggesting that IMiDs act as an anti-myeloma agent through interacting with cereblon. Cereblon binds to damaged DNA-binding protein and functions as a ubiquitin ligase, inducing degradation of IKZF1 and IKZF3 that are essential transcription factors for B and T cell development. Degradation of both IKZF1 and IKZF3 reportedly suppresses myeloma cell growth. Here, we found that IMiDs act as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferases (DMNTs). We previously reported that PU.1, which is an ETS family transcription factor and essential for myeloid and lymphoid development, functions as a tumor suppressor in myeloma cells. PU.1 induces growth arrest and apoptosis of myeloma cell lines. In this study, we found that low-dose lenalidomide and pomalidomide up-regulate PU.1 expression through inducing demethylation of the PU.1 promoter. In addition, IMiDs inhibited DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b activities in vitro. Furthermore, lenalidomide and pomalidomide decreased the methylation status of the whole genome in myeloma cells. Collectively, IMiDs exert demethylation activity through inhibiting DNMT1, 3a, and 3b, and up-regulating PU.1 expression, which may be one of the mechanisms of the anti-myeloma activity of IMiDs.

  11. Apoptotic effects of non-edible parts of Punica granatum on human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiraz, Yağmur; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Rummun, Nawraj; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is of great concern since existing therapies are unable to cure this clinical condition. Alternative therapeutic approaches are mandatory, and the use of plant extracts is considered interesting. Punica granatum and its derived products were suggested as potential anticancer agents due to the presence of bioactive compounds. Thus, polypenolic-rich extracts of the non-edible parts of P. granatum were investigated for their antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on U266 multiple myeloma cells. We demonstrated that there were dose-dependent decreases in the proliferation of U266 cells in response to P. granatum extracts. Also, exposure to the extracts triggered apoptosis with significant increases in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U266 cells exposed to the leaves and stem extracts, while the flower extract resulted in slight increases in loss of MMP. These results were confirmed by Annexin-V analysis. These results documented the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of P. granatum extracts on human U266 multiple myeloma cells via disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing cell cycle arrest. The data suggest that the extracts can be envisaged in cancer chemoprevention and call for further exploration into the potential application of these plant parts.

  12. Bone marrow infiltration by multiple myeloma causes anemia by reversible disruption of erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bouchnita, Anass; Eymard, Nathalie; Moyo, Tamara K; Koury, Mark J; Volpert, Vitaly

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) infiltrates bone marrow and causes anemia by disrupting erythropoiesis, but the effects of marrow infiltration on anemia are difficult to quantify. Marrow biopsies of newly diagnosed MM patients were analyzed before and after four 28-day cycles of non-erythrotoxic remission induction chemotherapy. Complete blood cell counts and serum paraprotein concentrations were measured at diagnosis and before each chemotherapy cycle. At diagnosis, marrow area infiltrated by myeloma correlated negatively with hemoglobin, erythrocytes, and marrow erythroid cells. After successful chemotherapy, patients with less than 30% myeloma infiltration at diagnosis had no change in these parameters, whereas patients with more than 30% myeloma infiltration at diagnosis increased all three parameters. Clinical data were used to develop mathematical models of the effects of myeloma infiltration on the marrow niches of terminal erythropoiesis, the erythroblastic islands (EBIs). A hybrid discrete-continuous model of erythropoiesis based on EBI structure/function was extended to sections of marrow containing multiple EBIs. In the model, myeloma cells can kill erythroid cells by physically destroying EBIs and by producing proapoptotic cytokines. Following chemotherapy, changes in serum paraproteins as measures of myeloma cells and changes in erythrocyte numbers as measures of marrow erythroid cells allowed modeling of myeloma cell death and erythroid cell recovery, respectively. Simulations of marrow infiltration by myeloma and treatment with non-erythrotoxic chemotherapy demonstrate that myeloma-mediated destruction and subsequent reestablishment of EBIs and expansion of erythroid cell populations in EBIs following chemotherapy provide explanations for anemia development and its therapy-mediated recovery in MM patients.

  13. Bioactivity and prognostic significance of growth differentiation factor GDF15 secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Corre, Jill; Labat, Elodie; Espagnolle, Nicolas; Hébraud, Benjamin; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Roussel, Murielle; Huynh, Anne; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Cordelier, Pierre; Klein, Bernard; Moreau, Philippe; Facon, Thierry; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Attal, Michel; Bourin, Philippe

    2012-03-15

    Overexpression of growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells occurs widely in patients with multiple myeloma, but the pathophysiologic effects of GDF15 in this setting remain undefined. GDF15 has been described in numerous solid tumors but never in hematologic malignancies. In this study, we report that GDF15 significantly increases survival of stroma-dependent multiple myeloma cells including primary multiple myeloma cells. In particular, GDF15 conferred resistance to melphalan, bortezomib, and to a lesser extent, lenalidomide in both stroma-dependent and stroma-independent multiple myeloma cells. Akt-dependent signaling was critical to mediate the effects of GDF15, whereas Src and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathways were not involved. Given these results, we tested the clinical significance of plasma concentrations of GDF15 (pGDF15) in 131 patients with multiple myeloma and found that it correlated with disease prognosis. Specifically, patients with high levels of pGDF15 had lower probabilities of event-free and overall survival 30 months after diagnosis than patients with low pGDF15 levels. Our findings suggest that tumor microenvironment-derived GDF15 is a key survival and chemoprotective factor for multiple myeloma cells, which is pathophysiologically linked to both initial parameters of the disease as well as patient survival.

  14. Arsenic trioxide and melarsoprol induce apoptosis in plasma cell lines and in plasma cells from myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, P; Labaume, S; Marolleau, J P; Larghero, J; Noguera, M H; Brouet, J C; Fermand, J P

    1999-03-01

    Recent data have renewed the interest for arsenic-containing compounds as anticancer agents. In particular, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been demonstrated to be an effective drug in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by inducing programmed cell death in leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. This prompted us to study the in vitro effects of As2O3 and of another arsenical derivative, the organic compound melarsoprol, on human myeloma cells and on the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells. At pharmacological concentrations (10(-8) to 10(-6) mol/L), As2O3 and melarsoprol caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of survival and growth in myeloma cell lines that was, in some, similar to that of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Both arsenical compounds induced plasma cell apoptosis, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, detection of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface using annexin V, and by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. As2O3 and melarsoprol also inhibited viability and growth and induced apoptosis in plasma-cell enriched preparations from the bone marrow or blood of myeloma patients. In nonseparated bone marrow samples, both arsenical compounds triggered death in myeloma cells while sparing most myeloid cells, as demonstrated by double staining with annexin V and CD38 or CD15 antibodies. In primary myeloma cells as in cell lines, interleukin 6 did not prevent arsenic-induced cell death or growth inhibition, and no synergistic effect was observed with IFN-alpha. In contrast to As2O3, melarsoprol only slightly reduced the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells induced by pokeweed mitogen. Both pokeweed mitogen-induced normal plasma cells and malignant plasma cells showed a normal nuclear distribution of PML protein, which was disrupted by As2O3 but not by melarsoprol, suggesting that the two arsenical derivatives acted by different mechanisms. These results point to the

  15. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of myeloma [corrected] and their uses in immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions.

  16. Long-term outcome after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced-intensity conditioning in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Furst, Sabine; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Ladaique, Patrick; Faucher, Catherine; Calmels, Boris; Lemarie, Claude; De Colella, Jean-Marc Schiano; Granata, Angela; Coso, Diane; Bouabdallah, Reda; Chabannon, Christian; Blaise, Didier

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the long-term outcomes of a cohort of patients with myeloma who were treated with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens after a minimum follow-up of 5 years at our centre. A total of 53 patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (Allo-SCT) between January 2000 and January 2007 were identified. The median follow-up of living patients was 84 months (51-141). The median age of the MM patients was 50 (28-70) years. Fifty-one patients (96%) received a transplant from a sibling donor. The median time between diagnosis and Allo-SCT was 34 months (6-161), and the median time between auto-SCT and Allo-SCT was 10 months (1-89). Fifty-one patients (96%) received at least one auto-SCT; 24 patients (45%) received a tandem auto-Allo-SCT. At last follow-up, 21 patients (40%) are alive > 5 years post RIC Allo-SCT. At last follow-up, 14 (26%) are in first complete remission (CR), and four patients (8%) in second CR after donor lymphocyte infusion or re-induction with one of the new anti-myeloma drugs (bortezomib or lenalidomide) after Allo-SCT. Eight patients (38%) among these long survivors received one of these new drugs as induction or relapse treatment before Allo-SCT. Disease status and occurrence of cGvHD were significantly associated with progression-free survival (PFS); hazard ratio (HR) = 0.62 (0.30-1.29, P = 0.20). Acute GvHD was correlated with higher transplant-related mortality; HR = 4.19 (1.05-16.77, P = 0.04). No variables were associated with overall survival (OS). In conclusion, we observe that long-term disease control can be expected in a subset of MM patients undergoing RIC Allo-SCT. After 10 years, the OS and PFS were 32% and 24%, respectively. The PFS curve after Allo-SCT stabilizes in time with a plateau after 6 years post Allo-SCT.

  17. Multiple Myeloma Relapse Following Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Presenting With Diffuse Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sumrall, Bradley; Diethelm, Lisa; Brown, Archie

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a common disease, accounting for about 10% of hematologic malignancies in the United States. For eligible patients, the treatment of choice includes induction therapy (usually involving newer biologic agents) followed by autologous stem cell transplant; however, this treatment is generally not considered curative, and relapses usually occur. However, extramedullary relapse is an uncommon presentation, and relapses that involve the lungs have only rarely been described. Case Report We report the case of a patient who underwent an autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma and subsequently relapsed with diffuse pulmonary nodules. She then had a rapid clinical and serologic response following initiation of salvage therapy. Conclusion This case is remarkable for both the radiographic appearance of the pulmonary involvement, as well as the rapid resolution of these findings after 2 cycles of treatment with bortezomib, dexamethasone, and lenalidomide. PMID:24358007

  18. Multiple Myeloma: Patient Handbook

    MedlinePlus

    ... way in which these agents cross-link the DNA of myeloma cells and block cell division. Amyloidosis: ... a cancer treatment regimen. Chromosome: A strand of DNA and proteins in the nucleus of a cell. ...

  19. Circulating Regulatory T-Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies of Uncertain Significance and Multiple Myeloma: In Search of a Role.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Rossi, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Statuto, Teodora; D'Auria, Fiorella; Valvano, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Giudice, Aldo; Innocenti, Idanna; De Feo, Vincenzo; Filosa, Rosanna; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    The frequency and function of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in multiple myeloma (MM) are still matter of debate. The percentage and absolute number of circulating Tregs (CD4(+)CD25(+high  density)CD127(-/low  density)) from 39 patients with untreated MM and 44 patients with monoclonal gammopathies of uncertain significance (MGUS) were tested and compared with 20 healthy subjects as controls. The mean percentage number of circulating Tregs was 2.1%  ± 1.0 (range 0.75-6.1%) in MM patients; 2.1%  ± 0.9 (range 0.3-4.4%) in MGUS; and 1.5%  ± 0.4 (range 0.9-2.1%) in controls (p ns). Mean absolute number of Tregs was 36.3/μL ± 23.7 (range 6.7-149/μL) in MM; 38.8/μL ± 19.1 (range 4.3-87/μL) in MGUS; and 39.4/μL ± 12.5 (range 18-63/μL) in controls (p ns). After a median follow-up of 38 months, 5 MGUS and 2 smoldering MM (SMM) transformed into overt MM; however Tregs number did not predict this evolution. With respect to MM patients and after a median follow-up of 33 months, Tregs did not show any significant correlation with main clinical and laboratory characteristics. Finally, from a functional point of view, Tregs displayed an effective suppressor function, irrespective of disease status. This study indicates that the number of circulating Tregs does not differ in different monoclonal gammopathies and normal subjects and do not correlate with clinical features of MM. PMID:27493974

  20. Circulating Regulatory T-Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies of Uncertain Significance and Multiple Myeloma: In Search of a Role

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Statuto, Teodora; D'Auria, Fiorella; Valvano, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Giudice, Aldo; Innocenti, Idanna; De Feo, Vincenzo; Filosa, Rosanna; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    The frequency and function of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in multiple myeloma (MM) are still matter of debate. The percentage and absolute number of circulating Tregs (CD4+CD25+high  densityCD127−/low  density) from 39 patients with untreated MM and 44 patients with monoclonal gammopathies of uncertain significance (MGUS) were tested and compared with 20 healthy subjects as controls. The mean percentage number of circulating Tregs was 2.1%  ± 1.0 (range 0.75–6.1%) in MM patients; 2.1%  ± 0.9 (range 0.3–4.4%) in MGUS; and 1.5%  ± 0.4 (range 0.9–2.1%) in controls (p ns). Mean absolute number of Tregs was 36.3/μL ± 23.7 (range 6.7–149/μL) in MM; 38.8/μL ± 19.1 (range 4.3–87/μL) in MGUS; and 39.4/μL ± 12.5 (range 18–63/μL) in controls (p ns). After a median follow-up of 38 months, 5 MGUS and 2 smoldering MM (SMM) transformed into overt MM; however Tregs number did not predict this evolution. With respect to MM patients and after a median follow-up of 33 months, Tregs did not show any significant correlation with main clinical and laboratory characteristics. Finally, from a functional point of view, Tregs displayed an effective suppressor function, irrespective of disease status. This study indicates that the number of circulating Tregs does not differ in different monoclonal gammopathies and normal subjects and do not correlate with clinical features of MM. PMID:27493974

  1. Circulating Regulatory T-Cells in Monoclonal Gammopathies of Uncertain Significance and Multiple Myeloma: In Search of a Role.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Rossi, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Statuto, Teodora; D'Auria, Fiorella; Valvano, Luciana; Simeon, Vittorio; Giudice, Aldo; Innocenti, Idanna; De Feo, Vincenzo; Filosa, Rosanna; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-01-01

    The frequency and function of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in multiple myeloma (MM) are still matter of debate. The percentage and absolute number of circulating Tregs (CD4(+)CD25(+high  density)CD127(-/low  density)) from 39 patients with untreated MM and 44 patients with monoclonal gammopathies of uncertain significance (MGUS) were tested and compared with 20 healthy subjects as controls. The mean percentage number of circulating Tregs was 2.1%  ± 1.0 (range 0.75-6.1%) in MM patients; 2.1%  ± 0.9 (range 0.3-4.4%) in MGUS; and 1.5%  ± 0.4 (range 0.9-2.1%) in controls (p ns). Mean absolute number of Tregs was 36.3/μL ± 23.7 (range 6.7-149/μL) in MM; 38.8/μL ± 19.1 (range 4.3-87/μL) in MGUS; and 39.4/μL ± 12.5 (range 18-63/μL) in controls (p ns). After a median follow-up of 38 months, 5 MGUS and 2 smoldering MM (SMM) transformed into overt MM; however Tregs number did not predict this evolution. With respect to MM patients and after a median follow-up of 33 months, Tregs did not show any significant correlation with main clinical and laboratory characteristics. Finally, from a functional point of view, Tregs displayed an effective suppressor function, irrespective of disease status. This study indicates that the number of circulating Tregs does not differ in different monoclonal gammopathies and normal subjects and do not correlate with clinical features of MM.

  2. Laminin receptor mediates anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombogenic effects of pigment epithelium-derived factor in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takanori; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-01-17

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombogenic properties both in cell culture and animal models. Although adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and laminin receptor (LR) are two putative receptors for PEDF, which receptor mainly mediates the beneficial effects of PEDF is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the issue. siRNA raised against LR (siLR) and siATGL transfection dramatically decreased LR and ATGL levels in human cultured myeloma cells, respectively. Ten nM PEDF significantly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mRNA levels in siCon- or siATGL-transfected myeloma cells, whereas PEDF increased rather than decreased these gene expressions in siLR-transfected cells. Neutralizing antibody directed against LR (LR-Ab) or LR antagonist actually bound to LR and reduced mRNA levels of VEGF, MCP-1, ICAM-1 and PAI-1 in myeloma cells. Further, pre-treatment of LR-Ab or LR antagonist suppressed the binding of PEDF to LR and resultantly blocked the effects of PEDF in myeloma cells. In addition, high concentration of LR agonist mimicked the actions of PEDF on these gene expressions in myeloma cells. This study indicates that PEDF causes anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombogenic reactions in myeloma cells through the interaction with LR. Target domain of LR agonist and antagonist might be involved in the PEDF-signaling to gene suppression in myeloma cells.

  3. The cellular immune system in myelomagenesis: NK cells and T cells in the development of MM and their uses in immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Dosani, T; Carlsten, M; Maric, I; Landgren, O

    2015-01-01

    As vast strides are being made in the management and treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), recent interests are increasingly focusing on understanding the development of the disease. The knowledge that MM develops exclusively from a protracted phase of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provides an opportunity to study tumor evolution in this process. Although the immune system has been implicated in the development of MM, the scientific literature on the role and status of various immune components in this process is broad and sometimes contradictory. Accordingly, we present a review of cellular immune subsets in myelomagenesis. We summarize the current literature on the quantitative and functional profiles of natural killer cells and T-cells, including conventional T-cells, natural killer T-cells, γδ T-cells and regulatory T-cells, in myelomagenesis. Our goal is to provide an overview of the status and function of these immune cells in both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow during myelomagenesis. This provides a better understanding of the nature of the immune system in tumor evolution, the knowledge of which is especially significant considering that immunotherapies are increasingly being explored in the treatment of both MM and its precursor conditions. PMID:25885426

  4. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  5. Evidence for a role of the histone deacetylase SIRT6 in DNA damage response of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cagnetta, Antonia; Adamia, Sophia; Acharya, Chirag; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Munshi, Aditya; Acharya, Prakrati; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zhong, Lei; Carrasco, Ruben; Monacelli, Fiammetta; Ballestrero, Alberto; Richardson, Paul; Gobbi, Marco; Lemoli, Roberto M.; Munshi, Nikhil; Hideshima, Teru; Nencioni, Alessio; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a highly unstable genome, with aneuploidy observed in nearly all patients. The mechanism causing this karyotypic instability is largely unknown, but recent observations have correlated these abnormalities with dysfunctional DNA damage response. Here, we show that the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT6 is highly expressed in MM cells, as an adaptive response to genomic stability, and that high SIRT6 levels are associated with adverse prognosis. Mechanistically, SIRT6 interacts with the transcription factor ELK1 and with the ERK signaling-related gene. By binding to their promoters and deacetylating H3K9 at these sites, SIRT6 downregulates the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway genes, MAPK signaling, and proliferation. In addition, inactivation of ERK2/p90RSK signaling triggered by high SIRT6 levels increases DNA repair via Chk1 and confers resistance to DNA damage. Using genetic and biochemical studies in vitro and in human MM xenograft models, we show that SIRT6 depletion both enhances proliferation and confers sensitization to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings therefore provide insights into the functional interplay between SIRT6 and DNA repair mechanisms, with implications for both tumorigenesis and the treatment of MM. PMID:26675349

  6. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor inhibitor NVP-AEW541 provokes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Maiso, Patricia; Ocio, Enrique M; Garayoa, Mercedes; Montero, Juan C; Hofmann, Francesco; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Zimmermann, Johann; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2008-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by accumulation of monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Despite recent advances in the treatment, MM represents an incurable disease for which development of new therapies is required. We report the antimyeloma effect of NVP-AEW541, a small molecule that belongs to the pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine class, identified as a selective inhibitor of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) in vitro kinase activity. NVP-AEW541 had a potent cytotoxic effect on fresh cells and in a murine MM model. NVP-AEW541 partially abrogated the proliferative advantage conferred by the coculture with BM stromal cells and the presence of growth factors produced by the BM microenvironment. In addition, NVP-AEW541 potentiated the action of drugs, such as bortezomib, lenalidomide, dexamethasone or melphalan. Moreover the triple combination of NVP-AEW541, dexamethasone and bortezomib resulted in a significant increase in growth inhibition. Mechanistic studies indicated that NVP-AEW541 provoked a marked cell cycle blockade accompanied by pRb downregulation. Interestingly, NVP-AEW541 increased the levels of p27 associated with a reduction in the CDK2 activity. Finally, NVP-AEW541 induced cell death through caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. All these data, suggest the potential effect of IGF-IR kinase inhibitors as therapeutic agents for MM patients.

  7. Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Nakamura, Kyohei; Vuckovic, Slavica; Hill, Geoffrey R; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a tumor of terminally differentiated B cells that arises in the bone marrow. Immune interactions appear as key determinants of MM progression. While myeloid cells foster myeloma-promoting inflammation, Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes mediate protective anti-myeloma responses. The profound immune deregulation occurring in MM patients may be involved in the transition from a premalignant to a malignant stage of the disease. In the last decades, the advent of stem cell transplantation and new therapeutic agents including proteasome inhibitors and immunoregulatory drugs has dramatically improved patient outcomes, suggesting potentially key roles for innate and adaptive immunity in disease control. Nevertheless, MM remains largely incurable for the vast majority of patients. A better understanding of the complex interplay between myeloma cells and their immune environment should pave the way for designing better immunotherapies with the potential of very long term disease control. Here, we review the immunological microenvironment in myeloma. We discuss the role of naturally arising anti-myeloma immune responses and their potential corruption in MM patients. Finally, we detail the numerous promising immune-targeting strategies approved or in clinical trials for the treatment of MM. PMID:26801219

  8. Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Nakamura, Kyohei; Vuckovic, Slavica; Hill, Geoffrey R; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a tumor of terminally differentiated B cells that arises in the bone marrow. Immune interactions appear as key determinants of MM progression. While myeloid cells foster myeloma-promoting inflammation, Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes mediate protective anti-myeloma responses. The profound immune deregulation occurring in MM patients may be involved in the transition from a premalignant to a malignant stage of the disease. In the last decades, the advent of stem cell transplantation and new therapeutic agents including proteasome inhibitors and immunoregulatory drugs has dramatically improved patient outcomes, suggesting potentially key roles for innate and adaptive immunity in disease control. Nevertheless, MM remains largely incurable for the vast majority of patients. A better understanding of the complex interplay between myeloma cells and their immune environment should pave the way for designing better immunotherapies with the potential of very long term disease control. Here, we review the immunological microenvironment in myeloma. We discuss the role of naturally arising anti-myeloma immune responses and their potential corruption in MM patients. Finally, we detail the numerous promising immune-targeting strategies approved or in clinical trials for the treatment of MM.

  9. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlie the Anti-Tumor Activities Exerted by Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Combined with Silica Nanoparticles against Multiple Myeloma Cancer Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K.; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A.; Rabah, Danny M.; El-Toni, Ahmed M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that remains incurable despite the advent of several novel therapeutics. In this study, we aimed to delineate the impact of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP) on primary MM cells isolated from patients diagnosed with MM as well as on two MM cell lines, U266 and RPMI 8226. The IC50 values of WEV and WEV+NP that significantly decreased MM cell viability without affecting the viability of normal peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined to be 25 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. Although both WEV (25 ng/ml) and WEV+NP (10 ng/ml) decreased the CD54 surface expression without affecting the expression of CXCR4 (CXCL12 receptor) on MM cells, they significantly reduced the ability of CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) to induce actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and the subsequent reduction in chemotaxis. It has been established that the binding of CXCL12 to its receptor CXCR4 activates multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that regulate MM cell chemotaxis, adhesion, and proliferation. We found that WEV and WEV+NP clearly decreased the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated activation of AKT, ERK, NFκB and Rho-A using western blot analysis; abrogated the CXCL12-mediated proliferation of MM cells using the CFSE assay; and induced apoptosis in MM cell as determined by PI/annexin V double staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Monitoring the expression of B-cell CCL/Lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members and their role in apoptosis induction after treatment with WEV or WEV+NP revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic effectors Bcl-2, BclXL and Mcl-1; conversely increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic effectors Bak, Bax and Bim; and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential in MM cells. Taken together, our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP and the

  10. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlie the anti-tumor activities exerted by Walterinnesia aegyptia venom combined with silica nanoparticles against multiple myeloma cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Badr, Gamal; Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Abdel-Maksoud, Mostafa A; Rabah, Danny M; El-Toni, Ahmed M

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that remains incurable despite the advent of several novel therapeutics. In this study, we aimed to delineate the impact of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) alone or in combination with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP) on primary MM cells isolated from patients diagnosed with MM as well as on two MM cell lines, U266 and RPMI 8226. The IC(50) values of WEV and WEV+NP that significantly decreased MM cell viability without affecting the viability of normal peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined to be 25 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. Although both WEV (25 ng/ml) and WEV+NP (10 ng/ml) decreased the CD54 surface expression without affecting the expression of CXCR4 (CXCL12 receptor) on MM cells, they significantly reduced the ability of CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) to induce actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and the subsequent reduction in chemotaxis. It has been established that the binding of CXCL12 to its receptor CXCR4 activates multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that regulate MM cell chemotaxis, adhesion, and proliferation. We found that WEV and WEV+NP clearly decreased the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated activation of AKT, ERK, NFκB and Rho-A using western blot analysis; abrogated the CXCL12-mediated proliferation of MM cells using the CFSE assay; and induced apoptosis in MM cell as determined by PI/annexin V double staining followed by flow cytometry analysis. Monitoring the expression of B-cell CCL/Lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members and their role in apoptosis induction after treatment with WEV or WEV+NP revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic effectors Bcl-2, Bcl(XL) and Mcl-1; conversely increased the expression of the pro-apoptotic effectors Bak, Bax and Bim; and altered the mitochondrial membrane potential in MM cells. Taken together, our data reveal the biological effects of WEV and WEV+NP and

  11. International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Statement for the Management, Treatment, and Supportive Care of Patients With Myeloma Not Eligible for Standard Autologous Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Larocca, Alessandra; Niesvizky, Ruben; Morgan, Gareth; Landgren, Ola; Hajek, Roman; Einsele, Hermann; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Spencer, Andrew; Stewart, A. Keith; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Lonial, Sagar; Sonneveld, Pieter; Durie, Brian G.M.; Moreau, Philippe; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide an update on recent advances in the management of patients with multiple myeloma who are not eligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature on diagnostic criteria is provided, and treatment options and management of adverse events are summarized. Results Patients with symptomatic disease and organ damage (ie, hypercalcemia, renal failure, anemia, or bone lesions) require immediate treatment. The International Staging System and chromosomal abnormalities identify high- and standard-risk patients. Proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, corticosteroids, and alkylating agents are the most active agents. The presence of concomitant diseases, frailty, or disability should be assessed and, if present, treated with reduced-dose approaches. Bone disease, renal damage, hematologic toxicities, infections, thromboembolism, and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequent disabling events requiring prompt and active supportive care. Conclusion These recommendations will help clinicians ensure the most appropriate care for patients with myeloma in everyday clinical practice. PMID:24419113

  12. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate induces apoptosis of myeloma cells via induction of TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Nakazato, Tomonori; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Ikeda, Yasuo; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2005-12-30

    A component of a traditional Thai condiment, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), is a natural compound, and it is obtained from rhizomes of the ethno-medicinal plant Languas galanga (Zingiberaceae). Our previous studies showed that ACA dramatically inhibited cellular growth of multiple myeloma cells in vivo and in vitro through the induction of apoptosis in association with the activation of caspase-8, inactivation of NF-kappaB, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Subsequently, we investigated the detailed apoptotic pathway of ACA and further demonstrated that ACA up-regulates the expression of both TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand/Apo2 ligand (TRAIL/Apo2L) and TRAIL receptor death receptor 5 (DR5). In addition, TRAIL/R-Fc chimera neutralizes the ACA-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that the death signaling of TRAIL is involved in the ACA-induced apoptosis of myeloma cells, and provide a rationale for the induction of TRAIL/Apo2L by ACA, which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in patients with multiple myeloma.

  13. Neurotoxicity of stem cell mobilization chemotherapy with vinorelbine in myeloma patients after bortezomib treatment.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sandra; Seipel, Katja; Novak, Urban; Mueller, Beatrice U; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri; Leibundgut, Kurt; Pabst, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Vinorelbine chemotherapy with G-CSF stimulation is the standard mobilization regimen in Switzerland for multiple myeloma patients. However, with the increasing use of bortezomib during induction treatment, adding the neurotoxic compound vinorelbine for mobilization may aggravate bortezomib-induced polyneuropathy. In this retrospective single-center study, we aimed to explore vinorelbine mediated neuropathy in 106 consecutive bortezomib pretreated myeloma patients. We confirmed that vinorelbine with G-CSF represents a reliable and effective regimen for mobilization of autologous stem cells. However, the single administration of 35 mg/m(2) vinorelbine added significant neurotoxicity. We found that 24 patients (24%) reported vinorelbine mediated neurotoxicity: Aggravation of bortezomib-induced neuropathy was observed in 17 patients (17%), and vinorelbine mobilization induced first occurrence of polyneuropathy in additional 7 patients (7%). We observed that development of polyneuropathy was not associated with differing survival rates. Finally, affected patients reported polyneuropathy associated disease burden as "very high" in 13% and "high" in 50%. Our data indicate that a single administration of vinorelbine to mobilize autologous stem cells is associated with significant additional polyneuropathy in bortezomib pretreated myeloma patients. The efficacy of vinorelbine mobilization should be balanced against its neurotoxic potential.

  14. Cleanroom compatible anodization cell for 150 mm Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardwell, Jennifer A.; LeBrun, Les; Evans, R. James; Curry, Donald G.; Abbott, Roger

    1996-06-01

    A cleanroom compatible anodization cell for use with 150 mm Si wafers has been constructed and tested. The material of construction is polyvinylidene fluoride, Kynar■, with Chemraz■ (elastomeric polytetrafluoroethylene) O-rings used for sealing. The back contact is made through a dilute HF solution, thus eliminating the possibility for metallic contamination which exists for other forms of back contact. Pt electrodes immersed in the back contact and front contact solutions are the primary electrical connection sites. Ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and dilute HF etch rate experiments were used to characterize the as-grown and annealed anodic oxides produced in this cell. Ellipsometric thickness mapping showed excellent lateral oxide uniformity over the entire anodized area; the standard deviations were <2 Å (for oxides ≤100 Å in thickness), <6 Å (for oxides ≤400 Å in thickness), and <10 Å (for oxides <500 Å in thickness). The properties of the oxides, as evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy are essentially identical to those grown on small-area samples using conventional anodization with a metallic back contact.

  15. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  16. Reconstruction of multiple myeloma lesions around the pelvis and acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Savvidou, Olga; Sim, Franklin H; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2015-05-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignancy of monoclonal plasma cells (plasma cells are of B-lymphocyte lineage of the hematopoietic system). It is the second most prevalent blood malignancy after non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It accounts for approximately 1 % of all malignancies and 2 % of all cancer deaths. Bony involvement is very common; the incidence of pelvic and periacetabular involvement in MM is reported to be around 6 %. Lytic lesions comprise a hallmark of multiple myeloma, which may be complicated with pathologic fractures in a substantial percentage of patients. Pelvic and periacetabular bony involvement of multiple myeloma is associated with some unique characteristics regarding the biomechanics of this specific anatomical region, the morbidity, the overall survival, and prognosis, which all reflect to impairment of quality of life. In this paper, we review the special features of multiple myeloma lesions around the pelvis and acetabulum and present an algorithm of management with the use of current surgical techniques.

  17. Smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM. PMID:25838344

  18. Smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-05-14

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM. PMID:25838344

  19. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Bhupendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth creates a state of hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment and results in release of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HiF-1α) in the local milieu. Hypoxia inducible factor activity is deregulated in many human cancers, especially those that are highly hypoxic. In multiple myeloma (MM) in initial stages of disease establishment, the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment supports the initial survival and growth of the myeloma cells. Hypoxic tumour cells are usually resistant to radiotherapy and most conventional chemotherapeutic agents, rendering them highly aggressive and metastatic. Therefore, HIF is an attractive, although challenging, therapeutic target in MM directly or indirectly in recent years. PMID:26900575

  20. TM-233, a novel analog of 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, induces cell death in myeloma cells by inhibiting both JAK/STAT and proteasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Sagawa, Morihiko; Tabayashi, Takayuki; Kimura, Yuta; Tomikawa, Tatsuki; Nemoto-Anan, Tomoe; Watanabe, Reiko; Tokuhira, Michihide; Ri, Masaki; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iida, Shinsuke; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the introduction of bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs has led to improved outcomes in patients with multiple myeloma, the disease remains incurable. In an effort to identify more potent and well-tolerated agents for myeloma, we have previously reported that 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a natural condiment from South-East Asia, induces apoptotic cell death of myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of NF-κB-related functions. Searching for more potent NF-κB inhibitors, we developed several ACA analogs based on quantitative structure–activity relationship analysis. TM-233, one of these ACA analogs, inhibited cellular proliferation and induced cell death in various myeloma cell lines with a lower IC50 than ACA. Treatment with TM-233 inhibited constitutive activation of JAK2 and STAT3, and then downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein, but not Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins. In addition, TM-233 rapidly decreased the nuclear expression of NF-κB and also decreased the accumulation of cytosolic NF-κB. We also examined the effects of TM-233 on bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells that we recently established, KMS-11/BTZ and OPM-2/BTZ. TM-233, but not bortezomib, inhibited cellular proliferation and induced cell death in KMS-11/BTZ and OPM-2/BTZ cells. Interestingly, the combination of TM-233 and bortezomib significantly induced cell death in these bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells through inhibition of NF-κB activity. These results indicate that TM-233 could overcome bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells mediated through different mechanisms, possibly inhibiting the JAK/STAT pathway. In conclusion, TM-233 might be a more potent NF-κB inhibitor than ACA, and could overcome bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells. PMID:25613668

  1. TM-233, a novel analog of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, induces cell death in myeloma cells by inhibiting both JAK/STAT and proteasome activities.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Morihiko; Tabayashi, Takayuki; Kimura, Yuta; Tomikawa, Tatsuki; Nemoto-Anan, Tomoe; Watanabe, Reiko; Tokuhira, Michihide; Ri, Masaki; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Iida, Shinsuke; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Although the introduction of bortezomib and immunomodulatory drugs has led to improved outcomes in patients with multiple myeloma, the disease remains incurable. In an effort to identify more potent and well-tolerated agents for myeloma, we have previously reported that 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a natural condiment from South-East Asia, induces apoptotic cell death of myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of NF-κB-related functions. Searching for more potent NF-κB inhibitors, we developed several ACA analogs based on quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. TM-233, one of these ACA analogs, inhibited cellular proliferation and induced cell death in various myeloma cell lines with a lower IC50 than ACA. Treatment with TM-233 inhibited constitutive activation of JAK2 and STAT3, and then downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein, but not Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins. In addition, TM-233 rapidly decreased the nuclear expression of NF-κB and also decreased the accumulation of cytosolic NF-κB. We also examined the effects of TM-233 on bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells that we recently established, KMS-11/BTZ and OPM-2/BTZ. TM-233, but not bortezomib, inhibited cellular proliferation and induced cell death in KMS-11/BTZ and OPM-2/BTZ cells. Interestingly, the combination of TM-233 and bortezomib significantly induced cell death in these bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells through inhibition of NF-κB activity. These results indicate that TM-233 could overcome bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells mediated through different mechanisms, possibly inhibiting the JAK/STAT pathway. In conclusion, TM-233 might be a more potent NF-κB inhibitor than ACA, and could overcome bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells.

  2. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  3. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  5. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM.

  6. Evidence of a Role for CD44 and Cell Adhesion in Mediating Resistance to Lenalidomide in Multiple Myeloma: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bjorklund, Chad C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Lin, Heather Y.; Jones, Richard J.; Kuiatse, Isere; Wang, Hua; Yang, Jing; Shah, Jatin J.; Thomas, Sheeba K.; Wang, Michael; Weber, Donna M.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of myeloma to lenalidomide is an emerging clinical problem, and though it has been associated in part with activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the mediators of this phenotype remained undefined. Lenalidomide-resistant models were found to overexpress the hyaluronan (HA)-binding protein CD44, a downstream Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target. Consistent with a role of CD44 in cell adhesion-mediated drug-resistance (CAM-DR), lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells were more adhesive to bone marrow stroma and HA-coated plates. Blockade of CD44 with monoclonal antibodies, free HA, or CD44 knockdown reduced adhesion and sensitized to lenalidomide. Wnt/β-catenin suppression by FH535 enhanced the activity of lenalidomide, as did interleukin-6 neutralization with siltuximab. Notably, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) down-regulated total β-catenin, cell-surface and total CD44, reduced adhesion of lenalidomide-resistant myeloma cells, and enhanced the activity of lenalidomide in a lenalidomide-resistant in vivo murine xenograft model. Finally, ATRA sensitized primary myeloma samples from patients that had relapsed and/or refractory disease after lenalidomide therapy to this immunomodulatory agent ex vivo. Taken together, our findings support the hypotheses that CD44 and CAM-DR contribute to lenalidomide-resistance in multiple myeloma, that CD44 should be evaluated as a putative biomarker of sensitivity to lenalidomide, and that ATRA or other approaches that target CD44 may overcome clinical lenalidomide resistance. PMID:23760401

  7. Preclinical validation of interleukin 6 as a therapeutic target in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rosean, Timothy R; Tompkins, Van S; Tricot, Guido; Holman, Carol J; Olivier, Alicia K; Zhan, Fenghuang; Janz, Siegfried

    2014-08-01

    Studies on the biologic and molecular genetic underpinnings of multiple myeloma (MM) have identified the pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), as a factor crucial to the growth, proliferation and survival of myeloma cells. IL-6 is also a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis and a sculptor of the tumor microenvironment in the bone marrow of patients with myeloma. This knowledge has engendered considerable interest in targeting IL-6 for therapeutic purposes, using a variety of antibody- and small-molecule-based therapies. However, despite the early recognition of the importance of IL-6 for myeloma and the steady progress in our knowledge of IL-6 in normal and malignant development of plasma cells, additional efforts will be required to translate the promise of IL-6 as a target for new myeloma therapies into significant clinical benefits for patients with myeloma. This review summarizes published research on the role of IL-6 in myeloma development and describes ongoing efforts by the University of Iowa Myeloma Multidisciplinary Oncology Group to develop new approaches to the design and testing of IL-6-targeted therapies and preventions of MM.

  8. Preclinical validation of interleukin 6 as a therapeutic target in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rosean, Timothy R.; Tompkins, Van S.; Tricot, Guido; Holman, Carol J.; Olivier, Alicia K.; Zhan, Fenghuang; Janz, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the biologic and molecular genetic underpinnings of multiple myeloma (MM) have identified the pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), as a factor crucial to the growth, proliferation and survival of myeloma cells. IL-6 is also a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis and a sculptor of the tumor microenvironment in the bone marrow of patients with myeloma. This knowledge has engendered considerable interest in targeting IL-6 for therapeutic purposes, using a variety of antibody- and small-molecule-based therapies. However, despite the early recognition of the importance of IL-6 for myeloma and the steady progress in our knowledge of IL-6 in normal and malignant development of plasma cells, additional efforts will be required to translate the promise of IL-6 as a target for new myeloma therapies into significant clinical benefits for patients with myeloma. This review summarizes published research on the role of IL-6 in myeloma development and describes ongoing efforts by the University of Iowa Myeloma Multidisciplinary Oncology Group to develop new approaches to the design and testing of IL-6-targeted therapies and preventions of MM. PMID:24845460

  9. Detection of Minimal Residual Disease by Flow Cytometry for Patients with Multiple Myeloma Submitted to Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bó, Suzane; Pezzi, Annelise; Amorin, Bruna; Valim, Vanessa; Isabel Bittencourt, Rosane; Silla, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The treatment strategy in multiple myeloma (MM) is to get complete remission followed by high-dose chemotherapy and autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Neoplastic Plasma Cells (NPCs) are CD45−/dim, CD38+high, CD138+, CD19−, and  CD56+high in most cases. The description of this immunophenotype is of major importance as it leads to the correct identification of minimal residual disease (MRD). Samples from 44 Patients were analyzed prospectively in this study. We analyzed if the presence of MRD at three months after HSCT was predictive of relapse or death. There were 40 evaluable patients of whom 16/40 patients had MRD at three moths after HSCT and there were none in cytological relapse. The mean overall survival (OS) was 34 months and disease-free survival (RFS) was 28 months after HSCT. There was no significant difference in the log rank analysis comparing OS and the presence of MRD (P = 0,611) and RFS (P = 0,3106). Here, we demonstrate that three color flow cytometry (FCM) is more sensitive for MDR evaluation than cytological analyzes. However, based in our data we can not affirm that MRD is a good predictor of MM relapse or death. In conclusion, our results could be attributed to a short followup, small sample size, and over most to the inability of a three-color FCM to detect the NPC population. PMID:23864957

  10. Over-expression of CKS1B activates both MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways and promotes myeloma cell drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Maurizio; Xu, Hongwei; Cao, Thai M.; Xu, Chunjiao; Wu, Yong; Xiao, Fang; Liu, Yinghong; Yang, Ye; Salama, Mohamed; Li, Guiyuan; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2010-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the crucial role of CKS1B in multiple myeloma (MM) progression and define CKS1B-mediated SKP2/p27Kip1-independent down-stream signaling pathways. Forced-expression of CKS1B in MM cells increased cell multidrug-resistance. CKS1B activates STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. In contrast, SKP2 knockdown or p27Kip1 over-expression resulted in activation of the STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. Further investigations showed that BCL2 is a downstream target of MEK/ERK signaling. Stimulation of STAT3 and MEK/ERK signaling pathways partially abrogated CKS1B knockdown induced MM cell death and growth inhibition. Targeting STAT3 and MEK/ ERK signaling pathways by specific inhibitors induced significant MM cell death and growth inhibition in CKS1B-overexpressing MM cells and their combinations resulted in synergy. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for targeting STAT3 and MEK/ERK/ BCL2 signaling in aggressive CKS1B-overexpressing MM. PMID:20930946

  11. Noninvasive imaging of multiple myeloma using near infrared fluorescent molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Bollerman-Nowlis, Alex; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal gammopathy and osteolytic bone lesions. Multiple myeloma is most commonly diagnosed in late disease stages, presenting with pathologic fracture. Early diagnosis and monitoring of disease status may improve quality of life and long-term survival for multiple myeloma patients from what is now a devastating and fatal disease. We have developed a near-infrared targeted fluorescent molecular probe with high affinity to the α4β1 integrin receptor (VLA-4)overexpressed by a majority of multiple myeloma cells as a non-radioactive analog to PET/CT tracer currently being developed for human diagnostics. A near-infrared dye that emits about 700 nm was conjugated to a high affinity peptidomimmetic. Binding affinity and specificity for multiple myeloma cells was investigated in vitro by tissue staining and flow cytometry. After demonstration of sensitivity and specificity, preclinical optical imaging studies were performed to evaluate tumor specificity in murine subcutaneous and metastatic multiple myeloma models. The VLA-4-targeted molecular probe showed high affinity for subcutaneous MM tumor xenografts. Importantly, tumor cells specific accumulation in the bone marrow of metastatic multiple myeloma correlated with GFP signal from transfected cells. Ex vivo flow cytometry of tumor tissue and bone marrow further corroborated in vivo imaging data, demonstrating the specificity of the novel agent and potential for quantitative imaging of multiple myeloma burden in these models.

  12. Circumvention of Mcl-1-Dependent Drug Resistance by Simultaneous Chk1 and MEK1/2 Inhibition in Human Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xin-Yan; Dai, Yun; Felthousen, Jessica; Chen, Shuang; Takabatake, Yukie; Zhou, Liang; Youssefian, Leena E.; Sanderson, Michael W.; Bodie, Wesley W.; Kramer, Lora B.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 plays a major role in multiple myeloma (MM) cell survival as well as bortezomib- and microenvironmental forms of drug resistance in this disease. Consequently, there is a critical need for strategies capable of targeting Mcl-1-dependent drug resistance in MM. The present results indicate that a regimen combining Chk1 with MEK1/2 inhibitors effectively kills cells displaying multiple forms of drug resistance stemming from Mcl-1 up-regulation in association with direct transcriptional Mcl-1 down-regulation and indirect disabling of Mcl-1 anti-apoptotic function through Bim up-regulation and increased Bim/Mcl-1 binding. These actions release Bak from Mcl-1, accompanied by Bak/Bax activation. Analogous events were observed in both drug-naïve and acquired bortezomib-resistant MM cells displaying increased Mcl-1 but diminished Bim expression, or cells ectopically expressing Mcl-1. Moreover, concomitant Chk1 and MEK1/2 inhibition blocked Mcl-1 up-regulation induced by IL-6/IGF-1 or co-culture with stromal cells, effectively overcoming microenvironment-related drug resistance. Finally, this regimen down-regulated Mcl-1 and robustly killed primary CD138+ MM cells, but not normal hematopoietic cells. Together, these findings provide novel evidence that this targeted combination strategy could be effective in the setting of multiple forms of Mcl-1-related drug resistance in MM. PMID:24594907

  13. Notch signaling deregulation in multiple myeloma: A rational molecular target

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Silvia; Platonova, Natalia; Paoli, Alessandro; Basile, Andrea; Taiana, Elisa; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) is still an incurable neoplasia due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to therapy. Myeloma cell localization in the bone marrow milieu allows direct interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor bone marrow cells which promote neoplastic cell growth, survival, bone disease, acquisition of drug resistance and consequent relapse. Twenty percent of MM patients are at high-risk of treatment failure as defined by tumor markers or presentation as plasma cell leukemia. Cumulative evidences indicate a key role of Notch signaling in multiple myeloma onset and progression. Unlike other Notch-related malignancies, where the majority of patients carry gain-of-function mutations in Notch pathway members, in MM cell Notch signaling is aberrantly activated due to an increased expression of Notch receptors and ligands; notably, this also results in the activation of Notch signaling in surrounding stromal cells which contributes to myeloma cell proliferation, survival and migration, as well as to bone disease and intrinsic and acquired pharmacological resistance. Here we review the last findings on the mechanisms and the effects of Notch signaling dysregulation in MM and provide a rationale for a therapeutic strategy aiming at inhibiting Notch signaling, along with a complete overview on the currently available Notch-directed approaches. PMID:26308486

  14. Radiosensitivity of human clonogenic myeloma cells and normal bone marrow precursors: Effect of different dose rates and fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, S.; Van Dyk, J.; Messner, H.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Evaluation of radiation dose rate and fractionation effects on clonogenic myeloma cells was carried out. The radiosensitivity of clonogenic myeloma cells was evaluated for seven human myeloma cell lines. The lines were maintained in liquid suspension culture. Following radiation, cells were plated in semisolid medium using methylcellulose as viscous support. Radiation doses up to 12 Gy were delivered at dose rates of 0.05 and 0.5 Gy/min by a [sup 60]Co source. Each total dose was administered either as a single dose or in multiple fractions of 2 Gy. The data were analyzed according to the linear quadratic and multi target model of irradiation. Clonogenic progenitors of the seven myeloma cell lines differed in their radiosensitivity as measured by multiple parameters. The differences were mainly observed at low dose. The most effective cytoreduction was seen when radiation was administered in a single fraction at high dose rate. The cytoreductive effect on clonogenic myeloma cells was compared for clinically practiced total body irradiation (TBI) schedules delivered either in a single or in multiple fractions without causing significant pulmonary toxicity. The administration of 12 Gy delivered in six fractions of 2 Gy resulted in a superior reduction of clonogenic cells compared to a single fraction of 5 Gy. The preparation of bone marrow transplant recipients with multiple myeloma using fractionated radiation with a total dose of 12 Gy appears to afford better ablation than a single dose of 5 Gy while maintaining a low incidence of pulmonary toxicity. 20 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D'Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-12-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:24091729

  16. miR-29b induces SOCS-1 expression by promoter demethylation and negatively regulates migration of multiple myeloma and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, Nicola; Bellizzi, Dina; Leotta, Marzia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Biamonte, Lavinia; D’Aquila, Patrizia; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Rossi, Marco; Lionetti, Marta; Leone, Emanuela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes frequently occurs and may account for their inactivation in cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that miR-29b is a tumor suppressor microRNA (miRNA) that targets de novo DNA methyltransferases and reduces the global DNA methylation of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Here, we provide evidence that epigenetic activity of miR-29b leads to promoter demethylation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a hypermethylated tumor suppressor gene. Enforced expression of synthetic miR-29b mimics in MM cell lines resulted in SOCS-1 gene promoter demethylation, as assessed by Sequenom MassARRAY EpiTYPER analysis, and SOCS-1 protein upregulation. miR-29b-induced SOCS-1 demethylation was associated with reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and impaired NFκB activity. Downregulation of VEGF-A and IL-8 mRNAs could be detected in MM cells transfected with miR-29b mimics as well as in endothelial (HUVEC) or stromal (HS-5) cells treated with conditioned medium from miR-29b-transfected MM cells. Notably, enforced expression of miR-29b mimics increased adhesion of MM cells to HS-5 and reduced migration of both MM and HUVEC cells. These findings suggest that miR-29b is a negative regulator of either MM or endothelial cell migration. Finally, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, which induces the expression of miR-29b, decreased global DNA methylation by a miR-29b-dependent mechanism and induced SOCS-1 promoter demethylation and protein upregulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that miR-29b is endowed with epigenetic activity and mediates previously unknown functions of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:24091729

  17. NEK2 mediates ALDH1A1-dependent drug resistance in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiliang; Gu, Zhimin; Wendlandt, Erik; Zhan, Xin; Janz, Siegfried; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) in multiple myeloma (MM) is a marker of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that is further associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). Here we demonstrate that member A1 of the ALDH1 family of proteins, ALDH1A1, is most abundantly expressed in myeloma. Enforced expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased clonogenicity, tumor formation in mice, and resistance to myeloma drugs in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism underlying these phenotypes included the ALDH1A1-dependent activation of drug-efflux pump, ABCB1, and survival proteins, AKT and BCL2. Over expression of ALDH1A1 in myeloma cells led to increased mRNA and protein levels of NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2), whereas shRNA-mediated knock down of NEK2 decreased drug efflux pump activity and drug resistance. The activation of NEK2 in myeloma cells relied on the ALDH1A1-dependent generation of the retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) ligand, 9-cis retinoic acid (9CRA) – not the retinoic acid receptor α (RARα) ligand, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). These findings implicate the ALDH1A1-RXRα-NEK2 pathway in drug resistance and disease relapse in myeloma and suggest that specific inhibitors of ALDH1A1 are worthy of consideration for clinical development of new approaches to overcome drug resistance in myeloma. PMID:25230277

  18. Role of erythropoietin in the angiogenic activity of bone marrow endothelial cells of MGUS and multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Saltarella, Ilaria; Ferrucci, Arianna; Ria, Roberto; Ruggieri, Simona; Racanelli, Vito; Rao, Luigia; Annese, Tiziana; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-22

    Increasing evidences suggest several biological roles for erythropoietin and its receptor (Epo and EpoR), unrelated to erythropoiesis, including angiogenesis. Here, we detected the expression of EpoR in bone marrow-derived endothelial cells from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and multiple myeloma (MM) patients (MGECs and MMECs, respectively) and assessed whether Epo plays a role in MGECs- and MMECs-mediated angiogenesis. We show that EpoR is expressed by both MGECs and MMECs even though at a higher level in the first ones. Both EC types respond to rHuEpo in terms of cell proliferation, whereas other responses, including activation of JAK2/STAT5 and PI3K/Akt pathways, cell migration and capillarogenesis are enhanced by Epo in MGECs, but not in MMECs. In addition, the conditioned media of both Epo-treated cells induce a strong angiogenic response in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane assay, comparable to that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Overall, these data highlight the effect of Epo on MGECs- and MMECs-mediated angiogenesis: MGECs are more responsive to Epo treatment than MMECs, probably because over-angiogenic phenotype of MMECs is already activated by their autocrine/paracrine loops occurring in the "angiogenic switch" from MGUS. PMID:26919105

  19. Role of erythropoietin in the angiogenic activity of bone marrow endothelial cells of MGUS and multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrucci, Arianna; Ria, Roberto; Ruggieri, Simona; Racanelli, Vito; Rao, Luigia; Annese, Tiziana; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest several biological roles for erythropoietin and its receptor (Epo and EpoR), unrelated to erythropoiesis, including angiogenesis. Here, we detected the expression of EpoR in bone marrow-derived endothelial cells from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and multiple myeloma (MM) patients (MGECs and MMECs, respectively) and assessed whether Epo plays a role in MGECs- and MMECs-mediated angiogenesis. We show that EpoR is expressed by both MGECs and MMECs even though at a higher level in the first ones. Both EC types respond to rHuEpo in terms of cell proliferation, whereas other responses, including activation of JAK2/STAT5 and PI3K/Akt pathways, cell migration and capillarogenesis are enhanced by Epo in MGECs, but not in MMECs. In addition, the conditioned media of both Epo-treated cells induce a strong angiogenic response in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane assay, comparable to that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Overall, these data highlight the effect of Epo on MGECs- and MMECs-mediated angiogenesis: MGECs are more responsive to Epo treatment than MMECs, probably because over-angiogenic phenotype of MMECs is already activated by their autocrine/paracrine loops occurring in the “angiogenic switch” from MGUS. PMID:26919105

  20. Molecular mechanisms in multiple myeloma drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nikesitch, Nicholas; Ling, Silvia C W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is predominantly an incurable malignancy despite high-dose chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant and novel agents. MM is a genetically heterogeneous disease and the complexity increases as the disease progresses to a more aggressive stage. MM arises from a plasma cell, which produces and secretes non-functioning immunoglobulins. Most MM cells are sensitive to proteasome inhibitors (PIs), which have become the main drug in the treatment of newly diagnosed and relapsed MM. However, not all MM is sensitive to PIs. This review summarises the literature regarding molecular biology of MM with a focus on the unfolded protein response and explores how this could affect drug sensitivity and progression of disease. PMID:26598624

  1. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70-80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance.

  2. Patterns of Relapse and Progression in Multiple Myeloma Patients after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: Implications for Patients’ Monitoring After Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Giralt, Sergio; Landau, Heather; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Lesokhin, Alex; Chung, David; Koehne, Guenther; Chimento, Danielle; Devlin, Sean M.; Riedel, Elyn; Bhutani, Manisha; Babu, Dilip; Hassoun, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is widely used in first-line treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). However, most patients eventually have relapse or progression of disease (R/POD). While precise knowledge of R/POD patterns would be important to generate evidence-based surveillance recommendations after ASCT, such data is limited in the literature, especially after introduction of the free light chain assay (FLCA). This retrospective study examined the patterns of R/POD after first-line ASCT in 273 patients, using established criteria. At time of R/POD, only 2% of patients had no associated serologic evidence of R/POD. Eighty five percent had asymptomatic R/POD first detected by serologic testing, while 15% had symptomatic R/POD with aggressive disease, early R/POD, and short survival, with poor cytogenetics and younger age identified as risk factors. While occult skeletal lesions were found in 40% of asymptomatic patients tested following serologic R/POD, yearly skeletal surveys and urine testing were poor at heralding R/POD. We found a consistent association between paraprotein types at diagnosis and R/POD allowing informed recommendations for appropriate serologic monitoring and propose a new needed criterion using FLCA for patients relapsing by FLC only. Our findings provide important evidence-based recommendations that strengthen current monitoring guidelines after first-line ASCT in MM. PMID:22890289

  3. Myeloma cells can corrupt senescent mesenchymal stromal cells and impair their anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Servet; Alessio, Nicola; Acar, Mustafa Burak; Toprak, Güler; Gönen, Zeynep Burcin; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Senescent cells secrete several molecules that help to prevent the progression of cancer. However, cancer cells can also misuse these secreted elements to survive and grow. Since the molecular and functional bases of these different elements remain poorly understood, we analyzed the effect of senescent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) secretome on the biology of ARH-77 myeloma cells. In addition to differentiating in mesodermal derivatives, MSCs have sustained interest among researchers by supporting hematopoiesis, contributing to tissue homeostasis, and modulating inflammatory response, all activities accomplished primarily by the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. Moreover, senescence profoundly affects the composition of MSC secretome. In this study, we induced MSC senescence by oxidative stress, DNA damage, and replicative exhaustion. While the first two are considered to induce acute senescence, extensive proliferation triggers replicative (i.e., chronic) senescence. We cultivated cancer cells in the presence of acute and chronic senescent MSC-conditioned media and evaluated their proliferation, DNA damage, apoptosis, and senescence. Our findings revealed that senescent secretomes induced apoptosis or senescence, if not both, to different extents. This anti-tumor activity became heavily impaired when secretomes were collected from senescent cells previously in contact (i.e., primed) with cancer cells. Our analysis of senescent MSC secretomes with LC-MS/MS followed by Gene Ontology classification further indicated that priming with cancer profoundly affected secretome composition by abrogating the production of pro-senescent and apoptotic factors. We thus showed for the first time that compared with cancer-primed MSCs, naïve senescent MSCs can exert different effects on tumor progression. PMID:26498687

  4. Plasmocytoma, multiple myeloma and plasma cell neoplasms in orofacial region.

    PubMed

    Zajko, J; Czako, L; Galis, B

    2016-01-01

    A neoplastic proliferation of B cell lymphocyte is called plasma cell neoplasms, results from malignant plasma cells transformation in bone marrow. The authors present a clinical study and overview of this pathology in maxillofacial region for six years (Tab. 2, Ref. 14). PMID:27546545

  5. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  6. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD.

  7. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of snake venom combined with silica nanoparticles in a murine model of human multiple myeloma: molecular targets for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M; Badr, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that reside in the bone marrow (BM). MM is an incurable disease; thus, screening for novel anti-myeloma drugs remains critically important. We recently described a silica nanoparticle-based snake venom delivery model that targets cancer cells, but not normal cells. Using this model, we demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) in two breast carcinoma cell lines when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we aimed to delineate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in an MM-bearing experimental nude mouse model. We found that treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to treatment with NP or vehicle. WEV+NP- and WEV-treated cancer cells exhibited marked elevations in oxidative stress and robust reductions in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and B cell-activating factor (BAFF). WEV+NP also decreased the surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4 and CXCR6 to a greater extent than WEV alone, and WEV+NP subsequently reduced migration in response to the cognate ligands CXCL10, CXCL12 and CXCL16. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (EGF-1)- and IL-6-mediated MM cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle and enhanced the induction of apoptosis of MM cells. In addition, the results of treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation of AKT; increased the expression of cyclin B1; altered the mitochondrial membrane potential; increased the activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9; and sensitized MM cells to growth arrest and apoptosis. Our data reveal the therapeutic potential of the nanoparticle-sustained delivery of snake venom to fight cancer cells. PMID:23973876

  8. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of snake venom combined with silica nanoparticles in a murine model of human multiple myeloma: molecular targets for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M; Badr, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that reside in the bone marrow (BM). MM is an incurable disease; thus, screening for novel anti-myeloma drugs remains critically important. We recently described a silica nanoparticle-based snake venom delivery model that targets cancer cells, but not normal cells. Using this model, we demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) in two breast carcinoma cell lines when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we aimed to delineate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in an MM-bearing experimental nude mouse model. We found that treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to treatment with NP or vehicle. WEV+NP- and WEV-treated cancer cells exhibited marked elevations in oxidative stress and robust reductions in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and B cell-activating factor (BAFF). WEV+NP also decreased the surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4 and CXCR6 to a greater extent than WEV alone, and WEV+NP subsequently reduced migration in response to the cognate ligands CXCL10, CXCL12 and CXCL16. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (EGF-1)- and IL-6-mediated MM cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle and enhanced the induction of apoptosis of MM cells. In addition, the results of treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation of AKT; increased the expression of cyclin B1; altered the mitochondrial membrane potential; increased the activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9; and sensitized MM cells to growth arrest and apoptosis. Our data reveal the therapeutic potential of the nanoparticle-sustained delivery of snake venom to fight cancer cells.

  9. TRIM13 (RFP2) downregulation decreases tumour cell growth in multiple myeloma through inhibition of NF Kappa B pathway and proteasome activity

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Moshe E; Takada, Kohichi; Mani, Mala; Lerner, Mikael; Pick, Marjorie; Hideshima, Teru; Carrasco, Daniel E.; Protopopov, Alexei; Ivanova, Elena; Sangfelt, Olle; Grandér, Dan; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Carrasco, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable neoplasm caused by proliferation of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). MM is characterized frequently by a complete or partial deletion of chromosome 13q14, seen in more than 50% of patients at diagnosis. Within this deleted region the tripartite motif containing 13 (TRIM13, also termed RFP2) gene product has been proposed to be a tumour suppressor gene (TSG). Here, we show that low expression levels of TRIM13 in MM are associated with chromosome 13q deletion and poor clinical outcome. We present a functional analysis of TRIM13 using a loss-of-function approach, and demonstrate that TRIM13 downregulation decreases tumour cell survival as well as cell cycle progression and proliferation of MM cells. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of TRIM13 downregulation in inhibiting the NF kappa B pathway and the activity of the 20S proteasome. Although this data does not support a role of TRIM13 as a TSG, it substantiates important roles of TRIM13 in MM tumour survival and proliferation, underscoring its potential role as a novel target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23647456

  10. Phenotypic and genomic analysis of multiple myeloma minimal residual disease tumor cells: a new model to understand chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Bruno; Corchete, Luis A; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Puig, Noemi; Maiso, Patricia; Rodriguez, Idoia; Alignani, Diego; Burgos, Leire; Sanchez, Maria-Luz; Barcena, Paloma; Echeveste, Maria-Asuncion; Hernandez, Miguel T; García-Sanz, Ramón; Ocio, Enrique M; Oriol, Albert; Gironella, Mercedes; Palomera, Luis; De Arriba, Felipe; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Johnson, Sarah K; Epstein, Joshua; Barlogie, Bart; Lahuerta, Juan José; Blade, Joan; Orfao, Alberto; Mateos, María-Victoria; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-04-14

    Persistence of chemoresistant minimal residual disease (MRD) plasma cells (PCs) is associated with inferior survival in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, characterization of the minor MRD subclone may represent a unique model to understand chemoresistance, but to our knowledge, the phenotypic and genetic features of the MRD subclone have never been investigated. Here, we compared the antigenic profile of MRD vs diagnostic clonal PCs in 40 elderly MM patients enrolled in the GEM2010MAS65 study and showed that the MRD subclone is enriched in cells overexpressing integrins (CD11a/CD11c/CD29/CD49d/CD49e), chemokine receptors (CXCR4), and adhesion molecules (CD44/CD54). Genetic profiling of MRD vs diagnostic PCs was performed in 12 patients; 3 of them showed identical copy number alterations (CNAs), in another 3 cases, MRD clonal PCs displayed all genetic alterations detected at diagnosis plus additional CNAs that emerged at the MRD stage, whereas in the remaining 6 patients, there were CNAs present at diagnosis that were undetectable in MRD clonal PCs, but also a selected number of genetic alterations that became apparent only at the MRD stage. The MRD subclone showed significant downregulation of genes related to protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, as well as novel deregulated genes such as ALCAM that is prognostically relevant in MM and may identify chemoresistant PCs in vitro. Altogether, our results suggest that therapy-induced clonal selection could be already present at the MRD stage, where chemoresistant PCs show a singular phenotypic signature that may result from the persistence of clones with different genetic and gene expression profiles. This trial was registered atwww.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01237249.

  11. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  12. FOXM1 is a therapeutic target for high-risk multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunyan; Yang, Ye; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xu, Hongwei; Tompkins, Van S.; Holman, Carol; Hose, Dirk; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang; Janz, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a validated oncoprotein in solid cancers, but its role in malignant plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma (MM) is unknown. We analyzed publicly available MM datasets and found that overexpression of FOXM1 prognosticates inferior outcome in a subset (~15%) of newly diagnosed cases, particularly patients with high-risk disease based on global gene expression changes. Follow-up studies using human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) as the principal experimental model system demonstrated that enforced expression of FOXM1 increased growth, survival and clonogenicity of myeloma cells, whereas knockdown of FOXM1 abolished these features. In agreement with that, constitutive up-regulation of FOXM1 promoted HMCL xenografts in laboratory mice, whereas inducible knockdown of FOXM1 led to growth inhibition. Expression of cyclin dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2) was co-regulated with FOXM1 in both HMCLs and myeloma patient samples, suggesting interaction of these 3 genes in a genetic network that may lend itself to targeting with small-drug inhibitors for new approaches to myeloma therapy and prevention. These results establish FOXM1 as high-risk myeloma gene and provide support for the design and testing of FOXM1-targeted therapies specifically for the FOXM1High subset of myeloma. PMID:26648534

  13. FOXM1 is a therapeutic target for high-risk multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gu, C; Yang, Y; Sompallae, R; Xu, H; Tompkins, V S; Holman, C; Hose, D; Goldschmidt, H; Tricot, G; Zhan, F; Janz, S

    2016-04-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a validated oncoprotein in solid cancers, but its role in malignant plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma (MM) is unknown. We analyzed publicly available MM data sets and found that overexpression of FOXM1 prognosticates inferior outcome in a subset (~15%) of newly diagnosed cases, particularly patients with high-risk disease based on global gene expression changes. Follow-up studies using human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) as the principal experimental model system demonstrated that enforced expression of FOXM1 increased growth, survival and clonogenicity of myeloma cells, whereas knockdown of FOXM1 abolished these features. In agreement with that, constitutive upregulation of FOXM1 promoted HMCL xenografts in laboratory mice, whereas inducible knockdown of FOXM1 led to growth inhibition. Expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and NIMA-related kinase 2 (NEK2) was coregulated with FOXM1 in both HMCLs and myeloma patient samples, suggesting interaction of these three genes in a genetic network that may lend itself to targeting with small-drug inhibitors for new approaches to myeloma therapy and prevention. These results establish FOXM1 as high-risk myeloma gene and provide support for the design and testing of FOXM1-targeted therapies specifically for the FOXM1(High) subset of myeloma. PMID:26648534

  14. Mandibular destructive radiolucent lesion: The first sign of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fregnani, Eduardo-Rodrigues; Leite, Amanda-Almeida; Parahyba, Claudia-Joffily; Nesrallah, Ana-Cristina-Alo; Ramos-Perez, Flávia-Maria-de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a mandibular lesion as the first sign of multiple myeloma (MM) is uncommon. This report describes a case of MM diagnosed because of a mandibular lesion. A 62-year-old woman presented a destructive radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular ramus. The lesion caused rupture of the anterior cortical bone and extended from the retromolar area to the coronoid process. An incisional biopsy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed numerous pleomorphic plasma cells, some with binucleated nuclei. The tumor cells showed kappa light-chain restriction. Bone marrow biopsy showed findings of massive infiltration of neoplastic plasma cells, besides lesions in the vertebrae. The diagnosis of MM was established. The patient underwent autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Currently, the patient is under regular follow up after 40 months of initial treatment. In conclusion, MM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of destructive mandibular lesions. Key words:Mandible, multiple myeloma, radiolucent lesion. PMID:27703618

  15. Bone marrow mast cell density correlates with serum levels of VEGF and CXC chemokines ENA-78 and GRO-α in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pappa, C A; Tsirakis, G; Devetzoglou, M; Zafeiri, M; Vyzoukaki, R; Androvitsanea, A; Xekalou, A; Sfiridaki, K; Alexandrakis, M G

    2014-06-01

    Angiogenesis is a crucial process in growth and progression of multiple myeloma (MM). Mast cells (MCs) play an important role in MM angiogenesis. Various angiogenic mediators secreted by MCs regulate endothelial cell proliferation and function. Among them, ELR(+) CXC chemokines, such as growth-related oncogen-alpha (GRO-α) and epithelial neutrophil activating protein-78 (ENA-78), have been described as potential mediators in regulation of angiogenesis. The purpose of the study was to quantify MCs in bone marrow (BM) biopsies of MM patients, expressed as MC density (MCD), and correlate it with serum concentrations of vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), GRO-α, ENA-78. Fifty-four newly diagnosed MM patients and 22 healthy controls were studied. Tryptase was used for the immunohistochemical stain of MCs. VEGF, GRO-α, and ENA-78 were measured in sera by ELISA. MCD and serum levels of GRO-α, ENA-78, and VEGF were significantly higher in MM patients compared to controls (p<0.001 in all cases). MCD was significantly increasing with increased stage of the disease (p<0.001). Furthermore, significant correlations were found between MCD with VEGF, GRO-α, and ENA-78. These findings support that MCs participate in the pathophysiology of MM and is implicated in the angiogenic process and disease progression.

  16. Cyproheptadine-induced myeloma cell apoptosis is associated with inhibition of the PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Cao, Biyin; Zhou, Shunye; Zhu, Jingyu; Zhang, Zubin; Hou, Tingjun; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies revealed that the anti-allergic cyproheptadine displays anti-blood cancer activity. However, its mechanism is still elusive. In this study, cyproheptadine was found to decrease the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, including Bcl-2, Mcl-1, and XIAP. More importantly, cyproheptadine-induced apoptosis was accompanied by suppressing AKT activation in myeloma cells. In the subsequent study, cyproheptadine was found to inhibit insulin-like growth factor 1-triggered AKT activation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Specifically, cyproheptadine blocked AKT translocation from nuclei for phosphorylation. This inhibition led to suppressed activation of p70S6K and 4EBP1, two key downstream signaling proteins in the PI3K/AKT pathway. However, cyproheptadine did not display inhibition on activation of IGF-1R or STAT3, possible upstream signals of AKT activation. These results further demonstrated that cyproheptadine suppresses the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, which is probably critical for cyproheptadine-induced MM cell apoptosis.

  17. A Rare Case of Nonsecretory Multiple Myeloma in Lagos, Nigeria: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Uche, Ebele; Akinbami, Akinsegun; John-Olabode, Sarah; Dosunmu, Adedoyin; Odesanya, Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder associated with clonal proliferation of plasma cells. Nonsecretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) is a rare variant of MM and accounts for approximately 1% to 5% of all cases. It is defined as symptomatic myeloma without detectable monoclonal immunoglobulin on serum or urine electrophoresis. This variant usually poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. We present a 60-year-old Nigerian man who was investigated extensively for bone pain, weight loss, and anaemia. He was eventually diagnosed as having nonsecretory multiple myeloma based on histology and immunohistochemistry results of bone marrow trephine biopsy. He is currently being managed with bortezomib, doxorubicin, and thalidomide, as well as zoledronic acid. He is also on anticoagulation. He continues to show remarkable clinical improvement. We describe this case report and literature review for better awareness amongst medical practitioners and pathologists. PMID:26649043

  18. A Rare Case of Nonsecretory Multiple Myeloma in Lagos, Nigeria: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Uche, Ebele; Akinbami, Akinsegun; John-Olabode, Sarah; Dosunmu, Adedoyin; Odesanya, Majeed

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell disorder associated with clonal proliferation of plasma cells. Nonsecretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) is a rare variant of MM and accounts for approximately 1% to 5% of all cases. It is defined as symptomatic myeloma without detectable monoclonal immunoglobulin on serum or urine electrophoresis. This variant usually poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. We present a 60-year-old Nigerian man who was investigated extensively for bone pain, weight loss, and anaemia. He was eventually diagnosed as having nonsecretory multiple myeloma based on histology and immunohistochemistry results of bone marrow trephine biopsy. He is currently being managed with bortezomib, doxorubicin, and thalidomide, as well as zoledronic acid. He is also on anticoagulation. He continues to show remarkable clinical improvement. We describe this case report and literature review for better awareness amongst medical practitioners and pathologists. PMID:26649043

  19. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro.

  20. Does my patient with a serum monoclonal spike have multiple myeloma?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giada; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2012-04-01

    A monoclonal spike on serum protein electrophoresis is a frequent finding in the general population and pathognomonic of a plasma cell dyscrasia. In otherwise healthy individuals, it is diagnostic of two asymptomatic, premalignant conditions called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) which carry a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM) or related malignancy. This article discusses the criteria for diagnosis of MGUS, SMM, and MM; current recommendations for follow-up and risk factors for progression to MM of patients with MGUS and SMM; and diagnostic evaluation of suspected MM transformation. PMID:22463833

  1. Dendritic cells mediate the induction of polyfunctional human IL17-producing cells (Th17-1 cells) enriched in the bone marrow of patients with myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Barbuto, Scott; Matthews, Phillip; Kukreja, Anjli; Mazumder, Amitabha; Vesole, David; Jagannath, Sundar; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2008-01-01

    IL17-producing (Th17) cells are a distinct lineage of T helper cells that regulate immunity and inflammation. The role of antigen-presenting cells in the induction of Th17 cells in humans remains to be fully defined. Here, we show that human dendritic cells (DCs) are efficient inducers of Th17 cells in culture, including antigen-specific Th17 cells. Although most freshly isolated circulating human Th17 cells secrete IL17 alone or with IL2, those induced by DCs are polyfunctional and coexpress IL17 and IFNγ (Th17-1 cells). The capacity of DCs to expand Th17-1 cells is enhanced upon DC maturation, and mature DCs are superior to monocytes for the expansion of autologous Th17 cells. In myeloma, where tumors are infiltrated by DCs, Th17 cells are enriched in the bone marrow relative to circulation. Bone marrow from patients with myeloma contains a higher proportion of Th17-1 cells compared with the marrow in preneoplastic gammopathy (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance [MGUS]). Uptake of apoptotic but not necrotic myeloma tumor cells by DCs leads to enhanced induction of Th17-1 cells. These data demonstrate the capacity of DCs to induce expansion of polyfunctional IL17-producing T cells in humans, and suggest a role for DCs in the enrichment of Th17-1 cells in the tumor bed. PMID:18669891

  2. Plerixafor: a review of its use in stem-cell mobilization in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2011-08-20

    Plerixafor (Mozobil®) is a CXCR4 chemokine receptor antagonist that is indicated for use in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize stem cells to the peripheral blood for collection and subsequent autologous stem-cell transplantation in patients who have non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or multiple myeloma (MM) [US] and in patients who have lymphoma or MM and are poor mobilizers (EU). This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous plerixafor for stem-cell mobilization in patients with lymphoma or MM, as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. Pharmacoeconomic analyses of plerixafor and decision-making algorithms intended to optimize its use are also discussed. Plerixafor plus G-CSF mobilized stem cells more efficiently than placebo plus G-CSF in adults with NHL or MM, according to the results of two randomized, double-blind, multicentre trials. In these trials, significantly more plerixafor plus G-CSF recipients than placebo plus G-CSF recipients reached primary apheresis targets in significantly fewer apheresis days. In the trial in patients with NHL, significantly more plerixafor plus G-CSF than placebo plus G-CSF recipients proceeded to transplantation. Results of compassionate-use studies in patients with lymphoma or MM demonstrated that plerixafor plus G-CSF successfully mobilized stem cells in the majority of patients who were poor mobilizers (i.e. sufficient CD34+ cells had not been collected during apheresis or apheresis had not occurred because of low peripheral blood CD34+ cell counts). Results of compassionate-use studies and additional studies in patients with lymphoma or MM also demonstrated that plerixafor plus G-CSF successfully mobilized stem cells in predicted poor mobilizers, such as heavily pretreated patients considered to be at high risk of mobilization failure. In addition, a small study showed mobilization with pre-emptive plerixafor to be effective. Subcutaneous

  3. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W J; Noort, Willy A; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Parren, Paul W H I; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Martens, Anton C M; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38(+) fractions of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38(+) malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  4. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W.J.; Noort, Willy A.; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Martens, Anton C.M.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38+ fractions of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38+ malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  5. Low intensity vibration mitigates tumor progression and protects bone quantity and quality in a murine model of myeloma.

    PubMed

    Pagnotti, Gabriel M; Chan, M Ete; Adler, Benjamin J; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Rubin, Janet; Bain, Steven D; Rubin, Clinton T

    2016-09-01

    Myeloma facilitates destruction of bone and marrow. Since physical activity encourages musculoskeletal preservation we evaluated whether low-intensity vibration (LIV), a means to deliver mechanical signals, could protect bone and marrow during myeloma progression. Immunocompromised-mice (n=25) were injected with human-myeloma cells, while 8 (AC) were saline-injected. Myeloma-injected mice (LIV; n=13) were subjected to daily-mechanical loading (15min/d; 0.3g @ 90Hz) while 12 (MM) were sham-handled. At 8w, femurs had 86% less trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in MM than in AC, yet only a 21% decrease in LIV was observed in comparison to AC, reflecting a 76% increase versus MM. Cortical BV was 21% and 15% lower in MM and LIV, respectively, than in AC; LIV showing 30% improvement over MM. Similar outcomes were observed in the axial skeleton, showing a 35% loss in MM with a 27% improved retention of bone in the L5 of LIV-treated mice as compared to MM. Transcortical-perforations in the femur from myeloma-induced osteolysis were 9× higher in MM versus AC, reduced by 57% in LIV. Serum-TRACP5b, 61% greater in MM versus AC, rose by 33% in LIV compared to AC, a 45% reduction in activity when compared to MM. Histomorphometric analyses of femoral trabecular bone demonstrated a 70% elevation in eroded surfaces of MM versus AC, while measures in LIV were 58% below those in MM. 72% of marrow in the femur of MM mice contained tumor, contrasted by a 31% lower burden in LIV. MM mice (42%) presented advanced-stage necrosis of tibial marrow while present in just 8% of LIV. Myeloma infiltration inversely correlated to measures of bone quality, while LIV slowed the systemic, myeloma-associated decline in bone quality and inhibited tumor progression through the hindlimbs. PMID:27262776

  6. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) confers resistance to bortezomib by promoting autophagic removal of misfolded proteins in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Belhacene, Nathalie; Puissant, Alexandre; Colosetti, Pascal; Robert, Guillaume; Jacquel, Arnaud; Mari, Bernard; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2014-08-15

    Velcade is one of the inescapable drug to treat patient suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and resistance to this drug represents a major drawback for patients. However, the mechanisms underlying velcade resistance remain incompletely understood. We derived several U266 MM cell clones that resist to velcade. U266-resistant cells were resistant to velcade-induced cell death but exhibited a similar sensitivity to various proapoptotic stimuli. Careful analysis of proteosomal subunits and proteasome enzymatic activities showed that neither the composition nor the activity of the proteasome was affected in velcade-resistant cells. Elimination of velcade-induced poly-ubiquitinated proteins and protein aggregates was drastically stimulated in the resistant cells and correlated with increased cell survival. Inhibition of the lysosomal activity in velcade-resistant cells resulted in an increase of cell aggregates and decrease survival, indicating that aggregates are eliminated through lysosomal degradation. In addition, pangenomic profiling of velcade-sensitive and resistant cells showed that the small heat shock protein HSPB8 was overexpressed in resistant cells. Finally, gain and loss of function experiment demonstrated that HSPB8 is a key factor for velcade resistance. In conclusion, HSPB8 plays an important role for the elimination of aggregates in velcade-resistant cells that contributes to their enhanced survival.

  7. Safety and efficacy of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in STRATUS (MM-010): a phase 3b study in refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Palumbo, Antonio; Corradini, Paolo; Cavo, Michele; Delforge, Michel; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Weisel, Katja C; Oriol, Albert; Hansson, Markus; Vacca, Angelo; Blanchard, María Jesús; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Doyen, Chantal; Kaiser, Martin; Petrini, Mario; Anttila, Pekka; Cafro, Anna Maria; Raymakers, Reinier; San-Miguel, Jesus; de Arriba, Felipe; Knop, Stefan; Röllig, Christoph; Ocio, Enrique M; Morgan, Gareth; Miller, Neil; Simcock, Mathew; Peluso, Teresa; Herring, Jennifer; Sternas, Lars; Zaki, Mohamed H; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-07-28

    Patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) have poor prognosis. The STRATUS study assessed safety and efficacy of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in the largest cohort to date of patients with RRMM. Patients who failed treatment with bortezomib and lenalidomide and had adequate prior alkylator therapy were eligible. Pomalidomide 4 mg was given on days 1-21 of 28-day cycles with low-dose dexamethasone 40 mg (20 mg for patients aged >75 years) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity. Safety was the primary end point; secondary end points included overall response rate (ORR), duration of response (DOR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Among 682 patients enrolled, median age was 66 years, and median time since diagnosis was 5.3 years. Median number of prior regimens was 5. Most patients were refractory to both lenalidomide and bortezomib (80.2%). Median follow-up was 16.8 months; median duration of treatment was 4.9 months. Most frequent grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were hematologic (neutropenia [49.7%], anemia [33.0%], and thrombocytopenia [24.1%]). Most common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were pneumonia (10.9%) and fatigue (5.9%). Grade 3/4 venous thromboembolism and peripheral neuropathy were rare (1.6% each). The ORR was 32.6%, and the median DOR was 7.4 months. Median PFS and OS were 4.6 months and 11.9 months, respectively. We present the largest trial to date evaluating pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in patients with RRMM, further confirming that this regimen offers clinically meaningful benefit and is generally well tolerated. www.Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01712789. PMID:27226434

  8. Safety and efficacy of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in STRATUS (MM-010): a phase 3b study in refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Antonio; Corradini, Paolo; Cavo, Michele; Delforge, Michel; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Weisel, Katja C.; Oriol, Albert; Hansson, Markus; Vacca, Angelo; Blanchard, María Jesús; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Doyen, Chantal; Kaiser, Martin; Petrini, Mario; Anttila, Pekka; Cafro, Anna Maria; Raymakers, Reinier; San-Miguel, Jesus; de Arriba, Felipe; Knop, Stefan; Röllig, Christoph; Ocio, Enrique M.; Morgan, Gareth; Miller, Neil; Simcock, Mathew; Peluso, Teresa; Herring, Jennifer; Sternas, Lars; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Moreau, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) have poor prognosis. The STRATUS study assessed safety and efficacy of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in the largest cohort to date of patients with RRMM. Patients who failed treatment with bortezomib and lenalidomide and had adequate prior alkylator therapy were eligible. Pomalidomide 4 mg was given on days 1-21 of 28-day cycles with low-dose dexamethasone 40 mg (20 mg for patients aged >75 years) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 until progressive disease or unacceptable toxicity. Safety was the primary end point; secondary end points included overall response rate (ORR), duration of response (DOR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Among 682 patients enrolled, median age was 66 years, and median time since diagnosis was 5.3 years. Median number of prior regimens was 5. Most patients were refractory to both lenalidomide and bortezomib (80.2%). Median follow-up was 16.8 months; median duration of treatment was 4.9 months. Most frequent grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events were hematologic (neutropenia [49.7%], anemia [33.0%], and thrombocytopenia [24.1%]). Most common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were pneumonia (10.9%) and fatigue (5.9%). Grade 3/4 venous thromboembolism and peripheral neuropathy were rare (1.6% each). The ORR was 32.6%, and the median DOR was 7.4 months. Median PFS and OS were 4.6 months and 11.9 months, respectively. We present the largest trial to date evaluating pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone in patients with RRMM, further confirming that this regimen offers clinically meaningful benefit and is generally well tolerated. www.Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01712789. PMID:27226434

  9. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Formation of assemblies on cell membranes by secreted proteins: molecular studies of free λ light chain aggregates found on the surface of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Andrew T; Malik, Ansha; Berkahn, Mark B; Agostino, Mark; To, Joyce; Tacchi, Jessica L; Djordjevic, Steven P; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Edmundson, Allen B; Jones, Darren R; Raison, Robert L; Ramsland, Paul A

    2013-09-15

    We have described the presence of cell-membrane-associated κFLCs (free immunoglobulin light chains) on the surface of myeloma cells. Notably, the anti-κFLC mAb (monoclonal antibody) MDX-1097 is being assessed in clinical trials as a therapy for κ light chain isotype multiple myeloma. Despite the clinical potential of anti-FLC mAbs, there have been limited studies on characterizing membrane-associated FLCs at a molecular level. Furthermore, it is not known whether λFLCs can associate with cell membranes of myeloma cells. In the present paper, we describe the presence of λFLCs on the surface of myeloma cells. We found that cell-surface-associated λFLCs are bound directly to the membrane and in an aggregated form. Subsequently, membrane interaction studies revealed that λFLCs interact with saturated zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and using automated docking, we characterize a potential recognition site for these lipids. Atomic force microscopy confirmed that membrane-associated λFLCs are aggregated. Given the present findings, we propose a model whereby individual FLCs show modest affinity for zwitterionic lipids, with aggregation stabilizing the interaction due to multivalency. Notably, this is the first study to image FLCs bound to phospholipids and provides important insights into the possible mechanisms of membrane association by this unique myeloma surface antigen.

  11. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Sarah L; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα's TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  12. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Sarah L.; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα’s TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  13. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  14. miR-29b sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis through the activation of a feedback loop with the transcription factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Amodio, N; Di Martino, M T; Foresta, U; Leone, E; Lionetti, M; Leotta, M; Gullà, A M; Pitari, M R; Conforti, F; Rossi, M; Agosti, V; Fulciniti, M; Misso, G; Morabito, F; Ferrarini, M; Neri, A; Caraglia, M; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) with tumor-suppressor potential might have therapeutic applications in multiple myeloma (MM) through the modulation of still undiscovered molecular pathways. Here, we investigated the effects of enforced expression of miR-29b on the apoptotic occurrence in MM and highlighted its role in the context of a new transcriptional loop that is finely tuned by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. In details, in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis of MM cells was induced by either transient expression of synthetic miR-29b or its stable lentivirus-enforced expression. We identified Sp1, a transcription factor endowed with oncogenic activity, as a negative regulator of miR-29b expression in MM cells. Since Sp1 expression and functions are regulated via the 26S proteasome, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on miR-29b-Sp1 loop, showing that miR-29b levels were indeed upregulated by the drug. At the same time, the bortezomib/miR-29b combination produced significant pro-apoptotic effects. We also demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway plays a major role in the regulation of miR-29b-Sp1 loop and induction of apoptosis in MM cells. Finally, MM xenografts constitutively expressing miR-29b showed significant reduction of their tumorigenic potential. Our findings indicate that miR-29b is involved in a regulatory loop amenable of pharmacologic intervention and modulates the anti-MM activity of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:23190608

  15. miR-29b sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis through the activation of a feedback loop with the transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Amodio, N; Di Martino, M T; Foresta, U; Leone, E; Lionetti, M; Leotta, M; Gullà, A M; Pitari, M R; Conforti, F; Rossi, M; Agosti, V; Fulciniti, M; Misso, G; Morabito, F; Ferrarini, M; Neri, A; Caraglia, M; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) with tumor-suppressor potential might have therapeutic applications in multiple myeloma (MM) through the modulation of still undiscovered molecular pathways. Here, we investigated the effects of enforced expression of miR-29b on the apoptotic occurrence in MM and highlighted its role in the context of a new transcriptional loop that is finely tuned by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. In details, in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis of MM cells was induced by either transient expression of synthetic miR-29b or its stable lentivirus-enforced expression. We identified Sp1, a transcription factor endowed with oncogenic activity, as a negative regulator of miR-29b expression in MM cells. Since Sp1 expression and functions are regulated via the 26S proteasome, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on miR-29b-Sp1 loop, showing that miR-29b levels were indeed upregulated by the drug. At the same time, the bortezomib/miR-29b combination produced significant pro-apoptotic effects. We also demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT pathway plays a major role in the regulation of miR-29b-Sp1 loop and induction of apoptosis in MM cells. Finally, MM xenografts constitutively expressing miR-29b showed significant reduction of their tumorigenic potential. Our findings indicate that miR-29b is involved in a regulatory loop amenable of pharmacologic intervention and modulates the anti-MM activity of bortezomib in MM cells. PMID:23190608

  16. Disparities in utilization of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciano J.; Huang, Jia-Xing; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2015-01-01

    Background AHCT is an established therapy for multiple myeloma (MM) with impact in quality of remissions and survival. We analyzed the role of race-ethnicity, sex and age-disparities in AHCT utilization in US. Methods We combined MM incidence derived from SEER-18 with transplant activity reported to the CIBMTR for the period of 2005–2009 to assess the impact of disparities in AHCT. Utilization (number of transplants/new cases) was compared between groups using relative utilization ratio (RUR), defined as [utilization for a given category]/[utilization for the entire population]. Results Data was obtained from 22,462 actual MM cases and 13,311 AHCT. Age-adjusted RUR was 1.17 (1.15–1.19) among non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), higher than in non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) [0.69 (0.67–0.72), P<0.0002], Hispanics [0.64 (0.60–0.69), p<0.002] and Asians [0.65 (0.58–0.73), P<0.0002]. There was higher AHCT utilization in men than in women among Hispanics (age-adjusted RUR 0.72 vs. 0.56, P=0.007), but not among NHW, NHB or Asians. Sex disparity prevents 1.3% of potential AHCTs in MM (10.4% among Hispanics). Racial-ethnic disparities prevent 13.8% of AHCTs (44.7% in Hispanic and Asians, 39.9% in NHBs). Conclusions Race-ethnicity disparity greatly affects AHCT utilization in MM. Sex disparity plays a lesser role, except among Hispanics. The ongoing decrease in age disparity will continue to drive major increase of AHCT activity. A 2-year and 5-year increase in age of the AHCT population would result in respectively 12% and 32% increase in volume of AHCT. PMID:25555447

  17. A novel bispecific protein (ULBP2-BB4) targeting the NKG2D receptor on natural killer (NK) cells and CD138 activates NK cells and has potent antitumor activity against human multiple myeloma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Hansen, Hinrich P; Reiners, Katrin S; Schnell, Roland; Borchmann, Peter; Merkert, Sabine; Simhadri, Venkateswara R; Draube, Andreas; Reiser, Marcel; Purr, Ingvill; Hallek, Michael; Engert, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    The inability of the immune system to recognize and kill malignant plasma cells in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has been attributed in part to the ineffective activation of natural killer (NK) cells. In order to activate and target NK cells to the malignant cells in MM we designed a novel recombinant bispecific protein (ULBP2-BB4). While ULBP2 binds the activating NK receptor NKG2D, the BB4 moiety binds to CD138, which is overexpressed on a variety of malignancies, including MM. ULBP2-BB4 strongly activated primary NK cells as demonstrated by a significant increase in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion. In vitro, ULBP2-BB4 enhanced the NK-mediated lysis of 2 CD138+ human MM cell lines, U-266 and RPMI-8226, and of primary malignant plasma cells in the allogenic and autologous setting. Moreover, in a nude mouse model with subcutaneously growing RPMI-8226 cells, the cotherapy with ULBP-BB4 and human peripheral blood lymphocytes abrogated the tumor growth. These data suggest potential clinical use of this novel construct in patients with MM. The use of recombinant NK receptor ligands that target NK cells to tumor cells might offer new approaches for other malignancies provided a tumor antigen-specific antibody is available.

  18. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells through suppression of nuclear factor-κB and upregulation of microRNA-29b.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zhu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor and is the most common primary tumor of the bone marrow in the USA. Genistein is predominantly found in Leguminosae and various lines of evidence have indicated that it suppresses cell growth, induces programmed cell death and inhibits angiogenesis. As a result of these capabilities, genistein presents as a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. However, the effect of genistein on MM remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells through the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and microRNA-29b (miR-29b). In the present study, cell proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, apoptosis was detected using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis assay and caspase-3 activation assay. The expression of NF-κB and miR-29b was analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-29b and anti-miR-29b plasmids were transfected into U266 cells to determine the effect of genistein on MM. In the present study, the results demonstrated that genistein could significantly reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and increase the activity of caspase-3 in U266 cells. Furthermore, it was found that genistein could suppress the protein level of NF-κB and promote the expression of miR-29b in U266 cells. The results also indicated that miR-29b could alter the expression of NF-κB in U266 cells. These findings suggest that genistein inhibits the proliferation of human MM cells by upregulating miR-29b resulting in suppression of NF-κB.

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy and smoldering multiple myeloma: diagnosis, staging, prognosis, management.

    PubMed

    Hillengass, Jens; Moehler, Thomas; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) as one of the most common premalignant disorders and smoldering multiple myeloma (sMM) are both caused by a proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells leading to a detectable serum monoclonal protein and/or excess of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Prerequisite for the diagnosis is that plasma cell disease does not cause clinical symptoms. Cytogenetic aberrations are detectable in the majority of patient in the clonally expanded plasma cells. MGUS consistently proceeds symptomatic MM. The lifetime risk of progression into symptomatic multiple myeloma lies between 15% and 59% for patients with MGUS or sMM. Prognostic parameters for development of symptomatic multiple myeloma from MGUS or sMM are concentration of monoclonal protein, bone marrow plasmocytosis, a non- IgG subtype and an abnormal free-light chain ratio. Detection of more than 1 focal lesion in whole body MRI, 95% or more of bone marrow plasma cells displaying an aberrant phenotype in flow cytometry and an evolving clinical course in two consecutive follow-up visits are additional prognostic parameters for sMM. Currently there is no accepted secondary prevention strategy available for sMM and MGUS progression. Future studies are required to combine increasing knowledge on risk factors and molecular pathogenesis with targeted agents to prevent progression. PMID:21509683

  20. Pathogenesis beyond the cancer clone(s) in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giada

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 4 decades, basic research has provided crucial information regarding the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. In particular, the relevance of cancer microenvironment (including both cellular and noncellular elements) and the concept of clonal evolution and heterogeneity have emerged as important in cancer pathogenesis, immunologic escape, and resistance to therapy. Multiple myeloma (MM), a cancer of terminally differentiated plasma cells, is emblematic of the impact of cancer microenvironment and the role of clonal evolution. Although genetic and epigenetic aberrations occur in MM and evolve over time under the pressure of exogenous stimuli, they are also largely present in premalignant plasma cell dyscrasia such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), suggesting that genetic mutations alone are necessary, but not sufficient, for myeloma transformation. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in mediating survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy in myeloma is well established; and although an appealing speculation, its role in fostering the evolution of MGUS or SMM into MM is yet to be proven. In this review, we discuss MM pathogenesis with a particular emphasis on the role of bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:25838343

  1. Pathogenesis beyond the cancer clone(s) in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giada; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2015-05-14

    Over the past 4 decades, basic research has provided crucial information regarding the cellular and molecular biology of cancer. In particular, the relevance of cancer microenvironment (including both cellular and noncellular elements) and the concept of clonal evolution and heterogeneity have emerged as important in cancer pathogenesis, immunologic escape, and resistance to therapy. Multiple myeloma (MM), a cancer of terminally differentiated plasma cells, is emblematic of the impact of cancer microenvironment and the role of clonal evolution. Although genetic and epigenetic aberrations occur in MM and evolve over time under the pressure of exogenous stimuli, they are also largely present in premalignant plasma cell dyscrasia such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), suggesting that genetic mutations alone are necessary, but not sufficient, for myeloma transformation. The role of bone marrow microenvironment in mediating survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy in myeloma is well established; and although an appealing speculation, its role in fostering the evolution of MGUS or SMM into MM is yet to be proven. In this review, we discuss MM pathogenesis with a particular emphasis on the role of bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:25838343

  2. Multiple Myeloma. Diagnostic challenges and standard therapy.

    PubMed

    Kyle, R A

    2001-04-01

    In the diagnosis of multiple myeloma (MM), the clinician must exclude other disorders in which a plasma cell reaction may occur such as rheumatoid arthritis and connective tissue disorders, or metastatic carcinoma where the patient may have osteolytic lesions associated with bone metastases. Patients with smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) have none of the complicating features of MM and do not require treatment with potentially toxic agents. The plasma cell labeling index can help make a differential diagnosis of MM from SMM. Patients with a high labeling index have a high risk of complications and should be monitored carefully. However, the labeling index can be low in active MM. In addition, SMM or MGUS patients have few or no circulating plasma cells. High-dose chemotherapy and stem cell support prolong overall survival in contrast to conventional therapy. If stem cell transplantation is considered, it is important to harvest the cells before using alkylating agents to obtain a sufficient number of cells. Supportive treatment consists of the occasional use of erythropoietin to maintain adequate hemoglobin levels and adequate hydration to protect renal function. Vaccination against pneumococcal infections and the prophylactic use of antibiotic therapy during the first 2 months of treatment can be beneficial. Recognizing the symptoms of spinal cord compression and initiating dexamethasone therapy promptly to prevent paraplegia are critical. PMID:11309703

  3. Antigen-specific T-cell immunity in multiple myeloma patients is restored following high-dose therapy: implications for timing of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Johnsen, H E

    2007-10-01

    The present study analyses the influence of high-dose chemotherapy (HD) and autologous stem cell transplantation on natural and vaccine induced specific immunity in multiple myeloma patients. Peripheral blood was collected from six multiple myeloma (MM) patients at serial time points in connection with treatment and during a follow-up period of 3 months. T-cell response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) was determined by flow cytometry analysis for CD69, TNFalpha, IFNgamma, IL-4 expression and cell proliferation. At diagnosis and prior to induction chemotherapy TNFalpha expressing T cells in 5/6 patients were found specific for CMV, 3/6 for VZV and 4/6 for TT. Serial analyses during treatment conclude impaired immune response, however, 3 months post-transplantation all but one patient had regained cytokine expressing CD8(+) T cells specific for CMV, VZV and TT. The highest percentages of cytokine responding T cells were observed after stimulation with CMV antigen. A striking observation was the low cytokine reactivity (close to zero) measured in G-CSF mobilized blood at the time of leukapheresis. In spite of a general reduction of the CD4/CD8 ratio following transplantation, recovery of antigen specific CD4(+) T cells reactivity generally occurred prior to CD8(+) recovery and often to a higher level. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that natural as well as vaccine induced specific immunity present prior to HD was regained after stem cell transplantation, hence identifying a possible window for future vaccination trials.

  4. Cytogenetic profiles in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a study in highly purified aberrant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Pérez-Andrés, Martin; Paiva, Bruno; Rasillo, Ana; Tabernero, Maria Dolores; Sayagués, José Maria; Lopez, Antonio; Bárcena, Paloma; Sanchez, María Luz; Gutiérrez, Norma C.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies in clonal plasma cell disorders have mainly been done in whole bone marrow or CD138+ microbead-enriched plasma cells and suggest that recurrent immunoglobulin heavy chain translocations - e.g. t(4;14) -are primary oncogenetic events. The aim of this study was to determine cytogenetic patterns of highly purified aberrant plasma cells (median purity ≥98%) in different clonal plasma cell disorders. We analyzed aberrant plasma cells from 208 patients with multiple myeloma (n=148) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=60) for the presence of del(13q14), del(17p13) and t(14q32) using multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Additionally, immunoglobulin heavy chain gene arrangements were analyzed and complementarity determining region 3 was sequenced in a subset of patients and combined multicolor interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization/immunofluorescent protein staining analyses were performed in selected cases to confirm clonality and cytogenetic findings. At diagnosis, 96% of cases with multiple myeloma versus 77% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance cases showed at least one cytogenetic alteration and/or hyperdiploidy. The cytogenetic heterogeneity of individual cases reflected coexistence of cytogenetically-defined aberrant plasma cell clones, and led to the assumption that karyotypic alterations were acquired stepwise. Cases of multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance frequently showed different but related cytogenetic profiles when other cytogenetic alterations such as deletions/gains of the immunoglobulin heavy chain or the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 were additionally considered. Interestingly, in 24% of multiple myeloma versus 62% of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients with an immunoglobulin heavy chain translocation, aberrant plasma cells with and without t(14q32) coexisted in the same patient. Our data suggest that

  5. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  6. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  7. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), one of the most intractable malignancies, is characterized by the infiltration and growth of plasma cells, the most differentiated cells in the B-cell lineage, in the bone marrow. Despite the introduction of novel therapeutic agents, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, the prognosis of patients with MM is still worse than that of most hematological malignancies. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the disease is essential to achieve any improvement of treatment outcome of MM patients. All MM cases pass through the phase of asymptomatic expansion of clonal plasma cells, referred to as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). It has long been believed that MM evolves linearly from MGUS to terminal phases, such as extramedullary tumors and plasma cell leukemia via the accumulation of novel mutations. However, recent studies using next-generation sequencing have disclosed the complex genomic architecture of the disease. At each step of progression, the acquisition of novel mutations is accompanied by subclonal evolution from reservoir clones with branching patterns. Each subclone may carry novel mutations and distinct phenotypes, including drug sensitivity. In addition, minor clones already exist at the MGUS stage, which could expand later in the clinical course, resulting in relapse and/or leukemic conversion. The ultimate goal of treatment is to eradicate all clones, including subclonal populations with distinct biological characteristics. This goal could be achieved by further improving treatment strategies that reflect the genomic landscape of the disease.

  8. Identification of the source of elevated hepatocyte growth factor levels in multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine which can lead to cancer cell proliferation, migration and metastasis. In multiple myeloma (MM) patients it is an abundant component of the bone marrow. HGF levels are elevated in 50% of patients and associated with poor prognosis. Here we aim to investigate its source in myeloma. Methods HGF mRNA levels in bone marrow core biopsies from healthy individuals and myeloma patients were quantified by real-time PCR. HGF gene expression profiling in CD138+ cells isolated from bone marrow aspirates of healthy individuals and MM patients was performed by microarray analysis. HGF protein concentrations present in peripheral blood of MM patients were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cytogenetic status of CD138+ cells was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA sequencing of the HGF gene promoter. HGF secretion in co-cultures of human myeloma cell lines and bone marrow stromal cells was measured by ELISA. Results HGF gene expression profiling in both bone marrow core biopsies and CD138+ cells showed elevated HGF mRNA levels in myeloma patients. HGF mRNA levels in biopsies and in myeloma cells correlated. Quantification of HGF protein levels in serum also correlated with HGF mRNA levels in CD138+ cells from corresponding patients. Cytogenetic analysis showed myeloma cell clones with HGF copy numbers between 1 and 3 copies. There was no correlation between HGF copy number and HGF mRNA levels. Co-cultivation of the human myeloma cell lines ANBL-6 and JJN3 with bone marrow stromal cells or the HS-5 cell line resulted in a significant increase in secreted HGF. Conclusions We here show that in myeloma patients HGF is primarily produced by malignant plasma cells, and that HGF production by these cells might be supported by the bone marrow microenvironment. Considering the fact that elevated HGF serum and plasma levels predict poor prognosis, these findings are of

  9. The formation of electronically excited species in the human multiple myeloma cell suspension

    PubMed Central

    Rác, Marek; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, evidence is provided on the formation of electronically excited species in human multiple myeloma cells U266 in the growth medium exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Two-dimensional imaging of ultra-weak photon emission using highly sensitive charge coupled device camera revealed that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension caused the formation of triplet excited carbonyls 3(R = O)*. The kinetics of 3(R = O)* formation in the real time, as measured by one-dimensional ultra-weak photon emission using low-noise photomultiplier, showed immediate enhancement followed by a slow decay. In parallel to the formation of 3(R = O)*, the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in U266 cells caused by the addition of H2O2 was visualized by the imaging of 1O2 using the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Additionally, the formation of 1O2 after the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy using 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone. Presented results indicate that the addition of H2O2 to cell suspension results in the formation of 3(R = O)* and 1O2 in U266 cell suspension. The contribution of the cell-free medium to the formation of electronically excited species was discussed. PMID:25744165

  10. A p53-dependent tumor suppressor network is induced by selective miR-125a-5p inhibition in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Marzia; Biamonte, Lavinia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Ronchetti, Domenica; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Botta, Cirino; Leone, Emanuela; Pitari, Maria Rita; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Amodio, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) is emerging as a novel approach to disclose the regulation of tumor suppressor or tumor promoting pathways in tumor cells. Targeting aberrantly expressed miRNAs is therefore a promising strategy for cancer treatment. By miRNA profiling of primary plasma cells from multiple myeloma (MM) patients, we previously reported increased miR-125a-5p levels associated to specific molecular subgroups. On these premises, we aimed at investigating the biological effects triggered by miR-125a-5p modulation in MM cells. Expression of p53 pathway-related genes was down-regulated in MM cells transfected with miR-125a-5p mimics. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed specific p53 targeting at 3'UTR level by miR-125a-5p mimics. Interestingly, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) affected the miR-125a-5p/p53 axis, since adhesion of MM cells to BMSCs strongly up-regulated miR-125a-5p levels, while reduced p53 expression. Moreover, ectopic miR-125a-5p reduced, while miR-125-5p inhibitors promoted, the expression of tumor suppressor miR-192 and miR-194, transcriptionally regulated by p53. Lentiviral-mediated stable inhibition of miR-125a-5p expression in wild-type p53 MM cells dampened cell growth, increased apoptosis and reduced cell migration. Importantly, inhibition of in vitro MM cell proliferation and migration was also achieved by synthetic miR-125a-5p inhibitors and was potentiated by the co-expression of miR-192 or miR-194. Taken together, our data indicate that miR-125a-5p antagonism results in the activation of p53 pathway in MM cells, underlying the crucial role of this miRNA in the biopathology of MM and providing the molecular rationale for the combinatory use of miR-125a inhibitors and miR-192 or miR-194 mimics for MM treatment. PMID:24819167

  11. Diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and osteosclerotic myeloma with features of POEMS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ngamdu, Kyari Sumayin; Torabi, Alireza; Badri, Nabeel; Teleb, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal hematopoietic neoplasm characterized by the proliferation of malignant plasma cells and associated end-organ damage, most notably lytic lesions in the bones. Osteosclerotic myeloma is an unusual variant of the disease in which the skeletal involvement is characterized by sclerotic lesions instead of classical lytic lesions. The disease can be associated with paraneoplastic symptoms, which have been given the acronym POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes). In addition to clonal plasma cell dyscrasias, some cases of POEMS syndrome are associated with Castleman's disease, and in 11% to 30% of the cases both Castleman's disease and clonal plasma cell proliferation are present. POEMS syndrome has rarely been described in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27365880

  12. Angiogenic cytokines profile in smoldering multiple myeloma: No difference compared to MGUS but altered compared to symptomatic myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gkotzamanidou, Maria; Christoulas, Dimitrios; Souliotis, Vassilis L.; Papatheodorou, Athanasios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Terpos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from an asymptomatic precursor state termed monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering myeloma (SMM). Angiogenesis plays a key role in the pathogenesis of MM but there are very limited data for angiogenesis in SMM. Material/Methods We measured the circulating levels of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and angiogenin in 54 patients with SMM. The results were compared with those of 27 MGUS patients, 55 MM patients, and 22 healthy controls. The expression of VEGF-A gene was also evaluated in 10 patients with SMM, 10 with symptomatic MM, and 10 with MGUS. Results The ratio of circulating Ang-1/Ang-2 was reduced in MM patients with symptomatic disease due to a dramatic increase of Ang-2 (p<0.001), but not in patients with SMM or MGUS, in whom it did not differ compared to controls. VEGF and angiogenin were increased in all patients compared to controls. However, circulating VEGF was higher in symptomatic MM compared to SMM and MGUS, while angiogenin was reduced. There were no differences in the expression of VEGF-A among the 3 patients categories. Conclusions SMM has a circulating angiogenic cytokine profile similar to that of MGUS, but has altered profile compared to symptomatic MM. Thus, in the progression of MGUS to SMM, circulating angiogenic cytokines seem to be the same. On the contrary, in symptomatic myeloma, the alterations of angiopoietins along with VEGF contribute to myeloma cell growth, supporting the target of these molecules for the development of novel anti-myeloma agents. PMID:24355943

  13. Notch signaling drives multiple myeloma induced osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michela; Thümmler, Katja; Mirandola, Leonardo; Garavelli, Silvia; Todoerti, Katia; Apicella, Luana; Lazzari, Elisa; Lancellotti, Marialuigia; Platonova, Natalia; Akbar, Moeed; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Soutar, Richard; Neri, Antonino; Goodyear, Carl S.; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is closely associated with bone destruction. Once migrated to the bone marrow, MM cells unbalance bone formation and resorption via the recruitment and maturation of osteoclast precursors. The Notch pathway plays a key role in different types of cancer and drives several biological processes relevant in MM, including cell localization within the bone marrow, proliferation, survival and pharmacological resistance. Here we present evidences that MM can efficiently drive osteoclastogenesis by contemporaneously activating Notch signaling on tumor cells and osteoclasts through the aberrant expression of Notch ligands belonging to the Jagged family. Active Notch signaling in MM cells induces the secretion of the key osteoclastogenic factor, RANKL, which can be boosted in the presence of stromal cells. In turn, MM cells-derived RANKL causes the upregulation of its receptor, RANK, and Notch2 in pre-osteoclasts. Notch2 stimulates osteoclast differentiation by promoting autocrine RANKL signaling. Finally, MM cells through Jagged ligands expression can also activate Notch signaling in pre-osteoclast by direct contact. Such synergism between tumor cells and pre-osteoclasts in MM-induced osteoclastogenesis can be disrupted by silencing tumor-derived Jagged1 and 2. These results make the Jagged ligands new promising therapeutic targets in MM to contrast bone disease and the associated co-morbidities. PMID:25257302

  14. CYT997 causes apoptosis in human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Katherine; Khong, Tiffany; Smith, Gregg; Spencer, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignancy of mature plasma cells. Microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) are an established class of drug that include many conventional and some novel compounds. MTAs function by inhibiting the polymerisation or depolymerisation of microtubules (MTs) within the cell, disrupting various important cellular functions. We have investigated pre-clinically the novel tubulin polymerisation inhibitor CYT997 for the potential treatment of MM. Here we demonstrate the promising anti-myeloma activity of CYT997 as evidenced by tubulin disruption, inhibition of growth and proliferation, cell cycle arrest and most importantly apoptosis of both human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) and primary MM cells using nanomolar drug concentrations. CYT997 also synergises with bortezomib to produce more potent anti-MM activity. These in vitro observations were validated in vivo by the ability of CYT997 to significantly prolong survival in a murine model of aggressive systemic myelomatosis. These findings provide a basis for continuing pre-clinical and clinical investigations into the anti-MM effects of CYT997.

  15. Elevated expression of APE1/Ref-1 and its regulation on IL-6 and IL-8 in bone marrow stromal cells of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jia-Yin; Li, Meng-Xia; Xiang, De-Bing; Mou, Jiang-Hong; Qing, Yi; Zeng, Lin-Li; Yang, Zhen-Zhou; Guan, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2010-10-01

    A number of growth factors secreted by bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), including interleukin-6 and -8 (IL-6/8), are important for the initiation and progression of multiple myeloma (MM). However, the mechanisms that regulate the production of IL-6/8 by BMSC have not yet been well characterized. Human dual functional protein apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is essential for cell survival and proliferation. Previous studies showed that APE1/Ref-1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, but few studies showed its expression in supportive cells in the tumor microenvironment. We first detected APE1/Ref-1 expression in BMSCs of normal, initial, and recurrent MM patients, and then explore the correlation between APE1/Ref-1 level and IL-6/8 secretion of BMSCs. A marked increase of APE1/Ref-1 expression and abnormal subcellular distribution were observed in MM BMSCs. APE1/Ref-1 overexpression was related to higher secretary level of IL-6/8 by MM BMSCs and the IL-6/8 secretion was blocked significantly by adenovirus-mediated APE1/Ref-1-specific (small interfering RNA) siRNA. Our results also demonstrated that APE1/Ref-1-specific siRNA significantly inhibited DNA binding activity of AP-1 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), 2 important transcription factors in the regulation IL-6/8 secretion in MM BMSCs. The results provided by the present study indicate APE1/Ref-1, which plays a regulatory role in IL-6/8 production by BMSCs, may be a potential therapeutic target of MM.

  16. Immunological Dysregulation in Multiple Myeloma Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; La Fauci, Alessia; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a systemic hematologic disease due to uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells (PC) in bone marrow (BM). Emerging in other solid and liquid cancers, the host immune system and the microenvironment have a pivotal role for PC growth, proliferation, survival, migration, and resistance to drugs and are responsible for some clinical manifestations of MM. In MM, microenvironment is represented by the cellular component of a normal bone marrow together with extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors produced by both stromal cells and PC themselves. All these components are able to protect PC from cytotoxic effect of chemo- and radiotherapy. This review is focused on the role of immunome to sustain MM progression, the emerging role of myeloid derived suppressor cells, and their potential clinical implications as novel therapeutic target. PMID:25013764

  17. Targeting the Biophysical Properties of the Myeloma Initiating Cell Niches: A Pharmaceutical Synergism Analysis Using Multi-Scale Agent-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jing; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Wen; Choi, Dong Song; Wen, Jianguo; Jiang, Beini; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma, the second most common hematological cancer, is currently incurable due to refractory disease relapse and development of multiple drug resistance. We and others recently established the biophysical model that myeloma initiating (stem) cells (MICs) trigger the stiffening of their niches via SDF-1/CXCR4 paracrine; The stiffened niches then promote the colonogenesis of MICs and protect them from drug treatment. In this work we examined in silico the pharmaceutical potential of targeting MIC niche stiffness to facilitate cytotoxic chemotherapies. We first established a multi-scale agent-based model using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to recapitulate the niche stiffness centric, pro-oncogenetic positive feedback loop between MICs and myeloma-associated bone marrow stromal cells (MBMSCs), and investigated the effects of such intercellular chemo-physical communications on myeloma development. Then we used AMD3100 (to interrupt the interactions between MICs and their stroma) and Bortezomib (a recently developed novel therapeutic agent) as representative drugs to examine if the biophysical properties of myeloma niches are drugable. Results showed that our model recaptured the key experimental observation that the MBMSCs were more sensitive to SDF-1 secreted by MICs, and provided stiffer niches for these initiating cells and promoted their proliferation and drug resistance. Drug synergism analysis suggested that AMD3100 treatment undermined the capability of MICs to modulate the bone marrow microenvironment, and thus re-sensitized myeloma to Bortezomib treatments. This work is also the first attempt to virtually visualize in 3D the dynamics of the bone marrow stiffness during myeloma development. In summary, we established a multi-scale model to facilitate the translation of the niche-stiffness centric myeloma model as well as experimental observations to possible clinical applications. We concluded that targeting the biophysical properties of stem

  18. Tetraspanin 7 (TSPAN7) expression is upregulated in multiple myeloma patients and inhibits myeloma tumour development in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Chee Man; Chow, Annie W.S.; Fitter, Stephen; Hewett, Duncan R.; Martin, Sally K.; Williams, Sharon A.; To, L. Bik; and others

    2015-03-01

    Background: Increased expression of the tetraspanin TSPAN7 has been observed in a number of cancers; however, it is unclear how TSPAN7 plays a role in cancer progression. Methods: We investigated the expression of TSPAN7 in the haematological malignancy multiple myleoma (MM) and assessed the consequences of TSPAN7 expression in the adhesion, migration and growth of MM plasma cells (PC) in vitro and in bone marrow (BM) homing and tumour growth in vivo. Finally, we characterised the association of TSPAN7 with cell surface partner molecules in vitro. Results: TSPAN7 was found to be highly expressed at the RNA and protein level in CD138{sup +} MM PC from approximately 50% of MM patients. TSPAN7 overexpression in the murine myeloma cell line 5TGM1 significantly reduced tumour burden in 5TGM1/KaLwRij mice 4 weeks after intravenous adminstration of 5TGM1 cells. While TSPAN7 overexpression did not affect cell proliferation in vitro, TSPAN7 increased 5TGM1 cell adhesion to BM stromal cells and transendothelial migration. In addition, TSPAN7 was found to associate with the molecular chaperone calnexin on the cell surface. Conclusion: These results suggest that elevated TSPAN7 may be associated with better outcomes for up to 50% of MM patients. - Highlights: • TSPAN7 expression is upregulated in newly-diagnosed patients with active multiple myeloma. • Overexpression of TSPAN7 inhibits myeloma tumour development in vivo. • TSPAN7 interacts with calnexin at the plasma membrane in a myeloma cell line.

  19. Glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibition limits osteoclast activation and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Adel; Xu, Ke; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Butters, Terry D.; Santo, Ana Espirito; Vattakuzhi, Youridies; Williams, Lynn M.; Goudevenou, Katerina; Danks, Lynett; Freidin, Andrew; Spanoudakis, Emmanouil; Parry, Simon; Papaioannou, Maria; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Chaidos, Aristeidis; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Twigg, Gabriele; Hu, Ming; Dwek, Raymond A.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Roberts, Irene; Dell, Anne; Rahemtulla, Amin; Horwood, Nicole J.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are essential constituents of cell membranes and lipid rafts and can modulate signal transduction events. The contribution of GSLs in osteoclast (OC) activation and osteolytic bone diseases in malignancies such as the plasma cell dyscrasia multiple myeloma (MM) is not known. Here, we tested the hypothesis that pathological activation of OCs in MM requires de novo GSL synthesis and is further enhanced by myeloma cell–derived GSLs. Glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitors, including the clinically approved agent N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ), prevented OC development and activation by disrupting RANKL-induced localization of TRAF6 and c-SRC into lipid rafts and preventing nuclear accumulation of transcriptional activator NFATc1. GM3 was the prevailing GSL produced by patient-derived myeloma cells and MM cell lines, and exogenous addition of GM3 synergistically enhanced the ability of the pro-osteoclastogenic factors RANKL and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) to induce osteoclastogenesis in precursors. In WT mice, administration of GM3 increased OC numbers and activity, an effect that was reversed by treatment with NB-DNJ. In a murine MM model, treatment with NB-DNJ markedly improved osteolytic bone disease symptoms. Together, these data demonstrate that both tumor-derived and de novo synthesized GSLs influence osteoclastogenesis and suggest that NB-DNJ may reduce pathological OC activation and bone destruction associated with MM. PMID:25915583

  20. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: Aberrant cellular division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, T.K.; Derby, M.; Martin, D.F.; Wright, S.D.; Dao, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells.

  1. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S.; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab’s effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8+:CD4+ and CD8+:Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8+ PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38+ immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  2. Ex Vivo Expanded Natural Killer Cells Demonstrate Robust Proliferation In Vivo In High-Risk Relapsed Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Szmania, Susann; Lapteva, Natalia; Garg, Tarun; Greenway, Amy; Lingo, Joshuah; Nair, Bijay; Stone, Katie; Woods, Emily; Khan, Junaid; Stivers, Justin; Panozzo, Susan; Campana, Dario; Bellamy, William T.; Robbins, Molly; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Waheed, Sarah; Gee, Adrian; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Rooney, Cliona; Barlogie, Bart; van Rhee, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Highly activated/expanded natural killer (NK) cells can be generated via stimulation with the HLA-deficient cell line K562 genetically modified to express 41BB-ligand and membrane-bound interleukin (IL)15. We tested the safety, persistence and activity of expanded NK cells generated from myeloma patients (auto-NK) or haplo-identical family donors (allo-NK) in heavily pretreated patients with high-risk relapsing myeloma. The preparative regimen comprised bortezomib only or bortezomib and immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone and fludarabine. NK cells were shipped overnight either cryopreserved or fresh. In 8 patients, up to 1×108 NK cells/kg were infused on day 0 and followed by daily administrations of IL2. Significant in vivo expansion was observed only in the 5 patients receiving fresh products, peaking at or near day 7, with the highest NK cell counts in 2 subjects who received cells produced in a high concentration of IL2 (500 units/mL). Seven days after infusion, donor NK cells comprised > 90% of circulating leukocytes in fresh allo-NK cell recipients, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic myeloma targets was retained in vitro. Among the 7 evaluable patients, there were no serious adverse events that could be related to NK cell infusion. One patient had a partial response and in another the tempo of disease progression decreased; neither patient required further therapy for 6 months. In the 5 remaining patients, disease progression was not affected by NK cell infusion. In conclusion, infusion of large numbers of expanded NK cells was feasible and safe; infusing fresh cells was critical to their expansion in vivo. PMID:25415285

  3. The proteasome deubiquitinase inhibitor VLX1570 shows selectivity for ubiquitin-specific protease-14 and induces apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Pierrou, Stefan; Hillertz, Per; Gullbo, Joachim; Selvaraju, Karthik; Paulus, Aneel; Akhtar, Sharoon; Bossler, Felicitas; Khan, Asher Chanan; Linder, Stig; D’Arcy, Padraig

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of deubiquitinase (DUB) activity is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. VLX1570 is an inhibitor of proteasome DUB activity currently in clinical trials for relapsed multiple myeloma. Here we show that VLX1570 binds to and inhibits the activity of ubiquitin-specific protease-14 (USP14) in vitro, with comparatively weaker inhibitory activity towards UCHL5 (ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase-5). Exposure of multiple myeloma cells to VLX1570 resulted in thermostabilization of USP14 at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Transient knockdown of USP14 or UCHL5 expression by electroporation of siRNA reduced the viability of multiple myeloma cells. Treatment of multiple myeloma cells with VLX1570 induced the accumulation of proteasome-bound high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates and an apoptotic response. Sensitivity to VLX1570 was moderately affected by altered drug uptake, but was unaffected by overexpression of BCL2-family proteins or inhibitors of caspase activity. Finally, treatment with VLX1570 was found to lead to extended survival in xenograft models of multiple myeloma. Our findings demonstrate promising antiproliferative activity of VLX1570 in multiple myeloma, primarily associated with inhibition of USP14 activity. PMID:27264969

  4. CD200 Expression on Plasma Cell Myeloma Cells is Associated with the Efficacies of Bortezomib, Lenalidomide and Thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Sakiko; Shiozawa, Eisuke; Homma, Mayumi; Arai, Nana; Kabasawa, Nobuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yukiko; Fujiwara, Shun; Okino, Kazumaro; Kobayashi, Kae; Yamochi, Toshiko; Tate, Genshu; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma (PCM) is a devastating disease with a highly heterogeneous outcome, with survival ranging from a few months to longer than 10 years. Treatment of multiple myeloma has changed markedly in the past decade due to the development of new drugs such as bortezomib, lenalidomide and thalidomide, which have greatly improved the outcome of PCM. The clinical and prognostic value of immunophenotyping in PCM remains questionable. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic and prognostic significance of CD200 expression in newly diagnosed PCM. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 107 patients newly diagnosed with PCM at Showa University Hospital between January 2004 and September 2013. Expression of CD200 was studied by immunohistochemistry. Clinical and pathological parameters were compared between CD200-positive and CD200-negative cases. CD200-positive PCM cases had lower serum albumin (p = 0.0001) compared to those without CD200 expression. Our results showed no significant difference in median overall survival between patients with CD200-positive and CD200-negative PCM. However, there was a strong correlation between CD200 expression and serum albumin level. In the CD200-negative group, median overall survival was significantly longer in patients who received new drug treatment. These findings suggest that CD200 expression is a useful marker for evaluation of the severity of PCM and that lack of CD200 expression may improve the sensitivity of PCM to therapy with new drugs.

  5. Cross-talk between two antioxidants, thioredoxin reductase and heme oxygenase-1, and therapeutic implications for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Raninga, Prahlad V.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancements in anti-myeloma therapies, MM remains an incurable disease. Antioxidant molecules are upregulated in many cancers, correlating with tumor proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance and therefore, have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets. This study investigated the cross-talk between two antioxidant molecules, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and their therapeutic implications in MM. We found that although auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor, significantly inhibited TrxR activity by more than 50% at lower concentrations, myeloma cell proliferation was only inhibited at higher concentrations of auranofin. Inhibition of TrxR using lower auranofin concentrations induced HO-1 protein expression in myeloma cells. Using a sub-lethal concentration of auranofin to inhibit TrxR activity in conjunction with HO-1 inhibition significantly decreased myeloma cell growth and induced apoptosis. TrxR was shown to regulate HO-1 via the Nrf2 signaling pathway in a ROS-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 mRNA levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to parent cells and HO-1 inhibition restored the sensitivity to bortezomib in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells. These findings indicate that concurrent inhibition of HO-1 with either a TrxR inhibitor or with bortezomib would improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. Hence, our findings further support the need to target multiple antioxidant systems alone or in combination with other therapeutics to improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. PMID:26795735

  6. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M.; Oldham, Robyn A. A.; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  7. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M; Oldham, Robyn A A; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  8. Gene expression profiling defines a high-risk entity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Feng-Huang; Barlogie, Bart; John D, Shaughnessy

    2007-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and remains incurable. The marked variation in survival of patients with symptomatic myeloma ranging from few months to more than 15 years can be explained by differences in tumor mass, proliferative activity and, more recently, by cytogenetic and molecular genetic characteristics of the myeloma clone. Oligonucleotide microarray-based gene expression analysis was applied to CD138-enriched plasma cells from newly diagnosed patients with symptomatic or progressive multiple myeloma treated with melphalan-based high-dose therapy. Here we discuss recent progress made in the development of molecular-based diagnostics and prognostics for MM from Myeloma Institute for Research and Therapy of University Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where we treat more patients with myeloma than anywhere else in the world. Seven distinct entities of myeloma were elucidated by genomic profiling. Expression extremes of 70 genes from a high-risk signature profile,30% of which were derived from chromosome 1, were strongly linked to disease-related survival. CKS1B located on chromosome 1q21, responsible for promoting cell cycle progression by inducing the degradation of p27Kip1, represented a strong candidate gene related to rapid patient death and was studied in detail. The data suggest that CKS1B influences myeloma cell growth and survival through SKP2j and P27(Kip1) -dependent and independent mechanisms and that therapeutic strategies aimed at abolishing CKS1B function may hold promise for the treatment of high-risk disease for which effective therapies are currently lacking.

  9. Emerging therapies for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Podar, Klaus; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Hideshima, Teru; Vallet, Sonia; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal plasma cell malignancy clinically characterized by osteolytic lesions, immunodeficiency, and renal disease. There are an estimated 750,000 people diagnosed with MM worldwide, with a median overall survival of 3 – 5 years. Besides chromosomal aberrations, translocations, and mutations in essential growth and tumor-suppressor genes, accumulating data strongly highlight the pathophysiologic role of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in MM pathogenesis. Based on this knowledge, several novel agents have been identified, and treatment options in MM have fundamentally changed during the last decade. Thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have been incorporated into conventional cytotoxic and transplantation regimens, first in relapsed and refractory and now also in newly diagnosed MM. Despite these significant advances, there remains an urgent need for more efficacious and tolerable drugs. Indeed, a plethora of preclinical agents awaits translation from the bench to the bedside. This article reviews the scientific rationale of new therapy regimens and newly identified therapeutic agents – small molecules as well as therapeutic antibodies – that hold promise to further improve outcome in MM. PMID:19249983

  10. [Therapy of multiple myeloma. What is confirmed?].

    PubMed

    Peest, D; Ganser, A; Einsele, H

    2013-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with clonal development. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are precursor stages of MM and both have to be differentiated from MM which is characterized by organ complications. High-dose chemotherapy combined with autologous stem cell support is the therapy of choice for most patients in order to achieve long-lasting complete remission with few symptoms, prevention of new organ complications and survival prolongation. Patients who cannot be intensively treated due to advanced age and comorbidities should be treated with low-dose chemotherapy, normally alkylating agents, for improved quality of life and also survival prolongation. Including thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, bortezomib or carfilzomib in both high-dose and low-dose chemotherapy concepts results in a significantly higher remission rate and longer survival. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with a relatively high mortality during the first year after transplantation which will be refined with the aim of healing in various trials and is an alternative treatment approach for selected patients. A treatment concept for MM patients has to be individually complemented by local irradiation, administration of bisphosphonates and supportive infusions of immunoglobulins. PMID:24201762

  11. Hepatitis B virus infection status is an independent risk factor for multiple myeloma patients after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Junru; Huang, Beihui; Zheng, Dong; Chen, Mei; Zhou, Zhenhai; Xu, Duorong; Zou, Waiyi

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and its impact on survival and to provide a clinical reference for monitoring and treating HBV during and after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A retrospective analysis of HBV infections was performed in 70 MM patients who received a sequential bortezomib-containing induction therapy and ASCT in our department from June 2006 to February 2012. Among the 70 patients in our study, 11 cases (15.7 %) were hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg+), and 23 cases (33.3 %) were hepatitis B core antibody positive (HBcAb+). Eight cases were HBsAg, hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), and HBcAb positive, while one case was HBsAg, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBcAb positive. The median follow-up times for the HBsAg+ group and the HBsAg-negative (HBsAg-) group were 27.0 (7.6-85.2) months and 28.7 (7.1-111.0) months, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg+ group were 90.9, 80.8, and 34.6 %, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.2 months (95 % CI, 24.8-37.6). The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg- group were 98.2, 94, and 84.6 %, respectively, while the median survival time was not yet available. There was a statistically significant difference (p=0.008) in the overall survival rate between the two groups. By Cox regression analysis, we found that the HBsAg+ status was a prognostic factor, which could independently influence the overall survival rate for ASCT. In conclusion, the HBsAg+ status is an independent risk factor for patients with MM receiving ASCT. The application of standard antiviral treatment might help to overcome this risk factor. PMID:23436046

  12. Enantioselective and Synergetic Toxicity of Axial Chiral Herbicide Propisochlor to SP2/0 Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Chunhong; Yang, Ruili; Xu, Zhenlin; Zhou, Lijun; Sun, Yuanming; Lei, Hongtao

    2015-09-16

    The axial chiral herbicide propisochlor is used to control weeds. Different enantiomers of a compound usually have different biological activities. It is unclear how the toxicities of the propisochlor enantiomers differ. Propisochlor enantiomers, separated by high-performance liquid chromatography, were tested on SP2/0 myeloma cells. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were measured, and interactions between the enantiomers were evaluated. The rac-propisochlor, pure R-(+) isomer, and pure S-(-) isomer inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. The rac-propisochlor, R-(+) isomer, and S-(-) isomer half maximal effective concentration values after 24 h of incubation were 111 ± 0.15, 68 ± 0.09, and 99 ± 0.21 μM, respectively. R-(+) isomer induced the most apoptosis. R-(+) isomer was ∼1.63 times more cytotoxic than rac-propisochlor and ∼1.46 times more cytotoxic than S-(-) isomer. Antagonistic cytotoxic interactions were found between R-(+) and S-(-) isomers. This is the first time the toxicities of these enantiomers and antagonism between the enantiomers have been reported. The antagonism indicates that the ecotoxicological effects of the enantiomers should be investigated. PMID:26299567

  13. Novel Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitor with Anticancer Activity in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Phillips, James G; Jha, Babal K; Govindgari, Shravya; Hu, Jennifer; Grabowski, Dale; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W; Smith, Mitchell R; Cotta, Claudiu; Xu, Yan; Chilakala, Sujatha; Kuang, Rebecca R; Tall, Samantha; Reu, Frederic J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma cells secrete more disulfide bond-rich proteins than any other mammalian cell. Thus, inhibition of protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) should increase ER stress beyond repair in this incurable cancer. Here, we report the mechanistically unbiased discovery of a novel PDI-inhibiting compound with antimyeloma activity. We screened a 30,355 small-molecule library using a multilayered multiple myeloma cell-based cytotoxicity assay that modeled disease niche, normal liver, kidney, and bone marrow. CCF642, a bone marrow-sparing compound, exhibited a submicromolar IC50 in 10 of 10 multiple myeloma cell lines. An active biotinylated analog of CCF642 defined binding to the PDI isoenzymes A1, A3, and A4 in MM cells. In vitro, CCF642 inhibited PDI reductase activity about 100-fold more potently than the structurally distinct established inhibitors PACMA 31 and LOC14. Computational modeling suggested a novel covalent binding mode in active-site CGHCK motifs. Remarkably, without any further chemistry optimization, CCF642 displayed potent efficacy in an aggressive syngeneic mouse model of multiple myeloma and prolonged the lifespan of C57BL/KaLwRij mice engrafted with 5TGM1-luc myeloma, an effect comparable to the first-line multiple myeloma therapeutic bortezomib. Consistent with PDI inhibition, CCF642 caused acute ER stress in multiple myeloma cells accompanied by apoptosis-inducing calcium release. Overall, our results provide an illustration of the utility of simple in vivo simulations as part of a drug discovery effort, along with a sound preclinical rationale to develop a new small-molecule therapeutic to treat multiple myeloma. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3340-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197150

  14. Thalidomide-prednisone maintenance following autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma: effect on thrombin generation and procoagulant markers in NCIC CTG MY.10.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Michael J; Davies, Gwynivere A; Chapman, Judy-Anne W; Bahlis, Nizar; Voralia, Michael; Roy, Jean; Kouroukis, C Tom; Chen, Christine; Belch, Andrew; Reece, Donna; Zhu, Liting; Meyer, Ralph M; Shepherd, Lois; Stewart, Keith A

    2015-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) has an increased incidence in patients with multiple myeloma (MM), especially during chemotherapy. Mechanisms including upregulation of procoagulant factors, such as factor VIII, have been postulated. The National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group MY.10 phase III clinical trial compared thalidomide-prednisone to observation for 332 patients with MM post-autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), with a primary endpoint of overall survival and various secondary endpoints including the incidence of VTE. One hundred and fifty-three patients had biomarker data, including D-dimer, factor VIII and thrombin anti-thrombin (TAT) levels collected post-ASCT at baseline and 2 months after intervention investigating in-vivo thrombin generation. Differences between the time-points included a significant reduction over time in D-dimer, factor VIII and TAT levels in the observation group and sustained elevation of D-dimer, significant increase in factor VIII and reduction in TAT levels in the thalidomide-prednisone group. Eight VTE events were reported in this subset of study patients, all in the thalidomide-prednisone arm, with a trend to increase in D-dimer levels over time in those patients with VTE. This study provides physiological and clinical evidence for an increased risk of VTE associated with thalidomide-prednisone maintenance therapy post-ASCT for MM.

  15. Induction of P3NS1 Myeloma Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest by Simvastatin and/or γ-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Ibrahim Y; Helwa, Reham; Elkashef, Hausein; Hassan, Nagwa H A

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of γ-radiation alone or combined with a cytotoxic drug, simvastatin, on viability and cell cycling of a myeloma cell line. P3NS1 myeloma cells were treated with the selected dose of simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) 24 hours prior to γ-irradiation (0.25, 0.5 and 1 Gy). The cell viability, induction of apoptosis, cell death, cell cycling, generation of ROS, and expression of P53, Bax, Bcl2, caspase3, PARP1 and Fas genes were estimated. The results indicated that simvastatin (0.1 μM/l) treatment for 24 hours prior to γ- irradiation increased cell death to 37.5% as compared to 4.81% by radiation (0.5 Gy) alone. It was found that simvastatin treatment before irradiation caused arrest of cells in G0/G1 and G2/M phases as assessed using flow cytometry. Interestingly, simvastatin treatment of P3NS1 cells increased the intracellular ROS production and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity with increased P53, Bax and Caspase3 gene expression while that of Bcl2 was decreased. Consequently, our results indicated that pre-treatment with simvastatin increased radio sensitivity of myeloma tumor cells in addition to apoptotic effects through an intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. PMID:26514497

  16. Expression and secretion of a recombinant ricin immunotoxin from murine myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Krek, C E; Ladino, C A; Goldmacher, V S; Blättler, W A; Guild, B C

    1995-05-01

    Expression plasmids carrying a humanized N901 immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (hN901HC) fused to a gene encoding the native B chain of ricin toxin (RTB), hN901HC-RTB, or a sugar binding mutant of RTB, hN901HC-RTB delta gly, were constructed. In each case, the fused gene constructions were co-expressed in murine myeloma cells (Sp2/0) with the gene for humanized N901 immunoglobulin light chain to produce the secreted recombinant products hN901-RTB and hN901-RTB delta gly, respectively. When purified by affinity chromatography, both the hN901-RTB and hN901-RTB delta gly products were found to have an apparent molecular mass of M(r) = 210,000 and to be composed of two hN901 antibody heavy chains each fused to a full-length copy of RTB and two hN901 antibody light chains. In each of the recombinant fusions the hN901 antibody moiety retained the full binding affinity and specificity for its cognate antigen, CD56. Moreover, when mixtures of hN901-RTB and native ricin A chain were incubated in the presence of the antigen-positive target cell line SW-2, antigen-specific potentiation of ricin A chain cytotoxicity was observed. It has been demonstrated previously that lectin activity of the B chain is essential for A chain cytotoxicity, and we conclude that the fused wild-type B chain was properly folded and maintained lectin activity. These data demonstrate that feasibility of using recombinant ricin B chain in an immunotoxin and of using mammalian cell culture for its expression. The use of recombinant hN901-RTB fusion protein to evaluate the contribution of the lectin activity of ricin B chain in the penetration of cell membranes by ricin A chain is proposed.

  17. Protease activity in protein-free NS0 myeloma cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Spens, Erika; Häggström, Lena

    2005-01-01

    Zymography of concentrated conditioned medium (CM) from protein-free NS0 myeloma cell cultures showed that this cell line produced and released/secreted several proteases. Two caseinolytic activities at 45-50 and 90 kDa were identified as aspartic acid proteases, and at least two cathepsins of the papain-like cysteine protease family with molecular masses of 30-35 kDa were found by gelatin zymography. One of these cathepsins was identified as cathepsin L by using an enzyme assay exploiting the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC and the inhibitor Z-Phe-Tyr-t(Bu)-DMK. The aspartic acid and cysteine proteases were active only at acidic pH and are therefore not a potential risk for degrading the product or affecting cell growth during culture. Secreted proforms of cathepsins may, however, possess mitogenic functions, but addition of anti-procathepsin L antibodies to NS0 cultures did not influence proliferation. The recombinant antibody product was not degraded in cell-free CM incubated at pH 7, but when the pH was decreased to 3.5-4, the aspartic acid proteases degraded the product. Gelatin zymography also revealed the presence of several serine proteases in NS0 CM, one at 85 kDa and two at 50 kDa, with pH optima close to culture pH. Addition of the serine protease inhibitor aprotinin significantly increased the specific proliferation rate as compared to the control. In addition to these data, N-terminal amino acid sequencing identified two proteins in NS0 CM as the protease inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor and cystatin C.

  18. [Advances Research on C-MYC Proto-oncogene in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Guo, Wen-Jian; Yao, Ron-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM) as one of the most common tumors of hmatologic system, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells, and the chemotherapy is the main therapeutic method. MM is an incurable disease because of drug-resistance of MM cells. Although the pathogenesis of MM remains unknown, the chromosome abnormalities exit in half of the patients, particularly the highly expressed gene C-MYC. Furthermore, plenty of clinical researches indicated a high expression level of C-MYC implied worse progression and/or poor prognosis of MM. Recently, the work exploiting the compounds targeting MYC has made substantial progress, even in the MM therapy. In this article, briefly the recent advances of the research on C-MYC proto-oncogene in multiple myeloma are reviewed. PMID:27531809

  19. Disruption of IkappaB kinase (IKK)-mediated RelA serine 536 phosphorylation sensitizes human multiple myeloma cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Chen, Shuang; Wang, Li; Pei, Xin-Yan; Funk, Vanessa L; Kramer, Lora B; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2011-09-30

    Post-translational modifications of RelA play an important role in regulation of NF-κB activation. We previously demonstrated that in malignant hematopoietic cells, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) induced RelA hyperacetylation and NF-κB activation, attenuating lethality. We now present evidence that IκB kinase (IKK) β-mediated RelA Ser-536 phosphorylation plays a significant functional role in promoting RelA acetylation, inducing NF-κB activation, and limiting HDACI lethality in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Immunoblot profiling revealed that although basal RelA phosphorylation varied in MM cells, Ser-536 phosphorylation correlated with IKK activity. Exposure to the pan-HDACIs vorinostat or LBH-589 induced phosphorylation of IKKα/β (Ser-180/Ser-181) and RelA (Ser-536) in MM cells, including cells expressing an IκBα "super-repressor," accompanied by increased RelA nuclear translocation, acetylation, DNA binding, and transactivation activity. These events were substantially blocked by either pan-IKK or IKKβ-selective inhibitors, resulting in marked apoptosis. Consistent with these events, inhibitory peptides targeting either the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) binding domain for IKK complex formation or RelA phosphorylation sites also significantly increased HDACI lethality. Moreover, IKKβ knockdown by shRNA prevented Ser-536 phosphorylation and significantly enhanced HDACI susceptibility. Finally, introduction of a nonphosphorylatable RelA mutant S536A, which failed to undergo acetylation in response to HDACIs, impaired NF-κB activation and increased cell death. These findings indicate that HDACIs induce Ser-536 phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunit RelA through an IKKβ-dependent mechanism, an action that is functionally involved in activation of the cytoprotective NF-κB signaling cascade primarily through facilitation of RelA acetylation rather than nuclear translocation. PMID:21816815

  20. Synthetic lethal approaches exploiting DNA damage in aggressive myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Francesca; Hideshima, Teru; Suzuki, Rikio; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Richardson, Paul G.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing DNA damage is a common feature of epithelial cancers. Here we show that tumor cells derived from multiple myeloma (MM), a disease of clonal plasma cells, demonstrate DNA replicative stress leading to DNA damage. We identified a poor prognosis subset of MM with extensive chromosomal instability and replicative stress which rely on ATR to compensate for DNA replicative stress; conversely, silencing of ATR or treatment with a specific ATR inhibitor triggers MM cell apoptosis. We show that oncogenes such as MYC induce DNA damage in MM cells not only by increased replicative stress, but also via increased oxidative stress, and that ROS-inducer piperlongumine triggers further DNA damage and apoptosis. Importantly, ATR inhibition combined with piperlongumine triggers synergistic MM cytotoxicity. This synthetic lethal approach, enhancing oxidative stress while concomitantly blocking replicative stress response, provides a novel combination targeted therapy to address an unmet medical need in this subset of MM. PMID:26080835

  1. Platelet factor 4 induces cell apoptosis by inhibition of STAT3 via up-regulation of SOCS3 expression in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Pei; Cheng, Suk Hang; Cheng, Chi Keung; Lau, Kin Mang; Lin, Shek Ying; Chow, Eudora Y.D.; Chan, Natalie P.H.; Ip, Rosalina K.L.; Wong, Raymond S.M.; Ng, Margaret H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an angiostatic chemokine that suppresses tumor growth and metastasis. We previously revealed frequent transcriptional silencing of PF4 in multiple myeloma, but the functional roles of this chemokine are still unknown. We studied the apoptotic effects of PF4 on myeloma cell lines and primary myeloma in vitro, and investigated the involved signaling pathway. The in vivo effects were also studied using a mouse model. PF4 not only suppressed myeloma-associated angiogenesis, but also inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in myeloma cells. We found that PF4 negatively regulated STAT3 and concordantly inhibited constitutive and interleukin-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, and down-regulated the expression of STAT3 target genes (Mcl-1, survivin and VEGF). Overexpression of constitutively activated STAT3 could rescue PF4-induced apoptotic effects. Furthermore, we found that PF4 induced the expression of SOCS3, a STAT3 inhibitor, and gene silencing of SOCS3 abolished its ability to inhibit STAT3 activation, suggesting a critical role of SOCS3 in PF4-induced STAT3 inhibition. Knockdown of LRP1, a putative PF4 receptor, could also abolish PF4-induced apoptosis and STAT3 inhibition. Finally, the tumor growth inhibitory effect of PF4 was confirmed by in vivo mouse models. Immunostaining of rabbit bone xenografts from PF4-treated mice showed induction of apoptosis of myeloma cells and inhibition of angiogenesis, which was associated with suppression of STAT3 activity. Together, our preclinical data indicate that PF4 may be a potential new targeting agent for the treatment of myeloma. PMID:22929979

  2. Therapeutic advancements in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gozzetti, Alessandro; Candi, Veronica; Papini, Giulia; Bocchia, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma survival has significantly improved in the latest years due to a broad spectrum of novel agents available for treatment. The introduction of thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide together with autologous stem-cell transplantation has considerably increased complete remission rate and progression-free survival resulting ultimately in prolonged survival in myeloma patients. Moreover, novel strategies of treatment such as consolidation and maintenance are being used to further implement responses. Finally, a number of new drugs such as carfilzomib and pomalidomide are already in clinical practice, making the future of myeloma patients brighter. PMID:25237651

  3. Therapeutic Advancements in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gozzetti, Alessandro; Candi, Veronica; Papini, Giulia; Bocchia, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma survival has significantly improved in the latest years due to a broad spectrum of novel agents available for treatment. The introduction of thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide together with autologous stem-cell transplantation has considerably increased complete remission rate and progression-free survival resulting ultimately in prolonged survival in myeloma patients. Moreover, novel strategies of treatment such as consolidation and maintenance are being used to further implement responses. Finally, a number of new drugs such as carfilzomib and pomalidomide are already in clinical practice, making the future of myeloma patients brighter. PMID:25237651

  4. Expansion of FOXP3high regulatory T cells by human dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and after injection of cytokine-matured DCs in myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Devi K.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Matayeva, Elyana; Steinman, Ralph M.; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2006-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg's) play an important role in the maintenance of immune tolerance. The mechanisms controlling the induction and maintenance of Treg's in humans need to be defined. We find that human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) are superior to other antigen presenting cells for the maintenance of FOXP3+ Treg's in culture. Coculture of DCs with autologous T cells leads to an increase in both the number of Treg's, as well as the expression of FOXP3 protein per cell both in healthy donors and myeloma patients. DC-mediated expansion of FOXP3high Treg's is enhanced by endogenous but not exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2), and DC-T-cell contact, including the CD80/CD86 membrane costimulatory molecules. DCs also stimulate the formation of Treg's from CD25- T cells. The efficacy of induction of Treg's by DCs depends on the nature of the DC maturation stimulus, with inflammatory cytokine-treated DCs (Cyt-DCs) being the most effective Treg inducers. DC-induced Treg's from both healthy donors and patients with myeloma are functional and effectively suppress T-cell responses. A single injection of cytokine-matured DCs led to rapid enhancement of FOXP3+ Treg's in vivo in 3 of 3 myeloma patients. These data reveal a role for DCs in increasing the number of functional FOXP3high Treg's in humans. PMID:16763205

  5. Interruption of the NF-kappaB pathway by Bay 11-7082 promotes UCN-01-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Pei, Xin-Yan; Rahmani, Mohamed; Conrad, Daniel H; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2004-04-01

    Interactions between pharmacologic NF-kappaB inhibitors (eg, Bay 11-7082, SN-50) and the checkpoint abrogator UCN-01 have been examined in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Exposure of U266 cells to Bay 11-7082 (Bay) in combination with UCN-01 resulted in the abrogation of NF-kappaB/DNA binding activity and the synergistic induction of apoptosis. Comparable synergism was observed in other MM cell lines and patient-derived CD138+ cells and between an inhibitory peptide of NF-kappaB (SN50) and UCN-01. Bay/UCN-01-mediated lethality involved mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cleavage, and poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP) degradation. Although Bay modestly blocked UCN-01-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, coadministration activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cdc2/cdk1 and down-regulated Mcl-1, XIAP, and Bcl-xL. Transfection with a constitutively activated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1)/green fluorescent protein (GFP) construct failed to block apoptosis induced by Bay/UCN-01 but significantly attenuated MEK inhibitor (U0126)/UCN-01-induced lethality. Inhibiting JNK activation with SP600125 or D-JNKI1 peptide markedly reduced Bay/UCN-01-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis and the down-regulation of Mcl-1, XIAP, and Bcl-xL but not of cdc2/cdk1 activation. Stable transfection of cells with dominant-negative caspase-9 dramatically diminished Bay/UCN-01 lethality without altering JNK or cdc2/cdk1 activation. Neither interleukin-6 (IL-6)- nor fibronectin-mediated adherence conferred resistance to Bay/UCN-01-induced apoptosis. Together, these findings suggest that a strategy combining UCN-01 with disruption of the IkappaB kinase (IKK)/IkappaB/NF-kappaB pathway warrants attention in MM.

  6. [Smoldering multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Fouquet, G; Guidez, S; Herbaux, C; Demarquette, H; Leleu, X

    2014-04-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic plasma cell neoplasia, characterized by monoclonal plasma cell proliferation in the absence of end-organ damage, but with a high risk of progression to multiple myeloma. It has therefore to be distinguished from monoclonal gammapathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), which has a much lower risk of progression, but also from multiple myeloma, which remains an incurable disease and requires a specific treatment. The critical question in the management of SMM is whether an early therapeutic strategy could help delaying the progression to multiple myeloma, in order to lower the risk of serious complications related to this progression, or even to cure the disease. This early treatment could not be proposed to all SMM patients, who are indeed asymptomatic, and in whom the risk of toxicity could make it difficult to justify the potential benefit obtained. The challenge is to target early at diagnosis SMM patients with a high risk of progression, using available routine tests sufficiently reliable to warrant the therapeutic sanction which relies on it. Today however, apart from randomized studies, recommendations are to maintain therapeutic abstention in SMM patients. PMID:24050785

  7. Statins inhibited the MIP-1α expression via inhibition of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Mashimo, Kenji; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1α) is detected at high concentrations in patients with multiple myeloma. It is thought to play an important role in the etiology of multiple myeloma and osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting MIP-1α expression may be useful in developing therapeutic treatments for multiple myeloma-induced osteolysis. In this study, we investigated the potential of statins to inhibit mRNA expression and secretion of MIP-1α in mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-31C). We found that statins inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. This inhibition was reversed when farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, were combined with statins. Furthermore, statins reduced the GTP form of Ras, a phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phosphorylated Akt. Our results indicate that statins inhibit biosynthesis of FPP and GGPP and thereby down regulate signal transduction of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways. The net effect suppresses LPS-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. Thus, statins hold great promise for developing effective therapies against myeloma-induced osteolysis.

  8. Effect of melphalan 140 mg/m(2) vs 200 mg/m(2) on toxicities and outcomes in multiple myeloma patients undergoing single autologous stem cell transplantation-a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Katragadda, Lakshmikanth; McCullough, Lindsay M; Dai, Yunfeng; Hsu, Jack; Byrne, Michael; Hiemenz, John; May, Stratford; Cogle, Christopher R; Norkin, Maxim; Brown, Randy A; Wingard, John R; Chang, Myron; Moreb, Jan S

    2016-08-01

    Although melphalan at a dose of 140 mg/m(2) (MEL140) is an acceptable conditioning regimen for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in multiple myeloma (MM) patients, very few studies compared it to the most commonly used dose of 200 mg/m(2) (MEL200). A retrospective review of records of MM patients (2001-2010) identified 33 patients who received MEL140 and 96 patients who received MEL200. As expected, significantly higher percentage of patients in the MEL140 arm were >65 years or had cardiac ejection fraction <50%, had Karnofsky score <80, or had creatinine >2 at the time of ASCT (P≤.01). There were no significant differences in incidence of treatment related mortality and morbidity. At a median follow-up of 74 months from ASCT, there were no significant differences in relapse free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Similar proportion had myeloma status improve to ≥VGPR at 3 months post-ASCT. Usage of post-ASCT maintenance was similar. In multivariate cox proportional hazards model, only disease status of ≥VGPR at the time of ASCT significantly improved RFS (P=.024), but not OS (P=.104). In conclusion, MM patients who received MEL140 had similar long-term outcomes to MEL200 patients despite their older age and co-morbidities.

  9. Kidney Disease and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rennke, Helmut G.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kidney injury is a common complication of multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias, and it is associated with increased mortality. Multiple pathogenic mechanisms can contribute to kidney injury in the patient with myeloma, some of which are the result of nephrotoxic monoclonal Ig and some of which are independent of paraprotein deposition. The pathogenic mechanisms that underlie paraprotein-related kidney disease are increasingly well understood. A novel assay allowing the quantification of free light chains in the serum has aided the diagnosis of new onset disease and allowed for the earlier detection of relapse. Novel myeloma agents have shown considerable promise in reversing renal failure in some patients and improving outcomes. Stem cell transplantation remains a mainstay of management for younger patients with myeloma who are suitable candidates for intensive therapy, whereas the role of new drugs, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation continues to evolve. PMID:23868898

  10. Multiple myeloma acquires resistance to EGFR inhibitor via induction of pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Huang, Ruibin; Ding, Jianghua; Ji, Dexiang; Song, Bing; Yuan, Liya; Chang, Hong; Chen, Guoan

    2015-04-20

    Multiple myeloma (MM) was characterized by frequent mutations in KRAS/NRAS/BRAF within the EGFR pathway that could induce resistance to EGFR inhibitors. We here report that EGFR inhibition solely exhibited moderate inhibition in KRAS/NRAS/BRAF wildtype (triple-WT) MM cells, whilst had no effect in myeloma cells with any of the mutated genes. The moderate inhibitory effect was conferred by induction of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) when cells were treated with Gefitinib, the EGFR inhibitor. Combination of Gefitinib with PPP inhibitor 6AN effected synergistically in triple-WT cells. The inhibition could be restored by addition of NADPH. Dual EGFR/ERBB2 inhibitor Afatinib also exhibited similar effects. Further genetic silencing of EGFR, ERBB2 and mTOR indicated that major effect conferred by ERBB2 was via convergence to EGFR pathway in MM. Our results contributed to the individualized targeted therapy with EGFR inhibitors in MM.

  11. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  12. Standard melanoma-associated markers do not identify the MM127 metastatic melanoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Parvathi; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Kashyap, Abhishek S.; McElwain, D. L. Sean; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable identification of different melanoma cell lines is important for many aspects of melanoma research. Common markers used to identify melanoma cell lines include: S100; HMB-45; and Melan-A. We explore the expression of these three markers in four different melanoma cell lines: WM35; WM793; SK-MEL-28; and MM127. The expression of these markers is examined at both the mRNA and protein level. Our results show that the metastatic cell line, MM127, cannot be detected using any of the commonly used melanoma-associated markers. This implies that it would be very difficult to identify this particular cell line in a heterogeneous sample, and as a result this cell line should be used with care. PMID:27087056

  13. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  14. Single cell functional analysis of multiple myeloma cell populations correlates with diffusion profiles in static microfluidic coculture systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas A; Young, Edmond W K

    2016-07-01

    Microfluidic cell culture systems are becoming increasingly useful for studying biology questions, particularly those involving small cell populations that are cultured within microscale geometries mimicking the complex cellular microenvironment. Depending on the geometry and spatial organization of these cell populations, however, paracrine signaling between cell types can depend critically on spatial concentration profiles of soluble factors generated by diffusive transport. In scenarios where single cell data are acquired to study cell population heterogeneities in functional response, uncertainty associated with concentration profiles can lead to interpretation bias. To address this issue and provide important evidence on how diffusion develops within typical microfluidic cell culture systems, a combination of experimental and computational approaches were applied to measure and predict concentration patterns within microfluidic geometries, and characterize the functional response of culture cells based on single-cell resolution transcription factor activation. Using a model coculture system consisting of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) and neighboring bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), we measured concentrations of three cytokines (IL-6, VEGF, and TNF-α) in conditioned media collected from separate culture compartments using a multiplex ELISA system. A 3D numerical model was developed to predict biomolecular diffusion and resulting concentration profiles within the tested microsystems and compared with experimental diffusion of 20 kDa FITC-Dextran. Finally, diffusion was further characterized by controlling exogenous IL-6 diffusion and the coculture spatial configuration of BMSCs to stimulate STAT3 nuclear translocation in MMCs. Results showed agreement between numerical and experimental results, provided evidence of a shallow concentration gradient across the center well of the microsystem that did not lead to a bias in results, and demonstrated that

  15. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  16. Exploration for the multi-effect of cardamom in's resistance to multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhihua, Zhao; Jianping, Yang; Miaomiao, Sun; Kuisheng, Chen

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to probe the cardamom in effect on the viability, proliferation, apoptosis and periodic function of the multiple myeloma, and explore its mechanism. We used CCK-8 method to evaluate the effect of cardamom in on the viability of PBMNCs (Persom Blood Mononuclear Normal Cells). EdU can test the influence of small cell proliferation. We used the method of PI single-staining flow cytometry, in order to test the influence of tumor cell cycle. AO (Acridine Orange), EB (Ethidium Bromide) double staining fluorescene microscope was applied to observe the influence of tumor apoptotic morphology. It can be concluded that cardamom in can inhibit the viability and proliferation of MM (Multiple Myeloma) cells and cardamom in is the anti-myeloma drug with strong viability. PMID:25410063

  17. Exploration for the multi-effect of cardamom in's resistance to multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zhihua, Zhao; Jianping, Yang; Miaomiao, Sun; Kuisheng, Chen

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to probe the cardamom in effect on the viability, proliferation, apoptosis and periodic function of the multiple myeloma, and explore its mechanism. We used CCK-8 method to evaluate the effect of cardamom in on the viability of PBMNCs (Persom Blood Mononuclear Normal Cells). EdU can test the influence of small cell proliferation. We used the method of PI single-staining flow cytometry, in order to test the influence of tumor cell cycle. AO (Acridine Orange), EB (Ethidium Bromide) double staining fluorescene microscope was applied to observe the influence of tumor apoptotic morphology. It can be concluded that cardamom in can inhibit the viability and proliferation of MM (Multiple Myeloma) cells and cardamom in is the anti-myeloma drug with strong viability.

  18. Successful Chemotherapy Following Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma and Multi-organ Dysfunction with Infiltration of Eosinophils: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sup; Park, Lee Chun; Shin, Seong Hoon; Lee, Sang Uk; Chang, Hee Kyung; Huh, Bang; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Mi Hyang; Kim, Yang Soo

    2011-09-01

    Eosinophils are derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Peripheral blood eosinophilia is defined as an absolute eosinophil count of ≥0.5×10(9)/L. Eosinophilia is classified into primary or clonal eosinophilia, secondary eosinophilia, and idiopathic categories including idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome. Both hematopoietic and solid neoplasms may be associated with peripheral blood eosinophilia, but multiple myeloma is rarely associated with eosinophilia. We now report the case of a 31-year-old man with multiple myeloma associated with marked eosinophilia who developed multiple organ dysfunction with infiltration of eosinophils. He recovered after treatment with chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation.

  19. Core promoter sequence of SEMG I spans between the two putative GATA-1 binding domains and is responsive to IL-4 and IL-6 in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yana; Wang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Jian; Lim, Seah H

    2009-01-01

    Semenogelin (SEMG) I is a cancer-testis antigen expressed in myeloma cells. SEMG I expression is upregulated by IL-4, IL-6 and 5-azacytidine. In this study, we set out to define the core promoter sequence needed for the expression of SEMG I in myeloma cells. We found that nucleotide sequences spanning the two putative GATA-1 binding domains are vital for the primary regulation of SEMG I promoter function while the other parts of the promoter sequence are responsible for the fine adjustment of the core promoter function. The core promoter sequence is responsive to the enhancing effect of IL-4 and IL-6. PMID:18602691

  20. Inhibition of thioredoxin 1 leads to apoptosis in drug-resistant multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Raninga, Prahlad V; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Bhatia, Maneet; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2015-06-20

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the aberrant accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancement in anti-myeloma treatment, MM remains an incurable disease. This study showed higher intrinsic oxidative stress and higher Trx1 and TrxR1 protein levels in MM cells compared to normal cells. Drug-induced Trx1 (PX-12) and TrxR1 (Auranofin) inhibition disrupted redox homeostasis resulting in ROS-induced apoptosis in MM cells and a reduction in clonogenic activity. Knockdown of either Trx1 or TrxR1 reduced MM cell viability. Trx1 inhibition by PX-12 sensitized MM cells to undergo apoptosis in response to the NF-κβ inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin. PX-12 treatment decreased the expression of the NF-κβ subunit p65 in MM cells. Bortezomib-resistant MM cells contained higher Trx1 protein levels compared to the parental cells and PX-12 treatment resulted in apoptosis. Thus, increased Trx1 enhances MM cell growth and survival and exerts resistance to NF-κβ inhibitors. Therefore inhibiting the thioredoxin system may be an effective therapeutic strategy to treat newly diagnosed as well as relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:25945832

  1. Inhibition of thioredoxin 1 leads to apoptosis in drug-resistant multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Raninga, Prahlad V.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Bhatia, Maneet; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the aberrant accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancement in anti-myeloma treatment, MM remains an incurable disease. This study showed higher intrinsic oxidative stress and higher Trx1 and TrxR1 protein levels in MM cells compared to normal cells. Drug-induced Trx1 (PX-12) and TrxR1 (Auranofin) inhibition disrupted redox homeostasis resulting in ROS-induced apoptosis in MM cells and a reduction in clonogenic activity. Knockdown of either Trx1 or TrxR1 reduced MM cell viability. Trx1 inhibition by PX-12 sensitized MM cells to undergo apoptosis in response to the NF-кβ inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin. PX-12 treatment decreased the expression of the NF-кβ subunit p65 in MM cells. Bortezomib-resistant MM cells contained higher Trx1 protein levels compared to the parental cells and PX-12 treatment resulted in apoptosis. Thus, increased Trx1 enhances MM cell growth and survival and exerts resistance to NF-кβ inhibitors. Therefore inhibiting the thioredoxin system may be an effective therapeutic strategy to treat newly diagnosed as well as relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:25945832

  2. Inhibition of thioredoxin 1 leads to apoptosis in drug-resistant multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Raninga, Prahlad V; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Bhatia, Maneet; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2015-06-20

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the aberrant accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancement in anti-myeloma treatment, MM remains an incurable disease. This study showed higher intrinsic oxidative stress and higher Trx1 and TrxR1 protein levels in MM cells compared to normal cells. Drug-induced Trx1 (PX-12) and TrxR1 (Auranofin) inhibition disrupted redox homeostasis resulting in ROS-induced apoptosis in MM cells and a reduction in clonogenic activity. Knockdown of either Trx1 or TrxR1 reduced MM cell viability. Trx1 inhibition by PX-12 sensitized MM cells to undergo apoptosis in response to the NF-κβ inhibitors, BAY 11-7082 and curcumin. PX-12 treatment decreased the expression of the NF-κβ subunit p65 in MM cells. Bortezomib-resistant MM cells contained higher Trx1 protein levels compared to the parental cells and PX-12 treatment resulted in apoptosis. Thus, increased Trx1 enhances MM cell growth and survival and exerts resistance to NF-κβ inhibitors. Therefore inhibiting the thioredoxin system may be an effective therapeutic strategy to treat newly diagnosed as well as relapsed/refractory MM.

  3. Comparable outcomes between unrelated and related donors after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    El-Cheikh, Jean; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Boher, Jean-Marie; Furst, Sabine; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Ladaique, Patrick; Faucher, Catherine; Calmels, Boris; Castagna, Luca; Lemarie, Claude; De Colella, Jean-Marc Schiano; Coso, Diane; Bouabdallah, Reda; Chabannon, Christian; Blaise, Didier

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) from matched related donors (MRD) and unrelated donors (URD) in 40 patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM) in a single centre. Seventeen (43%) (Group 1) and 23 patients (57%) (Group 2) had URD and MRD, respectively. Thirty-nine patients (98%) received one or more autologous transplantation. The median follow-up was 22 months (1-49). None of our patient experienced a graft rejection. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD was higher (47%) for the URD vs. (17%) for the MRD (P = 0.092). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was no different between the two groups (24% vs. 30%, respectively). At 2 yr, the TRM probabilities were lower in the unrelated group 12% vs. 22% in the related group (P = 0.4). Also at 2 yrs, for patients receiving unrelated transplantation overall and progression-free survivals, 59% and 42%, respectively compared to patients with related donor transplantation, 66% and 44% (P = 0.241). In conclusion, these results suggest that URD in MM is feasible. The small number of patients with URD emphasizes the need to delineate indications and perform prospective protocols.

  4. Antimyeloma activity of bromodomain inhibitors on the human myeloma cell line U266 by downregulation of MYCL

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhito; Arakawa, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Hisashi; Aiba, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomain and extraterminal protein (BET) inhibitors suppress the expression of c-MYC. U266, a human myeloma cell line, expresses the MYCL gene, but not the c-MYC gene. Our aim was to analyse the antimyeloma activity of BET inhibitors on U266 cells. Two BET inhibitors, I-BET151 and JQ1, were tested. U266 cell proliferation decreased to 61.5 and 54.0% of the control after incubation with 500 nmol/l I-BET151 for 72 and 96 h and to 53.5 and 56.4% of control after incubation with 500 nmol/l JQ1 for 72 and 96 h by MTS tetrazolium, respectively. BET inhibitors induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase in U266 cells, but did not induce apoptosis by flow cytometry. According to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, MYC-related genes were significantly downregulated in U266 cells treated with I-BET151 similar to KMS11 cells that expressed c-MYC. The MYCL1 was expressed in U266 cells, whereas c-MYC and MYCN were not by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription-PCR. Incubation with I-BET151 induced downregulation of MYCL1 in U266 cells. BET inhibitors decreased the cell proliferation in U266 cells with overexpression of MYCL less than those without overexpression of MYCL. BET inhibitors induce G1 arrest without apoptosis and interfere with the proliferation of U266 myeloma cells, which express MYCL, but not c-MYC. BET inhibitors might be active in cancers that express MYCL, but not c-MYC. PMID:27276402

  5. Antimyeloma activity of bromodomain inhibitors on the human myeloma cell line U266 by downregulation of MYCL.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhito; Yamamoto, Kouhei; Arakawa, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Hisashi; Aiba, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masanobu

    2016-09-01

    Bromodomain and extraterminal protein (BET) inhibitors suppress the expression of c-MYC. U266, a human myeloma cell line, expresses the MYCL gene, but not the c-MYC gene. Our aim was to analyse the antimyeloma activity of BET inhibitors on U266 cells. Two BET inhibitors, I-BET151 and JQ1, were tested. U266 cell proliferation decreased to 61.5 and 54.0% of the control after incubation with 500 nmol/l I-BET151 for 72 and 96 h and to 53.5 and 56.4% of control after incubation with 500 nmol/l JQ1 for 72 and 96 h by MTS tetrazolium, respectively. BET inhibitors induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase in U266 cells, but did not induce apoptosis by flow cytometry. According to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, MYC-related genes were significantly downregulated in U266 cells treated with I-BET151 similar to KMS11 cells that expressed c-MYC. The MYCL1 was expressed in U266 cells, whereas c-MYC and MYCN were not by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription-PCR. Incubation with I-BET151 induced downregulation of MYCL1 in U266 cells. BET inhibitors decreased the cell proliferation in U266 cells with overexpression of MYCL less than those without overexpression of MYCL. BET inhibitors induce G1 arrest without apoptosis and interfere with the proliferation of U266 myeloma cells, which express MYCL, but not c-MYC. BET inhibitors might be active in cancers that express MYCL, but not c-MYC. PMID:27276402

  6. Treatment of Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma with 3 mm Surgical Margin in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Wen; Ho, Ji-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Asians, most basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are pigmented with clear borders. The consensus of 4 mm surgical margin for BCC largely depends on studies in nonpigmented BCCs in Caucasians. However, little is known about recurrences of pigmented BCCs with a narrower surgical margin. We aimed to investigate 5-year recurrence of BCCs, either pigmented or nonpigmented, in Taiwanese with 3 mm surgical margin. Materials and Methods. 143 patients with BCC (M/F = 66/77, average 64 years) were confirmed pathologically from 2002 to 2013. Based on the pathological margin (>1 mm, ≤1 mm, and involved), patients were categorized into the complete excision group (n = 77), histology with close proximity group (n = 43), and unclear surgical margin group (n = 23). Results. Among 143 cases, 105 were pigmented. With standard 3 mm excision, there were 7 recurrences, with 6 of them from nonpigmented BCC group. Logistic regression showed that pigmentation was associated with lower recurrence. Interestingly, 5-year recurrence of completely excised and histology with close proximity BCC (0/77 versus 1/43) was not different statistically. Conclusions. A 3 mm surgical margin is adequate for pigmented BCC. A “wait and see” approach rather than further wide excision is appropriate for BCC with <1 mm free margin. PMID:27652267

  7. Treatment of Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma with 3 mm Surgical Margin in Asians.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shang-Hung; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Yang, Yi-Chien; Ho, Ji-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background. In Asians, most basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are pigmented with clear borders. The consensus of 4 mm surgical margin for BCC largely depends on studies in nonpigmented BCCs in Caucasians. However, little is known about recurrences of pigmented BCCs with a narrower surgical margin. We aimed to investigate 5-year recurrence of BCCs, either pigmented or nonpigmented, in Taiwanese with 3 mm surgical margin. Materials and Methods. 143 patients with BCC (M/F = 66/77, average 64 years) were confirmed pathologically from 2002 to 2013. Based on the pathological margin (>1 mm, ≤1 mm, and involved), patients were categorized into the complete excision group (n = 77), histology with close proximity group (n = 43), and unclear surgical margin group (n = 23). Results. Among 143 cases, 105 were pigmented. With standard 3 mm excision, there were 7 recurrences, with 6 of them from nonpigmented BCC group. Logistic regression showed that pigmentation was associated with lower recurrence. Interestingly, 5-year recurrence of completely excised and histology with close proximity BCC (0/77 versus 1/43) was not different statistically. Conclusions. A 3 mm surgical margin is adequate for pigmented BCC. A "wait and see" approach rather than further wide excision is appropriate for BCC with <1 mm free margin. PMID:27652267

  8. Non Secretory Multiple Myeloma With Extensive Extramedullary Plasmacytoma: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Low, Soo Fin; Mohd Tap, Nor Hanani; Kew, Thean Yean; Ngiu, Chai Soon; Sridharan, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by progressive proliferation of malignant plasma cells, usually initiating in the bone marrow. MM can affect any organ; a total of 7 - 18% of patients with MM demonstrate extramedullary involvement at diagnosis. Non-secretory multiple myeloma (NSMM) is a rare variant that accounts for 1 - 5% of all cases of multiple myeloma. The disease is characterized by the absence of monoclonal gammopathy in serum and urine electrophoresis. Our case report highlights the diagnostic challenge of a case of NSMM with extensive extramedullary involvement in a young female patient who initially presented with right shoulder pain and bilateral breasts lumps. Skeletal survey showed multiple lytic bony lesions. The initial diagnosis was primary breast carcinoma with osseous metastases. No monoclonal gammopathy was found in the serum or urine electrophoresis. Bone marrow and breast biopsies revealed marked plasmacytosis. The diagnosis was delayed for a month in view of the lack of clinical suspicion of multiple myeloma in a young patient and scant biochemical expression of non-secretory type of multiple myeloma. PMID:26528383

  9. Management of relapsed multiple myeloma: recommendations of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Laubach, J; Garderet, L; Mahindra, A; Gahrton, G; Caers, J; Sezer, O; Voorhees, P; Leleu, X; Johnsen, H E; Streetly, M; Jurczyszyn, A; Ludwig, H; Mellqvist, U-H; Chng, W-J; Pilarski, L; Einsele, H; Hou, J; Turesson, I; Zamagni, E; Chim, C S; Mazumder, A; Westin, J; Lu, J; Reiman, T; Kristinsson, S; Joshua, D; Roussel, M; O'Gorman, P; Terpos, E; McCarthy, P; Dimopoulos, M; Moreau, P; Orlowski, R Z; Miguel, J S; Anderson, K C; Palumbo, A; Kumar, S; Rajkumar, V; Durie, B; Richardson, P G

    2016-05-01

    The prognosis for patients multiple myeloma (MM) has improved substantially over the past decade with the development of new, more effective chemotherapeutic agents and regimens that possess a high level of anti-tumor activity. In spite of this important progress, however, nearly all MM patients ultimately relapse, even those who experience a complete response to initial therapy. Management of relapsed MM thus represents a vital aspect of the overall care for patients with MM and a critical area of ongoing scientific and clinical research. This comprehensive manuscript from the International Myeloma Working Group provides detailed recommendations on management of relapsed disease, with sections dedicated to diagnostic evaluation, determinants of therapy, and general approach to patients with specific disease characteristics. In addition, the manuscript provides a summary of evidence from clinical trials that have significantly impacted the field, including those evaluating conventional dose therapies, as well as both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Specific recommendations are offered for management of first and second relapse, relapsed and refractory disease, and both autologous and allogeneic transplant. Finally, perspective is provided regarding new agents and promising directions in management of relapsed MM. PMID:26710887

  10. Interleukin-6 is a cofactor for the growth of myeloid cells from human bone marrow aspirates but does not affect the clonogenicity of myeloma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borinaga, A M; Millar, B C; Bell, J B; Joffe, J K; Millar, J L; Gooding, R; Riches, P; McElwain, T J

    1990-12-01

    Several groups have claimed that IL-6 is a growth factor for human myeloma cells in vitro. Bone marrow aspirates from 30 patients at different stages of treatment with VAMP/high dose melphalan, were examined for myeloma colony formation (MY-CFUc) using a clonogenic assay in vitro. Myeloma cells from 16/30 patients produced MY-CFUc in our assay system, which uses heavily irradiated HL60 cells as an underlay in soft agar. These heavily irradiated cells were shown to be essential for the inhibition of granulocyte-macrophage colonies (GM-CFUc). The addition of recombinant human IL-6 (10 ng/plate) reduced the number of bone marrow samples which produced MY-CFUc from 16 to six. Furthermore, the addition of antibody to IL-6 (1 microgram/plate) failed to inhibit MY-CFUc from 6/7 samples. Conditioned medium from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-CM) contains approximately 2 ng/ml IL-6 and can be used to stimulate the growth and maintenance of the B9 murine IL-6 dependent hybridoma cell line. Recombinant human IL-6 supported the growth of B9 cells in a clonogenic assay and growth was inhibited by anti-IL-6 in the presence of rhIL-6 or PBMC-CM. Mononuclear cells from a second group of myeloma patients were cultured in soft agar in a mixture of PBMC-CM and fresh growth medium. Nine of the 10 samples produced myeloid colonies which consisted of granulocytes, monocytes and macrophages and the number of colonies was reduced by at least 50% in 6/8 samples when anti-IL-6 was added to the cultures. In no instance were MY-CFUc produced. Also, conditioned medium from the bladder carcinoma cell line 5637, which is used routinely as a source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), contains approximately 4 ng/ml IL-6. Although rhIL-6 failed to stimulate GM-CFUc in the absence of other growth factors, addition of anti-IL-6 to cultures containing a suboptimal amount of 5637-CM reduced the number of colonies by 50%. These data provide evidence that IL-6 is

  11. Biology and treatment of myeloma.

    PubMed

    Brioli, Annamaria; Melchor, Lorenzo; Walker, Brian A; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J

    2014-09-01

    In recent years significant progress has been made in the understanding of multiple myeloma (MM) biology and its treatment. Current strategies for the treatment of MM involve the concept of sequential blocks of therapy given as an induction followed by consolidation and maintenance. In an age characterized by emerging and more powerful laboratory techniques, it is of primary importance to understand the biology of MM and how this biology can guide the development of new treatment strategies. This review focuses on the genetic basis of myeloma, including the most common genetic abnormalities and pathways affected and the effects that these have on MM treatment strategies. MM biology is discussed also in the light of more recent theory of intraclonal heterogeneity. PMID:25486959

  12. A contribution to examination of propidium iodide and annexin V plasma cells indices in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Scudla, V; Ordeltova, M; Bacovsky, J; Vytrasova, M; Sumna, E; Martinek, A; Horak, P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was a contemporaneous measurement and a mutual comparison of plasma cells proliferative activity and grade of apoptosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and various phases of MM i.e. smoldering (SMM), stable/plateau and active (progression/relapse) forms of this disease. The analyzed group of 197 patients consisted of 30 MGUS, 21 SMM, 82 patients examined at the time of MM diagnosis and 64 patients analyzed during various phases of the disease after previous chemotherapy. Plasma cell proliferative activity was measured by means of a propidium iodide index (PC-PI) examined by flow cytometry using a DNA/CD138 double staining technique. For detection of plasma cells entering apoptosis (PC-AI) flow cytometry method with annexin V FITC and MoAb CD138 was used. The individuals with MGUS, SMM and stable/plateau form of MM had overall low levels of PC-PI (M-1.8, 1.7% and 2.1%) and relatively high levels of PC-AI (M-9.1, 10.8 and 9.0%). The correlation between PC-PI and PC-AI was in all the groups mutually highly statistically significant (p=0.000). Analysis of plasma cells proliferative activity (PC-PI) was statistically significant in comparison of MGUS or SMM and versus: patients examined at the time of MM diagnosis (p=0.018 or 0.016); patients evaluated during various phases of MM after previous chemotherapy (p=0.021 or 0.019); stable/plateau MM phase in the cohort of all patients (p=0.017 or 0.040); in the plateau phase after chemotherapy (p=0.008 or 0.024) but insignificant in comparison of MGUS and SMM and with the stable group examined at the time of MM diagnosis. Analysis of the apoptotic process revealed significant differences when comparing PC-AI of SMM but not MGUS group versus all cohort of stable/plateau MM patients (p=0.045); there were also insignificant differences in comparison of MGUS and SMM groupsand versus the stable form of MM measured at the time of MM diagnosis or plateau phase after

  13. Novel therapeutic targets in myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S L; Edwards, C M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic disorder of plasma cells characterized by clonal proliferation within the bone marrow. One of the major clinical features of multiple myeloma is the destructive osteolytic bone disease that occurs in the majority of patients. Myeloma bone disease is associated with increased osteoclast activity and suppression of osteoblastogenesis. Bisphosphonates have been the mainstay of treatment for many years; however, their use is limited by their inability to repair existing bone loss. Therefore, research into novel approaches for the treatment of myeloma bone disease is of the utmost importance. This review will discuss the current advances in our understanding of osteoclast stimulation and osteoblast suppression mechanisms in myeloma bone disease and the treatments that are under development to target this destructive and debilitating feature of myeloma. PMID:24750110

  14. [Molecular Mechanism and Malignant Clonal Evolution of Multiple Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ding, Fei; Zhu, Ping; Wu, Xue-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    Almost all patients with multiple myeloma (MM) have chromosomal translocation which can result in genetic variation. There are mainly five types of chromosomal translocations, involving the IGH gene translocation to 11q13 (CCND1), 4p16 (FGFR/MMSET), 16q23 (MAF), 6p21 (CCND3) and 20q11 (MAFB). It is possible that all IGH translocations converge on a common cell cycle signal pathway. Some MM develops through a multistep transformation from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to smoldering MM (SMM) and eventually to MM and plasma cell leukemia (PCL). Similarly to what Darwin proposed in the mid-19th century-random genetic variation and natural selection in the context of limited resources, MM clonal evolution follow branching and nonlinear mode. The failure of MM treatment is usually related with the minimal subclone which is hardly found at newlydiagnosed. PMID:26524068

  15. [Role of Biology Based on Epigenetics in Multiple Myeloma].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin-Bin; Wu, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor, characterized by dysplasia of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow secreting large amounts of monoclonal immunoglobulin or fragments (M protein), resulting in damage in relevant organs or tissues. The biological complexity of MM is based on disrupted cancer pathways. Except the central role of cytogenetic abnormalities, epigenetic aberrations have also been shown to be involved in the occurrence and development of MM. Epigenetics of MM is mainly concentrated in the ways of DNA methylation, histone modifications and noncoding RNA, which have generated abnormal signaling pathways to regulate cell cycle and apoptosis of MM. In this article, advances of research on epigenetics of development, clinical diagnosis and treatments of MM are reviewed. PMID:27342538

  16. The role of high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplant in the rapidly evolving era of modern multiple myeloma therapy.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Peter M; Usmani, Saad Z

    2016-09-01

    The advent of the immunomodulatory drugs thalido-mide, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide; the proteasome inhib-itors bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib; the histone deacet-ylase inhibitor panobinostat; and the monoclonal antibodies elotuzumab and daratumumab has led to dramatic improvements in outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma. Along with progress in nontransplant therapy have come questions regarding the continued role of high-dose melphalan (HDM) supported by autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Emerging evidence from phase 3 studies demonstrates that consolidation therapy with HDM/ASCT further improves depth of response and progression-free survival in the context of modern therapy for multiple myeloma. Moreover, unprecedented survival data from ongoing phase 3 studies of patients treated with modern myeloma therapy followed by HDM/ASCT in first-line or second-line therapy reaffirm single and tandem HDM/ASCT as important standards of care for eligible patients. Herein, we review the evolving role of HDM/ASCT for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed multiple myeloma. PMID:27673290

  17. Prolonged early G1 arrest by selective CDK4/CDK6 inhibition sensitizes myeloma cells to cytotoxic killing through cell cycle–coupled loss of IRF4

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiangao; Di Liberto, Maurizio; Jayabalan, David; Liang, Jun; Ely, Scott; Bretz, Jamieson; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Louie, Tracey; Chen, Isan; Randolph, Sophia; Hahn, William C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Moore, Malcolm A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK6 by gain of function or loss of inhibition is common in human cancer, including multiple myeloma, but success in targeting CDK with broad-spectrum inhibitors has been modest. By selective and reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, we have developed a strategy to both inhibit proliferation and enhance cytotoxic killing of cancer cells. We show that induction of prolonged early-G1 arrest (pG1) by CDK4/CDK6 inhibition halts gene expression in early-G1 and prevents expression of genes programmed for other cell-cycle phases. Removal of the early-G1 block leads to S-phase synchronization (pG1-S) but fails to completely restore scheduled gene expression. Consequently, the IRF4 protein required to protect myeloma cells from apoptosis is markedly reduced in pG1 and further in pG1-S in response to cytotoxic agents, such as the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. The coordinated loss of IRF4 and gain of Bim sensitize myeloma tumor cells to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in pG1 in the absence of Noxa and more profoundly in pG1-S in cooperation with Noxa in vitro. Induction of pG1 and pG1-S by reversible CDK4/CDK6 inhibition further augments tumor-specific bortezomib killing in myeloma xenografts. Reversible inhibition of CDK4/CDK6 in sequential combination therapy thus represents a novel mechanism-based cancer therapy. PMID:22718837

  18. Biological aspects of altered bone remodeling in multiple myeloma and possibilities of pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    Kupisiewicz, Kasia

    2011-05-01

    as a front-line treatment of myeloma patients by EMEA for the European Union. In our study we assessed the effect of bortezomib on osteoclasts in cultures under the conditions that mimic the pulse-treatment regime used for myeloma patients. The pulse administration of bortezomib significantly inhibited OC activity and, moreover, significantly but transiently reduced levels of two bone resorption markers measured in serum of treated myeloma patients. In MM the clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells results in the unbalanced bone remodelling, therefore it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms governing the actions of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. During my PhD, I was involved in the investigations of mesenchymal stem cells over-expressing delta like protein - 1(Dlk-1) previously shown to inhibit the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into osteoblasts. In results, the over-expression of Dlk-1 evoked pro-inflammatory phenotype in MSC suggesting the involvement of Dlk-1 in the immune response.

  19. Multiple myeloma: clinical features and indications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma-cell proliferative disease with an expected 15,270 new cases and 11,070 deaths in the USA in 2004 alone. This accounts for 1% of all malignancies and slightly more than 10% of all hematologic malignancies in Caucasians and 20% in African Americans. The diagnosis is based on the presence of bone pain, anemia, and plasma-cell infiltrate in the bone marrow or within bone lesions. It is essential that the spectrum of plasma-cell proliferative disorders be recognized: monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM), and active (symptomatic) MM. These distinctions affect important management decisions. Other related disorders include primary systemic amyloidosis, POEMS syndrome, and acquired Fanconi syndrome. PMID:16026737

  20. Berbamine, a novel nuclear factor κB inhibitor, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in human myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yun; Xu, Rong-zhen; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xiao-ying

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We sought to investigate the effect of berbamine on the growth of human multiple myeloma cell line KM3 and elucidate the mechanism of its action. Methods: MTT assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect of berbamine alone or combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. Flow cytometry was performed to characterize cell cycle profile in response to berbamine treatment. Western blot was used to measure the protein levels of p65, IκB Kinase α (IKKα), TNFAIP3 (A20), IκBα, p-IκBα, cyclinD1, Bcl-2, BAX, Bcl-xL, Bid, and survivin. Results: Berbamine inhibits the proliferation of KM3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Combination of berbamine with dexamethasone (Dex), doxorubicin (Dox) or arsenic trioxide (ATO) resulted in enhanced inhibition of cell growth. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that KM3 cells were arrested at G1 phase and apoptotic cells increased from 0.54% to 51.83% for 36 h. Morphological changes of cells undergoing apoptosis were observed under light microscope. Berbamine treatment led to increased expression of A20, down-regulation of IKKα, p-IκBα, and followed by inhibition of p65 nuclear localization. As a result, NF-κB downstream targets such as cyclinD1, Bcl-xL, Bid and survivin were down-regulated. Conclusion: Berbamine inhibits the growth of KM3 cells by inducing G1 arrest as well as apoptosis. Berbamine blocks NF-κB signaling pathway through up-regulating A20, down-regulating IKKα, p-IκBα, and then inhibiting p65 nuclear translocation, and resulting in decreased expression of the downstream targets of NF-κB. Our results suggest that berbamine is a novel inhibitor of NF-κB activity with remarkable anti-myeloma efficacy. PMID:19960011

  1. Detection of a rare BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase fusion protein in H929 multiple myeloma cells using immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Susanne B; Yuan, Min; Pihan, German A; Asara, John M

    2012-10-01

    Hypothesis directed proteomics offers higher throughput over global analyses. We show that immunoprecipitation (IP)-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in H929 multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells led to the discovery of a rare and unexpected BCR-ABL fusion, informing a therapeutic intervention using imatinib (Gleevec). BCR-ABL is the driving mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is uncommon to other cancers. Three different IP-MS experiments central to cell signaling pathways were sufficient to discover a BCR-ABL fusion in H929 cells: phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide IP, p85 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) IP, and the GRB2 adaptor IP. The pY peptides inform tyrosine kinase activity, p85 IP informs the activating adaptors and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) involved in AKT activation and GRB2 IP identifies RTKs and adaptors leading to ERK activation. Integration of the bait-prey data from the three separate experiments identified the BCR-ABL protein complex, which was confirmed by biochemistry, cytogenetic methods, and DNA sequencing revealed the e14a2 fusion transcript. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and the GAB2 adaptor protein, important for MAPK signaling, were common to all three IP-MS experiments. The comparative treatment of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drugs revealed only imatinib, the standard of care in CML, was inhibitory to BCR-ABL leading to down-regulation of pERK and pS6K and inhibiting cell proliferation. These data suggest a model for directed proteomics from patient tumor samples for selecting the appropriate TKI drug(s) based on IP and LC-MS/MS. The data also suggest that MM patients, in addition to CML patients, may benefit from BCR-ABL diagnostic screening.

  2. Survival and photoreactivability of ultraviolet-irradiated cultured fish cells (CAF-MM1)

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, Y.; Mitani, H.; Etoh, H.; Egami, N.

    1980-12-01

    The sensitivity to ultraviolet light (uv) and photoreactivating ability of cultured fish clone cells (CAF-MM1) were investigated. Dose-survival relationship curves were obtained using the colony-forming technique at various postirradiation temperatures (33, 26, and 20/sup 0/C). At 26/sup 0/C the values of D/sub 0/, D/sub q/, and the extrapolation number (n) were 1.74 J/m/sup 2/, 2.62 J/m/sup 2/, and 4.5, respectively; no marked differences in these values were found among different temperatures. Visible light illumination after uv irradiation produced a marked increase in survival. No photoreactivation effects were observed beyond about 30 h. Caffeine increased uv sensitivity of the CAF-MM1 cells, and from the results it is suggested that the cells have some caffeine-sensitive dark repair mechanisms.

  3. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  4. New criteria to identify risk of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and smoldering multiple myeloma based on multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of bone marrow plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Persona, Ernesto; Vidriales, María-Belén; Mateo, Gema; García-Sanz, Ramón; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; de Coca, Alfonso García; Galende, Josefina; Martín-Nuñez, Guillermo; Alonso, José M; de Las Heras, Natalia; Hernández, José M; Martín, Alejandro; López-Berges, Consuelo; Orfao, Alberto; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2007-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are plasma cell disorders with a risk of progression of approximately 1% and 10% per year, respectively. We have previously shown that the proportion of bone marrow (BM) aberrant plasma cells (aPCs) within the BMPC compartment (aPC/BMPC) as assessed by flow cytometry (FC) contributes to differential diagnosis between MGUS and multiple myloma (MM). The goal of the present study was to investigate this parameter as a marker for risk of progression in MGUS (n = 407) and SMM (n = 93). Patients with a marked predominance of aPCs/BMPC (> or = 95%) at diagnosis displayed a significantly higher risk of progression both in MGUS and SMM (P< .001). Multivariate analysis for progression-free survival (PFS) selected the percentage aPC/BMPC (> or = 95%) as the most important independent variable, together with DNA aneuploidy and immunoparesis, for MGUS and SMM, respectively. Using these independent variables, we have identified 3 risk categories in MGUS (PFS at 5 years of 2%, 10%, and 46%, respectively; P< .001) and SMM patients (PFS at 5 years of 4%, 46%, and 72%, respectively; P < .001). Our results show that multiparameter FC evaluation of BMPC at diagnosis is a valuable tool that could help to individualize the follow-up strategy for MGUS and SMM patients. PMID:17576818

  5. Electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique for small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses: feasibility testing.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E

    1997-01-01

    Multiple studies have indicated the importance of surface charge in the adhesion of multiple cardiovascular cell lines including platelets and endothelial cells on the substrate materials (1,4,7-10,12-15). It is the purpose of this article to report a feasibility study conducted using an electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique. The feasibility study was conducted using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a static pool apparatus, a voltage source, and a parallel plate capacitor. The HUVEC concentration and seeding times were constant at 560,000 HUVEC/ml and 30 min, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the endothelial cell adhesion indicated that an induced temporary positive surface charge on e-PTFE graft material enhances the number and the maturation (flattening) of HUVECs adhered. The results indicated that the total number of endothelial cells adhered (70.9 mm2) was increased from 9198 +/- 1194 HUVECs on the control (no induced surface charge) e-PTFE to 22,482 +/- 4814 HUVECs (2.4 x control) on the maximum induced positive surface charge. The total number of cells in the flattened phase of adhesion increased from 837 +/- 275 to 6785 +/- 1012 HUVECs (8.1x) under identical conditions. Thus, the results of the feasibility study support the premise that electrostatic interaction is an important factor in both the endothelial cell adhesion and spreading processes and suggest that the electrostatic seeding technique may lead to an increased patency of small diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses.

  6. MDS/AML-associated cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: evidence for frequent de novo occurrence and multipotent stem cell involvement of del(20q).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Therese; Nilsson, Lars; Lenhoff, Stig; Rylander, Lars; Astrand-Grundström, Ingbritt; Strömbeck, Bodil; Höglund, Mattias; Turesson, Ingemar; Westin, Jan; Mitelman, Felix; Jacobsen, Sten E W; Johansson, Bertil

    2004-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are characterized cytogenetically by 14q32 rearrangements, -13/13q-, and various trisomies. Occasionally, karyotypic patterns characteristic of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occur in MM, often signifying therapy-related (t)-MDS/t-AML. Comparison of cytogenetic features in all published MMs (n = 993) and t-MDS/t-AML post-MM (n = 117) revealed significant differences in complexity and ploidy levels and in most genomic changes. Thus, these features often can be used to distinguish between MM and t-MDS/t-AML. Rarely, myeloid-associated aberrations are detected in MM without any signs of MDS/AML. To characterize such abnormalities in MM/MGUS, we ascertained all 122 MM and 26 MGUS/smoldering MM (SMM) cases analyzed in our department. Sixty-six (54%) MMs and 8 (31%) MGUS/SMMs were karyotypically abnormal, of which 6 (9%) MMs and 3 (38%) MGUS/SMMs displayed myeloid abnormalities, that is, +8 (1 case) and 20q- (8 cases) as the sole anomalies, without any evidence of MDS/AML. One patient developed AML, whereas no MDS/AML occurred in the remaining 8 patients. In one MGUS with del(20q), fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed its presence in CD34+CD38- (hematopoietic stem cells), CD34+CD38+ (progenitors), CD19+ (B cells), and CD15+ (myeloid cells). The present data indicate that 20q- occurs in 10% of karyotypically abnormal MM/MGUS cases and that it might arise at a multipotent progenitor/stem cell level. PMID:15334545

  7. Multiple myeloma involving the orbit.

    PubMed

    Fay, A M; Leib, M L; Fountain, K S

    1998-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy often associated with destructive skeletal lesions. Orbital involvement in multiple myeloma is rare. Risk factors for orbital involvement have not been established, although risk may vary with immunoglobulin subtype. Early detection of orbital plasmacytoma may affect treatment and clinical course. A case is reported of multiple myeloma without elevated serum immunoglobulins that involves the orbit, and the implications of early detection are discussed. The patient was first examined by an ophthalmologist 13 months after multiple myeloma was diagnosed and 5 months after the external appearance of an orbital tumor. Urine protein electrophoresis demonstrated kappa light chains. Hypergammaglobulinemia was not detected. Plain-film roentgenography showed orbital involvement at the time of initial diagnosis. An impressive clinical response to external beam radiation therapy was seen. Attention to immunoprotein characteristics in multiple myeloma may help to identify risk factors for orbital involvement. Early detection may permit safer and equally effective treatment. All patients with multiple myeloma should undergo thorough ophthalmic examination at the time of initial diagnosis.

  8. Osteoclastome-like giant cell thyroid carcinoma controlled by intensive radiation and adriamycin, in a patient with meningioma and multiple myeloma treated by radiation and cytoxan

    SciTech Connect

    Vizel-Schwartz, M.

    1981-01-01

    The eighth cases of osteoclastome-like giant cell carcinoma of the thyroid, and the first one to be treated with adriamycin in addition to surgery and radiation, is reported. This rare variant of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma appeared in a patient operated on for meningioma and treated for multiple myeloma with cranial radiation and chronic administration of cytoxan.

  9. Bone scintigraphy in plasma-cell myeloma: a prospective study of 70 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bataille, R.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Sany, J.

    1982-12-01

    Radiography and scintigraphy were correlated in 70 patients with recently diagnosed, untreated multiple myeloma, including 59 with and 11 without primary lytic bone lesions. A site-by-site comparison showed that scintigraphy was more sensitive than radiography in only 18% of cases, whereas radiography was more sensitive in 38% (p<0.001). Patients whose bone scan was as sensitive or more so than the radiograph (''hot'' myeloma) had more active disease than those with the ''cold'' form. Remission was indicated by significant regression or disappearance of scintigraphic abnormalities in 90% of cases. The authors conclude that scintigraphy is not helpful in detecting myelomatous bone lesions, but does have prognastic value for diagnosis and chemotherapy: a positive bone scan indicates initial or residual activity.

  10. Bone scintigraphy in plasma-cell myeloma. A prospective study of 70 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bataille, R.; Chevalier, J.; Rossi, M.; Sany, J.

    1982-12-01

    Radiography and scintigraphy were correlated in 70 patients with recently diagnosed, untreated multiple myeloma, including 59 with and 11 without primary lytic bone lesions. A site-by-site comparison showed that scintigraphy was more sensitive than radiography in only 18% of cases, whereas radiography was more sensitive in 38% (p less than 0.001). Patients whose bone scan was as sensitive or more so than the radiograph (hot myeloma) had more active disease than those with the cold form. Remission was indicated by significant regression or disappearance of scintigraphic abnormalities in 90% of cases. The authors conclude that scintigraphy is not helpful in detecting myelomatous bone lesions, but does have prognostic value for diagnosis and chemotherapy: a positive bone scan indicates initial or residual activity.

  11. Kinome-wide RNAi studies in human multiple myeloma identify vulnerable kinase targets, including a lymphoid-restricted kinase, GRK6

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Schmidt, Jessica; Yin, Hongwei; Shi, Chang-Xin; Que, Qiang; Basu, Gargi; Azorsa, David; Perkins, Louise M.; Braggio, Esteban; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Mousses, Spyro; Stewart, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    A paucity of validated kinase targets in human multiple myeloma has delayed clinical deployment of kinase inhibitors in treatment strategies. We therefore conducted a kinome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) lethality study in myeloma tumor lines bearing common t(4;14), t(14;16), and t(11;14) translocations to identify critically vulnerable kinases in myeloma tumor cells without regard to preconceived mechanistic notions. Fifteen kinases were repeatedly vulnerable in myeloma cells, including AKT1, AK3L1, AURKA, AURKB, CDC2L1, CDK5R2, FES, FLT4, GAK, GRK6, HK1, PKN1, PLK1, SMG1, and TNK2. Whereas several kinases (PLK1, HK1) were equally vulnerable in epithelial cells, others and particularly G protein–coupled receptor kinase, GRK6, appeared selectively vulnerable in myeloma. GRK6 inhibition was lethal to 6 of 7 myeloma tumor lines but was tolerated in 7 of 7 human cell lines. GRK6 exhibits lymphoid-restricted expression, and from coimmunoprecipitation studies we demonstrate that expression in myeloma cells is regulated via direct association with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone. GRK6 silencing causes suppression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation associated with reduction in MCL1 levels and phosphorylation, illustrating a potent mechanism for the cytotoxicity of GRK6 inhibition in multiple myeloma (MM) tumor cells. As mice that lack GRK6 are healthy, inhibition of GRK6 represents a uniquely targeted novel therapeutic strategy in human multiple myeloma. PMID:19996089

  12. The Changing Landscape of Smoldering Multiple Myeloma: A European Perspective.

    PubMed

    Caers, Jo; Fernández de Larrea, Carlos; Leleu, Xavier; Heusschen, Roy; Zojer, Niklas; Decaux, Olivier; Kastritis, Efstathios; Minnema, Monique; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Beguin, Yves; Wäsch, Ralph; Palumbo, Antonio; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mateos, Maria Victoria; Ludwig, Heinz; Engelhardt, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder and bridges monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to multiple myeloma (MM), based on higher levels of circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin and bone marrow plasmocytosis without end-organ damage. Until a Spanish study reported fewer MM-related events and better overall survival among patients with high-risk SMM treated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone, prior studies had failed to show improved survival with earlier intervention, although a reduction in skeletal-related events (without any impact on disease progression) has been described with bisphosphonate use. Risk factors have now been defined, and a subset of ultra-high-risk patients have been reclassified by the International Myeloma Working Group as MM, and thus will require optimal MM treatment, based on biomarkers that identify patients with a >80% risk of progression. The number of these redefined patients is small (∼10%), but important to unravel, because their risk of progression to overt MM is substantial (≥80% within 2 years). Patients with a high-risk cytogenetic profile are not yet considered for early treatment, because groups are heterogeneous and risk factors other than cytogenetics are deemed to weight higher. Because patients with ultra-high-risk SMM are now considered as MM and may be treated as such, concerns exist that earlier therapy may increase the risk of selecting resistant clones and induce side effects and costs. Therefore, an even more accurate identification of patients who would benefit from interventions needs to be performed, and clinical judgment and careful discussion of pros and cons of treatment initiation need to be undertaken. For the majority of SMM patients, the standard of care remains observation until development of symptomatic MM occurs, encouraging participation in ongoing and upcoming SMM/early MM clinical trials, as well as consideration of bisphosphonate use in

  13. Impact of Prophylactic Levofloxacin on Rates of Bloodstream Infection and Fever in Neutropenic Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Satlin, Michael J.; Vardhana, Santosh; Soave, Rosemary; Shore, Tsiporah B.; Mark, Tomer M.; Jacobs, Samantha E.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Gergis, Usama

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the role of antibacterial prophylaxis during neutropenia in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At our center, levofloxacin prophylaxis was initiated in June 2006 in patients with myeloma who were undergoing autologous HSCT. We compared the incidence of bloodstream infection (BSI) and fever and neutropenia (FN) within 30 days of transplantation before (January 2003 - May 2006) and after (June 2006 - April 2010) the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients undergoing autologous HSCT for myeloma. We also compared rates of BSI and FN during the same time periods in autologous HSCT recipients with lymphoma who did not receive antibacterial prophylaxis during either time period. After the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, the BSI rate decreased from 41.2% (49/119) to 14.7% (23/156) and the rate of FN decreased from 91.6% to 60.9% in patients with myeloma (P < 0.001, for each). In contrast, rates of BSI (43.1% vs. 47.3%; P = 0.50) and FN (98.8% vs. 97.1%; P = 0.63) did not change in patients with lymphoma. Levofloxacin prophylaxis was independently associated with decreased odds of BSI (odds ratio [OR] 0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.51; P < 0.001) and FN (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09–0.36; P < 0.001) in multivariate analysis. Patients with myeloma had a non-significant increase in the risk of BSI due to levofloxacin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (5% vs. 1%, P = 0.08) and Clostridium difficile infection (7% vs. 3%, P = 0.12) after the initiation of levofloxacin prophylaxis, but did not have higher rates of BSI due to other resistant bacteria. Levofloxacin prophylaxis is associated with decreased risk of BSI and FN in patients with myeloma undergoing autologous HSCT. PMID:26150022

  14. Use of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation as initial therapy in multiple myeloma and the impact of socio-geo-demographic factors in the era of novel agents.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Go, Ronald S

    2014-08-01

    Very effective combination chemotherapy using novel agents has become available in multiple myeloma (MM). Its impact on the use of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT) as part of initial therapy is unknown. Using the National Cancer Data Base, we studied the rate of upfront AHCT use among 137,409 newly diagnosed MM patients from 1998 to 2010 in the United States and determined whether disparity exists among various sociodemographic as well as geographic subgroups. Overall, 12,378 (9.0%) patients received AHCT as part of initial treatment. The use of upfront AHCT increased steadily from 5.2% in 1998 to 12.1% in 2010 (trend test, P < 0.001), with no sign of plateau. This was seen across all socio-geo-demographic subgroups except among patients treated in the Northeast where the rate fell from 8.7% in 1998 to 6.6% in 2010. In multivariable analysis, patients with the following characteristics were the least likely to receive AHCT (odds ratio): year of diagnosis from 1998 to 2003 before the era of novel agents (0.67), older age (0.35), Black race (0.58), Hispanic ethnicity (0.78), low level of education or annual household income (0.55), residence in a metro area (0.66), no or unknown medical insurance (0.30), treatment at a community cancer center (0.16), and treatment facility located in the Northeast region (0.54). Even after the introduction of novel agents, the rate of upfront AHCT in MM continues to increase annually. Significant disparities exist dependent on demographic, social, and geographic factors.

  15. An antigenic study of human plasma cells in normal tissue and in myeloma: identification of a novel plasma cell associated antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P D; Walker, L; Hardie, D; Richardson, P; Khan, M; Johnson, G D; Ling, N R

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody named BU11 which detects an antigen strongly expressed on human plasma cells is described. The antibody stains plasma cells in tonsil sections, fresh and cultured plasmacytoid cells from the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma and cells of the plasmacytoid cell line RPMI 8226 used as the immunogen. In vitro studies of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated peripheral blood B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) stimulated tonsil B cells show that the antigen is present mainly on cells coexpressing the OKT10 antigen and containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg). The BU11 antigen is expressed weakly on some normal B cells and is not present on T cells, monocytes or granulocytes. The antigen is of molecular weight 58kD under reducing conditions and is biochemically distinct from previously described plasma cell antigens. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3024883

  16. Importance of the bone marrow microenvironment in inducing the angiogenic response in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Nico, B; Vacca, A

    2006-07-20

    Tumor microenvironment is essential for tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis through its provision of survival signals, secretion of growth and pro-angiogenic factors, and direct adhesion molecule interactions. This review examines its importance in the induction of an angiogenic response in multiple myeloma (MM). The encouraging results of preclinical and clinical trials in which MM has been treated by targeting the tumor microenvironment are also discussed.

  17. Clinical Use of Proteasome Inhibitors in the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Merin, Noah M.; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of neoplastic plasma cells. The use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of MM has led to significant improvements in outcomes. This article reviews data on the use of the two approved proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carlfilzomib), as well as newer agents under development. Emphasis is placed on the clinical use of proteasome inhibitors, including management of side effects and combination with other agents. PMID:25545164

  18. Resistance of a cultured fish cell line (CAF-MM1) to. gamma. irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, H.; Etoh, H.; Egami, N.

    1982-02-01

    Fish are generally more resistant to whole-body ionizing radiation than mammals. To study the radiosensitivity of fish in vitro, CAF-MM1 cells derived from the fin of the goldfish, Carassius auratus, were used. The survival parameters of CAF-MM1 obtained after ..gamma.. irradiation at 26/sup 0/C were 325 rad for D/sub o/, 975 rad for Dq, and 15 for n. No mammalian cell line with such a low sensitivity in the presence of O/sub 2/ has been reported. It was found that the large initial shoulder of the survival curve was paralleled by substantial repair of sublethal damage as evidenced by split-dose experiments. This low sensitivity to ..gamma.. irradiation did not change upon the administration of caffeine or postirradiation illumination, although these treatments were effective after uv irradiation. The decrease in the mitotic index in CAF-MM1 occurred immediately after irradiation, and it recovered within a very short time. This indicated that the duration of G2 arrest was shorter than that observed in mammalian cells. The data also suggest that the resistance of fish to whole-body irradiation is attributable to resistance at the cellular level.

  19. Frequent gain of chromosome band 1q21 in plasma-cell dyscrasias detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization: incidence increases from MGUS to relapsed myeloma and is related to prognosis and disease progression following tandem stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hanamura, Ichiro; Stewart, James P; Huang, Yongsheng; Zhan, Fenghuang; Santra, Madhumita; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Hollmig, Klaus; Zangarri, Maurizio; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; van Rhee, Frits; Cavallo, Federica; Burington, Bart; Crowley, John; Tricot, Guido; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2006-09-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization we investigated amplification of chromosome band 1q21 (Amp1q21) in more than 500 untreated patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS; n = 14), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM; n = 31), and newly diagnosed MM (n = 479) as well as 45 with relapsed MM. The frequency of Amp1q21 was 0% in MGUS, 45% in SMM, 43% in newly diagnosed MM, and 72% in relapsed MM (newly diagnosed versus relapsed MM, P < .001). Amp1q21 was detected in 10 of 12 patients whose disease evolved to active MM compared with 4 of 19 who remained with SMM (P < .001). Patients with newly diagnosed MM with Amp1q21 had inferior 5-year event-free/overall survival compared with those lacking Amp1q21 (38%/52% versus 62%/78%, both P < .001). Thalidomide improved 5-year EFS in patients lacking Amp1q21 but not in those with Amp1q21 (P = .004). Multivariate analysis including other major predictors revealed that Amp1q21 was an independent poor prognostic factor. Relapsed patients who had Amp1q21 at relapse had inferior 5-year postrelapse survival compared with those lacking Amp1q21 at relapse (15% versus 53%, P = .027). The proportion of cells with Amp1q21 and the copy number of 1q21 tended to increase at relapse compared with diagnosis. Our data suggest that Amp1q21 is associated with both disease progression and poor prognosis. PMID:16705089

  20. [Graft-versus-host disease associated with lenalidomide maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Shingaki, Sumito; Ikeda, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Kanji; Meshitsuka, Sohsuke; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Abe, Yu; Suzuki, Kenshi

    2015-07-01

    Although allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment option for multiple myeloma (MM), it is not recognized as a standard of care because of the high associated incidences of both treatment related mortality and relapse. We administered lenalidomide (Len) as maintenance therapy for patients with MM undergoing allo-SCT who were at high risk of disease relapse. Graft-versus-host disease was induced by Len administration in two patients, but was manageable with dose reduction. Although Len has a direct anti-myeloma effect and can also induce tumor immunity against residual myeloma cells, it is important to identify how to optimize the safety and the effects of Len administration after allo-SCT. Further accumulation of data including those from prospective clinical trials is urgently needed.