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Sample records for myocardial blood oxygen

  1. [Oxygen-transporting function of the blood circulation system in sevoflurane anesthesia during myocardial revascularization under extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Skopets, A A; Lomivorotov, V V; Karakhalis, N B; Makarov, A A; Duman'ian, E S; Lomivorotova, L V

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of oxygen-transporting function of the circulatory system under sevoflurane anesthesia during myocardial revascularization operations under extracorporeal circulation. Twenty-five patients with coronary heart disease were examined. Mean blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac index, total peripheral vascular resistance index, pulmonary pressure, pulmonary wedge pressure, and central venous pressure were measured. Arterial and mixed venous blood oxygen levels, oxygen delivery and consumption index, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and glucose and lactate concentrations were calculated. The study has demonstrated that sevoflurane is an effective and safe anesthetic for myocardial revascularization operations in patients with coronary heart disease. The use of sevoflurane contributes to steady-state oxygen-transporting function of the circulatory system at all surgical stages.

  2. The effects of hypothermia on myocardial oxygen consumption and transmural coronary blood flow in the potassium-arrested heart.

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W R; Sink, J D; Hill, R C; Wechsler, A S; Sabiston, D C

    1979-01-01

    Hypothermia remains the primary adjunct employed to lower cellular metabolism during various cardiac procedures. In these experiments, left ventricular myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) and transmural blood flow (TBF) were measured during cardiopulmonary bypass with the range of temperatures used clinically. Determinations were made in empty beating normothermic hearts and after potassium cardioplegia at 37, 32, 28, 22, 18, and 15 degrees (K+ = 15--37 meq/L: Hct 25 volumes %). Oxygen content of the total coronary sinus collection was compared with a large volume arterial sample using a Lex-O2-Con-TL analyzer (vs Van Slyke, R = 0.98). Transmural blood flow was measured at each temperature using microspheres (8 microns), and perfusion was maintained at 80 mmHg. Asystole (37 degrees) alone decreased MVO2 from 5.18 +/- 0.55 to 1.85 +/- 0.20 ml O2/min/100 g of left ventricle or approximately 65% (p less than 0.001). With progressive cooling to 15 degrees an additional 82% decrement in oxygen uptake occurred during asystole (p less than 0.001). During asystole at 37 degrees the decrease in MVO2 was reflected mainly by a large decrement (p less than 0.01) in TBF (1.27 +/- 0.19 to 0.74 +/- 0.17 ml/min/g of mean left ventricular flow). However, with cooling below 32 degrees, the arteriovenous oxygen difference narrowed progressively (p less than 0.001) while TBF paradoxically returned to control levels. Endocardial/epicardial flow ratios were not altered by cooling. These data not only confirm earlier reports describing a sequential drop in MVO2 with incremental myocardial cooling, but also establish MVO2 levels for perfused hearts arrested by potassium at lower temperatures (18--15 degrees). Moreover, as transmural blood flow becomes independent of metabolic necessity during hypothermia, coronary autoregulation appears to be impaired, possibly affecting detrimental tissue over perfusion. PMID:464672

  3. Synthetic Generation of Myocardial Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent MRI Time Series via Structural Sparse Decomposition Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Cristian; Morisi, Rita; Boschetto, Davide; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify approaches that generate appropriate synthetic data (computer generated) for Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent (CP–BOLD) MRI. CP–BOLD MRI is a new contrast agent- and stress-free approach for examining changes in myocardial oxygenation in response to coronary artery disease. However, since signal intensity changes are subtle, rapid visualization is not possible with the naked eye. Quantifying and visualizing the extent of disease relies on myocardial segmentation and registration to isolate the myocardium and establish temporal correspondences and ischemia detection algorithms to identify temporal differences in BOLD signal intensity patterns. If transmurality of the defect is of interest pixel-level analysis is necessary and thus a higher precision in registration is required. Such precision is currently not available affecting the design and performance of the ischemia detection algorithms. In this work, to enable algorithmic developments of ischemia detection irrespective to registration accuracy, we propose an approach that generates synthetic pixel-level myocardial time series. We do this by (a) modeling the temporal changes in BOLD signal intensity based on sparse multi-component dictionary learning, whereby segmentally derived myocardial time series are extracted from canine experimental data to learn the model; and (b) demonstrating the resemblance between real and synthetic time series for validation purposes. We envision that the proposed approach has the capacity to accelerate development of tools for ischemia detection while markedly reducing experimental costs so that cardiac BOLD MRI can be rapidly translated into the clinical arena for the noninvasive assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24691119

  4. Measurement of myocardial blood flow with oxygen-15 labelled water: comparison of different administration protocols.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, F; Rosen, S D; Fath-Ordoubadi, F; Kooner, J S; Clark, J C; Camici, P G; Lammertsma, A A

    1998-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) in conjunction with C15O2 or H215O can be used to measure myocardial blood flow (MBF) and tissue fraction (TF), i.e. the fraction of the tissue mass in the volume of the region of interest. However, with C15O2 inhalation, the tissue fraction in the septum is overestimated. Bolus injection of H215O together with arterial cannulation gives very precise results but is invasive. The purpose of this study was to develop a method which circumvents these problems. A four-parameter model with parameters for MBF, TF and spill-over fractions from both left and right ventricular cavities was developed. This method was compared with a three-parameter model (no right ventricular cavity spill-over) in both septal and non-septal regions of interest for three different administration protocols: bolus injection of H215O, infusion of H215O and inhalation of C15O2. It was found that MBF can be measured with intravenous administration of H215O without the requirement for arterial cannulation. The four-parameter protocol with bolus injection was stable in clinical studies. The four-parameter model proved essential for the septum, where it gave highly significantly better fits than did the three-parameter model (P<0.00003 in each of 15 subjects). Administration of H215O together with this four-parameter model also circumvented the problem of overestimation of TF in the septum seen with C15O2 inhalation. In addition, the radiation dose of H215O protocols is lower than that of C15O2 inhalation. Using a left atrial input curve instead of a left ventricular cavity input curve gave the same mean MBF and TF.

  5. Effects of nicardipine and nisoldipine on myocardial metabolism, coronary blood flow and oxygen supply in angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M F; Vincent, M F; Van Hoof, F; Van den Berghe, G; Charlier, A A; Pouleur, H

    1984-12-01

    The effects of the calcium antagonists nicardipine and nisoldipine on left ventricular (LV) metabolism were analyzed in 32 patients with angina pectoris. Measurements were made at a fixed heart rate under the basal state and during a cold pressor test (CPT). After administration of the drugs, coronary blood flow increased significantly and the mean aortic pressure decreased by 10% (p less than 0.01) in the basal state and by 11% (p less than 0.01) during CPT. Despite the reduction in pressure-rate product, myocardial oxygen consumption was unchanged in the basal state (18 +/- 4 vs 19 +/- 4 ml/min, difference not significant) and during CPT (21 +/- 5 vs 21 +/- 5 ml/min, difference not significant); this discrepancy between a reduced pressure-rate product and an unchanged oxygen consumption was also noted when nicardipine was given after propranolol (0.1 mg/kg; 12 patients). Both agents also increased LV lactate uptake, particularly during CPT (+13 mumol/min, p less than 0.05 vs control CPT) and reduced LV glutamine production. In 10 patients in whom 14C-lactate was infused, the chemical LV lactate extraction ratio increased more than the 14C-lactate extraction ratio after administration of the drugs, indicating a reduction in LV lactate production. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that nicardipine and nisoldipine improve perfusion and aerobic metabolism in chronically ischemic areas, resulting in an augmented oxygen consumption and in a reduced lactate production.

  6. A myocardial ischemia- and reperfusion-induced injury is mediated by reactive oxygen species released from blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Christian; Prechtl, Gerald; Kusus-Seligmann, Magda; Daniel, Werner G

    2013-01-01

    In recent experimental studies, blood platelets have been found to exhibit some cardiodepressive effects in ischemic and reperfused guinea pig hearts independent of thrombus formation. These effects seemed to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the source of these ROS - platelets or heart - remained still unknown. Isolated, buffer-perfused and pressure-volume work performing guinea pig hearts were exposed to a low-flow ischemia (1 ml/min) of 30 min duration and reperfused at a constant flow of 5 ml/min. Human thrombocytes were administered as 1 min bolus (20 000 thrombocytes/µl perfusion buffer) in the 15th min of ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion in the presence of thrombin (0.3 U/ml perfusion buffer). Recovery of external heart work (REHW) was expressed as ratio between postischemic and preischemic EHW in percent. Intracoronary platelet retention (RET) was quantified as percent of platelets applied. In a second set of experiments, thrombocytes were incubated with 10 µM of the irreversible NADPH oxidase blocker diphenyliodonium chloride and washed twice, thereafter, and administered according to the same protocol as described above. Hearts exposed to ischemia and reperfusion in the presence of thrombin but without application of platelets served as controls. Controls without application of platelets did not reveal a severe compromisation of myocardial function (REHW 85.5 ± 1%). However, addition of platelets during ischemia or in the 1st or 5th min of reperfusion led to a significant reduction of REHW as compared with controls (REHW 62.4 ± 6, 53.9 ± 3, 40.5 ± 3, respectively). Application of platelets pretreated with diphenyliodonium chloride did not reveal any cardiodepressive effects being significantly different from controls without platelet application. Moreover, treatment of platelets with diphenyliodonium chloride did not significantly decrease intracoronary platelet retention. In conclusion, these results demonstrate

  7. Hypoxemia (Low Blood Oxygen)

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) By Mayo Clinic Staff Hypoxemia is a below-normal level of oxygen in your blood, specifically in the arteries. Hypoxemia ... of breath. Hypoxemia is determined by measuring the oxygen level in a blood sample taken from an ...

  8. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  9. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes.

  10. Ethanol-induced myocardial ischemia: close relation between blood acetaldehyde level and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Abe, H; Hisanou, R

    1993-05-01

    A patient with vasospastic angina who developed myocardial ischemia following ethanol ingestion but not after exercise was described. Myocardial ischemia was evidenced by electrocardiograms (ECGs) and thallium-201 scintigrams. The blood acetaldehyde level after ethanol ingestion was abnormally high. The time course and severity of myocardial ischemia coincided with those of the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde level. Coronary arteriography showed ergonovine maleate-induced coronary vasospasm at the left anterior descending coronary artery. ECG changes similar to those induced by ethanol ingestion were observed at the same time. These findings suggest that the high blood acetaldehyde level might be responsible for the development of coronary vasospasm and myocardial ischemia in this patient.

  11. Noninvasive estimation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption by positron emission tomography with carbon-11 acetate in patients with myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.N.; Geltman, E.M.; Brown, M.A.; Henes, C.G.; Weinheimer, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R. )

    1989-11-01

    We previously demonstrated in experimental studies that myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) can be estimated noninvasively with positron emission tomography (PET) from analysis of the myocardial turnover rate constant (k) after administration of carbon-11 (11C) acetate. To determine regional k in healthy human subjects and to estimate alterations in MVO2 accompanying myocardial ischemia, we administered (11C)acetate to five healthy human volunteers and to six patients with myocardial infarction. Extraction of (11C)acetate by the myocardium was avid and clearance from the blood-pool rapid yielding myocardial images of excellent quality. Regional k was homogeneous in myocardium of healthy volunteers (coefficient variation = 11%). In patients, k in regions remote from the area of infarction was not different from values in myocardium of healthy human volunteers (0.061 +/- 0.025 compared with 0.057 +/- 0.008 min-1). In contrast, MVO2 in the center of the infarct region was only 6% of that in remote regions (p less than 0.01). In four patients studied within 48 hr of infarction and again more than seven days after the acute event, regional k and MVO2 did not change. The approach developed should facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of interventions designed to enhance recovery of jeopardized myocardium and permit estimation of regional MVO2 and metabolic reserve underlying cardiac disease of diverse etiologies.

  12. Reduced myocardial blood flow in acute and chronic digitalization.

    PubMed

    Steiness, E; Bille-Brahe, N E; Hansen, J F; Lomholt, N; Ring-Larsen, H

    1978-07-01

    The myocardial blood flow was measured by the 133Xenon disappearance curve from the left ventricular wall following an injection of 133Xenon in the left coronary artery in 8 dogs without digoxin pretreatment and in 8 chronically digitalized dogs. The myocardial blood flow was significantly less (30%) in the digitalized dogs than in the dogs without pretreatment. In the digitalized dogs as well as in those without pretreatment an intravenous injection of digoxin resulted in a further significant decrease of the myocardial blood flow of about 20% and a significant increase of the coronary vascular resistance. The reduced myocardial blood flow both during acute and chronic digitalization is beleived to be of clinical importance.

  13. Blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A model is developed for predicting oxygen uptake, muscle blood flow, and blood chemistry changes under exercise conditions. In this model, the working muscle mass system is analyzed. The conservation of matter principle is applied to the oxygen in a unit mass of working muscle under transient exercise conditions. This principle is used to relate the inflow of oxygen carried with the blood to the outflow carried with blood, the rate of change of oxygen stored in the muscle myoglobin, and the uptake by the muscle. Standard blood chemistry relations are incorporated to evaluate venous levels of oxygen, pH, and carbon dioxide.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Reactive Oxygen Species in Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingyang; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is experienced by individuals suffering from cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart diseases and subsequently undergoing reperfusion treatments in order to manage the conditions. The occlusion of blood flow to the tissue, termed ischemia, can be especially detrimental to the heart due to its high energy demand. Several cellular alterations have been observed upon the onset of ischemia. The danger created by cardiac ischemia is somewhat paradoxical in that a return of blood to the tissue can result in further damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been studied intensively to reveal their role in myocardial I/R injury. Under normal conditions, ROS function as a mediator in many cell signaling pathways. However, stressful environments significantly induce the generation of ROS which causes the level to exceed body's antioxidant defense system. Such altered redox homeostasis is implicated in myocardial I/R injury. Despite the detrimental effects from ROS, low levels of ROS have been shown to exert a protective effect in the ischemic preconditioning. In this review, we will summarize the detrimental role of ROS in myocardial I/R injury, the protective mechanism induced by ROS, and potential treatments for ROS-related myocardial injury.

  15. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L.; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H.; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction. PMID:24307973

  16. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-07-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction.

  17. Regional Myocardial Blood Flow and Ultrastructure Following Acute Temporary Ischemia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    kidneys of dogs and cats , and suggest some element present in whole blood, but not present in filtered blood may serve to further damage ischemic...minutes of myocardial ischemia in the dog as Krug et al. (66) has reported in the cat . Finally, in this experiment the relationship of inhibited reflow...transient inhibition of flow. One has to wonder if their 6 cats with smaller areas of risk are more like the dogs in this study and may also have had

  18. Cardiac cryosurgery: regional myocardial blood flow of ventricular cryolesions

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, W.L.; Ikeshita, M.; Lease, J.G.; Smith, P.K.; Ungerleider, R.M.; Cox, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    Cryosurgery is one of three methods introduced recently for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cryothermic exposure ablates arrhythmogenic ventricular myocardium, and produces a dense fibrous scar with a sharp border to histologically normal tissue. Myocardial blood flow in the region of the cryolesion, however, has not been quantitated. The purpose of this study was to measure regional blood flow within and around the cryolesion in an attempt to identify ischemic zones that might become arrhythmogenic. Left ventricular cryolesions were created in eleven adult dogs. Two weeks later, the animals underwent radioactive tracer microsphere injection for quantitation of regional myocardial blood flow. The fibrotic cryolesion demonstrated a significantly depressed blood flow (0.44 +/- 0.07 ml/min/g) compared to blood flow in control tissue (1.36 +/- 0.12 ml/min/g) (P less than 0.001). A 1-mm strip of myocardium immediately adjacent to the cryolesion, as well as other myocardium surrounding and subjacent to the cryolesion, did not show a significant decrease in regional blood flow. The border between the fibrotic cryolesion and the surrounding myocardium is, therefore, sharply defined not only in terms of histology but also in regards to regional blood flow. These data lend further support to the safe clinical use of cryothermia in the treatment of refractory ventricular tachycardia.

  19. Myocardial blood flow: Roentgen videodensitometry techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. C.; Robb, R. A.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The current status of roentgen videodensitometric techniques that provide an objective assessment of blood flow at selected sites within the coronary circulation were described. Roentgen videodensitometry employs conventional radiopaque indicators, radiological equipment and coronary angiographic techniques. Roentgen videodensitometry techniques developed in the laboratory during the past nine years, and for the past three years were applied to analysis of angiograms in the clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  20. Myocardial blood flow during induced aortic hypertension in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thai, B.N.; Levesque, M.J.; Nerem, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial blood flow was measured in anesthetized dogs during control conditions and under conditions where the aortic pressure was increased due to aortic constriction or during infusion. Blood flow was measured using the radioactive microsphere technique. Radioactive microspheres (15 m Ce-141, Sr-85, and Sc-46) were injected under control, aortic constriction and arterenol infusion in four dogs and under control conditions in two others. All microsphere injections were performed under stabilized conditions. It was found that coronary blood flow rose by 80% during aortic constriction and by 158% during arterenol infusion (P < 0.05). This increase in blood flow was not uniform throughout the heart, and higher increases were observed in the middle and apex regions of the left ventricle. Furthermore, under hypertension the increase in blood flow in LAD (left anterior descending) perfused territories was slightly higher than that in CFX (left circumflex) perfused territories.

  1. Combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow by myocardial contrast echocardiography after acute reperfused myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, F; Messner-Pellenc, P; Descours, Q; Daures, J; Pasquie, J; Hager, F; Davy, J; Grolleau-Raoux, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow by myocardial contrast echocardiography after myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed in patients with acute myocardial infarction shortly after successful coronary reperfusion (TIMI 3 patency) by direct angioplasty. Collateral flow was assessed before coronary angioplasty, and contrast reflow was evaluated 15 minutes after reperfusion. The presence of contractile reserve was assessed by low dose dobutamine echocardiography (5 to 15 µg/kg/min) at (mean (SD)) 3 (2) days after myocardial infarction. Recovery of segmental function (myocardial viability) was evaluated by resting echocardiography at a two month follow up. The study was prospective.
PATIENTS—35 consecutive patients referred for acute transmural myocardial infarction.
RESULTS—Contrast reflow was observed in 20 patients (57%) and collateral flow in 14 (40%). Contrast reflow and collateral contrast flow were both correlated with reversible dysfunction on initial dobutamine echocardiography and at follow up (p < 0.05). The presence of reflow or collateral flow on myocardial contrast echocardiography was a highly sensitive (100%) but weakly specific (60%) indicator of segmental dysfunction recovery. Simultaneous presence of contrast reflow and collateral flow was more specific of reversible dysfunction than reflow alone (90% v 60%).
CONCLUSIONS—Combined assessment of reflow and collateral blood flow enhanced the sensitivity of myocardial contrast echocardiography in predicting myocardial viability after acute, reperfused myocardial infarction. The simultaneous presence of reflow and collateral blood flow was highly specific of recovery of segmental dysfunction.


Keywords: contrast echocardiography; coronary reflow; collateral blood flow; dobutamine echocardiography; myocardial dysfunction PMID:10377311

  2. Baseline blood oxygenation modulates response amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanzhang; Zhao, Chenguang; Ge, Yulin; Lewis-Amezcua, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Although BOLD fMRI provides a useful tool for probing neuronal activities, large inter-subject variations in signal amplitude are commonly observed. Understanding the physiologic basis for these variations will have a significant impact on many fMRI studies. First, the physiologic modulator can be used as a regressor to reduce variations across subjects, thereby improving statistical power for detecting group differences. Second, if a pathologic condition or a drug treatment is shown to change fMRI responses, monitoring this modulatory parameter is useful in correctly interpreting the fMRI changes to neuronal deficits/recruitments. Here we present evidence that the task-evoked fMRI signals are modulated by baseline blood oxygenation. To measure global blood oxygenation, we used a recently developed technique, T2-Relaxation-Under-Spin-Tagging MRI, yielding baseline oxygenation of 63.7±7.2% in sagittal sinus with an estimation error of 1.3%. It was found that individuals with higher baseline oxygenation tend to have a smaller fMRI signal and vice versa. For every 10% difference in baseline oxygenation across subjects, the BOLD and cerebral blood flow signal differ by -0.4% and -30.0%, respectively, when using visual stimulation. TRUST MRI is a useful measurement for fMRI studies to control for the modulatory effects of baseline oxygenation that are unique to each subject. PMID:18666103

  3. Myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang-jie; Sun, Li-na; Li, Xing-hai; Wang, Ning-fu; Wu, Hong-hai; Yuan, Chen-xing; Li, Qiao-qiao; Xu, Peng; Ren, Ya-qi; Mao, Bao-gen

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore myocardial protection of early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock in pigs. 24 male pigs (34.6 ± 1.3 kg) were randomly divided into three groups-control group, drug therapy group, and ECMO group. Myocardial infarction model was created in drug therapy group and ECMO group by ligating coronary artery. When cardiogenic shock occurred, drugs were given in drug therapy group and ECMO began to work in ECMO group. The pigs were killed 24 h after cardiogenic shock. Compared with in drug therapy group, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in ECMO group decreased significantly 6 h after ligation (P < 0.05). At the end of the experiments, LV - dp/dt among three groups was significantly different, drug therapy group < ECMO group < control group. There was no difference in LV + dp/dt between drug therapy group and ECMO group. Compared with drug group, myocardial infarct size of ECMO group did not reduce significantly, but myocardial enzyme and troponin-I decreased significantly. Compared with drug therapy, ECMO improves left ventricular diastolic function, and may improve systolic function. ECMO cannot reduce myocardial infarct size without revascularization, but may have positive effects on ischemic areas by avoiding further injuring.

  4. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  5. Bloodless reperfusion with the oxygen carrier HBOC-201 in acute myocardial infarction: a novel platform for cardioprotective probes delivery.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Jose M; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Aguero, Jaume; Sánchez-González, Javier; García-Alvarez, Ana; Nuno-Ayala, Mario; Dubé, Gregory P; Zafirelis, Zafiris; López-Martín, Gonzalo J; Bernal, Juan A; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja

    2017-03-01

    Reperfusion, despite being required for myocardial salvage, is associated with additional injury. We hypothesize that infarct size (IS) will be reduced by a period of bloodless reperfusion with hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) before blood-flow restoration. In the pig model, we first characterized the impact of intracoronary perfusion with a fixed volume (600 ml) of a pre-oxygenated acellular HBOC, HBOC-201, on the healthy myocardium. HBOC-201 was administered through the lumen of the angioplasty balloon (i.e., distal to the occlusion site) immediately after onset of coronary occlusion at 1, 0.7, 0.4, or 0.2 ml/kg/min for 12, 17, 30, and 60 min, respectively, followed by blood-flow restoration. Outcome measures were systemic hemodynamics and LV performance assessed by the state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. The best performing HBOC-201 perfusion strategies were then tested for their impact on LV performance during myocardial infarction, in pigs subjected to 45 min mid-left anterior descending (LAD) coronary occlusion. At the end of the ischemia duration, pigs were randomized to regular reperfusion (blood-only reperfusion) vs. bloodless reperfusion (perfusion with pre-oxygenated HBOC-201 distal to the occlusion site), followed by blood-flow restoration. Hemodynamics and CMR-measured LV performance were assessed at 7- and 45-day follow-up. In modifications of the HBOC-201 procedure, glucose and insulin were included to support cardiac metabolism. A total of 66 pigs were included in this study. Twenty healthy pigs (5 per infusion protocol) were used in the study of healthy myocardium. Intracoronary administration of HBOC-201 (600 ml) at varying rates, including a flow of 0.4 ml/kg/min (corresponding to a maximum perfusion time of 30 min), did not damage the healthy myocardium. Slower perfusion (longer infusion time) was associated with permanent LV dysfunction and myocardial necrosis. A total of 46 pigs underwent MI induction

  6. Blood oxygenation monitoring by diffuse optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Patachia, M; Dutu, D.C.A.; Dumitras, D.C.

    2011-01-24

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) makes it possible to reconstruct, in two or three dimensions, the internal structure of the biological tissues based on the distribution of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, using optical measurements at multiple source - detector positions on the tissue surface. The measurement of the light intensity transmitted through the tissue can be also used to compute the haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin concentrations, measuring the selective absorption of the main blood chromophores by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The spectral selectivity of the system and the evaluation of the blood volume and blood oxygenation (BV and OXY distributions), together with the reconstruction of the inner structure of the tissue, can improve the accuracy of early cancer diagnosis, based on the tissue angiogenesis characterisation. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  7. Measurements Of Coronary Mean Transit Time And Myocardial Tissue Blood Flow By Deconvolution Of Intravasal Tracer Dilution Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korb, H.; Hoeft, A.; Hellige, G.

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that intramyocardial blood volume does not vary to a major extent even during extreme variation of hemodynamics and coronary vascular tone. Based on a constant intramyocardial blood volume it is therefore possible to calculate tissue blood flow from the mean transit time of an intravascular tracer. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically applicable method for measurement of coronary blood flow. The new method was based on indocyanine green, a dye which is bound to albumin and intravasally detectable by means of a fiberoptic catheter device. One fiberoptic catheter was placed in the aortic root and another in the coronary sinus. After central venous dye injection the resulting arterial and coronary venous dye dilution curves were processed on-line by a micro-computer. The mean transit time as well as myocardial blood flow were calculated from the step response function of the deconvoluted arterial and coronary venous signals. Reference flow was determined with an extracorporeal electromagnetic flowprobe within a coronary sinus bypass system. 38 steady states with coronary blood flow ranging from 49 - 333 ml/min*100g were analysed in 5 dogs. Mean transit times varied from 2.9 to 16.6 sec. An average intracoronary blood volume of 13.9 -7 1.8 m1/100g was calculated. The correlation between flow determined by the dye dilution technique and flow measured with the reference method was 0.98. According to these results determination of coronary blood flow with a double fiberoptic system and indocyanine green should be possible even under clinical conditions. Furthermore, the arterial and coronary venous oxygen saturation can be monitored continuously by the fiberoptic catheters. Therefore, additional information about the performance of the heart such as myocardial oxygen consumption and myocardial efficiency is available with the same equipment.

  8. Oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence used to characterize improved myocardial oxygenation resulting from vasculogenic cytokine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Atluri, Pavan; Fitzpatrick, J. Raymond; Frederick, John R.; Levit, Rebecca D.; McCormick, Ryan C.; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Yang, Elaine C.; Marotta, Nicole A.; MacArthur, John W.; Wilson, David F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates a therapy for infarct modulation and acute myocardial rescue and utilizes a novel technique to measure local myocardial oxygenation in vivo. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were targeted to the heart with peri-infarct intramyocardial injection of the potent EPC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF). Myocardial oxygen pressure was assessed using a noninvasive, real-time optical technique for measuring oxygen pressures within microvasculature based on the oxygen-dependent quenching of the phosphorescence of Oxyphor G3. Myocardial infarction was induced in male Wistar rats (n = 15) through left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. At the time of infarction, animals were randomized into two groups: saline control (n = 8) and treatment with SDF (n = 7). After 48 h, the animals underwent repeat thoracotomy and 20 μl of the phosphor Oxyphor G3 was injected into three areas (peri-infarct myocardium, myocardial scar, and remote left hindlimb muscle). Measurements of the oxygen distribution within the tissue were then made in vivo by applying the end of a light guide to the beating heart. Compared with controls, animals in the SDF group exhibited a significantly decreased percentage of hypoxic (defined as oxygen pressure ≤ 15.0 Torr) peri-infarct myocardium (9.7 ± 6.7% vs. 21.8 ± 11.9%, P = 0.017). The peak oxygen pressures in the peri-infarct region of the animals in the SDF group were significantly higher than the saline controls (39.5 ± 36.7 vs. 9.2 ± 8.6 Torr, P = 0.02). This strategy for targeting EPCs to vulnerable peri-infarct myocardium via the potent chemokine SDF-1α significantly decreased the degree of hypoxia in peri-infarct myocardium as measured in vivo by phosphorescence quenching. This effect could potentially mitigate the vicious cycle of myocyte death, myocardial fibrosis, progressive ventricular dilatation, and eventual heart failure seen after acute myocardial infarction. PMID

  9. Measurement of arterial and capillary blood oxygen tension

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    An oxygen electrode system, supplied as an attachment to the Radiometer Astrup micro equipment for blood pH determination (AME I), has been investigated. Determination of blood oxygen tension using this electrode system has been compared with tension measurements using an established Bishop type oxygen electrode and satisfactory agreement was found. The storage of blood for routine estimation of oxygen tension has been investigated. Capillary blood oxygen tension has been measured and compared with that of simultaneously taken arterial blood samples. PMID:5929338

  10. [The content of selen in blood plasma in patients with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E N; Nizov, A A; Ivanova, A Yu; Sidorova, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    The level of blood plasma selenium was analyzed by microfluorimetric method in in-patients and out-patients with acute coronary syndrome with ST-elevation resulting in acute Q-wave myocardial infarction. 72 patients, 40-75 years old, with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction were followed during a month. The initial decreased concentration of blood plasma selenium was recorded in most patients in the acute period of the myocardial infarction: deficiency of the microelement (< 90 mcg/l) was found in 30 subjects, the critical ranges (< 70 mcg/l) were stated in 33 patients. Just 2 patients had optimal concentration and 7 patients had a suboptimal one (90-114 mcg/l). Blood plasma level of the microelement increased in 2 weeks after myocardial infarction (in subacute stage) but it was still within deficient or critical levels. No difference was detected in selen concentration depending on gender, age, location on myocardial infarction, accompanying diseases, presence of some risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, hereditary predisposition to coronary artery disease). At the same time we revealed a significant Spearman rank correlation in patients with Q-wave myocardial infarction between basal level of blood serum selenium on the one hand, and electrocardiography indices (reflecting the rate of myocardial lesion and necrosis), echocardiography. data (which characterize myocardium reparation processes and remodeling), CPK (a prognostic marker of the myocardial necrosis), HDL-cholesterol (lipid profile index), blood potassium level and BMI on the other.

  11. Oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemic conservation determines the myocardial injury during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yansheng; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    There is discrepancy regarding the duration of reperfusion required using 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess myocardial infarction in an isolated, perfused heart model. Several investigators prefer long-term reperfusion (120 minutes) to determine myocardial injury, while others have used a shorter duration (30-40 minutes). We investigated whether oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia plays a critical role in the installation of myocardial infarction during reperfusion. Mice hearts were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus using Krebs Henseleit (KH) buffer oxygenated with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2 at 37°C. Hearts were either immersed in KH or suspended in air during 18 minutes of global ischemia in a normothermic, water-jacketed chamber. Hearts then were reperfused for 40, 60, or 90 minutes. We found that hearts immersed in KH had decreased recovery of function and increased myocardial infarct size, reaching a steady-state level after 40 minutes of reperfusion. In contrast, hearts suspended in air approached steady-state after 90 minutes of reperfusion. Thus, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was much lower in air-maintained hearts than in KH-immersed hearts. To investigate whether an increase in oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia might cause further damage, we bubbled the KH solution with nitrogen (KH+N2) rather than oxygen (KH+O2). With this alteration, recovery of cardiac function was improved and myocardial infarct size and mitochondrial ROS production were reduced compared with hearts immersed in KH+O2. In conclusion, short-term (40 minutes) reperfusion is sufficient to reach steady-state myocardial infarct size when hearts are immersed in physiologic solution during ischemia; however, a longer duration of reperfusion (90 minutes) is required if hearts are suspended in air. Thus, oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemia determines the extent of myocardium injury during reperfusion.

  12. The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow during acute and chronic myocardial ischemia in anesthetized and awake intact dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, J T; Watson, J T; Hutton, I; Fixler, D E; Curry, G C; Templeton, G H

    1975-01-01

    The influence of hypertonic mannitol on regional myocardial blood flow and ventricular performance was studied during acute myocardial ischemia in awake, unsedated and in anesthesized dogs and after myocardial infarction in awake unsedated dogs. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Generalized increases in regional myocardial blood flow occurred after mannitol in all of the different animal models studied. The increases in coronary blood flow after mannitol were just as impressive in the nonischemic regions as in the ischemic portion of the left ventricle in all of the different models that were examined in this study. Improvement in regional myocardial blood flow to the ischemic area of the left ventricle after mannitol was associated with a reduction in ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. The increases in regional myocardial flow after mannitol were also associated with increases in contractility, but the increases in flow appeared to be more impressive than the changes in contractility. The data obtained demonstrate that mannitol increases regional coronary blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic myocardium in both anesthetized and awake, unsedated, intact dogs with acute and chronic myocardial ischemia and that mannitol reduces ST segment elevation during acute myocardial ischemia in anesthetized dogs. Thus the results suggest that under these circumstances the increases in regional myocardial blood flow after mannitol are of physiological importance in reducing the extent of myocardial injury. Since coronary blood flow increased to nonischemic regions the increases in regional myocardial flow demonstrated in this study after mannitol cannot be entirely explained by the mechanism of reduction in ischemic cell swelling. PMID:1123427

  13. Myocardial contrast echo effect: the dilemma of coronary blood flow and volume.

    PubMed

    Rovai, D; DeMaria, A N; L'Abbate, A

    1995-07-01

    Despite the useful information provided by myocardial contrast echocardiography, the meaning of myocardial contrast intensity remains elusive. This review is meant to define the contribution of physical and biologic factors in producing myocardial contrast and to elucidate the relative roles of coronary blood flow and intramyocardial blood volume in determining contrast effect. The main physical factors influencing the contrast echo effect include the properties of microbubbles as scattering elements (mainly their radius, compressibility, stability and concentration), electronic signal processing, instrument setting and contrast-induced signal attenuation. The effect of these factors can be limited by an appropriate experimental or clinical setup. Biologic factors are less easily controllable, and changes in coronary blood flow and alterations in myocardial blood volume appear to be the main determinants of myocardial contrast intensity. Moreover, these factors influence contrast intensity in opposite directions. Both the area under the time-intensity curve and the mean transit time of myocardial contrast are inversely related to coronary blood flow but directly related to myocardial vascularity and blood volume. Therefore, an increase in coronary flow not accompanied by an increase in myocardial vascularity and volume is accompanied by a decrease in the area under the curve and mean transit time of contrast. Conversely, an increase in coronary flow mediated by augmented myocardial vascularity and volume will produce an increase in the area under the curve and mean transit time. A better understanding of the physical and biologic determinants of contrast echo intensity will be fundamental in the clinical application of new agents and technologies.

  14. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  15. Radioactive oxygen-15 in the study of cerebral blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Herscovitch, P.

    1985-10-01

    The short half-life of /sup 15/O led early observers to believe that it was unsuitable for use as a biological tracer. However, initial studies with this nuclide demonstrated its potential usefulness for in vivo, regional physiologic measurements. Subsequently, techniques were developed to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume, and oxygen metabolism using intracarotid injection of /sup 15/O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and highly collimated scintillation probes to record the time course of radioactivity in the brain. The development of positron emission tomography (PET) made possible the in vivo, noninvasive measurement of the absolute concentration of positron-emitting nuclides. A variety of tracer kinetic models were formulated to obtain physiologic measurements from tomographic images of the distribution of 15O-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in the brain. Regional cerebral oxygen metabolism is measured using scan data obtained following the inhalation of /sup 15/O-labeled oxygen. The tracer kinetic models used to measure rCBV, blood flow, and oxygen metabolism will be described and their relative advantages and limitations discussed. Several examples of the use of /sup 15/O tracer methods will be reviewed to demonstrate their widespread applicability to the study of cerebral physiology and pathophysiology. 110 references.

  16. Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation colour affect perceived human health.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Ian D; Coetzee, Vinet; Law Smith, Miriam; Perrett, David I

    2009-01-01

    Skin blood perfusion and oxygenation depends upon cardiovascular, hormonal and circulatory health in humans and provides socio-sexual signals of underlying physiology, dominance and reproductive status in some primates. We allowed participants to manipulate colour calibrated facial photographs along empirically-measured oxygenated and deoxygenated blood colour axes both separately and simultaneously, to optimise healthy appearance. Participants increased skin blood colour, particularly oxygenated, above basal levels to optimise healthy appearance. We show, therefore, that skin blood perfusion and oxygenation influence perceived health in a way that may be important to mate choice.

  17. Measuring blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Yu, Tianhao; Li, Lin; Chai, Xinyu; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-10-01

    Heart pumps blood through the blood vessels to provide body with oxygen and nutrients. As the result, the blood flow, volume and oxygenation in arteries has a pulsatile nature. Measuring these pulsatile parameters enables more precise monitoring of oxygen metabolic rate and is thus valuable for researches and clinical applications. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a proven label-free method for in vivo measuring blood oxygenation at single blood vessel level. However, studies using PAM to observe the pulsatile nature of blood oxygenation in arteries were not reported. In this paper, we use optical-resolution PAM (OR-PAM) technology to study the blood oxygenation dynamics of pulsatile arteries. First, the ability of our OR-PAM system to accurately reflect the change of optical absorption in imaged objects is demonstrated in a phantom study. Then the system is used to image exposed cortical blood vessels of cat. The pulsatile nature of blood volume and oxygenation in arteries is clearly reflected in photoacoustic (PA) signals, whereas it's not observable in veins. By using a multi-wavelength laser, the dynamics of the blood oxygenation of pulsatile arteries in cardiac cycles can be measured, based on the spectroscopic method.

  18. Real time measurement of myocardial oxygen dynamics during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion of rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Kim, Seung Ki; Kang, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok-Kyun; Chae, Su-Jin; Choi, Samjin; Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Hun-Kuk; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2012-11-21

    Because oxygen plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of myocardial injury during subsequent reperfusion, as well as ischemia, the accurate measurement of myocardial oxygen tension is crucial for the assessment of myocardial viability by ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Therefore, we utilized a sol-gel derived electrochemical oxygen microsensor to monitor changes in oxygen tension during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion. We also analyzed differences in oxygen tension recovery in post-ischemic myocardium depending on ischemic time to investigate the correlation between recovery parameters for oxygen tension and the severity of IR injury. An oxygen sensor was built using a xerogel-modified platinum microsensor and a coiled Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Rat hearts were randomly divided into 5 groups: control (0 min ischemia), I-10 (10 min ischemia), I-20 (20 min ischemia), I-30 (30 min ischemia), and I-40 (40 min ischemia) groups (n = 3 per group, respectively). After the induction of ischemia, reperfusion was performed for 60 min. As soon as the ischemia was initiated, oxygen tension rapidly declined to near zero levels. When reperfusion was initiated, the changes in oxygen tension depended on ischemic time. The normalized peak level of oxygen tension during the reperfusion episode was 188 ± 27 in group I-10, 120 ± 24 in group I-20, 12.5 ± 10.6 in group I-30, and 1.24 ± 1.09 in group I-40 (p < 0.001, n = 3, respectively). After 60 min of reperfusion, the normalized restoration level was 129 ± 30 in group I-10, 88 ± 4 in group I-20, 3.40 ± 4.82 in group I-30, and 0.99 ± 0.94 in group I-40 (p < 0.001, n = 3, respectively). The maximum and restoration values of oxygen tension in groups I-30 and I-40 after reperfusion were lower than pre-ischemic values. In particular, oxygen tension in the I-40 group was not recovered at all. These results were also demonstrated by TTC staining. We suggest that these recovery parameters could be utilized as an index of

  19. Blood oxygen content in microliter samples using an easy-to-build galvanic oxygen cell.

    PubMed

    Grubb, B R; Mills, C D

    1981-02-01

    We have designed a simple, inexpensive, easy-to-build and operate apparatus for measuring blood oxygen content. The galvanic oxygen cell (fuel cell) requires as little as 1 microliter of blood and has a measuring time of 1-3 min. It is well suited for measuring oxygen content in fluids low in oxygen inasmuch as the sensitivity of the instrument is variable. Either air or water (at a known temperature and oxygen tension) can be used for calibration. No significant differences in blood oxygen content measured with our cell or the Van Slyke manometric method were found.

  20. Blood storage device and method for oxygen removal

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a storage device and method for the long-term storage of blood and, more particularly, to a blood storage device and method capable of removing oxygen from the stored blood and thereby prolonging the storage life of the deoxygenated blood.

  1. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  2. Rodent Working Heart Model for the Study of Myocardial Performance and Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Isolated working heart models have been used to understand the effects of loading conditions, heart rate and medications on myocardial performance in ways that cannot be accomplished in vivo. For example, inotropic medications commonly also affect preload and afterload, precluding load-independent assessments of their myocardial effects in vivo. Additionally, this model allows for sampling of coronary sinus effluent without contamination from systemic venous return, permitting assessment of myocardial oxygen consumption. Further, the advent of miniaturized pressure-volume catheters has allowed for the precise quantification of markers of both systolic and diastolic performance. We describe a model in which the left ventricle can be studied while performing both volume and pressure work under controlled conditions. In this technique, the heart and lungs of a Sprague-Dawley rat (weight 300-500 g) are removed en bloc under general anesthesia. The aorta is dissected free and cannulated for retrograde perfusion with oxygenated Krebs buffer. The pulmonary arteries and veins are ligated and the lungs removed from the preparation. The left atrium is then incised and cannulated using a separate venous cannula, attached to a preload block. Once this is determined to be leak-free, the left heart is loaded and retrograde perfusion stopped, creating the working heart model. The pulmonary artery is incised and cannulated for collection of coronary effluent and determination of myocardial oxygen consumption. A pressure-volume catheter is placed into the left ventricle either retrograde or through apical puncture. If desired, atrial pacing wires can be placed for more precise control of heart rate. This model allows for precise control of preload (using a left atrial pressure block), afterload (using an afterload block), heart rate (using pacing wires) and oxygen tension (using oxygen mixtures within the perfusate). PMID:27584550

  3. Mimicking Oxygen delivery and waste removal functions of blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaifa; Barralet, Jake E

    2017-02-15

    In addition to immunological and wound healing cell and platelet delivery, ion stasis and nutrient supply, blood delivers oxygen to cells and tissues and removes metabolic wastes. For decades researchers have been trying to develop approaches that mimic these two immediately vital functions of blood. Oxygen is crucial for the long-term survival of tissues and cells in vertebrates. Hypoxia (oxygen deficiency) and even at times anoxia (absence of oxygen) can occur during organ preservation, organ and cell transplantation, wound healing, in tumors and engineering of tissues. Different approaches have been developed to deliver oxygen to tissues and cells, including hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), normobaric hyperoxia therapy (NBOT), using biochemical reactions and electrolysis, employing liquids with high oxygen solubility, administering hemoglobin, myoglobin and red blood cells (RBCs), introducing oxygen-generating agents, using oxygen-carrying microparticles, persufflation, and peritoneal oxygenation. Metabolic waste accumulation is another issue in biological systems when blood flow is insufficient. Metabolic wastes change the microenvironment of cells and tissues, influence the metabolic activities of cells, and ultimately cause cell death. This review examines advances in blood mimicking systems in the field of biomedical engineering in terms of oxygen delivery and metabolic waste removal.

  4. Case-Based Learning of Blood Oxygen Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, William H.

    2006-01-01

    A case study about carbon monoxide poisoning was used help students gain a greater understanding of the physiology of oxygen transport by the blood. A review of student answers to the case questions showed that students can use the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve to make meaningful determinations of oxygen uptake and delivery. However, the…

  5. Improvement in Myocardial Function and Coronary Blood Flow in Ischemic Myocardium after Mannitol

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, James T.; Powell, Wm. John; Guiney, Timothy E.; Stark, James J.; Sanders, Charles A.; Leaf, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperosmolality on the performance of, and the collateral blood flow to, ischemic myocardium. The myocardial response to mannitol, a hyperosmolar agent which remains extracellular, was evaluated in anesthetized dogs. Mannitol was infused into the aortic roots of 31 isovolumic hearts and of 15 dogs on right heart bypass, before and during ischemia. Myocardial ischemia was produced by temporary ligation of either the proximal or mid-left anterior descending coronary artery. Mannitol significantly improved the depressed ventricular function curves which occurred with left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. Mannitol also significantly lessened the S-T segment elevation (epicardial electrocardiogram) occurring during myocardial ischemia in the isovolumic hearts and this reduction was associated with significant increases in total coronary blood flow (P < 0.005) and with increased collateral coronary blood flow to the ischemia area (P < 0.005). Thus, increases in serum osmolality produced by mannitol result in the following beneficial changes during myocardial ischemia: (a) improved myocardial function, (b) reduced S-T segment elevation, (c) increased total coronary blood flow, and (d) increased collateral coronary blood flow. PMID:4640943

  6. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenator compatible with centrifugal blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Tadashi; Maeda, Tomohiro; Kawahito, Shinji; Matsui, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Seiji; Ishitoya, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Masaki; Nishimura, Ikuya; Shinohara, Toshiyuki; Oestmann, Daniel; Glueck, Julia; Kawaguchi, Yoichiro; Sato, Koshiro; Nosé, Yukihiko

    2002-11-01

    Coil-type silicone membrane oxygenators can only be used with roller blood pumps due to the resistance from the high blood flow. Therefore, during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) treatment, the combination of a roller pump and an oxygenator with a high blood flow resistance will induce severe hemolysis, which is a serious problem. A silicone rubber, hollow fiber membrane oxygenator that has a low blood flow resistance was developed and evaluated with centrifugal pumps. During in vitro tests, sufficient gas transfer was demonstrated with a blood flow less than 3 L/min. Blood flow resistance was 18 mm Hg at 1 L/min blood flow. This oxygenator module was combined with the Gyro C1E3 (Kyocera, Japan), and veno-arterial ECMO was established on a Dexter strain calf. An ex vivo experiment was performed for 3 days with stable gas performance and low blood flow resistance. The combination of this oxygenator and centrifugal pump may be advantageous to enhance biocompatibility and have less blood trauma characteristics.

  7. Noncoronary Collateral Myocardial Blood Flow: The Human Heart’s Forgotten Blood Supply

    PubMed Central

    Picichè, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The “noncoronary collateral circulation” (NCCC) or “noncoronary collateral myocardial blood flow” (NCCMBF), reaches the heart through a micro-vascular network arising from the bronchial, esophageal, pericardial, diaphragmatic, and aortic arteries. The left and right internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) along with their collateral branches also serve as a source of NCCMBF-a feature seen in other mammals. Under certain circumstances the ITAs have a high potential for developing collateral branches. In the case of severe Leriche syndrome or with chronic obstruction of the abdominal aorta, the ITAs can serve as the main or even sole source of blood supply to the lower limbs. It is also possible for the ITAs to develop angiographically visible branches that directly connect with the coronary arteries. In ischemic conditions there is a functional, ischemia-reducing extracardiac coronary artery supply via natural ipsilateral ITA anastomosis. To date we know little about NCCMBF and its potential benefits in clinical applications, which makes this a challenging and intriguing field of research. This paper reviews all available data on noncoronary collateral blood supply to the human heart. PMID:27006713

  8. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-02

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  9. Hyperpolarized (129)Xe T (1) in oxygenated and deoxygenated blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, M. S.; Balamore, D.; Kacher, D. F.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Jolesz, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    The viability of the new technique of hyperpolarized (129)Xe MRI (HypX-MRI) for imaging organs other than the lungs depends on whether the spin-lattice relaxation time, T(1), of (129)Xe is sufficiently long in the blood. In previous experiments by the authors, the T(1) was found to be strongly dependent upon the oxygenation of the blood, with T(1) increasing from about 3 s in deoxygenated samples to about 10 s in oxygenated samples. Contrarily, Tseng et al. (J. Magn. Reson. 1997; 126: 79-86) reported extremely long T(1) values deduced from an indirect experiment in which hyperpolarized (129)Xe was used to create a 'blood-foam'. They found that oxygenation decreased T(1). Pivotal to their experiment is the continual and rapid exchange of hyperpolarized (129)Xe between the gas phase (within blood-foam bubbles) and the dissolved phase (in the skin of the bubbles); this necessitated a complicated analysis to extract the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood. In the present study, the experimental design minimizes gas exchange after the initial bolus of hyperpolarized (129)Xe has been bubbled through the sample. This study confirms that oxygenation increases the T(1) of (129)Xe in blood, from about 4 s in freshly drawn venous blood, to about 13 s in blood oxygenated to arterial levels, and also shifts the red blood cell resonance to higher frequency. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Abbreviations used BOLD blood oxygen level dependent NOE nuclear overhouses effect PO(2) oxygen partial pressure RBC red blood cells RF radio frequency SNR signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Blood oxygen saturation determined by transmission spectrophotometry of hemolyzed blood samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, W. M.

    1967-01-01

    Use of the Lambert-Beer Transmission Law determines blood oxygen saturation of hemolyzed blood samples. This simplified method is based on the difference in optical absorption properties of hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin.

  11. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  12. Myocardial blood flow under general anaesthesia with sevoflurane in type 2 diabetic patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In type 2 diabetic patients, cardiac events in the perioperative period may be associated with diminished myocardial vasomotor function and endothelial dysfunction. The influence of sevoflurane anaesthesia on myocardial endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetic mellitus is investigated in this pilot study. Methods Six males with type 2 diabetes mellitus and eight healthy controls were included. Using myocardial contrast echocardiography, myocardial blood flow (MBF) was measured at rest, during adenosine-induced hyperaemia (endothelium-independent vasodilation) and after sympathetic stimulation by the cold pressor test (endothelium-dependent vasodilation). Measurements were performed before and after induction of sevoflurane anaesthesia. Results Sevoflurane anaesthesia decreased resting MBF in diabetics but not in controls (P = 0.03), while baseline MBF did not differ between diabetics and controls. Without anaesthesia, adenosine-induced hyperaemia increased MBF in both groups compared to resting values. Adenosine combined with sevoflurane resulted in a lower hyperaemic MBF in both groups compared to no anaesthesia. Differences in MBF in response to adenosine before and after sevoflurane administration were larger in diabetic patients, however not statistically significant in this pilot group (P = 0.08). Myocardial blood flow parameters after the cold pressor test were not different between groups. Conclusion These pilot data in type 2 diabetic patients show that sevoflurane anaesthesia decreases resting myocardial blood flow compared to healthy controls. Further, we observed a trend towards a lower endothelium-independent vasodilation capacity in diabetic patients under sevoflurane anaesthesia. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was not affected by sevoflurane in diabetic patients. These data provide preliminary insight into myocardial responses in type 2 diabetic patients under general anaesthesia. Trial registration http

  13. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Algorithm-Based Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Program Can Improve Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Unai, Shinya; Tanaka, Daizo; Ruggiero, Nicholas; Hirose, Hitoshi; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C

    2016-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in our institution resulted in near total mortality prior to the establishment of an algorithm-based program in July 2010. We hypothesized that an algorithm-based ECMO program improves the outcome of patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated with cardiogenic shock. Between March 2003 and July 2013, 29 patients underwent emergent catheterization for acute myocardial infarction due to left main or proximal left anterior descending artery occlusion complicated with cardiogenic shock (defined as systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg despite multiple inotropes, with or without intra-aortic balloon pump, lactic acidosis). Of 29 patients, 15 patients were treated before July 2010 (Group 1, old program), and 14 patients were treated after July 2010 (Group 2, new program). There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics, including age, sex, coronary risk factors, and left ventricular ejection fraction between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation prior to ECMO was performed in two cases (13%) in Group 1 and four cases (29%) in Group 2. ECMO support was performed in one case (6.7%) in Group 1 and six cases (43%) in Group 2. The 30-day survival of Group 1 versus Group 2 was 40 versus 79% (P = 0.03), and 1-year survival rate was 20 versus 56% (P = 0.01). The survival rate for patients who underwent ECMO was 0% in Group 1 versus 83% in Group 2 (P = 0.09). In Group 2, the mean duration on ECMO was 9.8 ± 5.9 days. Of the six patients who required ECMO in Group 2, 100% were successfully weaned off ECMO or were bridged to ventricular assist device implantation. Initiation of an algorithm-based ECMO program improved the outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock.

  14. Balance of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in myocardial reperfusion injury and protection.

    PubMed

    Folino, Anna; Losano, Gianni; Rastaldo, Raffaella

    2013-12-01

    Depending on their concentrations, both nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) take part either in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury or in protection by ischemic and pharmacological preconditioning (Ipre) and postconditioning (Ipost). At the beginning of reperfusion, a transient release of NO is promptly scavenged by ROS to form the highly toxic peroxynitrite, which is responsible for a further increase of ROS through endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. The protective role of NO has suggested the use of NO donors to mimic Ipre and Ipost. However, NO donors have not always given the expected protection, possibly because they are responsible for the production of different amounts of ROS that depend on the amount of released NO. This review is focused on the role of the balance of NO and ROS in myocardial injury and its prevention by Ipre and Ipost and after the use of NO donors given with or without antioxidant compounds to mimic Ipre and Ipost.

  15. Quantitative myocardial blood flow with Rubidium-82 PET: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, Christoffer E; Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows assessment of myocardial blood flow in absolute terms (ml/min/g). Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) extend the scope of conventional semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI): e.g. in 1) identification of the extent of a multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) burden, 2) patients with balanced 3-vessel CAD, 3) patients with subclinical CAD, and 4) patients with regional flow variance, despite of a high global MFR. A more accurate assessment of the ischemic burden in patients with intermediate pretest probability of CAD can support the clinical decision-making in treatment of CAD patients as a complementary tool to the invasive coronary angiography (CAG). Recently, several studies have proven Rubidium-82 (82Rb) PET’s long-term prognostic value by a significant association between compromised global MFR and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and together with new diagnostic possibilities from measuring the longitudinal myocardial perfusion gradient, cardiac 82Rb PET faces a promising clinical future. This article reviews current evidence on quantitative 82Rb PET’s ability to diagnose and risk stratify CAD patients, while assessing the potential of the modality in clinical practice. PMID:26550537

  16. Noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation in newborns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Wynne, Karon E.; Petrov, Yuriy; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Richardson, C. Joan; Prough, Donald S.

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral ischemia after birth and during labor is a major cause of death and severe complications such as cerebral palsy. In the USA alone, cerebral palsy results in permanent disability of 10,000 newborns per year and approximately 500,000 of the total population. Currently, no technology is capable of direct monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in newborns. This study proposes the use of an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive cerebral ischemia monitoring by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, near-infrared optoacoustic system suitable for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral ischemia in newborns with normal weight (NBW), low birth-weight (LBW, 1500 - 2499 g) and very low birth-weight (VLBW, < 1500 g). The system was capable of detecting SSS signals through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as through the skull. We tested the system in NBW, LBW, and VLBW newborns (weight range: from 675 g to 3,000 g) admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. We performed single and continuous measurements of the SSS blood oxygenation. The data acquisition, processing and analysis software developed by our group provided real-time, absolute SSS blood oxygenation measurements. The SSS blood oxygenation ranged from 60% to 80%. Optoacoustic monitoring of the SSS blood oxygenation provides valuable information because adequate cerebral oxygenation would suggest that no therapy was necessary; conversely, evidence of cerebral ischemia would prompt therapy to increase cerebral blood flow.

  17. The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension in the anaesthetized cat

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    1 The acute effects of nicotine, tobacco smoke, and carbon monoxide on myocardial oxygen tension (MPo2) were estimated amperometrically in 33 anaesthetized open-chest cats with a glass-insulated 25 μm platinum cathode within a 22-gauge needle implanted in the left ventricular wall. 2 MPo2 was 1.6-60 mmHg (mean 23.5 mmHg) when arterial Po2 was >80 mmHg. Sequential intravenous infusions of nicotine (2-3 μg/kg every 45 s) or intracheal puffs (3-5 ml) of tobacco smoke commonly produced transitory increases (25-35 mmHg) of arterial pressure and 4-6 mmHg increments of MPo2. Intratracheal puffs (5 ml) of 5% carbon monoxide sufficient to increase carboxyhaemoglobin from 0.8 to 1.5% to 4-7% had no effect on arterial Po2 or blood pressure but typically decreased MPo2 by approximately 1-4 mmHg. Augmentation of MPo2 often succeeded carbon monoxide administration. 3 Arterial hypoxia (arterial Po2 < 60 mmHg) reduced mean MPo2 to 14.4 mmHg but anoxic levels were not observed. Pressor responses to nicotine and tobacco smoke were accompanied by small increases (usually 1-3 mmHg) of MPo2. Puffs of 5% carbon monoxide had less effect than during normoxia. Locations of low MPo2 (<10 mmHg) were unaffected as carboxyhaemoglobin was raised to 7-11% during hypoxaemia. 4 It is concluded that nicotine and tobacco smoke cause augmentation of myocardial oxygen supply, even during moderate hypoxaemia. By contrast, smoking dosages of carbon monoxide have the potential of producing a small reduction of MPo2 during normoxia, but the effect is negligible during moderate hypoxaemia. PMID:656704

  18. Effects of myocardial infarction on the distribution and transport of nutrients and oxygen in porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Davis, Bryce H; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Sample, Chris; Olbrich, Kevin; Leddy, Holly A; Guilak, Farshid; Taylor, Doris A

    2012-10-01

    One of the primary limitations of cell therapy for myocardial infarction is the low survival of transplanted cells, with a loss of up to 80% of cells within 3 days of delivery. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of nutrients and oxygen in infarcted myocardium and to quantify how macromolecular transport properties might affect cell survival. Transmural myocardial infarction was created by controlled cryoablation in pigs. At 30 days post-infarction, oxygen and metabolite levels were measured in the peripheral skeletal muscle, normal myocardium, the infarct border zone, and the infarct interior. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescein or FITC-labeled dextran (0.3-70 kD) were measured in these tissues using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The vascular density was measured via endogenous alkaline phosphatase staining. To examine the influence of these infarct conditions on cells therapeutically used in vivo, skeletal myoblast survival and differentiation were studied in vitro under the oxygen and glucose concentrations measured in the infarct tissue. Glucose and oxygen concentrations, along with vascular density were significantly reduced in infarct when compared to the uninjured myocardium and infarct border zone, although the degree of decrease differed. The diffusivity of molecules smaller than 40 kD was significantly higher in infarct center and border zone as compared to uninjured heart. Skeletal myoblast differentiation and survival were decreased stepwise from control to hypoxia, starvation, and ischemia conditions. Although oxygen, glucose, and vascular density were significantly reduced in infarcted myocardium, the rate of macromolecular diffusion was significantly increased, suggesting that diffusive transport may not be inhibited in infarct tissue, and thus the supply of nutrients to transplanted cells may be possible. in vitro studies mimicking infarct conditions suggest that increasing nutrients available to

  19. Inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen by oxygen tension and blood flow imaging in rat.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-Yu; Albers, John; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic function of inner retinal cells relies on the availability of nutrients and oxygen that are supplied by the retinal circulation. Assessment of retinal tissue vitality and function requires knowledge of both the rate of oxygen delivery and consumption. The purpose of the current study is to report a novel technique for assessment of the inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen (MO(2)) by combined measurements of retinal blood flow and vascular oxygen tension (PO(2)) in rat. The application of this technology has the potential to broaden knowledge of retinal oxygen dynamics and advance understanding of disease pathophysiology.

  20. Patient-specific coronary artery blood flow simulation using myocardial volume partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kang, Dongwoo; Kang, Nahyup; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Hyong-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2013-03-01

    Using computational simulation, we can analyze cardiovascular disease in non-invasive and quantitative manners. More specifically, computational modeling and simulation technology has enabled us to analyze functional aspect such as blood flow, as well as anatomical aspect such as stenosis, from medical images without invasive measurements. Note that the simplest ways to perform blood flow simulation is to apply patient-specific coronary anatomy with other average-valued properties; in this case, however, such conditions cannot fully reflect accurate physiological properties of patients. To resolve this limitation, we present a new patient-specific coronary blood flow simulation method by myocardial volume partitioning considering artery/myocardium structural correspondence. We focus on that blood supply is closely related to the mass of each myocardial segment corresponding to the artery. Therefore, we applied this concept for setting-up simulation conditions in the way to consider many patient-specific features as possible from medical image: First, we segmented coronary arteries and myocardium separately from cardiac CT; then the myocardium is partitioned into multiple regions based on coronary vasculature. The myocardial mass and required blood mass for each artery are estimated by converting myocardial volume fraction. Finally, the required blood mass is used as boundary conditions for each artery outlet, with given average aortic blood flow rate and pressure. To show effectiveness of the proposed method, fractional flow reserve (FFR) by simulation using CT image has been compared with invasive FFR measurement of real patient data, and as a result, 77% of accuracy has been obtained.

  1. Iodophenylpentadecanoic acid-myocardial blood flow relationship during maximal exercise with coronary occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.H.; Martin, G.V.; Link, J.M.; Krohn, K.A.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Imaging {sup 123}I-labeled iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) uptake and clearance from the myocardium following exercise has been advocated as a means of detecting myocardial ischemia because fatty acid deposition is enhanced and clearance prolonged in regions of low flow. However, normal regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous, and it is not known how this heterogeneity affects regional metabolism or substrate uptake and thus image interpretation. In five instrumented dogs running at near maximal workload on a treadmill, {sup 131}I-labeled IPPA and 15-micron 46Sc microspheres were injected into the left atrium after 30 sec of circumflex coronary artery occlusion. Microsphere and IPPA activity were determined in 250 mapped pieces of myocardium of approximately 400 mg. Myocardial blood flows (from microspheres) ranged from 0.05 to 7.6 ml/min/g. Deposition of IPPA was proportional to regional flows (r = 0.83) with an average retention of 25%. The mean endocardial-epicardial ratio for IPPA (0.90 {plus minus} 0.43) was similar to that for microspheres (0.94 {plus minus} 0.47; p = 0.08). Thus, initial IPPA deposition during treadmill exercise increases in proportion to regional myocardial blood flow over a range of flows from very low to five times normal.

  2. Nonlinear photoacoustic measurements of oxygen saturation levels in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanzi, Albert

    Oxygen is necessary for metabolism. It is carried from lungs to the rest of the body by hemoglobin in blood. As each hemoglobin molecule can carry a maximum of four oxygen molecules, oxygen saturation (sO2) is the measure of percentage of oxygen content in blood. For a normal person sO2 is 95% - 100%. Point-of-care testing of sO2 in blood is important in medicine. It enables doctors and caregivers for monitoring a wide variety of chronic illnesses. On the other hand, mapping of sO2 values by performing a raster scan across the region of interest in vivo is also essential in clinical and research settings, such as to evaluate the therapeutic effects of a treatment, monitoring healing of wounds, etc. Several non-invasive methods have been developed for this purpose. In this thesis, I measured the nonlinear absorption coefficient (beta) of blood samples using photoacoustic Z-scan technique. Results depict linear dependency between beta and blood oxygenation levels.

  3. Myocardial Reloading After Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart, providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. ECMO also induces stress which can adversely affect the ability to reload or wean the heart from the circuit. Metabolic impairments induced by altered loading and/or stress conditions may impact weaning. However, cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading with ECMO modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Methods and Results Sixteen immature piglets (7.8 to 15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8‐hour ECMO (UNLOAD) and postwean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused into the coronary artery [2‐13C]‐pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]‐L‐leucine as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. Upon RELOAD, each functional parameter, which were decreased substantially by ECMO, recovered to near‐baseline level with the exclusion of minimum dP/dt. Accordingly, myocardial oxygen consumption was also increased, indicating that overall mitochondrial metabolism was reestablished. At the metabolic level, when compared to UNLOAD, RELOAD altered the contribution of various substrates/pathways to tissue pyruvate formation, favoring exogenous pyruvate versus glycolysis, and acetyl‐CoA formation, shifting away from pyruvate decarboxylation to endogenous substrate, presumably fatty acids. Furthermore, there was also a significant increase of tissue concentrations for all CAC intermediates (≈80%), suggesting enhanced anaplerosis, and of fractional protein synthesis rates (>70%). Conclusions RELOAD alters both cytosolic and mitochondrial energy substrate metabolism, while favoring leucine incorporation into protein synthesis rather than oxidation in the CAC. Improved understanding of factors governing these metabolic perturbations may

  4. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  5. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1200 - Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2... Indwelling blood oxygen partial pressure (PO2) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood oxygen... electrode) and that is used to measure, in vivo, the partial pressure of oxygen in blood to aid...

  10. Assessment of myocardial blood volume and water exchange: theoretical considerations and in vivo results.

    PubMed

    Bjørnerud, Atle; Bjerner, Tomas; Johansson, Lars O; Ahlström, Håkan K

    2003-05-01

    The measured signal response in contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion imaging has been shown to be affected by the rate of water exchange between the intravascular and extravascular compartments, the effect being particularly significant when intravascular contrast agents are used. In the present study, the T(1) relaxation rates were measured in eight pigs in blood and myocardium using a Look-Locker sequence after repeated injections of the intravascular contrast agent NC100150. The selection of myocardial region of interest was automated based on a minimum chi-square method. The intra- and extravascular water exchange rates and the myocardial blood volume were calculated from the measured relaxation rates by applying a two-compartment water exchange limited model that accounts for biexponential longitudinal relaxation. The following (mean +/- SD) values were obtained for the exchange frequency (f), the extravascular residence time (tau(e)), the intravascular residence time (tau(i)) and blood volume (BV), respectively: f = 1.39 +/- 0.52 s(-1), tau(e) = 708 +/- 264 ms, tau(i) = 107 +/- 63 ms, and BV = 11.2 +/- 2.1 mL/100 g. The mean value of f was found to be about 15% higher if biexponential relaxation was not accounted for, supporting the hypothesis that significant biexponential relaxation in tissues with large blood volume can lead to an overestimation of water exchange rates unless corrected for.

  11. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells From Peripheral Blood of ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ina Laura; Smith, Rachel; Bishop, Joanna C; Aldalati, Omar; Chase, Alex J; Morgan, Gareth; Thornton, Catherine A

    2017-02-28

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown therapeutic potential in the treatment of myocardial infarction patients. However, bone marrow requires invasive harvesting techniques. Therefore, the aim was to carry out a feasibility study of using autologous peripheral blood (PB) as a source for MSCs and platelet lysate (PL), a potential novel therapeutic intervention in acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Autologous PL and MSCs were prepared from STEMI patient and healthy control blood. MSCs were analyzed by trilineage differentiation and flow cytometry. PB MSCs were isolated from 83% of patients (n = 6) but not from controls. The use of PL was feasible in the first passage but not in subsequent ones due to volume. To conclude, PB is a promising alternative to bone marrow. It negates the need for invasive harvesting techniques, and reduces hemorrhagic risk in this patient population routinely managed with anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents.

  12. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. Materials and methods RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. Results P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. Discussion RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3. PMID:26674824

  13. Regional fibre stress-fibre strain area as an estimate of regional blood flow and oxygen demand in the canine heart.

    PubMed Central

    Delhaas, T; Arts, T; Prinzen, F W; Reneman, R S

    1994-01-01

    1. In the present study the relation between regional left ventricular contractile work, regional myocardial blood flow and oxygen uptake was assessed during asynchronous electrical activation. 2. In analogy to the use of the pressure-volume area for the estimation of global oxygen demand, the fibre stress-fibre strain area, as assessed regionally, was used to estimate regional oxygen demand. The more often used relation between the pressure-sarcomere length area and regional oxygen demand was also assessed. 3. Experiments were performed in six anaesthetized dogs with open chests. Regional differences in mechanical work were generated by asynchronous electrical activation of the myocardial wall. The ventricles were paced from the right atrium, the left ventricular free wall, the left ventricular apex or the right ventricular outflow tract. Regional fibre strain was measured at the epicardial anterior left ventricular free wall with a two-dimensional video technique. 4. Regional fibre stress was estimated from left ventricular pressure, the ratio of left ventricular cavity volume to wall volume, and regional deformation. Total mechanical power (TMP) was calculated from the fibre stress-fibre strain area (SSA) and the duration of the cardiac cycle (tcycle) using the equation: TMP = SSA/tcycle. Regional myocardial blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Regional oxygen uptake was estimated from regional myocardial blood flow values and arteriovenous differences in oxygen content. 5. During asynchronous electrical activation, total mechanical power, pressure-sarcomere length area, myocardial blood flow and oxygen uptake were significantly lower in early than in late activated regions (P < 0.05). 6. Within the experiments, the correlation between the pressure-sarcomere length area and regional oxygen uptake was not significantly lower than the one between total mechanical power (TMP) and regional oxygen uptake (VO2,reg). However, variability of this

  14. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  15. Improved sample capsule for determination of oxygen in hemolyzed blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, W. M.

    1967-01-01

    Sample capsule for determination of oxygen in hemolyzed blood consists of a measured section of polytetrafluoroethylene tubing equipped at each end with a connector and a stopcock valve. This method eliminates errors from air entrainment or from the use of mercury or syringe lubricant.

  16. Effects of nicardipine on coronary blood flow, left ventricular inotropic state and myocardial metabolism in patients with angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M F; Vincent, M F; Cheron, P; van den Berghe, G; Charlier, A A; Pouleur, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intravenous nicardipine (2.5 mg) on the left ventricular (LV) inotropic state, LV metabolism, and coronary haemodynamics were analysed in 22 patients with angina pectoris. Measurements were made at fixed heart rate (atrial pacing), under basal state, and during a cold pressor test. After nicardipine, coronary blood flow and oxygen content in the coronary sinus increased significantly. The indices of inotropic state increased slightly, and the rate of isovolumic LV pressure fall improved. Myocardial oxygen consumption was unchanged despite the significant reduction in pressure-rate product, but LV lactate uptake increased, particularly during the cold pressor test. When nicardipine was administered after propranolol, the indices of inotropic state were unaffected. The lack of direct effect of nicardipine on LV inotropic state was further confirmed by intracoronary injection of 0.1 and 0.2 mg in a separate group of 10 patients. It is concluded that the nicardipine-induced coronary dilatation seems to improve perfusion and aerobic metabolism in areas with chronic ischaemia, resulting in reduced lactate production and augmented oxygen consumption.

  17. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted.

  18. Elevated Myocardial Oxygen Consumption During Cutaneous Cold Stress in Young Adult Overweight and Obese Africans

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Toyib; Olatunji, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated cardiovascular responses to stressful stimuli (such as cold exposure) has been linked to the development of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, which in turn has been demonstrated to predict the development of future hypertension. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that enhanced change in myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) to cutaneous cold stress may be one potential mechanism that predisposes overweight/obese individuals in Africa to developing hypertension. The Rate-Pressure-Product (a non-invasive determinant of MVO2) was measured in normotensive young individuals aged between 18 and 25 years at baseline and during sympathetic activation elicited by cutaneous cold stimulation (CCS). Following CCS, there was a significant enhanced rate pressure product (RPP) change in overweight individuals (P = 0.019). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis showed that body mass index, but not body weight had a significant influence on RPP variation following CCS. Thus, it can be concluded that normotensive overweight or obese individuals have an exaggerated RPP response to the CCS. However, exposure to cold may augment sympathetic reactivity in overweight/obese individuals, which may contribute to increased risk of developing myocardial dysfunction, even in young normotensive individuals. PMID:28299141

  19. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death during myocardial infarction: roles of calcium and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    Excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytosolic calcium accumulation play major roles in the initiation of programmed cell death during acute myocardial infarction. Cell death may include necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, and combinations thereof. During ischemia, calcium handling between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofilament is disrupted and calcium is diverted to the mitochondria causing swelling. Reperfusion, while essential for survival, reactivates energy transduction and contractility and causes the release of ROS and additional ionic imbalance. During acute ischemia–reperfusion, the principal death pathways are programmed necrosis and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, initiated by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, respectively. Despite intense investigation, the mechanisms of action and modes of regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization are incompletely understood. Extrinsic apoptosis, necroptosis and autophagy may also contribute to ischemia–reperfusion injury. In this review, the roles of dysregulated calcium and ROS and the contributions of Bcl-2 proteins, as well as mitochondrial morphology in promoting mitochondrial membrane permeability change and the ensuing cell death during myocardial infarction are discussed. PMID:23176689

  20. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  1. PERFUSION FOR MYOCARDIAL REVASCULARIZATION WITHOUT AN ARTIFICIAL OXYGENATOR (New Method to Reduce Surgical Morbidity)

    PubMed Central

    De Moraes, Domingos Junqueira; Abilio, Fued Michel; Cunha, Marcos; Feitosa, Lionicio A.; Aragão, Esmeraldino; Cysne, Eumenes; Vieira, Roberto; Glavam, Haroldo C. C.; Zaniolo, Waldomiro; Netto, Mario Salles; Villela, Ronaldo De A.; Labrunie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Thirteen patients were submitted to direct myocardial revascularization (saphenous vein graft) without the use of an artificial oxygenator. The perfusion was done by a left ventricle-to-aorta bypass and autogenous oxygenation. Most patients had three grafts implanted plus endarterectomy of the distal right coronary artery. There was one hospital death that was apparently not related to the method used. Perfusion time ranged from 45 minutes to 4 hours. Body temperature during perfusion was kept between 25 and 30° C. Perfusion flow was maintained between 25 to 50 ml per kg of body weight per minute. Ischemic, hypothermic cardiac arrest was employed. We demonstrated for the first time that perfusion for this kind of heart surgery could be done with no artificial oxygenators and, apparently, is safer for the patients. There were no bleeding problems even in perfusions as long as 4 hours. There was no respiratory dysfunction, and artificial respiration was used for only 6 to 12 hours. The patients awoke at the end of surgery with no signs or symptoms of central nervous system damage, and vasopressor drugs were rarely used after surgery. Although the experience is very small, it suggests that many postoperative problems, especially those related to bleeding and respiratory dysfunction may be reduced or eliminated by this new method. PMID:15216319

  2. The influence of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes mellitus on vascular tone and myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Valenta, Ines; Dilsizian, Vasken; Quercioli, Alessandra; Schelbert, Heinrich R; Schindler, Thomas H

    2012-04-01

    Among individuals with cardiovascular risk factors, reductions in coronary vasodilator capacity with or without diabetes mellitus (DM) carry important diagnostic and prognostic information. Positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging in concert with tracer kinetic modeling allows the assessment of absolute regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and its response to various forms of vasomotor stress. Such noninvasive evaluation of myocardial flow reserve (MFR) or the vasodilator capacity of the coronary circulation expands the possibilities of conventional scintigraphic myocardial perfusion imaging from identifying flow-limiting epicardial coronary artery lesions to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of diabetic vasculopathy, microcirculatory dysfunction, and its atherothrombotic sequelae. Invaluable mechanistic insights were recently reported with PET by unraveling important effects of insulin resistance, obesity, and DM on the function of the coronary circulation. Such noninvasive assessment of coronary circulatory dysfunction enables monitoring its response to antidiabetic medication and/or behavioral interventions related to weight, diet, and physical activity that may evolve as a promising tool for an image-guided and personalized preventive diabetic vascular care. Whether PET-guided improvement or normalization of hyperemic MBF and/or MFR will translate into improved patient outcome in DM is a laudable goal to pursue next.

  3. Continuous blood oxygen saturation detection with single-wavelength photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiwen; Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-03-01

    Blood oxygen saturation (SO2) reflects the oxygenation level in blood transport and tissue. Previous studies have shown the capability of non-invasive quantitative measurements of SO2 by multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy for diagnosis of brain, tumor hemodynamics and other pathophysiological phenomena. However, those multi-wavelength methods require a tunable laser or multiple lasers which are relatively expensive and bulky for filed measurement environment and applications. Besides, the operation of multiple wavelengths, calibration procedures and data processing gets system complicated, which reduces the feasibility and flexibility for continuous real-time monitoring. Here we report a newly proposed method by combining PA and scattered light signals wherein imposing a hypothesis that scattering intensity is linear to the concentrations of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin weighed by blood scattering coefficients. A rigorous theoretical relationship between PA and scattering signals is thus established, making it possible that SO2 can be measured with only one excitation wavelength. To verify the theory basis, both dual-ink phantoms and fresh porcine blood sample have been employed in the experiments. The phantom experiment is able to quantify the concentration of mixed red-green ink that is in precise agreement with pre-set values. The ex vivo experiment with fresh porcine blood was conducted and the results of the proposed single-wavelength method achieved high accuracy of 1% - 4% errors. These demonstrated that the proposed single-wavelength SO2 detection is able to provide non-invasive, accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, and herein create potential for applying it to real clinical applications with low cost and high flexibility.

  4. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon Jnl; Petersen, Esben T

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy is increasingly being used to monitor cerebral oxygenation in neonates, it has a limited penetration depth. The T2-prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation (T2-BIOS) magnetic resonance sequence provides an oxygen saturation estimate on a voxel-by-voxel basis, without needing a respiratory calibration experiment. In 15 neonates, oxygen saturation measured by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy were compared. In addition, these measures were compared to cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy ( R(2 )= 0.64, p < 0.001). Strong linear correlations were found between near-infrared spectroscopy oxygen saturation, and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p < 0.01). The oxygen saturation obtained by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation correlated with venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.023), but no significant correlations could be demonstrated with frontal and whole brain cerebral blood flow. These results suggest that measuring oxygen saturation by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation is feasible, even in neonates. Strong correlations between the various methods work as a cross validation for near-infrared spectroscopy and T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation, confirming the validity of using of these techniques for determining cerebral oxygenation.

  5. Vane blood-bathed technique reveals the significance of adrenergic reaction in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Herbaczyńska-Cedro, Krystyna; Ceremuzyński, Leszek

    2010-01-01

    Using the blood-bathed technique of Vane we induced acute coronary occlusion in the dog and subsequently detected adrenaline release into the circulatory system, determined the rate of release and documented its significance for induction of cardiac arrhythmias. In the intact anesthetized dog, adrenaline excess of the magnitude released after coronary occlusion was sufficient to injure the healthy myocardium and to induce unfavorable metabolic systemic alterations. Subsequently, clinical research has documented that a serious clinical course of acute myocardial infarction is associated not only with enhanced excretion of catecholamines but also with augmentation of plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels. The positive therapeutic effect of aldosterone antagonists in acute myocardial infarction has been documented. The clinical value of our results, which were obtained in experimental and clinical studies, was later confirmed in multi-center trials.

  6. Effects of modified pharmacologic stress approaches on hyperemic myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.; Sun, K.T.

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacologic stress testing with 0.56 mg/kg of intravenous dipyridamole is frequently used to noninvasively detect coronary artery disease (CAD). However, high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) or the combination of standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg) with the isometric handgrip maneuver might evoke a greater coronary hyperemic response. To evaluate the effect of modified pharmacologic stress tests, myocardial blood flow was quantified in 11 male subjects (mean age: 27 {plus_minus} 7 yr) during standard-dose dipyridamole (0.56 mg/kg), high-dose dipyridamole (0.80 mg/kg) and standard-dose dipyridamole combined with the isometric handgrip exercise using dynamic PET and a two-compartment model for {sup 13}N-ammonia. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product remained unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but increased with the addition of the isometric handgrip. Myocardial blood flow was unchanged from standard to high-dose dipyridamole but was lower with the addition of the isometric handgrip. The hyperemic response induced by standard-dose dipyridamole cannot be further enhanced by high-dose dipyridamole. The addition of the isometric handgrip exercise results in a modest, but significant decline in hyperemic blood flow possibly due to increased extravascular resistive forces or an increase in a mediated coronary vasoconstriction associated with exercise. 31 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Pentobarbital-Induced Myocardial Stunning in Status Epilepticus Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Molaie, Donna; Nurok, Michael; Rosengart, Axel; Lahiri, Shouri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mild hypotension is a well-recognized complication of intravenous pentobarbital; however fulminant cardiopulmonary failure has not been previously reported. Case Report. A 28-year-old woman developed pentobarbital-induced cardiopulmonary failure that was successfully treated with maximal medical management including arteriovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She made an excellent cardiopulmonary and neurological recovery. Discussion and Conclusion. Pentobarbital is underrecognized as a potential cause of myocardial stunning. The mechanism involves direct myocardial depression and inhibition of autonomic neuroanatomical structures including the medulla and hypothalamus. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive cardiopulmonary support are essential to optimize the likelihood of a favorable outcome. PMID:27529037

  8. Optimally Repeatable Kinetic Model Variant for Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements with 82Rb PET

    PubMed Central

    deKemp, Robert A.; Renaud, Jennifer M.; Adler, Andy; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; Klein, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification with 82Rb positron emission tomography (PET) is gaining clinical adoption, but improvements in precision are desired. This study aims to identify analysis variants producing the most repeatable MBF measures. Methods. 12 volunteers underwent same-day test-retest rest and dipyridamole stress imaging with dynamic 82Rb PET, from which MBF was quantified using 1-tissue-compartment kinetic model variants: (1) blood-pool versus uptake region sampled input function (Blood/Uptake-ROI), (2) dual spillover correction (SOC-On/Off), (3) right blood correction (RBC-On/Off), (4) arterial blood transit delay (Delay-On/Off), and (5) distribution volume (DV) constraint (Global/Regional-DV). Repeatability of MBF, stress/rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR), and stress/rest MBF difference (ΔMBF) was assessed using nonparametric reproducibility coefficients (RPCnp = 1.45 × interquartile range). Results. MBF using SOC-On, RVBC-Off, Blood-ROI, Global-DV, and Delay-Off was most repeatable for combined rest and stress: RPCnp = 0.21 mL/min/g (15.8%). Corresponding MFR and ΔMBF RPCnp were 0.42 (20.2%) and 0.24 mL/min/g (23.5%). MBF repeatability improved with SOC-On at stress (p < 0.001) and tended to improve with RBC-Off at both rest and stress (p < 0.08). DV and ROI did not significantly influence repeatability. The Delay-On model was overdetermined and did not reliably converge. Conclusion. MBF and MFR test-retest repeatability were the best with dual spillover correction, left atrium blood input function, and global DV. PMID:28293274

  9. Texturing Blood-Glucose-Monitoring Optics Using Oxygen Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A method has been invented for utilizing directed, hyperthermal oxygen atoms and ions for texturing tips of polymeric optical fibers or other polymeric optical components for use in optical measurement of concentration of glucose in blood. The required texture of the sensory surface of such a component amounts to a landscape of microscopic hills having high aspect ratios (hills taller than they are wide), with an average distance between hills of no more than about 5 m. This limit on the average distance between hills is chosen so that blood cells (which are wider) cannot enter the valleys between the hills, where they could obstruct optical sensing of glucose in the blood plasma. On the other hand, the plasma is required to enter the valleys, and a high aspect ratio is intended to maximize the hillside and valley surface area in contact with the plasma, thereby making it possible to obtain a given level of optical glucose- measurement sensitivity with a relatively small volume of blood. The present method of texturing by use of directed, hyperthermal (particle energy >1 eV) oxygen atoms and ions stands in contrast to a prior method of texturing by use of thermal monatomic oxygen characterized by a temperature of the order of 0.5 eV. The prior method yields low-aspect- ratio (approximately hemispherical) craters that are tens of microns wide . too wide to exclude blood cells. The figure schematically depicts parts of a typical apparatus for texturing according to the present method. One or more polymeric optical components to be textured (e.g., multiple optical fibers bundled together for simultaneous processing) are mounted in a vacuum chamber facing a suitable ion- or atom-accelerating device capable of generating a beam of oxygen atoms and/or ions having kinetic energies >1 eV. Typically, such a device includes a heated cathode, in which case it is desirable to interpose a water-cooled thermal-radiation shield to prevent melting of the polymeric component(s) to

  10. Deoxygenation Reduces Sickle Cell Blood Flow at Arterial Oxygen Tension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinran; Wood, David K; Higgins, John M

    2016-06-21

    The majority of morbidity and mortality in sickle cell disease is caused by vaso-occlusion: circulatory obstruction leading to tissue ischemia and infarction. The consequences of vaso-occlusion are seen clinically throughout the vascular tree, from the relatively high-oxygen and high-velocity cerebral arteries to the relatively low-oxygen and low-velocity postcapillary venules. Prevailing models of vaso-occlusion propose mechanisms that are relevant only to regions of low oxygen and low velocity, leaving a wide gap in our understanding of the most important pathologic process in sickle cell disease. Progress toward understanding vaso-occlusion is further challenged by the complexity of the multiple processes thought to be involved, including, but not limited to 1) deoxygenation-dependent hemoglobin polymerization leading to impaired rheology, 2) endothelial and leukocyte activation, and 3) altered cellular adhesion. Here, we chose to focus exclusively on deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes in an effort to quantify their contribution independent of the other processes that are likely involved in vivo. We take advantage of an experimental system that, to our knowledge, uniquely enables the study of pressure-driven blood flow in physiologic-sized tubes at physiologic hematocrit under controlled oxygenation conditions, while excluding the effects of endothelium, leukocyte activation, adhesion, inflammation, and coagulation. We find that deoxygenation-dependent rheologic processes are sufficient to increase apparent viscosity significantly, slowing blood flow velocity at arterial oxygen tension even without additional contributions from inflammation, adhesion, and endothelial and leukocyte activation. We quantify the changes in apparent viscosity and define a set of functional regimes of sickle cell blood flow personalized for each patient that may be important in further dissecting mechanisms of in vivo vaso-occlusion as well as in assessing risk of patient

  11. Aging might augment reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and affect reactive nitrogen species (RNS) level after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in both humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qian; Chen, Mulei; Fang, Xiangyang; Lau, Wayne Bond; Xue, Lei; Zhao, Lina; Zhang, Hui; Liang, Yan-Hong; Bai, Xi; Niu, Hong-Yu; Ye, Jing; Chen, Qing; Yang, Xinchun; Liu, Miaobing

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies indicate aging results in significantly decreased cardiac function and increased myocardial apoptosis after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) in humans or rats. The underlying mechanisms of aging-exacerbated effects remain unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are known to play vital roles in aging-related MI/R injury. Heretofore, the effects of aging upon ROS and RNS formation were not investigated in humans, which is the focus of the current study. Due to experimental limitations with clinical trials, an additional animal experiment was performed. All enrolled acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy. AMI patients were assigned into two groups: adult (age <65, n = 34) and elderly (age ≥65, n = 45) AMI patients. Blood samples were obtained from all study participants at 24 h and 3 days post-PCI. Plasma/white blood cell (WBC) ROS and RNS markers (malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, NOx, and nitrotyrosine) were determined. The same markers were determined in rat cardiac tissue after 24 h MI/R. Compared to the adult group, elderly patients manifested increased plasma MDA and MPO and decreased plasma GSH concentrations. No significant differences in plasma NOx or nitrotyrosine concentration existed between adult and elderly patients. Furthermore, WBC iNOS activity in elderly patients was significantly decreased compared to the adult group. The measurement of ROS markers in the rat experiments was consistent and supported human study data. Surprisingly, RNS markers (NOx and nitrotyrosine) in blood and heart tissue increased from young to middle-aged rats but decreased from middle age to old age. Aging augments ROS, which might exacerbate MI/R injury. Additionally, our data support aging-induced changes of RNS levels in humans and rats in vivo.

  12. Hypoxia, Color Vision Deficiencies, and Blood Oxygen Saturation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    only a few subjects with congenital color vision defects and dichromats were excluded, we were interested in obtaining additional data from individuals...Hypoxia, Color Vision Deficiencies, and Blood Oxygen Saturation Jeffery K. Hovis1 Nelda J. Milburn2 Thomas E. Nesthus2 1University of Waterloo...2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. DOT/FAA/AM-13/20 4. Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date Hypoxia, Color Vision Deficiencies

  13. Frontal cerebral cortex blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygenation during normoxic and hypoxic exercise in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Habazettl, Helmut; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Wagner, Harrieth; Roussos, Charis; Wagner, Peter D; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During maximal hypoxic exercise, a reduction in cerebral oxygen delivery may constitute a signal to the central nervous system to terminate exercise. We investigated whether the rate of increase in frontal cerebral cortex oxygen delivery is limited in hypoxic compared to normoxic exercise. We assessed frontal cerebral cortex blood flow using near-infrared spectroscopy and the light-absorbing tracer indocyanine green dye, as well as frontal cortex oxygen saturation ( %) in 11 trained cyclists during graded incremental exercise to the limit of tolerance (maximal work rate, WRmax) in normoxia and acute hypoxia (inspired O2 fraction (), 0.12). In normoxia, frontal cortex blood flow and oxygen delivery increased (P < 0.05) from baseline to sub-maximal exercise, reaching peak values at near-maximal exercise (80% WRmax: 287 ± 9 W; 81 ± 23% and 75 ± 22% increase relative to baseline, respectively), both leveling off thereafter up to WRmax (382 ± 10 W). Frontal cortex % did not change from baseline (66 ± 3%) throughout graded exercise. During hypoxic exercise, frontal cortex blood flow increased (P = 0.016) from baseline to sub-maximal exercise, peaking at 80% WRmax (213 ± 6 W; 60 ± 15% relative increase) before declining towards baseline at WRmax (289 ± 5 W). Despite this, frontal cortex oxygen delivery remained unchanged from baseline throughout graded exercise, being at WRmax lower than at comparable loads (287 ± 9 W) in normoxia (by 58 ± 12%; P = 0.01). Frontal cortex % fell from baseline (58 ± 2%) on light and moderate exercise in parallel with arterial oxygen saturation, but then remained unchanged to exhaustion (47 ± 1%). Thus, during maximal, but not light to moderate, exercise frontal cortex oxygen delivery is limited in hypoxia compared to normoxia. This limitation could potentially constitute the signal to limit maximal exercise capacity in hypoxia. PMID:21727220

  14. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  15. Overshoot phenomenon of oxygen uptake during recovery from maximal exercise in patients with previous myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Suzuki, Takeya; Hoshimoto-Iwamoto, Masayo; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori

    2010-03-01

    The overshoot in oxygen uptake (VO2 overshoot) during recovery from maximal exercise is thought to reflect an overshoot in cardiac output. We investigated whether this phenomenon is related to cardiopulmonary function during exercise in cardiac patients. A total of 201 consecutive patients with previous myocardial infarction underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). An apparent VO2 overshoot during the recovery from CPX (6.5+/-8.1% increase relative to the peak VO2) was observed in ten patients. A comparison of patients with the VO2 overshoot to those without the VO2 overshoot revealed that the former had a significantly lower left ventricular ejection fraction (40.1+/-19.1 vs. 55. 2+/-14.9%, respectively, p = 0.002) and larger left ventricular diastolic and systolic dimensions. Patients with the VO2 overshoot also had a significantly lower peak VO2 (13.1+/-6.1 vs. 18.1+/-4.5 ml/min/kg, p < 0.001), lower DeltaVO2/DeltaWR (work rate) (6.6+/-3.8 vs. 9.5+/-1.7 mL/min/W, p < 0.0001), and a higher E (minute ventilation)/VCO2 (carbon dioxide output) slope (45.0+/-18.6 vs. 32.6+/-6.6, p < 0.0001) than those without the overshoot. A VO2 overshoot during recovery from maximal exercise was found in 5% of patients with previous myocardial infarction. This condition, which suggests a transient mismatch between cardiac contractility and afterload reduction, was found to be related to impaired cardiopulmonary function during exercise.

  16. Regulation of blood oxygen transport in hibernating mammals.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Inge G; Fago, Angela

    2017-03-21

    Along with the periodic reductions in O2 requirements of mammalian hibernators during winter, the O2 affinity of the blood of mammalian hibernators is seasonally regulated to help match O2 supply to consumption, contributing to limit tissue oxidative stress, particularly at arousals. Specifically, mammalian hibernators consistently show an overall increase in the blood-O2 affinity, which causes a decreased O2 unloading to tissues, while having similar or lower tissue O2 tensions during hibernation. This overview explores how the decreased body temperature and concentration of red blood cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) that occur in hibernation contribute separately or in combination to the concurrent increase in the O2 affinity of the hemoglobin, the O2 carrier protein of the blood. Most mammalian hemoglobins are responsive to changes in DPG concentrations, including that of the hibernating brown bear, although the smaller hibernators, such as golden-mantled ground squirrel, chipmunks, and dormice, have hemoglobins with low sensitivity to DPG. While the effect of DPG on oxygenation may vary, the decrease in body temperature invariably increases hemoglobin's O2 affinity in all hibernating species. However, the temperature sensitivity of hemoglobin oxygenation is low in hibernators compared to human, apparently due in part to endothermic allosteric quaternary transition in ground squirrels and dissociation of chloride ions in brown bears. A low heat of blood oxygenation in temporal heterotherms, like hibernators, may thus contribute to reduce heat loss, as found in regional heterotherms, like polar mammals, although the significance would be low in winter hibernation.

  17. [Peripheral blood circulation in the skin and the regulatory mechanisms in the course of primary transmural myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Khalepo, O V; Molotkov, O V; Eshkina, S L

    2009-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to study the indicators characterizing the peripheral blood circulation in the skin, regulatory mechanisms, and the compensatory capacities of the microcirculatory bed in 32 patients aged 45-60 years in the course of primary transmural myocardial infarction during exercise tests. Significant disturbances of the mechanism responsible for regulating the peripheral blood circulation system and chiefly its active components were detected in the presence of adequate blood filling of microvessels. There was a drastic decrease in the reserves of skin microvascular endothelial activity during ionophoresis of sodium nitroprusside and acetylcholine, the maximum degree of disturbances being observed on day 10 of myocardial infarction development.

  18. New method for measuring myocardial blood flow by high resolution scintigraphy in the excised dog heart.

    PubMed

    Hung, C Y; Burow, R D; Scherlag, B J; Basmadjian, G P; Lazzara, R

    1986-10-01

    The standard method for measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) with radioactive microspheres requires processing of selected tissue samples usually from the excised heart, and consequent loss of exact relation to myocardial morphology. A computer-based image processing method was developed by using [99mTc]microspheres (mean particle size 20 microns) for quantitative analysis of MBF in 25 dogs. A computer-controlled gamma camera was used to obtain the images of radioactive microsphere distribution in transaxial slices of the ex vivo heart. Any portion of these slice images could be quantitated by using a computer program based on modification of the formula for determining MBF by the standard microsphere method. Regional myocardial perfusion calculated by this technique correlated well with values obtained with reference microspheres (r = 0.96) over a broad range of MBF. The results show that our new method, accurately and with high resolution, delineated zones of differing MBF and confirmed the increase of MBF in surviving myocardium with healing.

  19. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (V˙O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and V˙O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (rV˙O2). The rBF and rV˙O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and V˙O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology. PMID:22894482

  20. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  1. Cerebral Blood Oxygenation Measurement Based on Oxygen-dependent Quenching of Phosphorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Wu, Weicheng; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of the spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation is crucial for better understanding of the neuro-metabolic-vascular relationship. Development of new pO2 measurement modalities with simultaneous monitoring of pO2 in larger fields of view with higher spatial and/or temporal resolution will enable greater insight into the functioning of the normal brain and will also have significant impact on diagnosis and treatment of neurovascular diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and head injury. Optical imaging modalities have shown a great potential to provide high spatiotemporal resolution and quantitative imaging of pO2 based on hemoglobin absorption in visible and near infrared range of optical spectrum. However, multispectral measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation relies on photon migration through the highly scattering brain tissue. Estimation and modeling of tissue optical parameters, which may undergo dynamic changes during the experiment, is typically required for accurate estimation of blood oxygenation. On the other hand, estimation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence should not be significantly affected by the changes in the optical parameters of the tissue and provides an absolute measure of pO2. Experimental systems that utilize oxygen-sensitive dyes have been demonstrated in in vivo studies of the perfused tissue as well as for monitoring the oxygen content in tissue cultures, showing that phosphorescence quenching is a potent technology capable of accurate oxygen imaging in the physiological pO2 range. Here we demonstrate with two different imaging modalities how to perform measurement of pO2 in cortical vasculature based on phosphorescence lifetime imaging. In first demonstration we present wide field of view imaging of pO2 at the cortical surface of a rat. This imaging modality has relatively simple experimental setup based on a CCD camera and a

  2. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  3. A blood-oxygenation-dependent increase in blood viscosity due to a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toru; Nagayama, Yuki; Tamura, Mamoru

    2004-07-21

    As the magnetic field of widely used MR scanners is one of the strongest magnetic fields to which people are exposed, the biological influence of the static magnetic field of MR scanners is of great concern. One magnetic interaction in biological subjects is the magnetic torque on the magnetic moment induced by biomagnetic substances. The red blood cell is a major biomagnetic substance, and the blood flow may be influenced by the magnetic field. However, the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. To examine the mechanisms of the magnetic influence on blood viscosity, we measured the time for blood to fall through a glass capillary inside and outside a 1.5 T MR scanner. Our in vitro results showed that the blood viscosity significantly increased in a 1.5 T MR scanner, and also clarified the mechanism of the interaction between red blood cells and the external magnetic field. Notably, the blood viscosity increased depending on blood oxygenation and the shear rate of the blood flow. Thus, our findings suggest that even a 1.5 T magnetic field may modulate blood flow.

  4. VEGF improves myocardial blood flow but produces EDRF-mediated hypotension in porcine hearts.

    PubMed

    Hariawala, M D; Horowitz, J R; Esakof, D; Sheriff, D D; Walter, D H; Keyt, B; Isner, J M; Symes, J F

    1996-06-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the potential for improving myocardial perfusion by the continuous administration of angiogenic growth factors. Studies in our laboratory have shown that a single intraarterial or intravenous bolus of the endothelial cell specific mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can significantly improve perfusion in a rabbit ischemic limb model. To test the efficacy of this therapeutic approach in chronic myocardial ischemia, 18 Yorkshire pigs underwent a left thoracotomy followed by placement of an ameroid constrictor around the proximal circumflex coronary artery. Gradual occlusion of the artery (26 +/- 4 days) was accompanied by identifiable hypokinesis of the posterolateral wall of the left ventricle (2D echo). Thirty days postoperatively, rhVEGF(165) (2 mg; n = 8) or saline (n = 10) was administered directly into the left coronary ostium. Postadenosine myocardial perfusion studies using colored microspheres 30 days later demonstrated superior blood flow in the ischemic zone of the VEGF-treated hearts (ischemic/normal ratio 1.09 vs 0.97, P < 0.05) compared with those receiving saline injection. Four of eight VEGF-treated animals succumbed, however, to severe hypotension following VEGF administration. Therefore 500 micrograms of VEGF were administered intracoronary to five normal pigs. A significant drop in mean arterial pressure (-44.4 +/- 3.2%, P < 0.05 vs baseline) and peripheral resistance (-13.2 +/- 4.5%, P < 0.05 vs baseline) was accompanied by increased heart rate. IV administration of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an EDRF inhibitor, restored blood pressure to baseline. We conclude that a single intracoronary bolus of VEGF is capable of significantly augmenting flow to collateral-dependent ischemic myocardium. The associated hypotension appears to be EDRF-mediated. Further studies are needed to define the best dose and route of administration of VEGF for the treatment of coronary insufficiency.

  5. Fractal regional myocardial blood flows pattern according to metabolism, not vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Yipintsoi, Tada; Kroll, Keith; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2016-02-01

    Regional myocardial blood flows are markedly heterogeneous. Fractal analysis shows strong near-neighbor correlation. In experiments to distinguish control by vascular anatomy vs. local vasomotion, coronary flows were increased in open-chest dogs by stimulating myocardial metabolism (catecholamines + atropine) with and without adenosine. During control states mean left ventricular (LV) myocardial blood flows (microspheres) were 0.5-1 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) and increased to 2-3 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with catecholamine infusion and to ∼4 ml·g(-1)·min(-1) with adenosine (Ado). Flow heterogeneity was similar in all states: relative dispersion (RD = SD/mean) was ∼25%, using LV pieces 0.1-0.2% of total. During catecholamine infusion local flows increased in proportion to the mean flows in 45% of the LV, "tracking" closely (increased proportionately to mean flow), while ∼40% trended toward the mean. Near-neighbor regional flows remained strongly spatially correlated, with fractal dimension D near 1.2 (Hurst coefficient 0.8). The spatial patterns remain similar at varied levels of metabolic stimulation inferring metabolic dominance. In contrast, adenosine vasodilation increased flows eightfold times control while destroying correlation with the control state. The Ado-induced spatial patterns differed from control but were self-consistent, inferring that with full vasodilation the relaxed arterial anatomy dominates the distribution. We conclude that vascular anatomy governs flow distributions during adenosine vasodilation but that metabolic vasoregulation dominates in normal physiological states.

  6. The history of the microsphere method for measuring blood flows with special reference to myocardial blood flow: a personal memoir.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Julien I E

    2017-04-01

    We use many types of equipment and technologies to make our measurements but give little thought to how they developed. Evolution was once described as a series of recoils from blind alleys, and this is exemplified by the gradual development of the microsphere method of measuring blood flows. The microsphere method is one of the most frequently used methods for measuring blood flow to organs and portions of organs. The method can measure myocardial blood flow with reasonable accuracy (within 10%) down to samples weighing >50 mg but probably will not do so for samples weighing 1-10 mg. Microspheres with diameters from 10 to 15 μm provide the best compromise between accurate flow measurement and retention in tissue. Radioactive labels have been almst entirely replaced by fluorescent labels, but colored microspheres and neutron-activated labels are also used.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The contributions of the various individuals who developed the microsphere method of measuring regional blood flows and how these advances took place are brought to light in this paper.

  7. Effects of Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers on Blood Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Roghani, Kimia; Holtby, Randall J.; Jahr, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been central in the development of resuscitation agents that might provide oxygen delivery in addition to simple volume expansion. Since 80% of the world population lives in areas where fresh blood products are not available, the application of these new solutions may prove to be highly beneficial (Kim and Greenburg 2006). Many improvements have been made to earlier generation HBOCs, but various concerns still remain, including coagulopathy, nitric oxide scavenging, platelet interference and decreased calcium concentration secondary to volume expansion (Jahr et al. 2013). This review will summarize the current challenges faced in developing HBOCs that may be used clinically, in order to guide future research efforts in the field. PMID:25514567

  8. [Whole blood viscosity measurement in acute myocardial infarction: feasibility and significance].

    PubMed

    Philippe, F; Lacombe, C; Bucherer, C; Drobinski, G; Montalescot, G; Thomas, D

    2001-10-01

    Thrombolytic agents and new antiplatelet drugs used in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) could change whole blood viscosity. The aim of this pilot trial is to compare blood viscosity at four shear rate levels among three groups of patients: AMI receiving thrombolysis with alteplase (n: 10), AMI eligible for primary angioplasty with abciximab (n: 10), healthy volunteers (n: 10). Viscosity measurement was obtained in 30 minutes with a Couette hemoviscosimeter. At baseline, blood viscosity level was higher in patients with acute coronary syndromes than in healthy volunteers (72 +/- 32 mPa.s versus 51 +/- 13 mPa.s, p<0.05). After thrombolysis, viscosity was higher at 90 minutes than at third day, paradoxically with fibrinogen elevation (72 +/- 32 mPa.s versus 58 +/- 27 mPa.s, p=0.01). In primary angioplasty with abciximab, viscosity decreased significantly (56 +/- 28 mPa.s versus 43 +/- 13 mPa.s, p=0.01). The effects of ionic contrast agent and abciximab are discussed. In healthy volunteers group, 100 mg aspirin once a day during 7 days reduces blood viscosity at high shear stress. The small size of the study population restricts correlation analysis with major clinical adverse events. A larger trial is necessary to evaluate the predictive value of whole blood viscosity in reocclusive and/or hemorrhagic events in those reperfusion strategies but also in case of thrombolytic agent and abciximab combination.

  9. A Investigation of Partially Extracted Tracers Used to Determine Myocardial Blood Flow with PET.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Bradley Thomas

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provides the ability to quantitatively measure mass-specific blood flow to myocardial tissue (ml/min/g tissue). The partially extracted tracers ^{62}Cu -PTSM and two single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) agents, teboroxime and sestamibi were studied. The latter two demonstrate the effectiveness of PET as a pharmacological tool for SPECT perfusion tracer development. The characteristics of these tracers were compared to commonly used partially extracted tracers ^{13}rm NH_3 and ^{82} Rb. Positron emitting ^{rm 94m}Tc was used to label ligands originally developed for ^{rm 99m} Tc labeling. ^{rm 94m }Tc can be produced by the bombardment of a natural molybdenum foil with an 11Mev proton beam, via the ^{94}rm Mo(p,n)^ {94m}Tc reaction. The production of ^{rm94m}Tc is accompanied by ^{92}Tc, ^ {94}Tc, ^{95} Tc, ^{rm 95m}Tc, ^{96}Tc, and ^{rm 99m}Tc due to the isotopic mixture of natural Mo. The presence of these radionuclidic impurities increase the radiation dose received by the patient and radio chemist. The elimination of these impurities was achieved by irradiating an isotopically enriched target material, ^{94}rm MoO_3. The ability to reclaim the enriched target is essential due to the high cost of the material. Recovery was accomplished by a solvent extraction technique yielding an activity recovery of 80% and target material recovery of 95%. Preliminary data was measured for the myocardial perfusion tracer ^{62}Cu -PTSM. It was found that the uptake of ^ {62}Cu-PTSM is linear for resting flows but a high degree of variability is observed at stress induced flows. This same result was found in the human studies when compared to ^{13} rm NH_3 measured myocardial perfusion values. The dynamic analysis of multiple tracers in the sequence of protocols: (1) acute canine prep ( ^{11}rm CO, ^{82 }Rb, ^{62}Cu-PTSM, ^{13}rm NH_3, ^{94m,99m}Tc-BATO, H_2 ^{14}rm O, ^{18 }FCH_3), (2) chronic canine prep ( ^{82}rm Rb, ^{13 }NH_3

  10. Effect of {beta}{sub 1} adrenergic receptor blockade on myocardial blood flow and vasodilatory capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, M.; Czernin, J.; Sun, K.

    1997-03-01

    The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade reduces cardiac work and may thereby lower myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest. The effect of {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on hyperemic MBF is unknown. To evaluate the effect of selective {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade on MBF at rest and during dipyridamole induced hyperemia, 10 healthy volunteers (8 men, 2 women, mean age 24 {+-} 5 yr) were studied using {sup 13}N-ammonia PET (two-compartment model) under control conditions and again during metoprolol (50 mg orally 12 hr and 1 hr before the study). The resting rate pressure product (6628 {+-} 504 versus 5225 {+-} 807) and heart rate (63 {+-} 6-54 {plus_minus} 5 bpm) declined during metoprolol (p < 0.05). Similarly, heart rate and rate pressure product declined from the baseline dipyridamole study to dipyridamole plus metoprolol (p < 0.05). Resting MBF declined in proportion to cardiac work by approximately 20% from 0.61 {+-} 0.09-0.51 {+-} 0.10 ml/g/min (p < 0.05). In contrast, hyperemic MBF increased when metoprolol was added to dipyridamole (1.86 {plus_minus} 0.27 {+-} 0.45 ml/g/min; p<0.05). The decrease in resting MBF together with the increase in hyperemic MBF resulted in a significant increase in the myocardial flow reserve during metoprolol (3.14 {+-} 0.80-4.61 {+-} 0.68; p<0.01). The {beta}{sub 1} receptor blockade increases coronary vasodilatory capacity and myocardial flow reserve. However, the mechanisms accounting for this finding remain uncertain. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Myocardial protection in diffuse coronary artery disease. Intermittent retrograde cold-blood cardioplegia at systemic normothermia versus intermittent antegrade cold-blood cardioplegia at moderate systemic hypothermia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, D; Fernandes, S; Frater, R W; Sisto, D

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the comparative merits of antegrade cardioplegia at moderate systemic hypothermia versus retrograde cardioplegia at systemic normothermia, we performed coronary artery bypass grafting using intermittent oxygenated blood cardioplegia in 2 sets of 50 consecutive patients with triple-vessel disease (complete occlusion of 1 coronary artery and greater than 90% narrowing of the other 2, with poor distal runoff). Group 1 had antegrade cardioplegia at moderate systemic hypothermia (28 degrees C). Group 2 had retrograde cardioplegia at systemic normothermia. This resulted in no deaths and in no differences in complication rates. Group 2's postoperative need for inotropic agents or vasodilators was significantly less (epinephrine, p < 0.0009; dopamine, p < 0.002; nitroglycerin, p < 0.001). Elevations of CKMB fraction were significantly more common in Group 1: 46% had CKMB levels greater than 9%, versus 16% of Group 2 patients (p < 0.0001). Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography was performed in 39 Group-1 patients and in 42 Group-2 patients. Development of a new wall-motion abnormality after bypass was significantly only in Group 1 (p < 0.009, by chi 2 analysis). We conclude that retrograde cardioplegia at normothermia provides myocardial protection that equals or surpasses that of antegrade delivery at moderate systemic hypothermia, while avoiding the possible deleterious side effects of hypothermia. PMID:8334370

  12. Effect of cold air inhalation and isometric exercise on coronary blood flow and myocardial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Gao, Zhaohui; Drew, Rachel C; Herr, Michael D; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2011-12-01

    The effects of cold air inhalation and isometric exercise on coronary blood flow are currently unknown, despite the fact that both cold air and acute exertion trigger angina in clinical populations. In this study, we used transthoracic Doppler echocardiography to measure coronary blood flow velocity (CBV; left anterior descending coronary artery) and myocardial function during cold air inhalation and handgrip exercise. Ten young healthy subjects underwent the following protocols: 5 min of inhaling cold air (cold air protocol), 5 min of inhaling thermoneutral air (sham protocol), 2 min of isometric handgrip at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (grip protocol), and 5 min of isometric handgrip at 30% maximal voluntary contraction while breathing cold air (cold + grip protocol). Heart rate, blood pressure, inspired air temperature, CBV, myocardial function (tissue Doppler imaging), O(2) saturation, and pulmonary function were measured. The rate-pressure product (RPP) was used as an index of myocardial O(2) demand, whereas CBV was used as an index of myocardial O(2) supply. Compared with the sham protocol, the cold air protocol caused a significantly higher RPP, but there was a significant reduction in CBV. The cold + grip protocol caused a significantly greater increase in RPP compared with the grip protocol (P = 0.045), but the increase in CBV was significantly less (P = 0.039). However, myocardial function was not impaired during the cold + grip protocol relative to the grip protocol alone. Collectively, these data indicate that there is a supply-demand mismatch in the coronary vascular bed when cold ambient air is breathed during acute exertion but myocardial function is preserved, suggesting an adequate redistribution of blood flow.

  13. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  14. Human whole-blood oxygen affinity: effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1984-08-01

    phe effect of temperature changes on human whole-blood O2 affinity was measured in the blood of six healthy donors over almost the entire O2 saturation (SO2) range (1-99%). The results showed that temperature has no influence on the shape of the O2 dissociation curve, implying that the temperature coefficient (delta log PO2/delta T) is independent of SO2. Simultaneous measurements of the total (proton) Haldane factor (delta[HbH]/[delta HbO2]) at the five temperatures under study (22, 27, 32, 37, and 42 degrees C) revealed that this factor depends on temperature. The liberation of protons from hemoglobin appeared to be linear with respect to changes in SO2. We therefore conclude that the (proton) Bohr factor (H+ factor) is dependent on temperature over the entire SO2 range in the same way as previously described for SO2 = 50%. The exothermic oxygenation reaction in whole blood was accompanied by a heat evolution (delta HO2) of 42.7 kJ/mol (monomeric) hemoglobin.

  15. Interaction of anesthesia, beta-receptor blockade, and blood loss in dogs with induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Prys-Roberts, C; Roberts, J G; Foëx, P; Clarke, T N; Bennett, M J; Ryder, W A

    1976-09-01

    The cardiovascular effects of halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia, and beta-receptor blockade with either propranolol or practolol, were studied in 15 dogs in which severe myocardial infarction had been induced ten days earlier. The hemodynamic responses to blood loss amounting to 25 per cent of estimated blood volume, and its subsequent replacement, were studied before and after induction of beta-receptor blockade. In terms of cardiac output and aortic blood flow acceleration, cardiac performance in the absence of beta-blockade was markedly impaired during steady-state anesthesia, compared with corresponding values in normal dogs. Practolol (2.0 mg/kg) administered during anesthesia induced no significant circulatory change other than a 14 per cent decrease in heart rate and a 25 per cent increase in strode volum. Propranolol (0.3 mg/kg) caused a comparable reduction of heart rate, but significantly reduced cardiac output (-27 per cent), aortic blood flow acceleration (-26 per cent), and peak LV power (-19 per cent), and increased systemic vascular resistance (+49 per cent). The two drugs caused comparable shifts of the isoproterenol dose-response curve during anesthesia. Graduated blood loss during anesthesia, to a total of 25 per cent of blood volume, caused consistent circulatory changes (decreased mean arterial pressure cardiac output, peak LV power, LV minute work) that were essentially similar before and after beta-receptor blockade with either propranolol or practolol. The positive inotropic effect of calcium gluconate during halothane anesthesia was significantly reduced following either propranolol or practolol, but the hemodynamic responses to changes of systemic vascular resistance induced with acetylcholine or phenylephrine were not modified by beta-receptor blockade.

  16. Myocardial blood flow estimated by synchronous, multislice, high-speed computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Wu, X.; Chung, N.; Ritman, E.L.

    1989-03-01

    Anesthetized dogs were scanned in the dynamic spatial reconstructor, a fast multislice computed tomographic scanner. In one group of eight dogs, four differently radiolabeled microspheres (15 /mu/m diameter) were injected into the left atrium, with each label corresponding to a different hemodynamic condition. The image data collected from this group of dogs were used to develop the algorithm for estimating regional myocardial perfusion from the CT image data. In an additional 11 dogs three differently radiolabelled microspheres were also injected during different hemodynamic conditions. The image data collected from this second group of dogs were used to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of the algorithm developed from data in the first group of dogs. In all dogs scans of 0.127 second duration were recorded for each cardiac cycle before, during, and after a bolus injection of 32 ml Iohexol into the aortic root. Dye dilution curves were generated from brightness values measured from images of 2 mm thick transaxial slices. In all dogs images were reconstructed at the phase of each cardiac cycle and were analyzed to obtain estimates of myocardial perfusion F/sub DSR/. After the scans were completed, the hearts were sectioned and microsphere-based estimates of myocardial perfusion (F/sub MS/) were obtained. In the group of eight dogs the resulting value was expressed in flow per gram of muscle within the sampled volume of myocardium so that F/sub DSR/ = 0.996 F/sub MS/ + 0.49, r = 0.972. A similar linear relationship was also demonstrated in four quadrants and three transmural layers. In the group of 11 dogs F/sub DSR/ = 0.98 F/sub MS/ + 0.16, r = 0.95. The contrast clearance data were also used to deduce the ratio of intramyocardial blood volume to total myocardial volume. At flows greater than 7 ml/g/min, this ratio exceeded 20 percent, and at 1 ml/g/min was approximately 7 percent.

  17. Myocardial function and hemoglobin oxygen affinity during hyperglycemia in the fetal lamb.

    PubMed Central

    Bard, H; Fouron, J C; De Muylder, X; Ducharme, G; Lafond, J S

    1986-01-01

    To determine the effects of maternal hyperglycemia on fetal hemodynamic and cardiac function, a study was carried out on nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep. In six fetuses, glucose was infused intravenously with an initial dose of 5 mg/kg per min. Data were compared with controls. This dose was gradually increased to 16 mg/kg per min by the fifth day. The initial blood glucose was 14.7 +/- 3.0 mg/dl and increased to 54.6 +/- 16.4 mg/dl by the last day of the infusion period (P less than 0.001). The PO2 decreased from a baseline of 20.25 +/- 3.40 to 15.88 +/- 5.24 mmHg (P less than 0.01). Similarly significant decreases were also observed for the blood O2 content and O2 hemoglobin saturation: 8.5 +/- 1.7 to 6.4 +/- 2.2 ml/dl and 62.3 +/- 13.6 to 46.1 +/- 17.6%, respectively, during hyperglycemia (P less than 0.01). The duration of the preejection period (PEP) before the start of the experiment was 45 +/- 4 ms; a final value of 57 +/- 10 ms was obtained (P less than 0.01). However, the electromechanical delay and ejection time (ET) showed no significant variation. The ratio of the PEP/ET increased from 0.31 +/- 0.04 to 0.38 +/- 0.07 (P less than 0.01) during hyperglycemia. The reticulocytes increased from 1.4 +/- 1.8 to 3.1 +/- 2.9% (P less than 0.05) and the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased from 4.4 +/- 1.1 to 2.8 +/- 1.2 mumol/g hemoglobin (P less than 0.005). This study demonstrated that fetal hyperglycemia depresses myocardial function in the fetal lamb. The changes in cardiac function could not be explained by the small drop in O2 saturation. PMID:3722375

  18. New data on the process of circulation and blood oxygenation in the lungs under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P

    2013-02-01

    Blood flow through the human lungs weighing 600 g is about 5 to 6 liters per minute. Blood capacity of human lung is about 500 ml. Therefore, 500 ml blood is oxygenated for 5 sec. Questions arise how such a large volume of blood passes through such a small mass of the lungs and what causes very rapid blood oxygenation. Since the structure of the lungs in mammals is almost the same, the work was carried out on rats (in rats 20-22 ml of blood per minute passes through the lungs weighing 1.5-2.0 g). Intensive blood circulation was proved to be linked with a large diameter pulmonary arterioles and high blood flow velocity in them. The oxygenation rate is explained by special structure of the alveoli and special blood flow conditions, which creates ideal conditions for oxygen diffusion.

  19. Cerebral blood oxygenation changes induced by visual stimulation in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Rudiger; Obrig, Hellmuth; Ruben, Jan; Villringer, Kersten; Thiel, Andreas; Bernarding, Johannes; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Villringer, Arno

    1996-10-01

    We examined local changes of cerebral oxygenation in response to visual stimuli by means of near infrared spectroscopy. A sharply outlined colored moving stimulus which is expected to evoke a broad activation of the striate and prestriate cortex was presented to sixteen healthy subjects. Six of these subjects were also exposed to a colored stationary and a gray stationary stimulus. In two subjects the colored moving stimulus was tested against the colored stationary with an optode position presumably over area V5/MT. As a control condition, subjects performed a simple finger opposition task. Since the calcarine fissure varies greatly with respect to bony landmarks, optodes were positioned individually according to 3D reconstructed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Concentration changes in oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) were continuously monitored with a temporal resolution of 1 s, using an NIRO 500. In response to the visual stimulus, the grand average across all sixteen subjects resulted in a significant increase in oxy-Hb of 0.33 +/- 0.09 arbitrary units mirrored by a significant decrease in deoxy-Hb of -0.18 +/- 0.02 arbitrary units, while the motor control condition elicited no significant changes in any parameters. When the near infrared spectroscopy probes were positioned over area V5/MT, the drop of deoxy-Hb associated with the moving stimulus was significantly more pronounced than with the stationary stimulus in both subjects examined. No significant differences between the visual stimuli were observed at the optode position close to the calcarine fissure. The oxygenation changes observed in this study are consistent with the pattern we have reported for motor activation. They are in line with physiological considerations and functional MRI studies relying on blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast.

  20. Modulation of perfusion and oxygenation by red blood cell oxygen affinity during acute anemia.

    PubMed

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2008-03-01

    Responses to exchange transfusion using red blood cells (RBCs) with modified hemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O(2)) affinity were studied in the hamster window chamber model during acute anemia to determine its role on microvascular perfusion and tissue oxygenation. Allosteric effectors were introduced in the RBCs by electroporation. Inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5HMF) were used to decrease and increase Hb-O(2) affinity. In vitro P50s (partial pressure of O(2) at 50% Hb saturation) were modified to 10, 25, 45, and 50 mm Hg (normal P50 is 32 mm Hg). Allosteric effectors also decreased the Hill coefficient. Anemic condition was induced by isovolemic hemodilution exchanges using 6% dextran 70 kD to 18% hematocrit (Hct). Modified RBCs (at 18% Hct in 5% albumin solution) were infused by exchange transfusion of 35% of blood volume. Systemic parameters, microvascular perfusion, capillary perfusion (functional capillary density, FCD), and microvascular Po(2) levels were measured. RBcs with P50 of 45 mm Hg increased tissue Po(2) and decreased O(2) delivery (Do(2)) and extraction (Vo(2)) and RBCs with P50 of 60 mmHg reduced FCD, microvascular flow, tissue Po(2), Do(2) and Vo(2). Erythrocytes with increased Hb-O(2) affinity maintained hemodynamic conditions, Do(2) and decreased tissue Po(2). This study shows that in an anemic condition, maximal tissue Po(2) does not correspond to maximal Do(2) and Vo(2).

  1. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-12-17

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker-induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown.

  2. Relation of retinal blood flow and retinal oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker

    PubMed Central

    Palkovits, Stefan; Lasta, Michael; Told, Reinhard; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral and retinal blood flow are dependent on local neuronal activity. Several studies quantified the increase in cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption during activity. In the present study we investigated the relation between changes in retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction during stimulation with diffuse luminance flicker and the influence of breathing gas mixtures with different fractions of O2 (FiO2; 100% 15% and 12%). Twenty-four healthy subjects were included. Retinal blood flow was studied by combining measurement of vessel diameters using the Dynamic Vessel Analyser with measurements of blood velocity using laser Doppler velocimetry. Oxygen saturation was measured using spectroscopic reflectometry and oxygen extraction was calculated. Flicker stimulation increased retinal blood flow (57.7 ± 17.8%) and oxygen extraction (34.6 ± 24.1%; p < 0.001 each). During 100% oxygen breathing the response of retinal blood flow and oxygen extraction was increased (p < 0.01 each). By contrast, breathing gas mixtures with 12% and 15% FiO2 did not alter flicker–induced retinal haemodynamic changes. The present study indicates that at a comparable increase in blood flow the increase in oxygen extraction in the retina is larger than in the brain. During systemic hyperoxia the blood flow and oxygen extraction responses to neural stimulation are augmented. The underlying mechanism is unknown. PMID:26672758

  3. Profound spatial heterogeneity of coronary reserve. Discordance between patterns of resting and maximal myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Austin, R E; Aldea, G S; Coggins, D L; Flynn, A E; Hoffman, J I

    1990-08-01

    We examined the ability of individual regions of the canine left ventricle to increase blood flow relative to baseline rates of perfusion. Regional coronary flow was measured by injecting radioactive microspheres over 90 seconds in seven anesthetized mongrel dogs. Preliminary experiments demonstrated a correlation between the regional distributions of blood flow during asphyxia and pharmacological vasodilatation with adenosine (mean r = 0.75; 192 regions in each of two dogs), both of which resulted in increased coronary flow. Subsequent experiments, during which coronary perfusion pressure was held constant at 80 mm Hg, examined the pattern of blood flow in 384 regions (mean weight, 106 mg) of the left ventricular free wall during resting flow and during maximal coronary flow effected by intracoronary adenosine infusion. We found that resting and maximal flow patterns were completely uncorrelated to each other in a given dog (mean r = 0.06, p = NS; n = 3 dogs). Furthermore, regional coronary reserve, defined as the ratio of maximal to resting flow, ranged from 1.75 (i.e., resting flow was 57% of maximum) to 21.9 (resting flow was 4.5% of maximum). Thus, coronary reserve is spatially heterogeneous and determined by two distinct perfusion patterns: the resting (control) pattern and the maximal perfusion pattern. Normal hearts, therefore, contain small regions that may be relatively more vulnerable to ischemia. This may explain the patchy nature of infarction with hypoxia and at reduced perfusion pressures as well as the difficulty of using global parameters to predict regional ischemia. Despite the wide dispersion of coronary reserve, we found, by autocorrelation analysis, that reserve in neighboring regions (even when separated by a distance of several tissue samples) was significantly correlated. This also applied to patterns of resting myocardial flow. Thus, both resting coronary blood flow and reserve appear to be locally continuous and may define functional

  4. Chronic Lead Exposure Increases Blood Pressure and Myocardial Contractility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fioresi, Mirian; Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Furieri, Lorena Barros; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson Brás; Vescovi, Marcos Vinícius A.; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cardiovascular effects of lead exposure, emphasising its direct action on myocardial contractility. Male Wistar rats were sorted randomly into two groups: control (Ct) and treatment with 100 ppm of lead (Pb) in the drinking water. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were anaesthetised and haemodynamic parameters and contractility of the left ventricular papillary muscles were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were properly stored for further biochemical investigations. Statistical analyses were considered to be significant at p<0.05. The lead concentrations in the blood reached approximately 13 µg/dL, while the bone was the site of the highest deposition of this metal. BP in the Pb-treated group was higher from the first week of lead exposure and remained at the same level over the next four weeks. Haemodynamic evaluations revealed increases in systolic (Ct: 96±3.79 vs. Pb: 116±1.37 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (Ct: 60±2.93 vs. Pb: 70±3.38 mmHg), left ventricular systolic pressure (Ct: 104±5.85 vs. Pb: 120±2.51 mmHg) and heart rate (Ct: 307±10 vs. Pb: 348±16 bpm). Lead treatment did not alter the force and time derivatives of the force of left ventricular papillary muscles that were contracting isometrically. However, our results are suggestive of changes in the kinetics of calcium (Ca++) in cardiomyocytes increased transarcolemmal Ca++ influx, low Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and high extrusion by the sarcolemma. Altogether, these results show that despite the increased Ca++ influx that was induced by lead exposure, the myocytes had regulatory mechanisms that prevented increases in force, as evidenced in vivo by the increased systolic ventricular pressure. PMID:24841481

  5. Effects of aging on cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, and blood oxygenation level dependent responses to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Liang, Christine L; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Fleisher, Adam S; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO(2). For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 +/- 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 +/- 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO(2) changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 +/- 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 +/- 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 +/- 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 +/- 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone.

  6. Elevated blood pressure and enhanced myocardial contractility in mice with severe IGF-1 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, G; Rockman, H A; Hunter, J J; Steinmetz, H; Koch, W J; Ma, L; Prinz, M P; Ross, J; Chien, K R; Powell-Braxton, L

    1996-01-01

    To circumvent the embryonic lethality of a complete deficiency in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), we generated mice homozygous for a site-specific insertional event that created a mutant IGF-1 allele (igf1m). These mice have IGF-1 levels 30% of wild type yet survive to adulthood, thereby allowing physiological analysis of the phenotype. Miniaturized catheterization technology revealed elevated conscious blood pressure in IGF-1(m/m) mice, and measurements of left ventricular contractility were increased. Adenylyl cyclase activity was enhanced in IGF-1(m/m) hearts, without an increase in beta-adrenergic receptor density, suggesting that crosstalk between IGF-1 and beta-adrenergic signaling pathways may mediate the increased contractility. The hypertrophic response of the left ventricular myocardium in response to aortic constriction, however, was preserved in IGF-1(m/m) mice. We conclude that chronic alterations in IGF-1 levels can selectively modulate blood pressure and left ventricular function, while not affecting adaptive myocardial hypertrophy in vivo. PMID:8958230

  7. Adaptive sampling of CT data for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; Bindschadler, Michael D.; Alessio, Adam M.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there are no widely accepted clinical methods for estimating MBF. Dynamic CT holds the promise of providing a quick and easy method to measure MBF quantitatively, however the need for repeated scans has raised concerns about the potential for high radiation dose. In our previous work, we explored techniques to reduce the patient dose by either uniformly reducing the tube current or by uniformly reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. These dose reduction techniques result in very noisy data, which can give rise to large errors in MBF estimation. In this work, we seek to investigate whether nonuniformly varying the tube current or sampling intervals can yield more accurate MBF estimates. Specifically, we try to minimize the dose and obtain the most accurate MBF estimate through addressing the following questions: when in the time attenuation curve (TAC) should the CT data be collected and at what tube current(s). We hypothesize that increasing the sampling rate and/or tube current during the time frames when the myocardial CT number is most sensitive to the flow rate, while reducing them elsewhere, can achieve better estimation accuracy for the same dose. We perform simulations of contrast agent kinetics and CT acquisitions to evaluate the relative MBF estimation performance of several clinically viable adaptive acquisition methods. We found that adaptive temporal and tube current sequences can be performed that impart an effective dose of about 5 mSv and allow for reductions in MBF estimation RMSE on the order of 11% compared to uniform acquisition sequences with comparable or higher radiation doses.

  8. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) attenuates myocardial inflammation and mitochondrial injury induced by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) in a healthy piglet model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Juanhong; Yu, Wenkui; Chen, Qiyi; Shi, Jialiang; Hu, Yimin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; He, Changsheng; Gong, Jianfeng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the myocardial inflammation and mitochondrial function during venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) and further evaluated the effects of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on them. Eighteen piglets were assigned to the control group, ECMO group, and ECMO+CRRT group. Myocardial inflammation was assessed by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO), myocardial concentrations, and mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6; mitochondrial function was assessed by activities of mitochondrial complexes I-V. VV ECMO elicited a general activation of serum and myocardial inflammation and significantly decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and IV. After being combined with CRRT, serum and myocardial concentrations of IL-1β and IL-6, myocardial mRNA expression of IL-6, and the activity of MPO were decreased significantly; the activities of mitochondrial complexes were increased. We conclude that myocardial inflammation was activated during ECMO therapy, inducing mitochondrial injury; moreover, CRRT reduced myocardial inflammation and partially ameliorated mitochondrial function.

  9. Reducing myocardial injury by minimizing imbalance between oxygen supply and demand.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hemodynamic and pharmacologic factors can influence the extent and severity of myocardial necrosis produced by coronary occlusion. In 48 dogs, 10 to 14 epicardial leads were recorded on the anterior surface of the left ventricle in the distribution and vicinity of the site of occlusion of a branch of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The average S-T segment elevation for each animal was determined at 5-min intervals after occlusion. This elevation was used as an index of the presence and severity of myocardial ischemic injury. Isoproterenol, ouabain, glucagon, bretylium, and tachycardia given prior to a repeated occlusion each increased the severity and extent of ischemic injury, while propranolol decreased it. Elevation of arterial pressure with methoxamine reduced the occlusion-induced S-T segment elevation, and lowering of the mean arterial pressure by hemorrhage had the opposite effect. In 19 additional experiments, propranolol, isoproterenol, and alterations in arterial pressure produced similar alterations in S-T segment elevation when these interventions were applied as long as 3 hr after ligation. Myocardial creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity determined 24 hr after coronary artery ligation correlated well with S-T segment elevation at the same sites recorded 15 min after ligation. Moreover, isoproterenol increased and propranolol decreased the area of depression of myocardial CPK activity. We conclude that the hemodynamic status and neurohumoral background at the time of coronary occlusion and for at least 3 hr thereafter can alter the extent and severity of myocardial ischemic injury and myocardial necrosis.

  10. Human whole-blood oxygen affinity: effect of carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Zwart, A; Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1984-07-01

    Oxygen dissociation curves (ODC) were recorded in the presence of carboxyhemoglobin fractions (FHbCO) up to 60%. The gradual shift to the left of the ODC at increasing amounts of HbCO was reflected in a gradual fall in the half-saturation pressure of the remaining Hb and was accompanied by a gradual change in the shape of the ODC to a hyperbolic one. The H+ factor (delta log PO2/delta pH) was determined over the entire oxygen saturation (SO2) range at three different FHbCO levels (14, 30, and 52%). At FHbCO = 14 and 30% and for the SO2 range 20-90%, the H+ factor vs. SO2 curve was not significantly different from that in the absence of HbCO. At FHbCO = 52%, however, the value found for the H+ factor (-0.55) was appreciably more negative than in the case of blood containing less than 1% HbCO (-0.44), and there was no dependence on SO2. Comparison of measured and calculated ODCs at varying HbCO fractions showed, for FHbCO less than or equal to 50%, that measured and calculated ODCs coincide over the greater part of the SO2 range. For FHbCO greater than 50%, the measured ODC was situated to the left of the calculated one over the entire SO2 range. We conclude that the heme-heme interaction for CO is appreciably larger than for O2 only for FHbCO greater than 50%, whereas for FHbCO less than 50% there is virtually no difference.

  11. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F; Boas, David A; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These "bottom-up" models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans.

  12. Modeling of Cerebral Oxygen Transport Based on In vivo Microscopic Imaging of Microvascular Network Structure, Blood Flow, and Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Louis; Smith, Amy F.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna; Secomb, Timothy W.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline. Experimental data on the structure, flow and oxygen levels of microvascular networks are needed, together with theoretical methods to integrate this information and predict physiologically relevant properties that are not directly measurable. Recent progress in optical imaging technologies for high-resolution in vivo measurement of the cerebral microvascular architecture, blood flow, and oxygenation enables construction of detailed computational models of cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen transport based on realistic three-dimensional microvascular networks. In this article, we review state-of-the-art optical microscopy technologies for quantitative in vivo imaging of cerebral microvascular structure, blood flow and oxygenation, and theoretical methods that utilize such data to generate spatially resolved models for blood flow and oxygen transport. These “bottom-up” models are essential for the understanding of the processes governing brain oxygenation in normal and disease states and for eventual translation of the lessons learned from animal studies to humans. PMID:27630556

  13. Myocardial Blood Flow Quantification for Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease by Positron Emission Tomography, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Alfonso H.; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications. PMID:24718671

  14. The Effect of Chronic Hypoxemia on Regional Myocardial Blood Flow in the Conscious Dog After Acute Coronary Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Sanford P.; White, Francis C.; Bloor, Colin M.

    1977-01-01

    Chronic hypoxemia was produced in 16 dogs by surgical transposition of the caudal vena cava to the left atrium to determine if chronic hypoxemia would alter the response of the myocardium to acute ischemia. An electromagnetic aortic flow probe, left atrial tube, and occlusive cuff on the left circumflex coronary artery were permanently implanted in 11 hypoxemic and 26 normal control dogs. The animals were studied in the conscious state after recovery from the surgery. Dogs with hypoxemia had a blood hematocrit value of 54.3 ± 1.0% (SE), arterial PO2 of 43.2 ± 1.4 mm Hg, and 80.2 ± 1.6% oxygen saturation. There was no difference from control animals in the ratio of left ventricular weight to body weight, but the right ventricular weight was significantly decreased in the hypoxemic dogs. Cardiac output from the left ventricle was twice that of the right ventricle. Aortic blood flow was 3.68 ± 0.22 liters/min in hypoxemic animals and 2.64 ± 0.19 liters/min in normal dogs. Myocardial blood flow measured with 15-μ diameter tracer microspheres was increased from 79 ± 10 and 59 ± 8 ml/100 g/min in left ventricular endocardial and epicardial halves, respectively, in normal dogs to 212 ± 48 and 172 ± 39 in dogs with chronic hypoxemia. There were no deaths in 10 hypoxemic dogs within 24 hours after complete circumflex coronary artery occlusion; 7 of 26 (27%) normal dogs died after circumflex coronary artery occlusion during the conscious state. Gross infarct size was extremely variable in both groups. Median infarct size was smaller in dogs with hypoxemia and was directly correlated with arterial PO2 in hypoxemic dogs. There was a mild, but statistically not significant, increase in the anastomotic index of hypoxemic dogs compared with that of normal animals, suggesting that a metabolic adaptive change rather than increased collateral circulation may have been responsible for the decreased mortality and smaller infarct size in hypoxemic dogs. PMID:596417

  15. Effects of Aging on Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Metabolism, and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Liang, Christine L.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO2. For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 ± 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 ± 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO2 changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 ± 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 ± 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 ± 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 ± 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone. PMID:18465743

  16. A Single Session of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Enhances Vascular Endothelial Function and Peripheral Blood Circulation in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinya; Masuda, Takashi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Hamazaki, Nobuaki; Akiyama, Ayako; Kamada, Yumi; Maekawa, Emi; Noda, Chiharu; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Ako, Junya

    2016-12-02

    This study aimed to investigate whether a single session of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can enhance vascular endothelial function and peripheral blood circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirty-four male patients with AMI were alternately assigned to 2 groups, and received NMES with muscle contraction (NMES group, n = 17) or without muscle contraction (control group, n = 17) after admission. NMES was performed for quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles of both legs for 30 minutes. We measured systolic blood pressure as a parameter of cardiovascular responses and the low-frequency component of blood pressure variability as an index of sympathetic activity. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index and transcutaneous oxygen pressure in foot (Foot-tcPO2) were also measured as parameters of vascular endothelial function and peripheral blood circulation, respectively. All patients completed the study without severe adverse events. Systolic blood pressure and the low-frequency component increased significantly during the NMES session in both groups (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). However, elevation from systolic blood pressure at rest was < 10 mmHg in both groups. In the NMES group, the RH-PAT index and Foot-tcPO2 increased significantly after NMES (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). No significant changes were observed in these parameters throughout the session in the control group. In conclusion, a single session of NMES with muscle contraction enhanced vascular endothelial function, leading to improvement in peripheral blood circulation without inducing excessive cardiovascular and autonomic responses in patients with AMI (UMIN000014196).

  17. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  18. Comparison of models and acquisition techniques for estimation of myocardial blood flow from CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Adam M.; Branch, Kelley R.; Caldwell, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced CT has been successfully applied in cardiac imaging for the estimation of myocardial blood flow (MBF). In general, these acquisitions impart a relatively high radiation dose because they require continuous or gated imaging of the heart for 15-40 seconds. At present, there is no consensus on the appropriate estimation method to derive MBF and on the appropriate acquisition technique to minimize dose while maintaining MBF estimation accuracy and precision. This work explores the tradeoff of accuracy and precision of MBF estimates with several estimation methods and acquisition techniques in support of the fundamental goal of optimizing dynamic cardiac CT in terms of radiation dose and MBF estimation fidelity. We simulated time attenuation curves (TACs) for a range of flow states (Flow = [0.8, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2] ml/g/min) and several acquisition techniques. We estimated MBF with 5 different methods for each simulated TAC. From multiple independent realizations, we assessed the accuracy and precision of each method. Results show that acquisition techniques with 1/3 tube current or 1/3 temporal sampling permits accurate MBF estimates with most methods with reduction in MBF estimate precision by on average 30%. Furthermore, reduction in model complexity can be beneficial for improving the precision of MBF estimates.

  19. Optimal wavelengths for optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation in biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Perekatova, Valeriya; Subochev, Pavel; Kleshnin, Mikhail; Turchin, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in blood vessels is a promising clinical application of optoacoustic imaging. Nevertheless, precise optoacoustic measurements of blood oxygen saturation are limited because of the complexities of calculating the spatial distribution of the optical fluence. In the paper error in the determination of blood oxygen saturation, associated with the use of approximate methods of optical fluence evaluation within the blood vessel, was investigated for optoacoustic measurements at two wavelengths. The method takes into account both acoustic pressure noise and the error in determined values of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients used for the calculation of the fluence. It is shown that, in conditions of an unknown (or partially known) spatial distribution of fluence at depths of 2 to 8 mm, minimal error in the determination of blood oxygen saturation is achieved at wavelengths of 658 ± 40 nm and 1069 ± 40 nm. PMID:27867709

  20. Sinogram smoothing techniques for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Modgil, Dimple; Alessio, Adam M.; Bindschadler, Michael D.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) could provide an accurate and widely available technique for myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimation to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. However, one of its primary limitations is the radiation dose imparted to the patient. We are exploring techniques to reduce the patient dose by either reducing the tube current or by reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. Both of these dose reduction techniques result in noisy data. In order to extract the MBF information from the noisy acquisitions, we have explored several data-domain smoothing techniques. In this work, we investigate two specific smoothing techniques: the sinogram restoration technique in both the spatial and temporal domains and the use of the Karhunen–Loeve (KL) transform to provide temporal smoothing in the sinogram domain. The KL transform smoothing technique has been previously applied to dynamic image sequences in positron emission tomography. We apply a quantitative two-compartment blood flow model to estimate MBF from the time-attenuation curves and determine which smoothing method provides the most accurate MBF estimates in a series of simulations of different dose levels, dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiac CT acquisitions. As measured by root mean square percentage error (% RMSE) in MBF estimates, sinogram smoothing generally provides the best MBF estimates except for the cases of the lowest simulated dose levels (tube current=25  mAs, 2 or 3 s temporal spacing), where the KL transform method provides the best MBF estimates. The KL transform technique provides improved MBF estimates compared to conventional processing only at very low doses (<7  mSv). Results suggest that the proposed smoothing techniques could provide high fidelity MBF information and allow for substantial radiation dose savings. PMID:25642441

  1. Blood Flow Versus Hematocrit in Optimization of Oxygen Transfer to Tissue During Fluid Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Siam, Jamal; Kadan, Marwa; Flaishon, Ron; Barnea, Ofer

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of fluid resuscitation regimens in hemorrhagic trauma is assessed based on its ability to increase oxygen concentration in tissue. Fluid resuscitation using both crystalloids and colloids fluids, creates a dilemma due to its opposing effects on oxygen transfer. It increases blood flow thereby augmenting oxygen transport but it also dilutes the blood simultaneously and reduces oxygen concentration thereby reducing oxygen transport. In this work we have studied these two opposing effects of fluid therapy on oxygen delivery to tissue. A mathematical model of oxygen diffusion from capillaries to tissue and its distribution in tissue was developed and integrated into a previously developed hemodynamic model. The capillary-tissue model was based on the Krogh structure. Compared to other models, fewer simplifying assumptions were made leading to different boundary conditions and less constraints, especially regarding capillary oxygen content at its venous end. Results showed that oxygen content in blood is the dominant factor in oxygen transport to tissue and its effect is greater than the effect of flow. The integration of the capillary/tissue model with the hemodynamic model that links administered fluids with flow and blood dilution indicated that fluid resuscitation may reduce oxygen transport to tissue.

  2. Reduced dose measurement of absolute myocardial blood flow using dynamic SPECT imaging in a porcine model

    SciTech Connect

    Timmins, Rachel; Klein, Ran; Petryk, Julia; Marvin, Brian; Kemp, Robert A. de; Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn; Wei, Lihui

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) measurements provide important additional information over traditional relative perfusion imaging. Recent advances in camera technology have made this possible with single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). Low dose protocols are desirable to reduce the patient radiation risk; however, increased noise may reduce the accuracy of MBF measurements. The authors studied the effect of reducing dose on the accuracy of dynamic SPECT MBF measurements. Methods: Nineteen 30–40 kg pigs were injected with 370 + 1110 MBq of Tc-99m sestamibi or tetrofosmin or 37 + 111 MBq of Tl-201 at rest + stress. Microspheres were injected simultaneously to measure MBF. The pigs were imaged in list-mode for 11 min starting at the time of injection using a Discovery NM 530c camera (GE Healthcare). Each list file was modified so that 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 of the original counts were included in the projections. Modified projections were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction and an energy window-based scatter correction and analyzed with FlowQuant kinetic modeling software using a 1-compartment model. A modified Renkin-Crone extraction function was used to convert the tracer uptake rate K1 to MBF values. The SPECT results were compared to those from microspheres. Results: Correlation between SPECT and microsphere MBF values for the full injected activity was r ≥ 0.75 for all 3 tracers and did not significantly degrade over all count levels. The mean MBF and MFR and the standard errors in the estimates were not significantly worse than the full-count data at 1/4-counts (Tc99m-tracers) and 1/2-counts (Tl-201). Conclusions: Dynamic SPECT measurement of MBF and MFR in pigs can be performed with 1/4 (Tc99m-tracers) or 1/2 (Tl-201) of the standard injected activity without significantly reducing accuracy and precision.

  3. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Ye, Yanjie; Lv, Kunru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change (ΔHbO2) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their ΔHbO2 and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, ΔHbO2 step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as ΔHbO2 and the concurrency of crucial turning points between ΔHbO2 and BLA was revealed. This relationship between ΔHbO2 and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that ΔHbO2 might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that ΔHbO2 can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, ΔHbO2 has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  4. Negative blood oxygen level dependent signals during speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Moreno, Diana; Schiff, Nicholas D; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Speech comprehension studies have generally focused on the isolation and function of regions with positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals with respect to a resting baseline. Although regions with negative BOLD signals in comparison to a resting baseline have been reported in language-related tasks, their relationship to regions of positive signals is not fully appreciated. Based on the emerging notion that the negative signals may represent an active function in language tasks, the authors test the hypothesis that negative BOLD signals during receptive language are more associated with comprehension than content-free versions of the same stimuli. Regions associated with comprehension of speech were isolated by comparing responses to passive listening to natural speech to two incomprehensible versions of the same speech: one that was digitally time reversed and one that was muffled by removal of high frequencies. The signal polarity was determined by comparing the BOLD signal during each speech condition to the BOLD signal during a resting baseline. As expected, stimulation-induced positive signals relative to resting baseline were observed in the canonical language areas with varying signal amplitudes for each condition. Negative BOLD responses relative to resting baseline were observed primarily in frontoparietal regions and were specific to the natural speech condition. However, the BOLD signal remained indistinguishable from baseline for the unintelligible speech conditions. Variations in connectivity between brain regions with positive and negative signals were also specifically related to the comprehension of natural speech. These observations of anticorrelated signals related to speech comprehension are consistent with emerging models of cooperative roles represented by BOLD signals of opposite polarity.

  5. Differential effects of octanoate and heptanoate on myocardial metabolism during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an infant swine model

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Odd-numbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant β-oxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26–45 days old) with 8-h ECMO received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA), or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol·kg body wt−1·min−1 as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5/group). The 13-carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate, and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 min before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio compared with other groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate and heptanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC compared with control. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in protein synthesis rate. In conclusion, octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate. PMID:26232235

  6. Differential Effects Of Octanoate And Heptanoate On Myocardial Metabolism During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation In An Infant Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-10-01

    Background: Nutritional energy support during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) should promote successful myocardial adaptation and eventual weaning from the ECMO circuit. Fatty acids (FAs) are a major myocardial energy source, and medium-chain FAs (MCFAs) are easily taken up by cell and mitochondria without membrane transporters. Oddnumbered MCFAs supply carbons to the citric acid cycle (CAC) via anaplerotic propionyl-CoA as well as acetyl-CoA, the predominant betaoxidation product for even-numbered MCFA. Theoretically, this anaplerotic pathway enhances carbon entry into the CAC, and provides superior energy state and preservation of protein synthesis. We tested this hypothesis in an immature swine model undergoing ECMO. Methods: Fifteen male Yorkshire pigs (26-45 days old) with 8-hour ECMO were received either normal saline, heptanoate (odd-numbered MCFA) or octanoate (even-numbered MCFA) at 2.3 μmol/kg body wt/min as MCFAs systemically during ECMO (n = 5 per group). The 13-Carbon (13C)-labeled substrates ([2-13C]lactate, [5,6,7-13C3]heptanoate and [U-13C6]leucine) were systemically infused as metabolic markers for the final 60 minutes before left ventricular tissue extraction. Extracted tissues were analyzed for the 13C-labeled and absolute concentrations of metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Octanoate produced markedly higher myocardial citrate concentration, and led to a higher [ATP]/[ADP] ratio compared with other http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jpen Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition For Peer Review groups. Unexpectedly, octanoate increased the flux of propionyl-CoA relative to acetyl-CoA into the CAC as well as heptanoate. MCFAs promoted increases in leucine oxidation, but were not associated with a difference in fractional protein synthesis rate. Conclusion: Octanoate provides energetic advantages to the heart over heptanoate, while preserving protein synthesis.

  7. Characterization of t1 relaxation and blood-myocardial contrast enhancement of NC100150 injection in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, J E; Johansson, L O; Lorenz, C H

    1999-11-01

    A new ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (Clariscan; NC100150 Injection) was studied in domestic farm pigs. The T1 effects were characterized for blood and myocardium and the blood-myocardial contrast was measured in T1-weighted cine images. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured at baseline and contrast doses of 1 and 5 mg Fe/kg body weight (bw) at end diastole and late systole. The T1 values for blood and myocardium were reduced by 97 and 43%, respectively, from baseline to 5 mg Fe/kg bw. The CNR was significantly improved with contrast at end diastole and late systole. The maximum improvement shown was 202% at 5 mg Fe/kg bw in late systole. The percent SNR enhancement was significantly higher in blood than myocardium at late systole. NC100150 Injection is an effective T1 shortening agent and can be used to improve blood-myocardial contrast in cine images of the heart. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:784-789.

  8. Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury: from basic science to clinical bedside.

    PubMed

    Frank, Anja; Bonney, Megan; Bonney, Stephanie; Weitzel, Lindsay; Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury contributes to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after myocardial ischemia, cardiac surgery or circulatory arrest. Primarily, no blood flow to the heart causes an imbalance between oxygen demand and supply, named ischemia (from the Greek isch, restriction; and haema, blood), resulting in damage or dysfunction of the cardiac tissue. Instinctively, early and fast restoration of blood flow has been established to be the treatment of choice to prevent further tissue injury. Indeed, the use of thrombolytic therapy or primary percutaneous coronary intervention is the most effective strategy for reducing the size of a myocardial infarct and improving the clinical outcome. Unfortunately, restoring blood flow to the ischemic myocardium, named reperfusion, can also induce injury. This phenomenon was therefore termed myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Subsequent studies in animal models of acute myocardial infarction suggest that myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury accounts for up to 50% of the final size of a myocardial infarct. Consequently, many researchers aim to understand the underlying molecular mechanism of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury to find therapeutic strategies ultimately reducing the final infarct size. Despite the identification of numerous therapeutic strategies at the bench, many of them are just in the process of being translated to bedside. The current review discusses the most striking basic science findings made during the past decades that are currently under clinical evaluation, with the ultimate goal to treat patients who are suffering from myocardial ischemia reperfusion-associated tissue injury.

  9. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  10. [Studying the influence of some reactive oxygen species on physical and chemical parameters of blood].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Martusevich, A A; Solov'eva, A G; Peretyagin, S P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the dynamics of blood physical and chemical parameters when blood specimens were processed by singlet oxygen in vitro. Our experiments were executed with whole blood specimens of healthy people (n=10). Each specimen was divided into five separate portions of 5 ml. The first portion was a control (without any exposures). The second one was processed by an oxygen-ozone mixture (at ozone concentration of 500 mcg/l, the third portion--by oxygen, and the fourth and fifth ones were processed by a gas mixture with singlet oxygen (50 and 100% of generator power). In blood samples after processing we studied the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase, erythrocyte and plasma levels of glucose and lactate, acid-base balance and the partial pressure of gases in blood. It was found out, that blood processing by singlet oxygen leads to optimization of energy, detoxication and antioxidant enzymes functioning with changes in plasma and erythrocyte level of glucose and lactate, normalization of blood gases level and acid-base balance. Our results show, that the effect of singlet oxygen on enzyme activity is more pronounced than exposure to an oxygen-ozone gas mixture.

  11. 129Xe chemical shift in human blood and pulmonary blood oxygenation measurement in humans using hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR

    PubMed Central

    Norquay, Graham; Leung, General; Stewart, Neil J.; Wolber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the dependency of the 129Xe‐red blood cell (RBC) chemical shift on blood oxygenation, and to use this relation for noninvasive measurement of pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo with hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR. Methods Hyperpolarized 129Xe was equilibrated with blood samples of varying oxygenation in vitro, and NMR was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T. Dynamic in vivo NMR during breath hold apnea was performed at 3 T on two healthy volunteers following inhalation of hyperpolarized 129Xe. Results The 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs was found to increase nonlinearly with blood oxygenation at 1.5 T and 3 T. During breath hold apnea, the 129Xe chemical shift in RBCs exhibited a periodic time modulation and showed a net decrease in chemical shift of ∼1 ppm over a 35 s breath hold, corresponding to a decrease of 7–10 % in RBC oxygenation. The 129Xe‐RBC signal amplitude showed a modulation with the same frequency as the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift. Conclusion The feasibility of using the 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift to measure pulmonary blood oxygenation in vivo has been demonstrated. Correlation between 129Xe‐RBC signal and 129Xe‐RBC chemical shift modulations in the lung warrants further investigation, with the aim to better quantify temporal blood oxygenation changes in the cardiopulmonary vascular circuit. Magn Reson Med 77:1399–1408, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27062652

  12. Non Invasive Assessment of Tissue Oxygenation and Blood Flow as a Tool for Staging Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Anand, B. S. Suresh; Jayanthy, A. K.; Murthy, V. B. Narayana; Sheshadri; Poddar, Richa

    2011-10-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging have been identified as an effective tool in characterizing/assessing tissue oxygenation and blood flow in real time tissues. In this paper we are exploring the possibility of finding out blood flow/oxygenation at different areas of feet of subjects with different levels of diabetes. Tissue blood flow is determined by assessing the contrast variations in the laser speckle image of the foot and tissue oxygenation is assessed by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. A combination of both techniques offers an effective and purely non invasive mode of examination in the staging of Diabetes.

  13. An exponential relationship exists between fatty acid uptake and myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sloof, G.W.; Comans, E.F.I.; Visser, F.C.

    1997-05-01

    High lineair (lin) correlations have been reported between myocardial blood flow (MBF) and uptake of various fatty acid (FA) analogues. However, the positive intercept with the Y-axis is not physiologically explainable (FA uptake without flow). This study investigates the appropriateness of an exponential (exp) model function. Methods: In 10 open-chest dogs the left anterior descending coronary artery was cannulated and extra corporally bypass perfused at reduced flow. MBF was assessed with scandium-46 labeled microspheres. 40 Minutes after iv. injection of 37 MBq 15-(p-[I-125]-iodophenyl)-3,3-dirnethylpentadecanoic acid (DMIPP), the heart was excised and cut into 120 samples. In each sample MBF (ml/g*min) and DMIPP uptake were assessed.In each dog, MBF and DMIPP uptake data were normalized to die respective means of the normally perfused myocardium. Uptake data were fitted to an exp model A[1-exp(-MBF/Fc)] by adjusting the flow constant Fc for minimal residual variance and adapting the amplitude A to obtain a zero mean residual error. The goodness of each fit was expressed by the standard error of the estimate (SEE). The mean SEE of the 10 dogs was 0.12{+-}0.04 with the exp fit and 0.24{+-}0.07 with the lin fit: p<0.001, F-test. For pooled data, the SEE was 0.15 with the exp fit and 0.26 with the lin fit (fig). Lin fit without zero intercept revealed a SEE of 0.18, which is higher than the SEE of the exp fit. The intercept was 0.54. Conclusion: In the normal to low MBF range, uptake of (methyl branched) FA analogues shows an exponential relationship, which is more appropriate than a linear relationship from a physiological point of view.

  14. Blood Leukocyte Count on Admission Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Acute Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Dharma, Surya; Hapsari, Rosmarini; Siswanto, Bambang B; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Jukema, J Wouter

    2015-06-01

    We aim to test the hypothesis that blood leukocyte count adds prognostic information in patients with acute non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (non-STEMI). A total of 585 patients with acute non-STEMI (thrombolysis in myocardial infarction risk score ≥ 3) were enrolled in this cohort retrospective study. Blood leukocyte count was measured immediately after admission in the emergency department. The composite of death, reinfarction, urgent revascularization, and stroke during hospitalization were defined as the primary end point of the study. The mean age of the patients was 61 ± 9.6 years and most of them were male (79%). Using multivariate Cox regression analysis involving seven variables (history of smoking, hypertension, heart rate > 100 beats/minute, serum creatinine level > 1.5 mg/dL, blood leukocyte count > 11,000/µL, use of β-blocker, and use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor), leukocyte count > 11,000/µL demonstrated to be a strong predictor of the primary end point (hazard ratio = 3.028; 95% confidence interval = 1.69-5.40, p < 0.001). The high blood leukocyte count on admission is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in patients with acute non-STEMI.

  15. Effects of phentolamine on coronary blood flow in patients with recent myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gould, L; Reddy, C V; Blatt, C J; Gomprecht, R F; Hayt, D B

    1975-06-01

    The myocardial clearance of rubidium may be obtained by praecordial counting after intravenous injection of Rb-minus 86 Cl. Eight patients with recent myocardial infarction had this determination performed before and after the infusion of 10 mg phentolamine at a rate of 0.3 mg/minute. The average predrug myocardial clearance of Rb was 89.3 plus or minus 29.9 ml/min per 100 g myocardium. After phentolamine, the average myocardial clearance rose to 117.3 plus or minus 33.3 ml/min per 100 g myocardium (P LESS THAN 0.01). An explanation for this findings is presented as well as its possible clinical applications.

  16. Effects of phentolamine on coronary blood flow in patients with recent myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, L; Reddy, C V; Blatt, C J; Gomprecht, R F; Hayt, D B

    1975-01-01

    The myocardial clearance of rubidium may be obtained by praecordial counting after intravenous injection of Rb-minus 86 Cl. Eight patients with recent myocardial infarction had this determination performed before and after the infusion of 10 mg phentolamine at a rate of 0.3 mg/minute. The average predrug myocardial clearance of Rb was 89.3 plus or minus 29.9 ml/min per 100 g myocardium. After phentolamine, the average myocardial clearance rose to 117.3 plus or minus 33.3 ml/min per 100 g myocardium (P LESS THAN 0.01). An explanation for this findings is presented as well as its possible clinical applications. PMID:1148064

  17. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  18. Increased blood oxygen affinity during digestion in the snake Python molurus.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Johannes; Wang, Tobias

    2002-11-01

    Many snakes exhibit large increases in metabolic rate during digestion that place extensive demands on efficient oxygen transport. In the present study, we describe blood oxygen affinity following three weeks of fasting and 48 h after feeding in the Burmese python (Python molurus). We also report simultaneous measurements of arterial blood gases and haematological parameters. Arterial blood was obtained from chronically implanted catheters, and blood oxygen-dissociation curves were constructed from oxygen content measurements at known oxygen partial pressure (P(O(2))) values at 2% and 5% CO(2). Arterial pH remained constant at approximately 7.6 after feeding, but digestion was associated with an approximately 6 mmol l(-1) increase in [HCO(3)(-)], while CO(2) partial pressure (P(CO(2))) increased from 2.21+/-0.13 kPa in fasted animals to 2.89+/-0.17 kPa at 48 h after feeding. Blood oxygen affinity in vivo was predicted on the basis of pH in vivo and the blood oxygen-dissociation curves obtained in vitro. The blood oxygen affinity in vivo increased during digestion, with P(50) values decreasing from 4.58+/-0.11 kPa to 3.53+/-0.24 kPa. This increase was associated with a significant decrease in the red blood cell [NTP]/[Hb(4)] ratio (relationship between the concentrations of organic phosphates and total haemoglobin) and a significant decrease in mean cellular haemoglobin content, which is indicative of swelling of the red blood cells. Our data for blood oxygen affinity and arterial oxygen levels, together with previously published values of oxygen uptake and blood flows, allow for a quantitative evaluation of oxygen transport during digestion. This analysis shows that a large part of the increased metabolism during digestion is supported by an increased venous extraction, while arterial P(O(2)) (Pa(O(2))) and haemoglobin saturation do not vary with digestive status. Thus, we predict that venous P(O(2)) (Pv(O(2))) is reduced from a fasting value of 5.2 kPa to 1.6 k

  19. Image-based modeling of blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Philip; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through the placenta. At the smallest scale of the feto-placental vasculature are the "terminal villi", bulbous structures that are thought to be the main sites for oxygen transfer in the final trimester of pregnancy. The objective of this study is to investigate blood flow and oxygen transfer in the terminal villi of the placenta. Three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy, are converted to finite-element meshes. Simulations of blood flow and oxygen transfer are performed to calculate the vascular flow resistance of the capillaries and the total oxygen transfer rate from the maternal blood. Scaling arguments, which predict the oxygen transfer across a range of Peclet numbers, are shown to be an efficient tool for quantifying the effect of statistical variability and experimental uncertainty. The effect of commonly observed localised dilations in the fetal vasculature on oxygen transfer is quantified using an idealised model in a simplified geometry. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximised by an optimal shape of the dilation, leading to an increase in oxygen transfer of up to 15%.

  20. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  1. Comparison between the changes in muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration in finswimmers during incremental exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bangde; Tian, Qingping; Zhang, Zhongxing; Gong, Hui

    2009-08-01

    For the purpose of comparing the response in local skeletal muscle oxygenation and blood lactate concentration during incremental exercise, 8 female finswimmers were recruited to take an incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer. Muscle oxygenation in right vastus lateralis (VL) were monitored by continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CW NIRS), respiratory gas exchange and blood lactate concentration ([La]b) were simultaneously measured by a metabolic system and a portable blood lactate analyzer respectively. NIRS measurements showed a muscle oxygenation index inflection point (OIip), from which the muscle oxygenation started to decrease dramatically. Significant correlations have been found between OIip and blood lactate threshold identified at the lowest [La]b value which was >0.5 mmol/L lower than that obtained at the following workload. These results might suggest that the CW NIRS measurement could be applied to monitor lactate threshold noninvasively.

  2. Investigation of tissue oxygenation by in vivo laser-induced photodissociation of cutaneous arterial blood oxyhemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimov, M. M.; Korolevich, A. N.

    2008-06-01

    A novel method of direct control of local tissue oxygenation based on laser-induced photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin in cutaneous blood vessels is discussed. New technology in selective and local increase of the concentration of free molecular oxygen in tissue that enhances metabolism of cells is demonstrated. Direct in vivo measurements of the tissue oxygen tension are carried out on human skin. Kinetics of oxygen tension in tissue is investigated under the effect of He-Ne laser radiation at the power of 1mW relatively to initial value of tissue oxygen tension. The results of experimental study the kinetics of oxygen distribution into tissue from arterial blood is presented. Biomedical applications of proposed new technology in laser therapy of pathologies where elimination of local tissue hypoxia is critical are discussed.

  3. Method of assessing blood oxygenation in microcirculation vessels based on Doppler approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir G.; Korsi, Larissa V.; Egorov, Sergei Y.

    2001-06-01

    Combination of laser Doppler flowmetry and pulse oximetry methods allows for the direct assessment of oxygen supply to tissues at the microcirculatory level, namely, in that part of the vascular network where the transcapillary exchange takes place that is responsible for saturating tissues with oxygen. The microcirculation system comprises arterial and venous microvascular parts that differ in blood flow velocities. Frequency separation of the photodetector signal components related to different velocity ranges makes possible to distinguish the hemodynamic processes in these two parts of the microvascular system. Moreover, numerous studies of collective oscillatory processes in hemodynamics reveal that cardio-oscillations are more pronounced in arterioles, whereas venous hemodynamics is mostly influenced by the breath rhythm. Taking account of the above phenomena allows developing a signal-filtration system for separate characterization of blood-oxygenation states in arterial and venous blood flows. Light absorbance in the skin depends on both light wavelength and blood-oxygenation level. Processing the signals obtained with a two-channel dual-wavelength (630 and 1115 nm) laser Doppler flowmeter provides information about blood oxygenation levels at the entrance and exit of the microvascular system and allows assessing the specific levels of oxygenation levels at the entrance and exit of the microvascular system and allows assessing the specific levels of oxygen consumption in tissues. In particular, this approach allows revealing pathogenic processes resulting from hyper- and hypo-oxygenation in tissues. For instance, rapidly growing malignant tumors are characterized by intensive metabolism, rapid formation of capillaries, and active transcapillary oxygen exchange that results in higher level of oxygen diffusion into tissue, while the level of oxygen is lowered in the microvascular veins.

  4. The jumbo squid, Dosidicus gigas (Ommastrephidae), living in oxygen minimum zones II: Blood-oxygen binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Brad A.

    2013-10-01

    Dosidicus gigas is a large, metabolically active squid that migrates across a strong oxygen and temperature gradient in the Eastern Pacific. Here we analyze the oxygen-binding properties of the squid's respiratory protein (hemocyanin, Hc) that facilitate such activity. A high Hc-oxygen affinity, strong temperature dependence, and pronounced pH sensitivity (P50=0.009T2.03, pH 7.4; Bohr coefficient=ΔlogP50/ΔpH=-1.55+0.034T) of oxygen binding facilitate night-time foraging in the upper water column, and support suppressed oxygen demand in hypoxic waters at greater depths. Expanding hypoxia may act to alter the species habitable depth range. This analysis supports the contention that ocean acidification could limit oxygen carrying capacity in squids at warmer temperature leading to reduced activity levels or altered distribution.

  5. An H-infinity approach to optimal control of oxygen and carbon dioxide contents in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Siano, Pierluigi; Selisteanu, Dan; Precup, Radu

    2016-12-01

    Nonlinear H-infinity control is proposed for the regulation of the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood of patients undergoing heart surgery and extracorporeal blood circulation. The levels of blood gases are administered through a membrane oxygenator and the control inputs are the externally supplied oxygen, the aggregate gas supply (oxygen plus nitrogen), and the blood flow which is regulated by a blood pump. The proposed control method is based on linearization of the oxygenator's dynamical model through Taylor series expansion and the computation of Jacobian matrices. The local linearization points are defined by the present value of the oxygenator's state vector and the last value of the control input that was exerted on this system. The modelling errors due to linearization are considered as disturbances which are compensated by the robustness of the control loop. Next, for the linearized model of the oxygenator an H-infinity control input is computed at each iteration of the control algorithm through the solution of an algebraic Riccati equation. With the use of Lyapunov stability analysis it is demonstrated that the control scheme satisfies the H-infinity tracking performance criterion, which signifies improved robustness against modelling uncertainty and external disturbances. Moreover, under moderate conditions the asymptotic stability of the control loop is also proven.

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of blood oxygenation content and its application in sports practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Gong, Hui; Ge, Xinfa; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    To research the change characteristics of blood oxygenation content in skeletal muscle, the change regularity between blood oxygenation content and exercise intensity as well as HbO2 and blood lactate acid while taking incremental exercises, we took an in vivo, real-time and continuous measurement on the blood oxygenation content of eight sportsmen when they did incremental exercises of five degrees on a power bicycle using a portable tissue oximeter which is based on the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy(NIRS), simultaneously, we detected the blood lactate acid of subjects after each degree of incremental physical load instantly using a blood lactate analysis equipment. The results showed that the content of HbO2 descended regularly while that of Hb ascended; blood volume decreased; and the density of lactate increased as the intensity of exercises was heightened. The statistics analyses showed that the relationship between HbO2 and blood lactate is rather close (correlation coefficient r=-0.918). With this discovery, a theoretical basis in measuring the relative change of blood oxygenation content non-invasively was evidenced, and a novel technology for assessing the physical situation of sportsman, grasping sports density and evaluating the training effect could be imported.

  7. Dual-wavelength photothermal optical coherence tomography for imaging microvasculature blood oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Biwei; McElroy, Austin B.; Kazmi, Shams; Dunn, Andrew K.; Duong, Timothy Q.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. A swept-source dual-wavelength photothermal (DWP) optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is demonstrated for quantitative imaging of microvasculature oxygen saturation. DWP-OCT is capable of recording three-dimensional images of tissue and depth-resolved phase variation in response to photothermal excitation. A 1,064-nm OCT probe and 770-nm and 800-nm photothermal excitation beams are combined in a single-mode optical fiber to measure microvasculature hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) levels in phantom blood vessels with a range of blood flow speeds (0 to 17  mm/s). A 50-μm-diameter blood vessel phantom is imaged, and SO2 levels are measured using DWP-OCT and compared with values provided by a commercial oximeter at various blood oxygen concentrations. The influences of blood flow speed and mechanisms of SNR phase degradation on the accuracy of SO2 measurement are identified and investigated. PMID:23640076

  8. Blood Oxygen Conservation in Diving Sea Lions: How Low Does Oxygen Really Go?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Does Oxygen Really Go ? Paul J. Ponganis Center for Marine Biotechnology and Biomedicine Scripps Institution of Oceanography 8655 Discovery Way...Does Oxygen Really Go ? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  9. Smart oxygen cuvette for optical monitoring of dissolved oxygen in biological blood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabhi, Harish; Alla, Suresh Kumar; Shahriari, Mahmoud R.

    2010-02-01

    A smart Oxygen Cuvette is developed by coating the inner surface of a cuvette with oxygen sensitive thin film material. The coating is glass like sol-gel based sensor that has an embedded ruthenium compound in the glass film. The fluorescence of the ruthenium is quenched depending on the oxygen level. Ocean Optics phase fluorometer, NeoFox is used to measure this rate of fluorescence quenching and computes it for the amount of oxygen present. Multimode optical fibers are used for transportation of light from an LED source to cuvette and from cuvette to phase fluorometer. This new oxygen sensing system yields an inexpensive solution for monitoring the dissolved oxygen in samples for biological and medical applications. In addition to desktop fluorometers, smart oxygen cuvettes can be used with the Ocean Optics handheld Fluorometers, NeoFox Sport. The Smart Oxygen Cuvettes provide a resolution of 4PPB units, an accuracy of less than 5% of the reading, and 90% response in less than 10 seconds.

  10. Novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive continuous monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury are a major cause of death for individuals under 50 years of age. In the USA alone, 150,000 patients per year suffer moderate or severe TBI. Moreover, TBI is a major cause of combatrelated death. Monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is critically important for management of TBI patients because cerebral venous blood oxygenation below 50% results in death or severe neurologic complications. At present, there is no technique for noninvasive, accurate monitoring of this clinically important variable. We proposed to use optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation by probing cerebral veins such as the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and validated it in animal studies. In this work, we developed a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system for continuous, real-time cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring and tested it in human subjects at normal conditions and during hyperventilation to simulate changes that may occur in patients with TBI. We designed and built a highly-sensitive optoacoustic probe for SSS signal detection. Continuous measurements were performed in the near infrared spectral range and the SSS oxygenation absolute values were automatically calculated in real time using a special algorithm developed by our group. Continuous measurements performed at normal conditions and during hyperventilation demonstrated that hyperventilation resulted in approximately 12% decrease of cerebral venous blood oxygenation.

  11. The Choroidal Eye Oximeter - An instrument for measuring oxygen saturation of choroidal blood in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laing, R. A.; Danisch, L. A.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Choroidal Eye Oximeter is an electro-optical instrument that noninvasively measures the oxygen saturation of choroidal blood in the back of the human eye by a spectrophotometric method. Since choroidal blood is characteristic of blood which is supplied to the brain, the Choroidal Eye Oximeter can be used to monitor the amount of oxygen which is supplied to the brain under varying external conditions. The instrument consists of two basic systems: the optical system and the electronic system. The optical system produces a suitable bi-chromatic beam of light, reflects this beam from the fundus of the subject's eye, and onto a low-noise photodetector. The electronic system amplifies the weak composite signal from the photodetector, computes the average oxygen saturation from the area of the fundus that was sampled, and displays the value of the computed oxygen saturation on a panel meter.

  12. Optical fiber head for monitoring of heart rate and blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Kacper; Baranowska, Agata; Zmojda, Jacek; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-09-01

    In this article we presented possibility of heart rate and blood oxygenation measurements by classic displacement optical fiber sensor in reflection mode. Based on numerical analysis of sensor head characteristics the optimal construction was developed. Three LED diodes at the wavelengths of 530nm (green), 650nm (red) and 850nm (infrared) were used for determine heart rate and saturation of blood during "in vivo" measurements. Developed sensor head allows noninvasive and continuously monitoring of blood parameters.

  13. Time course of changes in heart rate and blood pressure variability in rats with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Aires, R.; Pimentel, E.B.; Forechi, L.; Dantas, E.M.; Mill, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the time course of changes in autonomic balance in the acute (1 and 3 days), sub-acute (7 days) and chronic (28 days) phases of myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Autonomic balance was assessed by temporal and spectral analyses of blood pressure variability (BPV) and heart rate variability (HRV). Pulsatile blood pressure (BP) recordings (30 min) were obtained in awake and unrestrained male Wistar rats (N = 77; 8-10 weeks old) with MI (coronary ligature) or sham operation (SO). Data are reported as means±SE. The high frequency (HF) component (n.u.) of HRV was significantly lower in MI-1- (P<0.01) and MI-3-day rats (P<0.05) than in their time-control groups (SO-1=68±4 vs MI-1=35.3±4.3; SO-3=71±5.8 vs MI-3=45.2±3.8), without differences thereafter (SO-7=69.2±4.8 vs MI-7=56±5.8; SO-28=73±4 vs MI-28=66±6.6). A sharp reduction (P<0.05) of BPV (mmHg2) was observed in the first week after MI (SO-1=8.55±0.80; SO-3=9.11±1.08; SO-7=7.92±1.10 vs MI-1=5.63±0.73; MI-3=5.93±0.30; MI-7=5.30±0.25). Normal BPV, however, was observed 4 weeks after MI (SO-28=8.60±0.66 vs MI-28=8.43±0.56 mmHg2; P>0.05). This reduction was mainly due to attenuation of the low frequency (LF) band of BPV in absolute and normalized units (SO-1=39.3±7%; SO-3=55±4.5%; SO-7=46.8±4.5%; SO-28=45.7±5%; MI-1=13±3.5%; MI-3=35±4.7%; MI-7=25±2.8%; MI-28=21.4±2.8%). The results suggest that the reduction in HRV was associated with decrease of the HF component of HRV suggesting recovery of the vagal control of heartbeats along the post-infarction healing period. The depression of BPV was more dependent on the attenuation of the LF component, which is linked to the baroreflex modulation of the autonomic balance. PMID:28076450

  14. Myocardial blood flow assessment with 82rubidium-PET imaging in patients with left bundle branch block

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Andréa; Chalela, William; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Imada, Rodrigo; Soares, José; Do Val, Renata; Oliveira, Marco Antonio; Izaki, Marisa; Filho, Roberto Kalil; Meneghetti, José C

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Perfusion abnormalities are frequently seen in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) when a left bundle branch block is present. A few studies have shown decreased coronary flow reserve in the left anterior descending territory, regardless of the presence of coronary artery disease. OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate rubidium-82 (82Rb) positron emission tomography imaging in the assessment of myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve in patients with left bundle branch block. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with left bundle branch block (GI), median age 63.5 years, 22 (58%) female, 12 with coronary artery disease (≥70%; GI-A) and 26 with no evidence of significant coronary artery disease (GI-B), underwent rest-dipyridamole stress 82Rb-positron emission tomography with absolute quantitative flow measurements using Cedars-Sinai software (mL/min/g). The relative myocardial perfusion and left ventricular ejection fraction were assessed in 17 segments. These parameters were compared with those obtained from 30 patients with normal 82Rb-positron emission tomography studies and without left bundle branch block (GII). RESULTS: Stress myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve were significantly lower in GI than in GII (p<0.05). The comparison of coronary flow reserve between GI-A and GI-B showed that it was different from the global coronary flow reserve (p<0.05) and the stress flow was significantly lower in the anterior than in the septal wall for both groups. Perfusion abnormalities were more prevalent in GI-A (p=0.06) and the left ventricular ejection fraction was not different between GI-A and GI-B, whereas it was lower in GI than in GII (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The data confirm that patients with left bundle branch block had decreased myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve and coronary flow reserve assessed by 82Rb-positron emission tomography imaging may be useful in identifying coronary artery disease in patients with

  15. Optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of blood oxygenation: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Larina, Irina V.; Larin, Kirill V.; Deyo, Donald J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Prough, Donald S.

    2002-08-01

    Replacement of invasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation with noninvasive techniques offers great promise in the management of life-threatening neurologic illnesses including traumatic brain injury. We developed and built an optoacoustic system to noninvasively monitor cerebral venous oxygenation; the system includes a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser and a specially designed optoacoustic probe. We tested the system in vitro in sheep blood with experimentally varied oxygenation. Our results demonstrated that (1) the amplitude and temporal profile of the optoacoustic waves increase with blood oxygenation in the range from 24% to 92%, (2) optoacoustic signals can be detected despite optical and acoustic attenuation by thick bone, and (3) the system is capable of real-time and continuous measurements. These results suggest that the optoacoustic technique is technically feasible for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation.

  16. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  17. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  18. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN WHOLE BLOOD, BLOOD PLASMA AND BREAST MILK: VALIDATION OF A POTENTIAL MARKER OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized to contribute to the pathobiology of many diseases. We have applied a simple chemiluminescent (CL) probe to detect ROS in various biological fluids (plasma, whole blood, urine and breast milk) in an environmental arsenic drinking wate...

  19. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  20. Designed Proteins as Optimized Oxygen Carriers for Artificial Blood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Second year accomplishments include: (A) The creation and verification of a theoretical model for oxyferrous state lifetimes in oxygen transport...reduction potential of the bound cofactor and triple the oxyferrous state lifetime. (D) We have incorporated an optimized cofactor binding site and...lifetime. 1.1 Creating and testing a model for the oxyferrous state lifetime. We have developed a new model for oxyferrous state lifetimes

  1. Noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring: clinical test of multiwavelength optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y. Y.; Prough, D. S.; Petrova, I.; Patrikeev, I. A.; Cicenaite, I.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2007-02-01

    Continuous monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation is critically important for treatment of patients with life-threatening conditions like severe brain injury or during cardiac surgery. We designed and built a novel multiwavelength optoacoustic system for noninvasive, continuous, and accurate monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation. We use an Optical Parametric Oscillator as a light source. We successfully tested the system in vitro as well as in vivo in large animals (sheep) through thick tissues overlying blood vessels which drain venous blood out of the brain (e.g., superior sagittal sinus or jugular vein). Here we present the results of clinical tests of the system for continuous noninvasive cerebral blood oxygenation monitoring in the internal jugular vein of healthy volunteers. We applied our custom-built optoacoustic probe (which incorporated a wide-band acoustic transducer and an optical fiber) to the neck area overlying the internal jugular vein. We performed measurements with volunteers at 18 wavelengths in the near-infrared spectral range. Despite a thick layer of overlying connective tissue and low energy used in the experiments, we recorded signals with high signal-to-noise ratios for all volunteers. We found that the temporal (independent of signal amplitude) parameters of recorded profiles for different levels of blood oxygenation correlated well with the spectrum of effective attenuation coefficients of blood.

  2. Multi-modal in vivo imaging of brain blood oxygenation, blood flow and neural calcium dynamics during acute seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2016-03-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium has been implicated in the development of epilepsy. To better understand the relation between vascular function and seizure and provide a foundation for interpreting results from functional imaging in chronic disease models, we investigate the relationship between intracellular calcium dynamics and local cerebral blood flow and blood oxygen saturation during acute seizure-like events and pharmacological seizure rescue. To probe the relation between the aforementioned physiological markers in an acute model of epilepsy in rats, we integrated three different optical modalities together with electrophysiological recordings: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) was used to study changes in flow speeds, Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOSI) was used to monitor changes in oxygenated, de-oxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentration, and Calcium-sensitive dye imaging was used to monitor intracellular calcium dynamics. We designed a dedicated cortical flow chamber to remove superficial blood and dye resulting from the injection procedure, which reduced spurious artifacts. The near infrared light used for IOSI and LSCI was delivered via a light pipe integrated with the flow chamber to minimize the effect of fluid surface movement on illumination stability. Calcium-sensitive dye was injected via a glass electrode used for recording the local field potential. Our system allowed us to observe and correlate increases in intracellular calcium, blood flow and blood volume during seizure-like events and provide a quantitative analysis of neurovascular coupling changes associated with seizure rescue via injection of an anti-convulsive agent.

  3. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans.

  4. Image-guided optical measurement of blood oxygen saturation within capillary vessels (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akons, Kfir; Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    Values of blood oxygenation levels are useful for assessing heart and lung conditions, and are frequently monitored during routine patient care. Independent measurement of the oxygen saturation in capillary blood, which is significantly different from that of arterial blood, is important for diagnosing tissue hypoxia and for increasing the accuracy of existing techniques that measure arterial oxygen saturation. Here, we developed a simple, non-invasive technique for measuring the reflected spectra from individual capillary vessels within a human lip, allowing local measurement of the blood oxygen saturation. The optical setup includes a spatially incoherent broadband light that was focused onto a specific vessel below the lip surface. Backscattered light was imaged by a camera for identifying a target vessel and pointing the illumination beam to its cross section. Scattered light from the vessel was then collected by a single-mode fiber and analyzed by a fast spectrometer. Spectra acquired from small capillary vessels within a volunteer lip showed the characteristic oxyhemoglobin absorption bands in real time and with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measuring capillary oxygen saturation using this technique would potentially be more accurate compared to existing pulse oximetry techniques due to its insensitivity to the patient's skin color, pulse rate, motion, and medical condition. It could be used as a standalone endoscopic technique for measuring tissue hypoxia or in conjunction with conventional pulse oximetry for a more accurate measurement of oxygen transport in the body.

  5. Oxygen Supplementation is Effective in Attenuating Maternal Cerebral Blood Deoxygenation After Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Noriya; Kondo, Yuko; Maeda, Takeshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure changes in maternal cerebral blood oxygenation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for 15 min after spinal anesthesia performed for cesarean section, and to determine the efficacy of supplemental oxygen in maintaining maternal cerebral blood oxygenation. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to either receive 100% oxygen via a facemask at a constant flow rate of 3 l/min throughout the study (O2 group), or were evaluated without supplemental oxygen (Air group). Changes in cerebral blood oxygenation were evaluated using the following parameters: oxy-hemoglobin (Hb), deoxy-Hb, and total-Hb concentrations, as well as tissue oxygen index (TOI), measured over the forehead by NIRS. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were also recorded throughout the study. Mean oxy-Hb, total-Hb, TOI, and MAP in both groups decreased significantly from baseline values (P<0.05). The reduction in oxy-Hb and TOI in the Air group was significantly greater than that in the O2 group (oxy-Hb: -4.72 vs. -2.96 μmol/l; P<0.05, TOI: -6.82 vs. -1.68%; P<0.01); however, there were no significant differences in the reduction of total-Hb and MAP between the groups. Mean deoxy-Hb in the Air group was significantly higher than that in the O2 group (0.02 vs. -1.01 μmol/l; P<0.05). The results of the present study demonstrate that oxygen supplementation attenuates cerebral blood deoxygenation secondary to the reduction in cerebral blood flow following spinal anesthesia.

  6. Modeling of oxygen uptake in perfluorocarbon emulsions. Some comparisons with uptake by blood.

    PubMed

    Shah, N; Mehra, A

    1996-01-01

    The use of perfluorocarbons emulsified in water as blood substitutes (artificial blood), is well known. Although considerable research has been devoted to the study of stability, toxicity, and gas solubility properties of these emulsions, there is no quantitative guide to the oxygen transport behavior in such emulsions, especially with reference to this transport process in actual blood. This paper describes a mathematical model from which the oxygen flux into a straight, cylindrical tube carrying a perfluorocarbon emulsion may be computed. The solutions to the proposed model can be adapted to that for a capillary or for a single tube in a blood oxygenator. The rates of oxygen transfer, so obtained, have been compared with analogous transfer rates that can be achieved in natural blood flowing under identical conditions. Therefore, the minimal solubilization capacity for oxygen required of a perfluorocarbon emulsion can be estimated on a quantitative basis. The modeling approach used in this study is based on the well tested theory of mass transfer in microheterogeneous media reported in the chemical engineering literature.

  7. Application of a modified regularization procedure for estimating oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Isa; Ansari, Rashid; Samil Yetik, I.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorescence lifetime measurement based on a frequency domain approach is used to estimate oxygen tension in large retinal blood vessels. The classical least squares (LS) estimation was initially used to determine oxygen tension indirectly from intermediate variables. A spatial regularized least squares (RLS) method was later proposed to reduce the high variance of oxygen tension estimated by LS method. In this paper, we provide a solution using a modified RLS (MRLS) approach that utilizes prior knowledge about retinal vessels oxygenation based on expected oxygen tension values in retinal arteries and veins. The performance of MRLS method was evaluated in simulated and experimental data by determining the bias, variance, and mean absolute error (MAE) of oxygen tension measurements and comparing these parameters with those derived with the use of LS and RLS methods.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mononuclear Cells From Cord Blood: Cotransplantation Provides a Better Effect in Treating Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Yu, Hong; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cotransplanting mononuclear cells from cord blood (CB-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as treatment for myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CD34+ cells or MSCs separately has been shown effective in treating MI, but the effect of cotransplanting CB-MNCs and MSCs is not clear. In this study, MSCs were separated by their adherence to the tissue culture. The morphology, immunophenotype, and multilineage potential of MSCs were analyzed. CB-MNCs were separated in lymphocyte separation medium 1.077. CD34+ cell count and viability were analyzed by flow cytometry. Infarcted male Sprague-Dawley rats in a specific-pathogen-free grade were divided into four treatment groups randomly: group I, saline; group II, CB-MNCs; group III, MSCs; and group IV, CB-MNCs plus MSCs. The saline, and CB-MNCs and/or MSCs were injected intramyocardially in infarcted rats. Their cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The myocardial capillary density was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both cell types induced an improvement in the left ventricular cardiac function and increased tissue cell proliferation in myocardial tissue and neoangiogenesis. However, CB-MNCs plus MSCs were more effective in reducing the infarct size and preventing ventricular remodeling. Scar tissue was reduced significantly in the CB-MNCs plus MSCs group. MSCs facilitate engraftment of CD34+ cells and immunomodulation after allogeneic CD34+ cell transplantation. Cotransplanting MSCs and CB-MNCs might be more effective than transplanting MSCs or CB-MNCs separately for treating MI. This study contributes knowledge toward effective treatment strategies for MI. Significance This study assessed cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+ cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) in a rat model. The results demonstrate that MSCs and mononuclear cells from cord blood may have synergistic effects and

  9. Blood Pool Segmentation Results in Superior Virtual Cardiac Models than Myocardial Segmentation for 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Lengua, Carlos Gonzalez; Weinberg, Alan D; Nielsen, James C; Sanz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The method of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition and post-processing which should be used to create optimal virtual models for 3D printing has not been studied systematically. Patients (n = 19) who had undergone CMR including both 3D balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were retrospectively identified. Post-processing for the creation of virtual 3D models involved using both myocardial (MS) and blood pool (BP) segmentation, resulting in four groups: Group 1-bSSFP/MS, Group 2-bSSFP/BP, Group 3-MRA/MS and Group 4-MRA/BP. The models created were assessed by two raters for overall quality (1-poor; 2-good; 3-excellent) and ability to identify predefined vessels (1-5: superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta and at least one pulmonary vein). A total of 76 virtual models were created from 19 patient CMR datasets. The mean overall quality scores for Raters 1/2 were 1.63 ± 0.50/1.26 ± 0.45 for Group 1, 2.12 ± 0.50/2.26 ± 0.73 for Group 2, 1.74 ± 0.56/1.53 ± 0.61 for Group 3 and 2.26 ± 0.65/2.68 ± 0.48 for Group 4. The numbers of identified vessels for Raters 1/2 were 4.11 ± 1.32/4.05 ± 1.31 for Group 1, 4.90 ± 0.46/4.95 ± 0.23 for Group 2, 4.32 ± 1.00/4.47 ± 0.84 for Group 3 and 4.74 ± 0.56/4.63 ± 0.49 for Group 4. Models created using BP segmentation (Groups 2 and 4) received significantly higher ratings than those created using MS for both overall quality and number of vessels visualized (p < 0.05), regardless of the acquisition technique. There were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 3. The ratings for Raters 1 and 2 had good correlation for overall quality (ICC = 0.63) and excellent correlation for the total number of vessels visualized (ICC = 0.77). The intra-rater reliability was good for Rater A (ICC = 0.65). Three models were successfully printed

  10. Oxygen uptake and cardiovascular responses in control adults and acute myocardial infarction patients during bathing.

    PubMed

    Winslow, E H; Lane, L D; Gaffney, F A

    1985-01-01

    Physiological responses before, during, and after three types of baths were determined in 18 patients who were 5 to 17 days postinfarction and 22 control adults. In the patients, oxygen consumption (VO2) averaged 6, 7, and 7 ml/kg/min, peak heart rate 105, 108, and 112 beats per minute, and rate pressure product 115, 120, and 111 for basin, tub, and shower bathing, respectively. Oxygen consumption during bathing was less than 3 times resting levels. The patients had a significantly lower VO2 during bathing than the control subjects. The patients' peak heart rates were higher than anticipated for the level of exertion, and sometimes exceeded the target heart rates used in predischarge testing. Peak heart rate and occurrence of dysrhythmia did not differ significantly between the three types of baths. In the women patients, rate pressure product was significantly higher after tub bath than after basin bath or shower. The subjects had no cardiovascular symptoms during bathing, rated all three baths as light exertion, and disliked the basin bath. The data show that the physiologic costs of the three types of baths are similar, differences in responses to bathing seem more a function of subject variability than bath type, and many cardiac patients can take a tub bath or shower earlier in their hospitalization. However, more research is needed to predict patients likely to have an exaggerated response to bathing and to develop clear guidelines for bath method selection and progression.

  11. Raynaud's phenomenon in a child presenting as oxygen desaturation during transfusion with cold blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Coté, Charles J

    2008-12-01

    We report a case of Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) triggered by transfusion of cold blood to a pediatric burn patient under general anesthesia. The child was febrile so a decision was made to not use a blood warmer. When the blood was rapidly administered the child suddenly developed 'desaturation'. The child was placed on 100% oxygen, adequate ventilation assured, and the color of his oral mucosa assessed as 'pink'. Placement of the oximeter on the opposite hand revealed 100% saturation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of apparent RP reported in a pediatric patient triggered by transfusion of cold blood.

  12. Activation of SphK1 by K6PC-5 Inhibits Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation-Induced Myocardial Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun-jie; Peng, Yi; Wang, Li-ming; Wang, Jian-kai; Chen, Xin

    2015-11-01

    In the current study, we evaluated the potential effect of a novel sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activator, K6PC-5, on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation-induced damages to myocardial cells. We demonstrated that K6PC-5 increased intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) content and remarkably inhibited OGD/reoxygenation-induced death of myocardial cells (H9c2/HL-1 lines and primary murine myocardiocytes). SphK1 inhibitors, B-5354c and SKI-II, or SphK1-siRNA knockdown not only aggregated OGD/reoxygenation-induced cytotoxicity but also nullified the cytoprotection by K6PC-5. On the other hand, overexpression of SphK1 alleviated H9c2 cell death by OGD/reoxygenation, and K6PC-5-mediated cytoprotection was also enhanced in SphK1 overexpressed cells. Molecularly, OGD/reoxygenation activated the mitochondrial death pathway, evidenced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential reduction, and p53-cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) association, which were all alleviated by K6PC-5 or overexpression of SphK1, but exacerbated by SphK1 knockdown. Furthermore, OGD/reoxygenation induced prodeath ceramide production in myocardial cells, which was largely suppressed by K6PC-5. In the meantime, adding a cell-permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) mimicked OGD/reoxygenation actions and induced ROS production and the mitochondrial death pathway in myocardial cells. Together, we conclude that K6PC-5 inhibits OGD/reoxygenation-induced myocardial cell death probably through activating SphK1. The results of the study indicate a potential benefit of K6PC-5 on ischemic heart disease.

  13. Image-Based Modeling of Blood Flow and Oxygen Transfer in Feto-Placental Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Brownbill, Paul; Janáček, Jiří; Jirkovská, Marie; Kubínová, Lucie; Chernyavsky, Igor L.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through villous trees in the placenta. In this paper, we simulate blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries by converting three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, reconstructed from confocal laser scanning microscopy, to finite-element meshes, and calculating values of vascular flow resistance and total oxygen transfer. The relationship between the total oxygen transfer rate and the pressure drop through the capillary is shown to be captured across a wide range of pressure drops by physical scaling laws and an upper bound on the oxygen transfer rate. A regression equation is introduced that can be used to estimate the oxygen transfer in a capillary using the vascular resistance. Two techniques for quantifying the effects of statistical variability, experimental uncertainty and pathological placental structure on the calculated properties are then introduced. First, scaling arguments are used to quantify the sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the geometry and the parameters. Second, the effects of localized dilations in fetal capillaries are investigated using an idealized axisymmetric model, to quantify the possible effect of pathological placental structure on oxygen transfer. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximized by an optimal width of the dilation. The results could explain the prevalence of fetal hypoxia in cases of delayed villous maturation, a pathology characterized by a lack of the vasculo-syncytial membranes often seen in conjunction with localized capillary dilations. PMID:27788214

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of type 2 myocardial infarction: review and commentary.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Joseph S; Thygesen, Kristian A; White, Harvey D; Jaffe, Allan S

    2014-02-01

    The Task Force for the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction recently published updated guidelines for the clinical and research diagnosis of myocardial infarction under a variety of circumstances and in a variety of categories. A type 1 myocardial infarction (MI) is usually the result of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease with thrombotic coronary arterial obstruction secondary to atherosclerotic plaque rupture, ulceration, fissuring, or dissection, causing coronary arterial obstruction with resultant myocardial ischemia and necrosis. Patients with a type 2 MI do not have atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In this latter group of patients, myocardial necrosis occurs because of an increase in myocardial oxygen demand or a decrease in myocardial blood flow. Type 2 MI has been the subject of considerable clinical discussion and confusion. This review by knowledgeable members of the Task Force seeks to help clinicians resolve the confusion surrounding type 2 MI.

  15. Oxygenated-blood colour change thresholds for perceived facial redness, health, and attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Re, Daniel E; Whitehead, Ross D; Xiao, Dengke; Perrett, David I

    2011-03-23

    Blood oxygenation level is associated with cardiovascular fitness, and raising oxygenated blood colouration in human faces increases perceived health. The current study used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) psychophysics design to quantify the oxygenated blood colour (redness) change threshold required to affect perception of facial colour, health and attractiveness. Detection thresholds for colour judgments were lower than those for health and attractiveness, which did not differ. The results suggest redness preferences do not reflect a sensory bias, rather preferences may be based on accurate indications of health status. Furthermore, results suggest perceived health and attractiveness may be perceptually equivalent when they are assessed based on facial redness. Appearance-based motivation for lifestyle change can be effective; thus future studies could assess the degree to which cardiovascular fitness increases face redness and could quantify changes in aerobic exercise needed to increase facial attractiveness.

  16. Oxygenated-Blood Colour Change Thresholds for Perceived Facial Redness, Health, and Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Re, Daniel E.; Whitehead, Ross D.; Xiao, Dengke; Perrett, David I.

    2011-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level is associated with cardiovascular fitness, and raising oxygenated blood colouration in human faces increases perceived health. The current study used a two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) psychophysics design to quantify the oxygenated blood colour (redness) change threshold required to affect perception of facial colour, health and attractiveness. Detection thresholds for colour judgments were lower than those for health and attractiveness, which did not differ. The results suggest redness preferences do not reflect a sensory bias, rather preferences may be based on accurate indications of health status. Furthermore, results suggest perceived health and attractiveness may be perceptually equivalent when they are assessed based on facial redness. Appearance-based motivation for lifestyle change can be effective; thus future studies could assess the degree to which cardiovascular fitness increases face redness and could quantify changes in aerobic exercise needed to increase facial attractiveness. PMID:21448270

  17. Convenient preparation of /sup 11/C-methyltriphenylphosphonium iodide (MTP) for PET imaging of regional myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, D.V.; Dannals, R.F.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstrom, B.; Wong, D.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate /sup 11/C-MTP for use as a potential regional myocardial perfusion agent in positron emission tomography. The synthesis of /sup 11/C-MTP was accomplished by reacting triphenylphosphine with /sup 11/C- methyliodide. Triphenylphosphine was dissolved in benzene and cooled to O/sup 0/C in a septum sealed reaction vessel. /sup 11/C-methyliodide was synthesized from /sup 11/C-carbon dioxide, and bubbled through the reaction vessel in a stream of carrier nitrogen gas. When trapping of the /sup 11/C- methyliodide was complete, the vessel was placed in a block heater at 140/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. The reaction mixture was cooled and evaporated to dryness under reduced pressure. The residue was dissolved in absolute ethanol and then re-evaporated to dryness. The final product was dissolved in saline and passed through a 0.2 micron filter which removed excess unreacted tiphenylphosphine. The specific activity of the /sup 11/C-MTP was determined to be at least 10 mCi/..mu..mole using UV spectroscopy. PET imaging was performed on anesthetized dogs (normal and surgically infarcted hearts) and monkeys which were injected i.v. with a solution of 20 mCi of /sup 11/C-MTP. Scans of the heart were acquired using the authors' neuro ECAT. The myocardium was clearly visualized in both the dog and monkey. In dogs with myocardial infarctions, images showed an absence of radiotracer in regions corresponding to the infarcted zone. These studies indicate that /sup 11/C-MTP can be conveniently prepared to provide tomographic imaging of the heart using PET. Moreover, the uptake of /sup 11/C-MTP in the heart may be useful in determining regional myocardial blood flow.

  18. Impact of High-Normal Blood Pressure Measured in Emergency Room on Adverse Cardiac Events in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nam Sik; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chae, Shung Chull; Kim, Young Jo; Hur, Seung Ho; Seong, In Whan; Hong, Taek Jong; Choi, Donghoon; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Seung, Ki Bae; Chung, Wook Sung; Jang, Yang Soo; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Seung Jung

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prehypertension according to JNC7 is common and is associated with increased vascular mortality. The importance of management in high-normal blood pressure (BP) is underemphasized. Subjects and Methods We analyzed major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry in normal BP (group I) and high-normal BP (group II) patients. Results Among 14871 patients, 159 (61±12.3 years, 122 males) satisfied the study indication. Six-month and one-year clinical follow-up rate was 88.9% and 85.8%, respectively. Group I had 78 patients (60.9±12.4 years). Group II had 81 patients (61.6±12.5 years). Demographics of patients were not different between groups. Treatment strategy was not different. Initial Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 0 was less frequent in group II (n=32, 47.1%) than in group I (n=16, 21.9%) (p=0.001). Successful intervention rate was not different between group II (93.8%) and group I (97.1%) (p=0.590). Six-month MACE occurred in 3 patients in group I (4.4%) and 10 in group II (15.6%) (p=0.031). Compared with normal BP, the odds ratio for patients with high-normal BP was 1.147 (p=0.045, 95% confidence interval 1.011-1.402) for 6-month MACE. Conclusion Even though high-normal BP patients had a better baseline clinical status, the prognosis was poorer than patients with normal BP. Therapeutic BP target goal for the patients with acute myocardial infarction should be <140/90 mm Hg, which is recommended in JNC7. PMID:22701132

  19. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leukocyte antigen implies their participation in exchange of specific proteins in the course of acute myocardial infarction. Future studies of CD45(+) platelets in peripheral blood of acute myocardial infarction patients in association with generate reactive oxygen species production may provide a new insight into the complex mechanisms of cell-cell interactions associated with acute myocardial infarction.

  20. In vivo monitoring of blood oxygenation in large veins with a triple-wavelength optoacoustic system.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H P; Prough, D S; Petrov, Y Y; Patrikeev, I; Petrova, I Y; Deyo, D J; Cicenaite, I; Esenaliev, R O

    2007-11-26

    A noninvasive optoacoustic technique could be a clinically useful alternative to existing, invasive methods for cerebral oxygenation monitoring. Recently we proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for monitoring cerebral blood oxygenation by probing large cerebral and neck veins including the superior sagittal sinus and the internal jugular vein. In these studies we used a multi-wavelength optoacoustic system with a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator as a light source and a custom-made optoacoustic probe for the measurement of the optoacoustic signals in vivo from the area of the sheep neck overlying the external jugular vein, which is similar in diameter and depth to the human internal jugular vein. Optoacoustic signals induced in venous blood were measured with high resolution despite the presence of a thick layer of tissues (up to 10 mm) between the external jugular vein and the optoacoustic probe. Three wavelengths were chosen to provide accurate and stable measurements of blood oxygenation: signals at 700 nm and 1064 nm demonstrated high correlation with actual oxygenation measured invasively with CO-Oximeter ("gold standard"), while the signal at 800 nm (isosbestic point) was independent of blood oxygenation and was used for calibration.

  1. HEMORHEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF PERFLUOROCARBON BASED OXYGEN CARRIER INTERACTION WITH COLLOID PLASMA EXPANDERS AND BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Diana M.; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A.; Briceño, Juan C.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion based oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in microvessels using intravital microscopy when administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation, and increased blood viscosity. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo relative to non-aggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rate (e.g. arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) because aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decrease perfusion, pulmonary emboli, or focal ischemia. PMID:23606592

  2. Suppressed Neuronal Activity and Concurrent Arteriolar Vasoconstriction May Explain Negative Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Signal

    PubMed Central

    Devor, Anna; Tian, Peifang; Nishimura, Nozomi; Teng, Ivan C.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Narayanan, S. N.; Ulbert, Istvan; Boas, David A.; Kleinfeld, David; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic transmission initiates a cascade of signal transduction events that couple neuronal activity to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation. Although a number of vasoactive molecules and specific cell types have been implicated, the transformation of stimulus-induced activation of neuronal circuits to hemodynamic changes is still unclear. We use somatosensory stimulation and a suite of in vivo imaging tools to study neurovascular coupling in rat primary somatosensory cortex. Our stimulus evoked a central region of net neuronal depolarization surrounded by net hyperpolarization. Hemodynamic measurements revealed that predominant depolarization corresponded to an increase in oxygenation, whereas predominant hyperpolarization corresponded to a decrease in oxygenation. On the microscopic level of single surface arterioles, the response was composed of a combination of dilatory and constrictive phases. Critically, the relative strength of vasoconstriction covaried with the relative strength of oxygenation decrease and neuronal hyperpolarization. These results suggest that a neuronal inhibition and concurrent arteriolar vasoconstriction correspond to a decrease in blood oxygenation, which would be consistent with a negative blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal. PMID:17442830

  3. Factors affecting the blood concentration of ionized magnesium in patients in the acute phase of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Kenji; Tachibana, Hideaki; Suzuki, Tomomi; Hiramori, Katsuhiko

    2004-11-01

    Magnesium is physiologically active in its free state (Mg2+). In the present study, we attempted to clarify factors affecting blood concentrations of Mg2+ in the acute phase of myocardial infarction (AMI). Subjects were 84 consecutive patients with AMI. Blood samples were collected at the time of admission, 24h after admission, and 1 week after admission, to measure blood concentration of Mg2+ and noradrenaline (NA). Furthermore, to assess daily Mg intake the hardness of local drinking water was determined, and a survey was conducted regarding dietary preferences and habits. Based on the results of this survey, the patients were defined as having a low Mg intake (L Group) or not. In addition, based on chronological shifts in blood Mg2+ concentrations, subjects were divided into the following four groups: Normal group, blood concentration of Mg2+ within normal range at all measurement points; Early recovery group, low at time of admission, but normalized on the next day; Delayed recovery group, low at time of admission, but normalized 1 week after admission; and Unrecovered group, below normal range at all measurement points. The mean blood Mg2+ concentration on admission was 0.52 +/- 0.06 mmol/l, significantly lower than the normal range (P < 0.05). A negative correlation between blood Mg2+ and NA concentrations on admission was observed (r = 0.49, P < 0.005). As a result, blood Mg2+ concentrations were normalized in 94% of subjects by 1 week after admission. Mean blood Mg2+ concentration on admission in the L Group was 0.47 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, significantly lower than that found in other subjects (0.52 +/- 0.05 mmol/l, P < 0.01). Eighty percent of the patients classified into the Unrecovered group belonged to the L Group. These findings suggest that lower blood concentrations of Mg2+ and higher plasma NA levels may be a result of serious AMI. However, chronic Mg intake deficiency may play a partial role in patients whose blood concentrations of Mg2+ remain low for

  4. Use of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute to improve intravascular optical coherence tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khiet C.; Edris, Ahmad; Su, Jianping; Mukai, David S.; Mahon, Sari; Petrov, Artiom D.; Kern, Morton; Ashan, Chowdhury; Chen, Zhongping; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Narula, Jagat; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-05-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a catheter-based imaging technology with powerful resolution capable of identifying vulnerable plaques and guiding coronary intervention. However, a significant limitation of intravascular OCT imaging is its attenuation by blood. We propose that the use of an oxygen-carrying blood substitute could potentially optimize OCT image quality. Surgical isolation of the descending thoracic aorta of six rabbits is performed, followed by intravascular OCT imaging of the abdominal aorta. Perfluorodecalin (PFD) is oxygenated using a bubble-through technique with 100% oxygen. OCT imaging is performed and compared using three different flushing modalities: PFD; saline; and blood. OCT imaging of the rabbit abdominal aorta is successful in all of the subjects. In each of the six studied subjects, flushing with PFD consistently provides dramatically better imaging of the vessel wall tissue structures. OCT image quality is highly dependent on the ability of the flushing modality to remove blood from the imaging field. From this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that endovascular flushing with an oxygen-carrying blood substitute (PFD) is optically superior to saline flushing for intravascular imaging.

  5. Limitations of quantitative photoacoustic measurements of blood oxygenation in small vessels.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Mathangi; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Hao F; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-03-07

    We investigate the feasibility of obtaining accurate quantitative information, such as local blood oxygenation level (sO2), with a spatial resolution of about 50 microm from spectral photoacoustic (PA) measurements. The optical wavelength dependence of the peak values of the PA signals is utilized to obtain the local blood oxygenation level. In our in vitro experimental models, the PA signal amplitude is found to be linearly proportional to the blood optical absorption coefficient when using ultrasonic transducers with central frequencies high enough such that the ultrasonic wavelengths are shorter than the light penetration depth into the blood vessels. For an optical wavelength in the 578-596 nm region, with a transducer central frequency that is above 25 MHz, the sensitivity and accuracy of sO2 inversion is shown to be better than 4%. The effect of the transducer focal position on the accuracy of quantifying blood oxygenation is found to be negligible. In vivo oxygenation measurements of rat skin microvasculature yield results consistent with those from in vitro studies, although factors specific to in vivo measurements, such as the spectral dependence of tissue optical attenuation, dramatically affect the accuracy of sO2 quantification in vivo.

  6. Dynamic monitoring of blood oxygen saturation in vivo using double-ring photoacoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guangzhi; Xing, Da; Yang, Sihua

    2009-07-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) can distinguish oxygenated main chromophores which are hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) in blood by the optical absorption at multiple optical wavelengths. In this study, a noninvasive PA system with a double-ring sensor was used for fixed-point measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) continually. The double-ring sensor is an ultrasonic Fresnel zone plate ultrasonic transducer. It has two-zone negative zone plate piezoelectric material pattern with good focusing effect for fixed-point detection of SO2. Three specific optical absorbed wavelengths (760, 805, and 850 nm) of HbO2 and Hb were employed sequentially to obtain PA signals and calculate the SO2 at each blood oxygen level. The capability and accuracy of the system were tested by phantom samples and in vitro blood samples, and the results of the PA detection were in excellent agreement with the data of the control group by the blood-gas analyzer. In in vivo studies, the SO2 of the artery and the vein in a rabbit ear were noninvasively detected. Furthermore, changes in the SO2 from normal to hypoxia and to hyperoxia due to the changed inhale gas were dynamically recorded by the PA system. The experimental results demonstrate that this PA SO2 measurement system has the potential for fixed-point detection and dynamic monitoring of blood oxygen saturation.

  7. Blood flow regulation and oxygen uptake during high-intensity forearm exercise.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, S K; Berg, O K; Helgerud, J; Wang, E

    2017-04-01

    The vascular strain is very high during heavy handgrip exercise, but the intensity and kinetics to reach peak blood flow, and peak oxygen uptake, are uncertain. We included 9 young (25 ± 2 yr) healthy males to evaluate blood flow and oxygen uptake responses during continuous dynamic handgrip exercise with increasing intensity. Blood flow was measured using Doppler-ultrasound, and venous blood was drawn from a deep forearm vein to determine arteriovenous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) during 6-min bouts of 60, 80, and 100% of maximal work rate (WRmax), respectively. Blood flow and oxygen uptake increased (P < 0.05) from 60%WRmax [557 ± 177(SD) ml/min; 56.0 ± 21.6 ml/min] to 80%WRmax (679 ± 190 ml/min; 70.6 ± 24.8 ml/min), but no change was seen from 80%WRmax to 100%WRmax Blood velocity (49.5 ± 11.5 to 58.1 ± 11.6 cm/s) and brachial diameter (0.49 ± 0.05 to 0.50 ± 0.06 cm) showed concomitant increases (P < 0.05) with blood flow from 60% to 80%WRmax, whereas no differences were observed in a-vO2diff Shear rate also increased (P < 0.05) from 60% (822 ± 196 s(-1)) to 80% (951 ± 234 s(-1)) of WRmax The mean response time (MRT) was slower (P < 0.05) for blood flow (60%WRmax 50 ± 22 s; 80%WRmax 51 ± 20 s; 100%WRmax 51 ± 23 s) than a-vO2diff (60%WRmax 29 ± 9 s; 80%WRmax 29 ± 5 s; 100%WRmax 20 ± 5 s), but not different from oxygen uptake (60%WRmax 44 ± 25 s; 80%WRmax 43 ± 14 s; 100%WRmax 41 ± 32 s). No differences were observed in MRT for blood flow or oxygen uptake with increased exercise intensity. In conclusion, when approaching maximal intensity, oxygen uptake appeared to reach a critical level at ~80% of WRmax and be regulated by blood flow. This implies that high, but not maximal, exercise intensity may be an optimal stimulus for shear stress-induced small muscle mass training adaptations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study evaluated blood flow regulation and oxygen uptake during small muscle mass forearm exercise with high to maximal intensity. Despite

  8. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary.

  9. Cold blood--potassium cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Levinsky, L; Lee, A B; Lee, K C; Tatransky, F; Dockstader, R; Schimert, G

    1980-09-01

    A technique is described for providing myocardial protection utilizing oxygenated blood that is drawn from the pump oxygenator and passed through two disposable cardioplegic cooling coils, which are joined in series and submerged in ice slush. A potassium-containing cardioplegic solution is run into the oxygenated blood at the level of the cooling coils. The amount of blood used in the blood-potassium cardioplegic mixture is controlled using a screw clamp. This method has been used with excellent results in 150 consecutive patients undergoing aortocoronary saphenous vein bypass grafting.

  10. Oxygen-implanted induced formation of oxide layer enhances blood compatibility on titanium for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chiang; Chang, Fang-Mo; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lin, Che-Tong; Peng, Pei-Wen

    2016-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) layers were prepared on a Ti substrate by using oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (oxygen PIII). The surface chemical states, structure, and morphology of the layers were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscope. The mechanical properties, such as the Young's modulus and hardness, of the layers were investigated using nanoindentation testing. The Ti(4+) chemical state was determined to be present on oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, which consisted of nanocrystalline TiO2 with a rutile structure. Compared with Ti substrates, the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces exhibited decreased Young's moduli and hardness. Parameters indicating the blood compatibility of the oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces, including the clotting time and platelet adhesion and activation, were studied in vitro. Clotting time assays indicated that the clotting time of oxygen-PIII-treated surfaces was longer than that of the Ti substrate, which was associated with decreased fibrinogen adsorption. In conclusion, the surface characteristics and the blood compatibility of Ti implants can be modified and improved using oxygen PIII.

  11. Photoacoustic ultrasound spectroscopy for assessing red blood cell aggregation and oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-12-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygenation are important markers for a variety of blood disorders. No current technique is capable of simultaneously measuring aggregation/oxygenation levels noninvasively. We propose using photoacoustic ultrasound spectroscopy (PAUS) for assessing both phenomena. This technique relies on frequency-domain analysis of the PA signals by extracting parameters such as the ultrasound spectral slope and the midband fit. To investigate the effect of hematocrit, aggregation, and oxygenation levels on PAUS parameters, a Monte Carlo-based theoretical model and an experimental protocol using porcine RBCs were developed. The samples were illuminated at 750 and 1064 nm and changes in the PAUS parameters were compared to the oxygen-dependent optical absorption coefficients to assess the oxygenation level. Good agreement between the theoretical and experimental spectral parameters was obtained for the spectral slope of the nonaggregated spectra (˜0.3 dB/MHz). The experimental midband fit increased by ˜5 dB for the largest aggregate size. Based on the analysis of the PA signals, the oxygen saturation level of the most aggregated sample was >20% greater than the nonaggregated sample. The results provide a framework for using PA signals' spectroscopic parameters for monitoring the aggregation and oxygenation levels of RBCs.

  12. Relationship between blood oxygenation and lactate in human skeletal muscle revealed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Luo, Qingming; Ge, Xinfa; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2002-04-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a focus of attention in the research field of biomedical photonics. The concentration of HbO2 in human skeletal muscle has been measured noninvasive NIRS using a portable tissue oximeter continuously when the subjects did incremental exercises on a power bicycle. Blood lactate is one of traditional physical research subjects which is applied most widely. We study blood volume in the tissue of sportsmen when they are subjected by the incremental physical load, simultaneously detecting some parameters such as the heart rate, maximal oxygen absorption and the concentration of blood lactate. As the intensity of exercises was heightened, the concentration of blood lactate and blood volume in tissue increased, while the concentration of HbO2 decreased. Thus the rudimental characteristics of energy consumption and supply during hypoxia and aerobic exercises are investigated. By discovering the relationship between blood lactate in human skeletal muscle and blood oxygenation, a novel approach for measuring blood lactate noninvasively and assessing the sports ability could be provided. Furthermore, it is possible to assess the fatigue state with tissue oximeter to monitor the human sports intensity noninvasively and dynamically.

  13. The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine network optimizes coupling of cerebral blood volume with oxygen demand

    PubMed Central

    Bekar, Lane K; Wei, Helen S; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Given the brain's uniquely high cell density and tissue oxygen levels bordering on hypoxia, the ability to rapidly and precisely match blood flow to constantly changing patterns in neural activity is an essential feature of cerebrovascular regulation. Locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) projections innervate the cerebral vasculature and can mediate vasoconstriction. However, function of the LC-mediated constriction in blood-flow regulation has never been addressed. Here, using intrinsic optical imaging coupled with an anesthesia regimen that only minimally interferes with LC activity, we show that NE enhances spatial and temporal aspects of functional hyperemia in the mouse somatosensory cortex. Increasing NE levels in the cortex using an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist paradoxically reduces the extent of functional hyperemia while enhancing the surround blood-flow reduction. However, the NE-mediated vasoconstriction optimizes spatial and temporal focusing of the hyperemic response resulting in a sixfold decrease in the disparity between blood volume and oxygen demand. In addition, NE-mediated vasoconstriction accelerated redistribution to subsequently active regions, enhancing temporal synchronization of blood delivery. These observations show an important role for NE in optimizing neurovascular coupling. As LC neuron loss is prominent in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, the diminished ability to couple blood volume to oxygen demand may contribute to their pathogenesis. PMID:22872230

  14. The study of synchronization of rhythms of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation during adaptive changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaev, Andrey V.; Sidorov, Victor V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Palmer, Scott G.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Stewart, Neil A.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-02-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems, such as "LAKK-M", allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including blood microcirculatory index (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). Such systems may provide significant information relevant to physiology and clinical medicine. The aim of this research was to use such a system to study the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted with 8 healthy volunteers - 3 females and 5 males of 21-49 years. Each volunteer was subjected to basic 3 minute tests. The volunteers were observed for between 1-4 months each, totalling 422 basic tests. Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the forearm medial surface. Wavelet analysis was used to study rhythmic oscillations in LDF- and TRO-data. Tissue oxygen consumption (from arterial and venal blood oxygen saturation and nutritive flux volume) was calculated for all volunteers during "adaptive changes" as (617+/-123 AU) and (102+/-38 AU) with and without arteriovenous anastomoses (AVAs) respectively. This demonstrates increased consumption compared to normal (495+/-170 AU) and (69+/-40 AU) with and without AVAs respectively. Data analysis demonstrated the emergence of resonance and synchronization of rhythms of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and potentially from psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes suggest increased oxygen consumption resulting from increased microvascular blood flow velocity.

  15. Research report: the effects of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning on myocardial biomarkers of cardioprotection in patients having coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Jeysen, Zivan Yogaratnam; Gerard, Laden; Levant, Guvendik; Cowen, Mike; Cale, Alex; Griffin, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We have previously conducted and reported on the primary endpoint of a clinical study which demonstrated that hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) preconditioning consisting of two 30-minute intervals of 100% oxygen at 2.4 atmospheres absolute (ATA) prior to coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery leads to an improvement in left ventricular stroke work (LVSW) 24 hours following CABG. In that study, 81 patients were randomized to treatment with HBO2 (HBO2; n = 41) or routine treatment (Control Group; n = 40) prior to surgery. The objective of this manuscript is to further report on the result of the exploratory secondary endpoints from that study, specifically the effects of HBO2 preconditioning on biomarkers of myocardial protection. Intraoperative right atrial biopsies were assessed, via an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA), for the expression of eNOS and HSP72. In this study, no significant differences were observed between the groups with respect to the quantity of myocardial eNOS and HSP72. However, in the HBO2 Group, following ischemia and reperfusion, the quantities of myocardial eNOS and HSP72 were increased. This suggests that HBO2 preconditioning in this group of patients may be capable of inducing endogenous cardioprotection following ischemic reperfusion injury (IRI).

  16. [UCP2 and UCP3 gene expression, heart function and oxygen cost of myocardial work changes during aging and ischemia-reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Hoshovs'ka, Iu V; Lisovyĭ, O O; Shymans'ka, T V; Sahach, V F

    2009-01-01

    To examine the effects of ischemia/reperfusion on UCPs genes expression, heart function and oxygen cost of myocardial work, hearts of adult (6 mo) and old (24 mo) rats were perfused by Langendorf preparation and subjected to 20 min ischemia followed by 40 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial permeability transition due to ischemic stimuli was evaluated by release of mitochondrial factor (lambda 250 nm) which was previously shown as a marker of MPTP opening. Expression of UCPs was detected by reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction. Mitochondrial membrane potential (deltaphi(m)) and oxygen consumption in isolated heart mitochondria of adult and old rats were measured. It was shown that impaired function of aging rat hearts was accompanied with an increased oxygen cost of myocardial work and lower mitochondrial membrane potential compared with adult rats. Reperfusion disturbances of cardiodynamic, contractile activity of myocardium and noneffective oxygen utilization in early period of reperfusion were less intensive in aged hearts than in adult ones. Therefore, the levels of mRNA of UCP2 in aging hearts were higher and mRNA levels of UCP3 were tended to increase. At the same time ischemia/reperfusion increased the expression of UCP2 and UCP3 in adult myocardium: mRNA levels of UCPs were significantly higher that those in control, whereas there was no such effect in aging hearts. It is concluded that uncoupling proteins are implicated in the age-depended heart dysfunction and development of the pathological mechanisms during ischemia-reperfusion.

  17. Aging increases the susceptivity of MSCs to reactive oxygen species and impairs their therapeutic potency for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Guo, Yingfei; Zhai, Hongxia; Yin, Yaxin; Zhang, Jinjin; Chen, Haiwei; Wang, Lei; Li, Na; Liu, Runmei; Xia, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) transplantation has been considered a promising therapy. Recently, it was reported that the therapeutic effectiveness of MSCs is dependent on the age of the donor, yet the underlying mechanism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study was designed to investigate whether this impaired therapeutic potency is caused by an increased susceptivity of MSCs from old donors to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The MSCs were isolated from the subcutaneous inguinal region of young (8-10 weeks) and old (18 months) Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. By exposing these MSCs to H2O2, we found that the adhesion of MSCs from old donors was damaged more severely. Specifically, decreased expression of integrin and reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase Src and FAK were observed. Furthemore, H2O2 triggered an increased apoptosis of MSCs from old donors. To study the viability and therapeutic potency of MSCs from young and old donors in vivo, these MSCs were transplanted into acute MI model rats. We observed a more rapidly decreased survival rate of the old MSCs in the infarct region, which may be caused by their increased susceptivity to the micro-environmental ROS, as transplantation of the old MSCs with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, protected them. The low viability of engrafted old MSCs consequently impaired their therapeutic effectiveness, judging by the histology and function of heart. Our study may help to understand the mechanism of MSCs-host interaction during MI, as well as shed light on the design of therapeutic strategy in clinic.

  18. Simultaneous high-resolution pH and spectrophotometric recordings of oxygen binding in blood microvolumes.

    PubMed

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans-O; Mark, Felix C

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen equilibrium curves have been widely used to understand oxygen transport in numerous organisms. A major challenge has been to monitor oxygen binding characteristics and concomitant pH changes as they occur in vivo, in limited sample volumes. Here we report a technique allowing highly resolved and simultaneous monitoring of pH and blood pigment saturation in minute blood volumes. We equipped a gas diffusion chamber with a broad-range fibre-optic spectrophotometer and a micro-pH optode and recorded changes of pigment oxygenation along oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and pH gradients to test the setup. Oxygen binding parameters derived from measurements in only 15 μl of haemolymph from the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris showed low instrumental error (0.93%) and good agreement with published data. Broad-range spectra, each resolving 2048 data points, provided detailed insight into the complex absorbance characteristics of diverse blood types. After consideration of photobleaching and intrinsic fluorescence, pH optodes yielded accurate recordings and resolved a sigmoidal shift of 0.03 pH units in response to changing PO2 from 0 to 21 kPa. Highly resolved continuous recordings along pH gradients conformed to stepwise measurements at low rates of pH changes. In this study we showed that a diffusion chamber upgraded with a broad-range spectrophotometer and an optical pH sensor accurately characterizes oxygen binding with minimal sample consumption and manipulation. We conclude that the modified diffusion chamber is highly suitable for experimental biologists who demand high flexibility, detailed insight into oxygen binding as well as experimental and biological accuracy combined in a single setup.

  19. A three-dimensional single-scan approach for the measurement of changes in cerebral blood volume, blood flow, and blood oxygenation-weighted signals during functional stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Hua, Jun

    2017-02-15

    The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) effect reflects ensemble changes in several physiological parameters such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood flow (CBF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Quantitative BOLD approaches have been developed to estimate CMRO2 dynamics from BOLD, CBF and CBV responses, generally using separate scans. The ability to detect changes in these parameters in a single scan would shorten the total scan time and reduce temporal variations in physiology or neuronal responses. Here, an acquisition strategy, named 3D TRiple-acquisition after Inversion Preparation (3D-TRIP), is demonstrated for 3D acquisition of CBV, CBF, and BOLD signal changes in a single scan by incorporating VASO, FAIR-ASL and T2-prepared BOLD fMRI methods. Using a visual stimulation paradigm, we demonstrate that the activation patterns, relative signal changes, temporal signal-to-noise ratio (tSNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and estimated CMRO2 changes during visual stimulation are all comparable between the concurrent imaging proposed here and the separate scans conventionally applied. This approach is expected to provide a useful alternative for quantitative BOLD fMRI studies where information about oxygen metabolism alterations can be extracted from changes in hemodynamic signals associated with CBV, CBF, and blood oxygenation.

  20. Quantitative assessment of oscillatory components in blood circulation: classification of the effect of aging, diabetes, and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta; Urbancic-Rovan, Vilma; Azman-Juvan, Katja

    2005-04-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a complex system with the pumping activity of the heart as the main generator of oscillations. Besides the heartbeat there are several other oscillatory components which determine its dynamics. Their nonlinear nature and a weak coupling between them both require special treatment while studying this system. A particular characteristic of the oscillatory components is their frequency fluctuations in time. Consequently, their interactions also fluctuate in time. Therefore the wavelet transform is applied to trace the oscillatory components in time, and specific quantitative measures are introduced to quantify the contribution of each of the oscillatory components involved on the time scale of up to three minutes. Oscillatory components are then analysed from signals obtained by simultaneous measurements of blood flow in the microcirculation, ECG, respiration and blood pressure. Based on quantitative evaluation of the oscillatory components related to (I) the heart beat (0.6-2Hz), (II) respiration (0.145-0.6Hz), (III) intrinsic myogenic activity (0.052-0.145Hz), (IV) sympathetic activity (0.021-0.052Hz), (V, VI) endothelial related activity (0.0095-0.021Hz, 0.005 - 0.0095 Hz), 30-minutes recording taken on 109 healthy subjects, 75 patients with diabetes, and 82 patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were analysed. Classification of the effect of ageing, diabetes and AMI from blood flow signals simultaneously recorded in the skin of four extremities, the heart rate and heart rate variability from R-R intervals will be presented and discussed.

  1. Effect of Salvianolic Acid b and Paeonol on Blood Lipid Metabolism and Hemorrheology in Myocardial Ischemia Rabbits Induced by Pituitruin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Wang, Siwang; Xie, Yanhua; Wang, Jianbo; Li, Hua; Zhou, Xuanxuan; Liu, Wenbo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of salvianolic acid b and paeonol on coronary disease. The ischemia myocardial animal model is induced by administering pituitrin (20 μg·kg−1) intravenously via the abdominal vein. A combination of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (CSAP) (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) was administrated to experimental rabbits. Biochemical indices were evaluated during six weeks of intervention. We found that the compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can markedly and dose-dependently reduce fibrinogen and malonaldehyde levels, increase the HDL level, improve blood viscosity and plasma viscosity in rabbits. In addition, the medicine can still reduce the ratio of NO/ET and the contents of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that compound of salvianolic acid b and paeonol (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg BW) can improve the blood hemorrheology, decrease oxidative injury and repair the function of blood vessel endothelium, and subsequently prevent the development of Coronary disease. PMID:21152295

  2. Blood biochemical and cellular changes during a decompression procedure involving eight hours of oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauchem, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and cellular parameters were measured in human subjects before and after exposure to a decompression schedule involving 8 h of oxygen prebreathing. The exposure was designed to simulate space-flight extravehicular activity (EVA) for 6 h. Several statistically significant changes in blood parameters were observed following the exposure: increases in calcium, magnesium, osmolality, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, monocytes, and prothrombin time, and decreases in chloride, creatine phosphokinase and eosinophils. The changes, however, were small in magnitude and blood factor levels remained within normal clinical ranges. Thus, the decompression profile used in this study is not likely to result in blood changes that would pose a threat to astronauts during EVA.

  3. Role of blood-oxygen transport in thermal tolerance of the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Melzner, Frank; Mark, Felix C; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2007-10-01

    Mechanisms that affect thermal tolerance of ectothermic organisms have recently received much interest, mainly due to global warming and climate-change debates in both the public and in the scientific community. In physiological terms, thermal tolerance of several marine ectothermic taxa can be linked to oxygen availability, with capacity limitations in ventilatory and circulatory systems contributing to oxygen limitation at extreme temperatures. The present review briefly summarizes the processes that define thermal tolerance in a model cephalopod organism, the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, with a focus on the contribution of the cephalopod oxygen-carrying blood pigment, hemocyanin. When acutely exposed to either extremely high or low temperatures, cuttlefish display a gradual transition to an anaerobic mode of energy production in key muscle tissues once critical temperatures (T(crit)) are reached. At high temperatures, stagnating metabolic rates and a developing hypoxemia can be correlated with a progressive failure of the circulatory system, well before T(crit) is reached. However, at low temperatures, declining metabolic rates cannot be related to ventilatory or circulatory failure. Rather, we propose a role for hemocyanin functional characteristics as a major limiting factor preventing proper tissue oxygenation. Using information on the oxygen binding characteristics of cephalopod hemocyanins, we argue that high oxygen affinities (= low P(50) values), as found at low temperatures, allow efficient oxygen shuttling only at very low venous oxygen partial pressures. Low venous PO(2)s limit rates of oxygen diffusion into cells, thus eventually causing the observed transition to anaerobic metabolism. On the basis of existing blood physiological, molecular, and crystallographical data, the potential to resolve the role of hemocyanin isoforms in thermal adaptation by an integrated molecular physiological approach is discussed.

  4. Optical methods for correction of oxygen-transport characteristics of blood and their biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Akulich, N. V.; Marochkov, A. V.; Laskina, O. V.; Mit'kovskaya, N. P.

    2010-07-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the spectral characteristics of blood and blood components, gas-exchange and oximetry parameters for venous and arterial blood, central hemodynamic parameters, and the results of a complete blood count and chemistry panel before and after extracorporeal UV irradiation of the blood (UBI, ultraviolet blood irradiation) or intravenous exposure of blood to low-intensity emission from an He-Ne laser (LBI, laser blood irradiation). We have demonstrated the possibility of correcting the oxygentransport characteristics of blood by laser optical methods based on photodissociation of blood oxyhemoglobin. We have shown that the therapeutic effects initiated both by UBI and LBI are based on a single mechanism: a change in the balance between production of active oxygen species and their inhibition by antioxidants. The data obtained are of interest not only for studying the primary (molecular) mechanisms of action for photohemotherapy and their effect on processes occurring in the living body, but also can provide a basis for designing next-generation laser optical instruments and for development of not yet existing methods for assessing the therapeutic efficacy of photohemotherapy.

  5. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring during hyperventilation in healthy volunteers with a novel optoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Deyo, Donald J.; Henkel, Sheryl N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2013-03-01

    Monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation is useful to facilitate management of patients with severe or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt recognition of low cerebral venous oxygenation is a key to avoiding secondary brain injury associated with brain hypoxia. In specialized clinical research centers, jugular venous bulb catheters have been used for cerebral venous oxygenation monitoring and have demonstrated that oxygen saturation < 50% (normal range is 55-75%) correlates with poor clinical outcome. We developed an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation. Recently, we designed and built a novel, medical grade optoacoustic system operating in the near-infrared spectral range for continuous, real-time oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. In this work, we designed and built a novel SSS optoacoustic probe and developed a new algorithm for SSS oxygenation measurement. The SSS signals were measured in healthy volunteers during voluntary hyperventilation, which induced changes in SSS oxygenation. Simultaneously, we measured exhaled carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) using capnography. Good temporal correlation between decreases in optoacoustically measured SSS oxygenation and decreases in EtCO2 was obtained. Decreases in EtCO2 from normal values (35-45 mmHg) to 20-25 mmHg resulted in SSS oxygenation decreases by 3-10%. Intersubject variability of the responses may relate to nonspecific brain activation associated with voluntary hyperventilation. The obtained data demonstrate the capability of the optoacoustic system to detect in real time minor changes in the SSS blood oxygenation.

  6. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  7. EFFECTS OF DOBUTAMINE ON INTESTINAL MICROVASCULAR BLOOD FLOW HETEROGENEITY AND OXYGEN EXTRACTION DURING SEPTIC SHOCK.

    PubMed

    Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo Adolfo; García Marín, Alberto Federico; Echeverri, Gabriel J; Bermúdez, William Fernando; Madriñán Navia, Humberto José; Valencia, Juan David; Quiñones, Edgardo; Rodríguez, Fernando; Marulanda, Angela; Arango Davila, César Augusto; Bruhn, Alejandro; Hernández, Glenn; De Backer, Daniel

    2017-03-23

    Derangements of microvascular blood flow distribution might contribute to disturbing oxygen extraction by peripheral tissues. We evaluated the dynamic relationships between the mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio (mes-ERO2) and the heterogeneity of microvascular blood flow at the gut and sublingual mucosa, during the development and resuscitation of septic shock in a swine model of fecal peritonitis. Jejunal-villi and sublingual microcirculation were evaluated using a portable intravital-microscopy technique. Simultaneously, we obtained arterial, mixed-venous and mesenteric blood gases, and jejunal-tonometric measurements. During resuscitation, pigs were randomly allocated to fixed-dose of dobutamine (5 µgr/kg/min) or placebo, while three sham models with identical monitoring served as controls. At the time-of-shock, we observed a significant decreased proportion of perfused intestinal-villi (villi-PPV) and sublingual percentage of perfused small-vessels (SL-PPV), paralleling an increase in mes-ERO2 in both dobutamine and placebo groups. After starting resuscitation, villi-PPV and SL-PPV significantly increased in the dobutamine group with subsequent improvement of functional capillary density, while mes-ERO2 exhibited a corresponding significant decrease (repeated-measures ANOVA, p=0.02 and p=0.04 for time*group-interactions and inter-group differences for villi-PPV and mes-ERO2, respectively). Variations in villi-PPV were paralleled by variations in mes-ERO2 (R(2)=0.88, p<0.001) and these, in turn, by mesenteric lactate changes (R(2)=0.86, p<0.001). There were no significant differences in cardiac output and systemic oxygen delivery throughout the experiment. In conclusion, dynamic changes in microvascular blood flow heterogeneity at jejunal mucosa are closely related to the mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio, suggesting a crucial role for microvascular blood flow distribution on oxygen uptake during development and resuscitation from septic shock.

  8. Cerebral blood flow and oxygenation in infants after birth asphyxia. Clinically useful information?

    PubMed

    Greisen, Gorm

    2014-10-01

    The term 'luxury perfusion' was coined nearly 50 years ago after observation of bright-red blood in the cerebral veins of adults with various brain pathologies. The bright-red blood represents decreased oxygen extraction and hence the perfusion is 'luxurious' compared to oxygen needs. Gradual loss of cellular energy charge during the hours following severe birth asphyxia was observed twenty years later by sequential cranial magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This led to the concept of delayed energy failure that is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death. Abnormally increased perfusion and lack of normal cerebral blood flow regulation are also typically present, but whether the perfusion abnormalities at this secondary stage are detrimental, beneficial, or a mere epiphenomenon remains elusive. In contrast, incomplete reoxygenation of the brain during and following resuscitation is likely to compromise outcome. The clinical value of cerebral oximetry in this context can only be examined in a randomised clinical trial.

  9. Changes of some blood indices and myocardial electrolyte content during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, B. M.; Krotov, V. P.; Zhuravleva, Y. N.

    1979-01-01

    Using special hypokinetic cages, the volume changes of circulating blood, its hematocrit and protein content, volume ratios between extra- and intracellular liquids in the body, as well as electrolyte content in the blood and myocardium during hypokinesia were investigated experimentally in rabbits.

  10. Noninvasive monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in ovine superior sagittal sinus with novel multi-wavelength optoacoustic system.

    PubMed

    Petrova, I Y; Petrov, Y Y; Esenaliev, R O; Deyo, D J; Cicenaite, I; Prough, D S

    2009-04-27

    Noninvasive monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation with an optoacoustic technique offers advantages over current invasive and noninvasive methods. We report the results of in vivo studies in the sheep superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We changed blood oxygenation by increasing and decreasing the inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO(2)). Optoacoustic measurements from the SSS were performed at wavelengths of 700, 800, and 1064 nm using an optical parametric oscillator as a source of pulsed near-infrared light. Actual oxygenation of SSS blood was measured with a CO-Oximeter in blood samples drawn from the SSS through a small craniotomy. The amplitude of the optoacoustic signal induced in the SSS blood at lambda = 1064 nm closely followed the changes in blood oxygenation, at lambda = 800 nm was almost constant, and at lambda = 700 nm was changing in the opposite direction, all in accordance with the absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin. The optoacoustically predicted oxygenation correlated well with actual blood oxygenation in sheep SSS (R(2) = 0.965 to 0.990). The accuracy was excellent, with a mean difference of 4.8% to 9.3% and a standard deviation of 2.8% to 4.2%. To the best of our knowledge, this paper reports for the first time accurate measurements of cerebral venous blood oxygenation validated against the "gold standard" CO-Oximetry method.

  11. Regional myocardial blood flow and coronary vascular reserve in unanesthetized ponies during pacing-induced ventricular tachycardia

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.; Manohar, M.; Lundeen, G.

    1983-08-01

    To examine the effects of tachycardia on coronary circulation, transmural distribution of myocardial blood flow (MBF, 15-micron diameter radionuclide-labeled microspheres) was studied in six healthy adult ponies at rest (heart rate . 60 +/- 7 beats . min-1), during ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1, as well as with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 before and during maximal coronary vasodilatation (iv adenosine infusion; 4 mumole . kg-1 . min-1). Mean aortic pressure and cardiac output were unchanged from control values with ventricular pacing. Whereas ventricular pacing at 150 and 200 beats . min-1 resulted in a progressive uniform increase in transmural MBF and well-maintained endo:epi perfusion ratio, pacing at 250 beats . min-1 did not result in a further increase in MBF compared to pacing at 200 beats . min-1 and the left ventricular (LV) subendocardial:subepicardial (endo:epi) perfusion ratio was significantly less than 1.00 (0.87 +/- 0.05). Blood flow to the LV papillary muscles and subendocardium was significantly less than that recorded at 200 beats . min-1. The LV endo:epi perfusion ratio with ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 during adenosine infusion resulted in a decrease in mean aortic pressure (63% of control value) and a marked further reduction in blood flow to the LV papillary muscles as well as the LV subendocardium, while MBF increased dramatically in the LV subepicardium compared to values observed during ventricular pacing at 250 beats . min-1 alone. These data demonstrate that coronary vasomotion functions to maintain LV subendocardial blood flow in the pony myocardium at a heart rate of 200 beats . min-1, while at 250 beats . min-1 exhaustion of coronary vasodilator reserve in the deeper layers limits further increase in MBF.

  12. Blood flow and muscle oxygenation during low, moderate, and maximal sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Allen, Matti D; Olympico, Eric; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rice, Charles L

    2015-09-01

    A reduction of blood flow to active muscle will precipitate fatigue, and sustained isometric contractions produce intramuscular and compartmental pressures that can limit flow. The present study explored how blood flow and muscle oxygenation respond to isometric contractions at low, moderate, and maximal intensities. Over two visits, 10 males (26 ± 2 yr; means ± SD) performed 1-min dorsiflexion contractions at 30, 60, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. Doppler ultrasound of the anterior tibial artery was used to record arterial diameter and mean blood velocity and to calculate absolute blood flow. The tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of tibialis anterior was acquired with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). There was a progressive increase in blood flow at 30% MVC (peak of 289 ± 139% resting value), no change from rest until an increase in the final 10 s of exercise at 60% MVC (peak of 197 ± 102% rest), and an initial decrease (59 ± 30% resting value) followed by a progressive increase at 100% MVC (peak of 355 ± 133% rest). Blood flow was greater at 30 and 100% than 60% MVC during the last 30 s of exercise. TOI was ∼63% at rest and, within 30 s of exercise, reached steady-state values of ∼42%, ∼22%, and ∼22% for 30, 60, and 100% MVC, respectively. Even maximal contraction of the dorsiflexors is unable to cause more than a transient decrease of flow in the anterior tibial artery. Unlike dynamic or intermittent isometric exercise, our results indicate blood flow is not linearly graded with intensity or directly coupled with oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions.

  13. Longitudinal in vivo imaging to assess blood flow and oxygenation in implantable engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    White, Sean M; Hingorani, Ryan; Arora, Rajan P S; Hughes, Christopher C W; George, Steven C; Choi, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    The functionality of vascular networks within implanted prevascularized tissues is difficult to assess using traditional analysis techniques, such as histology. This is largely due to the inability to visualize hemodynamics in vivo longitudinally. Therefore, we have developed dynamic imaging methods to measure blood flow and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in implanted prevascularized tissues noninvasively and longitudinally. Using laser speckle imaging, multispectral imaging, and intravital microscopy, we demonstrate that fibrin-based tissue implants anastomose with the host (severe combined immunodeficient mice) in as short as 20 h. Anastomosis results in initial perfusion with highly oxygenated blood, and an increase in average hemoglobin oxygenation of 53%. However, shear rates in the preformed vessels were low (20.8±12.8 s(-1)), and flow did not persist in the vast majority of preformed vessels due to thrombus formation. These findings suggest that designing an appropriate vascular network structure in prevascularized tissues to maintain shear rates above the threshold for thrombosis may be necessary to maintain flow following implantation. We conclude that wide-field and microscopic functional imaging can dynamically assess blood flow and oxygenation in vivo in prevascularized tissues, and can be used to rapidly evaluate and improve prevascularization strategies.

  14. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator.

  15. Bidirectional Control of Blood Flow by Astrocytes: A Role for Tissue Oxygen and Other Metabolic Factors.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Grant R J; Howarth, Clare; MacVicar, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Altering cerebral blood flow through the control of cerebral vessel diameter is critical so that the delivery of molecules important for proper brain functioning is matched to the activity level of neurons. Although the close relationship of brain glia known as astrocytes with cerebral blood vessels has long been recognized, it is only recently that these cells have been demonstrated to translate information on the activity level and energy demands of neurons to the vasculature. In particular, astrocytes respond to elevations in extracellular glutamate as a consequence of synaptic transmission through the activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors. These Gq-protein coupled receptors elevate intracellular calcium via IP3 signaling. A close examination of astrocyte endfeet calcium signals has been shown to cause either vasoconstriction or vasodilation. Common to both vasomotor responses is the generation of arachidonic acid in astrocytes by calcium sensitive phospholipase A2. Vasoconstriction ensues from the conversion of arachidonic acid to 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, while vasodilation ensues from the production of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids or prostaglandins. Factors that determine whether constrictor or dilatory pathways predominate include brain oxygen, lactate, adenosine as well as nitric oxide. Changing the oxygen level itself leads to many downstream changes that facilitate the switch from vasoconstriction at high oxygen to vasodilation at low oxygen. These findings highlight the importance of astrocytes as sensors of neural activity and metabolism to coordinate the delivery of essential nutrients via the blood to the working cells.

  16. Reactivity of retinal blood flow to 100% oxygen breathing after lipopolysaccharide administration in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lasta, Michael; Polska, Elzbieta; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2008-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the retinal vascular reactivity after LPS infusion. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study, 18 healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg LPS or placebo as an intravenous bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4h after LPS/placebo administration. At baseline and at 4h after administration a short period of 100% oxygen inhalation was used to assess retinal vasoreactivity to this stimulus. Perimacular white blood cell velocity, density and flux were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, retinal branch arterial and venous diameters were measured with a retinal vessel analyzer and red blood cell velocity in retinal branch veins was measured with laser Doppler velocimetry. LPS is associated with peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased white blood cell density in ocular microvessels (p<0.001). In addition, retinal arterial (p=0.02) and venous (p<0.01) diameters were increased. All retinal hemodynamic parameters showed a decrease during 100% oxygen breathing. This decrease was significantly blunted by LPS for all retinal outcome parameters except venous diameter (p=0.04 for white blood cell velocity, p=0.0002 for white blood cell density, p<0.0001 for white blood cell flux, p=0.01 for arterial diameter, p=0.02 for red blood cell velocity and p=0.006 for red blood cell flux). These data indicate that LPS-induced inflammation induces vascular dysregulation in the retina. This may provide a link between inflammation and vascular dysregulation. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether this model may be suitable to study inflammation induced vascular dysregulation in the eye.

  17. Investigating the impact of oxygen concentration and blood flow variation on photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for cancer treatment based on the combined action of a photosensitizer, a special wavelength of light, oxygen (3O2) and generation of singlet oxygen (1O2). Intra-patient and inter-patient variability of oxygen concentration ([3O2]) before and after the treatment as well as photosensitizer concentration and hemodynamic parameters such as blood flow during PDT has been reported. Simulation of these variations is valuable, as it would be a means for the rapid assessment of treatment effect. A mathematical model has been previously developed to incorporate the diffusion equation for light transport in tissue and the macroscopic kinetic equations for simulation of [3O2], photosensitizers in ground and triplet states and concentration of the reacted singlet oxygen ([1O2]rx) during PDT. In this study, the finite-element based calculation of the macroscopic kinetic equations is done for 2-(1-Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide (HPPH)-mediated PDT by incorporating the information of the photosensitizer photochemical parameters as well as the tissue optical properties, photosensitizer concentration, initial oxygen concentration ([3O2]0), blood flow changes and ϕ that have been measured in mice bearing radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. Then, [1O2]rx calculated by using the measured [3O2] during the PDT is compared with [1O2]rx calculated based on the simulated [3O2]; both calculations showed a reasonably good agreement. Moreover, the impacts of the blood flow changes and [3O2]0 on [1O2]rx have been investigated, which showed no pronounced effect of the blood flow changes on the long-term 1O2 generation. When [3O2]0 becomes limiting, small changes in [3O2] have large effects on [1O2]rx. PMID:27453622

  18. Investigating the impact of oxygen concentration and blood flow variation on photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for cancer treatment based on the combined action of a photosensitizer, a special wavelength of light, oxygen (3O2) and generation of singlet oxygen (1O2). Intra-patient and inter-patient variability of oxygen concentration ([3O2]) before and after the treatment as well as photosensitizer concentration and hemodynamic parameters such as blood flow during PDT has been reported. Simulation of these variations is valuable, as it would be a means for the rapid assessment of treatment effect. A mathematical model has been previously developed to incorporate the diffusion equation for light transport in tissue and the macroscopic kinetic equations for simulation of [3O2], photosensitizers in ground and triplet states and concentration of the reacted singlet oxygen ([1O₂]rx) during PDT. In this study, the finite-element based calculation of the macroscopic kinetic equations is done for 2-(1- Hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide (HPPH)-mediated PDT by incorporating the information of the photosensitizer photochemical parameters as well as the tissue optical properties, photosensitizer concentration, initial oxygen concentration ([3O2]0), blood flow changes and Φ that have been measured in mice bearing radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors. Then, [1O2]rx calculated by using the measured [3O2] during the PDT is compared with [1O2]rx calculated based on the simulated [3O₂]; both calculations showed a reasonably good agreement. Moreover, the impacts of the blood flow changes and [3O2]0 on [1O2]rx have been investigated, which showed no pronounced effect of the blood flow changes on the long-term 1O2 generation. When [3O2]0 becomes limiting, small changes in [3O₂] have large effects on [1O2]rx.

  19. A retrospective comparison of blood transfusion requirements during cardiopulmonary bypass with two different small adult oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Lahanas, A; Argerakis, P W; Johnson, K A; Burdan, M L; Ozdirik, J E

    2013-11-01

    A low haematocrit during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is associated with adverse outcomes and often results in homologous blood transfusions. Oxygenators with improved venous reservoir designs aid in reducing the priming volume. Recently, we changed our small adult oxygenator model from the D905 EOS oxygenator (Dideco, Mirandola, Italy) to the Capiox FX1540 (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). We conducted a retrospective study of 42 patents to evaluate the impact of the Capiox FX 1540 on blood transfusion requirements in small patients (body surface area (BSA) up to 1.8 m(2)). The D905 EOS group had a lower minimum intraoperative haematocrit than the FX1540 group (20 ± 3 v 22 ± 4, p = 0.029) with 73% of the patients receiving intraoperative blood transfusions compared with 30% in the FX 1540 group (p = 0.012). Patients in the D905 EOS group received one blood transfusion more during CPB than the FX 1540 patients (p = 0.002). The haematocrits at the end of CPB and in the early postoperative period were identical in both groups. The postoperative ventilation time, length of stay in the intensive care unit and postoperative chest drain bleeding were similar in both groups. In conclusion, the Capiox FX1540 was effective in reducing intraoperative packed red cell transfusions.

  20. Regulation of Coronary Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Dick, Gregory M; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2017-03-16

    The heart is uniquely responsible for providing its own blood supply through the coronary circulation. Regulation of coronary blood flow is quite complex and, after over 100 years of dedicated research, is understood to be dictated through multiple mechanisms that include extravascular compressive forces (tissue pressure), coronary perfusion pressure, myogenic, local metabolic, endothelial as well as neural and hormonal influences. While each of these determinants can have profound influence over myocardial perfusion, largely through effects on end-effector ion channels, these mechanisms collectively modulate coronary vascular resistance and act to ensure that the myocardial requirements for oxygen and substrates are adequately provided by the coronary circulation. The purpose of this series of Comprehensive Physiology is to highlight current knowledge regarding the physiologic regulation of coronary blood flow, with emphasis on functional anatomy and the interplay between the physical and biological determinants of myocardial oxygen delivery. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:321-382, 2017.

  1. Hemoglobin-based blood substitutes: oxygen carriers, pressor agents, or oxidants?

    PubMed

    Alayash, A I

    1999-06-01

    Hemoglobin-based blood substitutes are being developed as oxygen-carrying agents for the prevention of ischemic tissue damage and hypovolemic (low blood volume) shock. The ability of cell-free hemoglobin blood substitutes to affect vascular tone through the removal of nitric oxide has also prompted an evaluation of their usefulness for maintaining blood pressure in critically ill patients. Before the clinical potential of these substitutes can be fully realized, however, concerns remain as to the intrinsic toxicity of the hemoglobin molecule, particularly the interference of the heme prosthetic group with the tissue oxidant/antioxidant balance. This review provides some insights into the complex redox chemistry of hemoglobin and places an emphasis on how current knowledge may be exploited both to selectively enhance/suppress specific chemical reaction pathway(s) and to ultimately design safer hemoglobin-based therapeutics.

  2. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, P.; Kuhl, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step towards simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size. PMID:26583449

  3. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.

  4. The oxygen status of the arterial blood in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Tulli, G; Vignali, G; Guadagnucci, A; Mondello, V

    1990-01-01

    In Critical Care medicine the concepts of Oxygen Delivery, Oxygen Consumption and Tissue Oxygenation have become fundamental in clinical practice but measurements of Oxygen Content and O2 Transport variables require invasive procedures that could be dangerous for critically ill patients and trigger a septic process. Derived indices obtained combining data from a Blood Gas Analyzer with the data from a multi-wavelength spectrophotometer and using the Ole Siggaard-Andersen pH/Blood Gas computerised algorithm might be the non-invasive answer. On 115 arterial blood samples from critically ill patients, we measured pH, pCO2, pO2, oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin concentration and fractions of carboxy- and methemoglobin. The new algorithm was used to calculate: active hemoglobin concentration, total oxygen concentration, actual half-saturation tension, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration, estimated functional shunt, uncompensated mixed venous pO2 (assuming an arterio-venous oxygen difference of 2.3 mmol/L based on a standard oxygen consumption of 11.2 mmol/min and a standard cardiac output of 4.9 L/min) and the cardiac oxygen compensation factor. In Intensive Care all the oxygen parameters may be determined with sufficient accuracy and precision provided the oxygen saturation level is less than 0.97 and provided the definition of oxygen saturation is properly settled and measurements are performed according to the highest state of the art. However, in critically ill patients in evolution our aim is to maintain an 'optimal' paO2 on the plateau of the Oxygen Dissociation Curve (ODC) and the use of mechanical ventilation, high FIO2, fluid challenges and the rapid improvement of the patient's conditions can cause a value for sO2 greater than or less than 0.97 and an improvement or worsening of the paO2. The p50 calculation both in simultaneously drawn arterial and venous blood permits utilisation of derived indices (pO2uv-, CQ) for sO2 greater than 0.97. The Ole Siggaard

  5. Blood oxygen depletion during rest-associated apneas of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Stockard, T K; Levenson, D H; Berg, L; Fransioli, J R; Baranov, E A; Ponganis, P J

    2007-08-01

    Blood gases (P(O)2, P(CO)2, pH), oxygen content, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were measured during rest-associated apneas of nine juvenile northern elephant seals. In conjunction with blood volume determinations, these data were used to determine total blood oxygen stores, the rate and magnitude of blood O(2) depletion, the contribution of the blood O(2) store to apneic metabolic rate, and the degree of hypoxemia that occurs during these breath-holds. Mean body mass was 66+/-9.7 kg (+/- s.d.); blood volume was 196+/-20 ml kg(-1); and hemoglobin concentration was 23.5+/-1.5 g dl(-1). Rest apneas ranged in duration from 3.1 to 10.9 min. Arterial P(O)2 declined exponentially during apnea, ranging between a maximum of 108 mmHg and a minimum of 18 mmHg after a 9.1 min breath-hold. Venous P(O)2 values were indistinguishable from arterial values after the first minute of apnea; the lowest venous P(O)2 recorded was 15 mmHg after a 7.8 min apnea. O(2) contents were also similar between the arterial and venous systems, declining linearly at rates of 2.3 and 2.0 ml O(2) dl(-1) min(-1), respectively, from mean initial values of 27.2 and 26.0 ml O(2) dl(-1). These blood O(2) depletion rates are approximately twice the reported values during forced submersion and are consistent with maintenance of previously measured high cardiac outputs during rest-associated breath-holds. During a typical 7-min apnea, seals consumed, on average, 56% of the initial blood O(2) store of 52 ml O(2) kg(-1); this contributed 4.2 ml O(2) kg(-1) min(-1) to total body metabolic rate during the breath-hold. Extreme hypoxemic tolerance in these seals was demonstrated by arterial P(O)2 values during late apnea that were less than human thresholds for shallow-water blackout. Despite such low P(O)2s, there was no evidence of significant anaerobic metabolism, as changes in blood pH were minimal and attributable to increased P(CO)2. These findings and the previously reported lack of lactate

  6. [Instant effect of temperature on the oxygen carrying capacity of single living intact red blood cell].

    PubMed

    Yao, Cheng-can; Li, Xiao-kun; Huang, Yao-xiong

    2005-04-01

    The instant effect of temperature on the absorption spectra of the hemoglobin in single living intact red blood cells was investigated, by employing a highly sensitive fast multi-channel micro-spectrophotometer system to perform non-invasive, in situ, real time measurements on the cells. It was found that both the heights and position of the specific peaks in the absorption spectra of intercellular hemoglobin were changed with temperature, indicating that the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells varies with temperature. The correlations of the structure and concentration as well as the function of hemoglobin, and the molecular mechanism were also discussed.

  7. Energetic atomic and ionic oxygen textured optical surfaces for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  8. Eigenspectra optoacoustic tomography achieves quantitative blood oxygenation imaging deep in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Olefir, Ivan; Stangl, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Glasl, Sarah; Bayer, Christine; Multhoff, Gabriele; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-06-01

    Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Spectral corruption has limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic spectroscopic methods, and impeded the goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical goal for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. Here we describe light fluence in the spectral domain and introduce eigenspectra multispectral optoacoustic tomography (eMSOT) to account for wavelength-dependent light attenuation, and estimate blood sO2 within deep tissue. We validate eMSOT in simulations, phantoms and animal measurements and spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumours, validating our measurements with histology data. eMSOT shows substantial sO2 accuracy enhancement over previous optoacoustic methods, potentially serving as a valuable tool for imaging tissue pathophysiology.

  9. High Levels of Residue within Polymeric Hollow Fiber Membranes Used for Blood Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Joseph V; Grulke, Eric A; Zwischenberger, Joseph B

    A number of research teams are developing surface coatings for hollow fiber membrane (HFM) blood oxygenators to improve their biocompatibility and service life. Surface coating techniques can be quite sensitive to the presence of contaminants on the exterior surface of the hollow fibers. We found large amounts of leachable oils associated with several commercial HFMs, i.e., as much as 2.5-7.5 weight percent. Leachable residues were suspected when a surface coating, a surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate, resulted in areas of 100 µm devoid of coatings on the exterior surfaces of HFMs. After leaching residual oils, s-ATRP coatings were uniform and continuous across the hollow fibers. Therefore, removal of residual material should be considered before applying coating technologies to commercial HFMs. The effects of such leachable agents on the performance of blood oxygenators are not known.

  10. Evaluation of blood oxygen saturation in vivo from diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2001-10-01

    A simple method to evaluate the hemoglobin oxygen saturation and relative hemoglobin concentration in a tissue from diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible wavelength range is put forward in this paper. It was assumed that while oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin contributions to light attenuation are strongly variable functions of wavelength, all other contributions to the attenuation including scattering are smooth wavelength functions and can be approximated by Taylor series expansion. Based on this assumption, a simple, robust algorithm suitable for real time monitoring of the hemoglobin oxygen saturation in the tissue has been derived. This algorithm can be used with different fiber probe configurations for delivering and collecting light passed through the tissue. An experimental technique using this algorithm has been developed for in vivo monitoring during artery occlusion and in vitro monitoring of blood samples. The experimental results obtained are presented in the paper.

  11. [Cerebral blood flow and oxygen extraction in lacunar hemiplegia. Semi-quantitative study using oxygen 15 and emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Rougemont, D; Baron, J C; Lebrun-Grandie, P; Bousser, M G; Cabanis, E; Laplane, D

    1983-01-01

    The oxygen 15 non invasive continuous inhalation technique coupled with positron emission tomography (P.E.T.) allows the local study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism. Recent P.E.T. studies have demonstrated the frequent occurrence of widespread metabolic depression remote from the site of middle cerebral artery territory infarct per se, especially over the cortical mantle and thalamus ipsilaterally, and over the cerebellar hemisphere contralaterally. These phenomena have been taken as indicative of transneural depression (i.e. diaschisis). We thought it interesting to study the possible occurrence of such abnormalities in patients with lacunar syndromes. We have applied the (15)0 technique to six patients (2 with pure motor hemiplegia, 4 with ataxic hemiparesis) for whom no large causal ischemic lesion could be demonstrated on CT scans; in only one patient was a lacunar lesion, presumably responsible for the clinical deficit demonstrated. Compared to a set of 19 patients without brain disease, the semi-quantitative results (analyzed in terms of asymmetry indices between homologous brain regions) in our patients did not disclose any pathophysiologically significant abnormality. More specifically, no evidence of physiological dysfunction similar to that reported in internal carotid artery territory infarcts, was detected over the cerebral or cerebellar cortices. These findings are commented upon in view of the presumably small size and the uncertain topography of the causal lesion.

  12. Blood Flow and Oxygen Transport Past an Elliptical Fiber in an Artificial Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald; Bartlett, Robert; Grotberg, James

    2007-11-01

    Artificial lungs are currently being developed to serve as bridges to lung transplantation with circular fibers, which are permeable to oxygen, used as the transport surface. Blood flows across the fibers while oxygen flows through the fiber lumen. The present work investigates the novel approach of using elliptical fibers as the transport medium. Steady blood flow, modeled as a Casson fluid, and oxygen transport over a single fiber are investigated for varying elliptic aspect ratios (Ar=minor radius/major radius) and orientations to flow (φ). The parameters investigated are Re = 1, 5, 10; Ar = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1; φ= 0^o, 15^o, 30^o, 45^o, 60^o, 75^o, 90^o; and Sc = 1000. The Casson properties of blood decrease the size and strength of recirculation(s) which when present are attached to the downstream side of the fiber. A maximum decrease of 24% in drag and an increase of 10% in transport are observed for Re = 5, Ar = 0.25 and φ= 0^o as compared to the circular fiber. The elliptic properties can thus aid in the design of artificial lungs.

  13. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing (‘clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23  to 37 mm Hg (30±7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54±24% versus 34±26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6±28% and 83.4±38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  14. Acrolein-Induced Increases in Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Are Coupled with Decreased Blood Oxygen Levels During Exposure in Hypertensive Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in individuals with pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Recent studies link exposure to air pollution with reduced blood oxygen saturation suggesting that hypoxia is a potential me...

  15. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kihara, Mikihiro; Schmelzer, J.D.; Poduslo, J.F.; Curran, G.L.; Nickander, K.K.; Low, P.A. )

    1991-07-15

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, the authors examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG, group II received STZ plus AG, group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. They monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. They suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  16. A novel method of combining blood oxygenation and blood flow sensitive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to measure the cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism responses to an unknown neural stimulus.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aaron B; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Wong, Eric C; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous implementation of magnetic resonance imaging methods for Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) imaging makes it possible to quantitatively measure the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)) that occur in response to neural stimuli. To date, however, the range of neural stimuli amenable to quantitative analysis is limited to those that may be presented in a simple block or event related design such that measurements may be repeated and averaged to improve precision. Here we examined the feasibility of using the relationship between cerebral blood flow and the BOLD signal to improve dynamic estimates of blood flow fluctuations as well as to estimate metabolic-hemodynamic coupling under conditions where a stimulus pattern is unknown. We found that by combining the information contained in simultaneously acquired BOLD and ASL signals through a method we term BOLD Constrained Perfusion (BCP) estimation, we could significantly improve the precision of our estimates of the hemodynamic response to a visual stimulus and, under the conditions of a calibrated BOLD experiment, accurately determine the ratio of the oxygen metabolic response to the hemodynamic response. Importantly we were able to accomplish this without utilizing a priori knowledge of the temporal nature of the neural stimulus, suggesting that BOLD Constrained Perfusion estimation may make it feasible to quantitatively study the cerebral metabolic and hemodynamic responses to more natural stimuli that cannot be easily repeated or averaged.

  17. Carotid intima media thickness and blood biomarkers of atherosclerosis in patients after stroke or myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kurkowska-Jastrzębska, Iwona; Karliński, Michał A.; Błażejewska-Hyżorek, Beata; Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona; Filipiak, Krzysztof J.; Członkowska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Aim To test if circulating levels of markers of inflammation, endothelial function, and chronic infections, as well as association between these markers and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), depend on the stage of atherosclerosis expressed as a history of a major vascular event. Methods The associations were analyzed separately in 75 healthy controls, 79 patients 3-6 months after the first-ever non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke (IS), and 37 patients 3-6 months after the first-ever myocardial infarction (MI). Data were collected prospectively in 2005. We measured high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), procalcitonin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), serum level of immune complexes (IC), and identified antibodies against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV), Cytomegalovirus, Chlamydia pneumonia, and Helicobacter pylori. Correlations with CIMT were determined using Pearson R and verified after adjustment for age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, and statin therapy. Results Median ICAM-1 concentration was significantly lower in controls than in post-IS patients (188 μg/L vs 215 μg/L), and significantly lower in post-IS patients than in post-MI patients (215 μg/L vs 260 μg/L). Control patients also had significantly lower IC level (0.03 U/L) and HSV antibody index (6.0) compared to both post-IS (0.6 U/L, 9.6) and post-MI (0.4 U/L, 9.2) patients. CIMT was correlated with age (Pearson R = 0.38, P = 0.001) in the control group, immune complexes (R = 0.26, P = 0.023) in the post-IS group, and with hs-CRP (R = 0.40, P = 0.017) in the post-MI group. These correlations were confirmed using multiple regression analysis. Conclusions Our study supports linear correlations between CIMT and IC and hs-CRP levels. However, these associations seem to depend on the type of vascular burden. PMID:28051279

  18. An upgraded camera-based imaging system for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Xiao; Qiu, Lina; Leotta, Daniel F.

    2016-07-01

    A camera-based imaging system was previously developed for mapping venous blood oxygenation in human skin. However, several limitations were realized in later applications, which could lead to either significant bias in the estimated oxygen saturation value or poor spatial resolution in the map of the oxygen saturation. To overcome these issues, an upgraded system was developed using improved modeling and image processing algorithms. In the modeling, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was used to verify the effectiveness of the ratio-to-ratio method for semi-infinite and two-layer skin models, and then the relationship between the venous oxygen saturation and the ratio-to-ratio was determined. The improved image processing algorithms included surface curvature correction and motion compensation. The curvature correction is necessary when the imaged skin surface is uneven. The motion compensation is critical for the imaging system because surface motion is inevitable when the venous volume alteration is induced by cuff inflation. In addition to the modeling and image processing algorithms in the upgraded system, a ring light guide was used to achieve perpendicular and uniform incidence of light. Cross-polarization detection was also adopted to suppress surface specular reflection. The upgraded system was applied to mapping of venous oxygen saturation in the palm, opisthenar and forearm of human subjects. The spatial resolution of the oxygenation map achieved is much better than that of the original system. In addition, the mean values of the venous oxygen saturation for the three locations were verified with a commercial near-infrared spectroscopy system and were consistent with previously published data.

  19. Neonatal oxidative stress depends on oxygen blood pressure in umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Proietti, F; De Bernardo, G; Longini, M; Sordino, D; Scaramuzzini, G; Tataranno, M L; Belvisi, E; Bazzini, F; Perrone, S; Buonocore, G

    2016-01-01

    With advancing gestation, partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and pH fall significantly. Hypoxia is a main factor inducing free radical generation and thereby oxidative stress (OS). Placental and fetal tissue response when oxygen becomes restricted is complex and partially known. We tested the hypothesis that changes in umbilical artery and vein blood gas concentrations modulate OS occurrence in the newborn. Seventy umbilical artery and vein plasma samples were collected from healthy term newborns immediately after delivery. F2 Isoprostanes (F2-Isop) were measured in all samples as reliable markers of lipid peroxidation. Significantly lower pCO2 and higher pO2 and pH were found in umbilical vein than in artery, as expected. A positive correlation was detected between pH and pO2 only in umbilical artery (p=0.019). F2-Isop levels were no different between artery and vein in cord blood. Significant correlations were found between F2-Isop and pCO2 (p=0.025) as well as between F2-Isop and pH in umbilical vein (p=0.027). F2-Isop correlated with pCO2 (p=0.007) as well as with pO2 values (p=0.005) in umbilical artery blood. Oxidative stress (OS) in newborns depends on oxygen concentrations in umbilical artery. OS biomarkers significantly correlate with pO2 and in umbilical artery but not in umbilical vein. In normoxic conditions fetal-maternal gas exchanges occurring in placenta re-establish normal higher oxygen levels in umbilical vein than artery, with a normal production of free radicals without any deleterious effects.

  20. Kinetics of /sup 13/N-ammonia uptake in myocardial single cells indicating potential limitations in its applicability as a marker of myocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, B.; Helus, F.; Grunze, M.; Braunwell, E.; Mall, G.; Hasselbach, W.; Kuebler, W.

    1985-02-01

    To study kinetics and principles of cellular uptake of /sup 13/N-ammonia, a marker of coronary perfusion in myocardial scintigraphy, heart muscle cells of adult rats were isolated by perfusion with collagenase and hyaluronidase. Net uptake of /sup 13/N, measured by flow dialysis, reached equilibrium within 20 sec in the presence of sodium bicarbonate and carbon dioxide (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C). Total extraction, 80 sec after the reaction start, was 786 +/- 159 mumol/ml cell volume. Cells destroyed by calcium overload were unable to extract /sup 13/N-ammonia. Omission of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide reduced total extraction to 36% of control. /sup 13/N-Ammonia uptake could also be reduced by 50 muM 4,4' diisothiocyanostilbene 2,2' disulfonic acid, by 100 micrograms/ml 1-methionine sulfoximine, and by preincubation with 5 muM free oleic acid. These results indicate that in addition to metabolic trapping by glutamine synthetase, the extraction of /sup 13/N-ammonia by myocardial cells is influenced by cell membrane integrity, intracellular-extracellular pH gradient, and possibly an anion exchange system for bicarbonate. For this reason, the uptake of /sup 13/N-ammonia may not always provide a valid measurement of myocardial perfusion.

  1. Human cord blood cells and myocardial infarction: effect of dose and route of administration on infarct size.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Burgos, Jose D; Vasko, Mark; Alvarado, Felipe; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Morgan, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal dose of stem cells or the optimal route of administration for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Bone marrow cells, containing hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, in doses of 0.5 x 10(6) to >30 x 10(6) have been directly injected into the myocardium or into coronary arteries or infused intravenously in subjects with myocardial infarctions to reduce infarct size and improve heart function. Therefore, we determined the specific effects of different doses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, on infarct size. In order to determine the optimal technique for stem cell administration, HUCBC were injected directly into the myocardium (IM), or into the LV cavity with the ascending aorta transiently clamped to facilitate coronary artery perfusion (IA), or injected intravenously (IV) in rats 1-2 h after the left anterior coronary artery was permanently ligated. Immune suppressive therapy was not given to any rat. One month later, the infarct size in control rat hearts treated with only Isolyte averaged 23.7 +/- 1.7% of the LV muscle area. Intramyocardial injection of HUCBC reduced the infarct size by 71% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 93% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in comparison with the controls (p < 0.001). Intracoronary injection reduced the infarction size by 47% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 80% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC (p < 0.001), and IV HUCBC reduced infarct size by 51% with 0.5 x 10(6) and by 75-77% with 16-32 million HUCBC (p < 0.001) in comparison with control hearts. With 4 x 10(6) HUCBC, infarction size was 65% smaller with IM HUCBC than with IA HUCBC and 78% smaller than with IV HUCBC (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, IM, IA, and IV HUCBC all produced significant reductions in infarct size in comparison with Isolyte-treated infarcted hearts without requirements for host immune suppression. The present experiments demonstrate that the optimal dose

  2. Tissue blood flow and oxygen consumption measured with near-infrared frequency-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunescu, Lelia Adelina

    2001-12-01

    For decades, researchers have contributed with new ways of applying physics' principles to medicine. Moreover, researchers were involved in developing new, non-invasive instrumentation for medical applications. Recently, application of optical techniques in biology and medicine became an important field. Researchers found a non- invasive approach of using visible and near-infrared light as a probe for tissue investigation. Optical methods can contribute to medicine by offering the possibility of rapid, low-resolution, functional images and real-time devices. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a useful technique for the investigation of biological tissues because of the relatively low absorption of water and high absorption of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in the near- infrared region of 750-900 nm. Due to these properties, the near-infrared light can penetrate biological tissues in the range of 0.5-2 cm, offering investigation possibility of deep tissues and differentiate among healthy and diseased tissues. This work represents the initial steps towards understanding and improving of the promising near- infrared frequency-domain technique. This instrument has a very important advantage: it can be used non-invasively to investigate many parts of the human body, including the brain. My research consists primarily of in vivo measurements of optical parameters such as absorption and reduced scattering coefficients and consequently, blood parameters such as oxy, deoxy, and total hemoglobin concentrations, tissue oxygen saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption of skeletal muscle of healthy and diseased subjects. This research gives a solid background towards a ready- to-use instrument that can continuously, in real-time, measure blood parameters and especially blood oxygenation. This is a very important information in emergency medicine, for persons under intensive care, or undergoing surgery, organ transplant or other interventions.

  3. Microvascular experimental evidence on the relative significance of restoring oxygen carrying capacity vs. blood viscosity in shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y; Wettstein, Reto; Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2008-10-01

    The development of volume replacement fluids for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock comprises oxygen carrying and non carrying fluids. Non oxygen carrying fluids or plasma expanders are used up to the transfusion trigger, and upon reaching this landmark either blood, and possibly in the near future oxygen carrying blood substitutes, are used. An experimental program in hemorrhagic shock using the hamster chamber window model allowed to compare the relative performance of most fluids proposed for shock resuscitation. This model allows investigating simultaneously the microcirculation and systemic reactions, in the awake condition, in a tissue isolated from the environment. Results from this program show that in general plasma expanders such as Ringer's lactate and dextran 70 kDa do not sufficiently restore blood viscosity upon reaching the transfusion trigger, causing microvascular collapse. This is in part restored by a blood transfusion, independently of the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. These results lead to the proposal that effective blood substitutes must be designed to prevent microvascular collapse, manifested in the decrease of functional capillary density. Achievement of this goal, in combination with the increase of oxygen affinity, significantly postpones the need for a blood transfusion, and lowers the total requirement of restoration of intrinsic oxygen carrying capacity.

  4. Microvascular experimental evidence on the relative significance of restoring oxygen carrying capacity vs. blood viscosity in shock resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Wettstein, Reto; Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Summary The development of volume replacement fluids for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock comprises oxygen carrying and non carrying fluids. Non oxygen carrying fluids or plasma expanders are used up to the transfusion trigger, and upon reaching this landmark either blood, and possibly in the near future oxygen carrying blood substitutes, are used. An experimental program in hemorrhagic shock using the hamster chamber window model allowed to compare the relative performance of most fluids proposed for shock resuscitation. This model allows investigating simultaneously the microcirculation and systemic reactions, in the awake condition, in a tissue isolated from the environment. Results from this program show that in general plasma expanders such as Ringer’s lactate and dextran 70 kDa do not sufficiently restore blood viscosity upon reaching the transfusion trigger, causing microvascular collapse. This is in part restored by a blood transfusion, independently of the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. These results lead to the proposal that effective blood substitutes must be designed to prevent microvascular collapse, manifested in the decrease of functional capillary density. Achievement of this goal, in combination with the increase of oxygen affinity, significantly postpones the need for a blood transfusion, and lowers the total requirement of restoration of intrinsic oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:18502215

  5. From blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals to brain temperature maps.

    PubMed

    Sotero, Roberto C; Iturria-Medina, Yasser

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical framework is presented for converting Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) images to brain temperature maps, based on the idea that disproportional local changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) as compared with cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO₂) during functional brain activity, lead to both brain temperature changes and the BOLD effect. Using an oxygen limitation model and a BOLD signal model, we obtain a transcendental equation relating CBF and CMRO₂ changes with the corresponding BOLD signal, which is solved in terms of the Lambert W function. Inserting this result in the dynamic bioheat equation describing the rate of temperature changes in the brain, we obtain a nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that depends on the BOLD response, which is solved numerically for each brain voxel. Temperature maps obtained from a real BOLD dataset registered in an attention to visual motion experiment were calculated, obtaining temperature variations in the range: (-0.15, 0.1) which is consistent with experimental results. The statistical analysis revealed that significant temperature activations have a similar distribution pattern than BOLD activations. An interesting difference was the activation of the precuneus in temperature maps, a region involved in visuospatial processing, an effect that was not observed on BOLD maps. Furthermore, temperature maps were more localized to gray matter regions than the original BOLD maps, showing less activated voxels in white matter and cerebrospinal fluid.

  6. Spatial mapping of blood flow and oxygen consumption in the human calf muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio; Hoimes, Matthew L.; Casavola, Claudia; Franceschini, Maria-Angela

    2001-05-01

    We have designed a new optical probe to perform spatially resolved measurements of blood flow and oxygen consumption over an area of about 4 x 4 cm2 of the lateral gastrocnemius muscle (calf muscle) of human subjects. The blood flow and the oxygen consumption were measured non- invasively with frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy from the maximum rate of increase of the oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin concentrations in the muscle during venous occlusion. In a preliminary test on one subject, involving measurements at rest and after exercise, we have found that the spatial variability of the measured blood flow and oxygen consumption is significantly greater than the variability of repeated measurements at a given tissue location. We have also observed a strong spatial dependence of the exercise-induced increase in blood flow and oxygen consumption.

  7. Influence of blood donation on oxygen uptake kinetics during moderate and heavy intensity cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D; Marshall, K; Connell, A; Barnes, R J

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a reduced whole body blood volume on the kinetic response of VO(2) during moderate and heavy intensity exercise. Six males and four females (age, 21+/-2 yrs; height, 175.2+/-5.1 cm; weight, 66.4+/-2.8 kg; VO(2)max, 53.0+/-4.1 ml x kg (-1) x min(-1)), completed a square-wave cycling ramp test to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and VO(2max). Kinetics trials were completed 24 h pre and post donation of 450 cm (3) of blood. The kinetics trials were moderate intensity (80%VT) and heavy intensity (Delta50% VT - VO(2max)). Breath-by-breath gas exchange, heart rate, blood pressure, haemoglobin O(2) saturation, and blood [lactate] were measured throughout the trials. Post-donation haemoglobin, haematocrit and erythrocyte count were all significantly reduced (pBlood donation caused a significant increase in resting heart rate (Por= 0.05), or in the amplitude of the slow component. The capacity of the cardiovascular system to meet the metabolic demands of skeletal muscle at the onset of exercise does not limit the oxygen uptake.

  8. Nitric oxide added to the sweep gas infusion reduces local clotting formation in adult blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Tevaearai, H T; Mueller, X M; Tepic, S; Cotting, J; Boone, Y; Montavon, P M; von Segesser, L K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. We analyzed the effect of direct infusion of NO into adult blood oxygenators on local clot formation. Nonheparinized calves in a control group (n = 3) and NO group (n = 4) were connected to a jugulocarotid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; centrifugal pump) for 6 hours. The venous line and pumphead were heparin coated, whereas the oxygenator, the heat exchanger, and the arterial line were not. A total of 80 ppm of NO was mixed with the sweep gas infusion in the NO group. The pressure gradient through the oxygenator (deltaP.Ox.) was monitored, and its evolution was compared between groups. Oxygenators membranes were analyzed and photographed, allowing for calculation of the percentage of surface area covered with clots by using a computer image analysis program. The deltaP.Ox. reached a plateau of 193 +/- 26% of the basal value in the NO group after 120 minutes, whereas a similar plateau of 202 +/- 22% was reached after only 20 minutes in the control group (p < 0.05). The surface area of the oxygenator covered with clots was significantly reduced in the NO group (0.54 +/- 0.41%) compared with the control group (5.78 +/- 3.80%, p < 0.05). However, general coagulation parameters were not modified by local NO administration. The activated coagulation time remained stable between 110 and 150 seconds in both groups (p = not significant [ns]), and there were no differences in hematocrit, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen between groups during the 6 hours of CPB. Thus, the mixed infusion of a continuous low dose of NO into adult oxygenators during prolonged CPB prevented local clot formation, whereas the general coagulation pattern remained unchanged.

  9. Increase in pulmonary blood flow at birth: role of oxygen and lung aeration.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; te Pas, Arjan B; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-03-01

    Lung aeration stimulates the increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, but the spatial relationships between PBF and lung aeration and the role of increased oxygenation remain unclear. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography, we have investigated the separate roles of lung aeration and increased oxygenation in PBF changes at birth using near-term (30 days of gestation) rabbit kits (n = 18). Rabbits were imaged before ventilation, then the right lung was ventilated with 100% nitrogen (N2), air or 100% O2 (oxygen), before all kits were switched to ventilation in air, followed by ventilation of both lungs using air. Unilateral ventilation of the right lung with 100% N2 significantly increased heart rate (from 69.4 ± 4.9 to 93.0 ± 15.0 bpm), the diameters of both left and right pulmonary axial arteries, number of visible vessels in both left and right lungs, relative PBF index in both pulmonary arteries, and reduced bolus transit time for both left and right axial arteries (from 1.34 ± 0.39 and 1.81 ± 0.43 s to 0.52 ± 0.17 and 0.89 ± 0.21 s in the left and right axial arteries, respectively). Similar changes were observed with 100% oxygen, but increases in visible vessel number and vessel diameter of the axial arteries were greater in the ventilated right lung during unilateral ventilation. These findings confirm that PBF increase at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration and that the increase in PBF to unventilated regions is unrelated to oxygenation, although oxygen can potentiate this increase.

  10. Significance of affinity and cooperativity in oxygen binding to hemoglobin of horse fetal and maternal blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Kobayashi, Keiko; Sasagawa, Keisuke; Imai, Kiyohiro; Kobayashi, Michiyori

    2003-09-01

    The physiological significance of the position and shape of the oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) of horse hemoglobin (Hb) is considered from the viewpoint of oxygen (O2) transport efficiency and the effectiveness of the Bohr effect. In horse fetal and maternal bloods, their physiological O2 affinities are nearly optimized with respect to the effectiveness of the Bohr shift occurring at the O2 release site, when it is measured by the change in O2 saturation per unit change in P50. With relatively low cooperativity (n=2.69) of horse Hb under physiological conditions, the effectiveness of the Bohr shift for fetal blood at O2 uptake site and maternal blood at O2 release site is high. These facts imply that the position and the cooperativity of horse Hb OEC are optimized to receive maximal benefit from the double Bohr shift. Before exercise, the position of the OEC for adult mares is nearly optimized for the effectiveness of the Bohr shift occurring at the O2 release site, whereas, at maximal exercise, the position of the OEC tends to become advantageous for O2 transport efficiency.

  11. Caffeine’s effects on cerebrovascular reactivity and coupling between cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd B.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal is dependent on multiple physiological factors such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), local oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Since caffeine affects both CBF and neural activity, its effects on BOLD remain controversial. The calibrated BOLD approach is an excellent tool to study caffeine because it combines CBF and BOLD measures to estimate changes in CMRO2. The present study used the calibrated BOLD approach with 5% CO2 to determine if a 2.5mg/kg intravenous injection of caffeine changes the coupling between CBF and CMRO2 during motor and visual tasks. The results show that caffeine decreases n, the CBF:CMRO2 coupling ratio, from 2.58 to 2.33 in motor (p=0.006) and from 2.45 to 2.23 in visual (p=0.002) areas respectively. The current study also demonstrated that caffeine does not alter cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. These results highlight the importance of the calibrated BOLD approach in improving interpretation of the BOLD signal in the presence of substances like caffeine. PMID:19000770

  12. Simultaneous imaging of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow with RGB reflectometry and LASCA during stroke in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimers, A.; Gramer, M.; Takagaki, M.; Graf, R.; Kohl-Bareis, M.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous mapping of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow changes of human skin and the exposed cortex in rats by broad-band reflectometry and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA). A hard- and software set-up is realized with a high temporal resolution achieved by techniques of multi- and manycore computing. Spatial and temporal resolved changes of haemoglobin oxygenation and blood flow in rats are observed in response to middle cerebral artery occlusion and cortical spreading depression.

  13. Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxygenation During Induction of General Anesthesia with Sevoflurane Versus Propofol.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuko; Hirose, Noriya; Maeda, Takeshi; Suzuki, Takahiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane and propofol are widely used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia. Although the effects of sevoflurane and propofol on cerebral hemodynamics during maintenance of general anesthesia have been demonstrated, the effects during induction of general anesthesia have still not been clarified. We therefore compared changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygenation (CBO) during induction of anesthesia using sevoflurane (group S: n=9) or propofol (group P: n=9). CBF and CBO were evaluated using the following variables: oxy-, deoxy-, and total-hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations and tissue oxygen index (TOI), measured on the forehead by near-infrared spectroscopy. The variables were recorded immediately before administration of sevoflurane or propofol and at every 10 s for 4 min after administration of the induction agent. Patients received 8% sevoflurane in 100% oxygen via an anesthesia mask in group S, and an IV bolus of 2 mg/kg of propofol during oxygenation in group P. We found that oxy-Hb, total-Hb, and TOI were significantly higher in group S than in group P (P>0.05). Changes in deoxy-Hb, MBP, and HR did not differ between the groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that sevoflurane increases CBF and CBO during induction of general anesthesia.

  14. Effects of acetazolamide on cerebral blood flow and brain tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, N. A.; Friberg, L.; Kastrup, J.; Rizzi, D.; Jensen, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Oral administration of 1 g of acetazolamide to 8 normal subjects studied at sea level and in normoxia caused an acute increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). During the subsequent prolonged oral treatment with 1 g of acetazolamide daily, CBF returned to normal within 2 days. The alveolar CO2 tension decreased gradually to 70% of the control value, indicating hyperventilation. At sea level hyperventilation will not increase brain oxygenation significantly in normal man, as the arterial oxygen content only increases minimally, while CBF is unchanged. At high altitude the beneficial effects of acetazolamide on the symptoms of acute mountain sickness may well be due to an improved oxygen supply to the brain, as hyperventilation will, at the low ambient PO2, cause a significant increase of the arterial oxygen content, while CBF presumably is unaffected by the drug. During hypoxia at high altitude the overall effect of prolonged acetazolamide treatment may thus be equivalent to a descent by several hundred metres. PMID:3118350

  15. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  16. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  17. Persistent reduced oxygen requirement following blood transfusion during recovery from hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Van de Louw, Andry

    2015-08-15

    Our study intended to determine the effects on oxygen uptake (VO2) of restoring a normal rate of O2 delivery following blood transfusion (BT) after a severe hemorrhage (H). Spontaneously breathing urethane anesthetized rats were bled by removing 20 ml/kg of blood over 30 min. Rats were then infused with their own shed blood 15 min after the end of H. At mid-perfusion, half of the rats received a unique infusion of the decoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP, 6 mg/kg). VO2 and arterial blood pressure (ABP) were continuously measured throughout the study, along with serial determination of blood lactate concentration [La]. Animals were euthanized 45 min after the end of reperfusion; liver and lungs were further analyzed for early expression of oxidative stress gene using RT-PCR. Our bleeding protocol induced a significant decrease in ABP and increase in [La], while VO2 dropped by half. The O2 deficit progressively accumulated during the period of bleeding reached -114 ± 53 ml/kg, just before blood transfusion. Despite the transfusion of blood, a significant O2 deficit persisted (-82 ± 59 ml/kg) 45 min after reperfusion. This slow recovery of VO2 was sped up by DNP injection, leading to a fast recovery of O2 deficit after reperfusion, becoming positive (+460 ± 132 ml/kg) by the end of the protocol, supporting the view that O2 supply is not the main controller of VO2 dynamics after BT. Of note is that DNP also enhanced oxidative stress gene expression (up-regulation of NADPH oxidase 4 in the lung for instance). The mechanism of slow recovery of O2 requirement/demand following BT and the resulting effects on tissues exposed to relatively high O2 partial pressure are discussed.

  18. Numerical simulation and analysis of accurate blood oxygenation measurement by using optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianhao; Li, Qian; Li, Lin; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2016-10-01

    Accuracy of photoacoustic signal is the crux on measurement of oxygen saturation in functional photoacoustic imaging, which is influenced by factors such as defocus of laser beam, curve shape of large vessels and nonlinear saturation effect of optical absorption in biological tissues. We apply Monte Carlo model to simulate energy deposition in tissues and obtain photoacoustic signals reaching a simulated focused surface detector to investigate corresponding influence of these factors. We also apply compensation on photoacoustic imaging of in vivo cat cerebral cortex blood vessels, in which signals from different lateral positions of vessels are corrected based on simulation results. And this process on photoacoustic images can improve the smoothness and accuracy of oxygen saturation results.

  19. Blood pressure, blood flow, and oxygenation in the clipped kidney of chronic 2-kidney, 1-clip rats: effects of tempol and Angiotensin blockade.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Onozato, Maristela; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-02-01

    Angiotensin II maintains renal cortical blood flow and renal oxygenation in the clipped kidney of early 2-kidney, 1-clip Goldblatt hypertensive (2K,1C) rats. The involvement of Ang II is believed to decline, whereas oxidative stress increases during the progression of 2K,1C hypertension. We investigated the hypothesis that the acute administration of drugs to inhibit reactive oxygen species (Tempol), angiotensin II type 1 receptors (candesartan), or angiotensin-converting enzyme (enalaprilat) lowers mean arterial pressure and increases kidney blood flow and oxygenation in the clipped kidney of chronic 2K,1C rats in contrast to sham controls. Twelve months after left renal artery clipping or sham, mean arterial pressure, renal cortical blood flow, and renal cortical and medullary oxygen tension were measured after acute administration of Tempol followed by enalaprilat or candesartan followed by enalaprilat. The mean arterial pressure of the 2K,1C rat was reduced by candesartan (-9%) and, more effectively, by Tempol (-35%). All of the applied treatments had similar blood pressure-lowering effects in sham rats (average: -21%). Only Tempol increased cortical blood flow (+35%) and cortical and medullary oxygen tensions (+17% and +94%, respectively) in clipped kidneys of 2K,1C rats. Administration of enalaprilat had no additional effect, except for a modest reduction in cortical blood flow in the clipped kidney of 2K,1C rats when coadministered with candesartan (-10%). In conclusion, acute administration of Tempol is more effective than candesartan in reducing the mean arterial blood pressure and improving renal blood perfusion and oxygenation in the clipped kidney of chronic 2K,1C rats.

  20. Blood oxygen affinity increases during digestion in the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Rafael P; Fuga, Adriana; Micheli-Campbell, Mariana A; Carvalho, José E; Andrade, Denis V

    2015-08-01

    Digesting snakes experience massive increases in metabolism that can last for many days and are accompanied by adjustments in the oxygen transport cascade. Accordingly, we examined the oxygen-binding properties of the blood in the South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) during fasting and 24 and 48h after the snakes have ingested a rodent meal corresponding to 15% (±2%) of its own body mass. In general, oxygen-hemoglobin (Hb-O2) affinity was significantly increased 24h post-feeding, and then returned toward fasting values within 48h post-feeding. Content of organic phosphates ([NTP] and [NTP]/[Hb]), hemoglobin cooperativity (Hill's n), and Bohr Effect (ΔlogP50/ΔpH) were not affected by feeding. The postprandial increase in Hb-O2 affinity in the South American rattlesnake can be almost entirely ascribed by the moderate alkaline tide that follows meal ingestion. In general, digesting snakes were able to regulate blood metabolites at quite constant levels (e.g., plasma osmolality, lactate, glucose, and total protein levels). The level of circulating lipids, however, was considerably increased, which may be related to their mobilization, since lipids are known to be incorporated by the enterocytes after snakes have fed. In conclusion, our results indicate that the exceptional metabolic increment exhibited by C. d. terrificus during meal digestion is entirely supported by the aerobic pathways and that among the attending cardiorespiratory adjustments, pulmonary Hb-O2 loading is likely improved due to the increment in blood O2 affinity.

  1. Quadriceps muscle blood flow and oxygen availability during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Athanasopoulos, Dimitrios

    2011-07-01

    In this study, we wished to determine whether the observed reduction in quadriceps muscle oxygen availability, reported during repetitive bouts of isometric exercise in simulated sailing efforts (i.e. hiking), is because of restricted muscle blood flow. Six national-squad Laser sailors initially performed three successive 3-min hiking bouts followed by three successive 3-min cycling tests sustained at constant intensities reproducing the cardiac output recorded during each of the three hiking bouts. The blood flow index (BFI) was determined from assessment of the vastus lateralis using near-infrared spectroscopy in association with the light-absorbing tracer indocyanine green dye, while cardiac output was determined from impedance cardiography. At equivalent cardiac outputs (ranging from 10.3±0.5 to 14.8±0.86 L · min(-1)), the increase from baseline in vastus lateralis BFI across the three hiking bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 3.1±0.6 nM · s(-1)) was lower (P = 0.036) than that seen during the three cycling bouts (from 1.1±0.2 to 7.2±1.4 nM · s(-1)) (Cohen's d: 3.80 nM · s(-1)), whereas the increase from baseline in deoxygenated haemoglobin (by ∼17.0±2.9 μM) (an index of tissue oxygen extraction) was greater (P = 0.006) during hiking than cycling (by ∼5.3±2.7 μM) (Cohen's d: 4.17 μM). The results suggest that reduced vastus lateralis muscle oxygen availability during hiking arises from restricted muscle blood flow in the isometrically acting quadriceps muscles.

  2. Measurement of changes in blood oxygenation using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) allows assessment of tumor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with the spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We aim to demonstrate that MSOT can be used to monitor the development of tumor vasculature. To establish the relationship between MSOT derived imaging biomarkers and biological changes during tumor development, we performed MSOT on nude mice (n=10) bearing subcutaneous xenograft U87 glioblastoma tumors using a small animal optoacoustic tomography system. The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified between 21% and 100%. The measurements from early (week 4) and late (week 7) stages of tumor development were compared. To further explore the functionality of the blood vessels, we examined the evolution of changes in the abundance of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin in the tumors in response to a gas challenge. We found that the kinetics of the change in oxygen saturation (SO2) were significantly different between small tumors and the healthy blood vessels in nearby normal tissue (p=0.0054). Furthermore, we showed that there was a significant difference in the kinetics of the gas challenge between small and large tumors (p=0.0015). We also found that the tumor SO2 was significantly correlated (p=0.0057) with the tumor necrotic fraction as assessed by H&E staining in histology. In the future, this approach may be of use in the clinic as a method for tumor staging and assessment of treatment response.

  3. Effects of Therapeutic Ultrasound on Intramuscular Blood Circulation and Oxygen Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Yuka; Morozumi, Kazunori; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Ito, Toshikazu; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to clarify the effects of therapeutic ultrasound on intramuscular local blood circulation (and oxygen dynamics) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Participants: The participants were 11 healthy males. Methods: All participants performed all three trials; (1) the ultrasound (US group), (2) without powered ultrasound (placebo group), and (3) rest (control group). Ultrasound was applied at 3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, and 100% duty cycle for 10 minutes. Evaluation index were oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations in the intramuscular and skin surface temperature (SST). The experimental protocol was a total of 40 minutes, that is, 10 minutes before trial (rest), 10 minutes during the trial (ultrasound, placebo, and control), and 20 minutes after trial (rest). The NIRS and SST data collected before and after the trial were divided into 5 minutes intervals for further analysis. Results: Oxygenated and total hemoglobin levels were significantly higher in the US group than in the placebo and control groups for the 20 minutes after ultrasound (p < 0.01). The SST was significantly higher in the US group than in the control for 15 minutes after ultrasound (p < 0.05), while it was significantly lower in the placebo group than in the US and control groups for 20 minutes after the trials (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The effects of ultrasound were maintained for 20 minutes after the trial on intramuscular blood circulation and oxygen dynamics. These effects were caused by a combination of thermal and mechanical effects of the ultrasound. PMID:25792902

  4. Modeling of a three-source perfusion and blood oxygenation sensor for transplant monitoring using multilayer Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Lee, Seungjoon; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2004-06-01

    A Multi-Layer Monte Carlo (MLMC) model was developed to predict the results of in vivo blood perfusion and oxygenation measurement of transplanted organs as measured by an indwelling optical sensor. A sensor has been developed which uses three-source excitation in the red and infrared ranges (660, 810, 940 nm). In vitro data was taken using this sensor by changing the oxygenation state of whole blood and passing it through a single-tube pump system wrapped in bovine liver tissue. The collected data showed that the red signal increased as blood oxygenation increased and infrared signal decreased. The center wavelength of 810 nanometers was shown to be quite indifferent to blood oxygenation change. A model was developed using MLMC code that sampled the wavelength range from 600-1000 nanometers every 6 nanometers. Using scattering and absorption data for blood and liver tissue within this wavelength range, a five-layer model was developed (tissue, clear tubing, blood, clear tubing, tissue). The theoretical data generated from this model was compared to the in vitro data and showed good correlation with changing blood oxygenation.

  5. Simultaneous blood flow and blood oxygenation measurements using a combination of diffuse speckle contrast analysis and near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Myeongsu; Phillips, Zephaniah; Mai, Phuong Minh; Yeo, Chaebeom; Song, Cheol; Lee, Kijoon; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-02-01

    A combined diffuse speckle contrast analysis (DSCA)-near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is proposed to simultaneously measure qualitative blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in human tissue. The system employs an optical switch to alternate two laser sources at two different wavelengths and a CCD camera to capture the speckle image. Therefore, an optical density can be measured from two wavelengths for NIRS measurements and a speckle contrast can be calculated for DSCA measurements. In order to validate the system, a flow phantom test and an arm occlusion protocol for arterial and venous occlusion were performed. Shorter exposure times (<1 ms) show a higher drop (between 50% and 66%) and recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion (approximately 150%), but longer exposure time (3 ms) shows more consistent hemodynamic changes. For four subjects, the 1/KS2 values dropped to an average of 82.1±4.0% during the occlusion period and the average recovery of 1/KS2 values after occlusion was 109.1±0.8%. There was also an approximately equivalent amplitude change in oxyhemoglobin (OHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (RHb) during arterial occlusion (max RHb=0.0085±0.0024 mM/DPF, min OHb=-0.0057±0.0044 mM/DPF). The sensitivity of the system makes it a suitable modality to observe qualitative hemodynamic trends during induced physiological changes.

  6. Usefulness of combined white blood cell count and plasma glucose for predicting in-hospital outcomes after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masaharu; Kojima, Sunao; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Asada, Yujiro; Kimura, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Tei, Chuwa; Hiraoka, Hisatoyo; Sonoda, Masahiro; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Shinoyama, Nobuo; Honda, Takashi; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2006-06-01

    Admission white blood cell (WBC) count and plasma glucose (PG) have been associated with adverse outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study investigated the joint effect of WBC count and PG on predicting in-hospital outcomes in patients with AMI. WBC count and PG were measured at the time of hospital admission in 3,665 patients with AMI. Patients were stratified into tertiles (low, medium, and high) based on WBC count and PG. Patients with a high WBC count had a 2.0-fold increase in in-hospital mortality compared with those with a low WBC count. Patients with a high PG level had a 2.7-fold increase in mortality compared with those with a low PG level. When a combination of different strata for each variable was analyzed, a stepwise increase in mortality was seen. There was a considerable number of patients with a high WBC count and low PG level or with a low WBC count and high PG level. These patients had an intermediate risk, whereas those with a high WBC count and high PG level had the highest risk, i.e., 4.8-fold increase in mortality, compared with those with a low WBC count and low PG level. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the predictor for in-hospital mortality using WBC count and PG level as continuous variables and showed that WBC count and PG level were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. These findings suggested that a simple combination of WBC count and PG level might provide further information for predicting outcomes in patients with AMI.

  7. Effect of Post-Reconstruction Gaussian Filtering on Image Quality and Myocardial Blood Flow Measurement with N-13 Ammonia PET

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Kwon, Seong Young; Lee, Byeong-il; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): In order to evaluate the effect of post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering on image quality and myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement by dynamic N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET), we compared various reconstruction and filtering methods with image characteristics. Methods: Dynamic PET images of three patients with coronary artery disease (male-female ratio of 2:1; age: 57, 53, and 76 years) were reconstructed, using filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) methods. OSEM reconstruction consisted of OSEM_2I, OSEM_4I, and OSEM_6I with 2, 4, and 6 iterations, respectively. The images, reconstructed and filtered by Gaussian filters of 5, 10, and 15 mm, were obtained, as well as non-filtered images. Visual analysis of image quality (IQ) was performed using a 3-grade scoring system by 2 independent readers, blinded to the reconstruction and filtering methods of stress images. Then, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated by noise and contrast recovery (CR). Stress and rest MBF and coronary flow reserve (CFR) were obtained for each method. IQ scores, stress and rest MBF, and CFR were compared between the methods, using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: In the visual analysis, IQ was significantly higher by 10 mm Gaussian filtering, compared to other sizes of filter (P<0.001 for both readers). However, no significant difference of IQ was found between FBP and various numbers of iteration in OSEM (P=0.923 and 0.855 for readers 1 and 2, respectively). SNR was significantly higher in 10 mm Gaussian filter. There was a significant difference in stress and rest MBF between several vascular territories. However CFR was not significantly different according to various filtering methods. Conclusion: Post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering with a filter size of 10 mm significantly enhances the IQ of N-13 ammonia PET-CT, without changing the results of CFR calculation. PMID:27408866

  8. Label-Free Optical Detection of Acute Myocardial Infarction Based on Blood Plasma Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. X.; Chen, M. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Lai, W. Q.; Huang, W.; Chen, H. Y.; Weng, G. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study is intended to explore the potential of silver (Ag) nanoparticle-based plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for providing a rapid and simple "Yes/No" assessment to detect acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A simple, rapid, and accurate method of diagnosing AMI is critical to reduce mortality and improve prognosis. Techniques such as electrocardiography examination and use of cardiac troponins have not yet met the current clinical need. Therefore, alternative approaches need to be developed. Plasma samples from 32 patients with AMI and 32 healthy control (Clt) subjects were assessed. Multivariate statistical techniques, including principal component (PC) analysis and linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA), were employed to develop a diagnostic algorithm for differentiating between patients with AMI and Clt subjects. Furthermore, the receiver operating characteristic was tested to evaluate the performance of the PCA-LDA algorithm for AMI detection. Each plasma sample was mixed with an equal volume of Ag colloidal solution, and the SERS measurement of each plasma sample was performed. The plasma SERS spectrum showed much stronger and sharper peaks compared with the normal Raman spectrum. Tentative assignments of Raman spectroscopy bands showed specific biomolecular (e.g., proteins, adenosine, adenine, and uric acid) changes. PC analysis and LDA were employed to discriminate patients with AMI from Clt subjects, yielding a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 93.8%. The findings of this study suggest that plasma SERS has a great potential for improving AMI in the future, and this will certainly reduce the difficulty, time to draw blood, and patients' pain to a great extent.

  9. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  10. Joint blood flow is more sensitive to inflammatory arthritis than oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Ajay; Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; St Lawrence, Keith; Lee, Ting-Yim; Bureau, Yves; Diop, Mamadou

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypoxia plays a central role in the progression and perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thus, optical techniques that can measure surrogate markers of hypoxia such as blood flow, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxygen saturation are being developed to monitor RA. The purpose of the current study was to compare the sensitivity of these physiological parameters to arthritis. Experiments were conducted in a rabbit model of RA and the results revealed that joint blood flow was the most sensitive to arthritis and could detect a statistically significant difference (p<0.05, power = 0.8) between inflamed and healthy joints with a sample size of only four subjects. Considering that this a quantitative technique, the high sensitivity to arthritis suggests that joint perfusion has the potential to become a potent tool for monitoring disease progression and treatment response in RA. PMID:27867697

  11. Energetic Atomic and Ionic Oxygen Textured Optical Surfaces for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting of a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  12. Blood circulation in rat lungs under conditions of reduced oxygen level in inhaled air.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, K P; Mel'nikova, N N

    2012-12-01

    According to some authors, reduction in oxygen level in the lung alveoli results in constriction of afferent vessels, while others observed no vessel constriction. The issue is of principle importance in relation to the lung involvement in body adaptation to hypoxia. Conventional methods are inefficient to solve it, therefore we used a contact microscope allowing observation of lung circulatory system structure and condition of the lung circulatory system in whole, virtually intact animal, on whole undamaged lungs in situ, at normal physiological lung position in the thorax. We found that large vessels carrying blood to the alveoli do not constrict or dilate at reduced Po(2)in lung alveoli. These vessels with a diameter of 15 to 40 μ and more are the only blood source for alveoli.

  13. My starting point: the discovery of an NMR method for measuring blood oxygenation using the transverse relaxation time of blood water.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith R

    2012-08-15

    This invited personal story, covering the period from 1979 to 2010, describes the discovery of the dependence of the transverse relaxation time of water in blood on the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in the erythrocytes. The underlying mechanism of the compartmentation of the different magnetic susceptibilities of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states also explains the mechanism that underlies blood oxygenation level dependent contrast used in fMRI. The story begins with the initial observation of line broadening during ischemia in small rodents detected by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy at high field. This spectroscopic line broadening or T2* relaxation effect was demonstrated to be related to the oxygenation state of blood. The effect was quantified more accurately using T2 values measured by the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill method. The effect was dependent on the integrity of the erythrocytes to compartmentalize the different magnetic susceptibilities produced by the changing spin state of the ferrous iron of hemoglobin in its different oxygenation states between the erythrocytes and the suspending solution. The hematocrit and magnetic field dependence, the requirement for erythrocyte integrity and lack of T1 dependence confirmed that the magnetic susceptibility effect explained the oxygenation state dependence of T2* and T2. This T2/T2* effect was combined with T1 based measurements of blood flow to measure oxygen consumption in animals. This blood oxygenation assay and its underlying magnetic susceptibility gradient mechanism was published in the biochemistry literature in 1982 and largely forgotten. The observation was revived to explain evolving imaging features of cerebral hematoma as MR imaging of humans increased in field strength to 1.5 T by the mid 1980s. Although the imaging version of this assay was used to measure a global metabolic rate of cerebral oxygen consumption in humans at 1.5-T by 1991, the global measurement had little clinical value

  14. Reliability of the determination of whole-blood oxygen affinity by means of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters.

    PubMed

    Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijistra, W G

    1989-05-01

    Determination of the oxygen affinity of human whole blood with the help of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters is compared with an accurate method for recording hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curves (Clin Chem 1982;28:1287-92). P50 (oxygen tension at half saturation; So2 = 50%) and Hill's n (delta log [So2/(1-So2)]/delta log Po2) were determined in blood of 24 healthy donors. Three slightly different procedures were used for determination of P50 on the basis of Po2, pH, Pco2, and So2 measured with each of four different blood-gas analyzer/oximeter combinations. These methods were not able to discriminate between high and low values for P50 within the normal reference interval, but never failed to detect the high oxygen affinity of blood stored for 12 days, reflected in low values of P50. The methods thus proved suitable for detecting clinically significant deviations in oxygen affinity such as occur in patients with, e.g., abnormal hemoglobins, anemias, or carbon monoxide poisoning. Determination of Hill's n by these methods did not produce useful results.

  15. Extreme hypoxemic tolerance and blood oxygen depletion in diving elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Champagne, Cory D; Costa, Daniel P; Williams, Cassondra L; Ponganis, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    Species that maintain aerobic metabolism when the oxygen (O(2)) supply is limited represent ideal models to examine the mechanisms underlying tolerance to hypoxia. The repetitive, long dives of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have remained a physiological enigma as O(2) stores appear inadequate to maintain aerobic metabolism. We evaluated hypoxemic tolerance and blood O(2) depletion by 1) measuring arterial and venous O(2) partial pressure (Po(2)) during dives with a Po(2)/temperature recorder on elephant seals, 2) characterizing the O(2)-hemoglobin (O(2)-Hb) dissociation curve of this species, 3) applying the dissociation curve to Po(2) profiles to obtain %Hb saturation (So(2)), and 4) calculating blood O(2) store depletion during diving. Optimization of O(2) stores was achieved by high venous O(2) loading and almost complete depletion of blood O(2) stores during dives, with net O(2) content depletion values up to 91% (arterial) and 100% (venous). In routine dives (>10 min) Pv(O(2)) and Pa(O(2)) values reached 2-10 and 12-23 mmHg, respectively. This corresponds to So(2) of 1-26% and O(2) contents of 0.3 (venous) and 2.7 ml O(2)/dl blood (arterial), demonstrating remarkable hypoxemic tolerance as Pa(O(2)) is nearly equivalent to the arterial hypoxemic threshold of seals. The contribution of the blood O(2) store alone to metabolic rate was nearly equivalent to resting metabolic rate, and mean temperature remained near 37 degrees C. These data suggest that elephant seals routinely tolerate extreme hypoxemia during dives to completely utilize the blood O(2) store and maximize aerobic dive duration.

  16. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported <25 days of age: 9 min) in previous studies than the captive pups in this study (maximum <25 days of age: 2.86 min). However, captivity may only affect the rate of development, as long duration dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging.

  17. Diving Related Changes in the Blood Oxygen Stores of Rehabilitating Harbor Seal Pups (Phoca vitulina)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amber; Ono, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) pups begin diving within hours of birth, stimulating the development of the blood oxygen (O2) stores necessary to sustain underwater aerobic metabolism. Since harbor seals experience a brief nursing period, the early-life development of these blood O2 stores is necessary for successful post-weaning foraging. If mothers and pups become prematurely separated, the pup may be transported to a wildlife rehabilitation center for care. Previous studies suggest that the shallow pools and lack of diving in rehabilitation facilities may lead to under-developed blood O2 stores, but diving behavior during rehabilitation has not been investigated. This study aimed to simultaneously study the diving behaviors and blood O2 store development of rehabilitating harbor seal pups. Standard hematology measurements (Hct, Hb, RBC, MCV, MCH, MCHC) were taken to investigate O2 storage capacity and pups were equipped with time-depth recorders to investigate natural diving behavior while in rehabilitation. Linear mixed models of the data indicate that all measured blood parameters changed with age; however, when compared to literature values for wild harbor seal pups, rehabilitating pups have smaller red blood cells (RBCs) that can store less hemoglobin (Hb) and subsequently, less O2, potentially limiting their diving capabilities. Wild pups completed longer dives at younger ages (maximum reported <25 days of age: 9 min) in previous studies than the captive pups in this study (maximum <25 days of age: 2.86 min). However, captivity may only affect the rate of development, as long duration dives were observed (maximum during rehabilitation: 13.6 min at 89 days of age). Further, this study suggests that there may be a positive relationship between RBC size and the frequency of long duration dives. Thus, rehabilitating harbor seal pups should be encouraged to make frequent, long duration dives to prepare themselves for post-release foraging. PMID:26061662

  18. Usefulness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to inhibit restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention for acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mohsen; Fares, Wassim; Abdel-Karim, Isam; Koch, J Michael; Sopko, Joseph; Adler, Dale

    2004-06-15

    The purpose of this trial was to assess whether the addition of hyperbaric oxygen to percutaneous coronary intervention can reduce clinical restenosis. Major adverse cardiac events at 8 months were found in only 1 of 24 patients (4%) who received hyperbaric oxygen compared with 13 of 37 patients (35%) who did not.

  19. In vitro measurements of absolute blood oxygen saturation using pulsed near-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy: accuracy and resolution.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Jan; Elwell, Clare; Delpy, Dave; Beard, Paul

    2005-09-21

    Pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to measure blood oxygen saturation in vitro. An optical parametric oscillator laser system provided nanosecond excitation pulses over the wavelength range 740-1040 nm which were used to generate photoacoustic signals in a cuvette through which a saline suspension of red blood cells was circulated. The signal amplitude and the effective attenuation coefficient were extracted from the photoacoustic signals as a function of wavelength to provide photoacoustic spectra of the blood. From these, the relative concentrations of oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin, and therefore blood oxygen saturation (SO2), were determined using forward models of the absorbed energy distribution based on diffusion theory. A standard linear model of the dependence of absorbance on the concentration of chromophores was also used to calculate the blood oxygen saturation from the signal amplitude spectra. The diffusion approximation model was shown to produce the highest accuracy in blood SO2. The photoacoustically determined oxygen saturation was found to have an accuracy of +/-4% SO2 for signal amplitude data and +/-2.5% SO2 for effective attenuation spectra. The smallest change in oxygen saturation that can be measured using this technique was +/-1% SO2.

  20. Effects of diving and oxygen on autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, Pawel J; Kot, Jacek; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Nuckowska, Magdalena K; Tkachenko, Yurii

    2013-09-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular leisure activity with the number of divers reaching several millions worldwide. Scuba diving represents a huge challenge for integrative physiology. In mammalian evolution, physiological reflexes developed to deal with lack of oxygen, rather than with an excess, which makes adaptations to scuba diving more difficult to describe and understand than those associated with breath-hold diving. The underwater environment significantly limits the use of equipment to register the organism's functions, so, in most instances, scientific theories are built on experiments that model real diving to some extent, like hyperbaric exposures, dive reflexes or water immersion. The aim of this review is to summarise the current knowledge related to the influence exerted by physiological conditions specific to diving on the autonomic nervous system and cerebral blood flow. The main factors regulating cerebral blood flow during scuba diving are discussed as follows: 1) increased oxygen partial pressure; 2) immersion-related trigemino-cardiac reflexes and 3) exposure to cold, exercise and stress. Also discussed are the potential mechanisms associated with immersion pulmonary oedema.

  1. Supervised training with wireless monitoring of ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clemens; Baumbach, Christian; Willemsen, Detlev; Nee, Oliver; Gorath, Torsten; Hein, Andreas; Scheffold, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a tele-rehabilitation application for training cardiac patients. It uses a modified ergometer bicycle with a set of wireless sensors. While the patient is exercising, the ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation are monitored constantly and automatically. If sensor values exceed pre-defined thresholds, the patient receives an alarm. As a result the training will either be stopped or continued at a reduced load, depending on the severity of the alarm. To measure user acceptance, we introduced the system to 13 members of staff and four patients, who trained on the system every day during their stay in hospital. A total of 39 training sessions were completed. In 27% of the exercise sessions an ECG connection could not be established and in 23%, blood pressure measurement failed. However, there were no failures to measure oxygen saturation. The overall acceptance of the patient's graphical user interface (GUI) was excellent. The doctor's GUI with its functions received an overall score of 1.5 on a scale of 1 to 4 (usefulness 1.6, usability 1.3 and operability 1.6). The SAPHIRE tele-rehabilitation system operated properly and was well accepted by patients and doctors.

  2. Oximeter for reliable clinical determination of blood oxygen saturation in a fetus

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.; Ward, Kenneth J.

    1996-01-01

    With the crude instrumentation now in use to continuously monitor the status of the fetus at delivery, the obstetrician and labor room staff not only over-recognize the possibility of fetal distress with the resultant rise in operative deliveries, but at times do not identify fetal distress which may result in preventable fetal neurological harm. The invention, which addresses these two basic problems, comprises a method and apparatus for non-invasive determination of blood oxygen saturation in the fetus. The apparatus includes a multiple frequency light source which is coupled to an optical fiber. The output of the fiber is used to illuminate blood containing tissue of the fetus. In the preferred embodiment, the reflected light is transmitted back to the apparatus where the light intensities are simultaneously detected at multiple frequencies. The resulting spectrum is then analyzed for determination of oxygen saturation. The analysis method uses multivariate calibration techniques that compensate for nonlinear spectral response, model interfering spectral responses and detect outlier data with high sensitivity.

  3. Assessment of skin flaps using optically based methods for measuring blood flow and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Payette, Jeri R; Kohlenberg, Elicia; Leonardi, Lorenzo; Pabbies, Arone; Kerr, Paul; Liu, Kan-Zhi; Sowa, Michael G

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two noninvasive techniques, laser Doppler and optical spectroscopy, for monitoring hemodynamic changes in skin flaps. Animal models for assessing these changes in microvascular free flaps and pedicle flaps were investigated. A 2 x 3-cm free flap model based on the epigastric vein-artery pair and a reversed MacFarlane 3 x 10-cm pedicle flap model were used in this study. Animals were divided into four groups, with groups 1 (n = 6) and 2 (n = 4) undergoing epigastric free flap surgery and groups 3 (n = 3) and 4 (n = 10) undergoing pedicle flap surgery. Groups 1 and 4 served as controls for each of the flap models. Groups 2 and 3 served as ischemia-reperfusion models. Optical spectroscopy provides a measure of hemoglobin oxygen saturation and blood volume, and the laser Doppler method measures blood flow. Optical spectroscopy proved to be consistently more reliable in detecting problems with arterial in flow compared with laser Doppler assessments. When spectroscopy was used in an imaging configuration, oxygen saturation images of the entire flap were generated, thus creating a visual picture of global flap health. In both single-point and imaging modes the technique was sensitive to vessel manipulation, with the immediate post operative images providing an accurate prediction of eventual outcome. This series of skin flap studies suggests a potential role for optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in the clinical assessment of skin flaps.

  4. Regional brain blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption during acute hypoxaemia in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Aníbal J; Riquelme, Raquel A; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Herrera, Emilio; Cabello, Gertrudis; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T

    2002-01-01

    Unlike fetal animals of lowland species, the llama fetus does not increase its cerebral blood flow during an episode of acute hypoxaemia. This study tested the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral O2 extraction rather than decreasing cerebral oxygen utilisation during acute hypoxaemia. Six llama fetuses were surgically instrumented under general anaesthesia at 217 days of gestation (term ca 350 days) with vascular and amniotic catheters in order to carry out cardiorespiratory studies. Following a control period of 1 h, the llama fetuses underwent 3 × 20 min episodes of progressive hypoxaemia, induced by maternal inhalational hypoxia. During basal conditions and during each of the 20 min of hypoxaemia, fetal cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres, cerebral oxygen extraction was calculated, and fetal cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption was determined by the modified Fick principle. During hypoxaemia, fetal arterial O2 tension and fetal pH decreased progressively from 24 ± 1 to 20 ± 1 Torr and from 7.36 ± 0.01 to 7.33 ± 0.01, respectively, during the first 20 min episode, to 16 ± 1 Torr and 7.25 ± 0.05 during the second 20 min episode and to 14 ± 1 Torr and 7.21 ± 0.04 during the final 20 min episode. Fetal arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2, 42 ± 2 Torr) remained unaltered from baseline throughout the experiment. Fetal cerebral hemispheric blood flow and cerebral hemispheric oxygen extraction were unaltered from baseline during progressive hypoxaemia. In contrast, a progressive fall in fetal cerebral hemispheric oxygen consumption occurred during the hypoxaemic challenge. In conclusion, these data do not support the hypothesis that the fetal llama brain maintains cerebral hemispheric O2 consumption by increasing cerebral hemispheric O2 extraction. Rather, the data show that in the llama fetus, a reduction in cerebral hemispheric metabolism occurs during acute

  5. Blood pressure reduction does not reduce perihematoma oxygenation: a CT perfusion study.

    PubMed

    Kate, Mahesh P; Hansen, Mikkel B; Mouridsen, Kim; Østergaard, Leif; Choi, Victor; Gould, Bronwen E; McCourt, Rebecca; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M; Coutts, Shelagh B; Dowlatshahi, Dariush; Emery, Derek J; Buck, Brian H; Butcher, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) reduction after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is controversial, because of concerns that this may cause critical reductions in perihematoma perfusion and thereby precipitate tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that BP reduction reduces perihematoma tissue oxygenation.Acute ICH patients were randomized to a systolic BP target of <150 or <180 mm Hg. Patients underwent CT perfusion (CTP) imaging 2 hours after randomization. Maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), maximum oxygen extraction fraction (OEF(max)), and the resulting maximum cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2(max)) permitted by local hemodynamics, were calculated from raw CTP data.Sixty-five patients (median (interquartile range) age 70 (20)) were imaged at a median (interquartile range) time from onset to CTP of 9.8 (13.6) hours. Mean OEF(max) was elevated in the perihematoma region (0.44±0.12) relative to contralateral tissue (0.36±0.11; P<0.001). Perihematoma CMRO2(max) (3.40±1.67 mL/100 g per minute) was slightly lower relative to contralateral tissue (3.63±1.66 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.025). Despite a significant difference in systolic BP between the aggressive (140.5±18.7 mm Hg) and conservative (163.0±10.6 mm Hg; P<0.001) treatment groups, perihematoma CBF was unaffected (37.2±11.9 versus 35.8±9.6 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.307). Similarly, aggressive BP treatment did not affect perihematoma OEF(max) (0.43±0.12 versus 0.45±0.11; P=0.232) or CMRO2(max) (3.16±1.66 versus 3.68±1.85 mL/100 g per minute; P=0.857). Blood pressure reduction does not affect perihematoma oxygen delivery. These data support the safety of early aggressive BP treatment in ICH.

  6. Effects of carotid compression, as assessed by near infrared spectroscopy, upon cerebral blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, M; Zanette, E; Sideri, G; Giannini, I; Fieschi, C; Carpi, A

    1987-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy, a recently developed optoelectronic technique, has been studied as a possible method of monitoring the adequacy of cerebral perfusion in 22 patients who were candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Using this technique, changes in haemoglobin volume, haemoglobin oxygen saturation and redox level of cytochrome-c-oxidase were recorded from the frontoparietal region during routine carotid compression tests performed under continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. A highly significant association was found between EEG slowing, indicating impaired cerebral function, and a fall in haemoglobin volume and oxygen saturation, indicating a reduced blood and oxygen supply to the brain (Fisher exact test, P less than 10(-5]. In a few tests haemoglobin volume and oxygen saturation were reduced without changes in the EEG recording. This study raises new issues concerning the compensatory mechanisms taking place during carotid occlusion and suggests that near infrared spectroscopy might be useful in monitoring the blood and oxygen supply to the brain during carotid endarterectomy. PMID:3560151

  7. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  8. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  9. Blood flow mechanics and oxygen transport and delivery in the retinal microcirculation: multiscale mathematical modeling and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Causin, Paola; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Malgaroli, Francesca; Sacco, Riccardo; Harris, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The scientific community continues to accrue evidence that blood flow alterations and ischemic conditions in the retina play an important role in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Many factors influence retinal hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation, including blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue metabolic demand. Since the influence of these factors on the retinal circulation is difficult to isolate in vivo, we propose here a novel mathematical and computational model describing the coupling between blood flow mechanics and oxygen ([Formula: see text]) transport in the retina. Albeit in a simplified manner, the model accounts for the three-dimensional anatomical structure of the retina, consisting in a layered tissue nourished by an arteriolar/venular network laying on the surface proximal to the vitreous. Capillary plexi, originating from terminal arterioles and converging into smaller venules, are embedded in two distinct tissue layers. Arteriolar and venular networks are represented by fractal trees, whereas capillary plexi are represented using a simplified lumped description. In the model, [Formula: see text] is transported along the vasculature and delivered to the tissue at a rate that depends on the metabolic demand of the various tissue layers. First, the model is validated against available experimental results to identify baseline conditions. Then, a sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the influence of blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue oxygen demand on the [Formula: see text] distribution within the blood vessels and in the tissue. This analysis shows that: (1) systemic arterial blood pressure has a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] profiles in both blood and tissue; (2) plasma viscosity and metabolic consumption rates have a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] tension at the level of the retinal ganglion cells; and (3) arterial [Formula: see text

  10. A novel method to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Pan, Boan; Gao, Yuan; Ruan, Zhengshang; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    This article introduces a novel method to estimate oxygen saturation of the internal jugular vein blood (SjvO2) by using Near Infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The different positions of patients can affect the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular vein (IJV), in other words, it causes the sectional change of the IJV blood volume. When lying position of patients, the CSA is larger than that keeping upper body 80 degree, and the CSA can compute quantitatively by the use of ultrasound and digital image processing methods. The entire method consist of constructing different position of patient (upper body rotation 0 and 80 degree), comparing the light absorption changes. SjvO2 has been determined from light absorption measurements in two wavelength, before and after the position changes. The method has been applied to the vertical area over the IJV of 11 patients who were placed a central venous catheter into a large vein in the neck for medical uses, using wavelength of 735 and 850 nm. At last, comparing the SjvO2NIRS which measured by NIRS noninvasively with SjvO2IJVBG which was quantified using a whole blood gas analyzer, we found there were some certain relativity. The results were influenced by vascular depth greatly.

  11. Blood oxygenation during hyperpressure intraperitoneal fluid administration in a rabbit model of severe liver injury: Evaluation of a novel concept for control of pre-hospital liver bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Noorbakhsh, Siavash; Azizi, Saeed; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Maham, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential part of the most important metabolic pathways in aerobic organisms. Oxygen delivery is merely dependent on blood, rendering blood loss a devastating event. Traumatic pre-hospital liver bleeding is a major cause of early trauma deaths in human and animals, with no established therapeutic method yet. Increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) has been shown to reduce liver bleeding by half. Although reduction of blood loss could be in favor of blood oxygen delivery, however, the complex interaction between increased IAP and respiratory mechanics during severe hemorrhagic shock remained unclear. We used a novel model of liver trauma in 16 rabbits and randomly assigned them to either normotensive abdomen group or increased IAP by fluid infusion (HA) groups (n=8 each). Liver size and the amount of liver injury were evaluated. Various blood oxygenation parameters were recorded. Both groups were identical in terms of the liver size and injury. The HA group had significantly lower shock index. Arterial oxygen capacity and oxygen content were higher in the HA group. No significant statistical difference was seen between groups in terms of abdominal perfusion pressure; alveolar pressure of oxygen; dissolved oxygen in blood plasma; alveolar to arterial oxygen tension gradient; arterial to alveolar oxygen pressure ratio; the ratio between partial pressure of arterial oxygen and fraction of inspired oxygen; and respiratory index. In conclusion, the novel therapeutic method of increasing IAP by fluid infusion in a rabbit model of liver hemorrhage preserved blood oxygenation better than the classic therapeutic method.

  12. The role of blood flow distribution in the regulation of cerebral oxygen availability in fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Luria, Oded; Bar, Jacob; Kovo, Michal; Malinger, Gustavo; Golan, Abraham; Barnea, Ofer

    2012-04-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) elicits hemodynamic compensatory mechanisms in the fetal circulation. These mechanisms are complex and their effect on the cerebral oxygen availability is not fully understood. To quantify the contribution of each compensatory mechanism to the fetal cerebral oxygen availability, a mathematical model of the fetal circulation was developed. The model was based on cardiac-output distribution in the fetal circulation. The compensatory mechanisms of FGR were simulated and their effects on cerebral oxygen availability were analyzed. The mathematical analysis included the effects of cerebral vasodilation, placental resistance to blood flow, degree of blood shunting by the ductus venosus and the effect of maternal-originated placental insufficiency. The model indicated a unimodal dependency between placental blood flow and cerebral oxygen availability. Optimal cerebral oxygen availability was achieved when the placental blood flow was mildly reduced compared to the normal flow. This optimal ratio was found to increase as the hypoxic state of FGR worsens. The model indicated that cerebral oxygen availability is increasingly dependent on the cardiac output distribution as the fetus gains weight.

  13. Seasonal variation in blood and muscle oxygen stores attributed to diving behavior, environmental temperature and pregnancy in a marine predator, the California sea lion.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Atkinson, Shannon; Paras-Garcia, Alberto; Costa, Daniel P

    2012-08-01

    Survival depends on an animal's ability to find and acquire prey. In diving vertebrates, this ability is directly related to their physiological capability (e.g. oxygen stores). We studied the seasonal variation in oxygen stores, body temperature and body condition in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) (CSL) as a function of seasonal variation in temperature, primary productivity, diving behavior and reproductive stage. During summer, blood oxygen stores were significantly greater and muscle oxygen stores were significantly lower than in winter. Total oxygen stores, body condition and body temperature did not change between seasons but variations in body temperature were greater during summer. Changes in oxygen stores are partly attributed to diving behavior, temperature and pregnancy that could increase oxygen consumption. Blood and muscle oxygen stores appear to be influenced by reproductive state. Blood oxygen stores are more likely influenced by diving behavior and temperature than muscle oxygen stores.

  14. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described.

  15. Reduced and reversed temperature dependence of blood oxygenation in an ectothermic scombrid fish: implications for the evolution of regional heterothermy?

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy Darren; Rummer, J L; Sepulveda, C A; Farrell, A P; Brauner, C J

    2010-01-01

    Tunas (family Scombridae) are exceptional among most teleost fishes in that they possess vascular heat exchangers which allow heat retention in specific regions of the body (termed 'regional heterothermy'). Seemingly exclusive to heterothermic fishes is a markedly reduced temperature dependence of blood-oxygen (blood-O(2)) binding, or even a reversed temperature dependence where increasing temperature increases blood-O(2) affinity. These unusual binding properties have been documented in whole blood and in haemoglobin (Hb) solutions, and they are hypothesised to prevent oxygen loss from arteries to veins within the vascular heat exchangers and/or to prevent excessive oxygen unloading to the warm tissues and ensure an adequate supply of oxygen to tissues positioned efferent to the heat exchangers. The temperature sensitivity of blood-O(2) binding has not been characterised in an ectothermic scombrid (mackerels and bonitos), but the existence of the unusual binding properties in these fishes would have clear implications for their proposed association with regional heterothermy. Accordingly, the present study examined oxygenation of whole blood of the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) at 10, 20 and 30 degrees C and at 0.5, 1 and 2% CO(2). Oxygen affinity was generally highest at 20 degrees C for all levels of CO(2). Temperature-independent binding was observed at low (0.5%) CO(2), where the PO(2) at 50% blood-O(2) saturation (P (50)) was not statistically different at 10 and 30 degrees C (2.58 vs. 2.78 kPa, respectively) with an apparent heat of oxygenation (H degrees ) close to zero (-6 kJ mol(-1)). The most significant temperature-mediated difference occurred at high (2%) CO(2), where the P (50) at 10 degrees C was twofold higher than that at 20 degrees C with a corresponding H degrees of +43 kJ mol(-1). These results provide clear evidence of independent and reversed open-system temperature effects on blood oxygenation in S. japonicus, and it is therefore

  16. PET studies of changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism after unilateral microembolization of the brain in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Weyne, J; De Ley, G; Demeester, G; Vandecasteele, C; Vermeulen, F L; Donche, H; Deman, J

    1987-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism have been measured with the steady-state oxygen-15 technique and positron emission tomography in anesthetized dogs. Regional microembolization was induced by infusing Sephadex particles (diameter, 40 micron) into one of the common carotid arteries. In the first series of experiments, 2.5 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined within 3-4 hours after embolization. In a second series 0.55 mg Sephadex was infused, and the dogs were examined either in the first 3-4 hours or 24-48 hours after embolization. Cerebral blood flow, oxygen extraction ratio, and cerebral oxygen utilization were measured at 3 PCO2 levels. In the acute experiments, cerebral oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was 6 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 25% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower than on the contralateral side. While cerebral blood flow was symmetrically distributed in normocapnia and hypocapnia, it was 9 (0.55 mg Sephadex) and 35% (2.5 mg Sephadex) lower in the embolized hemisphere during hypercapnia. In normocapnia and hypocapnia the lower oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was characterized by a lower oxygen extraction ratio, and in hypercapnia by an unchanged (0.55 mg Sephadex) or by a higher (2.5 mg Sephadex) extraction ratio. The different effect on oxygen extraction ratio in the control and embolized hemispheres resulted in images of uncoupling between perfusion and oxygen demand that varied according to the PCO2. The experiments also showed a fall in cerebral blood flow in the embolized hemisphere after 3-4 hours, indicating delayed hypoperfusion. After 24-48 hours, blood flow was about 10% higher in the embolized hemisphere, and this was observed at the 3 PCO2 levels, while the oxygen extraction ratio was systematically lower. Oxygen utilization in the embolized hemisphere was depressed to practically the same extent as in acute experiments. It can be concluded that between 4 and 24 hours after microembolization the cerebral

  17. Design a Wearable Device for Blood Oxygen Concentration and Temporal Heart Beat Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myint, Cho Zin; Barsoum, Nader; Ing, Wong Kiing

    2010-06-01

    The wireless network technology is increasingly important in healthcare as a result of the aging population and the tendency to acquire chronic disease such as heart attack, high blood pressure amongst the elderly. A wireless sensor network system that has the capability to monitor physiological sign such as SpO2 (Saturation of Arterial Oxygen) and heart beat rate in real-time from the human's body is highlighted in this study. This research is to design a prototype sensor network hardware, which consists of microcontroller PIC18F series and transceiver unit. The sensor is corporate into a wearable body sensor network which is small in size and easy to use. The sensor allows a non invasive, real time method to provide information regarding the health of the body. This enables a more efficient and economical means for managing the health care of the population.

  18. Assessment of skin blood content and oxygenation in spinal cord injured subjects during reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Hagisawa, S; Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M; Miller, S D

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the reactive hyperemia response following ischemia in spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals is different from that which occurs in able-bodied (AB) individuals. The reactive hyperemia response was produced by applying a pressure of 150 mmHg for 300 s, 600 s, and 900 s to the skin over the greater trochanter in 10 SCI and 10 AB subjects using a computer-controlled pneumatic indentation system. The changes in blood content and oxygenation in the superficial vessels of the skin, associated with indentation, were monitored using reflectance spectrophotometry. A brief pressure of 80 mmHg, to simulate finger pressing (blanching), was applied to the same site to detect changes in reflow behavior during the hyperemic period. The results indicate that the reactive hyperemia response in SCI group was not substantially different from AB group although the reflow rate after load release was slower in the SCI group compared with the AB group.

  19. Measurement of blood oxygen saturation using a multichannel fiberoptic oximeter-densitometer.

    PubMed

    Sekelj, P; Retfalvi, S; Lavoie, A

    1977-06-01

    Design principles and performance of a new fiberoptic oximeter-densitometer for measurement of blood oxygen saturation are described. This instrument is capable of performing measurements using either an intravascular catheter, flow-through cuvette, or earpiece. The operations of the flow-through cuvette and earpiece are based on the principles of light transmission, that of the catheter on the principles of hemoreflection. The system incorporates five interference filters permitting the selection of a particular wavelength or combination of wavelengths to perform different modes of operation. Estimates using both catheter and cuvette appeared to be independent of variations over a wide range in hematocrit and flow rate. In the range from 20 to 100% saturation the standard deviation of the differences between the in vitro estimates by the catheter and (or) cuvette and the Van Slyke analyses were 1.62 and 1.73%, respectively. In 53 children with congenital heart disease (22 cyanotic) values calculated from readings by the earpiece were related to values of arterial oxygen saturation as measured by American Optical Company reflection oximeter at the time of cardiac catheterization. In the range from 50 to 100% saturation, the regression line between the two techniques was linear and the standard deviation of the differences was 2.89% (3.12% in cyanotic children alone). The method provides a high degree of compensation for variations in skin pigmentation.

  20. [Effect of opioid peptides on oxygen-dependent microbicidity of peripheral blood neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Geĭn, S V; Gorshkova, K G

    2012-01-01

    Investigation ofopioid peptide effect on the production of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils in non-fractionated leukocyte suspension and in purified fraction of peripheral blood neutrophils is disclosed in this work. It was determined that selective delta- and micro-agonists of peptide origin stimulated the spontaneous and suppressed 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL (luminol-dependent chemiluminescence) reaction of neutrophils in leukocyte suspension. beta-endorphin was found to render less marked suppressive action on 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL, and delta2-agonist deltorphin 2 promoted 15 mkg/ml zymosan-induced LDCL only toward the 25 minutes of the experiment. beta-endorphin and selective d- and m- agonists did not affect the spontaneous and suppressed 15 mkg/ml and 150 mkg/ml zymosan-induced neutrophil LDCL. Therefore, opioid peptides play essential role in the process of direct and indirect regulation of oxygen-dependent system of neutrophil granulocyte bactericidal activity.

  1. Reduction of blood oxygen levels enhances postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in Burmese python (Python bivittatus).

    PubMed

    Slay, Christopher E; Enok, Sanne; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

    2014-05-15

    Physiological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by reversible enlargement of cardiomyocytes and changes in chamber architecture, which increase stroke volume and via augmented convective oxygen transport. Cardiac hypertrophy is known to occur in response to repeated elevations of O2 demand and/or reduced O2 supply in several species of vertebrate ectotherms, including postprandial Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus). Recent data suggest postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in P. bivittatus is a facultative rather than obligatory response to digestion, though the triggers of this response are unknown. Here, we hypothesized that an O2 supply-demand mismatch stimulates postprandial cardiac enlargement in Burmese pythons. To test this hypothesis, we rendered animals anemic prior to feeding, essentially halving blood oxygen content during the postprandial period. Fed anemic animals had heart rates 126% higher than those of fasted controls, which, coupled with a 71% increase in mean arterial pressure, suggests fed anemic animals were experiencing significantly elevated cardiac work. We found significant cardiac hypertrophy in fed anemic animals, which exhibited ventricles 39% larger than those of fasted controls and 28% larger than in fed controls. These findings support our hypothesis that those animals with a greater magnitude of O2 supply-demand mismatch exhibit the largest hearts. The 'low O2 signal' stimulating postprandial cardiac hypertrophy is likely mediated by elevated ventricular wall stress associated with postprandial hemodynamics.

  2. Reduction of neonatal blood eliminates the error induced by oxygen saturation in the spectrophotometric measurement of carboxyhaemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, N A; Karabus, C D; Klein, M; Hartley, P S

    1988-05-01

    Blood carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) is a sensitive index of haemolysis and has been used in assessing the cause of different types of neonatal jaundice. Although the introduction of automated spectrophotometry provides rapid and accurate measurement in adult blood, in neonates oxygenated foetal haemoglobin (HbF) is thought to interfere with COHb measurement. In an attempt to eliminate this problem, the haemoglobin in neonatal blood was reduced with sodium dithionite. Cord blood from 50 infants was measured before and after reduction using an IL-282 co-oximeter; COHb levels fell after reduction. A significant positive correlation was found between apparent COHb% and oxygenation of cord blood. In contrast, no significant correlation was found between these parameters in adult blood where COHb values remained the same or rose slightly after reduction. In 20 healthy non-icteric neonates the mean reduced blood COHb value was not significantly different from the mean COHb value of 23 healthy non-smoking adults. We suggest that COHb in neonatal blood can be simply and accurately measured by the IL-282 co-oximeter provided that the blood is fully reduced.

  3. Oxygen uptake and blood metabolic responses to a 400-m run.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Christine; Lepretre, Pierre-Marie; Bishop, David; Thomas, Claire

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the oxygen uptake and metabolic responses during a 400-m run reproducing the pacing strategy used in competition. A portable gas analyser was used to measure the oxygen uptake (VO2) of ten specifically trained runners racing on an outdoor track. The tests included (1) an incremental test to determine maximal VO2 (VO2max) and the velocity associated with VO2(max) (v - VO2max), (2) a maximal 400-m (400T) and 3) a 300-m running test (300T) reproducing the exact pacing pattern of the 400T. Blood lactate, bicarbonate concentrations [HCO3(-)], pH and arterial oxygen saturation were analysed at rest and 1, 4, 7, 10 min after the end of the 400 and 300T. The peak VO2 recorded during the 400T corresponded to 93.9 +/- 3.9% of VO2max and was reached at 24.4 +/- 3.2 s (192 +/- 22 m). A significant decrease in VO2 (P < 0.05) was observed in all subjects during the last 100 m, although the velocity did not decrease below v - VO2max. The VO2 in the last 5 s was correlated with the pH (r = 0.86, P < 0.0005) and [HCO3(-)] (r = 0.70, P < 0.05) measured at the end of 300T. Additionally, the velocity decrease observed in the last 100 m was inversely correlated with [HCO3(-)] and pH at 300T (r = -0.83, P < 0.001, r = -0.69, P < 0.05, respectively). These track running data demonstrate that acidosis at 300 m was related to both the VO2 response and the velocity decrease during the final 100 m of a 400-m run.

  4. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-04-06

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million worldwide. While PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO2) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared to age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight PAD patients and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven PAD patients and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO2 from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously. SmO2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, PAD patients had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 versus vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 versus 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO2 (-54 ± 10 versus -12 ± 4 %, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, non-painful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that PAD patients have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response.

  5. [Blood flow patterns in the left ventricle in patients with myocardial infarction and ventricular aneurysm: evaluation using real-time two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Konishiike, A; Mihata, S; Matsumori, Y; Nishian, K; Ikeoka, K; Yasutomi, N; Tanimoto, M; Makihata, S; Yamamoto, T; Iwasaki, T

    1987-12-01

    To evaluate how the intraventricular blood flow is affected by the size of a left ventricular aneurysm and ventricular dysfunction, systolic left ventricular blood flow patterns were evaluated using two-dimensional Doppler flow images (real-time 2-D Doppler echo). The subjects consisted of 10 normal controls, 35 patients with anteroseptal infarction, two patients with inferior infarction and five patients with anteroseptal-inferior infarctions. The systolic period was divided into three subsets; early, mid- and end-systole. Forty-two patients with myocardial infarction were classified into three groups according to the left ventricular inflow patterns on real-time 2-D Doppler echo using the apical left ventricular long-axis approach; i.e., inflow signals confined to early systole (Group I), visualized up to mid-systole (Group II) and end-systole (Group III). Left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVDd), left ventricular end-systolic dimension (LVDs), and % non-contractile circumference (delta L) were calculated by the same echocardiographic approach. Ejection fraction (EF) was calculated by left ventricular cineangiography using the Simpson's method. The left ventricular inflow Doppler signals in the normal controls and Group I turned in the apex and then directed toward the left ventricular outflow tract during late diastole and early systole. Significant differences in EF were observed among the three groups. EF in Group I, II and III was 53 +/- 9%, 41 +/- 8% and 29 +/- 7%, respectively. However, LVDd, LVDs and delta L had the largest values in Group III and the smallest values in Group I. LVDd, LVDs and delta L were smallest in Group I and largest in Group III. In the normal controls, the left ventricular inflow signals proceeded to the apex and directed toward the left ventricular outflow tract in the early systolic period. Various changes in the inflow pattern were observed in patients with myocardial infarction and severe wall motion abnormalities

  6. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    PubMed

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  7. Investigating tissue respiration and skin microhaemocirculation under adaptive changes and the synchronization of blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms.

    PubMed

    Dunaev, A V; Sidorov, V V; Krupatkin, A I; Rafailov, I E; Palmer, S G; Stewart, N A; Sokolovski, S G; Rafailov, E U

    2014-04-01

    Multi-functional laser non-invasive diagnostic systems allow the study of a number of microcirculatory parameters, including index of blood microcirculation (Im) (by laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of skin tissue (by tissue reflectance oximetry, TRO). This research aimed to use such a system to investigate the synchronization of microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation rhythms under normal and adaptive change conditions. Studies were conducted on eight healthy volunteers of 21-49 years. These volunteers were observed between one and six months, totalling 422 basic tests (3 min each). Measurements were performed on the palmar surface of the right middle finger and the lower forearm's medial surface. Rhythmic oscillations of LDF and TRO were studied using wavelet analysis. Combined tissue oxygen consumption data for all volunteers during 'adaptive changes' increased relative to normal conditions with and without arteriovenous anastomoses. Data analysis revealed resonance and synchronized rhythms in microvascular blood flow and oxygen saturation as an adaptive change in myogenic oscillation (vasomotion) resulting from exercise and possibly psychoemotional stress. Synchronization of myogenic rhythms during adaptive changes may lead to increased oxygen consumption as a result of increased microvascular blood flow velocity.

  8. System for the measurement of blood flow and oxygenation in tissue applied to neurovascular coupling in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl-Bareis, Matthias; Leithner, Christoph; Sellien, Heike; Guertler, Roland; Geraskin, Dmitri; Rohrer, Benjamin; Royl, Georg; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Lindauer, Ute

    2005-08-01

    We designed a system incorporating the independent measurement of blood flow and oxygenation of haemoglobin. This is based on laser-Doppler spectroscopy with NIR wavelengths which gives a measure for changes in blood flow or tissue perfusion as well as reflectance spectroscopy in the VIS wavelength range for the calculation of the oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin components. The co-registration of these parameters allows the neurovascular coupling of brain to be investigated. This is demonstrated by recording functional activity of the rat brain during electrical forepaw stimulation.

  9. A Novel Blood Viscosity Estimation Method Based on Pressure-Flow Characteristics of an Oxygenator During Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Soh, Zu; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hidenobu; Itoh, Hideshi; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2017-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), blood viscosity conspicuously increases and decreases due to changes in hematocrit and blood temperature. Nevertheless, blood viscosity is typically not evaluated, because there is no technology that can provide simple, continuous, noncontact monitoring. We modeled the pressure-flow characteristics of an oxygenator in a previous study, and in that study we quantified the influence of viscosity on oxygenator function. The pressure-flow monitoring information in the oxygenator is derived from our model and enables the estimation of viscosity. The viscosity estimation method was proposed and investigated in an in vitro experiment. Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8, 31.0, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37°C to 27°C, the mean inlet pressure (Pin ) and outlet pressure (Pout ) of the oxygenator and the flow (Q) and viscosity of the blood were measured. The estimated viscosity was calculated from the pressure gradient (ΔP = Pin  - Pout ) and Q and was compared to the measured blood viscosity. A strong correlation was found between the two methods for all samples. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean bias of -0.0263 mPa.s, a standard deviation of 0.071 mPa.s, limits of agreement of -0.114-0.166 mPa.s, and a percent error of 5%. Therefore, this method is considered compatible with the torsional oscillation viscometer that has plus or minus 5% measurement accuracy. Our study offers the possibility of continuously estimating blood viscosity during CPB.

  10. Preparation, characterization and in vivo investigation of blood-compatible hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles as oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzi; Zhao, Caiyan; Wang, Quan; You, Guoxing; Wang, Ying; Deng, Hongzhang; Chen, Gan; Xia, Sha; Zhao, Jingxiang; Wang, Bo; Li, Xianlei; Shao, Leihou; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Lian; Zhou, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Although many attempts have been made to design advanced hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs), no clinically viable product has been widely approved, because they do not perform normal blood functions, such as coagulation, hematologic reactions and stability. Additionally, the in vivo oxygenation of hemoglobin-loaded nanoparticles (HbPs) encapsulated with polymers has seldom been proved. Herein, HbPs of approximately 200nm with good stability were successfully fabricated and exhibited oxygen-carrying capacity. The HbPs preserve the biological and structure features of hemoglobin according to UV-vis spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) spectral analysis. In vitro, the HbPs showed a viscosity comparable to that of blood with no obvious effects on red blood cell aggregation. At the same time, blood compatibility was characterized in terms of platelet function, clot strength, speed of clot formation, degree of fibrin cross-linking and hemolysis rate. After intravenous administration of HbPs to mice with controlled hemorrhages, blood flow recovery and maintenance of systemic oxygenation were observed.

  11. Reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes with end-tidal carbon dioxide alterations.

    PubMed

    Dengel, Donald R; Evanoff, Nicholas G; Marlatt, Kara L; Geijer, Justin R; Mueller, Bryon A; Lim, Kelvin O

    2016-03-02

    Hypercapnia has been utilized as a stimulus to elicit changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, in many instances it has been delivered in a non-controlled method that is often difficult to reproduce. The purpose of this study was to examine the within- and between-visit reproducibility of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes to an iso-oxic square wave alteration in end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (Pet CO2 ). Two 3-Tesla (3T) MRI scans were performed on the same visit, with two square wave alterations administered per scan. The protocol was repeated on a separate visit with minimum of 3 days between scanning sessions. Pet CO2 was altered to stimulate changes in cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR), while Pet O2 was held constant. Eleven subjects (six females; mean age 26·5 ± 5·7 years) completed the full testing protocol. Excellent within-visit square wave reproducibility (ICC > 0·75) was observed. Similarly, square waves were reproducible between scanning sessions (ICC > 0·7). This study demonstrates BOLD signal changes in response to alterations in Pet CO2 are reproducible both within- and between-visit MRI scans.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Oxygenated and Deoxygenated Blood Flow through a Tapered Stenosed Arteries in Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Akbari Bidokhti, Amin Ali; Khak Rah, Hamid; Vaezi, Siavash; Hooshmand, Payam

    2016-01-01

    Current paper is focused on transient modeling of blood flow through a tapered stenosed arteries surrounded a by solenoid under the presence of heat transfer. The oxygenated and deoxygenated blood are considered here by the Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluid (power law and Carreau-Yasuda) models. The governing equations of bio magnetic fluid flow for an incompressible, laminar, homogeneous, non-Newtonian are solved by finite volume method with SIMPLE algorithm for structured grid. Both magnetization and electric current source terms are well thought-out in momentum and energy equations. The effects of fluid viscosity model, Hartmann number, and magnetic number on wall shear stress, shearing stress at the stenosis throat and maximum temperature of the system are investigated and are optimized. The current study results are in agreement with some of the existing findings in the literature and are useful in thermal and mechanical design of spatially varying magnets to control the drug delivery and biomagnetic fluid flows through tapered arteries. PMID:27941986

  13. Numerical Investigation of Oxygenated and Deoxygenated Blood Flow through a Tapered Stenosed Arteries in Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi, M Y; Akbari Bidokhti, Amin Ali; Khak Rah, Hamid; Vaezi, Siavash; Hooshmand, Payam

    2016-01-01

    Current paper is focused on transient modeling of blood flow through a tapered stenosed arteries surrounded a by solenoid under the presence of heat transfer. The oxygenated and deoxygenated blood are considered here by the Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluid (power law and Carreau-Yasuda) models. The governing equations of bio magnetic fluid flow for an incompressible, laminar, homogeneous, non-Newtonian are solved by finite volume method with SIMPLE algorithm for structured grid. Both magnetization and electric current source terms are well thought-out in momentum and energy equations. The effects of fluid viscosity model, Hartmann number, and magnetic number on wall shear stress, shearing stress at the stenosis throat and maximum temperature of the system are investigated and are optimized. The current study results are in agreement with some of the existing findings in the literature and are useful in thermal and mechanical design of spatially varying magnets to control the drug delivery and biomagnetic fluid flows through tapered arteries.

  14. Extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit. Influence of blood pressure, osmolarity, and blood-brain barrier damage

    SciTech Connect

    Go, K.G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Vaalburg, W.; Woldring, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    By external detection, the influence of arterial blood pressure (BP), osmolarity, and cold-induced blood-brain barrier damage was assessed on the extraction of water labeled with oxygen 15 during single-capillary transit in the rat. There was an inverse relation between arterial BP and extraction that was attributable to the influence of arterial BP on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the relation between CBF and extraction. Neither arterial BP nor osmolarity of the injected bolus had any direct effect on extraction of water 15O, signifying that the diffusional exchange component (determined by blood flow) of extraction greatly surpasses the convection flow contribution by hydrostatic or osmotic forces. Damage to the blood-brain barrier did not change its permeability to water.

  15. Dual-wavelength photothermal optical coherence tomography for blood oxygen saturation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Kuranov, Roman V.; McElroy, Austin B.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2013-03-01

    We report design and demonstration of a dual wavelength photothermal (DWP) optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for imaging of a phantom microvessel and measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) level. The DWP-OCT system contains a swept-source (SS) two-beam phase-sensitive (PhS) OCT system (1060 nm) and two intensity modulated photothermal excitation lasers (770 nm and 800 nm). The PhS-OCT probe beam (1060 nm) and photothermal excitation beams are combined into one single-mode optical fiber. A galvanometer based two-dimensional achromatic scanning system is designed to provide 14 μm lateral resolution for the PhS-OCT probe beam (1060 nm) and 13 μm lateral resolution for photothermal excitation beams. DWP-OCT system's sensitivity is 102 dB, axial resolution is 13 μm in tissue and uses a real-time digital dispersion compensation algorithm. Noise floor for optical pathlength measurements is 300 pm in the signal frequency range (380-400 Hz) of photothermal modulation frequencies. Blood SO2 level is calculated from measured optical pathlength (op) signal in a 300 μm diameter microvessel phantom introduced by the two photothermal excitation beams. En-face and B-scan images of a phantom microvessel are recorded, and six blood samples' SO2 levels are measured using DWP-OCT and compared with values provided by a commercial blood oximeter. A mathematical model indicates thermal diffusion introduces a systematic artifact that over-estimates SO2 values and is consistent with measured data.

  16. Lack of reactive oxygen species deteriorates blood pressure regulation in acute stress.

    PubMed

    Bernátová, I; Bališ, P; Goga, R; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J; Sekaj, I

    2016-10-24

    This study investigated the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to blood pressure regulation in conscious adult male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress. Role of ROS was investigated in rats with temporally impaired principal blood pressure regulation systems using ganglionic blocker pentolinium (P, 5 mg/kg), angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (C, 10 mg/kg), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (L, 30 mg/kg) and superoxide dismutase mimeticum tempol (T, 25 mg/kg). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured by the carotid artery catheter and inhibitors were administered intravenously. MAP was disturbed by a 3-s air jet, which increased MAP by 35.2+/-3.0 % vs. basal MAP after the first exposure. Air jet increased MAP in captopril- and tempol-treated rats similarly as observed in saline-treated rats. In pentolinium-treated rats stress significantly decreased MAP vs. pre-stress value. In L-NAME-treated rats stress failed to affect MAP significantly. Treatment of rats with P+L+C resulted in stress-induced MAP decrease by 17.3+/-1.3 % vs. pre-stress value and settling time (20.1+/-4.2 s). In P+L+C+T-treated rats stress led to maximal MAP decrease by 26.4+/-2.2 % (p<0.005 vs. P+L+C) and prolongation of settling time to 32.6+/-3.3 s (p<0.05 vs. P+L+C). Area under the MAP curve was significantly smaller in P+L+C-treated rats compared to P+L+C+T-treated ones (167+/-43 vs. 433+/-69 a.u., p<0.008). In conclusion, in rats with temporally impaired blood pressure regulation, the lack of ROS resulted in greater stress-induced MAP alterations and prolongation of time required to reach new post-stress steady state.

  17. Improving Blood Compatibility of Intravascular Oxygen Sensors Via Catalytic Decomposition of S-Nitrosothiols to Generate Nitric Oxide In Situ.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiduo; Rojas, Alvaro P; Griffith, Grant W; Skrzypchak, Amy M; Lafayette, Nathan; Bartlett, Robert H; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-01-30

    Reliable, real-time, in vivo sensing (intravascular) of blood gases and electrolytes remains a difficult challenge owing to biocompatibility issues that occur when chemical sensors are implanted into the blood stream. Recently, local release of nitric oxide (NO) at the sensor/blood interface has been suggested as a potential solution to this problem. However, the lifetime of NO release from thin polymer films coated on implanted sensors is limited by the reservoir of NO donor loaded within the polymeric coating. To continuously produce NO at the sensor/blood interface, a novel approach to catalytically decompose endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) in blood to generate NO in situ is reported herein. Metallic copper particles of two different sizes (3 μm and 80 nm) are embedded as catalysts in thin polymer coatings on the surface intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensing catheters. Oxygen levels (partial pressure of oxygen; PO(2)) provided by the copper particle/polymer coated sensors are, on average, more accurate than values obtained from non-NO generating control sensors when both types of sensors are implanted in porcine arteries for 19-20 h. Upon termination of each in vivo study, catheters were explanted and examined for surface thrombosis via both visual image and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The results indicate that the Cu(0)-catalyst coatings significantly reduce the occurrence of surface thrombosis, likely from the ability to generate NO from endogenous RSNO species at the sensor/blood interface.

  18. In vivo lumbar erector spinae oxygenation and blood volume measurements in healthy men during seated whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Maikala, Rammohan V; Bhambhani, Yagesh N

    2006-09-01

    Exposure to whole-body vibration is implicated as one of the occupational risk factors for lower back disorders; however, its influence on the lumbar muscle physiology is still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of backrest support and hand grip contractions on lumbar muscle oxygenation and blood volume responses during seated whole-body vibration using continuous dual-wave near-infrared spectroscopy. Thirteen healthy men were exposed to frequencies of 3, 4.5 and 6 Hz on a vibration simulator, in randomized order on separate days. Each day the duration of the protocol was 30 min. During the fifth minute of vibration 'with' and 'without' backrest support, participants performed maximal rhythmic hand grip contractions for 1 min. In general, erector spinae oxygenation and blood volume showed a trend to decrease with vibration exposure compared to the control condition. However, these responses were not influenced by the change in vibration frequency (P > 0.05). Sitting without backrest resulted in a greater decrease in oxygenation (by 27%, P = 0.02) and blood volume (by 11%, P = 0.05) than with backrest, implying a deficiency in oxygen supply owing to the sitting posture. Compared to the vibration-only condition, hand grip work decreased both oxygenation (by 22%, P = 0.003) and blood volume responses (by 13%, P = 0.04), suggesting that postural load due to prolonged sitting combined with physical activity during vibration might further burden paraspinal muscles. The influence of adipose tissue thickness of the lumbar muscle on optically derived oxygenation and blood volume changes was inconclusive.

  19. Mechanical indentation improves cerebral blood oxygenation signal quality of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during breath holding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Romero, Edwin; LaConte, Stephen M.; Rylander, Christopher G.

    2013-03-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a well-known technique for non-invasively measuring cerebral blood oxygenation, and many studies have demonstrated that fNIRS signals can be related to cognitive function. However, the fNIRS signal is attenuated by the skin, while scalp blood content has been reported to influence cerebral oxygenation measurements. Mechanical indentation has been shown to increase light transmission through soft tissues by causing interstitial water and blood flow away from the compressed region. To study the effects of indentation on fNIRS, a commercial fNIRS system with 16 emitter/detector pairs was used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation at 2 Hz. This device used diffuse reflectance at 730 nm and 850 nm to calculate deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin concentrations. A borosilicate glass hemisphere was epoxied over each sensor to function as both an indenter and a lens. After placing the indenter/sensor assembly on the forehead, a pair of plastic bands was placed on top of the fNIRS headband and strapped to the head to provide uniform pressure and tightened to approx. 15 N per strap. Cerebral blood oxygenation was recorded during a breath holding regime (15 second hold, 15 second rest, 6 cycles) in 4 human subjects both with and without the indenter array. Results showed that indentation increased raw signal intensity by 85 +/- 35%, and that indentation increased amplitude of hemoglobin changes during breath cycles by 313% +/- 105%. These results suggest that indentation improves sensing of cerebral blood oxygenation, and may potentially enable sensing of deeper brain tissues.

  20. A Simple Risk Stratification Model for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) from the Combination of Blood Examination Variables: Acute Myocardial Infarction-Kyoto Multi-Center Risk Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Yokota, Isao; Zen, Kan; Yamano, Tetsuhiro; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Jun; Sawada, Takahisa; Kohno, Yoshio; Kitamura, Makoto; Furukawa, Keizo; Matoba, Satoaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Many mortality risk scoring tools exist among patients with ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI). A risk stratification model that evaluates STEMI prognosis more simply and rapidly is preferred in clinical practice. Methods and Findings We developed a simple stratification model for blood examination by using the STEMI data of AMI-Kyoto registry in the derivation set (n = 1,060) and assessed its utility for mortality prediction in the validation set (n = 521). We selected five variables that significantly worsen in-hospital mortality: white blood cell count, hemoglobin, C-reactive protein, creatinine, and blood sugar levels at >10,000/μL, <10 g/dL, >1.0 mg/dL, >1.0 mg/dL, and >200 mg/dL, respectively. In the derivation set, each of the five variables significantly worsened in-hospital mortality (p < 0.01). We developed the risk stratification model by combining laboratory variables that were scored based on each beta coefficient obtained using multivariate analysis and divided three laboratory groups. We also found a significant trend in the in-hospital mortality rate for three laboratory groups. Therefore, we assessed the utility of this model in the validation set. The prognostic discriminatory capacity of our laboratory stratification model was comparable to that of the full multivariable model (c-statistic: derivation set vs validation set, 0.81 vs 0.74). In addition, we divided all cases (n = 1,581) into three thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk index groups based on an In TIME II substudy; the cases were further subdivided based on this laboratory model. The high laboratory group had significantly high in-hospital mortality rate in each TIMI risk index group (trend of in-hospital mortality; p < 0.01). Conclusions This laboratory stratification model can predict in-hospital mortality of STEMI simply and rapidly and might be useful for predicting in-hospital mortality of STEMI by further subdividing the TIMI risk index. PMID

  1. Benefits of exercise training on coronary blood flow in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Rebecca S.; Sturek, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Every 34 seconds an American experiences a myocardial infarction or cardiac death. Approximately 80% of these coronary artery disease (CAD)-related deaths are attributable to modifiable behaviors, such as a lack of physical exercise training (ET). Regular ET decreases CAD morbidity and mortality through systemic and cardiac-specific adaptations. ET increases myocardial oxygen demand acting as a stimulus to increase coronary blood flow and thus myocardial oxygen supply, which reduces myocardial infarction and angina. ET augments coronary blood flow through direct actions on the vasculature that improve endothelial and coronary smooth muscle function, enhancing coronary vasodilation. Additionally, ET promotes collateralization, thereby, increasing blood flow to ischemic myocardium and also treats macrovascular CAD by attenuating the progression of coronary atherosclerosis and restenosis, potentially through stabilization of atherosclerotic lesions. In summary, ET can be used as a relatively safe and inexpensive way to prevent and treat CAD. PMID:25446554

  2. Calculations of oxygen transport by red blood cells and hemoglobin solutions in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Arjun; Goldman, Daniel; Popel, Aleksander S

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical model is developed to investigate the influence of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) on oxygen transport in capillary-size vessels. A discrete cell model is presented with red blood cells (RBCs) represented in their realistic parachute shape flowing in a single file through a capillary. The model includes the free and Hb-facilitated transport of O2 and Hb-O2 kinetics in the RBC and plasma, diffusion of free O2 in the suspending phase, capillary wall, interstitium and tissue. A constant tissue consumption rate is specified that drives the simultaneous release of O2 from RBC and plasma as the cells traverse the capillary. The model mainly focuses on low capillary hematocrits and studies the effect of free hemoglobin affinity, cooperativity and concentration. The results are expressed in the form of cell and capillary mass transfer coefficients, or inverse transport resistances, that relate the spatially averaged flux of O2 coming out of the RBC and capillary to a driving force for O2 diffusion. The results show that HBOCs at a concentration of 7 g/dl reduce the intracapillary transport resistance by as much as 60% when capillary hematocrit is 0.2. HBOCs with high O2 affinity unload most O2 at the venular end, while those with low affinity supply O2 at the arteriolar end. A higher cooperativity did not favor O2 delivery due to the large variation in the mass transfer coefficient values during O2 unloading. The mass transfer coefficients obtained will be used in simulations of O2 transport in complex capillary networks.

  3. Impact of white blood cell count on myocardial salvage, infarct size, and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seungmin; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Chang, Sung-A; Lee, Sang-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Sang Hoon; Oh, Jae K; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the relationship between white blood cell count (WBCc) and infarct size assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In 198 patients undergoing primary PCI for STEMI, WBCc was measured upon arrival and CMR was performed a median of 7 days after the index event. Infarct size was measured on delayed enhancement imaging and the area at risk (AAR) was quantified on T2-weighted images. Baseline characteristics were not significantly different between the high WBCc group (>11,000/mm(3), n = 91) and low WBCc group (≤11,000/mm(3), n = 107). The median infarct size was larger in the high WBCc group than in the low WBCc group [22.0% (16.7-33.9) vs. 14.7% (8.5-24.7), p < 0.01]. Compared with the low WBCc group, the high WBCc group had a greater extent of AAR and a smaller myocardial salvage index [MSI = (AAR-infarct size)/AAR × 100]. The major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including cardiac death, nonfatal reinfarction, and rehospitalization for congestive heart failure at 12-month occurred more frequently in the high WBCc group (12.1 vs. 0.9%, p < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, high WBCc significantly increased the risk of a large infarct (OR 3.04 95% CI 1.65-5.61, p < 0.01), a low MSI (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.13-3.86, p = 0.02), and 1-year MACE (OR 16.0, 95% CI 1.89-134.5, p = 0.01). In patients undergoing primary PCI for STEMI, an elevated baseline WBCc is associated with less salvaged myocardium, larger infarct size and poorer clinical outcomes.

  4. The measurement of sequential changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism by positron computed tomography with continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tanada, S.; Yonekura, Y.; Senda, M.; Nishimura, K.; Tamaki, N.; Saji, H.; Fujita, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Taki, W.; Ishikawa, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled gases is a widely accepted method to measure regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/) with positron computed tomography (PCT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility to measure sequential changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ by PCT. The functional images of CBF, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and CMRO/sub 2/ were obtained using continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 labeled carbon dioxide and oxygen. The effects of spinal drainage in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were studied in patients with hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the rupture of intracranial aneurysm. Following the measurement in control state, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were withdrawn gradually through lumbar puncture, and sequential PCT scans were performed. CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ were markedly depressed in the case with hydrocephalus. The drainage of CSF significantly improved OEF and CMRO/sub 2/, whereas CBF remained depressed. In patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease, the changes in CBF were studied with inhalation of 5% carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/). CO/sub 2/ loading demonstrated the increase in CBF, while poor regional increase was observed in ''moyamoya'' disease, which permitted the assessment of vascular response to the elevation of plasma CO/sub 2/. The authors preliminary work indicated the potential usefulness of sequential PCT to study the changes in CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ with various interventions.

  5. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Koponen, Anne S; Aho, Jyrki M; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O(2) carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O(2)Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O(2) carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O(2) delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O(2) carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at

  6. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E.; Tikkanen, Heikki O.; Koponen, Anne S.; Aho, Jyrki M.; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak exercise

  7. Oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in time-dependent blood flow past fiber rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.; Fujioka, Hideki; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bartlett, Robert H.; Grotberg, James B.

    2009-03-01

    The influence of time-dependent flows on oxygen and carbon dioxide transport for blood flow past fiber arrays arranged in in-line and staggered configurations was computationally investigated as a model for an artificial lung. Both a pulsatile flow, which mimics the flow leaving the right heart and passing through a compliance chamber before entering the artificial lung, and a right ventricular flow, which mimics flow leaving the right heart and directly entering the artificial lung, were considered in addition to a steady flow. The pulsatile flow was modeled as a sinusoidal perturbation superimposed on a steady flow while the right ventricular flow was modeled to accurately depict the period of flow acceleration (increasing flow) and deceleration (decreasing flow) during systole followed by zero flow during diastole. It was observed that the pulsatile flow yielded similar gas transport as compared to the steady flow, while the right ventricular flow resulted in smaller gas transport, with the decrease increasing with Re. The pressure drop across the fiber array (a measure of the resistance), work (an indicator of the work required of the right heart), and shear stress (a measure of potential blood cell activation and damage) are lowest for steady flow, followed by pulsatile flow, and then right ventricular flow. The pressure drop, work, shear stress, and Sherwood numbers (a measure of the gas transport efficiency) decrease with increasing porosity and are smaller for AR <1 as compared to AR >1 (AR is the distance between fibers in the flow direction/distance between fibers in direction perpendicular to flow), although for small porosities the Sherwood numbers are of similar magnitude. In general, for any fiber array geometry, high pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with high Sherwood numbers, and low pressure drop, work, and shear stresses correlate with low Sherwood numbers creating a need for a compromise between pressure drop/work/shear stresses

  8. Increase in maximal oxygen uptake following 2-week walk training with blood flow occlusion in athletes.

    PubMed

    Park, Saejong; Kim, Jong Kyung; Choi, Hyun Min; Kim, Hyun Gook; Beekley, Matthew D; Nho, Hosung

    2010-07-01

    Walk training with blood flow occlusion (OCC-walk) leads to muscle hypertrophy; however, cardiorespiratory endurance in response to OCC-walk is unknown. Ischemia enhances the adaptation to endurance training such as increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO₂(max)) and muscle glycogen content. Thus, we investigated the effects of an OCC-walk on cardiorespiratory endurance, anaerobic power, and muscle strength in elite athletes. College basketball players participated in walk training with (n = 7) and without (n = 5) blood flow occlusion. Five sets of a 3-min walk (4-6 km/h at 5% grade) and a 1-min rest between the walks were performed twice a day, 6 days a week for 2 weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures (groups x time) was utilized (P < 0.05). Interactions were found in VO₂(max) (P = 0.011) and maximal minute ventilation (VE(max); P = 0.019). VO₂(max) (11.6%) and VE(max) (10.6%) were increased following the OCC-walk. For the cardiovascular adaptations of the OCC-walk, hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) at rest and during OCC-walk were compared between the first and the last OCC-walk sessions. Although no change in hemodynamics was found at rest, during the last OCC-walk session SV was increased in all five sets (21.4%) and HR was decreased in the third (12.3%) and fifth (15.0%) sets. With anaerobic power an interaction was found in anaerobic capacity (P = 0.038) but not in peak power. Anaerobic capacity (2.5%) was increased following the OCC-walk. No interaction was found in muscle strength. In conclusion, the 2-week OCC-walk significantly increases VO₂(max) and VE(max) in athletes. The OCC-walk training might be used in the rehabilitation for athletes who intend to maintain or improve endurance.

  9. Erythrocytes and the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery: role of erythrocyte count and oxygenation state of haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-04-01

    Blood flow to dynamically contracting myocytes is regulated to match O(2) delivery to metabolic demand. The red blood cell (RBC) itself functions as an O(2) sensor, contributing to the control of O(2) delivery by releasing the vasodilators ATP and S-nitrosohaemoglobin with the offloading of O(2) from the haemoglobin molecule. Whether RBC number is sensed remains unknown. To investigate the role of RBC number, in isolation and in combination with alterations in blood oxygenation, on muscle and systemic perfusion, we measured local and central haemodynamics during one-legged knee-extensor exercise ( approximately 50% peak power) in 10 healthy males under conditions of normocythaemia (control), anaemia, anaemia + plasma volume expansion (PVX), anaemia + PVX + hypoxia, polycythaemia, polycythaemia + hyperoxia and polycythaemia + hypoxia, which changed either RBC count alone or both RBC count and oxyhaemoglobin. Leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output (Q) and vascular conductance did not change with either anaemia or polycythaemia alone. However, LBF increased with anaemia + PVX (28 +/- 4%) and anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (46 +/- 6%) and decreased with polycythaemia + hyperoxia (18 +/- 5%). LBF and Q with anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (8.0 +/- 0.5 and 15.8 +/- 0.7 l min(-1), respectively) equalled those during maximal knee-extensor exercise. Collectively, LBF and vascular conductance were intimately related to leg arterial-venous (a-v) O(2) difference (r(2)= 0.89-0.93; P < 0.001), suggesting a pivotal role of blood O(2) gradients in muscle microcirculatory control. The systemic circulation accommodated to the changes in muscle perfusion. Our results indicate that, when coping with severe haematological challenges, local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and O(2) delivery primarily senses alterations in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and, to a lesser extent, alterations in the number of RBCs and haemoglobin molecules.

  10. Erythrocytes and the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery: role of erythrocyte count and oxygenation state of haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow to dynamically contracting myocytes is regulated to match O2 delivery to metabolic demand. The red blood cell (RBC) itself functions as an O2 sensor, contributing to the control of O2 delivery by releasing the vasodilators ATP and S-nitrosohaemoglobin with the offloading of O2 from the haemoglobin molecule. Whether RBC number is sensed remains unknown. To investigate the role of RBC number, in isolation and in combination with alterations in blood oxygenation, on muscle and systemic perfusion, we measured local and central haemodynamics during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (∼50% peak power) in 10 healthy males under conditions of normocythaemia (control), anaemia, anaemia + plasma volume expansion (PVX), anaemia + PVX + hypoxia, polycythaemia, polycythaemia + hyperoxia and polycythaemia + hypoxia, which changed either RBC count alone or both RBC count and oxyhaemoglobin. Leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output (Q) and vascular conductance did not change with either anaemia or polycythaemia alone. However, LBF increased with anaemia + PVX (28 ± 4%) and anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (46 ± 6%) and decreased with polycythaemia + hyperoxia (18 ± 5%). LBF and Q with anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (8.0 ± 0.5 and 15.8 ± 0.7 l min−1, respectively) equalled those during maximal knee-extensor exercise. Collectively, LBF and vascular conductance were intimately related to leg arterial–venous (a–v) O2 difference (r2 = 0.89–0.93; P < 0.001), suggesting a pivotal role of blood O2 gradients in muscle microcirculatory control. The systemic circulation accommodated to the changes in muscle perfusion. Our results indicate that, when coping with severe haematological challenges, local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery primarily senses alterations in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and, to a lesser extent, alterations in the number of RBCs and haemoglobin molecules. PMID:16439430

  11. Effects of Walking with Blood Flow Restriction on Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, G V; Vaz, J R; Pezarat-Correia, P; Fernhall, B

    2015-02-09

    This study determined the influence of walking with blood flow restriction (BFR) on the excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) of healthy young men. 17 healthy young men (22.1±2.9 years) performed graded treadmill exercise to assess VO2peak. In a randomized fashion, each participant performed 5 sets of 3-min treadmill exercise at their optimal walking speed with 1-min interval either with or without BFR. Participants were then seated in a chair and remained there for 30 min of recovery. Expired gases were continuously monitored during exercise and recovery. BFR increased the O2 cost of walking as well as its relative intensity and cumulative O2 deficit (p<0.05). The EPOC magnitude after walking with BFR was greater than in the non-BFR condition (p<0.05). No differences between conditions were seen for the duration of EPOC. The EPOC magnitude was no longer different between conditions after controlling for the differences in relative intensity and in the cumulative O2 deficit (p>0.05). These data indicate that walking with BFR increases the magnitude of EPOC. Moreover, they also demonstrate that such increment in EPOC is likely explained by the effects of BFR on walking relative intensity and cumulative O2 deficit.

  12. New principle for measuring arterial blood oxygenation, enabling motion-robust remote monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Gastel, Mark; Stuijk, Sander; de Haan, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Finger-oximeters are ubiquitously used for patient monitoring in hospitals worldwide. Recently, remote measurement of arterial blood oxygenation (SpO2) with a camera has been demonstrated. Both contact and remote measurements, however, require the subject to remain static for accurate SpO2 values. This is due to the use of the common ratio-of-ratios measurement principle that measures the relative pulsatility at different wavelengths. Since the amplitudes are small, they are easily corrupted by motion-induced variations. We introduce a new principle that allows accurate remote measurements even during significant subject motion. We demonstrate the main advantage of the principle, i.e. that the optimal signature remains the same even when the SNR of the PPG signal drops significantly due to motion or limited measurement area. The evaluation uses recordings with breath-holding events, which induce hypoxemia in healthy moving subjects. The events lead to clinically relevant SpO2 levels in the range 80–100%. The new principle is shown to greatly outperform current remote ratio-of-ratios based methods. The mean-absolute SpO2-error (MAE) is about 2 percentage-points during head movements, where the benchmark method shows a MAE of 24 percentage-points. Consequently, we claim ours to be the first method to reliably measure SpO2 remotely during significant subject motion. PMID:27924930

  13. Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Activation of the Primary Visual Cortex Predicts Size Adaptation Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Arrighi, Roberto; Biagi, Laura; Morrone, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    In natural scenes, objects rarely occur in isolation but appear within a spatiotemporal context. Here, we show that the perceived size of a stimulus is significantly affected by the context of the scene: brief previous presentation of larger or smaller adapting stimuli at the same region of space changes the perceived size of a test stimulus, with larger adapting stimuli causing the test to appear smaller than veridical and vice versa. In a human fMRI study, we measured the blood oxygen level-dependent activation (BOLD) responses of the primary visual cortex (V1) to the contours of large-diameter stimuli and found that activation closely matched the perceptual rather than the retinal stimulus size: the activated area of V1 increased or decreased, depending on the size of the preceding stimulus. A model based on local inhibitory V1 mechanisms simulated the inward or outward shifts of the stimulus contours and hence the perceptual effects. Our findings suggest that area V1 is actively involved in reshaping our perception to match the short-term statistics of the visual scene. PMID:24089504

  14. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroichiro; Yamauchi, Hideto; Hazama, Shiro; Hamamoto, Hirotsugu; Inoue, Nobuhiro

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N- isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21 +/- 7.65 to 56.24 +/- 13.69 (p equals 0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p equals 0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p equals 0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total- Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26 +/- 9.82% to 72.98 +/- 8.09% (p equals 0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r equals 0.758, p equals 0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r equals 0.740, p equals 0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide.

  15. Deciphering phonemes from syllables in blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in human superior temporal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingtian; Hu, Xiaolin; Luo, Huan; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Linguistic units such as phonemes and syllables are important for speech perception. How the brain encodes these units is not well understood. Many neuroimaging studies have found distinct representations of consonant-vowel syllables that shared one phoneme and differed in the other phoneme (e.g. /ba/ and /da/), but it is unclear whether this discrimination ability is due to the neural coding of phonemes or syllables. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multivariate pattern analysis to explore this question. Subjects listened to nine Mandarin syllables in a consonant-vowel form. We successfully decoded phonemes from the syllables based on the blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in the superior temporal gyrus (STG). Specifically, a classifier trained on the cortical patterns elicited by a set of syllables, which contained two phonemes, could distinguish the cortical patterns elicited by other syllables that contained the two phonemes. The results indicated that phonemes have unique representations in the STG. In addition, there was a categorical effect, i.e. the cortical patterns of consonants were similar, and so were the cortical patterns of vowels. Further analysis showed that phonemes exhibited stronger encoding specificity in the mid-STG than in the anterior STG.

  16. How bold is blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney? Opportunities, challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, T; Pohlmann, A; Arakelyan, K; Flemming, B; Cantow, K; Hentschel, J; Grosenick, D; Ladwig, M; Reimann, H; Klix, S; Waiczies, S; Seeliger, E

    2015-01-01

    Renal tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia are key elements in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury and its progression to chronic kidney disease. Yet, in vivo assessment of renal haemodynamics and tissue oxygenation remains a challenge. Many of the established approaches are invasive, hence not applicable in humans. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers an alternative. BOLD-MRI is non-invasive and indicative of renal tissue oxygenation. Nonetheless, recent (pre-) clinical studies revived the question as to how bold renal BOLD-MRI really is. This review aimed to deliver some answers. It is designed to inspire the renal physiology, nephrology and imaging communities to foster explorations into the assessment of renal oxygenation and haemodynamics by exploiting the powers of MRI. For this purpose, the specifics of renal oxygenation and perfusion are outlined. The fundamentals of BOLD-MRI are summarized. The link between tissue oxygenation and the oxygenation-sensitive MR biomarker T2∗ is outlined. The merits and limitations of renal BOLD-MRI in animal and human studies are surveyed together with their clinical implications. Explorations into detailing the relation between renal T2∗ and renal tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO2 ) are discussed with a focus on factors confounding the T2∗ vs. tissue pO2 relation. Multi-modality in vivo approaches suitable for detailing the role of the confounding factors that govern T2∗ are considered. A schematic approach describing the link between renal perfusion, oxygenation, tissue compartments and renal T2∗ is proposed. Future directions of MRI assessment of renal oxygenation and perfusion are explored.

  17. High-frequency photoacoustic imaging of erythrocyte aggregation and oxygen saturation: probing hemodynamic relations under pulsatile blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of high-frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging to study the shear rate dependent relationship between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygen saturation (SO2) in a simulated blood flow system. The PA signal amplitude increased during the formation of aggregates and cyclically varied at intervals corresponding to the beat rate (30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 bpm) for all optical wavelengths of illumination (750 and 850 nm).The SO2 also cyclically varied in phase with the PA signal amplitude for all beat rates. In addition, the mean blood flow velocity cyclically varied at the same interval of beat rate, and the shear rate (i.e. the radial gradient of flow velocity) also cyclically varied. On the other hand, the phase of the cyclic variation in the shear rate was reversed compared to that in the PA signal amplitude. This study indicates that RBC aggregation induced by periodic changes in the shear rate can be correlated with the SO2 under pulsatile blood flow. Furthermore, PA imaging of flowing blood may be capable of providing a new biomarker for the clinical application in terms of monitoring blood viscosity, oxygen delivery and their correlation.

  18. Effects of evening primrose oil treatment on sciatic nerve blood flow and endoneurial oxygen tension in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1994-12-01

    Evening primrose oil (EPO) is rich in the omega-6 essential fatty acid component, gamma-linolenic acid. The aim of the investigation was to determine whether EPO treatment prevented a reduction in sciatic nerve perfusion and oxygenation in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Rats were treated from diabetes induction with 10 g EPO kg-1 day-1. Sciatic blood flow was measured by microelectrode polarography and hydrogen clearance. Diabetes caused 47.7% +/- 3.4% (P < 0.001) and 58.8% +/- 4.8% (P < 0.001) reduction in the nutritive (capillary) and the non-nutritive (large vessel) components of endoneurial blood flow, respectively, which were prevented by EPO. Treatment had no significant effect on nutritive flow in non-diabetic rats; however, the rate of non-nutritive flow increased by 97.7% +/- 38.9% (P < 0.01). Sciatic endoneurial oxygen tension was measured by microelectrode polarography. Diabetes resulted in a 44.7% +/- 3.4% reduction in mean oxygen tension (P < 0.001), which was largely (82.3% +/- 10.2%) prevented by EPO treatment (P < 0.001). Thus, EPO prevents impairment of blood flow and endoneurial oxygenation in experimental diabetes. It is likely that this neurovascular action accounts for the beneficial effects of treatment on nerve function in diabetic rats and patients.

  19. [Band 3 protein as a metabolic sensor--CO2 regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2006-03-01

    Oxygen is essential for most forms of life, but too much oxygen is harmful and can induce tissue damage. Living creatures therefore have a tightly regulated system to deliver the necessary amount of oxygen to specific tissues at the right time. CO2 is not simply waste matter from tissues, but regulates the amount of oxygen delivered to tissues from red blood cells, utilizing the synergistic effects of hemoglobin, carbonic anhydrase and the anion exchange activity of band 3 protein. Red blood cells play an important role in this system and provide an ideal vehicle for delivering oxygen to tissues, depending on their metabolic activity.

  20. Myocardial oxygen supply/demand ratio in aortic stenosis: hemodynamic and echocardiographic evaluation of patients with and without angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Nadell, R; DePace, N L; Ren, J F; Hakki, A H; Iskandrian, A S; Morganroth, J

    1983-08-01

    Angina pectoris is a common symptom in patients with aortic stenosis without coronary artery disease. To investigate the correlates of angina pectoris, echocardiographic and hemodynamic data from 44 patients with aortic stenosis and no coronary artery disease (mean age 56 +/- 10 years) were analyzed. Twenty-three patients had no angina pectoris and 21 patients had angina pectoris. The ratio of the diastolic pressure-time index (area between the aortic and left ventricular pressure curves during diastole) to the systolic pressure-time index (area under the left ventricular pressure curve during systole), an index of the oxygen supply/demand ratio, was not different in patients with or without angina pectoris. There were no differences between patients with and without angina pectoris in echocardiographically determined wall thickness, chamber size, systolic and diastolic wall stress and left ventricular mass; in electrocardiographically defined voltage; and in hemodynamically defined aortic valve area, transaortic gradient and stroke work index. Thus, echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements at rest are not significantly different in the presence or absence of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis. Dynamic data appear to be essential for evaluation of the mechanisms of angina pectoris in patients with aortic stenosis.

  1. Oxygen saturation, red blood cell tissue fraction and speed resolved perfusion - A new optical method for microcirculatory assessment.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Hanna; Fredriksson, Ingemar; Pettersson, Anders; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a new fiber-optic system that combines diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) for a multi-modal assessment of the microcirculation. Quantitative data is achieved with an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm based on an individually adaptive skin model. The output parameters are calculated from the model and given in absolute units: hemoglobin oxygen saturation (%), red blood cell (RBC) tissue fraction (%), and the speed resolved RBC perfusion separated into three speed regions; 0-1mm/s, 1-10mm/s and above 10mm/s (% mm/s). The aim was to explore microcirculatory parameters using the new optical method, integrating DRS and LDF in a joint skin model, during local heating of the dorsal foot and venous and arterial occlusion of the forearm in 23 healthy subjects (age 20-28years). There were differences in the three speed regions in regard to blood flow changes due to local heating, where perfusion for high speeds increased the most. There was also a high correlation between changes in oxygenation and changes in perfusion for higher speeds. Oxygen saturation at baseline was 44% on foot, increasing to 83% at plateau after heating. The larger increase in perfusion for higher speeds than for lower speeds together with the oxygenation increase during thermal provocation, shows a local thermoregulatory blood flow in presumably arteriolar dermal vessels. In conclusion, there are improved possibilities to assess microcirculation using integrated DRS and LDF in a joint skin model by enabling both oxygenation and speed resolved blood flow assessment simultaneously and in the same skin site. Output parameters in absolute units may also yield new insights about the microcirculatory system.

  2. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  3. Forearm oxygenation and blood flow kinetics during a sustained contraction in multiple ability groups of rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Simon; Stoner, Lee; Scarrott, Carl; Lucero, Adam; Witter, Trevor; Love, Richard; Dickson, Tabitha; Draper, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the physiological mechanisms that allow elite level climbers to maintain intense isometric contractions for prolonged periods of time are unknown. Furthermore, it is unclear whether blood flow or muscle oxidative capacity best governs performance. This study aimed to determine the haemodynamic kinetics of 2 forearm flexor muscles in 3 ability groups of rock climbers. Thirty-eight male participants performed a sustained contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) until volitional fatigue. Oxygen saturation and blood flow was assessed using near infrared spectroscopy and Doppler ultrasound. Compared to control, intermediate, and advanced groups, the elite climbers had a significantly (P < 0.05) higher strength-to-weight ratio (MVC/N), de-oxygenated the flexor digitorum profundus significantly (P < 0.05) more (32, 34.3, and 42.8 vs. 63% O2, respectively), and at a greater rate (0.32, 0.27, and 0.34 vs. 0.77 O2%·s(-1), respectively). Furthermore, elite climbers de-oxygenated the flexor carpi radialis significantly (P < 0.05) more and at a greater rate than the intermediate group (36.5 vs. 14.6% O2 and 0.43 vs. 0.1O2%·s(-1), respectively). However, there were no significant differences in total forearm ∆ blood flow. An increased MVC/N is not associated with greater blood flow occlusion in elite climbers; therefore, oxidative capacity may be more important for governing performance.

  4. p53's choice of myocardial death or survival: Oxygen protects infarct myocardium by recruiting p53 on NOS3 promoter through regulation of p53-Lys(118) acetylation.

    PubMed

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Khan, Mahmood; Pati, Uttam; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2013-11-01

    Myocardial infarction, an irreversible cardiac tissue damage, involves progressive loss of cardiomyocytes due to p53-mediated apoptosis. Oxygenation is known to promote cardiac survival through activation of NOS3 gene. We hypothesized a dual role for p53, which, depending on oxygenation, can elicit apoptotic death signals or NOS3-mediated survival signals in the infarct heart. p53 exhibited a differential DNA-binding, namely, BAX-p53RE in the infarct heart or NOS3-p53RE in the oxygenated heart, which was regulated by oxygen-induced, post-translational modification of p53. In the infarct heart, p53 was heavily acetylated at Lys(118) residue, which was exclusively reversed in the oxygenated heart, apparently regulated by oxygen-dependent expression of TIP60. The inhibition of Lys(118) acetylation promoted the generation of NOS3-promoting prosurvival form of p53. Thus, oxygenation switches p53-DNA interaction by regulating p53 core-domain acetylation, promoting a prosurvival transcription activity of p53. Understanding this novel oxygen-p53 survival pathway will open new avenues in cardioprotection molecular therapy.

  5. Simultaneous myocardial strain and dark-blood perfusion imaging using a displacement-encoded MRI pulse sequence.

    PubMed

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd'Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in two to three myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single-shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 min, which covers a bolus infusion of Gadolinium contrast. The magnitudes of the images were T(1) weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n = 9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R(2) = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 mL/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients (n = 11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72), and the pixelwise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images.

  6. Simultaneous Myocardial Strain and Dark-Blood Perfusion Imaging Using a Displacement-Encoded MRI Pulse Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Le, Yuan; Stein, Ashley; Berry, Colin; Kellman, Peter; Bennett, Eric E.; Taylor, Joni; Lucas, Katherine; Kopace, Rael; Chefd’Hotel, Christophe; Lorenz, Christine H.; Croisille, Pierre; Wen, Han

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a displacement-encoded pulse sequence for simultaneous perfusion and strain imaging. Displacement-encoded images in 2–3 myocardial slices were repeatedly acquired using a single shot pulse sequence for 3 to 4 minutes, which covers a bolus infusion of Gd. The magnitudes of the images were T1 weighted and provided quantitative measures of perfusion, while the phase maps yielded strain measurements. In an acute coronary occlusion swine protocol (n=9), segmental perfusion measurements were validated against microsphere reference standard with a linear regression (slope 0.986, R2 = 0.765, Bland-Altman standard deviation = 0.15 ml/min/g). In a group of ST-elevation myocardial infarction(STEMI) patients (n=11), the scan success rate was 76%. Short-term contrast washout rate and perfusion are highly correlated (R2=0.72), and the pixel-wise relationship between circumferential strain and perfusion was better described with a sigmoidal Hill curve than linear functions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring strain and perfusion from a single set of images. PMID:20544714

  7. Impact of admission blood glucose on outcomes of nondiabetic patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (from the German Acute Coronary Syndromes [ACOS] Registry).

    PubMed

    Naber, Christoph K; Mehta, Rajendra H; Jünger, Claus; Zeymer, Uwe; Wienbergen, Harm; Sabin, Georg V; Erbel, Raimund; Senges, Jochen; Gitt, Anselm

    2009-03-01

    High blood glucose in patients with acute coronary syndromes have been associated with adverse short-term outcomes in patients without diabetes. However, the relation of admission glucose to long-term outcomes in these patients was less well established. Accordingly, consecutive patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without diabetes enrolled at 155 sites from July 2000 to November 2002 in the ACOS Registry were evaluated. Patients were categorized into tertiles based on admission blood glucose. Clinical end points of interest were 1-year mortality and composite of death, reinfarction, stroke, or rehospitalization (major adverse cardiac clinical events [MACCEs]) in the hospital and after discharge. Of 5,866 patients with STEMI, 36.9% had blood glucose <120 mg/dl; 33.1%, 120 to 150 mg/dl; and 30.0%, >150 mg/dl. Admission blood glucose was significantly related to increased risk of not only in-hospital events (death, glucose >150 vs <120 mg/dl, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.13 to 3.82, p <0.0001; and MACCE, >150 vs <120 mg/dl, adjusted OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.52 to 2.33; p <0.0001), but this increased risk persisted beyond the acute phase during 1-year follow-up of a mean 380 days (median 387; death, glucose >150 vs <120 mg/dl, adjusted OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.03, p <0.0001; and MACCE, >150 vs <120 mg/dl, adjusted OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.71, p <0.0001). In conclusion, high blood glucose at admission to the hospital independently correlated with short- and midterm mortality in patients with STEMI.

  8. Measuring percent oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, percent carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin, and concentrations of total hemoglobin and oxygen in blood of man, dog, and baboon.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R C; Valeri, C R

    1980-08-01

    We used an automated four-wavelength spectrometer to measure the concentration of total hemoglobin, percent oxyhemoglobin, carboxyhemoglobin, and methemoglobin, and concentration of oxygen bound to hemoglobin in the blood of humans, dogs, and baboons under clinical and various experimental conditions. Measurements of total hemoglobin and methemoglobin with this simple method were comparable to those with standard spectrometric procedures. Carboxyhemoglobin measurements were comparable to those made with gas chromatography, and measurements of oxygen content were comparable to those made with the galvanic cell method. The new instrument is as accurate as the comparison methods used to evaluate it in all parameters, is reliable, and measurements take only 63 s per sample. In addition, it requires minimal operator training, infrequent need for calibration, and no sample preparation.

  9. Analgesic effect of He-Ne laser irradiation of blood in acute myocardial infarction: possible neuro-humoral mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.; Doger-Guerrero, E.; Zemlink, A.; Sirenko, Yuri; Sychov, O.; Bogomolov, N.

    1996-01-01

    Statistically significant results on positive effects of low-energy intercardiac blood irradiation, based on observation of 354 patients suffering from Q-MI, are presented. The He-Ne laser and a catheterized flexible fiber-optic lightguide were used to perform the blood irradiation. The data obtained make it possible to draw a conclusion that the positive clinical effect of the laser blood irradiation is realized via stress-limiting mechanisms.

  10. Change in myocardial oxygen consumption employing continuous-flow LVAD with cardiac beat synchronizing system, in acute ischemic heart failure models.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Akihide; Nishimura, Takashi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Ando, Masahiko; Arakawa, Mamoru; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Mizuno, Toshihide; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2013-06-01

    Aiming the 'Bridge to Recovery' course, we have developed a novel left ventricular assist device (LVAD) controlling system. It can change the rotational speed of the continuous flow LVAD, EVAHEART, synchronized with the cardiac beat. Employing this system, we have already demonstrated that myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), which is considered to be equivalent to native heart load, changes in the hearts of normal goats. Herein, we examined changes in goats with acute ischemic heart failure. We studied 14 goats (56.1 ± 6.9 kg) with acute ischemic heart failure due to coronary microsphere embolization. We installed the EVAHEART and drive in four modes: "circuit-clamp", "continuous support", "counter-pulse", and "co-pulse", with 50 and 100 % bypass. In comparison to the circuit-clamp mode, MVO2 was reduced to 70.4 ± 17.9 % in the counter-pulse mode and increased to 90.3 ± 14.5 % in the co-pulse mode, whereas it was 80.0 ± 14.5 % in the continuous mode, with 100 % bypass (p < 0.05). The same difference was confirmed with 50 % bypass. This means that we may have a chance to change the native heart load by controlling the LVAD rotation in synchrony with the cardiac rhythm, so we named our controller as the Native Heart Load Control System (NHLCS). Employing changeable MVO2 with NHLCS according to the patient's condition may provide more opportunity for native heart recovery with LVAD, especially for patients with ischemic heart diseases.

  11. Institution of Veno-arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Does Not Lead to Increased Wall Stress in Patients with Impaired Myocardial Function.

    PubMed

    Koth, Andrew M; Axelrod, David M; Reddy, Sushma; Roth, Stephen J; Tacy, Theresa A; Punn, Rajesh

    2017-03-01

    The effect of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) on wall stress in patients with cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, or other cardiac conditions is unknown. We set out to determine the circumferential and meridional wall stress (WS) in patients with systemic left ventricles before and during VA ECMO. We established a cohort of patients with impaired myocardial function who underwent VA ECMO therapy from January 2000 to November 2013. Demographic and clinical data were collected and inotropic score calculated. Measurements were taken on echocardiograms prior to the initiation of VA ECMO and while on full-flow VA ECMO, in order to derive wall stress (circumferential and meridional), VCFc, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. A post hoc sub-analysis was conducted, separating those with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and those with impaired systemic output. Thirty-three patients met inclusion criteria. The patients' median age was 0.06 years (range 0-18.7). Eleven (33%) patients constituted the organ failure group (Gr2), while the remaining 22 (66%) patients survived to discharge (Gr1). WS and all other echocardiographic measures were not different when comparing patients before and during VA ECMO. Ejection and shortening fraction, WS, and VCFc were not statistically different comparing the survival and organ failure groups. The patients' position on the VCFc-WS curve did not change after the initiation of VA ECMO. Those with PH had decreased WS as well as increased EF after ECMO initiation, while those with impaired systemic output showed no difference in those parameters with initiation of ECMO. The external workload on the myocardium as indicated by WS is unchanged by the institution of VA ECMO support. Furthermore, echocardiographic measures of cardiac function do not reflect the changes in ventricular performance inherent to VA ECMO support. These findings are informative for the interpretation of echocardiograms in the setting of VA ECMO

  12. Red blood cell transfusion and skeletal muscle tissue oxygenation in anaemic haematologic outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Gavric, Ana Ursula; Podbregar, Eva; Mozina, Hugon; Stefanovic, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Stored red blood cells (RBCs) accumulate biochemical and biophysical changes, known as storage lesion. The aim of this study was to re-challenge current data that anaemia in chronically anaemic haematology patients is not associated with low skeletal muscle tissue oxygen (StO2), and that RBC storage age does not influence the tissue response after ischaemic provocation, using near-infrared spectroscopy. Patients and methods Twenty-four chronic anaemic haematology patients were included. Thenar skeletal muscle StO2 was measured at rest (basal StO2), with vascular occlusion testing (upslope StO2, maximum StO2) before and after transfusion. Results Basal StO2 was low (53% ± 7%). Average RBC storage time was 10.5 ± 3.9 days. Effects of RBC transfusions were as follows: basal StO2 and upslope StO2 did not change significantly; maximum StO2 increased compared to baseline (64 ± 14% vs. 59 ± 10%, p = 0.049). Change of basal StO2, upslope StO2 and maximum StO2 was negatively related to age of RBCs. The decrease of maximum StO2 was predicted (sensitivity 70%, specificity 100%), after receiving RBCs ≥ 10days old. Discussion Resting skeletal muscle StO2 in chronic anaemic patients is low. RBC storage time affects skeletal muscle StO2 in the resting period and after ischaemic provocation. PMID:27904454

  13. Segregation analysis of blood oxygen saturation in broilers suggests a major gene influence on ascites.

    PubMed

    Navarro, P; Visscher, P M; Chatziplis, D; Koerhuis, A N M; Haley, C S

    2006-12-01

    1. Blood oxygen saturation (SaO) is a potential indicator trait for resistance to ascites in chickens. 2. The objective of the study was to investigate the genetic architecture of SaO in a meat-type chicken line reared in commercial conditions. 3. Data were collected over 15 generations of selection and were divided into two data sets on the basis of a change in recording age from 6 to 5 weeks of age, approximately halfway through the period. The resulting pedigrees comprised in excess of 90,000 birds each and, on average, 12% of these birds had SaO records. 4. Segregation analyses of SaO were carried out assuming a mixed inheritance model that included a major locus segregating in a polygenic background. 5. The analyses suggest that a major gene is involved in the genetic control of SaO in this line. The putative gene acts in a dominant fashion and has an additive effect of around 0.90 sigma(p), equivalent to a predicted difference in SaO between the two homozygous classes of more than 10%. The frequency of the allele that increases SaO changed from 0.53 to 0.65 from the first to the second set of data, consistent with selection on SaO scores. 6. Using estimated genotype probabilities at the putative major locus, we inferred that it acts in an overdominant fashion on body weight and fleshing score. If the low SaO allele leads to susceptibility to ascites, its combined effects are consistent with it being maintained in the population by a balance of natural selection on fitness nad artificial selection on growth and carcase traits. 7. Even with selection on both SaO and growth traits, the combined genotypic effects would make it difficult to remove the unfavourable low-SaO allele by means of traditional selection without the use of genetic markers.

  14. Correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and cerebral blood flow simultaneously measured before and after acetazolamide administration.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Yamauchi, H; Hazama, S; Hamamoto, H; Inoue, N

    1999-10-01

    The cerebral circulation and metabolism of ten preoperative cardiac surgery patients were assessed. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), measured by 123I-N-isopropyl-p-iodo-amphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography, and in cerebral oxygen metabolism, simultaneously detected by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) before and after acetazolamide administration, were investigated. The rCBF (ml/min/100 g) increased significantly from 40.21±7.65 to 56.24±13.69(p<0.001), and a significant increase in oxyhemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) of 13.9% (p=0.0022) and total hemoglobin (Total-Hb) of 5.7% (0.0047) along with a significant decrease in deoxyhemoglobin (Deoxy-Hb) of 8.9% (p=0.0414) were observed concomitantly. Thus, the Oxy-Hb/Total-Hb ratio (%Oxy-Hb) rose significantly from 67.26±9.82% to 72.98±8.09%(p=0.0022). Examination of the relationships between individual parameters showed that the percentage changes in rCBF and Oxy-Hb were significantly correlated (r=0.758,p=0.011). The percentage changes in rCBF and %Oxy-Hb were also correlated significantly (r=0.740,p=0.014). In conclusion, this evidence suggested that NIRS is able to detect relative changes in cerebral hemodynamics and reflect luxury perfusion induced by acetazolamide. © 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  15. RSI: oxygen consumption, blood flow, and reoxygenation in patients suffering RSI measured by noninvasive optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thijssen, Dick H. J.; van Uden, Caro J. T.; Krijgsman, Hans; Colier, Willy N. J. M.

    2003-07-01

    Background: Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a major problem in nowadays health care and creates high financial costs and personal distress. Average prevalence rates in the Netherlands vary from 20-40% of the working population. Insight into the patho-physiological mechanism of RSI is important in order to establish adequate treatment and prevention programs. Objective: The aim of this study was to gain insight in muscle oxygen consumption (mVO2), blood flow (BF), and reoxygenation (ReOx) in the forearm of computer workers with stage III Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI). Method: We have used continuous wave infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure these variables. Measurements were conducted on the extensor and flexor muscle in both arms as well in RSI-patients (n=10) as in control subjects (n=21). A protocol of increased isometric repetitive contraction in a handgrip ergonometer was used with increasing levels of strength. Results: mVO2 in the extensor muscle in RSI-subjects (dominant side) was increased compared to control subjects and compared to the non-dominant side (p<0.05). ReOx was not increased in RSI (dominant side-extensor muscle). However, there was a tendency towards statistical significance (p=0.065). BF in rest was equal in both groups, however after exercise it tended to be increased. Half-time recovery (T ») was measured during only one part of the protocol and it was significantly increased (p<0.05). Conclusion: mVO2 in RSI is impaired. BF and ReOx did not show difference between both groups. Future research should aim at a microvascular dysfunction in RSI.

  16. The neural basis of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal.

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Nikos K

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rapidly become an important tool in clinical medicine and biological research. Its functional variant (functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) is currently the most widely used method for brain mapping and studying the neural basis of human cognition. While the method is widespread, there is insufficient knowledge of the physiological basis of the fMRI signal to interpret the data confidently with respect to neural activity. This paper reviews the basic principles of MRI and fMRI, and subsequently discusses in some detail the relationship between the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal and the neural activity elicited during sensory stimulation. To examine this relationship, we conducted the first simultaneous intracortical recordings of neural signals and BOLD responses. Depending on the temporal characteristics of the stimulus, a moderate to strong correlation was found between the neural activity measured with microelectrodes and the BOLD signal averaged over a small area around the microelectrode tips. However, the BOLD signal had significantly higher variability than the neural activity, indicating that human fMRI combined with traditional statistical methods underestimates the reliability of the neuronal activity. To understand the relative contribution of several types of neuronal signals to the haemodynamic response, we compared local field potentials (LFPs), single- and multi-unit activity (MUA) with high spatio-temporal fMRI responses recorded simultaneously in monkey visual cortex. At recording sites characterized by transient responses, only the LFP signal was significantly correlated with the haemodynamic response. Furthermore, the LFPs had the largest magnitude signal and linear systems analysis showed that the LFPs were better than the MUAs at predicting the fMRI responses. These findings, together with an analysis of the neural signals, indicate that the BOLD signal primarily measures the input

  17. Characterizing the Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Fluctuations in Musculoskeletal Tumours Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li-Sha; Wang, Meng-Jun; Sun, Feng; Zhao, Zhen-Jiang; Xing, Mei; Zang, Yu-Feng; Louis, Steven; Cui, Sheng-Jie; Cui, Jian-Ling; Zhang, Han

    2016-01-01

    This study characterized the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations in benign and malignant musculoskeletal tumours via power spectrum analyses in pre-established low-frequency bands. BOLD MRI and T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) were collected for 52 patients with musculoskeletal tumours. Three ROIs were drawn on the T1WI image in the tumours’ central regions, peripheral regions and neighbouring tissue. The power spectrum of the BOLD within each ROI was calculated and divided into the following four frequency bands: 0.01–0.027 Hz, 0.027–0.073 Hz, 0.073–0.198 Hz, and 0.198–0.25 Hz. ANOVA was conducted for each frequency band with the following two factors: the location of the region of interest (LoR, three levels: tumour “centre”, “peripheral” and “healthy tissue”) and tumour characteristic (TC, two levels: “malignant” and “benign”). There was a significant main effect of LoR in the frequencies of 0.073–0.198 Hz and 0.198–0.25 Hz. These data were further processed with post-hoc pair-wise comparisons. BOLD fluctuations at 0.073–0.198 Hz were stronger in the peripheral than central regions of the malignant tumours; however, no such difference was observed for the benign tumours. Our findings provide evidence that the BOLD signal fluctuates with spatial heterogeneity in malignant musculoskeletal tumours at the frequency band of 0.073–0.198 Hz. PMID:27845359

  18. The effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik, Nihal Gunes; Orhan, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Arican, Nadir; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet; Toklu, Akin Savas

    2013-09-19

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment yields conflicting results on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity under various pathological conditions and the effects of HBO on healthy brain is poorly understood. In this experimental study, the effects of HBO on BBB integrity were investigated in comparison with hyperbaric air (HBA) in intact rats. Four sessions of HBA or HBO were applied to intact rats in 24h. BBB integrity was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracers. In immunohistochemical evaluation, relative staining intensity for occludin, a tight junction (TJ) protein, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water-channel protein, was detected in the barrier type of microvessels of brain by image analysis. BBB permeability to EB dye significantly increased in animals in HBO treatment group compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of occludin, a tight junction protein, remained essentially unaltered in capillaries of hippocampus in all groups. In animals exposed to HBO, AQP4 immunoreactivity significantly increased in parietal cortex compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.01). Ultrastructurally, frequent vesicles containing HRP reaction products were observed in capillary endothelial cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to both HBA and HBO. Our results indicate that the HBO administration to intact rats increased BBB permeability to both EB and HRP while HBA increased only HRP extravasation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that HBA also impairs the BBB integrity in intact rats as well as HBO.

  19. Simultaneous assessment of red blood cell aggregation and oxygen saturation under pulsatile flow using high-frequency photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of photoacoustic (PA) imaging for assessing the correlation between red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and the oxygen saturation (sO2) in a simulated pulsatile blood flow system. For the 750 and 850 nm illuminations, the PA amplitude (PAA) increased and decreased as the mean blood flow velocity decreased and increased, respectively, at all beat rates (60, 120 and 180 bpm). The sO2 also cyclically varied, in phase with the PAA for all beat rates. However, the linear correlation between the sO2 and the PAA at 850 nm was stronger than that at 750 nm. These results suggest that the sO2 can be correlated with RBC aggregation induced by decreased mean shear rate in pulsatile flow, and that the correlation is dependent on the optical wavelength. The hemodynamic properties of blood flow assessed by PA imaging may be used to provide a new biomarker for simultaneous monitoring blood viscosity related to RBC aggregation, oxygen delivery related to the sO2 and their clinical correlation.

  20. Polymer/hemoglobin assemblies: biodegradable oxygen carriers for artificial red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Taihang; Jing, Xiabin; Huang, Yubin

    2011-07-07

    In routine clinical procedures, blood transfusion is now suffering from the defects of the blood products, like cross-matching, short storage time and virus infection. Various blood substitutes have been designed by researchers through continual efforts. With recent progress in nanotechnology, new types of artificial red blood cells with cellular structure are available. This article aims to describe some artificial red blood cells which encapsulate or conjugate hemoglobin molecules through various approaches, especially the nanoscale self-assembly technique, to mitigate the adverse effects of free hemoglobin molecules. These types of artificial red blood cell systems, which make use of biodegradable polymers as matrix materials, show advantages over the traditional types.

  1. Speech therapy changes blood circulation and oxygenation in the brain and muscle: a near-infrared spectrophotometry study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Martin; von Bonin, Dietrich; Wolf, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that artistic speech therapy (AST) has effects on heart rate variability. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether AST also affects hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation in the brain and skeletal muscle measured by near infrared spectrophotometry(NIRS). The results show that ATS has effects on important physiological parameters, i.e., it leads to a decrease in cerebral blood flow during recitation and to brain activation thereafter.

  2. [Potentiometric method of analyzing CO2 transfer in a blood membrane oxygenator].

    PubMed

    Vishnevskiĭ, M E; Pronina, N P; Mikhaĭlov, A A

    1987-01-01

    The paper proposes a method of the CO2 transfer intensity analysis in membrane oxygenators of the "MOCT" type. The dependence of the CO2 elimination rate on the liquid flow and oxygen blow-down rates for various oxygenators have been studied on a closed loop circuit. It has been established that the elimination rate depends not only on the transfer through membrane and the liquid layer, but also on the CO2 hydration-dehydration rate.

  3. [Studies of the blood antioxidant system and oxygen-transporting properties of human erythrocytes during 105-day isolation].

    PubMed

    Brazhe, N A; Baĭzhumanov, A A; Parshina, E Iu; Iusipovich, A I; Akhalaia, M Ia; Iarlykova, Iu V; Labetskaia, O I; Ivanova, S M; Morukov, B V; Maksimov, G V

    2011-01-01

    Effects of strict 105-d isolation on blood antioxidant status, erythrocyte membrane processes and oxygen-binding properties of hemoglobin were studied in 6 male volunteers (25 to 40 y.o.) in ground-based simulation of a mission to Mars (experiment Mars-105). The parameters were measured using venous blood samples collected during BDC, on days 35, 70 and 105 of the experiment and on days 7 and 14-15 after its completion. Methods of biochemistry (determination of enzyme activity and thin-layer chromatography) and biophysical (laser interference microscopy, Raman spectroscopy) showed changes in relative content of lipid and phospholipid fractions suggesting growth of membrane microviscosity and increase in TBA-AP (active products of lipids peroxidation interacting with thiobarbituric acid). A significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase activities against reduction of catalase activity points to both reparative processes in erythrocytes and disbalance between the number of evolving active forms of oxygen and antioxidant protection mechanisms in cells. Hemoglobin sensitivity of oxygen and blood level of oxyhemoglobin were found to increase, too. It is presumed that adaptation of organism to stresses experienced during and after the experiment may destroy balance of the antioxidant protection systems which is conducive to oxidation of membrane phospholipids, alteration of their content, increase of membrane microviscosity and eventual failure of the gas-exchange function of erythrocytes.

  4. Coronary vasodilator reserve persists despite tachycardia and myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, J.D.; McFalls, E.O.; Anselone, C.G.; Pantely, G.A. )

    1987-08-01

    During myocardial ischemia, the authors tested whether coronary blood flow measured with radioactive microspheres labeled with {sup 141}Ce, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 103}Ru, and {sup 95}Nb would increase in response to tachycardia thereby employing known coronary flow reserve. The authors instrumented the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary circulation in anesthetized pigs and performed three sets of experiments while coronary pressure was controlled and several heart rate increases were produced. (1) Pacing-induced tachycardia at normal LAD pressure was characterized by increased LAD flow and myocardial oxygen consumption, without production of lactate. (2) Tachycardia at a mean LAD pressure of 38 mmHg was associated with a lower, fixed coronary flow and oxygen consumption. Lactate was produced at all rates and local myocardial function declined progressively. (3) Coronary flow at low LAD pressure doubled during tachycardia when intracoronary adenosine was added. The increase to the subepicardium was >100%, whereas subendocardial flow changed little. There is persistent coronary flow reserve during moderately severe myocardial ischemia, even when metabolic demand is increased by tachycardia. This reserve, however, is predominantly subepicardial.

  5. Indirect Radionuclide Coronary Angiography to Evaluate Gradients of Myocardial Blood Flow and Flow Reserve Through Coronary Stenosis Using N-13 Ammonia PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Ju Han; Bom, Hee-Seung

    2013-08-01

    Although quantitative evaluation of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) has been perceived as an attractive advantage of positron emission tomography (PET) over other cardiac imaging technologies, application of the information to specific coronary lesions is a difficult task for nuclear cardiologists. We hypothesized that changes in MBF and MFR over a coronary lesion could be identified by use of a hybrid technology of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and N-13 ammonia PET. To evaluate this hypothesis, we measured the gradient of MBF and MFR through coronary stenosis in seven patients (M:F=3:4, median age 56 years) with coronary artery disease who underwent N-13 ammonia PET, CTCA, and interventional coronary angiography. Two patients had proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery disease and five patients had mid to distal LAD disease. Mean global stress and rest MBF were 2.62±0.58 and 1.03±0.19 ml/min/g, respectively. Mean global MFR was 2.6±0.73. Regional stress and rest MBF in the LAD territory were 2.36±0.75 and 0.96±0.21 ml/min/g, respectively. Regional MFR in the LAD territory was 2.55±0.83 ml/min/g. Stress MBF changed dramatically according to the location of coronary stenosis. It dropped acutely in proximal lesions, whereas it diminished gradually in mid to distal lesions. In conclusion, by use of a hybrid technology of CTCA and PET, it was feasible to make a direct correlation of coronary lesions with the gradient of MFR and CFR through coronary stenosis, which indicated the severity of the coronary lesion. We named this technique indirect radionuclide coronary angiography.

  6. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Akl, Tony; Cote, Gerard L.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance

    2011-01-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  7. Hypoxia effects on gill surface area and blood oxygen-carrying capacity of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina.

    PubMed

    Dabruzzi, Theresa F; Bennett, Wayne A

    2014-08-01

    Atlantic stingrays, Dasyatis sabina, are common residents of shallow-water seagrass habitats that experience natural cycles of severe hypoxia during summer months. We hypothesized that stingrays exposed to hypoxic episodes would improve their hypoxia tolerance by increasing branchial surface area and altering blood oxygen-carrying capacity. To this end, we compared critical oxygen minimum, gill morphology, and hemoglobin/hematocrit levels in a control group of Atlantic stingrays held at continuous oxygen saturations of 80-90% (≥5.5 mg/l), to treatment groups exposed to a 7-h hypoxic interval at 55% (~4.0 mg/l), or 30% oxygen saturation (~2.0 mg/l). Stingrays in hypoxic treatment groups significantly improved their hypoxia tolerance. Critical oxygen minimum values fell from 0.7 ± 0.11 mg/l in control fish to 0.4 ± 0.05 and 0.4 ± 0.06 mg/l in the 55 and 30% saturation treatment groups, respectively. Mass-specific gill surface area between control fish and the 30% saturation treatment group increased by 1.7-fold, from 85 to 142 mm(2)/g. Although stingrays did not show an increase in hematocrit or hemoglobin levels, production of more efficient hemoglobin isoforms could not be ruled out. An increase in hypoxia tolerance allows Atlantic stingrays to forage for longer times and across a wide range of hypoxic habitats that are less accessible to predators and competitors.

  8. Influence of 100% and 40% oxygen on penumbral blood flow, oxygen level, and T2*-weighted MRI in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Deuchar, Graeme A; McCabe, Christopher; Robertson, Craig A; Holmes, William M; Santosh, Celestine; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2011-08-01

    Accurate imaging of the ischemic penumbra is a prerequisite for acute clinical stroke research. T(2)(*) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with an oxygen challenge (OC) is being developed to detect penumbra based on changes in blood deoxyhemoglobin. However, inducing OC with 100% O(2) induces sinus artefacts on human scans and influences cerebral blood flow (CBF), which can affect T(2)(*) signal. Therefore, we investigated replacing 100% O(2) OC with 40% O(2) OC (5 minutes 40% O(2) versus 100% O(2)) and determined the effects on blood pressure (BP), CBF, tissue pO(2), and T(2)(*) signal change in presumed penumbra in a rat stroke model. Probes implanted into penumbra and contralateral cortex simultaneously recorded pO(2) and CBF during 40% O(2) (n=6) or 100% O(2) (n=8) OC. In a separate MRI study, T(2)(*) signal change to 40% O(2) (n=6) and 100% O(2) (n=5) OC was compared. Oxygen challenge (40% and 100% O(2)) increased BP by 8.2% and 18.1%, penumbra CBF by 5% and 15%, and penumbra pO(2) levels by 80% and 144%, respectively. T(2)(*) signal significantly increased by 4.56% ± 1.61% and 8.65% ± 3.66% in penumbra compared with 2.98% ± 1.56% and 2.79% ± 0.66% in contralateral cortex and 1.09% ± 0.82% and -0.32% ± 0.67% in ischemic core, respectively. For diagnostic imaging, 40% O(2) OC could provide sufficient T(2)(*) signal change to detect penumbra with limited influence in BP and CBF.

  9. Influence of 100% and 40% oxygen on penumbral blood flow, oxygen level, and T2*-weighted MRI in a rat stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Baskerville, Tracey A; Deuchar, Graeme A; McCabe, Christopher; Robertson, Craig A; Holmes, William M; Santosh, Celestine; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2011-01-01

    Accurate imaging of the ischemic penumbra is a prerequisite for acute clinical stroke research. T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with an oxygen challenge (OC) is being developed to detect penumbra based on changes in blood deoxyhemoglobin. However, inducing OC with 100% O2 induces sinus artefacts on human scans and influences cerebral blood flow (CBF), which can affect T2* signal. Therefore, we investigated replacing 100% O2 OC with 40% O2 OC (5 minutes 40% O2 versus 100% O2) and determined the effects on blood pressure (BP), CBF, tissue p2, and T2* signal change in presumed penumbra in a rat stroke model. Probes implanted into penumbra and contralateral cortex simultaneously recorded p2 and CBF during 40% O2 (n=6) or 100% O2 (n=8) OC. In a separate MRI study, T2* signal change to 40% O2 (n=6) and 100% O2 (n=5) OC was compared. Oxygen challenge (40% and 100% O2) increased BP by 8.2% and 18.1%, penumbra CBF by 5% and 15%, and penumbra p2 levels by 80% and 144%, respectively. T2* signal significantly increased by 4.56%±1.61% and 8.65%±3.66% in penumbra compared with 2.98%±1.56% and 2.79%±0.66% in contralateral cortex and 1.09%±0.82% and −0.32%±0.67% in ischemic core, respectively. For diagnostic imaging, 40% O2 OC could provide sufficient T2* signal change to detect penumbra with limited influence in BP and CBF. PMID:21559031

  10. APPLICATION OF LASERS AND LASER-OPTICAL METHODS IN LIFE SCIENCES Blood oxygenation monitoring by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patachia, M.; Dutu D. C., A.; Dumitras D., C.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) makes it possible to reconstruct, in two or three dimensions, the internal structure of the biological tissues based on the distribution of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient, using optical measurements at multiple source — detector positions on the tissue surface. The measurement of the light intensity transmitted through the tissue can be also used to compute the haemoglobin and oxyhaemoglobin concentrations, measuring the selective absorption of the main blood chromophores by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The spectral selectivity of the system and the evaluation of the blood volume and blood oxygenation (BV and OXY distributions), together with the reconstruction of the inner structure of the tissue, can improve the accuracy of early cancer diagnosis, based on the tissue angiogenesis characterisation.

  11. The influence of nanodiamond on the oxygenation states and micro rheological properties of human red blood cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Tsai, Lin-Wei; Perevedentseva, Elena; Chang, Hsin-Hou; Lin, Ching-Hui; Sun, Der-Shan; Lugovtsov, Andrei E.; Priezzhev, Alexander; Mona, Jani; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2012-10-01

    Nanodiamond has been proven to be biocompatible and proposed for various biomedical applications. Recently, nanometer-sized diamonds have been demonstrated as an effective Raman/fluorescence probe for bio-labeling, as well as, for drug delivery. Bio-labeling/drug delivery can be extended to the human blood system, provided one understands the interaction between nanodiamonds and the blood system. Here, the interaction of nanodiamonds (5 and 100 nm) with human red blood cells (RBC) in vitro is discussed. Measurements have been facilitated using Raman spectroscopy, laser scanning fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser diffractometry (ektacytometry). Data on cell viability and hemolytic analysis are also presented. Results indicate that the nanodiamonds in the studied condition do not cause hemolysis, and the cell viability is not affected. Importantly, the oxygenation/deoxygenation process was not found to be altered when nanodiamonds interacted with the RBC. However, the nanodiamond can affect some RBC properties such as deformability and aggregation in a concentration dependent manner. These results suggest that the nanodiamond can be used as an effective bio-labeling and drug delivery tool in ambient conditions, without complicating the blood's physiological conditions. However, controlling the blood properties including deformability of RBCs and rheological properties of blood is necessary during treatment.

  12. The influence of nanodiamond on the oxygenation states and micro rheological properties of human red blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Chung; Tsai, Lin-Wei; Perevedentseva, Elena; Chang, Hsin-Hou; Lin, Ching-Hui; Sun, Der-Shan; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Priezzhev, Alexander; Mona, Jani; Cheng, Chia-Liang

    2012-10-01

    Nanodiamond has been proven to be biocompatible and proposed for various biomedical applications. Recently, nanometer-sized diamonds have been demonstrated as an effective Raman/fluorescence probe for bio-labeling, as well as, for drug delivery. Bio-labeling/drug delivery can be extended to the human blood system, provided one understands the interaction between nanodiamonds and the blood system. Here, the interaction of nanodiamonds (5 and 100 nm) with human red blood cells (RBC) in vitro is discussed. Measurements have been facilitated using Raman spectroscopy, laser scanning fluorescence spectroscopy, and laser diffractometry (ektacytometry). Data on cell viability and hemolytic analysis are also presented. Results indicate that the nanodiamonds in the studied condition do not cause hemolysis, and the cell viability is not affected. Importantly, the oxygenation/deoxygenation process was not found to be altered when nanodiamonds interacted with the RBC. However, the nanodiamond can affect some RBC properties such as deformability and aggregation in a concentration dependent manner. These results suggest that the nanodiamond can be used as an effective bio-labeling and drug delivery tool in ambient conditions, without complicating the blood's physiological conditions. However, controlling the blood properties including deformability of RBCs and rheological properties of blood is necessary during treatment.

  13. Prognostic value of admission blood glucose concentration and diabetes diagnosis on survival after acute myocardial infarction: results from 4702 index cases in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Squire, Ian B; Nelson, Christopher P; Ng, Leong L; Jones, David R; Woods, Kent L; Lambert, Paul C

    2010-04-01

    The diagnosis of diabetes and admission blood glucose concentration are associated with adverse outcome after acute coronary syndromes. We compared the relative association with survival after ST elevation AMI (acute myocardial infarction) of admission blood glucose concentration and of diabetes diagnosis. We carried out a retrospective cohort study in 4702 consecutive patients with STEMI (ST elevation AMI) occurring from 1 April 1993 to 31 December 2005, assessed for mortality at 30 days and 1 year. Patients were classified according to antecedent diabetes and by blood glucose concentration at admission (quartile 1, <7 mmol/l; quartile 2, 7–8.2 mmol/l;quartile 3, 8.3–10.9 mmol/l; quartile 4, 11 mmol/l). Multivariable models were constructed for determinants of mortality, including year of STEMI and demographic variables, entering blood glucose concentration and antecedent diabetes individually and together. All-cause 30-day and 1-year mortality were 22.8% and 31.3% for patients with antecedent diabetes, compared with 16.3% and 23.0% respectively for those without. For glucose quartiles 1, 2, 3 and 4, crude 30-day mortality was 9.0%, 10.6%, 17.9% and 31.0%. Adjusted 30-day mortality risk was similar in quartile 2, higher by >80% in quartile 3 and by >150% in quartile 4, compared with glucose quartile 1. Antecedent diabetes was associated with an increase in mortality [unadjusted odds ratio (OR)1.52 (95% CI 1.24, 1.86)]. On multivariable analysis (excluding glucose quartile), this reduced to 1.24 (0.98, 1.58) and changed to a small, statistically non-significant reduction in risk when glucose quartile was added to the analysis [adjusted OR 0.87 (0.67, 1.13)]. Inclusion of antecedent diabetes in multivariable models did not add to the predictive value for mortality of glucose quartile(P=0.368). Similar relationships were observed for 1 year mortality. In patients with STEMI, blood glucose concentration shows graded association with risk of 30-day and 1-year

  14. Relationship between heart rate variability, blood pressure and arterial wall properties during air and oxygen breathing in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Graff, Beata; Szyndler, Anna; Czechowicz, Krzysztof; Kucharska, Wiesława; Graff, Grzegorz; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Laurent, Stephane; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies reported that normobaric hyperoxia influences heart rate, arterial pressure, cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are still not fully understood. Several factors are considered including degeneration of endothelium-derived nitric oxide by reactive oxygen species, the impact of oxygen-free radicals on tissues and alterations of autonomic nervous system function. Recently, new devices for the detailed non-invasive assessment of large and small arteries have been developed. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess heart rate variability (HRV) as a potential indicator of autonomic balance and its relation to blood pressure and vascular properties during medical air (MAB) and 100% oxygen breathing (OXB) in healthy volunteers. In 12 healthy subjects we assessed heart rate and blood pressure variability, baroreflex sensitivity, respiratory frequency, common carotid artery diameter and its wall distensibility, as well as changes in the digital artery pulse waveform, stroke index and systemic vascular resistance during MAB and OXB. Mean and systolic blood pressure have increased significantly while digital pulse amplitude and carotid artery diameter were significantly lower during hyperoxia. Heart rate variability measures did not differ during MAB and OXB. However, the correlations between spectral HRV components and those hemodynamic parameters which have changed due to hyperoxia varied substantially during MAB (correlated significantly) and OXB (no significant correlations were noted). Our findings suggest that autonomic nervous system might not be the main mediator of the cardiovascular changes during 100% oxygen breathing in healthy subjects. It seems that the direct vascular responses are initial consequences of hyperoxia and other cardiovascular parameter alterations are secondary to them.

  15. Effects of oxygenated or hydrogenated water on growth performance, blood parameters, and antioxidant enzyme activity of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Shin, D; Cho, E S R; Bang, H-T; Shim, K S

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of providing oxygenated and hydrogenated water on the growth performance, blood biochemical parameters, and immunoglobulin concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activity of broiler chickens. In our investigation, 144 Ross × Ross broiler chicks were randomly allotted to three different treatment groups with four replicates (treatment × replicate × bird = 3 × 4 × 12). All chicks were given one of the following types of water for five weeks: tap water (CON), hydrogenated water (HNW), and oxygenated water (ONW). ONW supplementation increased the final body weight and weight gain and also improved both feed intake and feed conversion of broiler chickens as compared to those of CON broiler chickens (P < 0.05). The abdominal fat and its ratio to the final body weight showed that fat accumulation in the broiler chicken abdomen was reduced when broiler chickens drank only ONW for five weeks (P < 0.05). ONW supplementation improved blood parameters, including triacylglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Additionally, in accordance with a globulin increase in broiler chickens, both IgG and IgM generation were significantly enhanced when ONW was supplied to broiler chickens (P < 0.05) but only a numerical advance was observed in the HNW group (P > 0.05). Both oxygenated and hydrogenated water supplementation significantly improved the antioxidant effects (P < 0.05), and it seems that superoxide dismutase refinement was completed due to oxygen and/or hydrogen enhancement of drinking water. These results indicate that oxygen enhancement of drinking water may be recommended to improve growth performance by increasing immunoglobulins mainly IgG and IgM.

  16. 55Cobalt (Co) as a PET-tracer in stroke, compared with blood flow, oxygen metabolism, blood volume and gadolinium-MRI.

    PubMed

    Stevens, H; Jansen, H M; De Reuck, J; Lemmerling, M; Strijckmans, K; Goethals, P; Lemahieu, I; de Jong, B M; Willemsen, A T; Korf, J

    1999-12-01

    Several studies have shown the feasibility of divalent cobalt (Co)-isotopes (55Co and 57Co) in imaging of neuronal damage in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cerebral tumors and traumatic brain injury. Little is known how regional Co uptake relates to other pathophysiological changes after stroke. Therefore, we compared 55Co-PET with functional parameters such as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using C(15)O(2), regional oxygen metabolism (rCMRO(2)) using 15O(2), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and post-gadolinium (Gd) T(1)w-MRI to assess the permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Sixteen patients (10 female; six male) aged 43 to 84 (mean 69) years with first ever stroke, as shown by CT or MRI, were examined with 55Co-PET and C(15)O(2)-, 15O(2)- and C(15)O-PET in one single session, in a period varying from 0 to 30 days after stroke-onset. Regions of infarction on C(15)O(2)- and 15O(2)-PET (defined by rCMRO(2)<65% or rCBF<45% of the contralateral value) were subsequently superimposed on the 55Co-PET scan. Clinical status was established using the Orgogozo stroke scale, which was assessed both at day 1 and at discharge (at least 6 weeks after day 1). Accumulation of 55Co was seen in eight out of 16 patients, occurring in areas showing a diminished oxygen metabolism, was only partially related to blood flow, and was located mainly outside the extent of the infarction or luxury perfusion as seen on post-Gd T(1)w-MRI. Statistical analysis showed a negative correlation between the Orgogozo score at discharge and the uptake of radioactive cobalt.

  17. Effect of acute and delayed hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cyanide whole blood levels during acute cyanide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lawson-Smith, P; Jansen, E C; Hilsted, L; Johnsen, A H; Hyldegaard, O

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide and carbon monoxide, which are often found in fire victims, are toxic gases emitted from fires. Cyanide and carbon monoxide have similar molecular structure. Cyanide binds to the enzyme cytochrome oxidase a, a3 similar to carbon monoxide, thus blocking the mitochondrial respiration chain causing depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) is recommended for treating carbon monoxide poisoning. The therapeutic effect is due to a high oxygen pressure removing carbon monoxide from the cells. We hypothesise that HBO2 induces changes in whole-blood-cyanide by a competitive mechanism forcing cyanide out of cellular tissues. A rat model was developed to study this effect. Female Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with a fentanyl + fluanizone combination and midazolam given subcutaneously (s.c.). Rats were poisoned with 5.4 mg/kg KCN injected intra-peritoneally in Group 1 and intra-arterially in Group 2. Blood samples were taken immediately after poisoning, and at one and a half, three and five hours. Blood was drawn from a jugular vein in Group 1 and from a femoral artery in Group 2. Group 1 rats were divided into a control group of 12 rats without HBO2, 10 rats had acute HBO2 immediately after poisoning and a group of 10 rats had HBO2 one and a half hours after poisoning. Group 2 rats were divided into a control group and an acute HBO2 group, with 10 rats in both groups. Whole-blood-cyanide concentrations were measured using the Conway method based on diffusion and the subsequent formation of cyanocobalamin measured by a spectrophotometer. Results showed that whole-blood-cyanide concentration in Group 1 controls and acute HBO2 initially rose and then fell towards zero. In rats treated with delayed HBO2, the reduction in whole-blood-cyanide concentration was significantly less as compared to controls and acute HBO2-treated rats. Group 2 controls whole-blood-cyanide concentration decreased towards zero throughout the observation period. However

  18. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of oxygen saturation of blood independent of the presence of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Mook, G A; Buursma, A; Gerding, A; Kwant, G; Zijlstra, W G

    1979-04-01

    The strong absorbance of indocyanine green in a broad band around lambda = 800 nm invalidates the usual spectrophotometric two-wavelength methods for measuring oxygen saturation operating in the red and near infrared region. By proper wavelength selection, however, the effect of the dye can be eliminated. With the two-wavelength method utilising lambda = 660 and 860 nm oxygen saturation is measured virtually independent of the presence of indocyanine green.

  20. Seasonal changes in blood oxygen transport and acid-base status in the tegu lizard, Tupinambis merianae.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Denis V; Brito, Simone P; Toledo, Luís Felipe; Abe, Augusto S

    2004-05-20

    Oxygen-binding properties, blood gases, and acid-base parameters were studied in tegu lizards, Tupinambis merianae, at different seasons and temperatures. Independent of temperature and pH, blood oxygen affinity was higher in dormant lizards than in those active during the summer. Haematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin content ([Hb]) were greater in active lizards resulting in a higher oxygen-carrying capacity. Nucleoside triphosphate content ([NTP]) was reduced during dormancy, but the ratio between [NTP] and [Hb] remained unchanged. Dormancy was accompanied by an increase in plasma bicarbonate ([HCO-(3)]pl) and an elevation of arterial CO2 partial pressure (PaCO2) and CO2 content in the plasma (CplCO2). These changes in acid-base parameters persist over a broad range of body temperatures. In vivo, arterial O2 partial pressure (PaO2) and O2 content (CaO2) were not affected by season and tended to increase with temperature. Arterial pH (pHa) of dormant animals is reduced compared to active lizards at body temperatures below 15 degrees C, while no significant difference was noticed at higher temperatures.

  1. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T.; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M.; Perthen, Joanna E.; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO2 coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4%±19.0% and 64.6%±19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57%±0.39% and 1.59%±0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO2 coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration. PMID:23238435

  2. Coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism is conserved for chromatic and luminance stimuli in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buracas, Giedrius T; Liang, Christine; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Shmuel, Amir; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-03-01

    The ratio of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation is a critical determinant of the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Cytochrome oxidase (CO), a key component of oxidative metabolism in the mitochondria, is non-uniformly distributed in visual area V1 in distinct blob and interblob regions, suggesting significant spatial variation in the capacity for oxygen metabolism. The goal of this study was to test whether CBF/CMRO(2) coupling differed when these subpopulations of neurons were preferentially stimulated, using chromatic and luminance stimuli to preferentially stimulate either the blob or interblob regions. A dual-echo spiral arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique was used to measure CBF and BOLD responses simultaneously in 7 healthy human subjects. When the stimulus contrast levels were adjusted to evoke similar CBF responses (mean 65.4% ± 19.0% and 64.6% ± 19.9%, respectively for chromatic and luminance contrast), the BOLD responses were remarkably similar (1.57% ± 0.39% and 1.59% ± 0.35%) for both types of stimuli. We conclude that CBF-CMRO(2) coupling is conserved for the chromatic and luminance stimuli used, suggesting a consistent coupling for blob and inter-blob neuronal populations despite the difference in CO concentration.

  3. Realization And Efficiency Evaluation Of A Micro-Photocatalytic Cell Prototype For Real-Time Blood Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Tania; Gilbert, Richard J; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Thorsen, Todd A

    2010-01-01

    A novel, miniaturized, high-efficiency photocatalytic cell, able to work in dynamic conditions, has been designed and validated in this study. Microfluidic channels were molded out of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by means of standard soft lithography techniques, so as to work as photocatalytic cells, where the coupling of anatase titanium dioxide thin films and platinum electrodes, allows an electrically assisted photocatalytic reaction to produce dissolved oxygen gas from the water content of flowing fluid (e.g. blood). The thin films were deposited onto quartz glass substrates at room temperature (300K) using reactive radio-frequency sputtering with a titanium metal target. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated through reduction rate of methylene blue solution. The results of the current study, as a proof of concept, have shown that the device can generate oxygen at a rate of 4.06μM O2/(cm2 min), thus extending its possible application range to the full oxygenation of flowing venous blood. PMID:21055994

  4. P2X7 receptor antagonism improves renal blood flow and oxygenation in angiotensin-II infused rats

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, Robert I.; Howarth, Amelia R.; Unwin, Robert J.; Tam, Frederick W.K.; Mullins, John J.; Bailey, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic activation of the renin angiotensin system promotes hypertension, renal microvascular dysfunction, tissue hypoxia and inflammation. We found previously that the injurious response to excess angiotensin II (ANGII) is greater in F344 rats, whereas Lewis rats are renoprotected, despite similar hypertension. We further identified p2rx7, encoding the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), as a candidate gene for differential susceptibility and here we have tested the hypothesis that activation of P2X7R promotes vascular dysfunction under high ANGII tone. 14-day infusion of ANGII at 30ng/min into F344 rats increased blood pressure by ~15mmHg without inducing fibrosis or albuminuria. In vivo pressure natriuresis was suppressed, medullary perfusion reduced by ~50% and the cortico-medullary oxygenation gradient disrupted. Selective P2X7R antagonism restored pressure natriuresis, promoting a significant leftward shift in the intercept and increasing the slope. Sodium excretion was increased 6 fold and blood pressure normalized. The specific P2X7R antagonist AZ11657312 increased renal medullary perfusion, but only in ANGII-treated rats. Tissue oxygenation was improved by P2X7R blockade, particularly in poorly oxygenated regions of the kidney. Activation of P2X7R induces microvascular dysfunction and regional hypoxia when ANGII is elevated. These pro-inflammatory effects may contribute to progression of renal injury induced by chronic ANGII. PMID:26108066

  5. The effect of in-plane arterial curvature on blood flow and oxygen transport in arterio-venous fistulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iori, F.; Grechy, L.; Corbett, R. W.; Gedroyc, W.; Duncan, N.; Caro, C. G.; Vincent, P. E.

    2015-03-01

    Arterio-Venous Fistulae (AVF) are the preferred method of vascular access for patients with end stage renal disease who need hemodialysis. In this study, simulations of blood flow and oxygen transport were undertaken in various idealized AVF configurations. The objective of the study was to understand how arterial curvature affects blood flow and oxygen transport patterns within AVF, with a focus on how curvature alters metrics known to correlate with vascular pathology such as Intimal Hyperplasia (IH). If one subscribes to the hypothesis that unsteady flow causes IH within AVF, then the results suggest that in order to avoid IH, AVF should be formed via a vein graft onto the outer-curvature of a curved artery. However, if one subscribes to the hypothesis that low wall shear stress and/or low lumen-to-wall oxygen flux (leading to wall hypoxia) cause IH within AVF, then the results suggest that in order to avoid IH, AVF should be formed via a vein graft onto a straight artery, or the inner-curvature of a curved artery. We note that the recommendations are incompatible—highlighting the importance of ascertaining the exact mechanisms underlying development of IH in AVF. Nonetheless, the results clearly illustrate the important role played by arterial curvature in determining AVF hemodynamics, which to our knowledge has been overlooked in all previous studies.

  6. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one-legged knee-extensor exercise (18 W) during control conditions and with cisatracurium blockade, as well as with cisatracurium blockade with prior glycopyrrone infusion. Thigh blood flow and vascular conductance in control and with cisatracurium infusion were similar at rest and during passive movement of the leg, but higher (P < 0.05) during exercise with cisatracurium than in control (3.83 +/- 0.42 vs. 2.78 +/- 0.21 l/min and 26.9 +/- 3.4 vs. 21.8 +/- 2.0 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1) at the end of exercise). Thigh oxygen uptake was similar in control and with cisatracurium infusion both at rest and during exercise, being 354 +/- 33 and 406 +/- 34 ml/min, at the end of exercise. Combined infusion of cisatracurium and glycopyrrone caused a similar increase in blood flow as cisatracurium infusion alone. The current results demonstrate that neuromuscular blockade leads to enhanced thigh blood flow and vascular conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade. The enhanced exercise hyperemia during partial neuromuscular blockade may be related to a greater recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  7. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature or in iced water and blood gas analysis was performed at baseline and after 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. RESULTS--In the first 10 minutes measured PaO2 in plastic syringes at room temperature fell by an average of 1.21 kPa/min; placing the sample on ice reduced the rate of PaO2 decline to 0.19 kPa/min. The rate of fall of PaO2 in glass at room temperature was 0.49 kPa/min. The changes in PaCO2 were less dramatic and at room temperature averaged increases of 0.47 kPa for plastic syringes and 0.71 kPa for glass syringes over the entire two hour period. These changes in gas tension for plastic syringes would lead to an overestimation of pulmonary shunt measured by the 100% oxygen technique of 0.6% for each minute left at room temperature before analysis. CONCLUSIONS--Glass syringes are superior to plastic syringes in preserving samples with a high PaO2, and prompt and adequate cooling of such samples is essential for accurate blood gas analysis. PMID:8016801

  8. Relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production in Nellore steers.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A S; Nascimento, M L; Tullio, R R; Rosa, A N; Alencar, M M; Lanna, D P

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of efficiency indices with performance, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood parameters, and estimated heat production (EHP) in Nellore steers. Eighteen steers were individually lot-fed diets of 2.7 Mcal ME/kg DM for 84 d. Estimated heat production was determined using oxygen pulse (OP) methodology, in which heart rate (HR) was monitored for 4 consecutive days. Oxygen pulse was obtained by simultaneously measuring HR and oxygen consumption during a 10- to 15-min period. Efficiency traits studied were feed efficiency (G:F) and residual feed intake (RFI) obtained by regression of DMI in relation to ADG and midtest metabolic BW (RFI). Alternatively, RFI was also obtained based on equations reported by the NRC's to estimate individual requirement and DMI (RFI calculated by the NRC [1996] equation [RFI]). The slope of the regression equation and its significance was used to evaluate the effect of efficiency indices (RFI, RFI, or G:F) on the traits studied. A mixed model was used considering RFI, RFI, or G:F and pen type as fixed effects and initial age as a covariate. For HR and EHP variables, day was included as a random effect. There was no relationship between efficiency indices and back fat depth measured by ultrasound or daily HR and EHP ( > 0.05). Because G:F is obtained in relation to BW, the slope of G:F was positive and significant ( < 0.05). Regardless of the method used, efficient steers had lower DMI ( < 0.05). The initial LM area was indirectly related to RFI and RFI ( < 0.05); however, the final muscle area was related to only RFI. Oxygen consumption per beat was not related to G:F; however, it was lower for RFI- and RFI-efficient steers, and consequently, oxygen volume (mL·min·kg) and OP (μL O·beat·kg) were also lower ( < 0.05). Blood parameters were not related to RFI and RFI ( > 0.05); however, G:F-efficient steers showed lower hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations ( < 0

  9. Effects of growth, diving history, and high altitude on blood oxygen capacity in harbor seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodama, A. M.; Elsner, R.; Pace, N.

    1977-01-01

    Blood volume and body composition for diving and nondiving harbor seals were measured at six-week intervals during a 10-month period of captitivity. Whole body hematocrit, red cell volume per kg of lean body mass, and total circulating hemoglobin per kg lean body mass were significantly higher in the diving group, but relatively large blood volumes expressed in terms of body weight (11-12%) were found in both groups. A pair of harbor seals exposed to high altitude for about three months registered significant increases in red cell volume, blood hemoglobin levels, and blood volume expressed in terms of body weight; results of alveolar gas analyses indicate that hyperventilation also occurred. These typical mammalian responses to hypoxia suggest that the harbor seal's large blood volume and high hemoglobin content are an expression of phylogenetic control, and that in spite of its adaptability to apnea during its diving life, the animal cannot be considered preacclimatized to high altitude.

  10. High impact of uranyl ions on carrying-releasing oxygen capability of hemoglobin-based blood substitutes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li; Du, Lili; Jia, Yi; Liu, Wenyuan; Liu, Zhichao; Li, Junbai

    2015-01-07

    The effect of radioactive UO2 (2+) on the oxygen-transporting capability of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers has been investigated in vitro. The hemoglobin (Hb) microspheres fabricated by the porous template covalent layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly were utilized as artificial oxygen carriers and blood substitutes. Magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (Fe3 O4 ) were loaded in porous CaCO3 particles for magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS). Through the adsorption spectrum of magnetic Hb microspheres after adsorbing UO2 (2+) , it was found that UO2 (2+) was highly loaded in the magnetic Hb microspheres, and it shows that the presence of UO2 (2+) in vivo destroys the structure and oxygen-transporting capability of Hb microspheres. In view of the high adsorption capacity of UO2 (2+) , the as-assembled magnetic Hb microspheres can be considered as a novel, highly effective adsorbent for removing metal toxins from radiation-contaminated bodies, or from nuclear-power reactor effluent before discharge into the environment.

  11. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  12. Nifedipine improves blood flow and oxygen supply, but not steady-state oxygenation of tumours in perfusion pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Thews, O; Hummel, M; Kelleher, D K; Lecher, B; Vaupel, P

    2002-12-02

    Isolated limb perfusion allows the direct application of therapeutic agents to a tumour-bearing extremity. The present study investigated whether the dihydropyridine-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine could improve blood flow and oxygenation status of experimental tumours during isolated limb perfusion. Perfusion was performed by cannulation of the femoral artery and vein in rats bearing DS-sarcoma on the hind foot dorsum. Perfusion rate was adjusted to maintain a perfusion pressure of 100-140 mmHg throughout the experiment. Following equilibration, nifedipine was continuously infused for 30 min (8.3 microg min(-1) kg(-1) BW). During constant-pressure isolated limb perfusion, nifedipine can significantly increase perfusion rate (+100%) and RBC flux (+60%) through experimental leg tumours. "Steal phenomena" in favour of the surrounding normal tissue and oedema formation were not observed. Despite the increased oxygen availability (+63%) seen upon application of this calcium channel blocker, nifedipine does not result in a substantial reduction of tumour hypoxia, most probably due to an increase in O(2) uptake with rising O(2) supply to the tumour-bearing hind limb. Nifedipine application during isolated limb perfusion can enhance tumour microcirculation and may therefore promote the delivery (pharmacokinetics) of anti-cancer drugs to the tumour and by this improve the efficacy of pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

  13. Myocardial blood flow measurement with a conventional dual-head SPECT/CT with spatiotemporal iterative reconstructions - a clinical feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Alhassen, Fares; Nguyen, Nhan; Bains, Sukhkarn; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho; Bacharach, Stephen L; Song, Xiyun; Shao, Lingxiong; Gullberg, Grant T; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras typically rotate too slowly around a patient to capture changes in the blood pool activity distribution and provide accurate kinetic parameters. A spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction method to overcome these limitations was investigated. Dynamic rest/stress 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) SPECT/CT was performed along with reference standard rest/stress dynamic positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 13N-NH3 in five patients. The SPECT data were reconstructed using conventional and spatiotemporal iterative reconstruction methods. The spatiotemporal reconstruction yielded improved image quality, defined here as a statistically significant (p<0.01) 50% contrast enhancement. We did not observe a statistically significant difference between the correlations of the conventional and spatiotemporal SPECT myocardial uptake K 1 values with PET K 1 values (r=0.25, 0.88, respectively) (p<0.17). These results indicate the clinical feasibility of quantitative, dynamic SPECT/CT using 99mTc-MIBI and warrant further investigation. Spatiotemporal reconstruction clearly provides an advantage over a conventional reconstruction in computing K 1. PMID:24380045

  14. Skin blood flow differentially affects near-infrared spectroscopy-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation and blood volume at rest and during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M

    2010-11-01

    The impact of skin blood flow changes on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived measures of muscle oxygen saturation (SmO(2)) and blood volume has not been fully established. We measured SmO(2) and total hemoglobin concentration ([tHb]) responses of the right vastus lateralis during rest and dynamic knee extension exercise in ten young, healthy males. The protocol was repeated four times: twice without thigh heating for reliability, and twice with different grades of thigh heating for assessing the impact of cutaneous vasodilation on SmO(2) and Δ[tHb]. The reliability of our SmO(2) and [tHb] measurements was good. Thigh heating at 37 and 42°C caused marked increases in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during rest and exercise (P < 0.001 between each condition), and small increases in SmO(2) during rest (from 69 ± 8% to 71 ± 7% and 73 ± 6%, respectively; P < 0.05 between each condition), but not during exercise (e.g. 1 min exercise: 51 ± 11% vs. 51 ± 11% and 52 ± 11%, respectively; P > 0.05 at all time points). In contrast, heating-induced increases in %CVC(peak) were accompanied by increases in [tHb] at rest and during exercise and a decrease in Δ[tHb] during exercise (all P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that NIRS-derived measures of SmO(2) and blood volume are differentially affected by skin blood flow at rest and during exercise. The findings from this study should be considered in NIRS experiments where skin blood flow can change markedly (e.g. high-intensity and/or prolonged exercise).

  15. Targeted Genome Engineering to Control VEGF Expression in Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Potential Implications for the Treatment of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Min; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Shen, Yi-Ming; Bonsra, Kwaku; Kang, Byung-Jae; Yum, Soo-Young; Kim, Joo-Hyun; Lee, So-Yeong; Choi, Min-Cheol; Kim, Hyongbum Henry; Jang, Goo; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2017-03-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) exhibit potency for the regeneration of infarcted hearts. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is capable of inducing angiogenesis and can boost stem cell-based therapeutic effects. However, high levels of VEGF can cause abnormal blood vessel growth and hemangiomas. Thus, a controllable system to induce therapeutic levels of VEGF is required for cell therapy. We generated an inducible VEGF-secreting stem cell (VEGF/hUCB-MSC) that controls the expression of VEGF and tested the therapeutic efficacy in rat myocardial infarction (MI) model to apply functional stem cells to MI. To introduce the inducible VEGF gene cassette into a safe harbor site of the hUCB-MSC chromosome, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases system was used. After confirming the integration of the cassette into the locus, VEGF secretion in physiological concentration from VEGF/hUCB-MSCs after doxycycline (Dox) induction was proved in conditioned media. VEGF secretion was detected in mice implanted with VEGF/hUCB-MSCs grown via a cell sheet system. Vessel formation was induced in mice transplanted with Matrigel containing VEGF/hUCB-MSCs treated with Dox. Moreover, seeding of the VEGF/hUCB-MSCs onto the cardiac patch significantly improved the left ventricle ejection fraction and fractional shortening in a rat MI model upon VEGF induction. Induced VEGF/hUCB-MSC patches significantly decreased the MI size and fibrosis and increased muscle thickness, suggesting improved survival of cardiomyocytes and protection from MI damage. These results suggest that our inducible VEGF-secreting stem cell system is an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of MI. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1040-1051.

  16. Noninvasive Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow and Blood Oxygenation Using Near-Infrared and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopies in Critically Brain-Injured Adults

    PubMed Central

    Durduran, Turgut; Frangos, Suzanne; Edlow, Brian L.; Buckley, Erin M.; Moss, Heather E.; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Guoqiang; Choe, Regine; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Wolf, Ronald L.; Grady, M. Sean; Greenberg, Joel H.; Levine, Joshua M.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Detre, John A.; Kofke, W. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Background This study assesses the utility of a hybrid optical instrument for noninvasive transcranial monitoring in the neurointensive care unit. The instrument is based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for measurement of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration. DCS/NIRS measurements of CBF and oxygenation from frontal lobes are compared with concurrent xenon-enhanced computed tomography (XeCT) in patients during induced blood pressure changes and carbon dioxide arterial partial pressure variation. Methods Seven neurocritical care patients were included in the study. Relative CBF measured by DCS (rCBFDCS), and changes in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO2), deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHb), and total hemoglobin concentration (ΔTHC), measured by NIRS, were continuously monitored throughout XeCT during a baseline scan and a scan after intervention. CBF from XeCT regions-of-interest (ROIs) under the optical probes were used to calculate relative XeCT CBF (rCBFXeCT) and were then compared to rCBFDCS. Spearman’s rank coefficients were employed to test for associations between rCBFDCS and rCBFXeCT, as well as between rCBF from both modalities and NIRS parameters. Results rCBFDCS and rCBFXeCT showed good correlation (rs = 0.73, P = 0.010) across the patient cohort. Moderate correlations between rCBFDCS and ΔHbO2/ΔTHC were also observed. Both NIRS and DCS distinguished the effects of xenon inhalation on CBF, which varied among the patients. Conclusions DCS measurements of CBF and NIRS measurements of tissue blood oxygenation were successfully obtained in neurocritical care patients. The potential for DCS to provide continuous, noninvasive bedside monitoring for the purpose of CBF management and individualized care is demonstrated. PMID:19908166

  17. Multiple taxon multiple locality approach to providing oxygen isotope evidence for warm-blooded theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, Henry C.; Rogers, Raymond R.

    2000-09-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios of fossil remains of coexisting taxa from several different localities can be used to help investigate dinosaur thermoregulation. Focusing on the Late Cretaceous, oxygen isotope ratios of crocodile tooth enamel from four separate localities exhibit less of a decrease with latitude than do ratios of tooth enamel from coexisting theropod dinosaurs. A shallower latitudinal gradient for crocodiles is consistent with how oxygen isotope ratios should vary for heterothermic animals having body temperatures coupled with their environments (“cold blooded”), while a steeper gradient for theropods is consistent with how these ratios should vary for homeothermic animals having constant body temperatures independent of their environments (“warm blooded”). This inferred homoethermy in theropods is likely due to higher rates of metabolic heat production relative to crocodiles and is not an artifact of body size.

  18. Theoretical considerations to optimize transabdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Boas, David A.

    2001-06-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are: the first in the range of 670-720nm and the second in the range of 825-925nm. Further we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements, and their contribution to the obtained saturation results.

  19. Megalophallus as a sequela of priapism in sickle cell anemia: use of blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kassim, A A; Umans, H; Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E

    2000-09-01

    Priapism is a common complication of sickle cell anemia. We report a little known sequela of priapism: painless megalophallus, with significant penile enlargement. The patient had had an intense episode of priapism 9 years previously and his penis remained enlarged. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging revealed enlarged, hypoxic corpora cavernosa. Megalophallus probably resulted from permanent loss of elasticity of the tunica albuginea due to severe engorgement during the episode of priapism. This sequela needs to be recognized by physicians because no intervention is necessary and sexual function seems to remain intact.

  20. Blood Oxygen Depletion in Diving California Sea Lions: How Close to the Limit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    appropriate surrogate model for further investigation of blood N2 uptake during diving. RELATED PROJECTS Deep-diving California sea lions: Are they... reservoir in the collapsed lungs serves to supplement blood O2 levels during ascent. Conclusions: Although California sea lions have extreme hypoxemic...Elsner et al. 1998) and f) the basic assumptions of many recent computer models of the uptake and distribution of N2 during diving (Fahlman et al. 2009

  1. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  2. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  3. Trans-abdominal monitoring of fetal arterial blood oxygenation using pulse oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourabian, Anna; Siegel, Andrew M.; Chance, Britton; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Rode, Martha; Boas, David A.

    2000-10-01

    Pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation monitoring) has markedly improved medical care in many fields, including anesthesiology, intensive care, and newborn intensive care. In obstetrics, fetal heart rate monitoring remains the standard for intrapartum assessment of fetal well being. Fetal oxygen saturation monitoring is a new technique currently under development. It is potentially superior to electronic fetal heart rate monitoring (cardiotocography) because it allows direct assessment of both the fetal oxygen status and fetal tissue perfusion. Here we present the analysis for determining the most optimal wavelength selection for pulse oximetry. The wavelengths we chose as the most optimal are the first in the range of 670 - 720 nm and the second in the range of 825 - 925 nm. Further, we discuss the possible systematic errors during our measurements and their contribution to the obtained saturation results. We present feasibility studies for fetal pulse oximetry, monitored noninvasively through the maternal abdomen. Our preliminary experiments show that the fetal pulse can be discriminated from the maternal pulse and thus, in principle, the fetal arterial oxygen saturation can be obtained. We present the methodology for obtaining these data, and discuss the dependence of our measurements on the fetal position with respect to the optode assembly.

  4. The oxygen transport system of red blood cells during diabetic ketoacidosis and recovery.

    PubMed

    Ditzel, J; Standl, E

    1975-08-01

    Daily evaluations of 8 newly detected ketoacidotic diabetics showed the Bohr-effect of haemoglobin to be decreased by 50% while erythrocyte 2,3-DPG was decreased below 10 mumoles/g Hb. 2,3-DPG correlated strongly with pH during acidosis and with plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) subsequently to the first insulin administration. Oxygen affinity of haemoglobin, measured as P50 act pH, was unchanged in ketoacidosis compared to the time, however, P50 act pH fell striking (p less than 0.001) and remained decreased up to 7 days depending upon the resynthesis of 2,3-DPG in relation to Pi. The Hill-coefeficient in reflecting the slope of the oxygen dissociation curve was diminished in ketoacidosis (p less than 0.005), and decreased further after pH-normalization (p less than 0.005). There was a close association of n with 2,3-DPG (p less than 0.001) and additionally with Pi at 2,3-DPG-levels below 10 mumoles/g Hb. Based on these findings a decreased erythrocyte oxygen release of one fifth during acidosis and more than one third after pH-correction can be hypothesised. In view of the intimate relation of Pi to the oxygen transport system it is suggesed that treatment of ketoacidosis should include Pi-sugstitution.

  5. Feed-derived volatile basic nitrogen increases reactive oxygen species production of blood leukocytes in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Ei; Gross, Josef J; Kawashima, Chiho; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Kida, Katsuya; Miyamoto, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated over 9 months the changes of fermentative quality of total mixed rations (TMR) containing grass silage (GS) as a major component, associated with changes in the volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) levels in an experimental dairy farm. Effects of VBN levels in TMR on metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and conception rates for dairy cows were analyzed. According to VBN levels in TMR during survey periods, three distinct phases were identified; phase A with low VBN; phase B with high VBN; and phase C with mid-VBN. Metabolic parameters in blood were all within normal range. However, during phases B and C, nitrogen metabolic indices such as blood urea nitrogen and milk urea nitrogen showed higher levels compared to those in phase A, and a simultaneous increase in ROS production by blood PMNs and the load on hepatic function in metabolic parameters was observed in the cows with a lower conception rate. This suggests that feeding TMR with elevated VBN levels due to poor fermented GS results in stimulation of ROS production by PMNs by ammonia, and negatively affects metabolism and reproductive performance in lactating dairy cow.

  6. Using ultrasonography to monitor liver blood flow for liver transplant from donors supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xian-Sheng; Wang, Sha-Sha; Cheng, Qi; Ye, Chuang-Wen; Huo, Feng; Li, Peng

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to support brain-dead donors for liver procurement. This study investigated the potential role of ultrasonographic monitoring of hepatic perfusion as an aid to improve the viability of liver transplants obtained from brain-dead donors who are supported on ECMO. A total of 40 brain-dead patients maintained on ECMO served as the study population. Hepatic blood flow was monitored using ultrasonography, and perioperative optimal perfusion was maintained by calibrating ECMO. Liver function tests were performed to assess the viability of the graft. The hepatic arterial blood flow was well maintained with no significant changes observed before and after ECMO (206 ± 32 versus 241 ± 45 mL/minute; P = 0.06). Similarly, the portal venous blood flow was also maintained throughout (451 ± 65 versus 482 ± 77 mL/minute; P = 0.09). No significant change in levels of total bilirubin, alanine transaminase, and lactic acid were reported during ECMO (P = 0.17, P = 0.08, and P = 0.09, respectively). Before the liver is procured, ultrasonographic monitoring of hepatic blood flow could be a valuable aid to improve the viability of a liver transplant by allowing for real-time calibration of ECMO perfusion in brain-dead liver donors. In our study, ultrasonographic monitoring helped prevent warm ischemic injury to the liver graft by avoiding both overperfusion and underperfusion of the liver.

  7. Blood oxygen- and carbon dioxide-carrying properties in captive penguins: effects of moulting and inter-specific comparison.

    PubMed

    Maxime, Valérie; Hassani, Sami

    2014-02-01

    Venous blood gas-carrying properties were compared in the three captive species of penguins (king, gentoo and rockhopper) at Océanopolis (France). Captivity permitted to control environmental influences. Given their different ecology and diving behaviour in the wild, it was wondered whether milder conditions and dive privation have repercussions on parameters determining oxygen storage and acid-base status of these birds. In addition, this work provided the opportunity to study the effects of moulting in king penguins. This annual event that imposes deep metabolic adjustments is liable to affect blood gas levels. Because of the regular food supply and probably also of the blood sampling conditions, the blood pH of captive penguins was low. This effect was increased in moulting penguins and supposedly due to both the decreased energetic metabolism and the production of uric acid resulting from new feather synthesis. The decrease in the anion gap also revealed the use of plasmatic albumin for this synthesis. The elevated venous PO2 in all birds is not likely due to stress caused by sampling conditions. The other data, in accordance with those in the literature, show neither major influence of captivity nor fundamental interspecific differences, despite potential diving aptitude.

  8. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beekvelt, Mireille C.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Hopman, Maria T.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1997-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  9. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beekvelt, Mireille C. P.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1998-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  10. Blood oxygen depletion is independent of dive function in a deep diving vertebrate, the northern elephant seal.

    PubMed

    Meir, Jessica U; Robinson, Patrick W; Vilchis, L Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L; Costa, Daniel P; Ponganis, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most "natural

  11. Blood Oxygen Depletion Is Independent of Dive Function in a Deep Diving Vertebrate, the Northern Elephant Seal

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Jessica U.; Robinson, Patrick W.; Vilchis, L. Ignacio; Kooyman, Gerald L.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Although energetics is fundamental to animal ecology, traditional methods of determining metabolic rate are neither direct nor instantaneous. Recently, continuous blood oxygen (O2) measurements were used to assess energy expenditure in diving elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris), demonstrating that an exceptional hypoxemic tolerance and exquisite management of blood O2 stores underlie the extraordinary diving capability of this consummate diver. As the detailed relationship of energy expenditure and dive behavior remains unknown, we integrated behavior, ecology, and physiology to characterize the costs of different types of dives of elephant seals. Elephant seal dive profiles were analyzed and O2 utilization was classified according to dive type (overall function of dive: transit, foraging, food processing/rest). This is the first account linking behavior at this level with in vivo blood O2 measurements in an animal freely diving at sea, allowing us to assess patterns of O2 utilization and energy expenditure between various behaviors and activities in an animal in the wild. In routine dives of elephant seals, the blood O2 store was significantly depleted to a similar range irrespective of dive function, suggesting that all dive types have equal costs in terms of blood O2 depletion. Here, we present the first physiological evidence that all dive types have similarly high blood O2 demands, supporting an energy balance strategy achieved by devoting one major task to a given dive, thereby separating dive functions into distinct dive types. This strategy may optimize O2 store utilization and recovery, consequently maximizing time underwater and allowing these animals to take full advantage of their underwater resources. This approach may be important to optimizing energy expenditure throughout a dive bout or at-sea foraging trip and is well suited to the lifestyle of an elephant seal, which spends > 90% of its time at sea submerged making diving its most

  12. Relationship between level of forage intake, blood flow and oxygen consumption by splanchnic tissues of sheep fed a tropical grass forage.

    PubMed

    Hentz, F; Kozloski, G V; Zeni, D; Brun, M V; Stefanello, S

    2017-02-01

    Four Polwarth castrated male sheep (42 ± 4.4 kg live weight (LW) surgically implanted with chronic indwelling catheters into the mesenteric, portal and hepatic veins, housed in metabolism cages and offered Cynodon sp. hay at rates (g of dry matter (DM)/kg LW) of 7, 14, 21 or ad libitum, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experiment to evaluate the effect of the level of forage intake on blood flow and oxygen consumption by the portal-drained viscera (PDV), liver and total splanchnic tissues (ST). The portal blood flow and the oxygen consumption by PDV linearly increased at increased organic matter (OM) intake. No effect of level of OM intake was obtained for the hepatic artery blood flow and oxygen consumption by liver. As a consequence, the level of OM intake only tended to directly affect hepatic blood flow and oxygen consumption by total ST. Oxygen consumption was linearly and positively related to blood flow across PDV, liver and total ST. The heat production by PDV and total ST, as proportion of metabolizable energy (ME) intake, decreased curvilinearly at increased ME intake. In conclusion, the oxygen consumption by PDV, but not by liver, was directly related to the level of forage intake by sheep. Moreover, when ingested at levels below maintenance, most of ME was spent as heat produced by ST.

  13. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism during mild hypothermia in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, S; Suzuki, A; Hadeishi, H; Yasui, N; Hatazawa, J

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolism during hypothermia (33-34 degrees C) was evaluated in 5 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage by positron emission tomography (PET). Their preoperative clinical condition was WFNS scale IV or V. The patients received surface cooling postoperatively, and were maintained in a hypothermic state during transfer for radiological examination. Positron emission tomography revealed a decrease in cerebral blood flow and O2 metabolic rate. Cerebral blood flow was 34.8+/-15.1 ml/100 ml/min and the O2 metabolic rate was 1.85+/-0.61 ml/100 ml/min in areas of the middle cerebral artery ipsilateral to the ruptured aneurysms, whereas these values were 30.8+/-7.1 and 2.21+/-0.45 ml/100 ml/min, respectively, on the contralateral side. This represents a decrease of 37+/-27% compared to normal cerebral blood flow and 52+/-16% compared to normal O2 metabolic rate (p < 0.02) in the ipsilateral areas, and decreases of 44+/-13% and 43+/-12%, respectively, on the contralateral side. The present results reflected the luxury perfusion state in almost all cases and provide the first PET evidence of decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolic rate of O2 during hypothermia in humans.

  14. Near-infrared diffuse optical monitoring of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation for the prediction of vasovagal syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Wang, Siqi; Evans, Joyce M.; Rayapati, Abner; Randall, David C.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Significant drops in arterial blood pressure and cerebral hemodynamics have been previously observed during vasovagal syncope (VVS). Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of these physiological variables during VVS is rare, but critical for determining which variable is the most sensitive parameter to predict VVS. The present study used a novel custom-designed diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter and a finger plethysmograph to simultaneously monitor relative changes of cerebral blood flow (rCBF), cerebral oxygenation (i.e., oxygenated/deoxygenated/total hemoglobin concentration: r[HbO2]/r[Hb]/rTHC), and mean arterial pressure (rMAP) during 70 deg head-up tilt (HUT) in 14 healthy adults. Six subjects developed presyncope during HUT. Two-stage physiological responses during HUT were observed in the presyncopal group: slow and small changes in measured variables (i.e., Stage I), followed by rapid and dramatic decreases in rMAP, rCBF, r[HbO2], and rTHC (i.e., Stage II). Compared to other physiological variables, rCBF reached its breakpoint between the two stages earliest and had the largest decrease (76±8%) during presyncope. Our results suggest that rCBF has the best sensitivity for the assessment of VVS. Most importantly, a threshold of ˜50% rCBF decline completely separated the subjects from those without presyncope, suggesting its potential for predicting VVS.

  15. Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Buckley, Erin M.; Thomas, Amy; Kim, Meeri N.; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

  16. Reduced cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in extremely preterm neonates with low-grade germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Hagan, Katherine; Fenoglio, Angela; Grant, P. Ellen; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2016-05-01

    Low-grade germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (GM-IVH) is the most common complication in extremely premature neonates. The occurrence of GM-IVH is highly associated with hemodynamic instability in the premature brain, yet the long-term impact of low-grade GM-IVH on cerebral blood flow and neuronal health have not been fully investigated. We used an innovative combination of frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (FDNIRS-DCS) to measure cerebral oxygen saturation (SO2) and an index of cerebral blood flow (CBFi) at the infant’s bedside and compute an index of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i). We enrolled twenty extremely low gestational age (ELGA) neonates (seven with low-grade GM-IVH) and monitored them weekly until they reached full-term equivalent age. During their hospital stay, we observed consistently lower CBFi and CMRO2i in ELGA neonates with low-grade GM-IVH compared to neonates without hemorrhages. Furthermore, lower CBFi and CMRO2i in the former group persists even after the resolution of the hemorrhage. In contrast, SO2 does not differ between groups. Thus, CBFi and CMRO2i may have better sensitivity than SO2 in detecting GM-IVH-related effects on infant brain development. FDNIRS-DCS methods may have clinical benefit for monitoring the evolution of GM-IVH, evaluating treatment response, and potentially predicting neurodevelopmental outcome.

  17. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  18. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-shan; Li, Su-zhi; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (−17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  19. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  20. In vivo spectral and fluorescence imaging microscopy of tumor microvessel blood supply and oxygenation changes following vascular targeting agent treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jennifer; Kozikowski, Raymond; Molnar, Nikolett; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of new microvasculature is essential for a tumor mass to grow. Vascular targeting agents (VTAs), including anti-angiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting a