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Sample records for myocardial contractility depression

  1. Myocardial contractile depression from high-frequency vibration is not due to increased cross-bridge breakage.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K B; Wu, Y; Kirkpatrick, R D; Slinker, B K

    1998-04-01

    Experiments were conducted in 10 isolated rabbit hearts at 25 degrees C to test the hypothesis that vibration-induced depression of myocardial contractile function was the result of increased cross-bridge breakage. Small-amplitude sinusoidal changes in left ventricular volume were administered at frequencies of 25, 50, and 76.9 Hz. The resulting pressure response consisted of a depressive response [delta Pd(t), a sustained decrease in pressure that was not at the perturbation frequency] and an infrequency response [delta Pf(t), that part at the perturbation frequency]. delta Pd(t) represented the effects of contractile depression. A cross-bridge model was applied to delta Pf(t) to estimate cross-bridge cycling parameters. Responses were obtained during Ca2+ activation and during Sr2+ activation when the time course of pressure development was slowed by a factor of 3. delta Pd(t) was strongly affected by whether the responses were activated by Ca2+ or by Sr2+. In the Sr(2+)-activated state, delta Pd(t) declined while pressure was rising and relaxation rate decreased. During Ca2+ and Sr2+ activation, velocity of myofilament sliding was insignificant as a predictor of delta Pd(t) or, when it was significant, participated by reducing delta Pd(t) rather than contributing to its magnitude. Furthermore, there was no difference in cross-bridge cycling rate constants when the Ca(2+)-activated state was compared with the Sr(2+)-activated state. An increase in cross-bridge detachment rate constant with volume-induced change in cross-bridge distortion could not be detected. Finally, processes responsible for delta Pd(t) occurred at slower frequencies than those of cross-bridge detachment. Collectively, these results argue against a cross-bridge detachment basis for vibration-induced myocardial depression.

  2. Acute exposure to Catha edulis depresses contractility and induces myocardial infarction in spontaneously contracting, isolated rabbit’s heart

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashem, Fahaid H.; Dallak, Mohammad A.; Nwoye, Luke O.; Bin-Jaliah, Ismaeel M.; Al-Amri, Hasan S.; Rezk, Mahmoud H.; Sakr, Hussein F.; Shatoor, Abdullah S.; Al-Khateeb, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Khat chewing is a recreational habit known to pose major socio-economic and medical problems in countries of Southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa. Among other adverse health effects, khat chewing has been associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in heavy consumers. This study was carried out to examine the direct effects of Catha edulis extract on contractility of spontaneously contracting, isolated rabbit heart and to investigate its mechanism of action. Isolated six rabbit’s hearts attached to a Langendorff apparatus were perfused with extract at a constant flow rate and continuously bubbled with a 95% O2/5% CO2 gas mixture. Each heart served as its own control, as responses were recorded before and after administration of C. edulis extract. Varying concentrations of extract (50, 100 and 250 mg/ml) were loaded in the perfusate, their effects recorded and effluent fluid collected for assay of cardiac enzymes. Histological examination of the cardiac tissue was performed at the end of perfusion with 250 mg/ml extract. This study revealed that acute exposure to C. edulis extract exerted negative inotropic and chronotropic effects on isolated hearts. The extract also had a vasoconstrictor effect on coronary vessels, independent of α1 adrenergic receptor stimulation. Histological examination of hearts perfused with 250 mg/ml C. edulis extract revealed the presence of histological changes unique to myocardial infarction, a finding consistent with observed increased levels of cardiac enzymes in perfusates. Thus, we have demonstrated experimentally a direct cardiac depressant- and MI inducing effects of C. edulis extract. These results are consistent with the earlier reported deleterious effects of khat on cardiovascular function among khat chewers. PMID:23961167

  3. Regional myocardial contractile function: multiparametric strain mapping.

    PubMed

    Cupps, Brian P; Taggar, Ajay K; Reynolds, Lina M; Lawton, Jennifer S; Pasque, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue tagging enables the quantification of multiple strain indices that can be combined through normalization into a single multiparametric index of regional myocardial contractile function. The aim of this study was to test the ability of multiparametric strain analysis to quantify regional differences in contractile function in an ovine model of myocardial injury. Regional variance in myocardial contractile function was induced in eight sheep by the ligation of the blood supply to the anterior and apical left ventricular (LV) myocardial walls. LV systolic strain was obtained from tissue tagged MRI images. A normal strain database (n=50) defines all parameters of systolic strain and allows normalization of regional function at 15,300 LV points by calculation of a z-score. Multiparametric systolic strain z-scores were therefore determined for 15,300 points in each injured sheep left ventricle. Multiparametric z-scores were found to vary significantly by region (P<0.001). z-Scores in regions remote to the infarct were found to be significantly smaller than those in the regions most likely to include infarcted myocardium. In this pre-clinical evaluation of MRI-based multiparametric strain analysis, it accurately quantified and visually defined regional differences in myocardial contractile function.

  4. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure.

  5. Myocardial contractile function and intradialytic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Owen, Paul J; Priestman, William S; Sigrist, Mhairi K; Lambie, Stewart H; John, Stephen G; Chesterton, Lindsay J; McIntyre, Christopher W

    2009-07-01

    Dialysis-induced hypotension remains a significant problem in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Numerous factors result in dysregulation of blood pressure control and impaired myocardial reserve in response to HD-induced cardiovascular stress. Episodic intradialytic hypotension may be involved in the pathogenesis of evolving myocardial injury. We performed an initial pilot investigation of cardiovascular functional response to pharmacological cardiovascular stress in hypotension-resistant (HR) and hypotension-prone (HP) HD patients. We studied 10 matched chronic HD patients (5 HP, 5 HR). Dobutamine-atropine stress (DAS) was performed on a nondialysis short interval day, with noninvasive pulse-wave analysis using the Finometer to continuously measure hemodynamic variables. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed at rest and during DAS. Baseline hemodynamic variables were not significantly different. The groups had differing hemodynamic responses to DAS. The Mean arterial pressure was unchanged in the HR group but decreased in HP patients (-13.6 +/- 3.5 mmHg; P<0.001). This was associated with failure to significantly increase cardiac output in the HP group (cf. increase in cardiac output in the HR group of +33.4 +/- 6%; P<0.05), and a reduced response in total peripheral resistance (HP -10.3 +/- 6.8%, HR -22.7 +/- 2.9%, P=NS). Baroreflex sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at baseline or within groups with increasing levels of DAS; however, the mean baroreflex sensitivity was higher in HR cf. HP subjects throughout pharmacological stress (P<0.05). Hypotension-prone patients appear to have an impaired cardiovascular response to DAS. The most significant abnormality is an impaired myocardial contractile reserve. Early identification of these patients would allow utilization of therapeutic strategies to improve intradialytic tolerability, potentially abrogating aggravation of myocardial injury.

  6. Depression after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, R C

    2001-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for increased postmyocardial infarction morbidity and mortality, even after controlling for the extent of coronary artery disease, infarct size, and the severity of left ventricular dysfunction. This risk factor takes on added significance when one considers that almost half of patients recovering from a myocardial infarction have major or minor depression and that major depression alone occurs in about one in five of these individuals. Despite the well-documented risk of depression, questions remain about the mechanism of the relationship between mood disturbance and adverse outcome. The link may be explained by an association with lower levels of social support, poor adherence to recommended medical therapy and lifestyle changes intended to reduce the risk of subsequent cardiac events, disturbances in autonomic tone, enhanced platelet activation and aggregation, and systemic immune activation. Unfortunately, questions about the pathophysiologic mechanism of depression in this setting are paralleled by uncertainties about the optimal treatment of depression for patients recovering from a myocardial infarction and by a lack of knowledge about whether treating depression lowers the associated increased mortality risk. Ongoing research studies will help to determine the benefits of psychosocial interventions and of antidepressant therapy for patients soon after myocardial infarction. Although the identification of depression as a risk factor may by itself be a reason to incorporate a comprehensive psychological evaluation into the routine care of patients with myocardial infarction, this practice should certainly become standard if studies show that treating depression reduces the increased mortality risk of these patients.

  7. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  8. A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep with Left Ventricular Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kay; Stander, Nielen; Jhun, Choon-Sik; Zhang, Zhihong; Suzuki, Takamaro; Wang, Guan-Ying; Saeed, Maythem; Wallace, Arthur W.; Tseng, Elaine E.; Baker, Anthony J.; Saloner, David; Einstein, Daniel R.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating regional myocardial contractility in vivo would be of great value in the design and evaluation of new surgical and medical strategies to treat and/or prevent infarction-induced heart failure. As a first step towards developing such a method, an explicit finite element (FE) model-based formal optimization of regional myocardial contractility in a sheep with left ventricular (LV) aneurysm was performed using tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and cardiac catheterization pressures. From the tagged MR images, 3-dimensional (3D) myocardial strains, LV volumes and geometry for the animal-specific 3D FE model of the LV were calculated, while the LV pressures provided physiological loading conditions. Active material parameters (Tmax_B and Tmax_R) in the non-infarcted myocardium adjacent to the aneurysm (borderzone) and in myocardium remote from the aneurysm were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the successive response surface method for optimization. The significant depression in optimized Tmax_B relative to Tmax_R was confirmed by direct ex vivo force measurements from skinned fiber preparations. The optimized values of Tmax_B and Tmax_R were not overly sensitive to the passive material parameters specified. The computation time of less than 5 hours associated with our proposed method for estimating regional myocardial contractility in vivo makes it a potentially very useful clinical tool. PMID:20016753

  9. Circadian rhythms in fatty acid-induced depression of myocardial contractile function: Potential mediation by the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in susceptibility to cardiovascular (CV) pathologic events (e.g., arrhythmias, myocardial infarction) are well established. These phenomena have been explained largely by diurnal variations in neurohumoral influences, such as sympathetic activity. Circadian clocks are intracellular...

  10. Green tea extract given before regional myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in rats improves myocardial contractility by attenuating calcium overload.

    PubMed

    Liou, Ying-Ming; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Chen, Jan-Yow

    2010-11-01

    There is evidence for a negative correlation between green tea consumption and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine whether green tea extract (GTE) given before regional myocardial ischemia could improve depression of myocardial contractility by preventing cytosolic Ca(2+) overload. Regional ischemia-reperfusion (IR) was induced in rats by ligating the left anterior descending branch for 20 min, then releasing the ligature. Ligation induced ventricular arrhythmias in rats without GTE pretreatment, but decreased arrhythmogenesis was seen in rats pretreated 30 min earlier with GTE (400 mg/kg). During reperfusion, arrhythmias only occurred during the initial 5 min, and GTE pretreatment had no effect. After overnight recovery, serum cTnI levels were greatly increased in control post-IR rats but only slightly elevated in GTE-pretreated post-IR rats. Myocardial contractility measured by echocardiography was still depressed after 3 days in control post-IR rats, but not in GTE-pretreated post-IR rats. No myocardial ischemic injury was seen in post-IR rats with or without GTE pretreatment. Using freshly isolated single heart myocytes, GTE was found to attenuate the post-IR injury-associated cytosolic Ca(2+) overload and modulate changes in the levels and distribution of myofibril, adherens junction, and gap junction proteins. In summary, GTE pretreatment protects cardiomyocytes from IR injury by preventing cytosolic Ca(2+) overload, myofibril disruption, and alterations in adherens and gap junction protein expression and distribution. PMID:20922441

  11. Catecholamines and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia and with an altered thyroid hormone balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruss, G. M.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Zhilinskaya, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia were studied in 109 white rats whose motor activity was severely restricted for up to 30 days. During the first five days myocardial catecholamine content, contractile function, and physical load tolerance decreased. Small doses of thyroidin counteracted this tendency. After 15 days, noradrenalin content and other indices approached normal levels and, after 30 days, were the same as control levels, although cardiac functional reserve was decreased. Thyroidin administration after 15 days had no noticeable effect. A detailed table shows changes in 17 indices of myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia.

  12. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F.; Roe, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complication in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity and carbonyl formation. Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival following LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice following LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O2−, and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury following LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by antioxidant NAC and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy. PMID:22902401

  13. Lidocaine Enhances Contractile Function of Ischemic Myocardial Regions in Mouse Model of Sustained Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Gabriela; Osto, Elena; Jakob, Philipp; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Perioperative myocardial ischemia is common in high-risk patients. The use of interventional revascularisation or even thrombolysis is limited in this patient subset due to exceedingly high bleeding risks. Blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) with lidocaine had been suggested to reduce infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death in ischemia/reperfusion models. However, the impact of lidocaine on cardiac function during sustained ischemia still remains unclear. Methods Sustained myocardial ischemia was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery in 12–16 weeks old male BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous lidocaine (30 mg/kg) was used to block VGSC. Cardiac function was quantified at baseline and at 72h by conventional and speckle-tracking based echocardiography to allow high-sensitivity in vivo phenotyping. Infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were assessed post mortem histologically and indirectly using troponin measurements. Results Ischemia strongly impaired both, global systolic and diastolic function, which were partially rescued in lidocaine treated in mice. No differences regarding infarct size and cardiomyocyte cell death were observed. Mechanistically, and as shown with speckle-tracking analysis, lidocaine specifically improves residual contractility in the ischemic but not in the remote, non-ischemic myocardium. Conclusion VGSC blockade with lidocaine rescues function of ischemic myocardium as a potential bridging to revascularisation in the setting of perioperative myocardial ischemia. PMID:27140425

  14. Mesenteric lymph from rats with trauma-hemorrhagic shock causes abnormal cardiac myocyte function and induces myocardial contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sambol, Justin T; Lee, Marlon A; Jiang, Mingshan; Dosi, Garima; Dong, Wei; Deitch, Edwin A; Yatani, Atsuko

    2011-09-01

    Myocardial contractile dysfunction develops following trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). We have previously shown that, in a rat fixed pressure model of T/HS (mean arterial pressure of 30-35 mmHg for 90 min), mesenteric lymph duct ligation before T/HS prevented T/HS-induced myocardial contractile depression. To determine whether T/HS lymph directly alters myocardial contractility, we examined the functional effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of mesenteric lymph collected from rats undergoing trauma-sham shock (T/SS) or T/HS on both isolated cardiac myocytes and Langendorff-perfused whole hearts. Acute application of T/HS lymph (0.1-2%), but not T/SS lymph, induced dual inotropic effects on myocytes with an immediate increase in the amplitude of cell shortening (1.4 ± 0.1-fold) followed by a complete block of contraction. Similarly, T/HS lymph caused dual, positive and negative effects on cellular Ca²⁺ transients. These effects were associated with changes in the electrophysiological properties of cardiac myocytes; T/HS lymph initially prolonged the action potential duration (action potential duration at 90% repolarization, 3.3 ± 0.4-fold), and this was followed by a decrease in the plateau potential and membrane depolarization. Furthermore, intravenous infusion of T/HS lymph, but not T/SS lymph, caused myocardial contractile dysfunction at 24 h after injection, which mimicked actual T/HS-induced changes; left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP rise and fall (±dP/dt(max)) were decreased and inotropic response to Ca²⁺ was blunted. However, the contractile responsiveness to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the T/HS lymph-infused hearts remained unchanged. These results suggest that T/HS lymph directly causes negative inotropic effects on the myocardium and that T/HS lymph-induced changes in myocyte function are likely to contribute to the development of T/HS-induced myocardial dysfunction.

  15. Mesenteric lymph from rats with trauma-hemorrhagic shock causes abnormal cardiac myocyte function and induces myocardial contractile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Justin T.; Lee, Marlon A.; Jiang, Mingshan; Dosi, Garima; Dong, Wei; Deitch, Edwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial contractile dysfunction develops following trauma-hemorrhagic shock (T/HS). We have previously shown that, in a rat fixed pressure model of T/HS (mean arterial pressure of 30–35 mmHg for 90 min), mesenteric lymph duct ligation before T/HS prevented T/HS-induced myocardial contractile depression. To determine whether T/HS lymph directly alters myocardial contractility, we examined the functional effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of mesenteric lymph collected from rats undergoing trauma-sham shock (T/SS) or T/HS on both isolated cardiac myocytes and Langendorff-perfused whole hearts. Acute application of T/HS lymph (0.1–2%), but not T/SS lymph, induced dual inotropic effects on myocytes with an immediate increase in the amplitude of cell shortening (1.4 ± 0.1-fold) followed by a complete block of contraction. Similarly, T/HS lymph caused dual, positive and negative effects on cellular Ca2+ transients. These effects were associated with changes in the electrophysiological properties of cardiac myocytes; T/HS lymph initially prolonged the action potential duration (action potential duration at 90% repolarization, 3.3 ± 0.4-fold), and this was followed by a decrease in the plateau potential and membrane depolarization. Furthermore, intravenous infusion of T/HS lymph, but not T/SS lymph, caused myocardial contractile dysfunction at 24 h after injection, which mimicked actual T/HS-induced changes; left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP rise and fall (±dP/dtmax) were decreased and inotropic response to Ca2+ was blunted. However, the contractile responsiveness to β-adrenergic receptor stimulation in the T/HS lymph-infused hearts remained unchanged. These results suggest that T/HS lymph directly causes negative inotropic effects on the myocardium and that T/HS lymph-induced changes in myocyte function are likely to contribute to the development of T/HS-induced myocardial dysfunction. PMID:21700891

  16. [CHANGES OF GLOBAL AND LOCAL MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTILITY OF CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT CLEAN-UP WORKERS WITH STABLE ANGINA].

    PubMed

    Nastina, O

    2014-01-01

    Changes of global and local myocardial contractility of Chernobyl accident clean-up workers (ChA CW) with stable angina were investigated. There were discovered that regular long-term treatment of ChA CW with stable angina using of antiischemic and metabolic drugs promoted to stabilization of global and local myocardial contractility indexes. Ejection fraction, degree of contraction of front-rear systolic left ventricle size, systolic thickness of interventricular septum sufficiently increased. Step-by-step worsening of global and local myocardial contractility indexes in cases of non-regular treatment was taken place. Sufficient differences between indexes of ejection fraction, left ventricle end-diastolic volume, systolic thickness and excursion of interventricular septum in stable angina patients of general population and ChA CW were discovered. Results of global and local myocardial contractility monitoring in ChA CW with stable angina substantiate the advisability of long-term supporting treatment using evidence-based drugs.

  17. Atorvastatin administered before myocardial infarction in rats improves contractility irrespective of metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, Tatiana Ederich; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado; Tavares, Angela Maria Vicente; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Schaan, Beatriz

    2014-12-01

    Statins have a beneficial effect after myocardial infarction, but the relationship between glucose transporters and their use before the event has not yet been studied. We assessed the effects of atorvastatin treatment pre- and post-myocardial infarction on cardiovascular function and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in the heart. Wistar-Kyoto rats were treated with 20 mg/kg atorvastatin or vehicle for 14 days before coronary artery occlusion surgery (myocardial infarction) or sham surgery. Echocardiographic evaluations were carried out 48 h after myocardial infarction (protocol A) and after 7 days (protocol B), when atorvastatin was also administered. Plasma inflammatory markers and GLUT4 in the heart were also evaluated. Animals were divided into the following groups: sham-operated and vehicle (C), myocardial infarction and vehicle (I), sham-operated and atorvastatin (CAt) and myocardial infarction and atorvastatin (IAt). After 48 h, myocardial infarction induced higher left ventricular fractional shortening in IAt versus I (~ 60%, P = 0.036), and the ejection fraction was lower (protocol A ~ 37%; protocol B ~ 30%). Myocardial infarction was associated with a rise in plasma membrane GLUT4 after 48 h (~ 40%, P < 0.001), and a reduction in GLUT4 after 7 days (I 25%; IAt 49%, P < 0.001). Atorvastatin treatment for 48 h after the infarction did not change GLUT4 expression, and after 7 days it had an additional negative effect on GLUT4 content (~ 39%, P = 0.030). In conclusion, atorvastatin treatment pre- and post-myocardial infarction improved myocardial contractility after 48 h, but not after 7 days, and was not associated with an increase in GLUT4 expression.

  18. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Cittadini, A; Monti, M G; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, P N; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2006-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the beta-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) handling, oxygen consumption, and beta-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca(2+) handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca(2+)-force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6+/-0.2 versus 2.7+/-0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca(2+) available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca(2+) responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca(2+)-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca(2+)-force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. beta-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1

  19. Doppler-derived myocardial systolic strain rate is a strong index of left ventricular contractility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Neil L.; Firstenberg, Michael S.; Castro, Peter L.; Main, Michael; Travaglini, Agnese; Odabashian, Jill A.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myocardial fiber strain is directly related to left ventricular (LV) contractility. Strain rate can be estimated as the spatial derivative of velocities (dV/ds) obtained by tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE). The purposes of the study were (1) to determine whether TDE-derived strain rate may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative index of contractility and (2) to compare the relative accuracy of systolic strain rate against TDE velocities alone. METHODS AND RESULTS: TDE color M-mode images of the interventricular septum were recorded from the apical 4-chamber view in 7 closed-chest anesthetized mongrel dogs during 5 different inotropic stages. Simultaneous LV volume and pressure were obtained with a combined conductance-high-fidelity pressure catheter. Peak elastance (Emax) was determined as the slope of end-systolic pressure-volume relationships during caval occlusion and was used as the gold standard of LV contractility. Peak systolic TDE myocardial velocities (Sm) and peak (epsilon'(p)) and mean (epsilon'(m)) strain rates obtained at the basal septum were compared against Emax by linear regression. Emax as well as TDE systolic indices increased during inotropic stimulation with dobutamine and decreased with the infusion of esmolol. A stronger association was found between Emax and epsilon'(p) (r=0.94, P<0.01, y=0.29x+0.46) and epsilon'(m) (r=0.88, P<0.01) than for Sm (r=0.75, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: TDE-derived epsilon'(p) and epsilon'(m) are strong noninvasive indices of LV contractility. These indices appear to be more reliable than S(m), perhaps by eliminating translational artifact.

  20. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, A.A.; Faria, T. de O.; Ribeiro, R.F.; Costa, G.P.; Marchezini, B.; Silveira, E.A.; Angeli, J.K.; Stefanon, I.; Vassallo, D.V.; Lizardo, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  1. Comparative effect of lidocaine, bupivacaine and RAC 109 on myocardial conduction and contractility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Nobutaka; Cosson, Claudine; Mazoit, Jean-Xavier

    2012-09-15

    Local anesthetic toxicity includes a decrease in ventricular conduction velocity and a decrease in myocardial contractile force. We tested the hypothesis that, like conduction, contraction was stereoselectively impaired by bupivacaine. We compared R(+) and S(-) bupivacaine to S(+) and R(-) RAC 109 in order to study the effects of hydrophobicity and ionization. We measured the changes in QRS duration and developed pressure in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. Binding of bupivacaine and RAC 109 to the ryanodine receptor was measured. The effect on cell shortening and relenghtening was measured on isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes. A mixed-effect pharmacodynamic model was used. The decrease in conduction velocity induced by the molecules was markedly stereospecific. All local anesthetics decreased ventricular velocity in a stereospecific manner with a RAC I(+)/II(-) and bupivacaine R(+)/S(-) potency ratio of maximum effect of 1.7 and 2.25 respectively. Contractility decreased in a dose dependent manner but this negative inotropic effect was not stereospecific with a C50 (concentration leading to half maximum effect) of 30 and 23 μM for RAC and bupivacaine respectively. The two drugs exhibited two-site binding to ryanodyne that may partly explain the observed effect. An effect on relaxation was observed only at very high concentrations. In conclusion, bupivacaine, a long acting local anesthetic, decreases ventricular conduction in a stereospecific manner, and decreases contractility non-stereospecifically.

  2. Myocardial contractility in the echo lab: molecular, cellular and pathophysiological basis

    PubMed Central

    Bombardini, Tonino

    2005-01-01

    In the standard accepted concept, contractility is the intrinsic ability of heart muscle to generate force and to shorten, independently of changes in the preload or afterload with fixed heart rates. At molecular level the crux of the contractile process lies in the changing concentrations of Ca2+ ions in the myocardial cytosol. Ca2+ ions enter through the calcium channel that opens in response to the wave of depolarization that travels along the sarcolemma. These Ca2+ ions "trigger" the release of more calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and thereby initiate a contraction-relaxation cycle. In the past, several attempts were made to transfer the pure physiological concept of contractility, expressed in the isolated myocardial fiber by the maximal velocity of contraction of unloaded muscle fiber (Vmax), to the in vivo beating heart. Suga and Sagawa achieved this aim by measuring pressure/volume loops in the intact heart: during a positive inotropic intervention, the pressure volume loop reflects a smaller end-systolic volume and a higher end-systolic pressure, so that the slope of the pressure volume relationship moves upward and to the left. The pressure volume relationship is the most reliable index for assessing myocardial contractility in the intact circulation and is almost insensitive to changes in preload and after load. This is widely used in animal studies and occasionally clinically. The limit of the pressure volume relationship is that it fails to take into account the frequency-dependent regulation of contractility: the frequency-dependent control of transmembrane Ca2+ entry via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels provides cardiac cells with a highly sophisticated short-term system for the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. An increased stimulation rate increases the force of contraction: the explanation is repetitive Ca2+ entry with each depolarization and, hence, an accumulation of cytosolic calcium. As the heart fails, there is a change in

  3. Maternal protein restriction compromises myocardial contractility in the young adult rat by changing proteins involved in calcium handling.

    PubMed

    de Belchior, Aucelia C S; Freire, David D; da Costa, Carlos P; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    Maternal protein restriction (MPR) during pregnancy is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in the offspring in adulthood. In this study we evaluated the cardiac function of young male rats born from mothers subjected to MPR during pregnancy, focusing on the myocardial mechanics and calcium-handling proteins. After weaning, rats received normal diet until 3 mo old, when the following parameters were assessed: arterial and left ventricular hemodynamics and in vitro cardiac contractility in isolated papillary muscles. The body weight was lower and arterial pressure higher in the MPR group compared with young adult offspring of female rats that received standard diet (controls); and left ventricle time derivatives increased in the MPR group. The force developed by the cardiac muscle was similar; but time to peak and relaxation time were longer, and the derivatives of force were depressed in the MPR. In addition, MPR group exhibited decreased post-pause potentiation of force, suggesting reduced reuptake function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Corroborating, the myocardial content of SERCA-2a and phosphorylated PLB-Ser16/total PLB ratio was decreased and sodium-calcium exchanger was increased in the MPR group. The contraction dependent on transsarcolemmal influx of calcium was higher in MPR if compared with the control group. In summary, young rats born from mothers subjected to protein restriction during pregnancy exhibit changes in the myocardial mechanics with altered expression of calcium-handling proteins, reinforcing the hypothesis that maternal malnutrition is related to increased cardiovascular risk in the offspring, not only for hypertension, but also cardiac dysfunction.

  4. GRK2 – A Link Between Myocardial Contractile Function and Cardiac Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Meryl C.; Ciccarelli, Michele; Woodall, Benjamin P.; Koch, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes a tremendous burden on the worldwide healthcare system, affecting more than 23 million people. There are many cardiovascular disorders that contribute to the development of HF and multiple risk factors that accelerate its occurrence, but regardless of its underlying cause, HF is characterized by a marked decrease in myocardial contractility and loss of pump function. One biomarker molecule consistently shown to be upregulated in human HF and several animal models is G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 (GRK2), a kinase originally discovered to be involved in GPCR desensitization, especially β-adrenergic receptors (βARs). Indeed, higher levels of GRK2 can impair βAR-mediated inotropic reserve and its inhibition or molecular reduction has shown to improve pump function in several animal models including a pre-clinical pig model of HF. Recently, non-classical roles for GRK2 in cardiovascular disease have been described, including negative regulation of insulin signaling, a role in myocyte cell survival and apoptotic signaling, and it has been shown to be localized in/on mitochondria. These new roles of GRK2 suggest that GRK2 may be a nodal link in the myocyte, influencing both cardiac contractile function and cell metabolism and survival and contributing to HF independent of its canonical role on GPCR desensitization. In this review, classical and non-classical roles for GRK2 will be discussed, focusing on recently discovered roles for GRK2 in cardiomyocyte metabolism and the effects that these roles may have on myocardial contractile function and HF development. PMID:24812353

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum Chaperon Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Alleviates Obesity-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan-Isik, Asli F.; Sreejayan, Nair; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    ER stress is involved in the pathophysiology of obesity although little is known about the role of ER stress on obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction. This study was designed to examine the effect of ER chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on obesity-induced myocardial dysfunction. Adult lean and ob/ob obese mice were treated TUDCA (50 mg/kg/d, p.o.) or vehicle for 5 wks. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Echocardiography, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) activity and protein expression of intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins were measured using 45Ca2+ uptake and Western blot analysis, respectively. Insulin signaling, ER stress markers and HSP90 were evaluated. Our results revealed that chronic TUDCA treatment lower systolic blood pressure and lessened glucose intolerance in obese mice. Obesity led to increased diastolic diameter, cardiac hypertrophy, compromised fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte contractile (peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, and duration of contraction/relaxation) and intracellular Ca2+ properties, all of which were significantly attenuated by TUDCA. TUDCA reconciled obesity-associated decreased in SERCA activity and expression, and increase in serine phosphorylation of IRS, total and phosphorylated cJun, ER stress markers Bip, peIF2α and pPERK. Obesity-induced changes in phospholamban and HSP90 were unaffected by TUDCA. In vitro finding revealed that TUDCA ablated palmitic acid-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction. In summary, these data depicted a pivotal role of ER stress in obesity-associated cardiac contractile dysfunction, suggesting the therapeutic potential of ER stress as a target in the management of cardiac dysfunction in obesity. PMID:21035453

  6. Myocardial contractility recovery during hypercapnic acidosis: its dissociation from recovery in pHi by ryanodine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, N G; Mattiazzi, A R; Camilion de Hurtado, M C; Cingolani, H E

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial contractility falls quickly during respiratory acidosis but if acidosis is maintained a slow gradual return towards control state is detected. In cat papillary muscle, changes in developed tension (DT) during isometric contractions (pacing rate 0.2 Hz) and intracellular pH (pHi) were continuously monitored before and during hypercapnia to study the contribution of pHi recovery to the recovery of contractility. On exposure to hypercapnia (extracellular pH [pHo] = 6.90) DT fell to 50.33 +/- 2.20% of control and pHi decreased from 7.21 +/- 0.05 to 6.90 +/- 0.02. After 30 mins of hypercapnia DT recovered to 64.66 +/- 4.05% of control, but no significant recovery in pHi was detected. Intracellular sodium concentration slowly rose to 61.05 +/- 23.79% over basal level 10 mins after the onset of hypercapnia and it remained elevated for 10 mins before gradually returning to control levels. When pHo was kept at 7.40 during hypercapnia by increasing sodium bicarbonate concentration, DT recovered to 79.11 +/- 6.94% of control after 30 mins of hypercapnia, while a significant recovery of pHi (0.12 +/- 0.02 pH units) was detected. Low extracellular sodium concentration diminished contractility recovery during hypercapnia without changing the initial decrease in DT. 5-[N-ethyl-N-isopropyl] amiloride (EIPA) (5 microM) increased the initial fall in DT to 34.33 +/- 8.68% of control and abolished the recovery. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) inhibition by ryanodine (0.5 microM) markedly reduced the recovery of contractility without altering the recovery in pHi.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656191

  7. Effect of exercise training and myocardial infarction on force development and contractile kinetics in isolated canine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Canan, Benjamin D; Haizlip, Kaylan M; Xu, Ying; Monasky, Michelle M; Hiranandani, Nitisha; Milani-Nejad, Nima; Varian, Kenneth D; Slabaugh, Jessica L; Schultz, Eric J; Fedorov, Vadim V; Billman, George E; Janssen, Paul M L

    2016-04-15

    It is well known that moderate exercise training elicits a small increase in ventricular mass (i.e., a physiological hypertrophy) that has many beneficial effects on overall cardiac health. It is also well known that, when a myocardial infarction damages part of the heart, the remaining myocardium remodels to compensate for the loss of viable functioning myocardium. The effects of exercise training, myocardial infarction (MI), and their interaction on the contractile performance of the myocardium itself remain largely to be determined. The present study investigated the contractile properties and kinetics of right ventricular myocardium isolated from sedentary and exercise trained (10-12 wk progressively increasing treadmill running, begun 4 wk after MI induction) dogs with and without a left ventricular myocardial infarction. Exercise training increased force development, whereas MI decreased force development that was not improved by exercise training. Contractile kinetics were significantly slower in the trained dogs, whereas this impact of training was less or no longer present after MI. Length-dependent activation, both evaluated on contractile force and kinetics, was similar in all four groups. The control exercise-trained group exhibited a more positive force-frequency relationship compared with the sedentary control group while both sedentary and trained post-MI dogs had a more negative relationship. Last, the impact of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol resulted in a similar increase in force and acceleration of contractile kinetics in all groups. Thus, exercise training increased developed force but slowed contractile kinetics in control (noninfarcted animals), actions that were attenuated or completely absent in post-MI dogs.

  8. Microtubule depolymerization normalizes in vivo myocardial contractile function in dogs with pressure-overload left ventricular hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Hamawaki, M.; Narishige, T.; Sato, H.; Nemoto, S.; DeFreyte, G.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper G, I. V.; Carabello, B. A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Because initially compensatory myocardial hypertrophy in response to pressure overloading may eventually decompensate to myocardial failure, mechanisms responsible for this transition have long been sought. One such mechanism established in vitro is densification of the cellular microtubule network, which imposes a viscous load that inhibits cardiocyte contraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the present study, we extended this in vitro finding to the in vivo level and tested the hypothesis that this cytoskeletal abnormality is important in the in vivo contractile dysfunction that occurs in experimental aortic stenosis in the adult dog. In 8 dogs in which gradual stenosis of the ascending aorta had caused severe left ventricular (LV) pressure overloading (gradient, 152+/-16 mm Hg) with contractile dysfunction, LV function was measured at baseline and 1 hour after the intravenous administration of colchicine. Cardiocytes obtained by biopsy before and after in vivo colchicine administration were examined in tandem. Microtubule depolymerization restored LV contractile function both in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: These and additional corroborative data show that increased cardiocyte microtubule network density is an important mechanism for the ventricular contractile dysfunction that develops in large mammals with adult-onset pressure-overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  9. Cardioselective Dominant-negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor (Δ337T) Modulates Myocardial Metabolism and Contractile Dfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Olson, Aaron; Ge, Ming; Ning, Xue-Han; Buroker, Norman E.; Chung, Youngran; Jue, Thomas; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-06-03

    Dominant- negative thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) show elevated expression relative to ligand-binding TRs during cardiac hypertrophy. We tested the hypothesis that overexpression of a dominant-negative TR alters cardiac metabolism and contractile efficiency (CE). We used mice expressing the cardioselective dominant-negative TRβ1 mutation Δ337T. Isolated working Δ337T hearts and nontransgenic control (Con) hearts were perfused with 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate (ACAC), lactate, and glucose at physiological concentrations for 30 min. 13C NMR spectroscopy and isotopomer analyses were used to determine substrate flux and fractional contributions (Fc) of acetyl-CoA to the citric acid cycle (CAC). Δ337T hearts exhibited rate depression but higher developed pressure and CE, defined as work per oxygen consumption (MV˙ O2). Unlabeled substrate Fc from endogenous sources was higher in Δ337T, but ACAC Fc was lower. Fluxes through CAC, lactate, ACAC, and FFA were reduced in Δ337T. CE and Fc differences were reversed by pacing Δ337T to Con rates, accompanied by an increase in FFA Fc. Δ337T hearts lacked the ability to increase MV˙ O2. Decreases in protein expression for glucose transporter-4 and hexokinase-2 and increases in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-2 and -4 suggest that these hearts are unable to increase carbohydrate oxidation in response to stress. These data show that Δ337T alters the metabolic phenotype in murine heart by reducing substrate flux for multiple pathways. Some of these changes are heart rate dependent, indicating that the substrate shift may represent an accommodation to altered contractile protein kinetics, which can be disrupted by pacing stress.

  10. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Metallothionein Rescues against Cigarette Smoking Exposure-Induced Myocardial Contractile and Mitochondrial Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Han, Xuefeng; Lane, Erin K.; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Second hand cigarette smoke is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although a tie between smoking and cardiovascular disease is well established, the underlying mechanisms still remains elusive due to the lack of adequate animal models. This study was designed to use a mouse model of exposure to cigarette smoke, a surrogate of environmental tobacco smoke, to evaluate the impact of cardiac overexpression of heavy metal scavenger metallothionein on myocardial geometry, contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties and apoptosis following side-stream smoke exposure. Methods Adult male wild-type FVB and metallothionein transgenic mice were placed in a chamber exposed to cigarette smoke for 1 hour daily for 40 days. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ properties, fibrosis, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage were examined. Results Our data revealed that smoke exposure enlarged ventricular end systolic and diastolic diameters, reduced myocardial and cardiomyocyte contractile function, disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, facilitated fibrosis, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage (cytochrome C release and aconitase activity), the effects of which were attenuated or mitigated by metallothionein. In addition, side-stream smoke expose enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β without affecting pan protein expression in the heart, the effect of which was abolished or ameliorated by metallothionein. Cigarette smoke extract interrupted cardiomyocyte contractile function and intracellular Ca2+ properties, the effect of which was mitigated by wortmannin and NAC. Conclusions These data suggest that side-stream smoke exposure led to myocardial dysfunction, intracellular Ca2+ mishandling, apoptosis, fibrosis and mitochondrial damage, indicating the therapeutic potential of antioxidant against in second smoking-induced cardiac defects possibly via mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. PMID:23431404

  11. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and NADPH Redox Regulates Cardiac Myocyte L-Type Calcium Channel Activity and Myocardial Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Dhwajbahadur K.; Hecker, Peter; Watanabe, Makino; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Levy, Richard J.; Okada, Takao; Edwards, John G.; Gupte, Sachin A.

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a 17-ketosteroid, epiandrosterone, attenuates L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa-L) in cardiac myocytes and inhibits myocardial contractility. Because 17-ketosteroids are known to inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, and to reduce intracellular NADPH levels, we hypothesized that inhibition of G6PD could be a novel signaling mechanism which inhibit ICa-L and, therefore, cardiac contractile function. We tested this idea by examining myocardial function in isolated hearts and Ca2+ channel activity in isolated cardiac myocytes. Myocardial function was tested in Langendorff perfused hearts and ICa-L were recorded in the whole-cell patch configuration by applying double pulses from a holding potential of −80 mV and then normalized to the peak amplitudes of control currents. 6-Aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, increased pCO2 and decreased pH. Additionally, 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited G6PD activity, reduced NADPH levels, attenuated peak ICa-L amplitudes, and decreased left ventricular developed pressure and ±dp/dt. Finally, dialyzing NADPH into cells from the patch pipette solution attenuated the suppression of ICa-L by 6-aminonicotinamide. Likewise, in G6PD-deficient mice, G6PD insufficiency in the heart decreased GSH-to-GSSG ratio, superoxide, cholesterol and acetyl CoA. In these mice, M-mode echocardiographic findings showed increased diastolic volume and end-diastolic diameter without changes in the fraction shortening. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibiting G6PD activity and reducing NADPH levels alters metabolism and leads to inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Notably, this pathway may be involved in modulating myocardial contractility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions during which the pentose phosphate pathway-derived NADPH redox is modulated (e.g., ischemia-reperfusion and heart failure). PMID:23071515

  12. Contractile reserve and calcium regulation are depressed in myocytes from chronically unloaded hearts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kenta; Nakayama, Masaharu; Hasan, Faisal; Yan, Xinhua; Schneider, Michael D.; Lorell, Beverly H.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cardiac unloading of the normal heart results in the reduction of left ventricular (LV) mass, but effects on myocyte contractile function are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac unloading and reduction in LV mass were induced by heterotopic heart transplantation to the abdominal aorta in isogenic rats. Contractility and [Ca(2+)](i) regulation in LV myocytes were studied at both 2 and 5 weeks after transplantation. Native in situ hearts from recipient animals were used as the controls for all experiments. Contractile function indices in myocytes from 2-week unloaded and native (control) hearts were similar under baseline conditions (0.5 Hz, 1.2 mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o), and 36 degrees C) and in response to stimulation with high [Ca(2+)](o) (range 2.5 to 4.0 mmol/L). In myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts, there were no differences in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) at baseline; however, time to 50% relengthening and time to 50% decline in [Ca(2+)](i) were prolonged compared with controls. Severe defects in fractional cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) were elicited in myocytes from 5-week unloaded hearts in response to high [Ca(2+)](o). However, there were no differences in the contractile response to isoproterenol between myocytes from unloaded and native hearts. In 5-week unloaded hearts, but not in 2-week unloaded hearts, LV protein levels of phospholamban were increased (345% of native heart values). Protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger were not changed. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic unloading of the normal heart caused a time-dependent depression of myocyte contractile function, suggesting the potential for impaired performance in states associated with prolonged cardiac atrophy.

  13. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jingkai; Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon A.; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is an adverse prognostic factor after an acute myocardial infarction (MI), and an increased propensity toward emotionally-driven myocardial ischemia may play a role. We aimed to examine the association between depressive symptoms and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in young survivors of an MI. Methods We studied 98 patients (49 women and 49 men) age 38–60 years who were hospitalized for acute MI in the previous 6 months. Patients underwent myocardial perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress (speech task), and after exercise or pharmacological stress. A summed difference score (SDS), obtained with observer-independent software, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used to measure depressive symptoms, which were analyzed as overall score, and as separate somatic and cognitive depressive symptom scores. Results There was a significant positive association between depressive symptoms and SDS with mental stress, denoting more ischemia. After adjustment for demographic and lifestyle factors, disease severity and medications, each incremental depressive symptom was associated with 0.14 points higher SDS. When somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms were examined separately, both somatic [β = 0.17, 95% CI: (0.04, 0.30), p = 0.01] and cognitive symptoms [β = 0.31, 95% CI: (0.07, 0.56), p = 0.01] were significantly associated with mental stress-induced ischemia. Depressive symptoms were not associated with ischemia induced by exercise or pharmacological stress. Conclusion Among young post-MI patients, higher levels of both cognitive and somatic depressive symptoms are associated with a higher propensity to develop myocardial ischemia with mental stress, but not with physical (exercise or pharmacological) stress. PMID:25061993

  14. Changes in myocardial cytoskeletal intermediate filaments and myocyte contractile dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy: an in vivo study in humans

    PubMed Central

    Di, S; Marotta, M; Salvatore, G; Cudemo, G; Cuda, G; De Vivo, F; Di, B; Ciaramella, F; Caputo, G; de Divitiis, O

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To investigate in vivo the intermediate cytoskeletal filaments desmin and vimentin in myocardial tissues from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and to determine whether alterations in these proteins are associated with impaired contractility.
METHODS—Endomyocardial biopsies were performed in 12 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and in 12 controls (six women with breast cancer before anthracycline chemotherapy and six male donors for heart transplantation). Biopsy specimens were analysed by light microscopy and immunochemistry (desmin, vimentin). Myocyte contractile protein function was evaluated by the actin-myosin in vitro motility assay. Left ventricular ejection fraction was assessed by echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography.
RESULTS—Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had a greater cardiomyocyte diameter than controls (p < 0.01). The increase in cell size was associated with a reduction in contractile function, as assessed by actin-myosin motility (r = −0.643; p < 0.01). Quantitative immunochemistry showed increased desmin and vimentin contents (p < 0.01), and the desmin distribution was disturbed in cardiomyopathy. There was a linear relation between desmin distribution and actin-myosin sliding in vitro (r = 0.853; p < 0.01) and an inverse correlation between desmin content and ejection fraction (r = −0.773; p < 0.02). Negative correlations were also found between myocardial vimentin content and the actin-myosin sliding rate (r = −0.74; p < 0.02) and left ventricular ejection fraction (r = −0.68; p < 0.01).
CONCLUSIONS—Compared with normal individuals, the myocardial tissue of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy shows alterations of cytoskeletal intermediate filament distribution and content associated with reduced myocyte contraction.


Keywords: dilated cardiomyopathy; desmin; vimentin; cardiac biopsy; actin-myosin PMID:11083750

  15. Taurine depresses cardiac contractility and enhances systemic heart glucose utilization in the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    MacCormack, Tyson J; Callaghan, N I; Sykes, A V; Driedzic, W R

    2016-02-01

    Taurine is the most abundant amino acid in the blood of the cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, where levels can exceed 200 mmol L(-1). In mammals, intracellular taurine modulates cardiac Ca(2+) handling and carbohydrate metabolism at much lower concentrations but it is not clear if it exerts similar actions in cephalopods. Blood Ca(2+) levels are high in cephalopods and we hypothesized that taurine would depress cardiac Ca(2+) flux and modulate contractility in systemic and branchial hearts of cuttlefish. Heart performance was assessed with an in situ perfused systemic heart preparation and contractility was evaluated using isometrically contracting systemic and branchial heart muscle rings. Stroke volume, cardiac output, and Ca(2+) sensitivity were significantly lower in systemic hearts perfused with supplemental taurine (100 mmol L(-1)) than in controls. In muscle ring preparations, taurine impaired relaxation at high contraction frequencies, an effect abolished by supra-physiological Ca(2+) levels. Taurine did not affect oxygen consumption in non-contracting systemic heart muscle, but extracellular glucose utilization was twice that of control preparations. Collectively, our results suggest that extracellular taurine depresses cardiac Ca(2+) flux and potentiates glucose utilization in cuttlefish. Variations in taurine levels may represent an important mechanism for regulating cardiovascular function and metabolism in cephalopods.

  16. Myocardial performance index is sensitive to changes in cardiac contractility, but is also affected by vascular load condition.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial performance index (MPI), or Tei index, is measured by Doppler echocardiography in clinical practice. MPI has been shown to be useful in evaluating left ventricular (LV) performance and predicting prognosis in cardiac patients. However, the effects of LV load and contractile states on MPI remain to be thoroughly investigated. In 14 anesthetized dogs, we obtained LV pressure-volume relationship with use of sonomicrometry and catheter-tip manometry. MPI was determined from the time derivative of LV volume and pressure. LV end-systolic pressure-volume ratio (Ees'), effective arterial elastance (Ea) and LV end-diastolic volume (Ved) were used as indices of LV contractility, afterload and preload, respectively. Hemodynamic conditions were varied over wide ranges [heart rate (HR), 66-192 bpm; mean arterial pressure, 71-177 mmHg] by infusing cardiovascular agents, by inducing ischemic heart failure and by electrical atrial pacing. Multiple linear regression analysis of pooled data (66 data sets) indicated that MPI (0.6-1.8) significantly correlated with Ees' [1.5-17.5 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.0001, standard partial regression coefficient (β) =-0.66], Ea (3.6-21.9 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.001, β = 0.4) and Ved (11-100 ml, p<0.0001, β = -0.69). MPI directly correlated with the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (19-66 ms, p<0.05), but not with HR or LV diastolic-stiffness (all p>0.1). Theoretical analysis also indicated that MPI decreases following the increases in LV contractility and in preload, while it increases in response to an increase in LV afterload. We conclude that MPI sensitively detects changes in LV contractility. However, MPI is also affected by changes in LV afterload and preload. PMID:24109782

  17. Cardiac-Specific Overexpression of Catalase Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Myocardial Geometric and Contractile Alteration: Role of ER Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ge, We; Zhang, Yingmei; Han, Xuefeng; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Paraquat, a quarternary nitrogen herbicide, is a highly toxic prooxidant resulting in multi-organ failure including the heart via generation of reactive oxygen species although the underlying mechanism has not been well elucidated. This study examined the influence of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase, an antioxidant detoxifying H2O2, on paraquat-induced myocardial geometric and functional alterations, with a focus on ER stress. FVB and catalase transgenic mice were administrated paraquat for 48 hrs. Myocardial geometry, contractile function, apoptosis, and ER stress were evaluated using echocardiography, edge-detection, caspase-3 activity and immunoblotting. Our results revealed that paraquat treatment significantly enlarged LV end-diastolic and systolic diameters, increased LV mass and resting myocyte length, reduced fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening and prolonged relengthening duration in FVB group. While catalase transgene itself did not alter myocardial geometry and function, it mitigated or significantly attenuated paraquat-elicited myocardial geometric and functional changes. Paraquat promoted overt apoptosis and ER stress as evidenced by increased caspase-3 activity, apoptosis and ER stress markers including Bax, Bcl-2, GADD153, calregulin and phosphorylation of JNK, IRE1α and eIF2α, all were ablated by catalase transgene. Paraquat-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction was mitigated by the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Moreover, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed paraquat-induced ER stress as evidenced by enhanced GADD153 and IRE1α phosphorylation. Taken together, these data revealed that catalase may rescue paraquat-induced myocardial geometric and functional alteration possibly via alleviating JNK-mediated ER stress. PMID:20937379

  18. Influence of hyperbaric oxygen on left ventricular contractility, total coronary blood flow, and myocardial oxygen consumption in the conscious dog.

    PubMed

    Savitt, M A; Rankin, J S; Elberry, J R; Owen, C H; Camporesi, E M

    1994-06-01

    It is known that hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) decreases total coronary blood flow (TCBF) and cardiac output (CO). To determine whether this is related to an alteration in myocardial contractility, 10 chronically instrumented conscious dogs were studied during pharmacologic autonomic blockade. Left ventricular (LV) volume was measured with ultrasonic transducers, LV transmural pressure with micromanometers, TCBF with Doppler-flow probes, and coronary AVO2 difference (A-CSO2) was calculated from direct LV and coronary sinus (CS) sampling. To evaluate the effect of increased oxygenation, data were obtained during resting control conditions and during dynamic vena caval occlusions (VCO), at 1 atmosphere of pressure, while breathing air (1 bar/0.21); at 3 atmospheres, breathing compressed air (3 bar/0.21), and at 3 atmospheres breathing 100% oxygen (3 bar/1.0). Because of autonomic blockade, heart rate (HR) was not statistically different in the three conditions. With increasing oxygenation, arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) increased from 85 +/- 5 mmHg (mean +/- SD) at 1 bar/0.21, to 1374 +/- 201 mmHg at 3 bar/1.0 whereas arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) and pH values were not statistically different. Arterial oxygen content (AO2 content) and CSO2 content increased significantly (both P < 0.05) with increasing PaO2. LV stroke volume (SV), CO, coronary blood flow, and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) were all significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of oxygenation. Intrinsic myocardial function, as measured by the stroke-work/end-diastolic volume relationship was unchanged from 1 bar/0.21 to 3 bar/0.21, and to 3 bar/1.0 (P < 0.20). Thus, the diminished TCBF, CO, and MVO2 associated with HBO do not seem to be associated with a primary alteration in myocardial contractility, but rather may result from a physiologic autoregulation of the myocardium to increasing levels of PaO2. PMID:8061558

  19. Assessment of the relationships between myocardial contractility and infarct tissue revealed by serial magnetic resonance imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    McComb, Christie; Carrick, David; McClure, John D; Woodward, Rosemary; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Foster, John E; Berry, Colin

    2015-08-01

    Imaging changes in left ventricular (LV) volumes during the cardiac cycle and LV ejection fraction do not provide information on regional contractility. Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) is a strain-encoded cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) technique that measures strain directly. We investigated the relationships between strain revealed by DENSE and the presence and extent of infarction in patients with recent myocardial infarction (MI). 50 male subjects were invited to undergo serial CMR within 7 days of MI (baseline) and after 6 months (follow-up; n = 47). DENSE and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were acquired to enable localised regional quantification of peak circumferential strain (Ecc) and the extent of infarction, respectively. We assessed: (1) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for the classification of LGE, (2) strain differences according to LGE status (remote, adjacent, infarcted) and (3) changes in strain revealed between baseline and follow-up. 300 and 258 myocardial segments were available for analysis at baseline and follow-up respectively. LGE was present in 130/300 (43%) and 97/258 (38%) segments, respectively. ROC analysis revealed moderately high values for peak Ecc at baseline [threshold 12.8%; area-under-curve (AUC) 0.88, sensitivity 84%, specificity 78%] and at follow-up (threshold 15.8%; AUC 0.76, sensitivity 85%, specificity 64%). Differences were observed between remote, adjacent and infarcted segments. Between baseline and follow-up, increases in peak Ecc were observed in infarcted segments (median difference of 5.6%) and in adjacent segments (1.5%). Peak Ecc at baseline was indicative of the change in LGE status between baseline and follow-up. Strain-encoded CMR with DENSE has the potential to provide clinically useful information on contractility and its recovery over time in patients with MI.

  20. Myocardial longitudinal peak systolic acceleration (pSac): relationship to ejection phase, pressure, and contractility.

    PubMed

    Odland, Hans Henrik; Brun, Henrik; Sejersted, Yngve; Dalen, Marit; Edvardsen, Thor; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Thaulow, Erik

    2012-05-01

    Acceleration has been measured both noninvasively and invasively, during both isovolumic contraction and early ejection and has been shown to reflect contractility, especially through correlation with dP/dt(max) . In this study timing and amplitude of mitral valve annulus acceleration assessed by tissue Doppler were measured and related to diastolic and systolic events. Invasive load independent measures of contractility, based on pressure-volume relationships, were derived, and pacing was done to modulate and control heart rate. Peak systolic acceleration (pSac) of the mitral valve annulus was shown to occur slightly later but timely related to dP/dt(max) (P < 0.05), while peak preejection acceleration (pPac) was related to diastolic events. During inotropy and preload modulation dP/dt(max) was found to be the strongest determinant of pSac (β= 0.9 ± 0.1; P < 0.001 and β= 1.3 ± 0.4; P < 0.001, respectively, log-transformed variables). PSac increased with pacing at a higher rate (β= 0.1 ± 0.0 cm/sec(2), P = 0.03). Furthermore, pSac indexed to end-diastolic volume (EDV) was linearly correlated to load independent contractility parameters (E(max), R = 0.7; ESPVR, R = 0.7; and PRSW, R = 0.5), and proved stable toward changes in preload and afterload. The relation between dP/dt(max)/EDV and pSac/EDV was stable throughout the study. In conclusion we found that peak systolic longitudinal acceleration (pSac) of the mitral valve annulus during aortic valve opening is strongly associated with dP/dt(max). Indexed to EDV, pSac may represent a load independent noninvasive contractility parameter. We consider pSac a candidate marker of long-axis contractility which should be viewed upon as the long-axis contribution to dP/dt(max).

  1. Is local myocardial contractility related to endocardial acceleration signals detected by a transvenous pacing lead?

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, M G; Soldati, E; Arena, G; Quirino, G; Vernazza, F; Bernasconi, A; Garberoglio, B

    1996-11-01

    The availability of sensors monitoring cardiac function parameters may offer many interesting new applications in cardiac pacing. A microaccelerometer sensor (BEST, Biomechanical Endocardial Sorin Transducer) located at the tip of a pacing lead (PL) has been developed by Sorin Biomedica. The signal detected by the accelerometer, peak endocardial acceleration (PEA), was shown to reflect cardiac contractility and to be related to the dP/dt signal. Whether the PEA detected by the BEST sensor in different cardiac locations is the expression of local acceleration forces or reflects the whole heart contractility has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Endocardial acceleration and PEA were evaluated in five patients (4 males, 1 female, mean age 68 years) who underwent cardiac catheterization. Sinus rhythm was present in four patients and chronic atrial fibrillation was present in one. The BEST PL was introduced through the left subclavian vein and PEA signals were recorded: (1) at the apex of the right ventricle (RV), (2) within the coronary sinus (CS), (3) at the right atrial appendage (RAA), and (4) floating in the right atrium. The PEA signals were recorded simultaneously with surface ECG, intracardiac electrograms, and RV pressure. At each recording site, PEA signals with significant amplitude were always recorded during the preejection period, during the isovolumic contraction phase, independently of the recording site and cardiac rhythm. The PEA amplitude was higher in the RV (mean value 1.32 g) and it decreased in the RAA and CS (0.75 and 0.45 g, respectively). The same behavior of PEA was observed during sinus rhythm or atrial fibrillation. The amplitude and the timing of the PEA signals detected by the BEST accelerometer were independent of the recording site and atrial rhythm; they appeared to be strictly related to the global ventricular contractility. These results suggest that the BEST could be used either as an effective sensor in closed loop pacing systems

  2. Certain characteristics of myocardial contractility of isovolumic dog heart at randomly variable heart rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bershitskaya, O N; Izakov VYa; Lysenko, L T; Protsenko, J L; Trubetskoy, A V

    1985-01-01

    The relationship "heart rate - left ventricular pressure" was investigated in the isolated canine heart perfused with constant pressure at different preloads. Rhythmical stimulation was performed with constant stimulus interval duration and with stimulus intervals randomly changed near the average value (150-200 stimuli in series). Correlation and dispersion function analysis show that rhythm dispersion had a negative inotropic effect which was independent of the preload of the ventricle in the range of 120-180 beat/min, but this dependence occurred with low rats of stimulation. This method is proposed for the assessment of contractility under conditions of heart rate variations (physiological and pathological arrhythmias).

  3. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro; Bartolome, Maria Visitacion; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente; Salaices, Mercedes; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small

  4. Effect of levosimendan on myocardial contractility, coronary and peripheral blood flow, and arrhythmias during coronary artery ligation and reperfusion in the in vivo pig model

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, E; Hofmann, D; McCarthy, J; Pineda, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser that facilitates the activation of the contractile apparatus by calcium, improves myocardial contractile function during severe ischaemia and reperfusion without exacerbating the incidence of arrhythmias.
DESIGN—Pigs were pretreated orally twice daily for 10 days with 0.08 mg/kg levosimendan or placebo. On day 11 the left main coronary artery was ligated for 30 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. A bolus dose of levosimendan, 11.2 µg/kg intravenously, or placebo was given 30 minutes before coronary ligation, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 µg/kg/min levosimendan or placebo for the remainder of the experiment.
RESULTS—During the ischaemic period, cardiac output was higher in the levosimendan group than in the placebo group (mean (SD): 2.6 (0.5) v 2.0 (0.2) l/min, p < 0.05) and systemic vascular resistance was lower (2024 (188) v 2669 (424) dyne.s−1.cm−5, p < 0.005). During reperfusion, cardiac output and contractility (LVmaxdP/dt (pos), 956 (118) v 784 (130) mm Hg/s, p < 0.05) were increased by levosimendan. The incidence of ischaemic ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia was similar in the two groups but there were more arrhythmic events (ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation) in the levosimendan treated group (8/12 levosimendan v 1/9 control p = 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—Levosimendan improved cardiac output and myocardial contractility during coronary artery ligation and reperfusion. However, it increased the number of arrhythmic events during ischaemia in this model of in vivo regional ischaemia.


Keywords: calcium sensitisers; myocardial ischaemia; arrhythmias PMID:11410569

  5. Influence of gender on ethanol-induced ventricular myocyte contractile depression in transgenic mice with cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinhong; Esberg, Lucy B; Ye, Gang; Borgerding, Anthony J; Ren, Bonnie H; Aberle, Nicholas S; Epstein, Paul N; Ren, Jun

    2003-03-01

    Acute ethanol exposure depresses ventricular contractility and contributes to alcoholic cardiomyopathy in both men and women chronically consuming ethanol. However, a gender-related difference in the severity of myopathy exists with female being more sensitive to ethanol-induced tissue damage. Acetaldehyde (ACA), the major oxidized product of ethanol, has been implicated to play a role in the pathogenesis and gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, possibly due to its direct cardiac effect and interaction with estrogen. This study was designed to compare the effects of cardiac overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which converts ethanol into ACA, on the cardiac contractile response to ethanol in ventricular myocytes isolated from age-matched adult male and female transgenic (ADH) and wild-type (FVB) mice. Mechanical properties were measured with an IonOptix SoftEdge system. ACA production was assessed by gas chromatography. The ADH myocytes from both genders exhibited similar mechanical properties but a higher efficacy to produce ACA compared to FVB myocytes. Exposure to ethanol (80-640 mg/dl) for 60 min elicited concentration-dependent decrease of cell shortening in both FVB and ADH groups. The ethanol-induced depression on cell shortening was significantly augmented in female but not male ADH group. ADH transgene did not exacerbate the ethanol-induced inhibition of maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening in either gender. In addition, neither ethanol nor ADH transgene affect the duration of shortening and relengthening in male or female mice. These data suggest that females may be more sensitive to ACA-induced cardiac contractile depression than male, which may attribute to the gender-related difference of alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Chlorine inhalation-induced myocardial depression and failure

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Bradley, Wayne E; Lazrak, Ahmed; Zafar, Iram; Doran, Stephen; Ahmad, Aftab; White, Carl W; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Victims of chlorine (Cl2) inhalation that die demonstrate significant cardiac pathology. However, a gap exists in the understanding of Cl2-induced cardiac dysfunction. This study was performed to characterize cardiac dysfunction occurring after Cl2 exposure in rats at concentrations mimicking accidental human exposures (in the range of 500 or 600 ppm for 30 min). Inhalation of 500 ppm Cl2 for 30 min resulted in increased lactate in the coronary sinus of the rats suggesting an increase in anaerobic metabolism by the heart. There was also an attenuation of myocardial contractile force in an ex vivo (Langendorff technique) retrograde perfused heart preparation. After 20 h of return to room air, Cl2 exposure at 500 ppm was associated with a reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well echocardiographic/Doppler evidence of significant left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Cl2 exposure at 600 ppm (30 min) was associated with biventricular failure (observed at 2 h after exposure) and death. Cardiac mechanical dysfunction persisted despite increasing the inspired oxygen fraction concentration in Cl2-exposed rats (500 ppm) to ameliorate hypoxia that occurs after Cl2 inhalation. Similarly ex vivo cardiac mechanical dysfunction was reproduced by sole exposure to chloramine (a potential circulating Cl2 reactant product). These results suggest an independent and distinctive role of Cl2 (and its reactants) in inducing cardiac toxicity and potentially contributing to mortality. PMID:26109193

  7. mTOR-Independent autophagy inducer trehalose rescues against insulin resistance-induced myocardial contractile anomalies: Role of p38 MAPK and Foxo1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiurong; Ren, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with cardiovascular diseases although the precise mechanisms remain elusive. Akt2, a critical member of the Akt family, plays an essential role in insulin signaling. This study was designed to examine the effect of trehalose, an mTOR-independent autophagy inducer, on myocardial function in an Akt2 knockout-induced insulin resistance model. Adult WT and Akt2 knockout (Akt2(-/-)) mice were administered trehalose (1mg/g/day, i.p.) for two days and were then given 2% trehalose in drinking water for two more months. Echocardiographic and myocardial mechanics, intracellular Ca(2+) properties, glucose tolerance, and autophagy were assessed. Apoptosis and ER stress were evaluated using TUNEL staining, Caspase 3 assay and Western blot. Autophagy and autophagy flux were examined with a focus on p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), Forkhead box O (Foxo1) and Akt. Akt2 ablation impaired glucose tolerance, myocardial geometry and function accompanied with pronounced apoptosis, ER stress and dampened autophagy, the effects of which were ameliorated by trehalose treatment. Inhibition of lysosomal activity using bafilomycin A1 negated trehalose-induced induction of autophagy (LC3B-II and p62). Moreover, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Foxo1 were upregulated in Akt2(-/-) mice, the effect of which was attenuated by trehalose. Phosphorylation of Akt was suppressed in Akt2(-/-) mice and was unaffected by trehalose. In vitro findings revealed that the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin and the Foxo1 inhibitor (through phosphorylation) AS1842856 effectively masked trehalose-offered beneficial cardiomyocyte contractile response against Akt2 ablation. These data suggest that trehalose may rescue against insulin resistance-induced myocardial contractile defect and apoptosis, via autophagy associated with dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Foxo1 without affecting phosphorylation of Akt. PMID:27363949

  8. Effects of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate on hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yoshitaka; Uemura, Aki

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypercapnia is associated with diaphragm muscle dysfunction that causes a reduction of diaphragmatic force generated for a constant elective myographic activity. No published data are available concerning hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility during dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophospate (DBcAMP) administration. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of DBcAMP on hypercapnic depression of diaphragmatic contractility in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. Methods: This experimental study was conducted from July to December 2008 at the Department of Anesthesiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan. Adult (aged >5 years) mongrel dogs weighing 10 to 15 kg were randomly divided into 3 equal groups. Hypercapnia (80–90 mm Hg) was induced with 10% carbon dioxide added to the inspired gas. When hypercapnia was established, group 1 was infused with low-dose DBcAMP (0.05 mg/kg/min); group 2 was infused with high-dose DBcAMP (0.2 mg/kg/min); and group 3 received placebo (saline). Study drug was administered intravenously for 60 minutes. Diaphragmatic contractility was assessed by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) at baseline, induction of hypercapnia, and study drug administration. Results: Twenty-one dogs were divided into 3 groups of 7. There were no significant differences observed at baseline. In the presence of hypercapnia, Pdi (mean [SD], cm H2O) at low- (20-Hz) and high-frequency (100-Hz) stimulation was significantly decreased from baseline in each group (all, P = 0.001). In groups 1 and 2, Pdi at both stimuli was significantly increased during DBcAMP administration compared with hypercapnia-induced values (group 1: 20-Hz, 13.5 [2.2] vs 15.0 [2.4], respectively, P = 0.001, 100-Hz, 21.2 [1.6] vs 22.5 [1.6], P = 0.001; group 2: 20-Hz, 13.7 [1.4] vs 19.2 [1.7], P = 0.001, 100-Hz, 21.0 [2.4] vs 27.2 [2.5], P = 0.001). The Pdi at both stimuli during DBcAMP administration was significantly

  9. Cardioplegia and myocardial preservation during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Engelman, R M; Levitsky, S; O'Donoghue, M J; Auvil, J

    1978-09-01

    A standard experimental protocol was developed to explore the role of hypothermia and potassium cardioplegia in myocardial preservation during 120 minutes of ischemic arrest followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Seven different experimental groups of six animals each were evaluated using an in-vivo pig heart preparation. Hypothermic arrest without cardioplegia and cardioplegic arrest at normothermia were each compared to hypothermic cardioplegia. In addition, the use of an asanguineous hypothermic coronary perfusate without cardioplegia was compared to both multidose cardioplegia and single-dose cardioplegia followed by the same asanguineous perfusate. The parameters measured included: myocardial contractility and compliance, myocardial blood flow, endocardial/epicardial blood flow ratio, and electron microscopic studies. Myocardial preservation was inadequate with hypothermic arrest alone (without cardioplegia; and with cardioplegia at normothermia. In both experimental groups, myocardial contractility and compliance were so depressed that the) could not be accurately measured following ischemia and reperfusion while coronary blood flow remained significantly elevated. Preservation was improved but still inadequate following myocardial washout with a normokalemic or hypokalemic perfusate and following single dose cardioplegia plus myocardial washout. In the latter four groups, contractility ranged from 42 to 78% of control, and there was a decrease in compliance of 16 to 78%. Adequate preservation was found only after hypothermia and multidose potassium (35 mEq/L) cardioplegia. In this group, contractility was 129 +/- 13% of control and compliance increased by 21 +/- 24% compared to that of the control.

  10. Intravenous Followed by X-ray Fused with MRI-Guided Transendocardial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Injection Improves Contractility Reserve in a Swine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Schmuck, Eric G.; Koch, Jill M.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Hatt, Charles R.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Vigen, Karl K.; Hendren, Nicholas; Leitzke, Cathlyn; Zhao, Ying-qi; Li, Zhanhai; Centanni, John M.; Hei, Derek J.; Schwahn, Denise; Kim, Jaehyup; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of early intravenous (IV) infusion later followed by transendocardial (TE) injection of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) following myocardial infarction (MI). Twenty-four swine underwent balloon occlusion reperfusion MI and were randomized into 4 groups: IV MSC (or placebo) infusion (post-MI day 2) and TE MSC (or placebo) injection targeting the infarct border with 2D X-ray fluoroscopy fused to 3D magnetic resonance (XFM) co-registration (post-MI day 14). Continuous ECG recording, MRI, and invasive pressure-volume analyses were performed. IV MSC plus TE MSC treated group was superior to other groups for contractility reserve (p=0.02) and freedom from VT (p=0.03) but had more lymphocytic foci localized to the peri-infarct region (p= 0.002). No differences were observed in post-MI remodeling parameters. IV followed by XFM targeted TE MSC therapy improves contractility reserve and suppresses VT but does not affect post-MI remodeling and may cause an immune response. PMID:26374144

  11. [Identification of viable myocardium in ischemic heart disease with severe left ventricular contractile dysfunction: comparison of myocardial scintigraphy with 99mTc-sestamabi and with 201-thallium].

    PubMed

    Brandao, S; Cagnac, R; Roncalli, J; Lotterie, J A; Elbaz, M; Richez, F; Galinier, M; Carrie, D; Alibelli-Chemarin, M J

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare quantitatively uptake of 99mTc-Sestamibi at rest and that of late redistribution of 201Tl in the same patients with severe ischaemic left ventricular dysfunction, and to correlate the uptake of the tracer to regional ventricular dysfunction studied by ECG grated 99Tc-Sestamini. A double isotope myocardial scintigraphy, 201 Thallium at rest/redistribution and 99Tc-Sestamibi at rest and on exercise, was performed in 28 patients with severe postinfarction ischaemic cardiomyopathy (EF= 29 +/- 4%). Quantitative analysis for each patient and each isotope were performed with respect to the number of hits expressed in percentage of the activity of a normal zone in 17 circumferential profiles distributed in 4 zones, that is to say in 476 segments. A score allowed counting of viable and non-viable segments and evaluation of contractile function of the 17 segments with respect to wall motion and systolic thickening. Total concordance of global uptake of the two isotopes was observed in 430 of the 476 segments (90.3%) (r= 0.814, p< 0.0001), but the 99mTc-Sestamibi uptake was less than 201 Th (71 +/- 23% vs 73 +/- 21%, p= 0.0001). With respect to left ventricular wall motion, uptake of 99mTc-Sestamibi was greater than that of 201Tl in normal or hypokinetic segments but less in akinetic and dyskinetic segments. The difference between the two isotopes was most marked in segments with very severe contractile dysfunction. The authors conclude that the uptake of 99mTc-Sestamibi is correlated with that of late distribution of 201Tl when left ventricular contraction is not too poor and should no longer be considered as only a marker of perfusion but can also be useful in the investigation of myocardial viability.

  12. Quantification and MRI validation of regional contractile dysfunction in mice post myocardial infarction using high resolution ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinbo; Garson, Christopher D; Xu, Yaqin; Beyers, Ronald J; Epstein, Frederick H; French, Brent A; Hossack, John A

    2007-06-01

    A versatile, computationally efficient two-dimensional (2D) speckle-tracking method based on high resolution ultrasound imaging is proposed to quantify regional myocardial dysfunction in mice. Ultrasound scans were performed on the hearts of normal and post myocardial infarction (MI) mice with a Vevo770 scanner (VisualSonics, Toronto, Canada) operating at 30 MHz frequency. Regional myocardial motion was tracked using a 2D minimum sum of absolute differences (MSAD) block-matching algorithm. Motion analyses calculated from ultrasound images were compared with gold-standard analyses performed using small animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radial and circumferential components of strain were compared between ultrasound and MRI short axis views and promising correlations were obtained (r = 0.90 and r = 0.85 for radial and circumferential strain, respectively). Therefore, ultrasound imaging, followed by 2D image tracking, provides an effective, low cost, mobile method to quantify murine cardiac function accurately and reliably.

  13. Contractile Function During Angiotensin-II Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Bamboye, Moradeke A.; Gondim, Antonio N.S.; Santos, Celio X.; Martin, Daniel; Ghigo, Alessandra; Perino, Alessia; Brewer, Alison C.; Ward, Christopher W.; Hirsch, Emilio; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Shah, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system activation is a feature of many cardiovascular conditions. Activity of myocardial reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NADPH oxidase 2 or Nox2) is enhanced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and contributes to increased hypertrophy, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling. Recent studies found that Nox2-mediated reactive oxygen species production modulates physiological cardiomyocyte function. Objectives This study sought to investigate the effects of cardiomyocyte Nox2 on contractile function during increased Ang II activation. Methods We generated a cardiomyocyte-targeted Nox2-transgenic mouse model and studied the effects of in vivo and ex vivo Ang II stimulation, as well as chronic aortic banding. Results Chronic subpressor Ang II infusion induced greater cardiac hypertrophy in transgenic than wild-type mice but unexpectedly enhanced contractile function. Acute Ang II treatment also enhanced contractile function in transgenic hearts in vivo and transgenic cardiomyocytes ex vivo. Ang II–stimulated Nox2 activity increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ uptake in transgenic mice, increased the Ca2+ transient and contractile amplitude, and accelerated cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation. Elevated Nox2 activity increased phospholamban phosphorylation in both hearts and cardiomyocytes, related to inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 activity. In a model of aortic banding–induced chronic pressure overload, heart function was similarly depressed in transgenic and wild-type mice. Conclusions We identified a novel mechanism in which Nox2 modulates cardiomyocyte SR Ca2+ uptake and contractile function through redox-regulated changes in phospholamban phosphorylation. This mechanism can drive increased contractility in the short term in disease states characterized by enhanced renin-angiotensin system activation. PMID:26184620

  14. Influence of Long-Term Caloric Restriction on Myocardial and Cardiomyocyte Contractile Function and Autophagy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xuefeng; Turdi, Subat; Hu, Nan; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence has revealed that calorie restriction (CR) is capable of improving heart function. However, most the reports are focused on the effect of CR on the pathological states such as obesity while the effect of CR on heart function in otherwise healthy subjects are not well understood. This study examined the long-term CR effect on cardiac contractile function and possible underlying mechanisms involved. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a 40% CR or ad libitum feeding for 20 weeks. Echocardiographic and cardiomyocyte contractile properties were evaluated. Intracellular signaling pathways were examined using western blot analysis. Our results showed that CR overtly lessened glucose intolerance, body and heart weights (although not heart size), lowered fat tissue density, decreased left ventricular (LV) wall thickness (septum and posterior wall) in both systole and diastole, and reduced LV mass (not normalized LV mass) without affecting fractional shortening. Cardiomyocyte cell length and cross-sectional area were reduced while peak shortening amplitude was increased following CR. CR failed to affect maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, duration of shortening and relengthening. Immunoblotting data depicted decreased and increased phosphorylation of Akt/GSK-3β and AMPK/ACC, respectively, following CR. CR also dampened the phosphorylation of mTOR, ERK1/2 and c-Jun while it increased the phosphorylation of JNK. Last but not least, CR significantly promoted cardiac autophagy as evidenced by increased expression of LC3B-II (and LC3B-IIto-LC3B-I ratio) and Beclin-1. In summary, our data suggested that long-term CR may preserve cardiac contractile function with improved cardiomyocyte function, lessen cardiac remodeling and promote autophagy. PMID:22444502

  15. Effects of a New Glutamic Acid Derivative on Myocardial Contractility of Stressed Animals under Conditions of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Blockade.

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2015-07-01

    Glufimet (glutamic acid derivative) in a dose of 28.7 mg/kg limited the reduction of the cardiac functional reserve in animals subjected to 24-h stress under conditions of nonselective NO synthase blockade with L-NAME (10 mg/kg). Adrenoreactivity and increased afterload tests showed that the increment of myocardial contraction/relaxation rates, left-ventricular pressure, and HR were significantly higher in glufimet-treated stressed animals with NO synthesis blockade than in animals which received no glufimet. The efficiency of glufimet was higher than that of phenibut (the reference drug).

  16. Use of insulin to decrease septic shock-induced myocardial depression in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Levenbrown, Yosef; Penfil, Scott; Rodriguez, Elena; Zhu, Yan; Hossain, Jobayer; Bhat, A Majeed; Hesek, Anne; O'Neil, Karen B; Tobin, Kelly; Shaffer, Thomas H

    2013-12-01

    Insulin is known to attenuate septic shock-induced myocardial depression. Possible mechanisms include an anti-inflammatory or inotropic effect of insulin. The objective of this study was to determine whether the mechanism of action of insulin in attenuating septic shock-induced myocardial depression is through an immunomodulatory effect. Fourteen pigs were assigned to one of two groups. Both groups received a 4-h infusion of lipopolysaccharide endotoxin from Escherichia coli 0111:B4. Group 2 additionally received insulin at 1.5 U/kg/h with infusions of D50 normal saline and KCl to maintain normal serum glucose and potassium levels. Cardiac function was measured with shortening fraction using transthoracic echocardiogram. Plasma TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were obtained every 30 min. Postmortem cytokine analysis and histomorphology were performed on the heart tissue. Although insulin attenuated septic shock-induced myocardial depression, this was not due to an anti-inflammatory effect and, therefore, likely resulted from an inotropic effect of insulin.

  17. Confluence of Depression and Acute Psychological Stress Among Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: Effects on Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthew M.; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is prevalent in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and increases risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) recurrence and mortality despite optimal medical care. The pathways underlying this risk remain elusive. Psychological stress (PS) can provoke impairment in myocardial perfusion and trigger ACS. A confluence of acute PS with depression might reveal coronary vascular mechanisms of risk. We tested whether depression increased risk for impaired myocardial perfusion during acute PS among patients with stable CHD. Methods and Results Patients (N=146) completed the Beck Depression Inventory‐I (BDI‐I), a measure of depression linked to recurrent ACS and post‐ACS mortality, and underwent single‐photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during acute PS. The likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS as a function of depression severity was tested. On the BDI‐I, 41 patients scored in the normal range, 48 in the high normal range, and 57 in the depressed range previously linked to CHD prognosis. A BDI‐I score in the depressed range was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS (odds ratio =2.89, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.63, P=0.012). This remained significant in models controlling ACS recurrence/mortality risk factors and medications. There was no effect for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications. Conclusions Depressed patients with CHD are particularly susceptible to impairment in myocardial perfusion during PS. The confluence of PS with depression may contribute to a better understanding of the depression‐associated risk for ACS recurrence and mortality. PMID:25359402

  18. Alcohol Dehydrogenase Protects against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction via Attenuation of Oxidative Stress and Autophagy: Role of PTEN-Akt-mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jiaojiao; Fuller, Nathan D.; Hu, Nan; Barton, Linzi A.; Henion, Jeremy M.; Guo, Rui; Chen, Yuguo; Ren, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an essential role in ensuring proper folding of the newly synthesized proteins. Aberrant ER homeostasis triggers ER stress and development of cardiovascular diseases. ADH is involved in catalyzing ethanol to acetaldehyde although its role in cardiovascular diseases other than ethanol metabolism still remains elusive. This study was designed to examine the impact of ADH on ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies and underlying mechanisms involved using cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Methods ADH and wild-type FVB mice were subjected to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin (1 mg/kg, i.p., for 48 hrs). Myocardial mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties, ER stress, autophagy and associated cell signaling molecules were evaluated. Results ER stress compromised cardiac contractile function (evidenced as reduced fractional shortening, peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged relengthening duration and impaired intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis), oxidative stress and upregulated autophagy (increased LC3B, Atg5, Atg7 and p62), along with dephosphorylation of PTEN, Akt and mTOR, all of which were attenuated by ADH. In vitro study revealed that ER stress-induced cardiomyocyte anomaly was abrogated by ADH overexpression or autophagy inhibition using 3-MA. Interestingly, the beneficial effect of ADH was obliterated by autophagy induction, inhibition of Akt and mTOR. ER stress also promoted phosphorylation of the stress signaling ERK and JNK, the effect of which was unaffected by ADH transgene. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggested that ADH protects against ER stress-induced cardiac anomalies possibly via attenuation of oxidative stress and PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathway-regulated autophagy. PMID:26807981

  19. Effect of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) on Depression in Patients With Myocardial Infarction (MI)

    PubMed Central

    Behnammoghadam, Mohammad; Alamdari, Ali Karam; Behnammoghadam, Aziz; Darban, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coronary heart disease is the most important cause of death and inability in all communities. Depressive symptoms are frequent among post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients and may cause negative effects on cardiac prognosis. This study was conducted to identify efficacy of EMDR on depression of patients with MI. Methods: This study is a clinical trial. Sixty patients with MI were selected by simple sampling, and were separated randomly into experimental and control groups. To collect data, demographic questionnaire and Beck Depression Questionnaire were used. In experimental group, EMDR therapy were performed in three sessions alternate days for 45–90 minutes, during four months after their MI. Depression level of patients was measured before, and a week after EMDR therapy. Data were analyzed using paired –t- test, t–test, and Chi-square. Results: The mean depression level in experimental group 27.26± 6.41 before intervention, and it was 11.76 ± 3.71 after intervention. Hence, it showed a statistically significant difference (P<0.001). The mean depression level in control group was 24.53 ± 5.81 before intervention, and it was 31.66± 6.09 after intervention, so it showed statistically significant difference (P<0.001). The comparison of mean depression level at post treatment, in both groups showed statistically significant difference (P<0.001). Conclusion: EMDR is an effective, useful, efficient, and non-invasive method for treatment and reducing depression in patients with MI. PMID:26153191

  20. Symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of acute myocardial infarction: the HUNT 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Gustad, Lise Tuset; Laugsand, Lars Erik; Janszky, Imre; Dalen, Håvard; Bjerkeset, Ottar

    2014-01-01

    Aims The nature of the association of depression and anxiety with risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. We aimed to study the prospective association of single and recurrent self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression with a risk of AMI in a large Norwegian population based cohort. Methods and results In the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995–97) baseline data on anxiety and depression symptoms, sociodemographic variables, health status including cardiovascular risk factors and common chronic disorders were registered for 57 953 adult men and women free of cardiovascular disease. The cohort was followed up during a mean (SD) 11.4 (2.9) years for a first AMI from baseline through 2008. A total of 2111 incident AMIs occurred, either identified at hospitals or by the National Cause of Death Registry. The multi-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.31 (95% CI 1.03–1.66) for symptoms of depression and 1.25 (CI 0.99–1.57) for anxiety. Two episodes of mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression (MSAD), reported 10 years apart, increased the risk for AMI by 52% (11–108%). After exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up, the association of depression symptoms with AMI risk was attenuated. Relative risk for AMI with anxiety symptoms and MSAD weakened when participants with chronic disorders were excluded. Conclusion Self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety, especially if recurrent, were moderately associated with the risk of incident AMI. We had some indications that these associations might partly reflect reverse causation or confounding from common chronic diseases. PMID:24057077

  1. Precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction: early thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, A.S.; Weiss, A.T.; Shah, P.K.; Maddahi, J.; Peter, T.; Ganz, W.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1985-02-01

    To investigate the myocardial perfusion correlates of precordial ST segment depression during acute inferior myocardial infarction, a rest thallium-201 scintigram and a closely timed 12 lead electrocardiogram were obtained within 6 hours of the onset of infarction in 44 patients admitted with their first acute inferior myocardial infarction. Thirty-six patients demonstrated precordial ST segment depression (group 1) and eight did not (group 2). A perfusion defect involving the inferior wall was present in all 44 patients. Additional perfusion defects of the adjacent posterolateral wall (n . 20), the ventricular septum (n . 9) or both (n . 6) were present in 35 of 36 patients from group 1 compared with only 1 of 8 patients from group 2 (p less than 0.001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery between group 1 and group 2 or between patients with and those without a thallium-201 perfusion defect involving the ventricular septum. Thus, precordial ST segment depression during an acute inferior myocardial infarction is associated with thallium-201 scintigraphic evidence of more extensive involvement of the adjacent posterolateral or inferoseptal myocardial segments, which probably reflects the extent and pattern of distribution of the artery of infarction, rather than the presence of coexistent multivessel coronary artery disease or disease of the left anterior descending artery.

  2. The GSTM2 C-Terminal Domain Depresses Contractility and Ca2+ Transients in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hewawasam, Ruwani P; Liu, Dan; Casarotto, Marco G; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is an intracellular ion channel that regulates Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of phase II detoxification enzymes with additional functions including the selective inhibition of RyR2, with therapeutic implications. The C-terminal half of GSTM2 (GSTM2C) is essential for RyR2 inhibition, and mutations F157A and Y160A within GSTM2C prevent the inhibitory action. Our objective in this investigation was to determine whether GSTM2C can enter cultured rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes and influence contractility. We show that oregon green-tagged GSTM2C (at 1 μM) is internalized into the myocytes and it reduces spontaneous contraction frequency and myocyte shortening. Field stimulation of myocytes evoked contraction in the same percentage of myocytes treated either with media alone or media plus 15 μM GSTM2C. Myocyte shortening during contraction was significantly reduced by exposure to 15 μM GSTM2C, but not 5 and 10 μM GSTM2C and was unaffected by exposure to 15 μM of the mutants Y160A or F157A. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient in the 15 μM GSTM2C - treated myocytes was significantly decreased, the rise time was significantly longer and the decay time was significantly shorter than in control myocytes. The Ca2+ transient was not altered by exposure to Y160A or F157A. The results are consistent with GSTM2C entering the myocytes and inhibiting RyR2, in a manner that indicates a possible therapeutic potential for treatment of arrhythmia in the neonatal heart. PMID:27612301

  3. The GSTM2 C-Terminal Domain Depresses Contractility and Ca2+ Transients in Neonatal Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hewawasam, Ruwani P.; Liu, Dan; Casarotto, Marco G.; Board, Philip G.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is an intracellular ion channel that regulates Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during excitation–contraction coupling in the heart. The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of phase II detoxification enzymes with additional functions including the selective inhibition of RyR2, with therapeutic implications. The C-terminal half of GSTM2 (GSTM2C) is essential for RyR2 inhibition, and mutations F157A and Y160A within GSTM2C prevent the inhibitory action. Our objective in this investigation was to determine whether GSTM2C can enter cultured rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes and influence contractility. We show that oregon green-tagged GSTM2C (at 1 μM) is internalized into the myocytes and it reduces spontaneous contraction frequency and myocyte shortening. Field stimulation of myocytes evoked contraction in the same percentage of myocytes treated either with media alone or media plus 15 μM GSTM2C. Myocyte shortening during contraction was significantly reduced by exposure to 15 μM GSTM2C, but not 5 and 10 μM GSTM2C and was unaffected by exposure to 15 μM of the mutants Y160A or F157A. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient in the 15 μM GSTM2C - treated myocytes was significantly decreased, the rise time was significantly longer and the decay time was significantly shorter than in control myocytes. The Ca2+ transient was not altered by exposure to Y160A or F157A. The results are consistent with GSTM2C entering the myocytes and inhibiting RyR2, in a manner that indicates a possible therapeutic potential for treatment of arrhythmia in the neonatal heart. PMID:27612301

  4. Effects of paroxetine-mediated inhibition of GRK2 expression on depression and cardiovascular function in patients with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiuqing; Wang, Qing; Guo, Rui; Xu, Lingling; Chen, Qin M; Hou, Yinglong

    2016-01-01

    Background Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor utilized in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Recent studies have identified paroxetine as a G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) inhibitor capable of reversing cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in experimental models of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We determine the clinical importance of paroxetine on cardiac functions in patients having AMI with depression (AMID) in comparison with fluoxetine, an unrelated selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that does not inhibit GRK2. Methods Diagnosis of depression was based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and Self-rating Depression Scale in AMI patients after hospital admission. AMID patients were randomly assigned to paroxetine or fluoxetine for treatment of depression. Heart rate variability and cardiac function were evaluated. GRK2 protein levels were measured using peripheral lymphocytes and Western blot. Results GRK2 expression in AMID patients was significantly higher than that in AMI patients without depression. In AMID patients, GRK2 levels were positively correlated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and the Self-rating Depression Scale scores, and negatively correlated with heart rate variability. Treatment of AMID patients with paroxetine significantly reduced the expression of GRK2, normalized the autonomic nervous system function, and improved cardiac performance. In contrast, fluoxetine normalized the autonomic nervous system but did not reduce the expression of GRK2 nor improved cardiac performance. Conclusion This study suggests that paroxetine is effective for improving cardiac function in patients with AMID and such effect correlates with GRK2 reduction.

  5. Phospholemman deficiency in postinfarct hearts: enhanced contractility but increased mortality.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Ayoub; Lane, Susan; Yang, Zequan; Karaoli, Themis; Akosah, Kwame; Hossack, John; McDuffie, Marcia; Wang, JuFang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y; Tucker, Amy L

    2012-06-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates [Na(+) ](i), [Ca(2+)](i) and contractility through its interactions with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) in the heart. Both expression and phosphorylation of PLM are altered after myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 in PLM-knockout (KO) mice is detrimental. Three weeks after MI, wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts were similarly hypertrophied. PLM expression was lower but fractional phosphorylation was higher in WT-MI compared to WT-sham hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction was severely depressed in WT-MI but significantly less depressed in PLM-KO-MI hearts despite similar infarct sizes. Compared with WT-sham myocytes, the abnormal [Ca(2+) ], transient and contraction amplitudes observed in WT-MI myocytes were ameliorated by genetic absence of PLM. In addition, NCX1 current was depressed in WT-MI but not in PLM-KO-MI myocytes. Despite improved myocardial and myocyte performance, PLM-KO mice demonstrated reduced survival after MI. Our findings indicate that alterations in PLM expression and phosphorylation are important adaptations post-MI, and that complete absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 is detrimental in post-MI animals.

  6. [Ventricular contractility: Physiology and clinical projection].

    PubMed

    Domenech, Raúl J; Parra, Víctor M

    2016-06-01

    The contractile state of the heart is the result of myocardial contractility, the intrinsic mechanism that regulates the force and the shortening of the ventricle and determines the ventricular ejection volume. However, the ejection volume is also modulated by ventricular preload (diastolic ventricular volume) and afterload (resistance to ejection). Accordingly, a decrease in contractility may be masked by changes in preload or afterload, maintaining a normal ejection volume and delaying the diagnosis of myocardial damage. Thus, it is necessary to develop a non-invasive method to measure contractility in the clinical practice. We review in this article the basic principles of cardiac contraction, the concept of contractility and its measurement with the ventricular pressure-volume loop, an experimental method that also measures most of the hemodynamic variables of the cardiac cycle including preload, afterload, ventricular work, ventricular lusitropy and arterial elastance. This method has been recently validated in cardiac patients and allows to evaluate the evolution of contractility in heart failure in a non invasive way. Although some modifications are still necessary, it will probably have an extensive use in practical cardiology in the near future. PMID:27598497

  7. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase participates in septic shock myocardial depression by nitric oxide overproduction and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ce; Yi, Chenju; Wang, Huiping; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) is involved in septic shock myocardial depression. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) method was used to induce septic shock. There was a significant depression of hemodynamic parameters recorded in the septic shock stage. After using nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), inducible NOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AMG), and neuronal NOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), depression of the parameters was partly attenuated. Nitric oxide production in isolated cardiac mitochondria increased obviously in the CLP-septic shock stage, L-NAME and 7-NI both decreased NO production significantly. Nitrite/nitrate (NOx) production in the septic shock stage was much greater than those in the corresponding sham groups, and NOx production in the cytosol by inducible NOS was greater. Treatment with AMG suppressed NOx production in the cytosol by iNOS, whereas treatment with 7-NI decreased NOx production in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial NOS expression increased significantly in the septic shock stage, and its overexpression was attenuated using 7-NI. There was no significant decrease in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore measurement in the CLP-septic shock group, whereas a significant decrease was observed in those treated with L-NAME or 7-NI. These results indicate that overexpression of mitochondrial NOS is involved in myocardial depression. PMID:21993446

  8. Effects of paroxetine-mediated inhibition of GRK2 expression on depression and cardiovascular function in patients with myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiuqing; Wang, Qing; Guo, Rui; Xu, Lingling; Chen, Qin M; Hou, Yinglong

    2016-01-01

    Background Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor utilized in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Recent studies have identified paroxetine as a G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) inhibitor capable of reversing cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in experimental models of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We determine the clinical importance of paroxetine on cardiac functions in patients having AMI with depression (AMID) in comparison with fluoxetine, an unrelated selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that does not inhibit GRK2. Methods Diagnosis of depression was based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and Self-rating Depression Scale in AMI patients after hospital admission. AMID patients were randomly assigned to paroxetine or fluoxetine for treatment of depression. Heart rate variability and cardiac function were evaluated. GRK2 protein levels were measured using peripheral lymphocytes and Western blot. Results GRK2 expression in AMID patients was significantly higher than that in AMI patients without depression. In AMID patients, GRK2 levels were positively correlated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale and the Self-rating Depression Scale scores, and negatively correlated with heart rate variability. Treatment of AMID patients with paroxetine significantly reduced the expression of GRK2, normalized the autonomic nervous system function, and improved cardiac performance. In contrast, fluoxetine normalized the autonomic nervous system but did not reduce the expression of GRK2 nor improved cardiac performance. Conclusion This study suggests that paroxetine is effective for improving cardiac function in patients with AMID and such effect correlates with GRK2 reduction. PMID:27695334

  9. Modulation of coronary flow rate and cardiac contractility by the divalent cation ionophore A23187 and inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase pathways: development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Björnsson, O G; Kobayashi, K; Williamson, J R

    1988-02-01

    In the present studies, we demonstrate in buffer-perfused isolated working guinea pig hearts that indometacin reduces coronary flow rate in a dose-dependent manner (max 56.7 +/- 5.5%, SEM, n = 6, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.01), and that this leads to a development of heterogeneous patterns of myocardial ischemia (elevated myocardial levels of reduced pyridine nucleotide, NADH) and depressed cardiac work (64.7 +/- 11.7%, SEM, of control at 5 x 10(-6) mol/l of indometacin, P less than 0.05). The effect of indometacin on coronary flow rate and consequently on myocardial tissue oxygenation was completely prevented by the preferential 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) (1 x 10(-6) mol/l), or the sulfidopeptide leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (2 x 10(-5) mol/l), indicating that the isolated working guinea pig heart, even when deprived of blood, is able to produce vasoactive sulfidopeptide leukotrienes at significant levels. At higher concentrations of indometacin (5 x 10(-5) mol/l, 1 x 10(-4) mol/l), coronary flow rate returned to initial levels while cardiac work became further depressed despite normoxic levels of NADH. These data support that indometacin also has a direct suppressive effect on the myocardium independent of its coronary vascular effect. This conclusion is supported by the observation that addition of sodium arachidonate (6 x 10(-5) mol/l) completely inhibited the vascular effect of indometacin, but not the depressive effect on the myocardium. The divalent cation ionophore A23187 (6 x 10(-6) mol/l) had a strong positive chronotropic effect on the heart and a biphasic effect on coronary flow rate. After a brief period of increased coronary flow rate, presumably due to coronary vasodilatation, the ionophore caused a sustained reduction in coronary flow, and this was accompanied by high myocardial levels of NADH fluorescence of characteristically heterogeneous pattern. This is presumably

  10. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Suffredini, Dante A; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q

    2015-12-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT's myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  11. Does Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Directly Depress Myocardial Function? A Review of Clinical Cases and Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Suffredini, Dante A.; Sampath-Kumar, Hanish; Li, Yan; Ohanjanian, Lernik; Remy, Kenneth E.; Cui, Xizhong; Eichacker, Peter Q.

    2015-01-01

    The US outbreak of B.anthracis infection in 2001 and subsequent cases in the US and Europe demonstrate that anthrax is a continuing risk for the developed world. While several bacterial components contribute to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis, production of lethal toxin (LT) is strongly associated with the development of hypotension and lethality. However, the mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular instability LT produces are unclear. Some evidence suggests that LT causes shock by impairing the peripheral vasculature, effects consistent with the substantial extravasation of fluid in patients dying with B. anthracis. Other data suggests that LT directly depresses myocardial function. However a clinical correlate for this latter possibility is less evident since functional studies and post-mortem examination in patients demonstrate absent or minimal cardiac changes. The purposes of this review were to first present clinical studies of cardiac functional and histologic pathology with B. anthracis infection and to then examine in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo preclinical studies of LT’s myocardial effects. Together, these data suggest that it is unclear whether that LT directly depresses cardiac function. This question is important for the clinical management and development of new therapies for anthrax and efforts should continue to be made to answer it. PMID:26703730

  12. Depression and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction and Coronary Death: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Kling, Juliana M

    2016-02-01

    Findings regarding the association between depression and risk of coronary heart disease are inconsistent. We aimed to assess the association between depression and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary death through a meta-analysis.We performed an electronic literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus databases through August 1, 2015, and manual search of the references of the eligible papers and related review articles. Two investigators independently conducted study selection and data abstraction. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. Confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Cochran Q statistic and Higgins index. Publication bias was assessed by funnel plot and Egger test. Study quality was appraised with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.Among 19 eligible cohort studies including 323,709 participants, 8447 cases of MI and coronary death were reported during follow-up ranging from 4 to 37 years. The pooled adjusted HRs for patients with depression (vs those without) were 1.22 (95% CI, 1.13-1.32) for combined MI and coronary death, 1.31 (95% CI, 1.09-1.57) for MI alone (9 studies), and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.14-1.63) for coronary death alone (8 studies). The increased risk of MI and coronary death associated with depression was consistent using modified inclusion criteria, across most subgroups, and after adjusting for possible publication bias.Depression is associated with a significantly increased risk of MI and coronary death. Effective prevention and treatment of depression may decrease such risk.

  13. Risk of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with myocardial infarction: A nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hsin-Pei; Chien, Wu-Chien; Cheng, Wei-Tung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Tzeng, Wen-Chii

    2016-08-01

    Anxiety and depressive symptoms are associated with adverse cardiovascular events after an acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, most studies focusing on anxiety or depression have used rating scales or self-report methods rather than clinical diagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between psychiatrist-diagnosed psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular prognosis.We sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database; 1396 patients with MI were recruited as the study cohort and 13,960 patients without MI were recruited as the comparison cohort. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of MI on the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders.During the first 2 years of follow-up, patients with MI exhibited a significantly higher risk of anxiety disorders (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 5.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.61-5.54) and depressive disorders (adjusted HR = 7.23, 95% CI: 4.88-10.88) than those without MI did. Greater risk for anxiety and depressive disorders was observed among women and patients aged 45 to 64 years following an acute MI. Patients with post-MI anxiety had a 9.37-fold (95% CI: 4.45-19.70) higher risk of recurrent MI than those without MI did after adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities.This nationwide population-based cohort study provides evidence that MI increases the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders during the first 2 years post-MI, and post-MI anxiety disorders are associated with a higher risk of recurrent MI. PMID:27559951

  14. ST-segment depression on the initial electrocardiogram in acute myocardial infarction-prognostic significance and its effect on short-term mortality: A report from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (NRMI-2, 3, 4).

    PubMed

    Pitta, Sridevi R; Grzybowski, Mary; Welch, Robert D; Frederick, Paul D; Wahl, Robert; Zalenski, Robert J

    2005-04-01

    This study analyzed 255,256 patients who had acute myocardial infarction and were enrolled in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction 2, 3, and 4 (1994 to 2002). The objective was to determine in-hospital mortality rate among patients who had ST-segment depression on the initial electrocardiogram. Patients who had ST-segment depression had an in-hospital mortality rate (15.8%) similar to that of patients who had ST-segment elevation or left bundle branch block (15.5%). After adjusting for observed differences, ST-segment depression was associated with only a slightly lower odds ratio (0.91) of mortality compared with ST-segment elevation or left bundle branch block. PMID:15781012

  15. Moderate ethanol administration accentuates cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and mitochondrial injury in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Lei, Yonghong; Wang, Qiurong; Esberg, Lucy B; Huang, Zaixing; Scott, Glenda I; Li, Xue; Ren, Jun

    2015-03-18

    Light to moderate drinking confers cardioprotection although it remains unclear with regards to the role of moderate drinking on cardiac function in obesity. This study was designed to examine the impact of moderate ethanol intake on myocardial function in high fat diet intake-induced obesity and the mechanism(s) involved with a focus on mitochondrial integrity. C57BL/6 mice were fed low or high fat diet for 16 weeks prior to ethanol challenge (1g/kg/d for 3 days). Cardiac contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, myocardial histology, and mitochondrial integrity [aconitase activity and the mitochondrial proteins SOD1, UCP-2 and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)] were assessed 24h after the final ethanol challenge. Fat diet intake compromised cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties (depressed peak shortening and maximal velocities of shortening/relengthening, prolonged duration of relengthening, dampened intracellular Ca(2+) rise and clearance without affecting duration of shortening). Although moderate ethanol challenge failed to alter cardiomyocyte mechanical property under low fat diet intake, it accentuated high fat diet intake-induced changes in cardiomyocyte contractile function and intracellular Ca(2+) handling. Moderate ethanol challenge failed to affect fat diet intake-induced cardiac hypertrophy as evidenced by H&E staining. High fat diet intake reduced myocardial aconitase activity, downregulated levels of mitochondrial protein UCP-2, PGC-1α, SOD1 and interrupted intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory proteins, the effect of which was augmented by moderate ethanol challenge. Neither high fat diet intake nor moderate ethanol challenge affected protein or mRNA levels as well as phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3β in mouse hearts. Taken together, our data revealed that moderate ethanol challenge accentuated high fat diet-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies as well as mitochondrial injury.

  16. The effect of midazolam on left ventricular pump performance and contractility in anesthetized patients with coronary artery disease: effect of preoperative ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Messina, A G; Paranicas, M; Yao, F S; Illner, P; Roman, M J; Saba, P S; Devereux, R B

    1995-10-01

    Forty patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were studied, of whom 24 had depressed global left ventricular (LV) function at preoperative catheterization, to evaluate the effects of midazolam on LV pump performance and contractility. Transesophageal echocardiography and simultaneous hemodynamic measurements were used to assess LV preload, afterload, and systolic performance during inhalation of 100% O2 and after 0.1 mg/kg of midazolam. Systolic function indices were expressed as a percent of the predicted value for observed end-systolic stress to estimate LV contractility. In the entire study population, midazolam did not affect cardiac index. Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were reduced (63 +/- 13 to 59 +/- 12 bm; P < 0.0006 and 89 +/- 15 to 76 +/- 16 mm Hg; P < 0.0001) as were pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, central venous pressure, and systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Afterload, as measured by end-systolic stress, was reduced (55 +/- 33 to 48 +/- 26 kdyne/cm2; P = 0.007) with no change in fractional shortening or percent area change. As a result, systolic function decreased in relation to observed end-systolic stress, providing evidence of reduced LV contractility. Thus, midazolam administration (0.1 mg/kg) caused no change in cardiac pump performance but decreased LV contractility in the entire population. Myocardial contractility was lower at baseline and after the administration of midazolam in the depressed ejection fraction group, but the decrease in contractility was not exaggerated in the depressed ejection fraction group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. The relationship between depressive symptoms, health service consumption, and prognosis after acute myocardial infarction: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kurdyak, Paul A; Gnam, William H; Goering, Paula; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of cardiovascular health services is greater among patients with depressive symptoms than among patients without. However, the extent to which such associations between depressive symptoms and health service utilization are attributable to variations in comorbidity and prognostic disease severity is unknown. This paper explores the relationship between depressive symptoms, health service cardiovascular consumption, and prognosis following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The study design was a prospective cohort study with follow-up telephone interviews of 1,941 patients 30 days following AMI discharged from 53 hospitals across Ontario, Canada between December 1999 and February, 2003. Outcome measures were post discharge use of cardiac and non-cardiac health care services. The service utilization outcomes were adjusted for age, sex, income, comorbidity, two validated measures of prognosis (cardiac functional capacity and risk adjustment severity index), cardiac procedures (CABG or PTCA) and drugs prescribed at discharge. Results Depressive symptoms were associated with a 24% (Adjusted RR:1.24; 95% CI:1.19–1.30, P < 0.001), 9% (Adjusted RR:1.09; 95% CI:1.02–1.16, P = 0.007) and 43% (Adjusted RR: 1.43; 95% CI:1.34–1.52, P < 0.001) increase in total, cardiac, and non-cardiac hospitalization days post-AMI respectively, after adjusting for baseline patient and hospital characteristics. Depressive-associated increases in cardiac health service consumption were significantly more pronounced among patients of lower than higher cardiac risk severity. Depressive symptoms were not associated with increased mortality after adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Conclusion Depressive symptoms are associated with significantly higher cardiac and non-cardiac health service consumption following AMI despite adjustments for comorbidity and prognostic severity. The disproportionately higher cardiac health service consumption among lower

  18. The effect of written material and verbal method education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in selected hospitals in Iran

    PubMed Central

    AGHAKHANI, NADER; KHADEMVATAN, KAMAL; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Myocardial infarction (MI) is the damage to the heart muscle, or myocardium, resulting from the lack of blood flow to the heart. MI patients experience mental and emotional problems such as depression and anxiety. These complications could cause delay in resuming work, decreased quality of life and increased risk of death. The role of education in facilitating adaptation is very important in these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of written material and verbal method education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in Urmia hospital in 2009. Methods: This study was a quasi-experimental study, comparing the effect of education on anxiety and depression in patients with myocardial infarction in hospitals affiliated to Urmia University of Medical Science. 124 patients were selected randomly and divided into two groups. The experimental group was educated through face to face training and an educational booklet (Written Material and Verbal Method). The control group did not receive any intervention. The level of anxiety and depression was evaluated, using HADS questionnaire at 3 intervals: after 48 hours of admission, the discharge day and 2 months after discharge. Results: The findings suggested that MI patients were worried about their social role, interpersonal relations and personal health. Such problems can aggravate symptoms and complicate the future care. There was no significant difference between the control and experimental groups before the intervention, but after the intervention, anxiety and depression in the experimental group was significantly less than that in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Considering the beneficial results obtained from written materials and verbal method education on reducing anxiety and depression in cases with myocardial infarction, this may be one of the health care goals. More research on more patients is required to achieve more conclusive results

  19. Myocardial failure with altered response to adrenaline in endotoxin shock

    PubMed Central

    Archer, L.T.; Black, M.R.; Hinshaw, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    regularly less in experimental hearts than the controls. Heart rate responses to adrenaline in both failing and non-failing hearts were identical. 5 In conclusion, it is suggested that myocardial contractile and relaxation characteristics and coronary vascular responses to adrenaline infusion are depressed in endotoxin shock during the period of demonstrated myocardial dysfunction. No distinct causal relationships were observed between the altered myocardial responsiveness and pathogenesis of heart dysfunction since myocardial dysfunction and altered responsiveness to adrenaline were generally observed together. Myocardial oedema formation after endotoxin as previously reported by this laboratory may bear a relationship to the depressed negative dP/dt response to adrenaline. PMID:1097013

  20. Mechanisms involved in the in vitro contractile dysfunction induced by different concentrations of ferrous iron in the rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Renata Andrade; Silva, Marito Afonso Sousa Costa; Peixoto, João Victor; Kassouf-Silva, Ilana; Fogaça, Rosalvo T H; Dos Santos, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Iron intoxication is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and organic damage including the cardiovascular system, and is a leading cause of poisoning deaths in children. In this study we examined whether a range of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) concentrations can interfere differently on the myocardial mechanics, investigating the ROS-mediated effects. Developed force of isolated rat papillary muscles was depressed with a concentration- and time-dependency by Fe(2+) 100-1000μM. The contractile response to Ca(2+) was reduced, but it was partially reversed by co-incubation with catalase and DMSO, but not TEMPOL. In agreement, in situ detection of OH was increased by Fe(2+) whereas O2(-) was unchanged. The myosin-ATPase activity was significantly decreased. Contractions dependent on the sarcolemal Ca(2+) influx were impaired only by Fe(2+) 1000μM, and antioxidants had no effect. In skinned fibers, Fe(2+) reduced the pCa-force relationship, and pCa50 was right-shifted by 0.55. In conclusion, iron overload can acutely impair myocardial contractility by reducing myosin-ATPase activity and myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. These effects are mediated by local production of OH and H2O2. Nevertheless, in a such high concentration as 1000μM, Fe(2+) appears to depress force also by reducing Ca(2+) influx, probably due to a competition at Ca(2+) channels. PMID:27396687

  1. Cardiological risk factors for depressive symptoms after a first myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, P.M.J.C.; Strik, J.J.M.H.; Lousberg, R.; van de Veen, F.H.; van Praag, H.M.; Wellens, H.J.J.; Honig, A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To detect possible cardiological risk factors in the acute phase of MI for developing depressive symptoms after first MI. Design Retrospective analysis of cardiac and psychiatric data of 111 consecutive patients admitted with a first MI. Methods During one year, all consecutive patients with a first MI, less than 12 hours chest pain and a maximal aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) value of at least 80 U/l, admitted to the University Hospital of Maastricht, were screened for the presence of depressive symptoms using the 90-item 'Symptom checklist' (SCL-90) questionnaire at one month post-MI. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 111 patients; 28 patients refused to participate in the study. Results No correlation was found between LVEF, peak ASAT, peak CK value and characteristics, location or mode of treatment of the MI and depressive symptoms post-MI. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between SCL-90 depression score and cardiac tissue loss as defined by cumulative ASAT release at 24, 48 and 72 hours after the acute event (p values 0.029, 0.028 and <0.009, respectively) at the one month post-MI screening. Conclusions No cardiological parameters were correlated to depressive symptoms post-MI. If there was a connection at all, this appeared to be a negative correlation between infarct size as measured by ASAT release and the occurrence of depressive symptoms at one month post-MI. PMID:25696157

  2. What does the beck depression inventory measure in myocardial infarction patients? a psychometric approach using item response theory and person-fit.

    PubMed

    Wardenaar, Klaas J; Wanders, Rob B K; Roest, Annelieke M; Meijer, Rob R; De Jonge, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Observed associations between depression following myocardial infarction (MI) and adverse cardiac outcomes could be overestimated due to patients' tendency to over report somatic depressive symptoms. This study was aimed to investigate this issue with modern psychometrics, using item response theory (IRT) and person-fit statistics to investigate if the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) measures depression or something else among MI-patients. An IRT-model was fit to BDI-data of 1135 MI patients. Patients' adherence to this IRT-model was investigated with person-fit statistics. Subgroups of "atypical" (low person-fit) and "prototypical" (high person-fit) responders were identified and compared in terms of item-response patterns, psychiatric diagnoses, socio-demographics and somatic factors. In the IRT model, somatic items had lower thresholds compared to depressive mood/cognition items. Empirically identified "atypical" responders (n = 113) had more depressive mood/cognitions, scored lower on somatic items and more often had a Comprehensive International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) depressive diagnosis than "prototypical" responders (n = 147). Additionally, "atypical" responders were younger and more likely to smoke. In conclusion, the BDI measures somatic symptoms in most MI patients, but measures depression in a subgroup of patients with atypical response patterns. The presented approach to account for interpersonal differences in item responding could help improve the validity of depression assessments in somatic patients. PMID:25994207

  3. [Myocardial contractility and hemodynamics in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Selivonenko, V G

    1977-01-01

    The author determined the phasic structure of the systole of the left ventricle by the method of polycardiography and hemodynamics in 20 patients suffering from hypothyrodism. Blood plasma and erythrocyte electrolytes were examined at the same time. Patients with hypothyroidism displayed a phasic syndrome of hypodynamia and a marked correlation between the phase of the synchronous contraction, the period of ejection, the strength of contraction of the left ventricle and the electrolyte content. Sodium and magnesium produced the greatest influence on the phasic structure of the systole; potassium and calcium had a lesser effect. The heart stroke volume diminished; as to the cardiac index, expenditure of the energy of cardiac contractions directed to the maintenance of movement of 1 litre of the minute blood volume; the external work, and the peripheral vascular resistance displayed no significant change.

  4. Propofol Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Expression and Myocardial Depression through Decreasing the Generation of Superoxide Anion in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Hu, Ji-Jie; Lu, Chun-Hua; Liang, Jia-Ni; Xiao, Jin-Fang; Liu, You-Tan; Lin, Chun-Shui; Qin, Zai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    TNF-α has been shown to be a major factor responsible for myocardial depression in sepsis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an anesthetic, propofol, on TNF-α expression in cardiomyocytes treated with LPS both in vivo and in vitro. In cultured cardiomyocytes, compared with control group, propofol significantly reduced protein expression of gp91phox and phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 MAPK, which associates with reduced TNF-α production. In in vivo mice studies, propofol significantly improved myocardial depression and increased survival rate of mice after LPS treatment or during endotoxemia, which associates with reduced myocardial TNF-α production, gp91phox, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK. It is concluded that propofol abrogates LPS-induced TNF-α production and alleviates cardiac depression through gp91phox/ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK signal pathway. These findings have great clinical importance in the application of propofol for patients enduring sepsis. PMID:25180066

  5. Inhibition of caspase 1 reduces human myocardial ischemic dysfunction via inhibition of IL-18 and IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Benjamin J.; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Harken, Alden H.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine IL-18 was investigated for its role in human myocardial function. An ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model of suprafused human atrial myocardium was used to assess myocardial contractile force. Addition of IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP), the constitutive inhibitor of IL-18 activity, to the perifusate during and after I/R resulted in improved contractile function after I/R from 35% of control to 76% with IL-18BP. IL-18BP treatment also preserved intracellular tissue creatine kinase levels (by 420%). Steady-state mRNA levels for IL-18 were elevated after I/R, and the concentration of IL-18 in myocardial homogenates was increased (control, 5.8 pg/mg vs. I/R, 26 pg/mg; P < 0.01). Active IL-18 requires cleavage of its precursor form by the IL-1β-converting enzyme (caspase 1); inhibition of caspase 1 also attenuated the depression in contractile force after I/R (from 35% of control to 75.8% in treated atrial muscle; P < 0.01). Because caspase 1 also cleaves the precursor IL-1β, IL-1 receptor blockade was accomplished by using the IL-1 receptor antagonist. IL-1 receptor antagonist added to the perifusate also resulted in a reduction of ischemia-induced contractile dysfunction. These studies demonstrate that endogenous IL-18 and IL-1β play a significant role in I/R-induced human myocardial injury and that inhibition of caspase 1 reduces the processing of endogenous precursors of IL-18 and IL-1β and thereby prevents ischemia-induced myocardial dysfunction. PMID:11226333

  6. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... make negative thinking worse. previous continue Depression Can Go Unrecognized People with depression may not realize they ... themselves or who have eating disorders or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression. ...

  7. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  8. Left ventricular dysfunction following transient ischaemia induced by transluminal coronary angioplasty. Beneficial effects of calcium antagonists against post-ischaemic myocardial stunning.

    PubMed

    Sheiban, I; Tonni, S; Benussi, P; Marini, A; Trevi, G P

    1993-07-01

    Acute and severe ischaemia is followed by depression of myocardial contractility during reperfusion; return to full recovery might take a long time. This phenomenon, termed myocardial stunning, has been extensively demonstrated in experimental studies and in different clinical settings. The beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in preventing post-ischaemic myocardial stunning have been tested in experimental studies, showing that when administered before or during ischaemia, they inhibit post-ischaemic myocardial dysfunction. The present study was undertaken to verify the possible occurrence of myocardial stunning following transient ischaemia induced by coronary angioplasty. The aim was also to evaluate the possible protective effects of calcium antagonists (nisoldipine) and nitrates against myocardial stunning in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing routine coronary angioplasty (PCTA) with prolonged inflation. The study included 25 patients, aged between 40 and 69 years, with exercise-induced angina and single vessel disease. The stenosis was severe (80% to subtotal occlusion), localized on the left anterior descending artery, but without collaterals at coronary angiogram. All patients had normal left ventricular (LV) overall function and normal systolic thickening of the anterior wall supplied by the diseased artery. Our data suggest that post-ischaemic myocardial stunning is not only an experimental curiosity, but that it does occur in different clinical settings. Calcium antagonists (i.e. nisoldipine), when added before or during ischaemia, seem to prevent myocardial stunning. These findings confer a potential role to these agents in the treatment of post-ischaemic myocardial dysfunction.

  9. Role of microtubules in the contractile dysfunction of hypertrophied myocardium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Ishiguro, Y.; Conrad, C. H.; Buckley, J. M.; Morgan, J. P.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the ameliorative effects of microtubule depolymerization on cellular contractile dysfunction in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy apply at the tissue level. BACKGROUND: A selective and persistent increase in microtubule density causes decreased contractile function of cardiocytes from cats with hypertrophy produced by chronic right ventricular (RV) pressure overloading. Microtubule depolymerization by colchicine normalizes contractility in these isolated cardiocytes. However, whether these changes in cellular function might contribute to changes in function at the more highly integrated and complex cardiac tissue level was unknown. METHODS: Accordingly, RV papillary muscles were isolated from 25 cats with RV pressure overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) for 4 weeks and 25 control cats. Contractile state was measured using physiologically sequenced contractions before and 90 min after treatment with 10(-5) mol/liter colchicine. RESULTS: The PAB significantly increased RV systolic pressure and the RV weight/body weight ratio in PAB; it significantly decreased developed tension from 59+/-3 mN/mm2 in control to 25+/-4 mN/mm2 in PAB, shortening extent from 0.21+/-0.01 muscle lengths (ML) in control to 0.12+/-0.01 ML in PAB, and shortening rate from 1.12+/-0.07 ML/s in control to 0.55+/-0.03 ML/s in PAB. Indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that PAB muscles had a selective increase in microtubule density and that colchicine caused complete microtubule depolymerization in both control and PAB papillary muscles. Microtubule depolymerization normalized myocardial contractility in papillary muscles of PAB cats but did not alter contractility in control muscles. CONCLUSIONS: Excess microtubule density, therefore, is equally important to both cellular and to myocardial contractile dysfunction caused by chronic, severe pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy.

  10. Depressed expression of MuRF1 and MAFbx in areas remote of recent myocardial infarction: a mechanism contributing to myocardial remodeling?

    PubMed

    Conraads, Viviane M; Vrints, Christiaan J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Bosmans, Johan; Claeys, Marc J; Van Herck, Paul; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2010-03-01

    Ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI) includes myocardial hypertrophy, a process requiring increased protein synthesis and sarcomere assembly. The anti-hypertrophic effect of MuRF1/MafBx, both muscle-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases, has been demonstrated in animal experiments and in cultured cardiomyocytes. We assessed MuRF1/MAFbx expression in myocardium remote of recently (<2 weeks) infarcted regions (MI), compared with patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, with normal systolic function and without previous infarction (control or Con). Left ventricular myocardial biopsies were obtained from the contralateral normal zone in MI (n = 14) patients and from the Con (n = 12) group. MuRF-1/MAFbx expression was assessed using RT-PCR and Western blot (WB). In addition, the myocardial expression of TNF-alpha was measured (RT-PCR) and troponin I, beta-myosin and phosphorylated Akt/Akt (pAkt/Akt) were quantified (WB). MuRF1 and MAFbx expression (mRNA and protein level) were significantly reduced in biopsies from MI patients. TNF-alpha was significantly higher in MI and exhibited a negative correlation with MuRF1 and MAFbx. The expression of troponin I and cardiomyocyte size were increased in MI in comparison to Con, whereas beta-myosin expression was not altered. When compared with Con, pAkt/Akt was elevated. The results of the present study suggest that the atrogenes MuRF1/MAFbx are involved in regulating the hypertrophic response, characteristic of the early post-infarction remodeling phase. Reduced expression of MuRF1 and MAFbx in the myocardium might permit hypertrophy, which is supported by the elevation of troponin I. A regulatory role of TNF-alpha needs to be confirmed in further experiments. PMID:19859778

  11. Depressed expression of MuRF1 and MAFbx in areas remote of recent myocardial infarction: a mechanism contributing to myocardial remodeling?

    PubMed

    Conraads, Viviane M; Vrints, Christiaan J; Rodrigus, Inez E; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Bosmans, Johan; Claeys, Marc J; Van Herck, Paul; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker

    2010-03-01

    Ventricular remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI) includes myocardial hypertrophy, a process requiring increased protein synthesis and sarcomere assembly. The anti-hypertrophic effect of MuRF1/MafBx, both muscle-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases, has been demonstrated in animal experiments and in cultured cardiomyocytes. We assessed MuRF1/MAFbx expression in myocardium remote of recently (<2 weeks) infarcted regions (MI), compared with patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery, with normal systolic function and without previous infarction (control or Con). Left ventricular myocardial biopsies were obtained from the contralateral normal zone in MI (n = 14) patients and from the Con (n = 12) group. MuRF-1/MAFbx expression was assessed using RT-PCR and Western blot (WB). In addition, the myocardial expression of TNF-alpha was measured (RT-PCR) and troponin I, beta-myosin and phosphorylated Akt/Akt (pAkt/Akt) were quantified (WB). MuRF1 and MAFbx expression (mRNA and protein level) were significantly reduced in biopsies from MI patients. TNF-alpha was significantly higher in MI and exhibited a negative correlation with MuRF1 and MAFbx. The expression of troponin I and cardiomyocyte size were increased in MI in comparison to Con, whereas beta-myosin expression was not altered. When compared with Con, pAkt/Akt was elevated. The results of the present study suggest that the atrogenes MuRF1/MAFbx are involved in regulating the hypertrophic response, characteristic of the early post-infarction remodeling phase. Reduced expression of MuRF1 and MAFbx in the myocardium might permit hypertrophy, which is supported by the elevation of troponin I. A regulatory role of TNF-alpha needs to be confirmed in further experiments.

  12. Depression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Donna E; Gucciardi, Enza; Grace, Sherry L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. KEY FINDINGS: Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared with 2.9% in men. The highest rates of depression are seen among women of reproductive age. Predictive factors for depression include previous depression, feeling out of control or overwhelmed, chronic health problems, traumatic events in childhood or young adulthood, lack of emotional support, lone parenthood, and low sense of mastery. Although depression is treatable, only 43% of depressed women had consulted a health professional in 1998/99 and only 32.4% were taking antidepressant medication. People with lower education, inadequate income, and fewer contacts with a health professional were less likely to receive depression treatment. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A better understanding of factors that increase vulnerability and resilience to depression is needed. There is also a need for the collection and analysis of data pertaining to: prevalence of clinical anxiety; the prevalence of depression band 12 months after childbirth factors contributing to suicide contemplation and attempts among adolescent girls, current treatments for depression and their efficacy in depressed women at different life stages; interprovincial variation in depression rates and hospitalizations and the impact and costs of depression on work, family, individuals, and society.

  13. Fractal correlation properties of R-R interval dynamics and mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huikuri, H. V.; Makikallio, T. H.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Hintze, U.; Moller, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preliminary data suggest that the analysis of R-R interval variability by fractal analysis methods may provide clinically useful information on patients with heart failure. The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic power of new fractal and traditional measures of R-R interval variability as predictors of death after acute myocardial infarction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Time and frequency domain heart rate (HR) variability measures, along with short- and long-term correlation (fractal) properties of R-R intervals (exponents alpha(1) and alpha(2)) and power-law scaling of the power spectra (exponent beta), were assessed from 24-hour Holter recordings in 446 survivors of acute myocardial infarction with a depressed left ventricular function (ejection fraction depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction.

  14. A study of ventricular contractility and other parameters possibly related to vasodepressor syncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, K. H.; Sullivan, R. W.; Spears, W. R.; Vetter, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of diminished orthostatic and exercise tolerance resulting from prolonged bedrest were studied by noninvasion methods to determine if alterations in myocardial contractility were induced by bedrest. These methods were apexcardiography, systolic time intervals, and echocardiography. It is concluded that bedrest causes detrimental alterations in the contractile state of the myocardium which accounts for the decreases in maximal oxygen uptaken during exercise after bedrest. Tabulated test data are included.

  15. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  16. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  17. Contractile Dysfunction in Sarcomeric Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    MacIver, David H; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotype of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are controversial. The development of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension and aortic stenosis is usually described as a compensatory mechanism that normalizes wall stress. We suggest that an important abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reduced contractile stress (the force per unit area) generated by myocardial tissue secondary to abnormalities such as cardiomyocyte disarray. In turn, a progressive deterioration in contractile stress provokes worsening hypertrophy and disarray. A maintained or even exaggerated ejection fraction is explained by the increased end-diastolic wall thickness producing augmented thickening. We propose that the nature of the hemodynamic load in an individual with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy could determine its phenotype. Hypertensive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more likely to develop exaggerated concentric hypertrophy; athletic individuals an asymmetric pattern; and inactive individuals a more apical hypertrophy. The development of a left ventricular outflow tract gradient and mitral regurgitation may be explained by differential regional strain resulting in mitral annular rotation.

  18. Combination of Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175 reduces post-myocardial infarction depression symptoms and restores intestinal permeability in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Arseneault-Bréard, Jessica; Rondeau, Isabelle; Gilbert, Kim; Girard, Stéphanie-Anne; Tompkins, Thomas A; Godbout, Roger; Rousseau, Guy

    2012-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) in rats is accompanied by apoptosis in the limbic system and a behavioural syndrome similar to models of depression. We have already shown that probiotics can reduce post-MI apoptosis and designed the present study to determine if probiotics can also prevent post-MI depressive behaviour. We also tested the hypothesis that probiotics achieve their central effects through changes in the intestinal barrier. MI was induced in anaesthetised rats via 40-min transient occlusion of the left anterior coronary artery. Sham rats underwent the same surgical procedure without actual coronary occlusion. For 7 d before MI and between the seventh post-MI day and euthanasia, half the MI and sham rats were given one billion live bacterial cells of Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 and Bifidobacterium longum R0175 per d dissolved in water, while the remaining animals received only the vehicle (maltodextrin). Depressive behaviour was evaluated 2 weeks post-MI in social interaction, forced swimming and passive avoidance step-down tests. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by oral administration with fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, 4 h before euthanasia. MI rats displayed less social interaction and impaired performance in the forced swimming and passive avoidance step-down tests compared to the sham controls (P < 0·05). Probiotics reversed the behavioural effects of MI (P < 0·05), but did not alter the behaviour of sham rats. Intestinal permeability was increased in MI rats and reversed by probiotics. In conclusion, L. helveticus R0052 and B. longum R0175 combination interferes with the development of post-MI depressive behaviour and restores intestinal barrier integrity in MI rats.

  19. Depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna

    2009-04-01

    This is an invited article on how my career as an epidemiologist studying depression unfolded. The role of the Civil Rights movement in opening the PhD doors to women at Yale began my career. The unfolding of depression studies are described. These studies included a clinical trial of medication and what later was known as interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the first community survey of psychiatric disorder, family genetic and brain imaging studies or depression and anxiety disorders. I hope the new generation will have the wonderful opportunities I have had.

  20. Depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna

    2009-04-01

    This is an invited article on how my career as an epidemiologist studying depression unfolded. The role of the Civil Rights movement in opening the PhD doors to women at Yale began my career. The unfolding of depression studies are described. These studies included a clinical trial of medication and what later was known as interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the first community survey of psychiatric disorder, family genetic and brain imaging studies or depression and anxiety disorders. I hope the new generation will have the wonderful opportunities I have had. PMID:19344866

  1. Myocardial perfusion and contraction in acute ischemia and chronic ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Canty, John M; Suzuki, Gen

    2012-04-01

    A large body of evidence has demonstrated that there is a close coupling between regional myocardial perfusion and contractile function. When ischemia is mild, this can result in the development of a new balance between supply and energy utilization that allows the heart to adapt for a period of hours over which myocardial viability can be maintained, a phenomenon known as "short-term hibernation". Upon reperfusion after reversible ischemia, regional myocardial function remains depressed. The "stunned myocardium" recovers spontaneously over a period of hours to days. The situation in myocardium subjected to chronic repetitive ischemia is more complex. Chronic dysfunction can initially reflect repetitive stunning with insufficient time for the heart to recover between episodes of spontaneous ischemia. As the frequency and/or severity of ischemia increases, the heart undergoes a series of adaptations which downregulate metabolism to maintain myocyte viability at the expense of contractile function. The resulting "hibernating myocardium" develops regional myocyte cellular hypertrophy as a compensatory response to ischemia-induced apoptosis along with a series of molecular adaptations that while regional, are similar to global changes found in advanced heart failure. As a result, flow-function relations become independently affected by tissue remodeling and interventions that stimulate myocyte regeneration. Similarly, chronic vascular remodeling may alter flow regulation in a fashion that increases myocardial vulnerability to ischemia. Here we review our current understanding of myocardial flow-function relations during acute ischemia in normal myocardium and highlight newly identified complexities in their interpretation in viable chronically dysfunctional myocardium with myocyte cellular and molecular remodeling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Coronary Blood Flow".

  2. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborns, as well as jitteriness, difficulty feeding, and low blood sugar after delivery. However, moms who stop medications can ... a kind of antidepressant for treating depression and anxiety disorders. However, a number of research studies show ...

  3. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein suppresses cardiomyocyte contractile function: Role of TRPV1 and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenbiao; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with an increased prevalence of heart disease and is known to trigger a proinflammatory response via stimulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channels (TRPV1, also known as the capsaicin receptor). This study was designed to examine the effect of acrolein, an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant, on myocardial contractile function and the underlying mechanism involved with a focus on TRPV1 and oxidative stress. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated using an IonOptix MyoCam® system including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90 ), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. Changes in apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. The degree of oxidative stress was assessed using the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione. Results obtained revealed that exposure of cardiomyocytes to acrolein acutely compromised contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties including depressed PS, ± dL/dt and ΔFFI, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. In addition, acrolein exposure upregulated TRPV1 associated with an increase in both apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the acrolein-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies, as well as apoptosis (as evidenced by Bcl-2, Bax, FasL, Caspase-3 and -8), were negated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger glutathione or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Collectively these data suggest that the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein may play a role in the pathogenesis and sequelae of air pollution-induced heart disease via a TRPV1- and oxidative stress-dependent mechanism.

  4. Beneficial actions of bevantolol on subendocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Gross, G J; Buck, J D; Warltier, D C; Hardman, H F

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a new cardioselective beta adrenergic antagonist, bevantolol (CI-775), on regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function distal to a severe flow-limiting stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery was studied in open-chest dogs. Bevantolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline was administered 30 min after production of left circumflex stenosis sufficient to reduce resting coronary blood flow and contractile force approximately 40%. Regional myocardial blood flow and contractile force were measured with radiolabeled microspheres and Brodie-Walton strain gauge arches, respectively. No significant changes were observed in the saline-treated group. Following bevantolol treatment subendocardial blood flow (1.30 +/- 0.29 to 0.93 +/- 0.19 ml/min/g) and contractile force decreased (11.4 +/- 4.4%) significantly (p less than 0.05) in nonischemic myocardium. Subendocardial blood flow (0.59 +/- 0.14 to 0.81 +/- 0.14 ml/min/g) and contractile force increased (29.3 +/- 3.6%) significantly (p less than 0.05) in ischemic myocardium. These results suggest that bevantolol produces a favorable redistribution of flow to ischemic subendocardium. The increase in flow results in an improvement of contractile function in the ischemic region.

  5. Prostaglandins attenuate cardiac contractile dysfunction produced by free radical generation but not by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, K M; Karmazyn, M

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare the potential influence of cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase derived metabolites of arachidonic acid on myocardial injury produced either by a free radical generating system consisting of purine plus xanthine oxidase or that produced by hydrogen peroxide. A free radical generating system consisting of purine (2.3 mM) and xanthine oxidase (10 U/L) as well as hydrogen peroxide (75 microM) produced significant functional changes in the absence of either significant deficits in high energy phosphates or ultrastructural damage. Prostaglandin F2 alpha (30 nM) significantly attenuated both the negative inotropic effect of purine plus xanthine oxidase as well as the ability of the free radical generator to elevate diastolic pressure. An identical concentration of prostaglandin 12 (prostacyclin) significantly reduced diastolic pressure elevation only and had no effect on contractile depression. The salutary effects of the two PGs occurred in the absence of any inhibitory influence on superoxide anion generation produced by the purine and xanthine oxidase reaction. None of prostaglandins modulated the response to hydrogen peroxide. In addition, neither prostaglandin E2 nor leukotrienes exerted any effect on changes produced by either type of oxidative stress. A 5 fold elevation in the concentrations of free radical generators or hydrogen peroxide produced extensive injury as characterized by a virtual total loss in contractility, 400% elevation in diastolic pressure, ultrastructural damage and significant depletions in high energy phosphate content. None of these effects were modulated by eicosanoid treatment. Our results therefore demonstrate a selective ability of both prostaglandin F2 alpha and to a lesser extent prostacyclin, to attenuate dysfunction produced by purine plus xanthine oxidase but not hydrogen peroxide. It is possible that these eicosanoids may represent endogenous protective factors under conditions of enhanced

  6. Fractal analysis of heart rate dynamics as a predictor of mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction. TRACE Investigators. TRAndolapril Cardiac Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Hoiber, S.; Kober, L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1999-01-01

    A number of new methods have been recently developed to quantify complex heart rate (HR) dynamics based on nonlinear and fractal analysis, but their value in risk stratification has not been evaluated. This study was designed to determine whether selected new dynamic analysis methods of HR variability predict mortality in patients with depressed left ventricular (LV) function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Traditional time- and frequency-domain HR variability indexes along with short-term fractal-like correlation properties of RR intervals (exponent alpha) and power-law scaling (exponent beta) were studied in 159 patients with depressed LV function (ejection fraction <35%) after an AMI. By the end of 4-year follow-up, 72 patients (45%) had died and 87 (55%) were still alive. Short-term scaling exponent alpha (1.07 +/- 0.26 vs 0.90 +/- 0.26, p <0.001) and power-law slope beta (-1.35 +/- 0.23 vs -1.44 +/- 0.25, p <0.05) differed between survivors and those who died, but none of the traditional HR variability measures differed between these groups. Among all analyzed variables, reduced scaling exponent alpha (<0.85) was the best univariable predictor of mortality (relative risk 3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.96 to 5.15, p <0.0001), with positive and negative predictive accuracies of 65% and 86%, respectively. In the multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis, mortality was independently predicted by the reduced exponent alpha (p <0.001) after adjustment for several clinical variables and LV function. A short-term fractal-like scaling exponent was the most powerful HR variability index in predicting mortality in patients with depressed LV function. Reduction in fractal correlation properties implies more random short-term HR dynamics in patients with increased risk of death after AMI.

  7. Depression.

    PubMed

    Tallo, Donato

    2014-04-15

    Reading the CPD article was beneficial to my professional nursing practice and development. I gained a greater understanding of how depression is likely to exacerbate the effects of a physical illness or complicate the treatment of other health conditions. PMID:24712633

  8. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators.

  9. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators. PMID:27353089

  10. Myocardial Ischemia: Lack of Coronary Blood Flow or Myocardial Oxygen Supply/Demand Imbalance?

    PubMed

    Heusch, Gerd

    2016-07-01

    Regional myocardial blood flow and contractile function in ischemic myocardium are well matched, and there is no evidence for an oxygen supply/demand imbalance. Thus, myocardial ischemia is lack of coronary blood flow with electric, functional, metabolic, and structural consequences for the myocardium. All therapeutic interventions must aim to improve blood flow to ischemic myocardium as much and as quickly as possible. PMID:27390331

  11. Dual antiplatelet compared to triple antithrombotic therapy in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction complicated by depressed left ventricular ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Oyetayo, Ola O.; Slicker, Kipp; De La Rosa, Lisa; Lane, Wesley; Langsjoen, Dane; Patel, Chhaya; Brough, Kevin; Chiles, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) consisting of warfarin, aspirin, and a P2Y12 inhibitor following an anterior ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by extensive wall motion abnormalities. This recommendation, however, is based on data collected before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) became the standard of care for the treatment of STEMI. We designed a retrospective study of patients who received PCI for anterior STEMI over an 8-year period to compare rates of thromboembolic and bleeding events between patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and those receiving TT, including warfarin. Patients were included if the predischarge echocardiogram showed extensive wall motion abnormality and an ejection fraction ≤35%. Patients with known left ventricular thrombus were excluded. A total of 124 patients met the criteria, with 80 patients in the DAPT group and 44 in the TT group. The median age was 58 years in the TT group and 64 years in the DAPT group (P < 0.04), with an average ejection fraction of 31%. Thromboembolic events occurred in 4 patients (5%) in the DAPT group compared with 3 patients (6.8%) in the TT group (P = 0.70). Bleeding occurred in 2 patients in the DAPT group and 4 patients in the TT group (2.5% in DAPT vs. 9.1% in TT group, P = 0.18). No differences in rates of clinical embolism or left ventricular thrombus were found. Our data support recent findings that warfarin may not be indicated for patients following PCI for anterior STEMI, even when significant wall motion abnormalities and reduced ejection fraction ≤35% are present. PMID:26424937

  12. Nitrendipine binding in congestive heart failure due to myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, I.M.; Lee, S.L.; Dhalla, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    Depressed cardiac pump function is the hallmark of congestive heart failure, and it is suspected that decreased influx of Ca2+ into the cardiac cell is responsible for depressed contractile function. Since Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemmal membrane are considered to be an important route for the entry of Ca2+, we examined the status of Ca2+ receptors/channels in failing rat hearts after myocardial infarction of the left ventricular free wall. For this purpose, the left coronary artery was ligated and hearts were examined 4, 8, and 16 weeks later; sham-operated animals served as controls. Hemodynamic assessment revealed decreased total mechanical energy (left ventricular systolic pressure x heart rate), increased left ventricular diastolic pressure, and decreased positive and negative dP/dt in experimental animals at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Although accumulation of ascites in the abdominal cavity was evident at 4 weeks, other clinical signs of congestive heart failure in experimental rats were evident from the presence of lung congestion and cardiac dilatation at 8 and 16 weeks after induction of myocardial infarction. The density of Ca2+ receptors/channels in crude membranes, as assessed by (3H)nitrendipine binding assay, was found to be decreased in the uninfarcted experimental left ventricle at 8 and 16 weeks; however, no change in the affinity of nitrendipine was evident. A similar depression in the specific binding of another dihydropyridine compound, (3H)PN200-110, was also evident in failing hearts. Brain and skeletal muscle crude membrane preparations, unlike those of the right ventricle and liver, revealed a decrease in Ca2+ receptors/channels density in experimental animals at 16 weeks.

  13. Intracoronary Levosimendan during Ischemia Prevents Myocardial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, Markus; Vähäsilta, Tommi; Saraste, Antti; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Pärkkä, Jussi P.; Leino, Kari; Laitio, Timo; Stark, Christoffer; Heikkilä, Aira; Saukko, Pekka; Savunen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Levosimendan is a calcium sensitizer that has been shown to prevent myocardial contractile depression in patients post cardiac surgery. This drug exhibits an anti-apoptotic property; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this report, we characterized the myocardial protective of levosimendan in preventing cardiomyocyte apoptosis and post-operative stunning in an experimental ischemia–reperfusion model. Methods: Three groups of pigs (n = 8 per group) were subjected to 40 min of global, cardioplegic ischemia followed by 240 min of reperfusion. Levosimendan (65 μg/kg body weight) was given to pigs by intravenous infusion (L-IV) before ischemia or intracoronary administration during ischemia (L-IC). The Control group did not receive any levosimendan. Echocardiography was used to monitor cardiac function in all groups. Apoptosis levels were assessed from the left ventricle using the terminal transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and immunocytochemical detection of Caspase-3. Results: Pigs after ischemia–reperfusion had a much higher TUNEL%, suggesting that our treatment protocol was effective. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in Control pigs that did not receive any levosimendan (0.062 ± 0.044%) relative to those received levosimendan either before (0.02 ± 0.017%, p = 0.03) or during (0.02 ± 0.017%, p = 0.03) the ischemia phase. Longitudinal left ventricular contraction in pigs that received levosimendan before ischemia (0.75 ± 0.12 mm) was significantly higher than those received levosimendan during ischemia (0.53 ± 0.11 mm, p = 0.003) or Control pigs (0.54 ± 0.11 mm, p = 0.01). Conclusion: Our results suggested that pigs received levosimendan displayed a markedly improved cell survival post I–R. The effect on cardiac contractility was only significant in our perfusion heart model when levosimendan was delivered intravenously before

  14. Chronic Contractile Dysfunction without Hypertrophy Does Not Provoke a Compensatory Transcriptional Response in Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, David R.; McMullen, Julie R.; Woodcock, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased myocardium from humans and experimental animal models shows heightened expression and activity of a specific subtype of phospholipase C (PLC), the splice variant PLCβ1b. Previous studies from our group showed that increasing PLCβ1b expression in adult mouse hearts by viral transduction was sufficient to cause sustained contractile dysfunction of rapid onset, which was maintained indefinitely in the absence of other pathological changes in the myocardium. We hypothesized that impaired contractility alone would be sufficient to induce a compensatory transcriptional response. Unbiased, comprehensive mRNA-sequencing was performed on 6 biological replicates of rAAV6-treated blank, PLCβ1b and PLCβ1a (closely related but inactive splice variant) hearts 8 weeks after injection, when reduced contractility was manifest in PLCβ1b hearts without evidence of induced hypertrophy. Expression of PLCβ1b resulted in expression changes in only 9 genes at FDR<0.1 when compared with control and these genes appeared unrelated to contractility. Importantly, PLCβ1a caused similar mild expression changes to PLCβ1b, despite a complete lack of effect of this isoform on cardiac contractility. We conclude that contractile depression caused by PLCβ1b activation is largely independent of changes in the transcriptome, and thus that lowered contractility is not sufficient in itself to provoke measurable transcriptomic alterations. In addition, our data stress the importance of a stringent control group to filter out transcriptional changes unrelated to cardiac function. PMID:27359099

  15. Anisotropic Elastography for Local Passive Properties and Active Contractility of Myocardium from Dynamic Heart Imaging Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Sun, L. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters. PMID:23165032

  16. Contractile function of the myocardium with prolonged hypokinesia in patients with surgical tuberculosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakutayeva, V. P.; Matiks, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the myocardial contractile function with hypokinesia in surgical tuberculosis patients are discussed. The phase nature of the changes is noted, specifically the changes in the various systoles, diastole, and other parts of the cardiac cycle. The data compare these changes during confinement in bed with no motor activity to and with a return to motor activity after leaving the in-bed regimen.

  17. The role of nitric oxide in cardiac depression induced by interleukin-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, R; Panas, D L; Catena, R; Moncada, S; Olley, P M; Lopaschuk, G D

    1995-01-01

    1. Myocardial dysfunction during septic shock is associated with enhanced production of cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). These cytokines depress cardiac mechanical function by a mechanism which is not well defined. 2. Bacterial endotoxin or cytokines cause the expression of Ca(2+)-independent nitric oxide (NO) synthase in cardiac myocytes, vascular endothelial cells and endocardial endothelial cells, causing enhanced production of NO. As NO has negative inotropic actions on cardiac muscle, we tested the sum effects of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha in the intact heart to determine whether enhanced expression of NO synthase activity in the cells that comprise the heart is involved in cardiac depression associated with cytokine stimulation. 3. Rat isolated working hearts perfused with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha showed a markedly greater depression in contractile function, measured as cardiac work, after 2 h of perfusion compared with time-matched control hearts. The depressant action of IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha was first apparent after 1 h of perfusion; no early (15 min) cardiac depressant actions were seen. 4. The competitive inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent NO synthases, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 microM) when given concurrently with IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha prevented the loss in contractile function such that these hearts after 2 h of perfusion had similar function to time-matched controls. L-NAME did not acutely reverse the loss of contractile function in hearts exposed for 2 h to IL-1 beta plus TNF-alpha.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7536096

  18. [Ischemia-reperfusion myocardial injury].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Chávez, Edmundo

    2003-01-01

    In this article, we present some considerations on the myocardial damage due to a deficit of oxygen supply. In fact, this damage properly constitutes a partial diastolic depolarization or injury, i.e., a moderate reduction of the rest transmembrane potential. This phenomenon is characteristic of the acute phase of the myocardial infarction syndrome and is responsible for the main electrical manifestations appearing in this phase: disorders of rhythm and conduction, as well as a reduced contractility of the involved myocardial fibers. All the mentioned phenomena are due to a defect of the myocardial energetic mechanisms, owing to the mitochondrial alterations in myocytes: early reduction of the nicotinamide adenine nucleotides, accumulation of calcium ("calcium overload") into mitochondria, and a drop in oxidative phosphorylation. These changes can present again, more exaggerated, in a following phase of evolution of the myocardial infarction due to myocardial reperfusion. Its severity is related to the duration of the initial ischemia period. Moreover, consequences of the oxidative stress can add producing cellular damage by liberation of reactive oxygen species. Oxidant stress causes also alterations in the mitochondrial DNA, i.e., mutations due to oxidation of nitrogenous bases. During the initial ischemia phase, as well as during reperfusion, metabolic therapy can be very useful as, for example, glucose-insulin-potassium solutions (G-I-K). These could act as scavengers of the free radicals derived from oxygen and avoid or reduce the myocardial damage due to reperfused myocytes. Metabolic drugs, as for example trimetazidine, antioxidants, etc, can also be used in the myocardial reperfusion phase.

  19. Restoring redox balance enhances contractility in heart trabeculae from type 2 diabetic rats exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Niraj M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Shen, Xiaoxu; Dey, Swati; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro; O′Rourke, Brian; Gao, Wei Dong

    2014-01-01

    Hearts from type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects are chronically subjected to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, both thought to contribute to oxidizing conditions and contractile dysfunction. How redox alterations and contractility interrelate, ultimately diminishing T2DM heart function, remains poorly understood. Herein we tested whether the fatty acid palmitate (Palm), in addition to its energetic contribution, rescues function by improving redox [glutathione (GSH), NAD(P)H, less oxidative stress] in T2DM rat heart trabeculae subjected to high glucose. Using cardiac trabeculae from Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, we assessed the impact of low glucose (EG) and high glucose (HG), in absence or presence of Palm or insulin, on force development, energetics, and redox responses. We found that in EG ZDF and lean trabeculae displayed similar contractile work, yield of contractile work (Ycw), representing the ratio of force time integral over rate of O2 consumption. Conversely, HG had a negative impact on Ycw, whereas Palm, but not insulin, completely prevented contractile loss. This effect was associated with higher GSH, less oxidative stress, and augmented matrix GSH/thioredoxin (Trx) in ZDF mitochondria. Restoration of myocardial redox with GSH ethyl ester also rescued ZDF contractile function in HG, independently from Palm. These results support the idea that maintained redox balance, via increased GSH and Trx antioxidant activities to resist oxidative stress, is an essential protective response of the diabetic heart to keep contractile function. PMID:25485897

  20. Continuum theory of contractile fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, K.; Zumdieck, A.; Jülicher, F.

    2003-12-01

    The generation of contractile forces by living cells often involves linear arrangements of actively interacting polar filaments. We develop a physical description of the dynamics of active fibers based on a general expression for the tension in terms of the filament density and the bundle polarisation. We discuss the long-time behaviour of oriented and of nonpolar fibres, discuss effects of polymerization and depolymerization, and relate this continuum theory to nonlocal descriptions of filament-motor systems. We show that a nonpolar arrangement of filaments suppresses oscillatory instabilities which could be relevant for muscle fibers.

  1. MYOCARDIAL AKT: THE OMNIPRESENT NEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Mark A.; Völkers, Mirko; Fischer, Kimberlee; Bailey, Brandi; Cottage, Christopher T.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Avitabile, Daniele; Alvarez, Roberto; Sundararaman, Balaji; Quijada, Pearl; Mason, Matt; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Malhowski, Amy; Cheng, Zhaokang; Khan, Mohsin; McGregor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest examples of integrated signal transduction is revealed by examination of effects mediated by AKT kinase in myocardial biology. Positioned at the intersection of multiple afferent and efferent signals, AKT exemplifies a molecular sensing node that coordinates dynamic responses of the cell in literally every aspect of biological responses. The balanced and nuanced nature of homeostatic signaling is particularly essential within the myocardial context, where regulation of survival, energy production, contractility, and response to pathological stress all flow through the nexus of AKT activation or repression. Equally important, the loss of regulated AKT activity is primarily the cause or consequence of pathological conditions leading to remodeling of the heart and eventual decompensation. This review presents an overview compendium of the complex world of myocardial AKT biology gleaned from more than a decade of research. Summarization of the widespread influence that AKT exerts upon myocardial responses leaves no doubt that the participation of AKT in molecular signaling will need to be reckoned with as a seemingly omnipresent regulator of myocardial molecular biological responses. PMID:21742795

  2. Critical role of extracellular heat shock cognate protein 70 in the myocardial inflammatory response and cardiac dysfunction after global ischemia-reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ning; Ao, Lihua; Cleveland, Joseph C.; Yang, Xiaoping; Su, Xin; Cai, Guang-Yun; Banerjee, Anirban; Fullerton, David A.; Meng, Xianzhong

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) modulates the myocardial inflammatory response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, and we recently found that cytokines link TLR4 to postischemic cardiac dysfunction. Although TLR4 can be activated in cultured cells by endogenous agents including heat shock protein 70, how it is activated during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is unknown. In the present study, we examined 1) whether heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is constitutively expressed in the myocardium, is released during ischemia-reperfusion; 2) whether extracellular HSC70 induces the myocardial inflammatory response and modulates cardiac function; and 3) whether HSC70 exerts these effects via TLR4. We subjected isolated mouse hearts to global ischemia-reperfusion via the Langendorff technique. Immunoblotting and immunostaining detected the release of HSC70 from the myocardium during reperfusion. Treatment with an antibody specific to HSC70 suppressed myocardial cytokine expression and improved cardiac functional recovery after ischemia-reperfusion. Recombinant HSC70 induced NF-κB activation and cytokine expression and depressed myocardial contractility in a TLR4-dependent manner. These effects required the substrate-binding domain of HSC70. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis of isolated macrophages demonstrated that extracellular HSC70 interacts with TLR4. Therefore, this study demonstrates for the first time that 1) the myocardium releases HSC70 during ischemia-reperfusion, 2) extracellular HSC70 contributes to the postischemic myocardial inflammatory response and to cardiac dysfunction, 3) HSC70 exerts these effects through a TLR4-dependent mechanism, and 4) the substrate-binding domain of HSC70 is required to induce these effects. Thus extracellular HSC70 plays a critical role in regulating the myocardial innate immune response and cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:18441202

  3. iPSC-derived human mesenchymal stem cells improve myocardial strain of infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingfeng; Shim, Winston; Tee, Nicole; Lim, Sze Yun; Chung, Ying Ying; Ja, K P Myu Mia; Ooi, Ting Huay; Tan, Grace; Kong, Geraldine; Wei, Heming; Lim, Chong Hee; Sin, Yoong Kong; Wong, Philip

    2014-08-01

    We investigated global and regional effects of myocardial transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) in infarcted myocardium. Acute myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by ligation of left coronary artery of severe combined immunodeficient mice before 2 × 10(5) iMSCs or cell-free saline were injected into peri-infarcted anterior free wall. Sham-operated animals received no injection. Global and regional myocardial function was assessed serially at 1-week and 8-week by segmental strain analysis by using two dimensional (2D) speckle tracking echocardiography. Early myocardial remodelling was observed at 1-week and persisted to 8-week with global contractility of ejection fraction and fractional area change in saline- (32.96 ± 14.23%; 21.50 ± 10.07%) and iMSC-injected (32.95 ± 10.31%; 21.00 ± 7.11%) groups significantly depressed as compared to sham control (51.17 ± 11.69%, P < 0.05; 34.86 ± 9.82%, P < 0.05). However, myocardial dilatation was observed in saline-injected animals (4.40 ± 0.62 mm, P < 0.05), but not iMSCs (4.29 ± 0.57 mm), when compared to sham control (3.74 ± 0.32 mm). Furthermore, strain analysis showed significant improved basal anterior wall strain (28.86 ± 8.16%, P < 0.05) in the iMSC group, but not saline-injected (15.81 ± 13.92%), when compared to sham control (22.18 ± 4.13%). This was corroborated by multi-segments deterioration of radial strain only in saline-injected (21.50 ± 5.31%, P < 0.05), but not iMSC (25.67 ± 12.53%), when compared to sham control (34.88 ± 5.77%). Improvements of the myocardial strain coincided with the presence of interconnecting telocytes in interstitial space of the infarcted anterior segment of the heart. Our results show that localized injection of iMSCs alleviates ventricular remodelling, sustains global and regional myocardial strain by paracrine-driven effect on neoangiogenesis and myocardial deformation/compliance via parenchymal and

  4. Mechanoelectrical feedback: independent role of preload and contractility in modulation of canine ventricular excitability.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, B B; Burkhoff, D; Yue, D T; Franz, M R; Sagawa, K

    1985-01-01

    Mechanoelectrical feedback, defined as changes in mechanical state that precede and alter transmembrane potential, may have potential importance in understanding the role of altered load and contractility in the initiation and modulation of ventricular arrhythmias. To assess the independent effects of preload and contractility on myocardial excitability and action potential duration, we determined the stimulus strength-interval relationship and recorded monophasic action potentials in isolated canine left ventricles contracting isovolumically. The strength-interval relationship was characterized by three parameters: threshold excitability, relative refractory period, and absolute refractory period. The effects of a threefold increase in left ventricular volume or twofold increase in contractility on these parameters were independently assessed. An increase in preload did not change threshold excitability in 11 ventricles but significantly shortened the absolute refractory period from 205 +/- 15 to 191 +/- 14 ms (P less than 0.001) (mean +/- SD). Similarly, the relative refractory period decreased from 220 +/- 18 to 208 +/- 19 ms (P less than 0.002). Comparable results were observed when contractility was increased as a result of dobutamine infusion in 10 ventricles. That is, threshold excitability was unchanged but the absolute refractory period decreased from 206 +/- 14 to 181 +/- 9 ms (P less than 0.003), and the relative refractory period decreased from 225 +/- 17 to 205 +/- 18 ms (P less than 0.003). Similar results were obtained when contractility was increased with CaCl2, indicating that contractility associated changes were independent of beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. An increase in preload or contractility was associated with shortening of the action potential. A threefold increase in preload and twofold increase in contractility were associated with a decrease in action potential duration of 22 and 24 ms, respectively. There was a significant

  5. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  6. [The role of free radicals in the myocardial reperfusion injuries and in the development of endogenous adaptation].

    PubMed

    Rőth, Erzsébet

    2015-11-22

    The reperfusion of acute ischaemic myocardium is essential for myocardial salvage, so-called "gold standard" therapy, however it can result in serious damage to the myocardium. Functional alterations occur, including depressed contractile function and decreased coronary flow as well as altered vascular reactivity. Over several decades it has been demonstrated that oxygen radical formation is greatly increased in the post-ischaemic heart and serves as a critical central mechanism of ischaemic-reperfusion injury. However it has been demonstrated that free radicals play an important role in the endogenous adaptation phenomenon of the heart, too. Ischaemic preconditioning is a cellular adaptive response of the heart to stress, which provides the most potent endogenous protection against reperfusion arrhytmias, stunning and infarction. Post-conditioning defined as brief periods of ischaemia and reperfusion during the very early minutes of reperfusion stimulates endogenous adaptation. Post-conditioning may also attenuate the damage to endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes from oxidants, cytokines, proteases and inflammatory cells.

  7. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-07-15

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway. PMID:27495954

  8. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  9. Myocardial Bridging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial bridging is rare. Myocardial bridges are most commonly localized in the middle segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The anatomic features of the bridges vary significantly. Alterations of the endothelial morphology and the vasoactive agents impact on the progression of atherosclerosis of myocardial bridging. Patients may present with chest pain, myocardial infarction, arrhythmia and even sudden death. Patients who respond poorly to the medical treatment with β-blockers warrant a surgical intervention. Myotomy is a preferred surgical procedure for the symptomatic patients. Coronary stent deployment has been in limited use due to the unsatisfactory long-term results. PMID:27074276

  10. Contractile forces in tumor cell migration.

    PubMed

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja; Rösel, Daniel; Fabry, Ben; Brábek, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Cancer is a deadly disease primarily because of the ability of tumor cells to spread from the primary tumor, to invade into the connective tissue, and to form metastases at distant sites. In contrast to cell migration on a planar surface where large cell tractions and contractile forces are not essential, tractions and forces are thought to be crucial for overcoming the resistance and steric hindrance of a dense three-dimensional connective tissue matrix. In this review, we describe recently developed biophysical tools, including 2-D and 3-D traction microscopy to measure contractile forces of cells. We discuss evidence indicating that tumor cell invasiveness is associated with increased contractile force generation.

  11. Stem cell therapy after myocardial infarction: ready for clinical application?

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Markus G; Franz, Wolfgang M

    2006-10-01

    The discovery of stem cells capable of generating angiogenic or contractile cells and structures might offer new treatment options for patients suffering from heart disease. In particular, embryonic stem cells are considered to have great potential for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Studies suggest that delivery or mobilization of stem and progenitor cells might improve tissue perfusion and contractile performance of the damaged heart; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Fusion or trans-differentiation into cardiomyocytes or vascular cells are considered rare events of cellular engraftment, and adult stem cells are now considered as 'regenerator cells', acting via paracrine effects of cytokines, or by activation of resident stent cells, thereby supporting the myocardial healing mechanisms after injury. Administration of autologous hematopoietic stem cells or mobilization of endogenous stem cells has been shown to be safe after myocardial infarction or cardiomyopathies, whereas skeletal myoblasts are considered to be hazardous due to the occurrence of life-threatening arrhythmias. This review focuses on the use of adult human stem cells for treating myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy, and discusses recent preliminary efficacy data, which suggest that 'regenerator cells' might have the potential to improve myocardial perfusion and contractile performance in patients suffering from myocardial infarction, severe ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure. PMID:17078382

  12. Effect of phorbol esters on contractile state and calcium flux in cultured chick heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherman, G.F.; Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.

    1987-07-01

    Phorbol esters are potent tumor promoters that have been widely used in studies of transmembrane signaling because of their ability to activate protein kinase C. To study the effect of phorbol esters (and indirectly, the role of protein kinase C) on the cardiac muscle contractility, the authors examined the effects of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on contractile state, transmembrane /sup 45/Ca fluxes, and cytosolic free Ca concentration ((Ca)/sub i/) using spontaneously contracting cultured chick ventricular cells. PMA produced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in the amplitude of cell motion (half maximum inhibitory concentration) with maximal effect observed at 1 ..mu..M. PMA (1 ..mu..M) reduced /sup 45/Ca uptake rate by 16 /plus minus/ 4% and the size of the rapidly exchangeable Ca pool by 11 /plus minus/ 2%, but did not alter the /sup 45/Ca efflux rate. In fura-2-loaded cells. PMA produced a decrease in (Ca)/sub i/ from 96 /plus minus/ 7 to 72 /plus minus/ 5 nM with a time course similar to that of alteration in contractile amplitude. These results indicate that PMA influences transsarcolemmal Ca uptake, and thus the excitation-contraction process, and suggest that protein kinase C may modulate myocardial Ca homeostassis and contractile state.

  13. Nitric oxide regulation of monkey myometrial contractility

    PubMed Central

    Kuenzli, Karri A; Buxton, Iain L O; Bradley, Michael E

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) donor CysNO (S-nitroso-L-cysteine) and endogenous NO upon spontaneous contractility in non-pregnant cynomolgus monkeys. We also assessed the role of intracellular guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic GMP]i) as a second messenger for NO in monkey uterine smooth muscle.CysNO reduced spontaneous contractility by 84% (P<0.05) at maximal concentrations, and significantly elevated [cyclic GMP]i (P<0.05). However, increases in [cyclic GMP]i were not required for CysNO-induced relaxations; CysNO inhibited contractile activity despite the complete inhibition of guanylyl cyclase by methylene blue or LY83,583.Analogues of cyclic GMP had no significant effect upon spontaneous contractile activity. L-arginine produced a 62% reduction in spontaneous activity (P<0.05) while D-arginine had no effect. The competitive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) not only blocked L-arginine-induced relaxations, but also significantly increased spontaneous contractile activity when added alone (P<0.05); the inactive D-enantiomer of NOARG had no such effect.While both endogenous NO and the NO donor CysNO relax monkey myometrium, this effect is not causally related to CysNO-induced elevations in [cyclic GMP]i. The failure of cyclic GMP analogues to alter monkey uterine smooth muscle tension also argues against a role for [cyclic GMP]i in the regulation of uterine contractility. Not only do these findings argue for the existence of a functionally-relevant NOS in the monkey uterus, but increases in contractile activity seen in the presence of NOS inhibitors suggest a role for NO in the moment-to-moment regulation of contractile activity in this organ. PMID:9630344

  14. Caffeine and taurine containing energy drink increases left ventricular contractility in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Jonas M; Kuetting, Daniel L; Luetkens, Julian A; Naehle, Claas P; Dabir, Darius; Homsi, Rami; Nadal, Jennifer; Schild, Hans H; Thomas, Daniel K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the impact of a caffeine and taurine containing energy drink (ED) on myocardial contractility in healthy volunteers using cardiac MR and cardiac MR based strain analysis. 32 healthy volunteers (mean age 28 years) were investigated before and 1 h after consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED. For assessment of global cardiac functional parameters balanced SSFP-Cine imaging was performed, whereas CSPAMM tagging was used to evaluate global and regional myocardial strain. In addition, ten randomly chosen subjects were investigated once more using a caffeine only protocol to further evaluate the effect of caffeine solely. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded throughout all studies. ED consumption led to a significant increase in peak systolic strain (PSS) and peak systolic strain rate (PSSR) 1 h after consumption (PSS: w/o ED -22.8 ± 2.1%; w ED -24.3 ± 2.4%, P = <0.0001 and PSSR: w/o ED -1.2 ± 0.1 1/s; w ED -1.3 ± 0.2 1/s, P = 0.0056), which was not observed in the caffeine only group. In contrast, global left ventricular function was unchanged (P = 0.2076). No significant changes of vital parameters and diastolic filling pattern were detected 1 h after ED consumption. Consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED results in a subtle, but significant increase of myocardial contractility 1 h after consumption. PMID:25425431

  15. Caffeine and taurine containing energy drink increases left ventricular contractility in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Jonas M; Kuetting, Daniel L; Luetkens, Julian A; Naehle, Claas P; Dabir, Darius; Homsi, Rami; Nadal, Jennifer; Schild, Hans H; Thomas, Daniel K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the impact of a caffeine and taurine containing energy drink (ED) on myocardial contractility in healthy volunteers using cardiac MR and cardiac MR based strain analysis. 32 healthy volunteers (mean age 28 years) were investigated before and 1 h after consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED. For assessment of global cardiac functional parameters balanced SSFP-Cine imaging was performed, whereas CSPAMM tagging was used to evaluate global and regional myocardial strain. In addition, ten randomly chosen subjects were investigated once more using a caffeine only protocol to further evaluate the effect of caffeine solely. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded throughout all studies. ED consumption led to a significant increase in peak systolic strain (PSS) and peak systolic strain rate (PSSR) 1 h after consumption (PSS: w/o ED -22.8 ± 2.1%; w ED -24.3 ± 2.4%, P = <0.0001 and PSSR: w/o ED -1.2 ± 0.1 1/s; w ED -1.3 ± 0.2 1/s, P = 0.0056), which was not observed in the caffeine only group. In contrast, global left ventricular function was unchanged (P = 0.2076). No significant changes of vital parameters and diastolic filling pattern were detected 1 h after ED consumption. Consumption of a caffeine and taurine containing ED results in a subtle, but significant increase of myocardial contractility 1 h after consumption.

  16. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Knockout Accentuates Ethanol-Induced Cardiac Depression: Role of Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heng; Byra, Emily A.; Yu, Lu; Hu, Nan; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Ren, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol consumption leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction possibly due to the toxicity of ethanol and its major metabolite acetaldehyde. This study was designed to examine the influence of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) knockout (KO) on acute ethanol exposure-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Wild-type (WT) and ALDH2 KO mice were subjected to acute ethanol (3 g/kg, i.p.) challenge and cardiomyocyte contractile function was assessed 24 hrs later using an IonOptix® edge-detection system. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate ALDH2, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). ALDH2 KO accentuated ethanol-induced elevation in cardiac acetaldehyde levels. Ethanol exposure depressed cardiomyocyte contractile function including decreased cell shortening amplitude and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening as well as prolonged relengthening duration and a greater decline in peak shortening in response to increasing stimulus frequency, the effect of which was significantly exaggerated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO also unmasked an ethanol-induced prolongation of shortening duration. In addition, short-term in vitro incubation of ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte mechanical defects were exacerbated by the ALDH inhibitor cyanamide. Ethanol treatment dampened phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β associated with up-regulated PP2A, which was accentuated by ALDH2 KO. ALDH2 KO aggravated ethanol-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. These results suggested that ALDH2 deficiency led to worsened ethanol-induced cardiomyocyte function, possibly due to upregulated expression of protein phosphatase, depressed Akt activation and subsequently impaired mitochondrial function. These findings depict a critical role of ALDH2 in the pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:20362583

  18. Myocardial Bridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. See also on this site: Ask a Texas Heart Institute Doctor: Search "myocardial bridge" Updated August ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  19. Acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yewen; Yin, Xing; Wijaya, Cori; Huang, Ming-He; McConnell, Bradley K

    2011-01-01

    With heart failure leading the cause of death in the USA (Hunt), biomedical research is fundamental to advance medical treatments for cardiovascular diseases. Animal models that mimic human cardiac disease, such as myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia-reperfusion (IR) that induces heart failure as well as pressure-overload (transverse aortic constriction) that induces cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (Goldman and Tarnavski), are useful models to study cardiovascular disease. In particular, myocardial ischemia (MI) is a leading cause for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality despite controlling certain risk factors such as arteriosclerosis and treatments via surgical intervention (Thygesen). Furthermore, an acute loss of the myocardium following myocardial ischemia (MI) results in increased loading conditions that induces ventricular remodeling of the infarcted border zone and the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Myocyte apoptosis, necrosis and the resultant increased hemodynamic load activate multiple biochemical intracellular signaling that initiates LV dilatation, hypertrophy, ventricular shape distortion, and collagen scar formation. This pathological remodeling and failure to normalize the increased wall stresses results in progressive dilatation, recruitment of the border zone myocardium into the scar, and eventually deterioration in myocardial contractile function (i.e. heart failure). The progression of LV dysfunction and heart failure in rats is similar to that observed in patients who sustain a large myocardial infarction, survive and subsequently develops heart failure (Goldman). The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in rats has been used to mimic human cardiovascular disease; specifically used to study cardiac signaling mechanisms associated with heart failure as well as to assess the contribution of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure. The method described in this report is the rat model of acute myocardial

  20. Facilitated ethanol metabolism promotes cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction through autophagy in murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Hu, Nan; Kandadi, Machender R.; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Chronic drinking leads to myocardial contractile dysfunction where ethanol metabolism plays an essential role. Acetaldehyde, the main ethanol metabolite, mediates alcohol-induced cell injury although the underlying mechanism is still elusive. This study was designed to examine the mechanism involved in accelerated ethanol metabolism-induced cardiac defect with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type FVB and cardiac-specific overexpression of alcohol dehydrogenase mice were placed on a 4% nutrition-balanced alcohol diet for 8 weeks. Myocardial histology, immunohistochemistry, autophagy markers and signal molecules were examined. Expression of micro RNA miR-30a, a potential target of Beclin 1, was evaluated by real-time PCR. Chronic alcohol intake led to cardiac acetaldehyde accumulation, hypertrophy and overt autophagosome accumulation (LC3-II and Atg7), the effect of which was accentuated by ADH. Signaling molecules governing autophagy initiation including class III PtdIns3K, phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K were enhanced and dampened, respectively, following alcohol intake. These alcohol-induced signaling responses were augmented by ADH. ADH accentuated or unmasked alcohol-induced downregulation of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and MiR-30a. Interestingly, ADH aggravated alcohol-induced p62 accumulation. Autophagy inhibition using 3-MA abolished alcohol-induced cardiomyocyte contractile anomalies. Moreover, acetaldehyde led to cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction and autophagy induction, which was ablated by 3-MA. Ethanol or acetaldehyde increased GFP-LC3 puncta in H9c2 cells, the effect of which was ablated by 3-MA but unaffected by lysosomal inhibition using bafilomycin A1, E64D and pepstatin A. In summary, these data suggested that facilitated acetaldehyde production via ADH following alcohol intake triggered cardiac autophagosome formation along with impaired lysosomal degradation, en route to myocardial defect. PMID:22441020

  1. Electrically contractile polymers augment right ventricular output in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ruhparwar, Arjang; Piontek, Patricia; Ungerer, Matthias; Ghodsizad, Ali; Partovi, Sasan; Foroughi, Javad; Szabo, Gabor; Farag, Mina; Karck, Matthias; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2014-12-01

    Research into the development of artificial heart muscle has been limited to assembly of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes seeded around a matrix, while nonbiological approaches to tissue engineering have rarely been explored. The aim of the study was to apply electrically contractile polymer-based actuators as cardiomyoplasty for positive inotropic support of the right ventricle. Complex trilayer polypyrrole (PPy) bending polymers for high-speed applications were generated. Bending motion occurred directly as a result of electrochemically driven charging and discharging of the PPy layers. In a rat model (n = 5), strips of polymers (3 × 20 mm) were attached and wrapped around the right ventricle (RV). RV pressure was continuously monitored invasively by direct RV cannulation. Electrical activation occurred simultaneously with either diastole (in order to evaluate the polymer's stand-alone contraction capacity; group 1) or systole (group 2). In group 1, the pressure generation capacity of the polymers was measured by determining the area under the pressure curve (area under curve, AUC). In group 2, the RV pressure AUC was measured in complexes directly preceding those with polymer contraction and compared to RV pressure complexes with simultaneous polymer contraction. In group 1, the AUC generated by polymer contraction was 2768 ± 875 U. In group 2, concomitant polymer contraction significantly increased AUC compared with complexes without polymer support (5987 ± 1334 U vs. 4318 ± 691 U, P ≤ 0.01). Electrically contractile polymers are able to significantly augment right ventricular contraction. This approach may open new perspectives for myocardial tissue engineering, possibly in combination with fetal or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  2. Impaired subendocardial contractile myofiber function in asymptomatic aged humans, as detected using MRI.

    PubMed

    Lumens, Joost; Delhaas, Tammo; Arts, Theo; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2006-10-01

    With aging, structural and functional changes occur in the myocardium without obvious impairment of systolic left ventricular (LV) function. Transmural differences in myocardial vulnerability for these changes may result in increase of transmural inhomogeneity in contractile myofiber function. Subendocardial fibrosis and impairment of subendocardial perfusion due to hypertension might change the transmural distribution of contractile myofiber function. The ratio of LV torsion to endocardial circumferential shortening (torsion-to-shortening ratio; TSR) during systole reflects the transmural distribution of contractile myofiber function. We investigated whether the transmural distribution of systolic contractile myofiber function changes with age. Magnetic resonance tissue tagging was performed to derive LV torsion and endocardial circumferential shortening. TSR was quantified in asymptomatic young [age 23.2 (SD 2.6) yr, n = 15] and aged volunteers [age 68.8 (SD 4.4) yr, n = 16]. TSR and its standard deviation were significantly elevated in the aged group [0.47 (SD 0.12) aged vs. 0.34 (SD 0.05) young; P = 0.0004]. In the aged group, blood pressure and the ratio of LV wall mass to end-diastolic volume were mildly elevated but could not be correlated to the increase in TSR. There were no significant differences in other indexes of systolic LV function such as end-systolic volume and ejection fraction. The elevated systolic TSR in the asymptomatic aged subjects suggests that aging is associated with local loss of contractile myofiber function in the subendocardium relative to the subepicardium potentially caused by subclinical pathological incidents.

  3. Combretastatin A4 disodium phosphate-induced myocardial injury.

    PubMed

    Tochinai, Ryota; Nagata, Yuriko; Ando, Minoru; Hata, Chie; Suzuki, Tomo; Asakawa, Naoyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazuhiko; Uchida, Kazumi; Kado, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological and electrocardiographic features of myocardial lesions induced by combretastatin A4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP) were evaluated, and the relation between myocardial lesions and vascular changes and the direct toxic effect of CA4DP on cardiomyocytes were discussed. We induced myocardial lesions by administration of CA4DP to rats and evaluated myocardial damage by histopathologic examination and electrocardiography. We evaluated blood pressure (BP) of CA4DP-treated rats and effects of CA4DP on cellular impedance-based contractility of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs). The results revealed multifocal myocardial necrosis with a predilection for the interventricular septum and subendocardial regions of the apex of the left ventricular wall, injury of capillaries, morphological change of the ST junction, and QT interval prolongation. The histopathological profile of myocardial lesions suggested that CA4DP induced a lack of myocardial blood flow. CA4DP increased the diastolic BP and showed direct effects on hiPS-CMs. These results suggest that CA4DP induces dysfunction of small arteries and capillaries and has direct toxicity in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, it is thought that CA4DP induced capillary and myocardial injury due to collapse of the microcirculation in the myocardium. Moreover, the direct toxic effect of CA4DP on cardiomyocytes induced myocardial lesions in a coordinated manner. PMID:27559241

  4. Myocardial uptake of digoxin in chronically digitalized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Steiness, E; Valentin, N

    1976-01-01

    1 The time course of myocardial uptake of digoxin, increase in contractility and changes in myocardial potassium concentration was studied for 90 min following an intravenous digoxin dose to long-term digitalized dogs. 2 Nineteen dogs were investigated by the use of a biopsy technique which allowed sampling before and after administration of digoxin. 3 Ten minutes after administration of digoxin the myocardial concentration increased from 60 to 306 nmol/kg tissue, the myocardial concentration of digoxin was significantly lower (250 nmol/kg tissue) after 30 min and then increased again. 4 The transmural myocardial distribution of digoxin was uniform before and 90 min after administration of digoxin in long-term digitalized dogs but at 10 min after administration, both the subepicardial and the subendocardial concentration of digoxin were significantly lower than that of the mesocardial layer. 5 During the first 10 min the dp/dtmax increased to 135% of the control level. The increase remained unchanged during the rest of the study. 6 Myocardial potassium decreased throughout the study. 7 The M-configuration of the myocardial uptake curve and the non-uniformity of myocardial distribution of digoxin observed at 10 min after administrating digoxin to long-term digitalized dogs indicate that the distribution of myocardial blood flow may be changed during chronic digitalization. PMID:1000132

  5. Darbepoetin alpha, a long-acting erythropoeitin derivate, does not alter LPS evoked myocardial depression and gene expression of Bax, Bcl-Xs, Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Brendt, Peter; Frey, Ulrich; Adamzik, Michael; Schäfer, Simon T; Peters, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Darbepoetin alpha (DA), a long-acting erythropoietin derivative stimulating erythropoiesis, can, by antiapoptotic effects, mitigate myocardial I/R injury. We tested the hypothesis that DA treatment improves left ventricular function (LV) in LPS evoked cardiomyopathy and alters gene expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Bax, and Bcl-Xs) and TNF-alpha. In a prospective, controlled, randomized study in Lewis rats (n = 56; 8 groups), myocardial depression was evoked by LPS administration (serotype O127:B8; 10 mg/kg, i.p.). Darbepoetin alpha or vehicle was injected either 24 h before (pretreatment) or 2 h after LPS injection (treatment). Hearts were isolated 8 h after LPS injection, perfused (Krebs-Henseleit solution) in a Langendorff apparatus, and LV developed pressure and its derivatives were measured. For gene expression analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction of LV specimen was performed. LPS decreased LV developed pressure (-64.6 +/- 7.9 mmHg) and its derivates by more than 60% in comparison to vehicle (P < 0,01), but this effect was not attenuated by DA pretreatment or DA treatment. LPS administration increased gene expression of Bcl-Xs, Bax, and TNF-alpha, but this was not altered by DA pretreatment. Furthermore, there was no effect on Bcl-Xl and Bcl-2 expression by DA alone. Whereas proapoptotic genes of the myocardium are up-regulated in LPS-induced cardiomyopathy, neither DA pretreatment nor treatment has significant effects on LV function or gene expression. This may suggest cardiac resistance to darbepoetin in LPS-mediated sepsis.

  6. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde crotonaldehyde triggers cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction: role of TRPV1 and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Sang, Hanfei; Wu, Zhenbiao; Meng, Rongsen; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Maris, Jackie R; Li, Ruiman; Ren, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased prevalence of heart diseases. Given that cigarette smoking triggers proinflammatory response via stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel TRPV1, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde from cigarette smoke crotonaldehyde on myocardial function and the underlying mechanism with a focus on TRPV1 and mitochondria. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI), intracellular Ca2+ decay and SERCA activity. Apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage were measured using the intracellular fluoroprobe 5-(6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), respectively. Our data revealed that crotonaldehyde interrupted cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ property including depressed PS, ±dL/dt, ΔFFI and SERCA activity, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ decay. Crotonaldehyde exposure increased TRPV1 and NADPH oxidase levels, promoted apoptosis, mitochondrial injury (decreased aconitase activity, PGC-1α and UCP-2) as well as production of ROS and 8-OHdG. Interestingly, crotonaldehyde-induced cardiac defect was obliterated by the ROS scavenger glutathione and the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Capsazepine (not glutathione) ablated crotonaldehyde-induced mitochondrial damage. Capsazepine, glutathione and the NADPH inhibitor apocynin negated crotonaldehyde-induced ROS accumulation. Our data suggest a role of crotonaldehyde compromises cardiomyocyte mechanical function possibly through a TRPV1- and mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  7. Mesenteric lymph duct ligation prevents trauma/hemorrhage shock-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sambol, Justin T.; Lee, Marlon A.; Caputo, Francis J.; Kawai, Kentaro; Badami, Chirag; Kawai, Tomoko; Deitch, Edwin A.; Yatani, Atsuko

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that trauma combined with hemorrhage shock (T/HS) is associated with myocardial contractile dysfunction. However, the initial events triggering the cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated. Thus we tested the hypothesis that factors carried in intestinal (mesenteric) lymph contribute to negative inotropic effects in rats subjected to a laparotomy (T) plus hemorrhagic shock (HS; mean arterial blood pressure of 30–40 Torr for 90 min) using a Langendorff isolated heart preparation. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed 24 h after trauma plus sham shock (T/SS) or T/HS by recording the LV developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP rise and fall ( ± dP/dtmax) in five groups of rats: 1) naive noninstrumented rats, 2) rats subjected to T/SS, 3) rats subjected to T/HS, 4) rats subjected to T/SS with mesenteric lymph duct ligation (T/SS+LDL), or 5) rats subjected to T/HS+LDL. Cardiac function was comparable in hearts from naive, T/SS, and T/SS+LDL rats. Both LVDP and ± dP/dtmax were significantly depressed after T/HS. The T/HS hearts also manifested a blunted responsiveness to increases in coronary flow rates and Ca2+, and this was prevented by LDL preceding T/HS. Although electrocardiograms were normal under physiological conditions, when the T/HS hearts were perfused with low Ca2+ levels (∼0.5 mM), prolonged P-R intervals and second-degree plus Wenckebach-type atrioventricular blocks were observed. No such changes occurred in the control or T/HS+LDL hearts. The effects of T/HS were similar to those of the Ca2+ channel antagonist diltiazem, indicating that an impairment of cellular Ca2+ handling contributes to T/HS-induced cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, gut-derived factors carried in mesenteric lymph are responsible for acute T/HS-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:19008486

  8. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions.

  9. Recent Insights in the Paracrine Modulation of Cardiomyocyte Contractility by Cardiac Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology. PMID:24745027

  10. Intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography predicts regional and global left ventricular remodelling after acute myocardial infarction: comparison with low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Y; Muro, T; Sakanoue, Y; Komatsu, R; Otsuka, M; Naruko, T; Itoh, A; Yoshiyama, M; Haze, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of intravenous myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in predicting functional recovery and regional or global left ventricular (LV) remodelling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) compared with low dose dobutamine stress echocardiography (LDSE). Methods: 21 patients with anterior AMI and successful primary angioplasty underwent MCE and LDSE during the subacute stage (2–4 weeks after AMI). Myocardial perfusion and contractile reserve were assessed in each segment (12 segment model) with MCE and LDSE. The 118 dyssynergic segments in the subacute stage were classified as recovered, unchanged, or remodelled according to wall motion at six months’ follow up. Percentage increase in LV end diastolic volume (%ΔEDV) was also calculated. Results: The presence of perfusion was less accurate than the presence of contractile reserve in predicting regional recovery (55% v 81%, p < 0.0001). However, the absence of perfusion was more accurate than the absence of contractile reserve in predicting regional remodelling (83% v 48%, p < 0.0001). The number of segments without perfusion was an independent predictor of %ΔEDV, whereas the number of segments without contractile reserve was not. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the number of segments without perfusion predicted substantial LV dilatation (%ΔEDV > 20%) more accurately than did the number of segments without contractile reserve (0.88 v 0.72). Conclusion: In successfully revascularised patients with AMI, myocardial perfusion assessed by MCE is predictive of regional and global LV remodelling rather than of functional recovery, whereas contractile reserve assessed by LDSE is predictive of functional recovery rather than of LV remodelling. PMID:15797931

  11. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  12. Prediction of fatal or near-fatal cardiac arrhythmia events in patients with depressed left ventricular function after an acute myocardial infarction†

    PubMed Central

    Huikuri, Heikki V.; Raatikainen, M.J. Pekka; Moerch-Joergensen, Rikke; Hartikainen, Juha; Virtanen, Vesa; Boland, Jean; Anttonen, Olli; Hoest, Nis; Boersma, Lucas V.A.; Platou, Eivind S.; Messier, Marc D.; Bloch-Thomsen, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    Aims To determine whether risk stratification tests can predict serious arrhythmic events after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 0.40). Methods and results A total of 5869 consecutive patients were screened in 10 European centres, and 312 patients (age 65 ± 11 years) with a mean LVEF of 31 ± 6% were included in the study. Heart rate variability/turbulence, ambient arrhythmias, signal-averaged electrocardiogram (SAECG), T-wave alternans, and programmed electrical stimulation (PES) were performed 6 weeks after AMI. The primary endpoint was ECG-documented ventricular fibrillation or symptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). To document these arrhythmic events, the patients received an implantable ECG loop-recorder. There were 25 primary endpoints (8.0%) during the follow-up of 2 years. The strongest predictors of primary endpoint were measures of heart rate variability, e.g. hazard ratio (HR) for reduced very-low frequency component (<5.7 ln ms2) adjusted for clinical variables was 7.0 (95% CI: 2.4–20.3, P < 0.001). Induction of sustained monomorphic VT during PES (adjusted HR = 4.8, 95% CI, 1.7–13.4, P = 0.003) also predicted the primary endpoint. Conclusion Fatal or near-fatal arrhythmias can be predicted by many risk stratification methods, especially by heart rate variability, in patients with reduced LVEF after AMI. PMID:19155249

  13. Characteristics of nobiletin-induced effects on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yong-Jian; Chen, Da-Peng; Lv, Bo-Chao; Liu, Fang-Fei; Wang, Li; Lin, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxylated flavone, exhibits multiple biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-insulin resistance effects. The present study found that nobiletin exerted significant stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments in all 6 different low contractile states, and meanwhile significant inhibitory effects in all 6 different high contractile states, showing characteristics of bidirectional regulation (BR). Nobiletin-exerted BR on jejunal contractility was abolished in the presence of c-kit receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib or Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil. In the presence of neuroxin tetrodotoxin, nobiletin only exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in both low and high contractile states. Hemicholinium-3 and atropine partially blocked nobiletin-exerted stimulatory effects on jejunal contractility in low-Ca(2+)-induced low contractile state. Phentolamine or propranolol or l-NG-nitro-arginine significantly blocked nobiletin-exerted inhibitory effects on jejunal contractility in high-Ca(2+)-induced high contractile state respectively. The effects of nobiletin on myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, MLCK protein content, and myosin light chain phosphorylation extent were also bidirectional. In summary, nobiletin-exerted BR depends on the contractile states of rat jejunal segments. Nobiletin-exerted BR requires the enteric nervous system, interstitial cell of Cajal, Ca(2+), and myosin phosphorylation-related mechanisms.

  14. Contractile reserve and intracellular calcium regulation in mouse myocytes from normal and hypertrophied failing hearts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Yan, X.; Tajima, M.; Su, Z.; Barry, W. H.; Lorell, B. H.; Schneider, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Mouse myocyte contractility and the changes induced by pressure overload are not fully understood. We studied contractile reserve in isolated left ventricular myocytes from mice with ascending aortic stenosis (AS) during compensatory hypertrophy (4-week AS) and the later stage of early failure (7-week AS) and from control mice. Myocyte contraction and [Ca(2+)](i) transients with fluo-3 were measured simultaneously. At baseline (0.5 Hz, 1.5 mmol/L [Ca(2+)](o), 25 degrees C), the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) in 7-week AS were not different from those of controls, whereas contraction, relaxation, and the decline of [Ca(2+)](i) transients were slower. In response to the challenge of high [Ca(2+)](o), fractional cell shortening was severely depressed with reduced peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) in 7-week AS compared with controls. In response to rapid pacing stimulation, cell shortening and peak-systolic [Ca(2+)](i) increased in controls, but this response was depressed in 7-week AS. In contrast, the responses to both challenge with high [Ca(2+)](o) and rapid pacing in 4-week AS were similar to those of controls. Although protein levels of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger were increased in both 4-week and 7-week AS, the ratio of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase to phospholamban protein levels was depressed in 7-week AS compared with controls but not in 4-week AS. This was associated with an impaired capacity to increase sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load during high work states in 7-week AS myocytes. In hypertrophied failing mouse myocytes, depressed contractile reserve is related to an impaired augmentation of systolic [Ca(2+)](i) and SR Ca(2+) load and simulates findings in human failing myocytes.

  15. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery

    PubMed Central

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-01-01

    Clenbuterol is a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg−1 day−1) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca2+ transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (−19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (−25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca2+ release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  16. Chronic clenbuterol treatment compromises force production without directly altering skeletal muscle contractile machinery.

    PubMed

    Py, G; Ramonatxo, C; Sirvent, P; Sanchez, A M J; Philippe, A G; Douillard, A; Galbès, O; Lionne, C; Bonnieu, A; Chopard, A; Cazorla, O; Lacampagne, A; Candau, R B

    2015-04-15

    Clenbuterol is a β2 -adrenergic receptor agonist known to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a slow-to-fast phenotypic shift. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on contractile efficiency and explore the underlying mechanisms, i.e. the muscle contractile machinery and calcium-handling ability. Forty-three 6-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to one of six groups that were treated with either subcutaneous equimolar doses of clenbuterol (4 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) or saline solution for 9, 14 or 21 days. In addition to the muscle hypertrophy, although an 89% increase in absolute maximal tetanic force (Po ) was noted, specific maximal tetanic force (sPo) was unchanged or even depressed in the slow twitch muscle of the clenbuterol-treated rats (P < 0.05). The fit of muscle contraction and relaxation force kinetics indicated that clenbuterol treatment significantly reduced the rate constant of force development and the slow and fast rate constants of relaxation in extensor digitorum longus muscle (P < 0.05), and only the fast rate constant of relaxation in soleus muscle (P < 0.05). Myofibrillar ATPase activity increased in both relaxed and activated conditions in soleus (P < 0.001), suggesting that the depressed specific tension was not due to the myosin head alteration itself. Moreover, action potential-elicited Ca(2+) transients in flexor digitorum brevis fibres (fast twitch fibres) from clenbuterol-treated animals demonstrated decreased amplitude after 14 days (-19%, P < 0.01) and 21 days (-25%, P < 0.01). In conclusion, we showed that chronic clenbuterol treatment reduces contractile efficiency, with altered contraction and relaxation kinetics, but without directly altering the contractile machinery. Lower Ca(2+) release during contraction could partially explain these deleterious effects. PMID:25656230

  17. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  18. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  19. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells. PMID:24445418

  20. Stretch-induced increase in cardiac contractility is independent of myocyte Ca2+ while block of stretch channels by streptomycin improves contractility after ischemic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Samhita S; Camara, Amadou K S; Aldakkak, Mohammed; Heisner, James S; Stowe, David F

    2015-01-01

    Stretching the cardiac left ventricle (LV) enhances contractility but its effect on myoplasmic [Ca2+] is controversial. We measured LV pressure (LVP) and [Ca2+] as a function of intra-LV stretch in guinea pig intact hearts before and after 15 min global stunning ± perfusion with streptomycin (STM), a stretch-activated channel blocker. LV wall [Ca2+] was measured by indo-1 fluorescence and LVP by a saline-filled latex balloon inflated in 50 μL steps to stretch the LV. We implemented a mathematical model to interpret cross-bridge dynamics and myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness from the instantaneous relationship between [Ca2+] and LVP ± stretching. We found that: (1) stretch enhanced LVP but not [Ca2+] before and after stunning in either control (CON) and STM groups, (2) after stunning [Ca2+] increased in both groups although higher in STM versus CON (56% vs. 39%), (3) STM-enhanced LVP after stunning compared to CON (98% vs. 76% of prestunning values), and (4) stretch-induced effects on LVP were independent of [Ca2+] before or after stunning in both groups. Mathematical modeling suggested: (1) cooperativity in cross-bridge kinetics and myofilament Ca2+ handling is reduced after stunning in the unstretched heart, (2) stunning results in depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in the presence of attached cross-bridges regardless of stretch, and (3) the initial mechanism responsible for increased contractility during stretch may be enhanced formation of cross-bridges. Thus stretch-induced enhancement of contractility is not due to increased [Ca2+], whereas enhanced contractility after stunning in STM versus CON hearts results from improved Ca2+ handling and/or enhanced actinomyosin cross-bridge cycling. PMID:26290532

  1. Effects of Using Tricaine Methanesulfonate and Metomidate before Euthanasia on the Contractile Properties of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jordan C; Syme, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Because many anesthetics work through depressing cell excitability, unanesthetized euthanasia has become common for research involving excitable tissues (for example muscle and nerve) to avoid these depressive effects. However, anesthetic use during euthanasia may be indicated for studies involving isolated tissues if the potential depressive effects of brief anesthetic exposure dissipate after subsequent tissue isolation, washout, and saline perfusion. We explore this here by measuring whether, when applied prior to euthanasia, standard immersion doses of 2 fish anesthetics, tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS; 100 mg/L, n = 6) and methyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (metomidate, 10 mg/L, n = 6), have residual effects on the contractile properties (force and work output) of isolated and saline-perfused ventricular compact myocardium from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results suggest that direct exposure of muscle to immersion doses of TMS-but not metomidate-impairs muscle contractile performance. However, brief exposure (2 to 3 min) to either anesthetic during euthanasia only-providing that the agent is washed out prior to tissue experimentation-does not have an effect on the contractile properties of the myocardium. Therefore, the use of TMS, metomidate, and perhaps other anesthetics that depress cell excitability during euthanasia may be indicated when conducting research on isolated and rinsed tissues. PMID:27657711

  2. Elastomeric contractile actuators for hand rehabilitation splints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Mannini, Andrea; De Rossi, Danilo

    2008-03-01

    The significant electromechanical performances typically shown by dielectric elastomer actuators make this polymer technology particularly attractive for possible active orthoses for rehabilitation. Folded contractile actuators made of dielectric elastomers were recently described as a simple configuration, suitable to easily implement linear contractile devices. This paper describes an application of folded actuators for so-called hand splints: they consist of orthotic systems for hand rehabilitation. The dynamic versions of the state-of-the-art splints typically include elastic bands, which exert a passive elastic resistance to voluntary elongations of one or more fingers. In order to provide such splints with the possibility of electrically modulating the compliance of the resistive elements, the substitution of the passive elastic bands with the contractile actuators is here described. The electrical activation of the actuators is used to vary the compliance of the system; this enables modulations of the force that acts as an antagonist to voluntary finger movements, according to programmable rehabilitation exercises. The paper reports results obtained from the first prototype implementations of such a type of system.

  3. Circumferential Strain Can Be Used to Detect Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Myocardial Dysfunction and Predict the Mortality of Severe Sepsis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Gao, Yao; Zhou, Bin; Wu, Bingruo; Wang, Junhong; Xu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Background Sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction is a common and severe complication of septic shock. However, conventional echocardiography often fails to reveal myocardial depression in severe sepsis. Recently, strain measurements based on speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) have been used to evaluate cardiac function. Aims To investigate the role of STE in detecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction, M-mode and 2-D echocardiography were used in LPS-treated mice. Methods The mice were treated with a 10mg/kg (n = 10), 20mg/kg (n = 10) or 25mg/kg LPS (n = 30) to induce cardiac dysfunction. Subsequently, the ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) were measured with standard M-mode tracings, whereas the circumferential (Scirc) and radial strain (Srad) were measured with STE. Serum biochemical and cardiac histopathological examinations were performed to assess sepsis-induced myocardial injury. Results 20mg/kg LPS resulted in more deterioration, myocardial damage and cardiac contractile dysfunction based on serum biochemical and histological examinations. The mice that were subjected to 20mg/kg LPS exhibited reduced Scirc but no reduction in Srad, whereas on conventional echocardiography, the ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) were similar in the 10mg/kg and 20mg/kg groups. Moreover, Scirc was positively correlated with body temperature in the mice at 20 h after LPS injection (r = 0.746, p = 0.001), but no significant correlation was observed between Srad and body temperature (r = 0.356, p = 0.123). Moreover, the mice with high Scirc (-5.9% to -10.4%) exhibited reduced mortality following the administration of 25mg/kg LPS (p = 0.03) compared with the low-strain group (-2% to -5.9%). Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that circumferential strain is a specific and reliable indicator for evaluating LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice. PMID:27177150

  4. Myocardial protection with mild hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Tissier, Renaud; Ghaleh, Bijan; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M; Berdeaux, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Mild hypothermia, 32-35° C, is very potent at reducing myocardial infarct size in rabbits, dogs, sheep, pigs, and rats. The benefit is directly related to reduction in normothermic ischaemic time, supporting the relevance of early and rapid cooling. The cardioprotective effect of mild hypothermia is not limited to its recognized reduction of infarct size, but also results in conservation of post-ischaemic contractile function, prevention of no-reflow or microvascular obstruction, and ultimately attenuation of left ventricular remodelling. The mechanism of the anti-infarct effect does not appear to be related to diminished energy utilization and metabolic preservation, but rather to survival signalling that involves either the extracellular signal-regulated kinases and/or the Akt/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Initial clinical trials of hypothermia in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were disappointing, probably because cooling was too slow to shorten normothermic ischaemic time appreciably. New approaches to more rapid cooling have recently been described and may soon be available for clinical use. Alternatively, it may be possible to pharmacologically mimic the protection provided by cooling soon after the onset of ischaemia with an activator of mild hypothermia signalling, e.g. extracellular signal-regulated kinase activator, that could be given by emergency medical personnel. Finally, the protection afforded by cooling can be added to that of pre- and post-conditioning because their mechanisms differ. Thus, myocardial salvage might be greatly increased by rapidly cooling patients as soon as possible and then giving a pharmacological post-conditioning agent immediately prior to reperfusion. PMID:22131353

  5. Contractile activity of cultured adult Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed

    Bowen, John M; Vitayavirasuk, Banjong

    2004-01-30

    A method for long-term maintenance of adult heartworms (HW) in culture for use in contractile activity studies was developed. Culture conditions included Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) containing Earle's balanced salt solution and MEM vitamins and supplemented with 10% horse serum, pH 7.6, 37 degrees C, and humidified 5% CO2:95% room air atmosphere. Motility was observed for up to 91 days. Reducing the culture atmosphere from 20% oxygen to 5% oxygen reduced acid production and survival to 28 days or less. Spontaneous contractile activity of adult HW coils (1 cm diameter) was measured using an isometric force displacement transducer system. Activity had an arrhythmic pattern of good magnitude that could be recorded after up to 50 days in culture for male HW and after up to 40 days in culture for female HW. Analyses of contractile activity included determination of its amplitude, frequency, contraction index, and basal tension. Amplitude for males (3.4 +/- 1.2 g) (mean +/- S.D.) was significantly greater (P < 0.02) than that for females (3.0 +/- 1.1 g), whereas frequency for females (8.2 +/- 2.3 min) was significantly greater (P < 0.03) than that for males (7.5 +/- 2.3 min). The contraction index for females was 16.7 +/- 13.7 mm/min and for males, 14.4 +/- 9.0 mm/min. The difference was not significant. The contraction index was based on line integration of the record of contractile activity. Amplitude and frequency of contractile activity for anterior segments (2.5 cm), suspended lengthwise, from cultured adult female HW, were not significantly different from results for coils, but the contraction index (34.5 +/- 33.8) was significantly higher (P < 0.01) indicating that the pattern of activity was more uniform in the segments. An applied basal tension of about 4 g was suitable for the coils, while a suitable basal tension for segments was about 1.5 g. For coils, amplitude, frequency, and contraction index increased significantly (P < 0.02) with increase in

  6. Cardiomyocyte-Specific Deletion of Endothelin Receptor A Rescues Ageing-Associated Cardiac Hypertrophy and Contractile Dysfunction: Role of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan-Isik, Asli F.; Dong, Maolong; Zhang, Yingmei; Dong, Feng; Turdi, Subat; Nair, Sreejayan; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac ageing is manifested as cardiac remodeling and contractile dysfunction although precise mechanisms remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in ageing-associated myocardial morphological and contractile defects. Echocardiographic and cardiomyocyte contractile properties were evaluated in young (5–6 mo) and old (26–28 mo) C57BL/6 wild-type and cardiomyocyte-specific ETA receptor knockout (ETAKO) mice. Cardiac ROS production and histology were examined. Our data revealed that ETAKO mice displayed an improved survival. Ageing increased plasma levels of ET-1 and Ang II, compromised cardiac function (fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte peak shortening, maximal velocity of shortening/ relengthening and prolonged relengthening) and intracellular Ca2+ handling (reduced intracellular Ca2+ release and decay), the effects of which with the exception of ET-1 and Ang II levels was improved by ETAKO. Histological examination displayed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis associated with cardiac remodeling in aged C57 mice, which were alleviated in ETAKO mice. Ageing promoted ROS generation, protein damage, ER stress, upregulated GATA4, ANP, NFATc3, and the autophagosome cargo protein p62, downregulated intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins SERCA2a and phospholamban as well as the autophagic markers Beclin-1, Atg7, Atg5 and LC3BII, which were ablated by ETAKO. ET-1 triggered a decrease in autophagy and increased hypertrophic markers in vitrothe effect of which were reversed by the ETA receptor antagonist BQ123 and the autophagy inducer rapamycin. Antagonism of ETA but not ETB receptor rescued cardiac ageing, which was negated by autophagy inhibition. Taken together, our data suggest that cardiac ETA receptor ablation protects against ageing-associated myocardial remodeling and contractile dysfunction possibly through autophagy regulation. PMID:23381122

  7. Diadenosine tetra- and pentaphosphates affect contractility and bioelectrical activity in the rat heart via P2 purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, Ksenia B; Kuzmin, Vladislav S; Abramochkin, Denis V

    2016-03-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates (Ap(n)As) are endogenously produced molecules which have been identified in various tissues of mammalian organism, including myocardium. Ap(n)As contribute to the blood clotting and are also widely accepted as regulators of blood vascular tone. Physiological role of Ap(n)As in cardiac muscle has not been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of diadenosine tetra- (Ap4A) and penta- (Ap5A) polyphosphates on contractile function and action potential (AP) waveform in rat supraventricular and ventricular myocardium. We have also demonstrated the effects of A4pA and Ap5A in myocardial sleeves of pulmonary veins (PVs), which play a crucial role in genesis of atrial fibrillation. APs were recorded with glass microelectrodes in multicellular myocardial preparations. Contractile activity was measured in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Both Ap4A and Ap5A significantly reduced contractility of isolated Langendorff-perfused heart and produced significant reduction of AP duration in left and right auricle, interatrial septum, and especially in right ventricular wall myocardium. Ap(n)As also shortened APs in rat pulmonary veins and therefore may be considered as potential proarrhythmic factors. Cardiotropic effects of Ap4A and Ap5A were strongly antagonized by selective blockers of P2 purine receptors suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), while P1 blocker DPCPX was not effective. We conclude that Ap(n)As may be considered as new class of endogenous cardioinhibitory compounds. P2 purine receptors play the central role in mediation of Ap4A and Ap5A inhibitory effects on electrical and contractile activity in different regions of the rat heart. PMID:26680209

  8. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2009-05-15

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses.

  9. Cell stiffness, contractile stress and the role of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    An, Steven S.; Kim, Jina; Ahn, Kwangmi; Trepat, Xavier; Drake, Kenneth J.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Ling, Guoyu; Purington, Carolyn; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Kensler, Thomas W.; Mitzner, Wayne; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Biswal, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Here we have assessed the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and rigidity on mechanical properties of the human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. Cell stiffness and contractile stress showed appreciable changes from the most relaxed state to the most contracted state: we refer to the maximal range of these changes as the cell contractile scope. The contractile scope was least when the cell was adherent upon collagen V, followed by collagen IV, laminin, and collagen I, and greatest for fibronectin. Regardless of ECM composition, upon adherence to increasingly rigid substrates, the ASM cell positively regulated expression of antioxidant genes in the glutathione pathway and heme oxygenase, and disruption of a redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor (Nrf2), culminated in greater contractile scope. These findings provide biophysical evidence that ECM differentially modulates muscle contractility and, for the first time, demonstrate a link between muscle contractility and Nrf2-directed responses. PMID:19327344

  10. Contractile Film Model for Polymorphism in Adherent Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Giomi, Luca

    2013-03-01

    The optimal shapes attained by contractile cells on elastic substrates are determined by the crosstalk between intracellular forces and extracellular forces of adhesion. We model an adherent stationary cell as a contractile film bounded by an elastic cortex and connected to the substrate via elastic links. When the adhesion sites are continuously distributed, optimal cell shape is constrained by the adhesion geometry, with a spread area sensitively dependent on the substrate stiffness and contractile tension. For discrete adhesion sites, equilibrium cell shape is convex at weak contractility, while developing local concavities at intermediate values of contractility. Increasing contractility beyond a critical value, controlled by substrate stiffness, cell contour undergoes a discontinuous transition to a star-shaped configuration with cusps and protrusions, accompanied by a region of bistability and hysteresis.

  11. Myocardial abscess complicating healed myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, S.; Young, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    An isolated myocardial abscess due to Bacteroides fragilis developed in the scar of a myocardial infarction. Fever, chills and signs of pericarditis were the main clinical features. Mild enteritis 1 week prior to the onset of symptoms related to the abscess was the most likely cause of the bacteremia. The diagnosis was established at thoracotomy, performed because of cardiac tamponade. Thirteen other cases of isolated bacterial myocardial abscess accompanying myocardial infarction have been reported, but all the infarctions were recent. Surgical resection for a suspected myocardial abscess should be considered in view of the high mortality, largely from cardiac rupture. Images FIG. 1 PMID:861868

  12. Cytoskeletal Role in the Contractile Dysfunction of Hypertrophied Myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Kazuaki; Cooper, George

    1993-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy in response to systolic pressure loading frequently results in contractile dysfunction of unknown cause. In the present study, pressure loading increased the microtubule component of the cardiac muscle cell cytoskeleton, which was responsible for the cellular contractile dysfunction observed. The linked microtubule and contractile abnormalities were persistent and thus may have significance for the deterioration of initially compensatory cardiac hypertrophy into congestive heart failure.

  13. Regulation of tissue morphodynamics: an important role for actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    Siedlik, Michael J.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Forces arising from contractile actomyosin filaments help shape tissue form during morphogenesis. Developmental events that result from actomyosin contractility include tissue elongation, bending, budding, and collective migration. Here, we highlight recent insights into these morphogenetic processes from the perspective of actomyosin contractility as a key regulator. Emphasis is placed on a range of results obtained through live imaging, culture, and computational methods. Combining these approaches in the future has the potential to generate a robust, quantitative understanding of tissue morphodynamics. PMID:25748251

  14. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 channel is involved in contractile function of glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Sours-Brothers, Sherry; Coleman, Rashadd; Ding, Min; Graham, Sarabeth; Kong, De-Hu; Ma, Rong

    2007-05-01

    Contractility of mesangial cells (MC) is tightly controlled by [Ca(2+)](i). Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane constitutes a major component of mesangial responses to vasoconstrictors. Canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel in a variety of cell types. This study was performed to investigate whether TRPC1 takes part in vasoconstrictor-induced mesangial contraction by mediating Ca(2+) entry. It was found that angiotensin II (AngII) evoked remarkable contraction of the cultured MC. Downregulation of TRPC1 using RNA interference significantly attenuated the contractile response. Infusion of AngII or endothelin-1 in rats caused a decrease in GFR. The GFR decline was significantly reduced by infusion of TRPC1 antibody that targets an extracellular domain in the pore region of TRPC1 channel. However, the treatment of TRPC1 antibody did not affect the AngII-induced vasopressing effect. Electrophysiologic experiments revealed that functional or biologic inhibition of TRPC1 significantly depressed AngII-induced channel activation. Fura-2 fluorescence-indicated that Ca(2+) entry in response to AngII stimulation was also dramatically inhibited by TRPC1 antibody and TRPC1-specific RNA interference. These results suggest that TRPC1 plays an important role in controlling contractile function of MC. Mediation of Ca(2+) entry might be the underlying mechanism for the TRPC1-associated MC contraction. PMID:17389736

  15. Cadmium translocation by contractile roots differs from that in regular, non-contractile roots

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Alexander; Lackovič, Andrej; Van Staden, Johannes; Lišková, Desana; Kohanová, Jana; Martinka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Contractile roots are known and studied mainly in connection with the process of shrinkage of their basal parts, which acts to pull the shoot of the plant deeper into the ground. Previous studies have shown that the specific structure of these roots results in more intensive water uptake at the base, which is in contrast to regular root types. The purpose of this study was to find out whether the basal parts of contractile roots are also more active in translocation of cadmium to the shoot. Methods Plants of the South African ornamental species Tritonia gladiolaris were cultivated in vitro for 2 months, at which point they possessed well-developed contractile roots. They were then transferred to Petri dishes with horizontally separated compartments of agar containing 50 µmol Cd(NO3)2 in the region of the root base or the root apex. Seedlings of 4-d-old maize (Zea mays) plants, which do not possess contractile roots, were also transferred to similar Petri dishes. The concentrations of Cd in the leaves of the plants were compared after 10 d of cultivation. Anatomical analyses of Tritonia roots were performed using appropriately stained freehand cross-sections. Key Results The process of contraction required specific anatomical adaptation of the root base in Tritonia, with less lignified and less suberized tissues in comparison with the subapical part of the root. These unusual developmental characteristics were accompanied by more intensive translocation of Cd ions from the basal part of contractile roots to the leaves than from the apical–subapical root parts. The opposite effects were seen in the non-contractile roots of maize, with higher uptake and transport by the apical parts of the root and lower uptake and transport by the basal part. Conclusions The specific characteristics of contractile roots may have a significant impact on the uptake of ions, including toxic metals from the soil surface layers. This may be important for plant

  16. Myocardial infarction-induced N-terminal fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) impairs myofilament function in human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Witayavanitkul, Namthip; Ait Mou, Younss; Kuster, Diederik W D; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Sarkey, Jason; Govindan, Suresh; Chen, Xin; Ge, Ying; Rajan, Sudarsan; Wieczorek, David F; Irving, Thomas; Westfall, Margaret V; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2014-03-28

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with depressed cardiac contractile function and progression to heart failure. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C, a cardiac-specific myofilament protein, is proteolyzed post-MI in humans, which results in an N-terminal fragment, C0-C1f. The presence of C0-C1f in cultured cardiomyocytes results in decreased Ca(2+) transients and cell shortening, abnormalities sufficient for the induction of heart failure in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the association between C0-C1f and altered contractility in human cardiac myofilaments in vitro. To accomplish this, we generated recombinant human C0-C1f (hC0C1f) and incorporated it into permeabilized human left ventricular myocardium. Mechanical properties were studied at short (2 μm) and long (2.3 μm) sarcomere length (SL). Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere had the greatest effect at short, but not long, SL, decreasing maximal force and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Moreover, hC0C1f led to increased cooperative activation, cross-bridge cycling kinetics, and tension cost, with greater effects at short SL. We further established that the effects of hC0C1f occur through direct interaction with actin and α-tropomyosin. Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere is sufficient to induce depressed myofilament function and Ca(2+) sensitivity in otherwise healthy human donor myocardium. Decreased cardiac function post-MI may result, in part, from the ability of hC0C1f to bind actin and α-tropomyosin, suggesting that cleaved C0-C1f could act as a poison polypeptide and disrupt the interaction of native cardiac myosin-binding protein C with the thin filament.

  17. Effect of eating on thallium myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.A.; Sullivan, P.J.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Morris, C.; Pohost, G.M.; Strauss, H.W.

    1986-02-01

    To determine if eating between initial and delayed thallium images alters the appearance of the delayed thallium scan, a prospective study was performed; 184 subjects sent for routine thallium imaging were randomized into two groups, those who ate a meal high in carbohydrates between initial and delayed thallium myocardial images (n = 106), and those who fasted (n = 78). The /sup 201/Tl images were interpreted in blinded fashion for global myocardial and pulmonary clearance of /sup 201/Tl myocardial defects. The eating group had a significantly lower incidence of transient myocardial defects compared to the noneating group (7 percent vs 18 percent, respectively; p less than 0.05). The time between initial and delayed images and the incidence of exercise-induced ischemic ST-segment depression or pathologic Q waves on the electrocardiogram were not significantly different between the two groups. These data suggest that eating a high-carbohydrate meal between initial and delayed /sup 201/Tl images causes increased /sup 201/Tl myocardial clearance rates and may alter /sup 201/Tl myocardial redistribution over time.

  18. Adult progenitor cell transplantation influences contractile performance and calcium handling of recipient cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon; Stagg, Mark A; Fukushima, Satsuki; Soppa, Gopal K R; Siedlecka, Urszula; Youssef, Samuel J; Suzuki, Ken; Yacoub, Magdi H; Terracciano, Cesare M N

    2009-04-01

    Adult progenitor cell transplantation has been proposed for the treatment of heart failure, but the mechanisms effecting functional improvements remain unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, in failing hearts treated with cell transplantation, the mechanical properties and excitation-contraction coupling of recipient cardiomyocytes are altered. Adult rats underwent coronary artery ligation, leading to myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. After 3 wk, they received intramyocardial injections of either 10(7) green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive bone marrow mononuclear cells or 5 x 10(6) GFP-positive skeletal myoblasts. Four weeks after injection, both cell types increased ejection fraction and reduced cardiomyocyte size. The contractility of isolated GFP-negative cardiomyocytes was monitored by sarcomere shortening assessment, Ca(2+) handling by indo-1 and fluo-4 fluorescence, and electrophysiology by patch-clamping techniques. Injection of either bone marrow cells or skeletal myoblasts normalized the impaired contractile performance and the prolonged time to peak of the Ca(2+) transient observed in failing cardiomyocytes. The smaller and slower L-type Ca(2+) current observed in heart failure normalized after skeletal myoblast, but not bone marrow cell, transplantation. Measurement of Ca(2+) sparks suggested a normalization of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) leak after skeletal myoblast transplantation. The increased Ca(2+) wave frequency observed in failing myocytes was reduced by either bone marrow cells or skeletal myoblasts. In conclusion, the morphology, contractile performance, and excitation-contraction coupling of individual recipient cardiomyocytes are altered in failing hearts treated with adult progenitor cell transplantation. PMID:19181964

  19. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Adam W.; Alford, Patrick W.; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Werdich, Andreas A.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation. PMID:22594976

  20. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Adam W; Alford, Patrick W; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Werdich, Andreas A; Sheehy, Sean P; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2012-08-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation.

  1. Acute inhibition of myoglobin impairs contractility and energy state of iNOS-overexpressing hearts.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Carsten; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Heger, Jacqueline; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-27

    Elevated cardiac levels of nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in the development of heart failure. The surprisingly benign phenotype of recently generated mice with cardiac-specific iNOS overexpression (TGiNOS) provided the rationale to investigate whether NO scavenging by oxymyoglobin (MbO2) yielding nitrate and metmyoglobin (metMb) is involved in preservation of myocardial function in TGiNOS mice. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to monitor changes of cardiac myoglobin (Mb) metabolism in isolated hearts of wild-type (WT) and TGiNOS mice. NO formation by iNOS resulted in a significant decrease of the MbO2 signal and a concomitantly emerging metMb signal in spectra of TGiNOS hearts only (DeltaMbO2: -46.3+/-38.4 micromol/kg, DeltametMb: +41.4+/-17.6 micromol/kg, n=6; P<0.05) leaving contractility and energetics unaffected. Inhibition of the Mb-mediated NO degradation by carbon monoxide (20%) led to a deterioration of myocardial contractility in TGiNOS hearts (left ventricular developed pressure: 78.2+/-8.2% versus 96.7+/-4.6% of baseline, n=6; P<0.005), which was associated with a profound pertubation of cardiac energy state as assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy (eg, phosphocreatine: 13.3+/-1.3 mmol/L (TGiNOS) versus 15.9+/-0.7 mmol/L (WT), n=6; P<0.005). These alterations could be fully antagonized by the NOS inhibitor S-ethylisothiourea. Our findings demonstrate that myoglobin serves as an important cytoplasmic buffer of iNOS-derived NO, which determines the functional consequences of iNOS overexpression. PMID:12775582

  2. Acute inhibition of myoglobin impairs contractility and energy state of iNOS-overexpressing hearts.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Carsten; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Heger, Jacqueline; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-27

    Elevated cardiac levels of nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in the development of heart failure. The surprisingly benign phenotype of recently generated mice with cardiac-specific iNOS overexpression (TGiNOS) provided the rationale to investigate whether NO scavenging by oxymyoglobin (MbO2) yielding nitrate and metmyoglobin (metMb) is involved in preservation of myocardial function in TGiNOS mice. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to monitor changes of cardiac myoglobin (Mb) metabolism in isolated hearts of wild-type (WT) and TGiNOS mice. NO formation by iNOS resulted in a significant decrease of the MbO2 signal and a concomitantly emerging metMb signal in spectra of TGiNOS hearts only (DeltaMbO2: -46.3+/-38.4 micromol/kg, DeltametMb: +41.4+/-17.6 micromol/kg, n=6; P<0.05) leaving contractility and energetics unaffected. Inhibition of the Mb-mediated NO degradation by carbon monoxide (20%) led to a deterioration of myocardial contractility in TGiNOS hearts (left ventricular developed pressure: 78.2+/-8.2% versus 96.7+/-4.6% of baseline, n=6; P<0.005), which was associated with a profound pertubation of cardiac energy state as assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy (eg, phosphocreatine: 13.3+/-1.3 mmol/L (TGiNOS) versus 15.9+/-0.7 mmol/L (WT), n=6; P<0.005). These alterations could be fully antagonized by the NOS inhibitor S-ethylisothiourea. Our findings demonstrate that myoglobin serves as an important cytoplasmic buffer of iNOS-derived NO, which determines the functional consequences of iNOS overexpression.

  3. Emerging trends in the pathophysiology of lymphatic contractile function.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Davis, Michael J; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2015-02-01

    Lymphatic contractile dysfunction is central to a number of pathologies that affect millions of people worldwide. Due to its critical role in the process of inflammation, a dysfunctional lymphatic system also compromises the immune response, further exacerbating a number of inflammation related diseases. Despite the critical physiological functions accomplished by the transport of lymph, a complete understanding of the contractile machinery of the lymphatic system lags far behind that of the blood vasculature. However, there has been a surge of recent research focusing on different mechanisms that underlie both physiological and pathophysiological aspects of lymphatic contractile function. This review summarizes those emerging paradigms that shed some novel insights into the contractile physiology of the lymphatics in normal as well as different disease states. In addition, this review emphasizes the recent progress made in our understanding of various contractile parameters and regulatory elements that contribute to the normal functioning of the lymphatics.

  4. Effects of Acetaminophen on Left Atrial Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jun-Hei; Cheng, Pao-Yun; Hsu, Chih-Hsueng; Chen, Yao-Chang; Hong, Po-Da

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen shows cardioprotective efficacy in mammals. In this study, we investigated the electromechanical effects of acetaminophen on the left atrium (LA). Methods Conventional microelectrodes were used to record the action potentials (AP) in rabbit LA preparations. The action potential duration (APD) at repolarization levels of 90%, 50% and 20% of the AP amplitude (APD90, APD50, and APD20, respectively), resting membrane potential, and contractile force were measured during 2 Hz electrical stimulation before and after sequential acetaminophen administration to the LA. Results Acetaminophen (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3 mM) reduced APD20 from 9.4 ± 1.2 to 8.0 ± 1.1 (p < 0.05), 7.1 ± 0.8 (p < 0.05), 7.8 ± 1.1, and 6.8 ± 1.2 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, and APD50 from 20.2 ± 1.9 to 17.4 ± 2.0, 15.6 ± 1.8 (p < 0.05), 15.8 ± 2.2 (p < 0.05), and 14.1 ± 2.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. APD90 was reduced from 72.0 ± 3.6 to 64.7 ± 4.2, 61.9 ± 4.3, 60.5 ± 3.7, and 53.4 ± 4.4 ms (p < 0.05), respectively. Acetaminophen increased LA contractility from 45 ± 9 to 52 ± 10 (p < 0.05), 55 ± 9 (p < 0.01), 58 ± 9 (p < 0.01), and 60 ± 9 mg (p < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME or PKG-I inhibitor DT-2, additional acetaminophen treatment did not significantly increase LA contractility. Conclusions Acetaminophen modulated the electromechanical characteristics of LA by inhibiting the NOS and PKG I pathway, and then contributed to the positive inotropic effect. PMID:27471362

  5. Depression - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  6. Influence of dark phase restricted high fat feeding on myocardial adaptation in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Yun; Villegas-Montoya, Carolina; Boland, Brandon B; Blasier, Zachary; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Gonzalez, Raquel; Kueht, Michael; McElfresh, Tracy A; Brewer, Rachel A; Chandler, Margaret P; Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2013-02-01

    Prolonged high fat feeding is associated with myocardial contractile dysfunction in rodents. However, epidemiological data do not necessarily support the concept that fat-enriched diets adversely affect cardiac function in humans. When fed in an ad libitum manner, laboratory rodents consume chow throughout the day. In contrast, humans typically consume food only during the awake phase. Discrepancies between rodent and human feeding behaviors led us to hypothesize that the time of day at which dietary lipids are consumed significantly influences myocardial adaptation. In order to better mimic feeding behavior in humans, mice were fed (either a control or high fat diet) only during the 12-hour dark phase (i.e., no food was provided during the light phase). We report that compared to dark phase restricted control diet fed mice, mice fed a high fat diet during the dark phase exhibit: 1) essentially normal body weight gain and energy balance; 2) increased fatty acid oxidation at whole body, as well as skeletal and cardiac muscle (in the presence of insulin and/or at high workloads) levels; 3) induction of fatty acid responsive genes, including genes promoting triglyceride turnover in the heart; 4) no evidence of cardiac hypertrophy; and 5) persistence/improvement of myocardial contractile function, as assessed ex vivo. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that ingestion of dietary fat only during the more active/awake period allows adequate metabolic adaptation, thereby preserving myocardial contractile function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Focus on cardiac metabolism".

  7. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Schramm, David; Rasmussen, Paul; Mullally, Kevin; Meixler, Lewis D.; Pearlman, Daniel; Kirk, Alice

    2011-04-01

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  8. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, David Schramm, Paul Rasmussen, Kevin Mullaly, Ras Labs, LLC, Intelligent Materials for Prosthetics & Automation, Lewis D. Meixler, Daniel Pearlman and Alice Kirk

    2011-05-23

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  9. Considerations For Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, Lewis D. Meixler and Charles A. Gentile

    2012-02-29

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) that bend, swell, ripple (first generation materials), and now contract with low electric input (new development) have been produced. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments, molecular modeling, electrolyte experiments, pH experiments, and an ionic concentration experiment were used to determine the chain of events that occur during contraction and, reciprocally, expansion when the polarity is reversed, in these ionic EAPs. Plasma treatment of the electrodes, along with other strategies, allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface, analogous to nerves and tendons moving with muscles during movement. Challenges involved with prototyping actuation using contractile EAPs are also discussed.

  10. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Meixler, Lewis D.; Gentile, Charles A.

    2012-04-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) that bend, swell, ripple (first generation materials), and now contract with low electric input (new development) have been produced. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments, molecular modeling, electrolyte experiments, pH experiments, and an ionic concentration experiment were used to determine the chain of events that occur during contraction and, reciprocally, expansion when the polarity is reversed, in these ionic EAPs. Plasma treatment of the electrodes, along with other strategies, allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface, analogous to nerves and tendons moving with muscles during movement. Challenges involved with prototyping actuation using contractile EAPs are also discussed.

  11. Action of acetylstrophanthidin on experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, G. T.; Pope, S. E.; Harrison, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental animal model with acute myocardial infarction of a size insufficient to produce profound heart failure or shock was used to study the effects of acute infarction on digitalis tolerance and the hemodynamic changes produced by moderate and large doses of acetylstrophanthidin. With acute myocardial infarction, digitalis toxic arrhythmias could be precipitated with significantly lower doses of digitalis than in animals without myocardial infarction. There was no precise correlation between the size of infarction and the toxic dose of glycoside. Coronary artery ligation produced a stable but relatively depressed circulatory state, as evidenced by lowered cardiac output and stroke volume and elevated systemic vascular resistance and left atrial mean pressure. When digitalis was infused, the following significant changes were observed at nontoxic doses: (1) elevation of aortic and left ventricular pressures; (2) further decline in cardiac output; and (3) decreased left atrial mean pressure.

  12. Prevalence and clinical significance of painless ST segment depression during early postinfarction exercise testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaiser, D.L.

    1987-03-01

    In a recent study of 190 survivors of acute myocardial infarction, the authors sought to determine whether exercise-induced painless ST segments depression indicates residual myocardial ischemia, as defined by /sup 201/Tl scintigraphic criteria. 2 weeks after uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and whether quantitative /sup 201/Tl imaging enhances the prognostic value of such an exercise electrocardiographic response.

  13. Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia following cold provocation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, M.J.; Deanfield, J.E.; deLandsheere, C.M.; Wilson, R.A.; Kensett, M.; Selwyn, A.P.

    1987-09-01

    Cold is thought to provoke angina in patients with coronary disease either by an increase in myocardial demand or an increase in coronary vascular resistance. We investigated and compared the effects of cold pressor stimulation and symptom-limited supine bicycle exercise on regional myocardial perfusion in 35 patients with stable angina and coronary disease and in 10 normal subjects. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed with positron emission tomography and rubidium-82. Following cold pressor stimulation 24 of 35 patients demonstrated significant abnormalities of regional myocardial perfusion with reduced cation uptake in affected regions of myocardium: 52 +/- 9 to 43 +/- 9 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Among these 24 patients only nine developed ST depression and only seven had angina. In contrast, 29 of 35 patients underwent supine exercise, and abnormal regional myocardial perfusion occurred in all 29, with a reduction in cation intake from 48 +/- 10 to 43 +/- 14 (p less than 0.001 vs normal subjects). Angina was present in 27 of 29 and ST depression in 25 of 29. Although the absolute decrease in cation uptake was somewhat greater following cold as opposed to exercise, the peak heart rate after cold was significantly lower than that after exercise (82 +/- 12 vs 108 +/- 16 bpm, p less than 0.05). Peak systolic blood pressures after cold and exercise were similar (159 +/- 24 vs 158 +/- 28). Thus, cold produces much more frequent asymptomatic disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion in patients with stable angina and coronary disease than is suggested by pain or ECG changes.

  14. Assessment of dsigma*/dt (max), a load independent index of contractility, in the canine.

    PubMed

    Black, Adam; Grenz, Nathan; Niccole, Schaible; Arndt, Peter; Lucht, Jordan; Nesvig, Kellen; Ewert, Dan; Mulligan, Lawrence

    2009-06-01

    The search for a load-independent index of myocardial contractility has been a focus for nearly 100 years. Nearly all of the parameters developed have yielded insight into cardiac function but their clinical utility has been limited. A new index, dsigma*/dt (max), has been proposed to be useful in the clinic. This parameter is expressed as the maximum time rate of change of the pressure normalized circumferential wall stress (sigma* = sigma ( theta )/P, where sigma ( theta ) is circumferential wall stress and P is pressure) for a thick walled sphere model of the left ventricle (LV). This definition for a contractility index renders dsigma*/dt (max) dependent only on LV wall volume (V (m)) and maximum time rate of change of the ventricular volume, dV/dt (max). The index dsigma*/dt (max) has been studied in patients with echocardiogram-derived volume, but up until this point its characteristics in canines have remained unknown. Validating this index in the canine will allow for a more intensive and wide-range investigation of the index that is not available with humans. The purpose of this study was to validate dsigma*/dt (max) as a load-independent measure of contractility in the canine heart with the hope that it was a noninvasive assessment of contractile function. To assess the load independence of dsigma*/dt (max), the index was estimated over a range of preloads (end diastolic volume, EDV) during a vena caval occlusion (VCO). The study was conducted in five canines under various pacing modes [right atrial (RA), right ventricular (RV), left ventricular (LV), and biventricular (BV)] at rates of 90 or 100, and 160 bpm. The animals' ventricular volume measurements were assessed by conductance catheter, calibrated with echocardiography. A 50 Hz filter was applied to the volume signal before differentiation to obtain dV/dt (max). Echocardiography was used to calculate left ventricle mass and V (m). In eight of ten cases, dsigma*/dt (max) was significantly correlated

  15. Glycolytic pathway (GP), kreb's cycle (KC), and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity in myocardial subcellular fractions exposed to cannabinoids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.T.; Manno, B.R.; King, J.W.; Fowler, M.R.; Dempsey, C.A.; Manno, J.E.

    1986-03-05

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (..delta../sup 9/-THC), the primary psychoactive component of marihuana, and its active metabolite 11-hydroxy-..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC) have been reported to produce a direct cardiac depressant effect. Studies in isolated perfused rat hearts have indicated a decreased force of contraction (inotropic response) when ..delta../sup 9/-THC or 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC was administered in microgram amounts. The mechanism and site of action have not been explained or correlated with associated metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on major myocardial energy producing pathways, GP and KC, and a non-energy producing pathway, HMS. Cardiac ventricular tissue from male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) was excised and homogenized for subcellular fractionation. KC, GP and HMS activity was assayed in the appropriate fractions by measuring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ generation from /sup 14/C-2-pyruvate, /sup 14/C-6-glucose and /sup 14/C-1-glucose respectively. Duplicate assays (n=8) were performed on tissue exposed to saline (control), empty liposomes (vehicle) and four doses each of ..delta../sup 9/-THC and 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC. Changes in metabolic activity and decreases in cardiac contractile performance may be associated.

  16. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  17. Pathophysiology and pathogenesis of stunned myocardium. Depressed Ca2+ activation of contraction as a consequence of reperfusion-induced cellular calcium overload in ferret hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Kusuoka, H; Porterfield, J K; Weisman, H F; Weisfeldt, M L; Marban, E

    1987-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction in stunned myocardium could result from a decrease in the intracellular free [Ca2+] transient during each beat, a decrease in maximal Ca2+-activated force, or a shift in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. We measured developed pressure (DP) at several [Ca]0 (0.5-7.5 mM) in isovolumic Langendorff-perfused ferret hearts at 37 degrees C after 15 min of global ischemia (stunned group, n = 13) or in a nonischemic control group (n = 6). At all [Ca]0, DP was depressed in the stunned group (P less than 0.001). Maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (MCAP), measured from tetani after exposure to ryanodine, was decreased after stunning (P less than 0.05). Normalization of the DP-[Ca]0 relationship by corresponding MCAP (Ca0 sensitivity) revealed a shift to higher [Ca]0 in stunned hearts. To test whether cellular Ca overload initiates stunning, we reperfused with low-[Ca]0 solution (0.1-0.5 mM; n = 8). DP and MCAP in the low-[Ca]0 group were comparable to control (P greater than 0.05), and higher than in the stunned group (P less than 0.05). Myocardial [ATP] observed by phosphorus NMR failed to correlate with functional recovery. In conclusion, contractile dysfunction in stunned myocardium is due to a decline in maximal force, and a shift in Ca0 sensitivity (which may reflect either decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity or a decrease in the [Ca2+] transient). Our results also indicate that calcium entry upon reperfusion plays a major role in the pathogenesis of myocardial stunning. Images PMID:3818956

  18. Myosin heavy chain and parvalbumin expression in swimming and feeding muscles of centrarchid fishes: the molecular basis of the scaling of contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Campion, L A; Choi, S; Mistry, H L; Coughlin, D J

    2012-10-01

    In centrarchid fishes, such as bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus, Rafinesque) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides, Lacepède), the contractile properties of feeding and swimming muscles show different scaling patterns. While the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) and rate of relaxation from tetanus of swimming or myotomal muscle slow with growth, the feeding muscle shows distinctive scaling patterns. Cranial epaxial muscle, which is used to elevate the head during feeding strikes, retains fast contractile properties across a range of fish sizes in both species. In bass, the sternohyoideous muscle, which depresses the floor of the mouth during feeding strikes, shows faster contractile properties with growth. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular basis of these different scaling patterns. We examined the expression of two muscle proteins, myosin heavy chain (MyHC) and parvalbumin (PV), that affect contractile properties. We hypothesized that the relative contribution of slow and fast MyHC isoforms will modulate V(max) in these fishes, while the presence of PV in muscle will enhance rates of muscle relaxation. Myotomal muscle displays an increase in sMyHC expression with growth, in agreement with its physiological properties. Feeding muscles such as epaxial and sternohyoideus show no change or a decrease in sMyHC expression with growth, again as predicted from contractile properties. PV expression in myotomal muscle decreases with growth in both species, as has been seen in other fishes. The feeding muscles again show no change or an increase in PV expression with growth, contributing to faster contractile properties in these fishes. Both MyHC and PV appear to play important roles in modulating muscle contractile properties of swimming and feeding muscles in centrarchid fishes. PMID:22705556

  19. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications.

  20. Geometrical Origins of Contractility in Disordered Actomyosin Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Movement within eukaryotic cells largely originates from localized forces exerted by myosin motors on scaffolds of actin filaments. Although individual motors locally exert both contractile and extensile forces, large actomyosin structures at the cellular scale are overwhelmingly contractile, suggesting that the scaffold serves to favor contraction over extension. While this mechanism is well understood in highly organized striated muscle, its origin in disordered networks such as the cell cortex is unknown. Here, we develop a mathematical model of the actin scaffold's local two- or three-dimensional mechanics and identify four competing contraction mechanisms. We predict that one mechanism dominates, whereby local deformations of the actin break the balance between contraction and extension. In this mechanism, contractile forces result mostly from motors plucking the filaments transversely rather than buckling them longitudinally. These findings shed light on recent in vitro experiments and provide a new geometrical understanding of contractility in the myriad of disordered actomyosin systems found in vivo.

  1. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  2. [Tissue Doppler in the assessment of myocardial function in stress echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Citro, Rodolfo; Salustri, Alessandro; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2002-02-01

    Recently, stress echocardiography has emerged as a valuable tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of coronary artery disease, but its interpretation still remains subjective, relying on image quality and reader's experience. These problems could be overcome by quantitative analysis of wall motion. Tissue Doppler provides quantitative information on regional myocardial systolic and diastolic velocities that can be displayed either in spectral mode or color coded, reflecting the peak velocity increment induced by exercise or dobutamine administration. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler allows to measure regional instantaneous myocardial velocities with high temporal resolution and has been shown valuable for detecting stress-induced changes of both myocardial systolic and diastolic function. This method may also identify myocardial viability by measuring increase in systolic peak velocity at low-dose of dobutamine in dysfunctional myocardial segments. Color coded tissue Doppler resolves mean velocities with higher spatial resolution, and post-processing analysis of digital acquired images has been shown feasible and reproducible. Myocardial velocity gradient is a more sensitive parameter compared to the simple measurement of the peak endocardial systolic velocity for evaluating myocardial ischemia during dobutamine echocardiography. From the raw data, it is also possible to measure strain and strain rate. These new parameters have the potential to differentiate between wall motion and contractility, with obvious implications when applied to stress echocardiography. In conclusion, tissue Doppler is able to quantify regional myocardial function. After a large scale validation, this technique will be incorporated with stress echocardiography in clinical practice.

  3. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Carl; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2010-02-19

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  4. [Left-ventricular function and physical exertion tolerance in patients with myocardial infarction with isolated lesion of the coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Golikov, A P; Levshunov, S P; Belozerov, G E

    1989-01-01

    Myocardial infarction area and left-ventricular myocardial contractility, determined by sectoral scanning, and exercise tolerance were assessed in 47 myocardial infarction patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. The area under myocardial infarction was shown to be dependent on the site of the atherosclerotic process rather than the degree of stenosis in patients with isolated coronary arterial lesions. A relationship was established between the incidence of complications developing in the acute phase of infarction and the degree of stenosis. The disease was complicated more frequently in patients with coronary arterial occlusion as compared to those with severe coronary-arterial stenosis. High stress tolerance, irrespective of the site of myocardial infarction, is an evidence of great functional potentials in this category of patients.

  5. Effects of regular exercise training on skeletal muscle contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is critical to movement and one's ability to perform daily tasks, such as eating and walking. One objective of this article is to review the contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle and single fibers, with particular emphasis on the cellular events that control or rate limit the important mechanical properties. Another important goal of this article is to present the current understanding of how the contractile properties of limb skeletal muscle adapt to programs of regular exercise.

  6. Neuro-fuzzy systems for computer-aided myocardial viability assessment.

    PubMed

    Behloul, F; Lelieveldt, B P; Boudraa, A; Janier, M F; Revel, D; Reiber, J H

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes a multimodality framework for computer-aided myocardial viability assessment based on neuro-fuzzy techniques. The proposed approach distinguishes two main levels: the modality-independent inference level and the modality-dependent application level. This two-level distinction releases the hard constraint of multimodality image registration. An abstract description template is used to describe the different myocardial functions (contractile function, perfusion, metabolism). Parameters extracted from different image modalities are combined to derive a diagnostic image. The neuro-fuzzy techniques make our system transparent, adaptive and easily extendable. Its effectiveness and robustness are demonstrated in a positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging data fusion application.

  7. Multimodality imaging in the assessment of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Partington, Sara L.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of heart failure due to coronary artery disease continues to increase, and it portends a worse prognosis than non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Revascularization improves prognosis in these high-risk patients who have evidence of viability; therefore, optimal assessment of myocardial viability remains essential. Multiple imaging modalities exist for differentiating viable myocardium from scar in territories with contractile dysfunction. Given the multiple modalities available, choosing the best modality for a specific patient can be a daunting task. In this review, the physiology of myocardial hibernation and stunning will be reviewed. All the current methods available for assessing viability including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging with single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography imaging and cardiac computed tomography will be reviewed. The effectiveness of the various techniques will be compared, and the limitations of the current literature will be discussed. PMID:21069458

  8. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte directly regulates myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology remains unknown. We hypothesized that circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte plays a role in regulating myocardia...

  9. [Masked depression].

    PubMed

    Preradović, M; Griva, D; Eror, S

    1991-01-01

    The study comprised 25 patients with masked depression and 30 patients with endogenous depression. According to the general characteristics both groups were homogenous and accordingly, comparable. Together with clinical evaluation of depressive syndrome, psychological management was applied. Rorschach test, Thematic Apperception Test and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory were used in the study. In the clinical picture of masked depressions somatovegetative disorders dominated and depressive behavior in endogenous depression. The frequence of suicid does not differ between patients with masked and endogenous depression.

  10. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  11. Mechanisms of impaired gallbladder contractile response in chronic acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Merg, Anders R; Kalinowski, Scott E; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Mitros, Frank A; Ephgrave, Kimberly S; Cullen, Joseph J

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the impaired gallbladder contractile response in chronic acalculous cholecystitis are unknown. To determine the mechanisms that may lead to impaired gallbladder emptying in chronic acalculous cholecystitis, gallbladder specimens removed during hepatic resection (controls) and after cholecystectomy for chronic acalculous cholecystitis were attached to force transducers and placed in tissue baths with oxygenated Krebs solution. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) (1 to 10 Hz, 0.1 msec, 70 V) or the contractile agonists, CCK-8 (10(-9) to 10(-5)) or K(+) (80 mmol/L), were placed separately in the tissue baths and changes in tension were determined. Patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis had a mean gallbladder ejection fraction of 12% +/- 4%. Pathologic examination of all gallbladders removed for chronic acalculous cholecystitis revealed chronic cholecystitis. Spontaneous contractile activity was present in gallbladder strips in 83% of control specimens but only 29% of gallbladder strips from patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (P < 0.05 vs. controls). CCK-8 contractions were decreased by 54% and EFS-stimulated contractions were decreased by 50% in the presence of chronic acalculous cholecystitis (P < 0.05 vs. controls). K(+)-induced contractions were similar between control and chronic acalculous cholecystitis gallbladder strips. The impaired gallbladder emptying in chronic acalculous cholecystitis appears to be due to diminished spontaneous contractile activity and decreased contractile responsiveness to both CCK and EFS.

  12. Cardiac tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease 4 dictates cardiomyocyte contractility and differentiation of embryonic stem cells into cardiomyocytes: Road to therapy☆

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Kalani, Anuradha; Familtseva, Anastasia; Kamat, Pradip Kumar; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2015-01-01

    Background TIMP4 (Tissue Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloprotease 4), goes down in failing hearts and mice lacking TIMP4 show poor regeneration capacity after myocardial infarction (MI). This study is based on our previous observation that administration of cardiac inhibitor of metalloproteinase (~TIMP4) attenuates oxidative stress and remodeling in failing hearts. Therefore, we hypothesize that TIMP4 helps in cardiac regeneration by augmenting contractility and inducing the differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells into cardiomyocytes. Methods To validate this hypothesis, we transfected mouse cardiomyocytes with TIMP4 and TIMP4-siRNA and performed contractility studies in the TIMP4 transfected cardiomyocytes as compared to siRNA-TIMP4 transfected cardiomyocytes. We evaluated the calcium channel gene serca2a (sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase2a) and mir122a which tightly regulates serca2a to explain the changes in contractility. We treated mouse embryonic stem cells with cardiac extract and cardiac extract minus TIMP4 (using TIMP4 monoclonal antibody) to examine the effect of TIMP4 on differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells. Results Contractility was augmented in the TIMP4 transfected cardiomyocytes as compared to siRNA-TIMP4 transfected cardiomyocytes. There was elevated expression of serca2a in the TIMP4 transformed myocytes and down regulation of mir122a. The cells treated with cardiac extract containing TIMP4 showed cardiac phenotype in terms of Ckit+, GATA4+ and Nkx2.5 expression. Conclusion This is a novel report suggesting that TIMP4 augments contractility and induces differentiation of progenitor cells into cardiac phenotype. In view of the failure of MMP9 inhibitors for cardiac therapy, TIMP4 provides an alternative approach, being an indigenous molecule and a natural inhibitor of MMP9. PMID:25745981

  13. Asymptomatic myocardial infarction in Kawasaki disease: Long-term prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, I.; Onouchi, Z.; Hayano, T.; Hamaoka, K.; Kiyosawa, N. )

    1991-04-01

    Eight patients with Kawasaki disease who had sustained asymptomatic myocardial infarction 8-15 years ago (mean, 13.1 years) were reexamined by various noninvasive cardiac function tests to assess long-term prognosis. At present, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are normal in six patients. However, all eight patients had a prolonged preejection period (PEP) to left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio 30 s after amylnitrate (AN) inhalation. Six patients had perfusion defects by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and two patients developed ST segment depression in treadmill exercise testing. These patients are symptom-free even though their physical activity has not been restricted. Yet they proved to have serious abnormalities suggesting sequelae of myocardial infarction or existing myocardial ischemia. Judging from the results of noninvasive cardiac function tests and recently performed coronary angiography, five of the eight patients require coronary bypass surgery.

  14. Energy Drinks and Myocardial Ischemia: A Review of Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The use and abuse of energy drinks (EDs) is constantly increasing worldwide. We performed a systematic search in Medline, Scopus and Web of Science to identify evidence about the potential link between these beverages and myocardial ischemia. Overall, 8 case reports could be detected, all of which described a realistic association between large intake of EDs and episodes of myocardial ischemia. Interestingly, no additional triggers of myocardial ischemia other than energy drinks could be identified in the vast majority of cases. Some plausible explanations can be brought in support of this association. Most of the biological effects of EDs are seemingly mediated by a positive inotropic effect on cardiac function, which entails increase in heart rate, cardiac output and contractility, stroke volume and arterial blood pressure. Additional biological abnormalities reported after EDs intake include increased platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction, hyperglycemia as well as an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although a causal relationship between large consumption of EDs and myocardial ischemia cannot be definitely established so far, concerns about the cardiovascular risk of excessive consumption of these beverages are seemingly justified.

  15. Energy Drinks and Myocardial Ischemia: A Review of Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    The use and abuse of energy drinks (EDs) is constantly increasing worldwide. We performed a systematic search in Medline, Scopus and Web of Science to identify evidence about the potential link between these beverages and myocardial ischemia. Overall, 8 case reports could be detected, all of which described a realistic association between large intake of EDs and episodes of myocardial ischemia. Interestingly, no additional triggers of myocardial ischemia other than energy drinks could be identified in the vast majority of cases. Some plausible explanations can be brought in support of this association. Most of the biological effects of EDs are seemingly mediated by a positive inotropic effect on cardiac function, which entails increase in heart rate, cardiac output and contractility, stroke volume and arterial blood pressure. Additional biological abnormalities reported after EDs intake include increased platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction, hyperglycemia as well as an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although a causal relationship between large consumption of EDs and myocardial ischemia cannot be definitely established so far, concerns about the cardiovascular risk of excessive consumption of these beverages are seemingly justified. PMID:26320007

  16. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  17. Sum of effects of myocardial ischemia followed by electrically induced tachycardia on myocardial function

    PubMed Central

    Díez, José Luis; Hernándiz, Amparo; Cosín-Aguilar, Juan; Aguilar, Amparo; Portolés, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background The alteration of contractile function after tachyarrhythmia ceases is influenced by the type of prior ischemia (acute coronary syndrome or ischemia inherent in a coronary revascularization procedure). We aimed to analyze cardiac dysfunction in an acute experimental model of supraphysiological heart rate preceded by different durations and types of ischemia. Material/Methods Twenty-four pigs were included in: (S1) series of ventricular pacing; (S2, A and B) series with 10 or 20 min, respectively, of coronary occlusion previous to ventricular pacing; S3 with 20 brief, repeated ischemia/reperfusion processes prior to ventricular pacing and; (S4) control series. Overall cardiac function parameters and regional myocardial contractility at the apex and base of the left ventricle were recorded, as were oxidative stress markers (glutathione and lipid peroxide serum levels). Left ventricular pacing at 60% over baseline heart rate was performed for 2 h followed by 1 h of recovery. Results High ventricular pacing rates preceded by short, repeated periods of coronary ischemia/reperfusion resulted in worse impairment of overall cardiac and regional function that continued to be altered 1 h after tachycardia ceased. There was significant reduction of stroke volume (26.9±5.3 basal vs. 16±6.2 ml; p<0.05), LVP; dP/dt and LAD flow (13.1±1.5 basal vs. 8.4±1.6 ml/min; p<0.05); the base contractility remained altered when recovering compared to baseline (base SF: 5.6±2.8 vs. 2.2±0.7%; p<0.05); and LPO levels were higher than less aggressive series at the end of recovery. Conclusions Ischemia and tachycardia accumulate their effects, with increased cardiac involvement depending on the type of ischemia. PMID:23722244

  18. [Assessing myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    vom Dahl, J

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of the heart has gained widespread scientific and clinical acceptance with regard to two indications: 1) The detection of perfusion abnormalities by qualitative and semiquantitative analyses of perfusion images at rest and during physical or pharmacological stress using well-validated perfusion tracers, such as N-13 ammonia, Rb-82 rubidium chloride, or O-15 labeled water. 2) Viability imaging of myocardial regions with reduced contractility by combining perfusion measurements with substrate metabolism as assessed from F-18 deoxyglucose utilization. This overview summarizes the use of PET as a perfusion imaging method. With a sensitivity > 90% in combination with high specificity, PET is today the best-validated available nuclear imaging technique for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The short half-life of the perfusion tracers in combination with highly sophisticated hard- and software enables rapid PET studies with high patient throughput. The high diagnostic accuracy and the methological advantages as compared to conventional scintigraphy allows one to use PET perfusion imaging to detect subtle changes in the perfusion reserve for the detection of CAD in high risk but asymptomatic patients as well as in patients with proven CAD undergoing various treatment forms such as risk factor reduction or coronary revascularization. In patients following orthotopic heart transplantation, evolving transplant vasculopathy can be detected at an early stage. Quantitative PET imaging at rest allows for detection of myocardial viability since cellular survival is based on maintenance of a minimal perfusion and structural changes correlate to the degree of perfusion reduction. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of the myocardial perfusion reserve detects the magnitude and competence of collaterals in regions with occluded epicardial collaterals and, thus, imaging of several coronary distribution territories in one noninvasive

  19. Myocyte repolarization modulates myocardial function in aging dogs.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Signore, Sergio; Qanud, Khaled; Borghetti, Giulia; Meo, Marianna; Cannata, Antonio; Zhou, Yu; Wybieralska, Ewa; Luciani, Marco; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Zhang, Eric; Matsuda, Alex; Webster, Andrew; Cimini, Maria; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; D'Alessandro, David A; Wunimenghe, Oriyanhan; Michler, Robert E; Royer, Christopher; Goichberg, Polina; Leri, Annarosa; Barrett, Edward G; Anversa, Piero; Hintze, Thomas H; Rota, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Studies of myocardial aging are complex and the mechanisms involved in the deterioration of ventricular performance and decreased functional reserve of the old heart remain to be properly defined. We have studied a colony of beagle dogs from 3 to 14 yr of age kept under a highly regulated environment to define the effects of aging on the myocardium. Ventricular, myocardial, and myocyte function, together with anatomical and structural properties of the organ and cardiomyocytes, were evaluated. Ventricular hypertrophy was not observed with aging and the structural composition of the myocardium was modestly affected. Alterations in the myocyte compartment were identified in aged dogs, and these factors negatively interfere with the contractile reserve typical of the young heart. The duration of the action potential is prolonged in old cardiomyocytes contributing to the slower electrical recovery of the myocardium. Also, the remodeled repolarization of cardiomyocytes with aging provides inotropic support to the senescent muscle but compromises its contractile reserve, rendering the old heart ineffective under conditions of high hemodynamic demand. The defects in the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiomyocytes with aging suggest that this cell population is an important determinant of the cardiac senescent phenotype. Collectively, the delayed electrical repolarization of aging cardiomyocytes may be viewed as a critical variable of the aging myopathy and its propensity to evolve into ventricular decompensation under stressful conditions.

  20. Dietary Nitrate and Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Coggan, Andrew R; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from exercise intolerance that diminishes their ability to perform normal activities of daily living and hence compromises their quality of life. This is due largely to detrimental changes in skeletal muscle mass, structure, metabolism, and function. This includes an impairment of muscle contractile performance, i.e., a decline in the maximal force, speed, and power of muscle shortening. Although numerous mechanisms underlie this reduction in contractility, one contributing factor may be a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Consistent with this, recent data demonstrate that acute ingestion of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice, a source of NO via the NO synthase-independent enterosalivary pathway, markedly increases maximal muscle speed and power in HF patients. This review discusses the role of muscle contractile dysfunction in the exercise intolerance characteristic of HF, and the evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation may represent a novel and simple therapy for this currently underappreciated problem. PMID:27271563

  1. Caregiver Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  2. Postpartum depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... The exact causes of postpartum depression are unknown. Changes in hormone levels during and after pregnancy may affect a woman's mood. Many non-hormonal factors may also ...

  3. Regulation of contractile ring formation and septation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Willet, Alaina H; McDonald, Nathan A; Gould, Kathleen L

    2015-12-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has become a powerful model organism for cytokinesis studies, propelled by pioneering genetic screens in the 1980s and 1990s. S. pombe cells are rod-shaped and divide similarly to mammalian cells, utilizing a medially-placed actin-and myosin-based contractile ring. A cell wall division septum is deposited behind the constricting ring, forming the new ends of each daughter cell. Here we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation of contractile ring formation through formin proteins and the role of the division septum in S. pombe cell division.

  4. Assessment of the Contractile Properties of Permeabilized Skeletal Muscle Fibers.

    PubMed

    Claflin, Dennis R; Roche, Stuart M; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Mendias, Christopher L; Brooks, Susan V

    2016-01-01

    Permeabilized individual skeletal muscle fibers offer the opportunity to evaluate contractile behavior in a system that is greatly simplified, yet physiologically relevant. Here we describe the steps required to prepare, permeabilize and preserve small samples of skeletal muscle. We then detail the procedures used to isolate individual fiber segments and attach them to an experimental apparatus for the purpose of controlling activation and measuring force generation. We also describe our technique for estimating the cross-sectional area of fiber segments. The area measurement is necessary for normalizing the absolute force to obtain specific force, a measure of the intrinsic force-generating capability of the contractile system. PMID:27492182

  5. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  6. Early changes in contractility and coronary blood flow in the normal areas of the ischemic porcine heart.

    PubMed

    Pashkow, F; Holland, R; Brooks, H

    1977-03-01

    The regional responses of normal myocardium distant from an ischemic area were studied during acute anterior descending occlusion in the open-chest chloralose-anesthetized pig. Three markers of regional response in both normal and ischemic areas were used: surface ECG electrode, a force gauge in series with left ventricular outer wall fibers, and coronary blood inflow to each region as determined by electromagnetic cuff-probes. Following brief anterior descending artery occlusion (120 sec)., a characteristic rapid decline in contractile force and evolution of TQ-ST segment changes was observed in the ischemic area. In contrast, in the distant area increases in contractil force (p less than 0.001) and coronary blood flow (p less than 0.002) occurred. These distant responses were essentially obliterated following transection and cannulation of the artery supplying this region (p less than 0.05). The findings are consistent with a reflex neurovascular mechanism operating within the intact heart. This reflex is rapidly activated in order to maintain adequate levels of cardiac performance despite sudden loss of functional myocardial mass.

  7. ORM-3819 promotes cardiac contractility through Ca(2+) sensitization in combination with selective PDE III inhibition, a novel approach to inotropy.

    PubMed

    Nagy, László; Pollesello, Piero; Haikala, Heimo; Végh, Ágnes; Sorsa, Tia; Levijoki, Jouko; Szilágyi, Szabolcs; Édes, István; Tóth, Attila; Papp, Zoltán; Papp, Julius Gy

    2016-03-15

    This study is the first pharmacological characterization of the novel chemical entity, ORM-3819 (L-6-{4-[N'-(4-Hydroxi-3-methoxy-2-nitro-benzylidene)-hydrazino]-phenyl}-5-methyl-4,5-dihydro-2H-pyridazin-3-one), focusing primarily on its cardiotonic effects. ORM-3819 binding to cardiac troponin C (cTnC) was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a selective inhibition of the phosphodiesterase III (PDE III) isozyme (IC50=3.88±0.3 nM) was revealed during in vitro enzyme assays. The Ca(2+)-sensitizing effect of ORM-3819 was demonstrated in vitro in permeabilized myocyte-sized preparations from left ventricles (LV) of guinea pig hearts (ΔpCa50=0.12±0.01; EC50=2.88±0.14 µM). ORM-3819 increased the maximal rate of LV pressure development (+dP/dtmax) (EC50=8.9±1.7 nM) and LV systolic pressure (EC50=7.63±1.74 nM) in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts. Intravenous administration of ORM-3819 increased LV+dP/dtmax (EC50=0.13±0.05 µM/kg) and improved the rate of LV pressure decrease (-dP/dtmax); (EC50=0.03±0.02 µM/kg) in healthy guinea pigs. In an in vivo dog model of myocardial stunning, ORM-3819 restored the depressed LV+dP/dtmax and improved % segmental shortening (%SS) in the ischemic area (to 18.8±3), which was reduced after the ischaemia-reperfusion insult (from 24.1±2.1 to 11.0±2.4). Our data demonstrate ORM-3819 as a potent positive inotropic agent exerting its cardiotonic effect by a cTnC-dependent Ca(2+)-sensitizing mechanism in combination with the selective inhibition of the PDE III isozyme. This dual mechanism of action results in the concentration-dependent augmentation of the contractile performance under control conditions and in the postischemic failing myocardium.

  8. S100A1 gene therapy preserves in vivo cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pleger, Sven T; Remppis, Andrew; Heidt, Beatrix; Völkers, Mirko; Chuprun, J Kurt; Kuhn, Matthew; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Gao, Erhe; Szabo, Gabor; Weichenhan, Dieter; Müller, Oliver J; Eckhart, Andrea D; Katus, Hugo A; Koch, Walter J; Most, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) represents an enormous clinical challenge as loss of myocardium due to ischemic injury is associated with compromised left ventricular (LV) function often leading to acute cardiac decompensation or chronic heart failure. S100A1 was recently identified as a positive inotropic regulator of myocardial contractility in vitro and in vivo. Here, we explore the strategy of myocardial S100A1 gene therapy either at the time of, or 2 h after, MI to preserve global heart function. Rats underwent cryothermia-induced MI and in vivo intracoronary delivery of adenoviral transgenes (4 x 10(10) pfu). Animals received saline (MI), the S100A1 adenovirus (MI/AdS100A1), a control adenovirus (MI/AdGFP), or a sham operation. S100A1 gene delivery preserved global in vivo LV function 1 week after MI. Preservation of LV function was due mainly to S100A1-mediated gain of contractility of the remaining, viable myocardium since contractile parameters and Ca(2+) transients of isolated MI/AdS100A1 myocytes were significantly enhanced compared to myocytes isolated from both MI/AdGFP and sham groups. Moreover, S100A1 gene therapy preserved the cardiac beta-adrenergic inotropic reserve, which was associated with the attenuation of GRK2 up-regulation. Also, S100A1 overexpression reduced cardiac hypertrophy 1 week post-MI. Overall, our data indicate that S100A1 gene therapy provides a potential novel treatment strategy to maintain contractile performance of the post-MI heart.

  9. Biohybrid Thin Films for Measuring Contractility in Engineered Cardiovascular Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Feinberg, Adam W.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2010-01-01

    In vitro cardiovascular disease models need to recapitulate tissue-scale function in order to provide in vivo relevance. We have developed a new method for measuring the contractility of engineered cardiovascular smooth and striated muscle in vitro during electrical and pharmacological stimulation. We present a growth theory-based finite elasticity analysis for calculating the contractile stresses of a 2D anisotropic muscle tissue cultured on a flexible synthetic polymer thin film. Cardiac muscle engineered with neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and paced at 0.5 Hz generated stresses of 9.2 ± 3.5 kPa at peak systole, similar to measurements of the contractility of papillary muscle from adult rats. Vascular tissue engineered with human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells maintained a basal contractile tone of 13.1 ± 2.1 kPa and generated another 5.1 ± 0.8 kPa when stimulated with endothelin-1. These data suggest that this method may be useful in assessing the efficacy and safety of pharmacological agents on cardiovascular tissue. PMID:20149449

  10. Computational analysis of contractility in engineered heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Grant; Sondergaard, Claus; Jeffreys, Angela; Childs, William; Le, Bao Linh; Sahota, Amrit; Najibi, Skender; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2012-05-01

    Engineered heart tissue (EHT) is a potential therapy for heart failure and the basis of functional in vitro assays of novel cardiovascular treatments. Self-organizing EHT can be generated in fiber form, which makes the assessment of contractile function convenient with a force transducer. Contractile function is a key parameter of EHT performance. Analysis of EHT force data is often performed manually; however, this approach is time consuming, incomplete and subjective. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a computer algorithm to efficiently and objectively analyze EHT force data. This algorithm incorporates data filtering, individual contraction detection and validation, inter/intracontractile analysis and intersample analysis. We found the algorithm to be accurate in contraction detection, validation and magnitude measurement as compared to human operators. The algorithm was efficient in processing hundreds of data acquisitions and was able to determine force-length curves, force-frequency relationships and compare various contractile parameters such as peak systolic force generation. We conclude that this computer algorithm is a key adjunct to the objective and efficient assessment of EHT contractile function. PMID:22361653

  11. Altered right ventricular contractile pattern after cardiac surgery: monitoring of septal function is essential.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin; Cao, Long; Movahed, Assad

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of right ventricular (RV) function is important in the management of various forms of cardiovascular disease. Accurately assessing RV volume and systolic function is a challenge in day-to-day clinical practice due to its complex geometry. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and systolic excursion velocity (S') have been reviewed to further assess their suitability and objectivity in evaluating RV function. Multiple studies have validated their diagnostic and prognostic values in numerous pathologic conditions. Diminished longitudinal contraction after cardiothoracic surgery is a well-known phenomenon, but it is not well validated. Despite significant reduction in RV performance along the long-axis assessed by TAPSE and S' after cardiac surgery, RV ejection fractions did not change as well as the left ventricular parameters and exercise capacity. RV contractile patterns were markedly altered with decreased longitudinal shortening and increased transverse shortening, which are likely resulted from the septal damage during cardiac surgery. The septum is essential for RV performance due to its oblique fiber orientation. This allows ventricular twisting, which is a vital mechanism against increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The septum function along with TAPSE and S' should be adequately assessed during cardiac surgery, and evidence of septal dysfunction should lead to reevaluation of myocardial protection methods. PMID:24919944

  12. Altered right ventricular contractile pattern after cardiac surgery: monitoring of septal function is essential.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin; Cao, Long; Movahed, Assad

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of right ventricular (RV) function is important in the management of various forms of cardiovascular disease. Accurately assessing RV volume and systolic function is a challenge in day-to-day clinical practice due to its complex geometry. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and systolic excursion velocity (S') have been reviewed to further assess their suitability and objectivity in evaluating RV function. Multiple studies have validated their diagnostic and prognostic values in numerous pathologic conditions. Diminished longitudinal contraction after cardiothoracic surgery is a well-known phenomenon, but it is not well validated. Despite significant reduction in RV performance along the long-axis assessed by TAPSE and S' after cardiac surgery, RV ejection fractions did not change as well as the left ventricular parameters and exercise capacity. RV contractile patterns were markedly altered with decreased longitudinal shortening and increased transverse shortening, which are likely resulted from the septal damage during cardiac surgery. The septum is essential for RV performance due to its oblique fiber orientation. This allows ventricular twisting, which is a vital mechanism against increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The septum function along with TAPSE and S' should be adequately assessed during cardiac surgery, and evidence of septal dysfunction should lead to reevaluation of myocardial protection methods.

  13. Characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction by positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.; Biello, D.; Welch, M.J.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-04-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) performed after i.v. 11C-palmitate permits detection and characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction. PET was performed after the i.v. injection of 11C-palmitate in 10 normal subjects, 24 patients with initial nontransmural myocardial infarction (defined electrocardiographically), and 22 patients with transmural infarction. Depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate was detected with sagittal, coronal and transverse reconstructions, and quantified based on 14 contiguous transaxial reconstructions. Defects with homogeneously intense depression of accumulation of tracer were detected in all 22 patients with transmural infarction (100%). Abnormalities of the distribution of 11C-palmitate in the myocardium were detected in 23 patients with nontransmural infarction (96%). Thallium scintigrams were abnormal in only 11 of 18 patients with nontransmural infarction (61%). Tomographically estimated infarct size was greater among patients with transmural infarction (50.4 +/- 7.8 PET-g-Eq/m2 (+/- SEM SEM)) compared with those with nontransmural infarction (19 +/- 4 PET-g-Eq, p less than 0.01). Residual accumulation of 11C-palmitate within regions of infarction was more intensely depressed among patients with transmural compared to nontransmural infarction (33 +/- 1 vs 39 +/- 1% maximal myocardial radioactivity, p less than 0.01). Thus, PET and metabolic imaging with 11C-palmitate is a sensitive means of detecting, quantifying and characterizing nontransmural and transmural myocardial infarction.

  14. Identification of contractile vacuole proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Paul N; Jimenez, Veronica; Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N J; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-03-18

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  15. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  16. Carbon monoxide pollution impairs myocardial perfusion reserve: implication of coronary endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G; Boissiere, J; Tanguy, S; Rugale, C; Gayrard, S; Jover, B; Obert, P; Reboul, C

    2011-12-01

    Chronic exposure to simulated urban CO pollution is reported to be associated with cardiac dysfunction. Despite the potential implication of myocardial perfusion alteration in the pathophysiology of CO pollution, the underlying mechanisms remain today still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of prolonged exposure to simulated urban CO pollution on the regulation of myocardial perfusion. Cardiac hemodynamics and myocardial perfusion were assessed under basal conditions and during the infusion of a β-Adrenergic agonist. The effects of CO exposure on capillary density, coronary endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, eNOS expression and eNOS uncoupling were also evaluated. Our main results were that prolonged CO exposure was associated with a blunted myocardial perfusion response to a physiological stress responsible for an altered contractile reserve. The impairment of myocardial perfusion reserve was not accounted for a reduced capillary density but rather by an alteration in coronary endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation (-45% of maximal relaxation to ACh). In addition, though chronic CO exposure did not change eNOS expression, it significantly increased eNOS uncoupling. Therefore, the present work underlines the fact that chronic CO exposure, at levels found in urban air pollution, is associated with reduced myocardial perfusion reserve. This phenomenon is explained at the coronary-vessel level by deleterious effects of CO exposure on the endothelium NO-dependent vasorelaxation via eNOS uncoupling.

  17. Multifunctional MR monitoring of the healing process after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bönner, Florian; Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Borg, Nadine; Ding, Zhaoping; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Healing of the myocardium after infarction comprises a variety of local adaptive processes which contribute to the functional outcome after the insult. Therefore, we aimed to establish a setting for concomitant assessment of regional alterations in contractile function, morphology, and immunological state to gain prognostic information on cardiac recovery after infarction. For this, mice were subjected to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and monitored for 28 days by cine MRI, T2 mapping, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), and (19)F MRI. T2 values were calculated from gated multi-echo sequences. (19)F-loaded nanoparticles were injected intravenously for labelling circulating monocytes and making them detectable by (19)F MRI. In-house developed software was used for regional analysis of cine loops, T2 maps, LGE, and (19)F images to correlate local wall movement, tissue damage as well as monocyte recruitment over up to 200 sectors covering the left ventricle. This enabled us to evaluate simultaneously zonal cardiac necrosis, oedema, and inflammation patterns together with sectional fractional shortening (FS) and global myocardial function. Oedema, indicated by a rise in T2, showed a slightly better correlation with FS than LGE. Regional T2 values increased from 19 ms to above 30 ms after I/R. In the course of the healing process oedema resolved within 28 days, while myocardial function recovered. Infiltrating monocytes could be quantitatively tracked by (19)F MRI, as validated by flow cytometry. Furthermore, (19)F MRI proved to yield valuable insight on the outcome of myocardial infarction in a transgenic mouse model. In conclusion, our approach permits a comprehensive surveillance of key processes involved in myocardial healing providing independent and complementary information for individual prognosis. PMID:25098936

  18. Angle-independent myocardial elastography: theoretical analysis and clinical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Lee, Wei-Ning; Fung-kee-Fung, Simon D.

    2007-03-01

    Several methods have been introduced in the past few years to quantify left-ventricular strain in order to detect myocardial ischemia and infarction. Myocardial Elastography is one of these methods, which is based on ultrasound Radio-Frequency (RF) signal processing at high frame rates for the highest precision and resolution of strain estimation. Myocardial elastography estimates displacement and strain during the natural contraction of the myocardium using cross-correlation techniques. We have previously shown that imaging of the myocardial strain at high precision allows the correct assessment of the contractility of the cardiac muscle and thus measurement of the extent of ischemia or infarct. In this paper, for the first time in echocardiography, we show how angle-independent techniques can be used to estimate and image the mechanics of normal and pathological myocardia, both in simulations and in vivo. First, the fundamental limits of 2D normal and principal strain component estimation are determined using an ultrasound image formation model and a 2D short-axis view of a 3D left-ventricular, finite-element model, in normal and ischemic configurations. Two-dimensional (i.e., lateral and axial) cumulative displacement and strain components were iteratively estimated and imaged using 1D cross-correlation and recorrelation techniques in a 2D search. Validation of these elastographic findings in one normal human subject was performed. Principal strains were also imaged for the characterization of normal myocardium. In conclusion, the feasibility of angle-independent, 2D myocardial elastography technique was shown through the calculation of the in-plane principal strains, which was proven essential in the reliable depiction of strains independent of the beam-tissue angle or the type of sonographic view used.

  19. Multifunctional MR monitoring of the healing process after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bönner, Florian; Jacoby, Christoph; Temme, Sebastian; Borg, Nadine; Ding, Zhaoping; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Healing of the myocardium after infarction comprises a variety of local adaptive processes which contribute to the functional outcome after the insult. Therefore, we aimed to establish a setting for concomitant assessment of regional alterations in contractile function, morphology, and immunological state to gain prognostic information on cardiac recovery after infarction. For this, mice were subjected to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and monitored for 28 days by cine MRI, T2 mapping, late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), and (19)F MRI. T2 values were calculated from gated multi-echo sequences. (19)F-loaded nanoparticles were injected intravenously for labelling circulating monocytes and making them detectable by (19)F MRI. In-house developed software was used for regional analysis of cine loops, T2 maps, LGE, and (19)F images to correlate local wall movement, tissue damage as well as monocyte recruitment over up to 200 sectors covering the left ventricle. This enabled us to evaluate simultaneously zonal cardiac necrosis, oedema, and inflammation patterns together with sectional fractional shortening (FS) and global myocardial function. Oedema, indicated by a rise in T2, showed a slightly better correlation with FS than LGE. Regional T2 values increased from 19 ms to above 30 ms after I/R. In the course of the healing process oedema resolved within 28 days, while myocardial function recovered. Infiltrating monocytes could be quantitatively tracked by (19)F MRI, as validated by flow cytometry. Furthermore, (19)F MRI proved to yield valuable insight on the outcome of myocardial infarction in a transgenic mouse model. In conclusion, our approach permits a comprehensive surveillance of key processes involved in myocardial healing providing independent and complementary information for individual prognosis.

  20. Myofilament calcium sensitization delays decompensated hypertrophy differently between the sexes following myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Shioura, Krystyna M.; Farjah, Mariam; Geenen, David L.; Solaro, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction is common to many forms of cardiovascular disease. Approaches directed at enhancing cardiac contractility at the level of the myofilaments during heart failure (HF) may provide a means to improve overall cardiovascular function. We are interested in gender-based differences in cardiac function and the effect of sarcomere activation agents that increase contractility. Thus, we studied the effect of gender and time on integrated arterial-ventricular function (A-V relationship) following myocardial infarction (MI). In addition, transgenic mice that overexpress the slow skeletal troponin I isoform were used to determine the impact of increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity following MI. Based on pressure-volume (P-V) loop measurements, we used derived parameters of cardiovascular function to reveal the effects of sex, time, and increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity among groups of post-MI mice. Analysis of the A-V relationship revealed that the initial increase was similar between the sexes, but the vascular unloading of the heart served to delay the decompensated stage in females. Conversely, the vascular response at 6 and 10 wk post-MI in males contributed to the continuous decline in cardiovascular function. Increasing the myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity appeared to provide sufficient contractile support to improve contractile function in both male and female transgenic mice. However, the improved contractile function was more beneficial in males as the concurrent vascular response contributed to a delayed decompensated stage in female transgenic mice post-MI. This study represents a quantitative approach to integrating the vascular-ventricular relationship to provide meaningful and diagnostic value following MI. Consequently, the data provide a basis for understanding how the A-V relationship is coupled between males and females and the enhanced ability of the cardiovascular system to tolerate pathophysiological stresses associated with HF in

  1. Myocardial mechanics in aortic and mitral valvular regurgitation: the concept of instantaneous impedance as a determinant of the performance of the intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Urschel, Charles W.; Covell, James W.; Sonnenblick, Edmund H.; Ross, John; Braunwald, Eugene

    1968-01-01

    The effects on myocardial mechanics of acute, artificial aortic and mitral regurgitation were studied in the dog to determine the manner in which the changes in load induced by valvular regurgitation alter ventricular performance. With mitral and aortic regurgitant volumes of approximately the same magnitude as the forward stroke volume, immediate increases occurred in total stroke volume, left ventricular enddiastolic pressure, and peak ejection velocity, whereas contractility remained unchanged. Although calculated myocardial fiber tension rose, the rate of decline of tension during ejection was accelerated with regurgitation due to the more rapid decrease in ventricular size. Average tension therefore decreased relative to average pressure. As a consequence of the increased fiber length and this unloading, contractile element velocity, work, and power were increased. Despite unchanged contractility of the myocardium, the ejection fraction rose with both aortic and mitral regurgitation. When regurgitant beats were compared with control beats at a constant end-diastolic volume, ventricular stroke volume, work, power, and ejection fraction, as well as contractile element velocity, work, and power consistently increased. Thus, reduction of instantaneous impedance to ejection allowed the ventricle to empty further, reducing ventricular wall tension with a resultant increase in the velocity of shortening. External energy output was increased despite unchanged contractility and diastolic fiber length. It is concluded that the impedance to ejection and myocardial fiber tension during ejection govern the velocity and extent of contractile element shortening, and hence affect stroke volume, peak aortic flow rate, and ejection fraction. The alterations of ventricular function accompanying valvular regurgitation can be explained by an evaluation of the effects of these lesions on the instantaneous impedance to left ventricular ejection. Images PMID:5641623

  2. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cardiac contractile dysfunction in an Akt2-knockout murine model of insulin resistance: role of mitochondrial injury and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Nan; Dong, Maolong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a toxic gas now being recognized as an endogenous signaling molecule in multiple organ systems, in particular, the cardiovascular system. H2S is known to regulate cardiac function and protect against ischemic injury. However, little information is available regarding the effect of H2S on cardiac function in insulin resistance. This study was designed to examine the impact of H2S supplementation on cardiac function using an Akt2 knockout model of insulin resistance. Wild-type and Akt2 knockout mice were treated with NaHS (50 μM·kg−1·day−1 ip for 10 days) prior to evaluation of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile, and intracellular Ca2+ properties, apoptosis, and mitochondrial damage. Our results revealed that Akt2 ablation led to overtly enlarged ventricular end-systolic diameter, reduced myocardial and cardiomyocyte contractile function, and disrupted intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis, the effects of which were ameliorated by H2S. Furthermore, Akt2 knockout displayed upregulated apoptotic protein markers (Bax, caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspace-12) and mitochondrial damage (reduced aconitase activity and NAD+, elevated cytochrome-c release from mitochondria) along with reduced phosphorylation of PTEN, Akt, and GSK3β in the absence of changes in pan protein expression, the effects of which were abolished or significantly ameliorated by H2S treatment. In vitro data revealed that H2S-induced beneficial effect against Akt2 ablation was obliterated by mitochondrial uncoupling. Taken together, our findings suggest the H2S may reconcile Akt2 knockout-induced myocardial contractile defect and intracellular Ca2+ mishandling, possibly via attenuation of mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. PMID:24622975

  3. Therapeutic safety of high myocardial expression levels of the molecular inotrope S100A1 in a preclinical heart failure model

    PubMed Central

    Weber, C; Neacsu, I; Krautz, B; Schlegel, P; Sauer, S; Raake, P; Ritterhoff, J; Jungmann, A; Remppis, AB; Stangassinger, M; Koch, WJ; Katus, HA; Müller, OJ; Most, P; Pleger, ST

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of the molecular inotrope S100A1 are sufficient to rescue post-ischemic heart failure (HF). As a prerequisite to clinical application and to determine the safety of myocardial S100A1 DNA-based therapy, we investigated the effects of high myocardial S100A1 expression levels on the cardiac contractile function and occurrence of arrhythmia in a preclinical large animal HF model. At 2 weeks after myocardial infarction domestic pigs presented significant left ventricular (LV) contractile dysfunction. Retrograde application of AAV6-S100A1 (1.5 × 1013 tvp) via the anterior cardiac vein (ACV) resulted in high-level myocardial S100A1 protein peak expression of up to 95-fold above control. At 14 weeks, pigs with high-level myocardial S100A1 protein overexpression did not show abnormalities in the electrocardiogram. Electrophysiological right ventricular stimulation ruled out an increased susceptibility to monomorphic ventricular arrhythmia. High-level S100A1 protein overexpression in the LV myocardium resulted in a significant increase in LV ejection fraction (LVEF), albeit to a lesser extent than previously reported with low S100A1 protein overexpression. Cardiac remodeling was, however, equally reversed. High myocardial S100A1 protein overexpression neither increases the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmia nor causes detrimental effects on myocardial contractile function in vivo. In contrast, this study demonstrates a broad therapeutic range of S100A1 gene therapy in post-ischemic HF using a preclinical large animal model. PMID:24305416

  4. Thrombospondins in the transition from myocardial infarction to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Cingolani, Oscar H

    2016-01-01

    The heart's reaction to ischemic injury from a myocardial infarction involves complex cross-talk between the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and different cell types within the myocardium. The ECM functions not only as a scaffold where myocytes beat synchronously, but an active signaling environment that regulates the important post-MI responses. The thrombospondins are matricellular proteins that modulate cell--ECM interactions, functioning as "sensors" that mediate outside-in and inside-out signaling. Thrombospondins are highly expressed during embryonic stages, and although their levels decrease during adult life, can be re-expressed in high quantities in response to cardiac stress including myocardial infarction and heart failure. Like a Swiss-army knife, the thrombospondins possess many tools: numerous binding domains that allow them to interact with other elements of the ECM, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules. It is through these that the thrombospondins function. In the present review, we provide basic as well as clinical evidence linking the thrombospondin proteins with the post myocardial infarction response, including inflammation, fibrotic matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, as well as myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, and contractile dysfunction in heart failure. We will describe what is known regarding the intracellular signaling pathways that are involved with these responses, paving the road for future studies identifying these proteins as therapeutic targets for cardiac disease.

  5. (1) Coronary Events Caused by Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Yoko, Kawawa; Ehiichi, Kohda; Toshiharu, Ishii

    2009-01-01

    Myocardial bridge (MB), which covers a part of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), is a normal anatomical variant structure (45% in frequency by autopsy) in LAD. MB contraction plays the role of a “double-edged sword” on the coronary events, suppressing coronary atherosclerosis under the MB, yet generating abnormal blood flow associated with coronary heart diseases (CHDs). High shear stress driven by MB compression causes the suppression of vascular permeability and vasoactive protein expression such as e-NOS and endothelin-1, which leads to the suppression of atherosclerosis in the LAD segment under the MB. However, despite the prevalent view of MB as benignancy by conventional coronary angiography (5-6% in frequency), with advance of imaging technique such as multislice spiral computed tomography [(MSCT); 16% in frequency], cardiologists are now frequently aware of symptomatic MB occurring not only in hospitalized patients, but also in young athletes free from atherosclerosis. Moreover, the large mass volume of MB muscle induces atherosclerosis evolution at the settled site in LAD proximal to MB and contributes to the occurrence of myocardial infarction. These events upon the coronary events result from the different pathophysiological mechanisms induced by contractile force of MB, which is solely determined just by the integration of anatomical properties of MB, such as the location, length and thickness of MB in an individual LAD. A recent MSCT provides the objective quantification of the anatomical variables that correlate with the histopathological results in relation to the occurrence of CHD. In this review, we therefore discuss the necessity to explore MB as a inherent chance anatomical risk factor for CHD. PMID:23555365

  6. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles.

  7. Implementing cell contractility in filament-based cytoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B

    2016-02-01

    Cells are known to respond over time to mechanical stimuli, even actively generating force at longer times. In this paper, a microstructural filament-based cytoskeletal network model is extended to incorporate this active response, and a computational study to assess the influence on relaxation behaviour was performed. The incorporation of an active response was achieved by including a strain energy function of contractile activity from the cross-linked actin filaments. A four-state chemical model and strain energy function was adopted, and generalisation to three dimensions and the macroscopic deformation field was performed by integration over the unit sphere. Computational results in MATLAB and ABAQUS/Explicit indicated an active cellular response over various time-scales, dependent on contractile parameters. Important features such as force generation and increasing cell stiffness due to prestress are qualitatively predicted. The work in this paper can easily be extended to encompass other filament-based cytoskeletal models as well. PMID:26899417

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Muscle Contractility in Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shama R; Valencia, Ana P; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In patients with muscle injury or muscle disease, assessment of muscle damage is typically limited to clinical signs, such as tenderness, strength, range of motion, and more recently, imaging studies. Animal models provide unmitigated access to histological samples, which provide a "direct measure" of damage. However, even with unconstrained access to tissue morphology and biochemistry assays, the findings typically do not account for loss of muscle function. Thus, the most comprehensive measure of the overall health of the muscle is assessment of its primary function, which is to produce contractile force. The majority of animal models testing contractile force have been limited to the muscle groups moving the ankle, with advantages and disadvantages depending on the equipment. Here, we describe in vivo methods to measure torque, to produce a reliable muscle injury, and to follow muscle function within the same animal over time. We also describe in vivo methods to measure tension in the leg and thigh muscles. PMID:27492180

  9. Spontaneous Oscillations of Elastic Contractile Materials with Turnover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierkes, Kai; Sumi, Angughali; Solon, Jérôme; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Single and collective cellular oscillations driven by the actomyosin cytoskeleton have been observed in numerous biological systems. Here, we propose that these oscillations can be accounted for by a generic oscillator model of a material turning over and contracting against an elastic element. As an example, we show that during dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo, experimentally observed changes in actomyosin concentration and oscillatory cell shape changes can, indeed, be captured by the dynamic equations studied here. We also investigate the collective dynamics of an ensemble of such contractile elements and show that the relative contribution of viscous and friction losses yields different regimes of collective oscillations. Taking into account the diffusion of force-producing molecules between contractile elements, our theoretical framework predicts the appearance of traveling waves, resembling the propagation of actomyosin waves observed during morphogenesis.

  10. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  11. Some Fundamental Molecular Mechanisms of Contractility in Fibrous Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkern, L.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamental molecular mechanisms of contractility and tension development in fibrous macromolecules are developed from the point of view of the principles of polymer physical chemistry. The problem is treated in a general manner to encompass the behavior of all macromolecular systems irrespective of their detailed chemical structure and particular function, if any. Primary attention is given to the contractile process which accompanies the crystal-liquid transition in axially oriented macromolecular systems. The theoretical nature of the process is discussed, and many experimental examples are given from the literature which demonstrate the expected behavior. Experimental attention is focused on the contraction of fibrous proteins, and the same underlying molecular mechanism is shown to be operative for a variety of different systems. PMID:6050598

  12. An Optogenetic Method to Modulate Cell Contractility during Tissue Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmi, Giorgia; Barry, Joseph D.; Huber, Wolfgang; De Renzis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Summary Morphogenesis of multicellular organisms is driven by localized cell shape changes. How, and to what extent, changes in behavior in single cells or groups of cells influence neighboring cells and large-scale tissue remodeling remains an open question. Indeed, our understanding of multicellular dynamics is limited by the lack of methods allowing the modulation of cell behavior with high spatiotemporal precision. Here, we developed an optogenetic approach to achieve local modulation of cell contractility and used it to control morphogenetic movements during Drosophila embryogenesis. We show that local inhibition of apical constriction is sufficient to cause a global arrest of mesoderm invagination. By varying the spatial pattern of inhibition during invagination, we further demonstrate that coordinated contractile behavior responds to local tissue geometrical constraints. Together, these results show the efficacy of this optogenetic approach to dissect the interplay between cell-cell interaction, force transmission, and tissue geometry during complex morphogenetic processes. PMID:26777292

  13. Characterization of contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Bodelsson, G; Stjernquist, M

    1995-08-25

    Adrenoceptors mediating contraction in ring segments of human umbilical arteries from normal term pregnancies were investigated in vitro. Contraction was elicited by (order of potency indicated): noradrenaline = the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline > the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and phenylephrine. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline. Oxymetazoline had an efficacy 5 times higher than that of noradrenaline and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist methysergide antagonized the contraction elicited by oxymetazoline. It is suggested that the contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery consist of both alpha 1 and alpha 2 subtypes. Furthermore, the contractile effect of oxymetazoline seems to be mediated via both alpha 2-adrenoceptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors.

  14. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Steven J.; Chen, Christopher S.; Crocker, John C.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil’s morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell’s mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (−20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (−106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the

  15. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  16. Sperm flagella: autonomous oscillations of the contractile system.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, C B; Rikmenspoel, R

    1972-01-21

    Bull sperm are deactivated, losing all motility, when they are impaled or dissected with a microprobe. Loss of activity is due to the creation of a hole or break in the cell membrane. Uncoordinated contractile activity is retained if external adenosine triphosphate and adenosine diphosphate are present. When these substances are in the medium, coordinated wave motion can be initiated in impaled or dissected sperm by bending a segment of the flagellum.

  17. Protrusive and Contractile Forces of Spreading Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Henry, Steven J; Chen, Christopher S; Crocker, John C; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-08-18

    Human neutrophils are mediators of innate immunity and undergo dramatic shape changes at all stages of their functional life cycle. In this work, we quantified the forces associated with a neutrophil's morphological transition from a nonadherent, quiescent sphere to its adherent and spread state. We did this by tracking, with high spatial and temporal resolution, the cell's mechanical behavior during spreading on microfabricated post-array detectors printed with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Two dominant mechanical regimes were observed: transient protrusion and steady-state contraction. During spreading, a wave of protrusive force (75 ± 8 pN/post) propagates radially outward from the cell center at a speed of 206 ± 28 nm/s. Once completed, the cells enter a sustained contractile state. Although post engagement during contraction was continuously varying, posts within the core of the contact zone were less contractile (-20 ± 10 pN/post) than those residing at the geometric perimeter (-106 ± 10 pN/post). The magnitude of the protrusive force was found to be unchanged in response to cytoskeletal inhibitors of lamellipodium formation and myosin II-mediated contractility. However, cytochalasin B, known to reduce cortical tension in neutrophils, slowed spreading velocity (61 ± 37 nm/s) without significantly reducing protrusive force. Relaxation of the actin cortical shell was a prerequisite for spreading on post arrays as demonstrated by stiffening in response to jasplakinolide and the abrogation of spreading. ROCK and myosin II inhibition reduced long-term contractility. Function blocking antibody studies revealed haptokinetic spreading was induced by β2 integrin ligation. Neutrophils were found to moderately invaginate the post arrays to a depth of ∼1 μm as measured from spinning disk confocal microscopy. Our work suggests a competition of adhesion energy, cortical tension, and the relaxation of cortical tension is at play at the onset of

  18. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 ameliorates doxorubicin-induced myocardial dysfunction through detoxification of 4-HNE and suppression of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aijun; Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Shijun; Tian, Shan; Zou, Yunzeng; Hu, Kai; Ren, Jun; Ge, Junbo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) protects against cardiac injury via reducing production of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and ROS. This study was designed to examine the impact of ALDH2 on doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy and mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy. 4-HNE and autophagic markers were detected by Western blotting in ventricular tissues from normal donors and patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac function, 4-HNE and levels of autophagic markers were detected in WT, ALDH2 knockout or ALDH2 transfected mice treated with or without DOX. Autophagy regulatory signaling including PI-3K, AMPK and Akt was examined in DOX-treated cardiomyocytes incubated with or without ALDH2 activator Alda-1. DOX-induced myocardial dysfunction, upregulation of 4-HNE and autophagic proteins were further aggravated in ALDH2 knockout mice while they were ameliorated in ALDH2 transfected mice. DOX downregulated Class I and upregulated Class III PI3-kinase, the effect of which was augmented by ALDH2 deletion. Accumulation of 4-HNE and autophagic protein markers in DOX-induced cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced by Alda-1. DOX depressed phosphorylated Akt but not AMPK, the effect was augmented by ALDH2 knockout. The autophagy inhibitor 3-MA attenuated, whereas autophagy inducer rapamycin mimicked DOX-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects. In addition, rapamycin effectively mitigated Alda-1-offered protective action against DOX-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Our data further revealed downregulated ALDH2 and upregulated autophagy levels in the hearts from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Taken together, our findings suggest that inhibition of 4-HNE and autophagy may be a plausible mechanism underscoring ALDH2-offered protection against DOX-induced cardiac defect. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". PMID:24434637

  19. Influence of previous mechanical events on the contractility of isolated cat papillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, B. R.; Rovell, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. The influence of previous mechanical events on myocardial contractility has been investigated in the cat papillary muscle preparation. 2. When a muscle that had been producing a stable response under isometric conditions was allowed to shorten isotonically, its ability to do so increased in successive beats until it reached a steady level, which represented a potentiated state compared with that seen in the first isotonic beat and in the preceding stable isometric contractions. 3. The increase in tension development in the first isometric beat after a period of isotonic beating was used as an index of the degree of potentiation. It was found to be well correlated with the changes in other parameters that could have been used for this purpose. 4. The main determinants of the degree of potentiation produced by a period of isotonic beating were: (a) the amount by which the muscle shortened. This was inversely related to the force opposing shortening (i.e. the isotonic load); (b) the number of isotonic beats. There was some potentiation (about 10%) after a single isotonic beat, but the number of beats required for maximal potentiation (up to 25%) depended on the frequency of stimulation; about 8 beats were required at 24 min-1. 5. An isotonic release during the rise of tension in an isometric response was even more effective in potentiating the next isometric beat than an afterloaded contraction against the same load. Isotonic releases at later times had a diminishing influence on tension development in the next isometric beat. 6. In the absence of stimulation, the potentiated state produced by a period of isotonic beating decayed with a half-time of about 50 sec. When the muscle was stimulated it disappeared sooner, and its rate of decay depended on the frequency of stimulation; at 24 min-1 about 8 beats were required to restore contractility to its previous steady level. 7. The characteristics of the decay of the potentiated state were closely similar to those of

  20. Teen Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... shown that certain types of talk therapy or psychotherapy can help teens deal with depression. These include ... behaviors, and feelings related to depression, and interpersonal psychotherapy, which focuses on working on relationships. Read more ...

  1. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  2. Human capacity for explosive force production: neural and contractile determinants.

    PubMed

    Folland, J P; Buckthorpe, M W; Hannah, R

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the integrative neural and contractile determinants of human knee extension explosive force production. Forty untrained participants performed voluntary and involuntary (supramaximally evoked twitches and octets - eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the maximum possible rate of force development) explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors. Explosive force (F0-150 ms) and sequential rate of force development (RFD, 50-ms epochs) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded (superficial quadriceps and hamstrings, 50-ms epochs) and normalized (quadriceps to Mmax, hamstrings to EMGmax). Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was also assessed. Multiple linear regressions assessed the significant neural and contractile determinants of absolute and relative (%MVF) explosive force and sequential RFD. Explosive force production exhibited substantial interindividual variability, particularly during the early phase of contraction [F50, 13-fold (absolute); 7.5-fold (relative)]. Multiple regression explained 59-93% (absolute) and 35-60% (relative) of the variance in explosive force production. The primary determinants of explosive force changed during the contraction (F0-50, quadriceps EMG and Twitch F; RFD50-100, Octet RFD0-50; F100-150, MVF). In conclusion, explosive force production was largely explained by predictor neural and contractile variables, but the specific determinants changed during the phase of contraction.

  3. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Angela M. Jimenez; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X.; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix. PMID:26528856

  4. Contractile dynamics change before morphological cues during florescence illumination

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, S. G.; Ahmed, W. W.; Saif, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    Illumination can have adverse effects on live cells. However, many experiments, e.g. traction force microscopy, rely on fluorescence microscopy. Current methods to assess undesired photo-induced cell changes rely on qualitative observation of changes in cell morphology. Here we utilize a quantitative technique to identify the effect of light on cell contractility prior to morphological changes. Fibroblasts were cultured on soft elastic hydrogels embedded with fluorescent beads. The adherent cells generated contractile forces that deform the substrate. Beads were used as fiducial markers to quantify the substrate deformation over time, which serves as a measure of cell force dynamics. We find that cells exposed to moderate fluorescence illumination (λ = 540–585 nm, I = 12.5 W/m2, duration = 60 s) exhibit rapid force relaxation. Strikingly, cells exhibit force relaxation after only 2 s of exposure, suggesting that photo-induced relaxation occurs nearly immediately. Evidence of photo-induced morphological changes were not observed for 15–30 min after illumination. Force relaxation and morphological changes were found to depend on wavelength and intensity of excitation light. This study demonstrates that changes in cell contractility reveal evidence of a photo-induced cell response long before any morphological cues. PMID:26691776

  5. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix.

  6. Soluble miniagrin enhances contractile function of engineered skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Weining; Bursac, Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Neural agrin plays a pleiotropic role in skeletal muscle innervation and maturation, but its specific effects on the contractile function of aneural engineered muscle remain unknown. In this study, neonatal rat skeletal myoblasts cultured within 3-dimensional engineered muscle tissue constructs were treated with 10 nM soluble recombinant miniagrin and assessed using histological, biochemical, and functional assays. Depending on the treatment duration and onset time relative to the stage of myogenic differentiation, miniagrin was found to induce up to 1.7-fold increase in twitch and tetanus force amplitude. This effect was associated with the 2.3-fold up-regulation of dystrophin gene expression at 6 d after agrin removal and enhanced ACh receptor (AChR) cluster formation, but no change in cell number, expression of muscle myosin, or important aspects of intracellular Ca2+ handling. In muscle constructs with endogenous ACh levels suppressed by the application of α-NETA, miniagrin increased AChR clustering and twitch force amplitude but failed to improve intracellular Ca2+ handling and increase tetanus-to-twitch ratio. Overall, our studies suggest that besides its synaptogenic function that could promote integration of engineered muscle constructs in vivo, neural agrin can directly promote the contractile function of aneural engineered muscle via mechanisms distinct from those involving endogenous ACh.—Bian, W., Bursac, N. Soluble miniagrin enhances contractile function of engineered skeletal muscle. PMID:22075647

  7. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension. PMID:27777977

  8. Mechanism of action of Trolox on duodenal contractility.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, D S; Grasa, L; Gonzalo, S; Martinez de Salinas, F; Arruebo, M P; Plaza, M A; Murillo, M D

    2013-12-01

    Trolox is a hydrophilic analogue of vitamin E. The aim of this work was to study the mechanism of action of Trolox on rabbit duodenal spontaneous motility and contractility. The duodenal contractility studies in vitro were carried out in an organ bath. Trolox (12 mM) reduced the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions and the acetylcholine-induced contractions in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of rabbit duodenum. Quinine reverted the Trolox-induced (12 mM) reduction on the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions in the longitudinal and circular muscle. Charibdotoxin and glibenclamide reverted only the amplitude of spontaneous contractions in circular muscle of the duodenum. The decrease of ACh-induced contractions evoked by Trolox 12 mM in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the duodenum was antagonized by quinine in longitudinal and circular muscle and by Bay K8644, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo [4, 3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and nimesulide in circular muscle. We conclude that in the decrease of duodenal contractility induced by Trolox participate K(+) and Ca(2+) channels, adenylyl cyclase, guanylyl cyclase and cyclooxygenase-2.

  9. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix. PMID:26528856

  10. Multicellular contractility contributes to the emergence of mesothelioma nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirok, Andras

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) nodules arise from the mesothelial lining of the pleural cavity by a poorly understood mechanism. We demonstrate that macroscopic multicellular aggregates, reminiscent of the MPM nodules found in patients, develop when MPM cell lines are cultured at high cell densities for several weeks. Surprisingly, the nodule-like aggregates do not arise by excessive local cell proliferation, but by myosin II-driven cell contractility. Contractile nodules contain prominent actin cables that can span several cells. Several features of the in vitro MPM nodule development can be explained by a computational model that assumes uniform and steady intercellular contractile forces within a monolayer of cells, and a mechanical load-dependent lifetime of cell-cell contacts. The model behaves as a self-tensioned Maxwell fluid and exhibits an instability that leads to pattern formation. Altogether, our findings suggest that inhibition of the actomyosin system may provide a hitherto not utilized therapeutic approach to affect MPM growth. NIH R01-GM102801.

  11. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein 2 limits infarct size after myocardial infarction in mice.

    PubMed

    Ebelt, Henning; Hillebrand, Ina; Arlt, Stephan; Zhang, Ying; Kostin, Sawa; Neuhaus, Herbert; Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Schwarz, Elisabeth; Werdan, Karl; Braun, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Various strategies have been devised to reduce the clinical consequences of myocardial infarction, including acute medical care, revascularization, stem cell transplantations, and more recently, prevention of cardiomyocyte cell death. Activation of embryonic signaling pathways is a particularly interesting option to complement these strategies and to improve the functional performance and survival rate of cardiomyocytes. Here, we have concentrated on bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), which induces ectopic formation of beating cardiomyocytes during development in the mesoderm and protects neonatal cardiomyocytes from ischemia-reperfusion injury. In a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction, an i.v. injection of BMP-2 reduced infarct size in mice when given after left anterior descending artery ligation. Mice treated with BMP-2 are characterized by a reduced rate of apoptotic cardiomyocytes both in the border zone of the infarcts and in the remote myocardium. In vitro, BMP-2 increases the frequency of spontaneously beating neonatal cardiomyocytes and the contractile performance under electrical pacing at 2 Hz, preserves cellular adenosine triphosphate stores, and decreases the rate of apoptosis despite the increased workload. In addition, BMP-2 specifically induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 proteins and protected adult cardiomyocytes from long-lasting hypoxia-induced cellular damage and oxidative stress without activation of the cardiodepressant transforming growth factor-β pathway. Our data suggest that BMP-2 treatment may have considerable therapeutic potential in individuals with acute and chronic myocardial ischemia by improving the contractility of cardiomyocytes and preventing cardiomyocyte cell death.

  12. Sensorless control for a sophisticated artificial myocardial contraction by using shape memory alloy fibre.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Saijo, Y; Sato, F; Tanaka, A; Yoshizawa, M; Sugai, T K; Sakata, R; Luo, Y; Park, Y; Uematsu, M; Umezu, M; Fujimoto, T; Masumoto, N; Liu, H; Baba, A; Konno, S; Nitta, S; Imachi, K; Tabayashi, K; Sasada, H; Homma, D

    2008-01-01

    The authors have been developing an artificial myocardium, which is capable of supporting natural contractile function from the outside of the ventricle. The system was originally designed by using sophisticated covalent shape memory alloy fibres, and the surface did not implicate blood compatibility. The purpose of our study on the development of artificial myocardium was to achieve the assistance of myocardial functional reproduction by the integrative small mechanical elements without sensors, so that the effective circulatory support could be accomplished. In this study, the authors fabricated the prototype artificial myocardial assist unit composed of the sophisticated shape memory alloy fibre (Biometal), the diameter of which was 100 microns, and examined the mechanical response by using pulse width modulation (PWM) control method in each unit. Prior to the evaluation of dynamic characteristics, the relationship between strain and electric resistance and also the initial response of each unit were obtained. The component for the PWM control was designed in order to regulate the myocardial contractile function, which consisted of an originally-designed RISC microcomputer with the input of displacement, and its output signal was controlled by pulse wave modulation method. As a result, the optimal PWM parameters were confirmed and the fibrous displacement was successfully regulated under the different heat transfer conditions simulating internal body temperature as well as bias tensile loading. Then it was indicated that this control theory might be applied for more sophisticated ventricular passive or active restraint by the artificial myocardium on physiological demand.

  13. Micropatterned nanostructures: a bioengineered approach to mass-produce functional myocardial grafts.

    PubMed

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-02-13

    Cell-based therapies are a recently established path for treating a wide range of human disease. Tissue engineering of contractile heart muscle for replacement therapy is among the most exciting and important of these efforts. However, current in vitro techniques of cultivating functional mature cardiac grafts have only been moderately successful due to the poor capability of traditional two-dimensional cell culture systems to recapitulate necessary in vivo conditions. In this issue, Kiefer et al introduce a laser-patterned nanostructured substrate (Al/Al2O3 nanowires) for efficient maintenance of oriented human cardiomyocytes, with great potential to open new roads to mass-production of contractile myocardial grafts for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  14. Micropatterned nanostructures: a bioengineered approach to mass-produce functional myocardial grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpooshan, Vahid; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-02-01

    Cell-based therapies are a recently established path for treating a wide range of human disease. Tissue engineering of contractile heart muscle for replacement therapy is among the most exciting and important of these efforts. However, current in vitro techniques of cultivating functional mature cardiac grafts have only been moderately successful due to the poor capability of traditional two-dimensional cell culture systems to recapitulate necessary in vivo conditions. In this issue, Kiefer et al [1] introduce a laser-patterned nanostructured substrate (Al/Al2O3 nanowires) for efficient maintenance of oriented human cardiomyocytes, with great potential to open new roads to mass-production of contractile myocardial grafts for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  15. Adolescent Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina M.

    Affective disorder is characterized by maladaptive changes in mood, attitudes, energy level, and physical status. These changes constitute the basic dimensions of depression. Depression results from a combination of genetic and experiential factors. There are sex differences and age differences with regard to depression, and there is a high…

  16. Perinatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  17. Measurement of cytosolic Ca2+ in isolated contractile lymphatics.

    PubMed

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M; Kurtz, Kristine M; Breslin, Jerome W

    2011-01-01

    Lymphatic vessels comprise a multifunctional transport system that maintains fluid homeostasis, delivers lipids to the central circulation, and acts as a surveillance system for potentially harmful antigens, optimizing mucosal immunity and adaptive immune responses. Lymph is formed from interstitial fluid that enters blind-ended initial lymphatics, and then is transported against a pressure gradient in larger collecting lymphatics. Each collecting lymphatic is made up of a series of segments called lymphangions, separated by bicuspid valves that prevent backflow. Each lymphangion possesses a contractile cycle that propels lymph against a pressure gradient toward the central circulation. This phasic contractile pattern is analogous to the cardiac cycle, with systolic and diastolic phases, and with a lower contraction frequency. In addition, lymphatic smooth muscle generates tone and displays myogenic constriction and dilation in response to increases and decreases in luminal pressure, respectively. A hybrid of molecular mechanisms that support both the phasic and tonic contractility of lymphatics are thus proposed. Contraction of smooth muscle is generally regulated by the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) plus sensitivity to Ca(2+) of the contractile elements in response to changes in the environment surrounding the cell. [Ca(2+)](i) is determined by the combination of the movement of Ca(2+) through plasma membrane ligand or voltage gated Ca(2+) channels and the release and uptake of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Cytosolic Ca(2+) binds to calmodulin and activates enzymes such as myosin light chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK), which in turn phosphorylates MLC leading to actin-myosin-mediated contraction. However, the sensitivity of this pathway to Ca(2+) can be regulated by the MLC phosphatase (MLCP). MLCP activity is regulated by Rho kinase (ROCK) and the myosin phosphatase inhibitor protein CPI-17. Here, we present a method to evaluate changes in [Ca(2+)](i

  18. AP180-mediated trafficking of Vamp7B limits homotypic fusion of Dictyostelium contractile vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yujia; Stavrou, Irene; Bersuker, Kirill; Brady, Rebecca J; De Lozanne, Arturo; O'Halloran, Theresa J

    2009-10-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles play an established role in endocytosis from the plasma membrane, but they are also found on internal organelles. We examined the composition of clathrin-coated vesicles on an internal organelle responsible for osmoregulation, the Dictyostelium discoideum contractile vacuole. Clathrin puncta on contractile vacuoles contained multiple accessory proteins typical of plasma membrane-coated pits, including AP2, AP180, and epsin, but not Hip1r. To examine how these clathrin accessory proteins influenced the contractile vacuole, we generated cell lines that carried single and double gene knockouts in the same genetic background. Single or double mutants that lacked AP180 or AP2 exhibited abnormally large contractile vacuoles. The enlarged contractile vacuoles in AP180-null mutants formed because of excessive homotypic fusion among contractile vacuoles. The SNARE protein Vamp7B was mislocalized and enriched on the contractile vacuoles of AP180-null mutants. In vitro assays revealed that AP180 interacted with the cytoplasmic domain of Vamp7B. We propose that AP180 directs Vamp7B into clathrin-coated vesicles on contractile vacuoles, creating an efficient mechanism for regulating the internal distribution of fusion-competent SNARE proteins and limiting homotypic fusions among contractile vacuoles. Dictyostelium contractile vacuoles offer a valuable system to study clathrin-coated vesicles on internal organelles within eukaryotic cells.

  19. Psychological rehabilitation after myocardial infarction: multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. A.; West, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate rehabilitation after myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial of rehabilitation in unselected myocardial infarction patients in six centres, baseline data being collected on admission and by structured interview (of patients and spouses) shortly after discharge and outcome being assessed by structured interview at six months and clinical examination at 12 months. SETTING: Six district general hospitals. SUBJECTS: All 2328 eligible patients admitted over two years with confirmed myocardial infarction and discharged home within 28 days. INTERVENTIONS: Rehabilitation programmes comprising psychological therapy, counselling, relaxation training, and stress management training over seven weekly group outpatient sessions for patients and spouses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anxiety, depression, quality of life, morbidity, use of medication, and mortality. RESULTS: At six months there were no significant differences between rehabilitation patients and controls in reported anxiety (prevalence 33%) or depression (19%). Rehabilitation patients reported a lower frequency of angina (median three versus four episodes a week), medication, and physical activity. At 12 months there were no differences in clinical complications, clinical sequelae, or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Rehabilitation programmes based on psychological therapy, counselling, relaxation training, and stress management seem to offer little objective benefit to patients who have experienced myocardial infarction compared with previous reports of smaller trials. PMID:8978226

  20. [Occupational stress and myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Silla M

    2015-01-01

    Besides the best-known role of depressed mood, occupational stress deserves to be taken as a coronary risk factor. There are two basic models to define occupational stress: Karasek's model (high job psychological demands associated with low decision latitude, or even low social support at work) and Siegrist's model (imbalance between efforts and rewards received). The combination of the two models better reflects the coronary risk than each model alone. Occupational stress appears both as a risk factor and a prognostic factor after the occurrence of myocardial infarction. The relevance of the models is best in men or in younger age subjects. In women, role conflicts (occupational/domestic), the existence of excessive "intrinsic" efforts (job over investment) and association with marital stress provide more specific information. Burnout, particularly among health professionals, and bullying at work are also linked to cardiovascular risk. Occupational stress is a collective indicator of health at work, valuable to the employer. At an individual level, it can lead to therapeutic preventive approaches. PMID:26150284

  1. [Occupational stress and myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Silla M

    2015-01-01

    Besides the best-known role of depressed mood, occupational stress deserves to be taken as a coronary risk factor. There are two basic models to define occupational stress: Karasek's model (high job psychological demands associated with low decision latitude, or even low social support at work) and Siegrist's model (imbalance between efforts and rewards received). The combination of the two models better reflects the coronary risk than each model alone. Occupational stress appears both as a risk factor and a prognostic factor after the occurrence of myocardial infarction. The relevance of the models is best in men or in younger age subjects. In women, role conflicts (occupational/domestic), the existence of excessive "intrinsic" efforts (job over investment) and association with marital stress provide more specific information. Burnout, particularly among health professionals, and bullying at work are also linked to cardiovascular risk. Occupational stress is a collective indicator of health at work, valuable to the employer. At an individual level, it can lead to therapeutic preventive approaches.

  2. Patterns of disturbed myocardial perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease. Regional myocardial perfusion in angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Forse, G.; Fox, K.; Jonathan, A.; Steiner, R.

    1981-07-01

    Fifty patients who presented with angina pectoris were studied to examine the disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion during stress. Each patient underwent 16-point precordial mapping of the ECG during an exercise test, and coronary and left ventricular angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed using an atrial pacing test and a short-lived radionuclide, krypton-81m. Eleven patients had negative exercise tests and uniform increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m of 98 +/- 18.0% during pacing. Ten patients performed 30,000-43,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m to remote and jeopardized myocardium at the onset of pacing. However, further pacing produced a decrease in activity in the affected segment of 68.0 +/- 9.0% accompanied by ST-segment depression and angina. Twelve patients achieved 26,000-32,000 J in positive exercise tests and had significant coronary artery disease. Atrial pacing produced increased activity of krypton-81m to remote myocardium. The jeopardized segment at first showed no change and then a decrease in regional activity of krypton-81m (89.0 +/- 17%) accompanied by ST-segment depression and chest pain. Seventeen patients achieved only 7000-22,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and developed decreases in regional activity of krypton-81m to the affected segment of myocardium starting at the onset of atrial pacing and decreasing by 88 +/- 0 7.0% below control. We conclude that different patterns of disturbed myocardial distribution of krypton-81m are present during stress-induced ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. There was a close temporal relationship between these disturbances and ST-segment depression.

  3. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this review we have attempted a comprehensive compilation of the cardiac morphologic changes that occur in spontaneous and experimental myocardial diseases of animals. Our coverage addresses diseases of mammals and birds and includes these diseases found in both domesticated and wild animals. A similar review of the myocardial diseases in this broad range of animal species has not been attempted previously. We have summarized and illustrated the gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural alterations for these myocardial diseases; and, whenever possible, we have reviewed their biochemical pathogenesis. We have arranged the myocardial diseases for presentation and discussion according to an etiologic classification with seven categories. These include a group of idiopathic or primary cardiomyopathies recognized in man (hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive types) and a large group of secondary cardiomyopathies with known causes, such as inherited tendency; nutritional deficiency; toxicity; physical injury and shock; endocrine disorders, and myocarditides of viral, bacterial, and protozoal causation. Considerable overlap exists between each of the etiologic groups in the spectrum of pathologic alterations seen in the myocardium. These include various degenerative changes, myocyte necrosis, and inflammatory lesions. However, some diseases show rather characteristic myocardial alterations such as vacuolar degeneration in anthracycline cardiotoxicity, myofibrillar lysis in furazolidone cardiotoxicity, calcification in calcinosis of mice, glycogen accumulation in the glycogenoses, lipofuscinosis in cattle, fatty degeneration in erucic acid cardiotoxicity, myofiber disarray in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and lymphocytic inflammation with inclusion bodies in canine parvoviral myocarditis. The myocardial diseases represent the largest group in the spectrum of spontaneous cardiac diseases of animals. Pericardial and endocardial diseases and congential cardiac diseases are

  4. Do depressive symptoms "blunt" effort? An analysis of cardiac engagement and withdrawal for an increasingly difficult task.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Mironovová, Zuzana; McHone, Ashley N; Sperry, Sarah H; Harper, Kelly L; Kwapil, Thomas R; Eddington, Kari M

    2016-07-01

    Research on depression and effort has suggested "depressive blunting"-lower cardiovascular reactivity in response to challenges and stressors. Many studies, however, find null effects or higher reactivity. The present research draws upon motivational intensity theory, a broad model of effort that predicts cases in which depressive symptoms should increase or decrease effort. Because depressive symptoms can influence task-difficulty appraisals-people see tasks as subjectively harder-people high in depressive symptoms should engage higher effort at objectively easier levels of difficulty but also quit sooner. A sample of adults completed a mental effort challenge with four levels of difficulty, from very easy to difficult-but-feasible. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the CESD and DASS; effort-related cardiac activity was assessed via markers of contractility (e.g., the cardiac pre-ejection period [PEP]) obtained with impedance cardiography. The findings supported the theory's predictions. When the task was relatively easier, people high in depressive symptoms showed higher contractility (shorter PEP), consistent with greater effort. When the task was relatively harder, people high in depressive symptoms showed diminished contractility, consistent with quitting. The results suggest that past research has been observing a small part of a larger trajectory of trying and quitting, and they illustrate the value of a theoretically grounded analysis of depressive symptoms and effort-related cardiac activity.

  5. Assessment of viability after myocardial infarction. Clinical relevance and methodological problems.

    PubMed

    Fragasso, G; Margonato, A; Chierchia, S L

    1993-01-01

    In patients with myocardial infarction, the distinction between reversible and irreversible ventricular dysfunction has important clinical implications since dysfunctional but viable myocardium will resume contraction following revascularization. Various methods have been developed for the identification of potentially reversible myocardial dysfunction. Thallium reinjection, immediately after stress-redistribution imaging, may provide evidence of myocardial viability by demonstrating thallium uptake in regions with apparently 'irreversible' defects. Hypoperfused, hypocontractile segments may recover function after revascularization, when exhibiting increased 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake on positron emission tomography. Improved contractile function by selective beta 1 adrenergic stimulation with low dose dobutamine may also indicate the presence of viable tissue and predict subsequent improvement upon restoration of adequate flow. Finally, exercise-induced ST segment elevation on leads exploring a recent myocardial infarction has also been shown to indicate the presence of viable, potentially salvageable tissue. We discuss here these and several other methods that have been proposed for the detection of residual myocardial viability. Their advantages, limitations, and relevance to clinical problems are also discussed.

  6. Cardiac Remodeling, Adaptations and Associated Myocardial Mechanics in Hypertensive Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yau-Huei; Lo, Chi-In; Wu, Yih-Jer; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Yeh, Hung-I

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of heart failure and cardiovascular comorbidities in developed countries. Left ventricular structural/functional alterations such as concentric remodeling or hypertrophy have been extensively studied in hypertensive heart diseases. Furthermore, it is also well-recognized that diastolic function actually deteriorates in hypertensive subjects prior to overt heart failure. Novel imaging modality techniques such as myocardial deformation have allowed for early detection of regional/global myocardial contractile dysfunction. Myocardial deformation, which can be quantified by measuring the systolic strain and strain rate in three different directions (longitudinal, circumferential and radial), has facilitated new insights into the understanding of cardiac systolic mechanics in subjects with early stage myocardial damage. Previous studies had shown that longitudinal function remains the most sensitive parameter in identifying hypertension-related myocardial dysfunction, particularly for those patients who had developed LV hypertrophy. Instead, preserved or enhanced short-axis function, when presented as circumferential or radial strains, may remain relatively preserved or enhanced in order to compensate for longitudinal functional decline. In this manner, global cardiac pumping in terms of ejection fraction may remain relatively unchanged. The early recognition of subclinical systolic dysfunction and associated mechanical compensation in the context of hypertension is crucial, which potentially helps to identify a disease stage that is still responsive to therapeutic intervention. PMID:27122686

  7. Positron emission tomography for the assessment of myocardial viability

    SciTech Connect

    Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-09-01

    The detection of viable myocardium or ischemically injured myocardium with a reversible impairment of contractile function remains clinically important but challenging. Detection of reversible dysfunction and distinction from irreversible tissue injury by positron emission tomography is based on identification of preserved or even enhanced glucose metabolism with F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose. Regional patterns of myocardial glucose utilization and blood flow, defined as perfusion-metabolism mismatches or matches, on positron emission tomography in patients with chronic or even acute ischemic heart disease are highly accurate in predicting the functional outcome after interventional revascularization. Compared with thallium-201 redistribution scintigraphy, positron emission tomography appears to be diagnostically more accurate, especially in patients with severely impaired left ventricular function. While larger clinical trials are needed for further confirmation, positron emission tomography has already proved clinically useful for stratifying patients with poor left ventricular function to the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  8. Contractile Units in Disordered Actomyosin Bundles Arise from F-Actin Buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Thoresen, Todd; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2012-06-01

    Bundles of filaments and motors are central to contractility in cells. The classic example is striated muscle, where actomyosin contractility is mediated by highly organized sarcomeres which act as fundamental contractile units. However, many contractile bundles in vivo and in vitro lack sarcomeric organization. Here we propose a model for how contractility can arise in bundles without sarcomeric organization and validate its predictions with experiments on a reconstituted system. In the model, internal stresses in frustrated arrangements of motors with diverse velocities cause filaments to buckle, leading to overall shortening. We describe the onset of buckling in the presence of stochastic motor head detachment and predict that buckling-induced contraction occurs in an intermediate range of motor densities. We then calculate the size of the “contractile units” associated with this process. Consistent with these results, our reconstituted actomyosin bundles show contraction at relatively high motor density, and we observe buckling at the predicted length scale.

  9. Regional deformation and contractile function in canine right ventricular free wall.

    PubMed

    Chuong, C J; Sacks, M S; Templeton, G; Schwiep, F; Johnson, R L

    1991-04-01

    We used biplane cinefluorgraphy to study the regional deformation and local contractile function of the canine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) among the inflow, midventricular, and outflow regions. For a region delimited by three neighboring markers, under the assumption of homogeneous deformation, we identified the magnitudes and directions of principal shortening or elongation and changes in area every 16.7 ms. Furthermore, we extended this approach to study the alterations of these parameters during RV afterload increase by applying pulmonary artery (PA) occlusion. Results show that, at both control and PA occlusion states, the outflow region was subjected to maximal fractional area reduction (AR) and maximal time rate of fractional area reduction (ARR) during systole, with no differences between inflow and midventricular regions (P less than 0.05). At the control state, the percent AR and the corresponding value for ARR were 27% and 179%/s at the outflow, 19% and 112%/s at the midventricular, and 15% and 107%/s at the inflow region, respectively. During PA occlusion, they became 21% and 115%/s at the outflow, 14% and 97%/s at the midventricular, and 15% and 102%/s at the inflow region, respectively. Statistically, only the outflow region deformation was affected by PA occlusion (P less than 0.05). For the control state, we also compared the direction of regional principal shortening at end systole to the local transmural myocardial fiber orientations. The directions were found to correspond closely to the mean of all local transmural fiber orientations. This suggests that the regional RVFW deformation we measured is the combined deformation behavior from all the local participating myofibers.

  10. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis.

  11. Cell motion, contractile networks, and the physics of interpenetrating reactive flow.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M; Harlow, F

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we propose a physical model of contractile biological polymer networks based on the notion of reactive interpenetrating flow. We show how our model leads to a mathematical formulation of the dynamical laws governing the behavior of contractile networks. We also develop estimates of the various parameters that appear in our equations, and we discuss some elementary predictions of the model concerning the general scaling principles that pertain to the motions of contractile networks. PMID:3730497

  12. Thr164Ile polymorphism of β2‐adrenergic receptor negatively modulates cardiac contractility: implications for prognosis in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Emanuele; Penicka, Martin; Delrue, Leen; Van Durme, Frederic; De Bruyne, Bernard; Goethals, Marc; Wijns, William; Vanderheyden, Marc; Bartunek, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    Background β2‐adrenergic receptor Thr164Ile (threonine (Thr) is replaced by an isoleucine (Ile) at codon 164) polymorphism was postulated to contribute to lower exercise tolerance and poor prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure. However, heart failure is associated with several abnormalities of β receptor signalling, and underlying mechanisms are not clear. Objectives To investigate whether Thr164Ile polymorphism negatively modulates myocardial contractile performance and is associated with adverse long‐term prognosis of patients with congestive heart failure. Methods Among 55 subjects, cardiac contractile response to the β2‐adrenergic receptor agonist terbutaline was assessed from the peak myocardial velocity of systolic shortening (Sm) in 18 subjects with the Ile‐164 variant and 37 matched controls. In total, 24 subjects had normal left ventricular (LV) function and 31 presented with congestive heart failure due to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. Results In patients with normal LV function, peak terbutaline‐induced increase (Δ) in Sm was lower in subjects with the Ile‐164 variant than in controls (Δ33% (4%) vs Δ56% (4%), p<0.01). In patients with heart failure, subjects with Ile‐164 showed further severe reduction of β2‐adrenergic‐mediated increase in Sm as compared with controls with heart failure (Δ20% (5%) vs Δ39% (4%), p<0.05). Patients with heart failure with Ile‐164 showed a severely blunted force–frequency relationship in response to agonist stimulation. At 2‐years of follow‐up, patients with heart failure with the Ile‐164 variant showed higher incidence of adverse events than controls with heart failure (75% (6/8)] vs 30% (7/23), p<0.05). Conclusions The β2‐adrenergic Thr164Ile polymorphism directly modulates adrenergic‐mediated cardiac responses in patients with normal and failing myocardium. Furthermore, blunted β2 adrenergic‐mediated myocardial contractile response in patients with Ile‐164

  13. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  14. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  15. Caveolin-3 Promotes a Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractile Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Iturrieta, Jeannette; Dulam, Vipin; Wang, Yu; Pavlides, Stephanos; Malacari, Gabriella; Lisanti, Michael P.; Frank, Philippe G.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle (SM) cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular SM cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature, contractile SM cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of SM cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial SM cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured SM cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 SM cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as SM α-actin, SM myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing SM cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic SM cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating SM function in atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26664898

  16. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  17. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  18. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  19. [Atypical depression].

    PubMed

    Escande, M; Boucard, J

    1999-04-01

    The principal atypical aspects of depressive disease are: minor and attenued aspects, monosymptomatic and atypical aspects (food disorders and sleep disorders), masqued aspects (somatoform, anxious, characterial and addict disorders), atypical aspects of child (anxious nevrotical disorder), pseudo-demented and characterial aspects of aged subjects. Facing to these aspects, the diagnosis of depression is evoqued on: the recent and fast advent of these disorders, their morning predominance, their recurrent character, the state of attenued depressive symptoms (anhedonia), the positive responsiveness to treatment.

  20. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  1. Biochemical rationale for the use of fatty acid analogs as agents for studying myocardial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Elmaleh D.R.; Livni E.; Brownell, G.L.; Strauss, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    Since fatty acids are the major energy source for myocardial contractile work, the rate of utilization of these substrates/unit work performed, should be an indicator of the health of the muscle. (1-C-11) palmitic acid has been shown to be useful as a myocardial imaging agent for positron tomography. The main limitations for the use of this substrate are the fast washout and translocation of the activity from the normal myocardium and the back diffusion in ischemia. Since alpha and omega oxidation are only present to a limited degree, branched chain fatty acids should have a prolonged residence time in the myocardium. The similarity in structure, chain length, solubility, and charge of the branched to the non-branched fatty acids should make these compounds behave in similar fashion in terms of their blood clearance and entry into tissues. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future.

  3. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  4. Resolving the Role of Actoymyosin Contractility in Cell Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Christopher M.; Sun, Sean X.; Wirtz, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's original description of Brownian motion established a direct relationship between thermally-excited random forces and the transport properties of a submicron particle in a viscous liquid. Recent work based on reconstituted actin filament networks suggests that nonthermal forces driven by the motor protein myosin II can induce large non-equilibrium fluctuations that dominate the motion of particles in cytoskeletal networks. Here, using high-resolution particle tracking, we find that thermal forces, not myosin-induced fluctuating forces, drive the motion of submicron particles embedded in the cytoskeleton of living cells. These results resolve the roles of myosin II and contractile actomyosin structures in the motion of nanoparticles lodged in the cytoplasm, reveal the biphasic mechanical architecture of adherent cells—stiff contractile stress fibers interdigitating in a network at the cell cortex and a soft actin meshwork in the body of the cell, validate the method of particle tracking-microrheology, and reconcile seemingly disparate atomic force microscopy (AFM) and particle-tracking microrheology measurements of living cells. PMID:19756147

  5. Type VI secretion system: secretion by a contractile nanomachine

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are present in about a quarter of all Gram-negative bacteria. Several key components of T6SS are evolutionarily related to components of contractile nanomachines such as phages and R-type pyocins. The T6SS assembly is initiated by formation of a membrane complex that binds a phage-like baseplate with a sharp spike, and this is followed by polymerization of a long rigid inner tube and an outer contractile sheath. Effectors are preloaded onto the spike or into the tube during the assembly by various mechanisms. Contraction of the sheath releases an unprecedented amount of energy, which is used to thrust the spike and tube with the associated effectors out of the effector cell and across membranes of both bacterial and eukaryotic target cells. Subunits of the contracted sheath are recycled by T6SS-specific unfoldase to allow for a new round of assembly. Live-cell imaging has shown that the assembly is highly dynamic and its subcellular localization is in certain bacteria regulated with a remarkable precision. Through the action of effectors, T6SS has mainly been shown to contribute to pathogenicity and competition between bacteria. This review summarizes the knowledge that has contributed to our current understanding of T6SS mode of action. PMID:26370934

  6. Effects of abnormal cannabidiol on oxytocin-induced myometrial contractility.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Dennedy, Michael C; Morrison, John J

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of abnormal cannabidiol (abn-cbd) on oxytocin-induced myometrial contractility occurring during pregnancy. Isometric tension recordings were performed in isolated myometrial strips from biopsies obtained at elective cesarean section. The effects of cumulative doses of abn-cbd (10(-9)-10(-5) M) on oxytocin-induced myometrial contractions alone, and on those following pre-incubation with SR 144528, AM 251, methylene blue, and iberiotoxin were measured, and dose-response curves were constructed. The pD(2) (-log EC(50)) values and the maximal inhibitory (MMI) values that were achieved were compared for each tissue type. Abn-cbd exerted a potent relaxant effect on oxytocin-induced myometrial contractions in vitro. Pre-incubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue, and the BK(Ca) channel antagonist, iberiotoxin, significantly attenuated this effect (for pD(2), P<0.01; for MMI, P<0.01). Abn-cbd exerts a potent inhibitory effect on human uterine contractility. This effect is partially mediated through modulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of BK(Ca) channel activity. These findings have implications for physiologic regulation of myometrial quiescence.

  7. Contractile apparatus dysfunction early in the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Waddingham, Mark T; Edgley, Amanda J; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Kelly, Darren J; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Pearson, James T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart failure in patients. Independent of hypertension and coronary artery disease, diabetes is associated with a specific cardiomyopathy, known as diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). Four decades of research in experimental animal models and advances in clinical imaging techniques suggest that DCM is a progressive disease, beginning early after the onset of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, ahead of left ventricular remodeling and overt diastolic dysfunction. Although the molecular pathogenesis of early DCM still remains largely unclear, activation of protein kinase C appears to be central in driving the oxidative stress dependent and independent pathways in the development of contractile dysfunction. Multiple subcellular alterations to the cardiomyocyte are now being highlighted as critical events in the early changes to the rate of force development, relaxation and stability under pathophysiological stresses. These changes include perturbed calcium handling, suppressed activity of aerobic energy producing enzymes, altered transcriptional and posttranslational modification of membrane and sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins, reduced actin-myosin cross-bridge cycling and dynamics, and changed myofilament calcium sensitivity. In this review, we will present and discuss novel aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of early DCM, with a special focus on the sarcomeric contractile apparatus. PMID:26185602

  8. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  9. Silent myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gutterman, David D

    2009-05-01

    Although much progress has been made in reducing mortality from ischemic cardiovascular disease, this condition remains the leading cause of death throughout the world. This might in part be due to the fact that over half of patients have a catastrophic event (heart attack or sudden death) as their initial manifestation of coronary disease. Contributing to this statistic is the observation that the majority of myocardial ischemic episodes are silent, indicating an inability or failure to sense ischemic damage or stress on the heart. This review examines the clinical characteristics of silent myocardial ischemia, and explores mechanisms involved in the generation of angina pectoris. Possible mechanisms for the more common manifestation of injurious reductions in coronary flow; namely, silent ischemia, are also explored. A new theory for the mechanism of silent ischemia is proposed. Finally, the prognostic importance of silent ischemia and potential future directions for research are discussed.

  10. Myocardial apoptosis and SIDS.

    PubMed

    Grasmeyer, Sarah; Madea, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis mediates cardiac damage in severe forms of myocarditis. In fatal myocarditis, large amounts of cardiomyocytes show apoptotic DNA fragmentation, while in human controls, few apoptotic cardiomyocytes are found. In the present study the frequency of apoptosis in 88 SIDS cases (category 1b according to the San Diego Classification) and 15 control cases was investigated. In every case myocardial samples from 8 standard locations were collected. Detection of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was performed by TUNEL method. Furthermore the myocardial tissue was stained with HE and immunohistochemical methods (LCA, CD68, CD45-R0). More than 90% of the slides did not contain apoptotic cardiomyocytes at all. The detection rate of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was almost equal in control group (26.7%) and SIDS group (23.86%). A quantification of apoptotic cardiomyocytes per mm(2) revealed no significant difference between both groups either. Altogether there is no evidence for a higher rate of apoptosis in SIDS.

  11. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Chandra, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant—such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity—is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT), which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB) recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC)-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W) of the human DCM mutation (R131W), we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic mice (β-MHC). TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units) than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units). Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background. PMID:27757084

  12. Myocardial gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isner, Jeffrey M.

    2002-01-01

    Gene therapy is proving likely to be a viable alternative to conventional therapies in coronary artery disease and heart failure. Phase 1 clinical trials indicate high levels of safety and clinical benefits with gene therapy using angiogenic growth factors in myocardial ischaemia. Although gene therapy for heart failure is still at the pre-clinical stage, experimental data indicate that therapeutic angiogenesis using short-term gene expression may elicit functional improvement in affected individuals.

  13. Cardiac action potential duration and contractility in the intact dog heart.

    PubMed

    Drake-Holland, A J; Noble, M I; Pieterse, M; Schouten, V J; Seed, W A; ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1983-12-01

    The maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (DP) and action potential duration (a.p.d.) were measured in closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade. Right ventricular stimulation was carried out with protocols consisting of a conditioning 'priming' period and a test period. When a single test stimulus was introduced at varying intervals after the priming period, DP was found to be maximal at 800-1000 ms. With this single test stimulus fixed at the optimum, DP was found to be a variable inverse function of the a.p.d. of the same beat; no positive correlation could be found between DP and a.p.d. When a second test stimulus at the optimum interval was introduced after the first, the DP (DP2) was found to be strongly dependent on that elicited by the first test stimulus (DP1); the relationship was positive, linear, independent of the method used to vary DP, and independent of whether DP1 was depressed or potentiated. The slope of the relationship was less than 1.0 and the line passed through the point where DP2 = DP1; this is the point of continuous stimulation at the optimum interval in a steady state. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the coefficient relating DP1 to DP2, at constant a.p.d. of the first test pulse (AP1), is an index of the proportion of the activator of contraction stored during relaxation of test beat 1 which is released again on beat 2. In order to test the hypothesis that the remaining contractility depended on the action potential of test beat 1, AP1 was varied by changing the intervals between the priming stimuli. In order to determine the relationship between DP2 and AP1 it was necessary to carry out multiple regression analysis because DP2 was already known to be strongly dependent on DP1 (point 3 above), i.e. DP2 = BDP(DP1) + BAP(AP1 - D). This analysis yielded highly significant positive values for the coefficients BDP and BAP. This result is compatible with the

  14. Myocardial Tagging With SSFP

    PubMed Central

    Herzka, Daniel A.; Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the first implementation of myocardial tagging with refocused steady-state free precession (SSFP) and magnetization preparation. The combination of myocardial tagging (a noninvasive method for quantitative measurement of regional and global cardiac function) with the high tissue signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) obtained with SSFP is shown to yield improvements in terms of the myocardium–tag contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and tag persistence when compared to the current standard fast gradient-echo (FGRE) tagging protocol. Myocardium–tag CNR and tag persistence were studied using numerical simulations as well as phantom and human experiments. Both quantities were found to decrease with increasing imaging flip angle (α) due to an increased tag decay rate and a decrease in myocardial steady-state signal. However, higher α yielded better blood–myocardium contrast, indicating that optimal α is dependent on the application: higher α for better blood–myocardium boundary visualization, and lower α for better tag persistence. SSFP tagging provided the same myocardium–tag CNR as FGRE tagging when acquired at four times the bandwidth and better tag– and blood–myocardium CNRs than FGRE tagging when acquired at equal or twice the receiver bandwidth (RBW). The increased acquisition efficiency of SSFP allowed decreases in breath-hold duration, or increases in temporal resolution, as compared to FGRE. PMID:12541254

  15. Catecholamine stimulation, substrate competition, and myocardial glucose uptake in conscious dogs assessed with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Merhige, M E; Ekas, R; Mossberg, K; Taegtmeyer, H; Gould, K L

    1987-11-01

    Uptake of radiolabelled deoxyglucose out of proportion to reduced coronary flow demonstrated by positron emission tomography has been used to identify reversibly ischemic, viable myocardium. For this concept to be applied reliably in the clinical setting, factors that may depress glucose availability independent of tissue viability, such as adrenergic stimulation and substrate competition, must be examined. Accordingly, we studied the effect of catecholamine stimulation by dopamine on myocardial glucose uptake in vivo using chronically instrumented, intact dogs and positron emission tomography. We measured myocardial activity of [2-18F]-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) and 82Rb in glucose-loaded animals randomly studied during dopamine infusion, during insulin infusion, and then during their combined infusion. Myocardial FDG uptake was significantly decreased when animals were treated with dopamine, compared with treatment in the same animals with insulin. When insulin was added to the dopamine infusion, myocardial FDG uptake was restored. In contrast, myocardial activity of 82Rb, which is taken up in proportion to coronary flow, was similar under all three experimental conditions. Plasma glucose, free fatty acid, and lactate concentrations were determined before and during each infusion. The depression of myocardial FDG activity seen during dopamine infusion and its reversal with addition of insulin can be explained on the basis of effects of these hormones on substrate availability and competition.

  16. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  17. Comparison of enzymic with cineangiocardiographic estimations of myocardial infarct size.

    PubMed Central

    Sammel, N L; Stuckey, J G; Brandt, P W; Norris, R M

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons were made between enzymic indices of myocardial infarct size (total creatine kinase appearance and peak enzyme activity) measured during the acute state of a first myocardial infarct in 32 male patients, and analysis of contraction abnormalities in biplane left ventricular cineangiocardiograms performed one month later. The cineangiocardiograms were analysed independently by two radiologists, each using two different methods for quantification of subjectively classified abnormalities of left ventricular wall motion. A very strong correlation was found between the two enzymic indices of infarct size and somewhat weaker correlations between assessment of contractility abnormalities made by the two radiologists using the same method, or by the same radiologist using the two different methods. Comparisons between enzymic and angiocardiographic indices for all infarcts showed correlation coefficients (r) within the range of 0.53 to 0.72. With all comparisons of enzymic with radiological indices r values were higher for anterior infarcts than for inferior infarcts, and there was a tendency for higher enzyme levels for a given degree of left ventricular damage in inferior than in anterior infarction. This may be the result of variable degrees of right ventricular damage in inferior infarction. PMID:7426141

  18. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described. PMID:25638347

  19. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described.

  20. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Corstens, F.H.; Thien, T. )

    1989-10-01

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-{sup 201}Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging.

  1. Effects of total flavones from Acanthopanax senticosus on L-type calcium channels, calcium transient and contractility in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shengjiang; Ma, Juanjuan; Chu, Xi; Gao, Yonggang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Zhenyi; Zhang, Jianping; Chu, Li

    2015-04-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms (AS), a traditional herbal medicine, has been widely used to treat ischemic heart disease. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms of its benefits to cardiac function remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of total flavones from AS (TFAS) on L-type Ca(2+) channel currents (ICa-L ) using the whole cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge-detection system. Exposure to TFAS resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L , with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of 283.12 µg/mL and the maximal inhibitory effect of 36.49 ± 1.95%. Moreover, TFAS not only increased the maximum current in the current-voltage relationship but also shifted the activation and inactivation curves of ICa-L toward the hyperpolarizing direction. Meanwhile, TFAS significantly reduced amplitudes of myocyte shortening and [Ca(2+) ]i with an increase in the time to 10% of the peak (Tp) and a decrease in the time to 10% of the baseline (Tr). Thus, the cardioprotective effects of TFAS may be attributed mainly to the attenuation of [Ca(2+) ]i through the direct inhibition of ICa-L in rat ventricular myocytes and consequent negative effect on myocardial contractility. PMID:25586009

  2. Relationships of thigh muscle contractile and non-contractile tissue with function, strength, and age in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Akima, Hiroshi; Lott, Donovan; Senesac, Claudia; Deol, Jasjit; Germain, Sean; Arpan, Ishu; Bendixen, Roxanna; Lee Sweeney, H; Walter, Glenn; Vandenborne, Krista

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the contractile and non-contractile content in thigh muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and determine the relationship with functional abilities. Magnetic resonance images of the thigh were acquired in 28 boys with DMD and 10 unaffected boys. Muscle strength, timed functional tests, and the Brookes Lower Extremity scale were also assessed. Non-contractile content in the DMD group was significantly greater than in the control group for six muscles, including rectus femoris, biceps femoris-long head and adductor magnus. Non-contractile content in the total thigh musculature assessed by MRI correlated with the Brookes scale (r(s)=0.75) and supine-up test (r(s)=0.68), as well as other functional measures. An age-related specific torque increase was observed in the control group (r(s)=0.96), but not the DMD (r(s)=0.06). These findings demonstrate that MRI measures of contractile and non-contractile content can provide important information about disease progression in DMD. PMID:21807516

  3. Perioperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, Pericles; Martins, Gerez Fernandes; Biscaro, Andressa; Kruczan, Dany David; Jessen, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative myocardial infarction adversely affects the prognosis of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft and its diagnosis was hampered by numerous difficulties, because the pathophysiology is different from the traditional instability atherosclerotic and the clinical difficulty to be characterized. Objective To identify the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction and its outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Retrospective cohort study performed in a tertiary hospital specialized in cardiology, from May 01, 2011 to April 30, 2012, which included all records containing coronary artery bypass graft records. To confirm the diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction criteria, the Third Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction was used. Results We analyzed 116 cases. Perioperative myocardial infarction was diagnosed in 28 patients (24.1%). Number of grafts and use and cardiopulmonary bypass time were associated with this diagnosis and the mean age was significantly higher in this group. The diagnostic criteria elevated troponin I, which was positive in 99.1% of cases regardless of diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction. No significant difference was found between length of hospital stay and intensive care unit in patients with and without this complication, however patients with perioperative myocardial infarction progressed with worse left ventricular function and more death cases. Conclusion The frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction found in this study was considered high and as a consequence the same observed average higher troponin I, more cases of worsening left ventricular function and death. PMID:25859867

  4. Spontaneous contractility of human placental vessels in vitro axipetal and isometric recording.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Panizza, V H; Benedetti, W L; Alvarez, H

    1980-01-01

    In vitro contractility of isolated cylindrical segments of chorial arteries and veins from 40 human term placentas was studied. Contractility was recorded by an isometrical and axipetal method. Spontaneous contractility was observed in 75% of the arteries and in 45% of veins. In both types of vessels, contractility was similar and characterized by development of tonic circumferential tension, between 100 and 200 mg/mm. Clonic activity consisting of rhythmic contractions with an average frequency between 0.7 and 0.9/min and an average intensity of 5--40 mg/min was superimposed. Vasoconstrictor drugs (PGF2 alpha, histamine and adrenaline) increase tonic tension without modifying the frequency of clonic activity. It is suggested that spontaneous contractility may be the expression of myogenic excitability related to the regulation of fetal placental blood flow.

  5. Ex Vivo Assessment of Contractility, Fatigability and Alternans in Isolated Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Ho; Brotto, Leticia; Lehoang, Oanh; Brotto, Marco; Ma, Jianjie; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Described here is a method to measure contractility of isolated skeletal muscles. Parameters such as muscle force, muscle power, contractile kinetics, fatigability, and recovery after fatigue can be obtained to assess specific aspects of the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) process such as excitability, contractile machinery and Ca2+ handling ability. This method removes the nerve and blood supply and focuses on the isolated skeletal muscle itself. We routinely use this method to identify genetic components that alter the contractile property of skeletal muscle though modulating Ca2+ signaling pathways. Here, we describe a newly identified skeletal muscle phenotype, i.e., mechanic alternans, as an example of the various and rich information that can be obtained using the in vitro muscle contractility assay. Combination of this assay with single cell assays, genetic approaches and biochemistry assays can provide important insights into the mechanisms of ECC in skeletal muscle. PMID:23149471

  6. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Contribute to Pathological Structural and Functional Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer; Correll, Robert N.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Berretta, Remus M.; Kubo, Hajime; Madesh, Muniswamy; Chen, Xiongwen; Gao, Erhe; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cellular and molecular basis for post myocardial infarction (MI) structural and functional remodeling is not well understood. Objective To determine if Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential (canonical) (TRPC) channels contributes to post-MI structural and functional remodeling. Methods and Results TRPC1/3/4/6 channel mRNA increased after MI in mice and was associated with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry. Cardiac myocyte specific expression of a dominant negative (dn: loss of function) TRPC4 channel increased basal myocyte contractility and reduced hypertrophy and cardiac structural and functional remodeling after MI while increasing survival. We used adenovirus-mediated expression of TRPC3/4/6 channels in cultured adult feline myocytes (AFMs) to define mechanistic aspects of these TRPC-related effects. TRPC3/4/6 over expression in AFMs induced calcineurin (Cn)-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) mediated hypertrophic signaling, which was reliant on caveolae targeting of TRPCs. TRPC3/4/6 expression in AFMs increased rested state contractions and increased spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ sparks mediated by enhanced phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. TRPC3/4/6 expression was associated with reduced contractility and response to catecholamines during steady state pacing, likely due to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak. Conclusions Ca2+ influx through TRPC channels expressed after MI activates pathological cardiac hypertrophy and reduces contractility reserve. Blocking post-MI TRPC activity improved post-MI cardiac structure and function. PMID:25047165

  8. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  9. Interventions during and after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sleight, P

    1983-01-01

    There is now evidence that infarct size in man can be reduced by early treatment and that some cases of threatened infarction can be aborted. Beta blockade, given intravenously within about 6-8 hours after the onset of pain can reduce infarct size and abort some infarctions. So far we have no conclusive data on mortality. Beta blockers may act by a number of mechanisms, namely reduction of cardiac contractility, heart rate and blood pressure thus reducing cardiac work and oxygen requirement, prevention of cardiac rupture by the same mechanism, and by an early effect on R on T ectopic beats and hence serious ventricular arrhythmia. Early myocardial revascularization either by coronary graft, percutaneous angioplasty or intracoronary streptokinase are all promising but so far unproven by adequate clinical trial. Randomized trials suggest that intravenous streptokinase may be effective and hyaluronidase appears promising, possibly by promotion of collateral vessel flow. Calcium channel blockade may also be helpful and there are some early studies which support this. Lowering work by sodium nitroprusside also reduces infarct size. Heparin may have a place in the treatment of threatened infarction. After recovery it now appears established that beta 1-blockade will lower mortality. We do not know how long this effect persists. Other agents are less well established perhaps because the trials have been too small. Anticoagulants may have a place but their use is not widespread. Anti-platelet agents are also controversial. Studies of dipyridamole and sulphinpyrazone have been suggestive but not conclusive; the studies of aspirin are moderately encouraging, when all trials are pooled. Anti-arrhythmic therapy after infarction has been disappointing, with the exception of beta blockade. Perhaps more emphasis should also be put upon changes in lifestyle, notably stopping smoking, reduction of fat intake and encouraging regular exercise.

  10. Improvement of myocardial function by trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, after acute coronary artery occlusion and coronary revascularization.

    PubMed

    Otani, H; Engelman, R M; Rousou, J A; Breyer, R H; Clement, R; Prasad, R; Klar, J; Das, D K

    1989-02-01

    Activation of an intracellular calcium-calmodulin complex may play an important role in myocardial injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion. Trifluoperazine, a calmodulin antagonist, was used before ischemia to enhance myocardial preservation by preventing intracellular calcium accumulation. The experimental model used an isolated in situ pig heart (19 control animals and 15 trifluoperazine-treated animals) subjected to occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 60 minutes followed by 60 minutes of hypothermic potassium crystalloid cardioplegic arrest and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Myocardial segmental function measured by ultrasonic crystals showed that active systolic segment shortening was abolished in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery after 60 minutes of occlusion irrespective of the treatment, whereas that not in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery increased by about 15% in both groups of animals. Restoration of systolic segment shortening in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery 60 minutes after reperfusion was 12% and 42% of baseline levels in untreated and trifluoperazine-treated animals, respectively (p less than 0.01). This improvement in segmental function by trifluoperazine was reflected in significantly (p less than 0.05) better global myocardial contractility and compliance and in significantly (p less than 0.01) greater total coronary blood flow and myocardial oxygen consumption. Trifluoperazine also increased myocardial creatine phosphate content in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery (p less than 0.01) during reperfusion, and creatine kinase release was reduced (p less than 0.05). Our results suggest that trifluoperazine improved regional myocardial function after acute occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and reperfusion and that global cardiac performance was thereby improved. The beneficial effects of trifluoperazine may be exerted by

  11. Mechanism of Cytokinetic Contractile Ring Constriction in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; Laplante, Caroline; Chin, Harvey F.; Guirao, Boris; Karatekin, Erdem; Pollard, Thomas D.; O’Shaughnessy, Ben

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytokinesis involves constriction of a contractile actomyosin ring. The mechanisms generating ring tension and setting the constriction rate remain unknown, since the organization of the ring is poorly characterized, its tension was rarely measured, and constriction is coupled to other processes. To isolate ring mechanisms we studied fission yeast protoplasts, where constriction occurs without the cell wall. Exploiting the absence of cell wall and actin cortex, we measured ring tension and imaged ring organization, which was dynamic and disordered. Computer simulations based on the amounts and biochemical properties of the key proteins showed that they spontaneously self-organize into a tension-generating bundle. Together with rapid component turnover, the self-organization mechanism continuously reassembles and remodels the constricting ring. Ring constriction depended on cell shape, revealing that the ring operates close to conditions of isometric tension. Thus, the fission yeast ring sets its own tension, but other processes set the constriction rate. PMID:24914559

  12. Contractility of glycerinated Amoeba proteus and Chaos-chaos.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, R; Opas, M; Hrebenda, B

    1975-05-01

    Immediate contact with large volumes of cold 50% (v/v) buffered glycerol preserved typical ameboid shape of Chaos chaos and Amoeba proteus with no visible distortions. These technics allowed determination of the contraction sites in these glycerinated models upon applications of ATP-Ca-Mg-solutions. The ectoplasmic tube was the main site of contraction. Preliminary EM investigations revealed thick and thin filaments, associated with the ectoplasmic tube near the plasma-lemma, which appeared to be the basis for the contractility of the ectoplasmic tube. There was no predominant contraction of the pseudopodial tips or the endoplasm in these models. The changes of volume were as much as 50%, and in some cases were not accompanied by any change in the length of the ameba; however, lengthwise contractions of the ectoplasmic tube in some amebae occurred to as much as 25%. The data substantiate a basic requirement of the ectoplasmic tube contraction theory of ameboid locomotion.

  13. Inhibition of contractile vacuole function by brefeldin A.

    PubMed

    Becker, Burkhard; Hickisch, Angela

    2005-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) causes a block in the secretory system of eukaryotic cells. In the scaly green flagellate Scherffelia dubia, BFA also interfered with the function of the contractile vacuoles (CVs). The CV is an osmoregulatory organelle which periodically expels fluid from the cell in many freshwater protists. Fusion of the CV membrane with the plasma membrane is apparently blocked by BFA in S. dubia. The two CVs of S. dubia swell and finally form large central vacuoles (LCVs). BFA-induced formation of LCVs depends on V-ATPase activity, and can be reversed by hypertonic media, suggesting that water accumulation in the LCVs is driven by osmosis. We suggest that the BFA-induced formation of LCVs represents a prolonged diastole phase. A normal diastole phase takes about 20 s and is difficult to investigate. Therefore, BFA-induced formation of LCVs in S. dubia represents a unique model system to investigate the diastole phase of the CV cycle.

  14. Cellular Polarization and Contractility in Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Collective cell migration drives many biological processes such as metastasis, morphogenesis and wound healing. These coordinated motions are driven by active forces. The physical nature of these forces and the mechanisms by which they generate collective cell migration are still not fully understood. We have developed a minimum physical model of a cell monolayer as an elastic continuum whose deformation field is coupled to two internal degrees of freedom: the concentration of a chemical signal, controlling cell Contractility, and the polarization field controlling the direction of local cell motion. By combining theory with experiments, we show that these two internal variables account for the sloshing waves and the systematic deviations of the direction of cell polarization from that of local cell velocity observed in confined cell monolayers. KJCU and MCM were supported by the Simons Foundation.

  15. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases Preserves Myocardial Performance and Prevents Cardiac Remodeling through Stimulation of Endogenous Angiomyogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Qin, Xin; Zhao, Yu; Fast, Loren; Zhuang, Shougang; Liu, Paul; Cheng, Guangmao

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) protects the heart against acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. We also demonstrated that HDAC inhibition stimulates myogenesis and angiogenesis in a cultured embryonic stem cell model. We investigate whether in vivo inhibition of HDAC preserves cardiac performance and prevents cardiac remodeling in mouse myocardial infarction (MI) through the stimulation of endogenous regeneration. MI was created by ligation of the left descending artery. Animals were divided into three groups: 1) sham group, animals that underwent thoracotomy without MI; 2) MI, animals that underwent MI; and 3) MI + trichostatin A (TSA), MI animals that received a daily intraperitoneal injection of TSA. In addition, infarcted mice received a daily intraperitoneal injection of TSA (0.1 mg/kg), a selective HDAC inhibitor. 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (50 mg/kg) was delivered every other day to pulse-chase label in vivo endogenous cardiac replication. Eight weeks later, the MI hearts showed a reduction in ventricular contractility. HDAC inhibition increased the improvement of myocardial functional recovery after MI, which was associated with the prevention of myocardial remodeling and reduction of myocardial and serum tumor necrosis factor α. HDAC inhibition enhanced the formation of new myocytes and microvessels, which was consistent with the robust increase in proliferation and cytokinesis in the MI hearts. An increase in angiogenic response was demonstrated in MI hearts receiving TSA treatment. It is noteworthy that TSA treatment significantly inhibited HDAC activity and increased phosphorylation of Akt-1, but decreased active caspase 3. Taken together, our results indicate that HDAC inhibition preserves cardiac performance and mitigates myocardial remodeling through stimulating cardiac endogenous regeneration. PMID:22271820

  16. PKCβII Modulation of Myocyte Contractile Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyosook; Robinson, Dustin A; Stevenson, Tamara K; Wu, Helen C; Kampert, Sarah E; Pagani, Francis D; Dyke, D. Brad; Martin, Jody L; Sadayappan, Sakthival; Day, Sharlene M; Westfall, Margaret V

    2012-01-01

    Significant up-regulation of the protein kinase CβII (PKCβII) develops during heart failure and yet divergent functional outcomes are reported in animal models. The goal here is to investigate PKCβII modulation of contractile function and gain insights into downstream targets in adult cardiac myocytes. Increased PKCβII protein expression and phosphorylation developed after gene transfer into adult myocytes while expression remained undetectable in controls. The PKCβII was distributed in a perinuclear pattern and this expression resulted in diminished rates and amplitude of shortening and re-lengthening compared to controls and myocytes expressing dominant negative PKCβII (PKCβDN). Similar decreases were observed in the Ca2+ transient and the Ca2+ decay rate slowed in response to caffeine in PKCβII-expressing myocytes. Parallel phosphorylation studies indicated PKCβII targets phosphatase activity to reduce phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation at residue Thr17 (pThr17-PLB). The PKCβ inhibitor, LY379196 (LY) restored pThr17-PLB to control levels. In contrast, myofilament protein phosphorylation was enhanced by PKCβII expression, and individually, LY and the phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A each failed to block this response. Further work showed PKCβII increased Ca2+- activated, calmodulin-dependent kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) expression and enhanced both CaMKIIδ and protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of both signaling targets also was resistant to acute inhibition by LY. These later results provide evidence PKCβII modulates contractile function via intermediate downstream pathway(s) in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22587992

  17. Complete regression of myocardial involvement associated with lymphoma following chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinicki, Juan Pablo; Cianciulli, Tomás F; Farace, Gustavo A; Saccheri, María C; Lax, Jorge A; Kazelian, Lucía R; Wachs, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac involvement as an initial presentation of malignant lymphoma is a rare occurrence. We describe the case of a 26 year old man who had initially been diagnosed with myocardial infiltration on an echocardiogram, presenting with a testicular mass and unilateral peripheral facial paralysis. On admission, electrocardiograms (ECG) revealed negative T-waves in all leads and ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. On two-dimensional echocardiography, there was infiltration of the pericardium with mild effusion, infiltrative thickening of the aortic walls, both atria and the interatrial septum and a mildly depressed systolic function of both ventricles. An axillary biopsy was performed and reported as a T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL). Following the diagnosis and staging, chemotherapy was started. Twenty-two days after finishing the first cycle of chemotherapy, the ECG showed regression of T-wave changes in all leads and normalization of the ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. A follow-up Two-dimensional echocardiography confirmed regression of the myocardial infiltration. This case report illustrates a lymphoma presenting with testicular mass, unilateral peripheral facial paralysis and myocardial involvement, and demonstrates that regression of infiltration can be achieved by intensive chemotherapy treatment. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of T-LBL presenting as a testicular mass and unilateral peripheral facial paralysis, with complete regression of myocardial involvement. PMID:24109501

  18. Complete regression of myocardial involvement associated with lymphoma following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vinicki, Juan Pablo; Cianciulli, Tomás F; Farace, Gustavo A; Saccheri, María C; Lax, Jorge A; Kazelian, Lucía R; Wachs, Adolfo

    2013-09-26

    Cardiac involvement as an initial presentation of malignant lymphoma is a rare occurrence. We describe the case of a 26 year old man who had initially been diagnosed with myocardial infiltration on an echocardiogram, presenting with a testicular mass and unilateral peripheral facial paralysis. On admission, electrocardiograms (ECG) revealed negative T-waves in all leads and ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. On two-dimensional echocardiography, there was infiltration of the pericardium with mild effusion, infiltrative thickening of the aortic walls, both atria and the interatrial septum and a mildly depressed systolic function of both ventricles. An axillary biopsy was performed and reported as a T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL). Following the diagnosis and staging, chemotherapy was started. Twenty-two days after finishing the first cycle of chemotherapy, the ECG showed regression of T-wave changes in all leads and normalization of the ST-segment elevation in the inferior leads. A follow-up Two-dimensional echocardiography confirmed regression of the myocardial infiltration. This case report illustrates a lymphoma presenting with testicular mass, unilateral peripheral facial paralysis and myocardial involvement, and demonstrates that regression of infiltration can be achieved by intensive chemotherapy treatment. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of T-LBL presenting as a testicular mass and unilateral peripheral facial paralysis, with complete regression of myocardial involvement. PMID:24109501

  19. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... If depression is very severe, you may have hallucinations and delusions (false beliefs). This condition is called ... relieve your symptoms. If you have delusions or hallucinations, your provider may prescribe additional medicines. Tell your ...

  20. Restoration of depressed prostanoid-induced ileal contraction in spontaneously hypertensive rats by dietary fish oil.

    PubMed

    Patten, Glen S; Adams, Michael J; Dallimore, Julie A; Rogers, Paul F; Topping, David L; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y

    2005-01-01

    We have reported that dietary fish oil (FO) rich in n-3 PUFA modulates gut contractility. It was further demonstrated that the gut of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has a depressed contractility response to prostaglandins (PG) compared with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. We investigated whether feeding diets supplemented with n-3 PUFA increased gut contractility and restored the depressed prostanoid response in SHR gut. Thirteen-week-old SHR were fed diets containing fat at 5 g/100 g as coconut oil (CO), lard, canola oil containing 10% (w/w) n-3 FA as alpha-linolenic acid (1 8:3n-3), or FO (as HiDHA, 22:6n-3) for 12 wk. A control WKY group was fed 5 g/100 g CO in the diet. As confirmed, the SHR CO group had a significantly lower gut response to PGE2 and PGF2alpha compared with the WKY CO group. Feeding FO increased the maximal contraction response to acetylcholine in the ileum compared with all diets and in the colon compared with lard, and restored the depressed response to PGE2 and PGF2alpha in the ileum but not the colon of SHR. FO feeding also led to a significant increase in gut total phospholipid n-3 PUFA as DHA (22:6n-3) with lower n-6 PUFA as arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Canola feeding led to a small increase in ileal EPA (20:5n-3) and DHA and in colonic DHA without affecting contractility. However, there was no change in ileal membrane muscarinic binding properties due to FO feeding. This report confirms that dietary FO increases muscarinic- and eicosanoid receptor-induced contractility in ileum and that the depressed prostanoid response in SHR ileum, but not colon, is restored by tissue incorporation of DHA as the active nutrient.

  1. Recovery of regional myocardial dysfunction after successful coronary angioplasty early after a non-Q wave myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Suryapranata, H.; Serruys, P.W.; Beatt, K.; De Feyter, P.J.; van den Brand, M.; Roelandt, J. )

    1990-08-01

    More aggressive therapy has been suggested for patients who have a non-Q wave myocardial infarction (MI) because of the frequency of subsequent unstable angina, recurrent MI, and high mortality rate compared to patients with Q wave MI. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of coronary angioplasty on regional myocardial function of the infarct zone in patients with angina early after a non-Q wave MI. The study population consisted of 36 patients undergoing successful coronary angioplasty within 30 days of a non-Q wave MI, in whom sequential left ventricular angiograms of adequate quality were obtained before the initial procedure and at follow-up angiography. The global ejection fraction increased significantly from 60 +/- 9% to 67 +/- 6% (p = 0.0003). This significant increase in the global ejection fraction was primarily due to a significant improvement in the regional myocardial function of the infarct zone. The results of the present study show not only that ischemic attacks early after a non-Q wave MI may lead to prolonged regional myocardial dysfunction but more important that this depressed myocardium has the potential to achieve normal contraction after successful coronary angioplasty.

  2. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  3. Myocardial imaging in dogs treated with grisorixin: relationship between /sup 201/Tl uptake and coronary blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Moins, N.; Gachon, P.; Maublant, J.

    1982-04-01

    /sup 201/Tl myocardial imaging was performed in dogs after pretreatment with grisorixin, which appeared to increase the myocardial uptake of /sup 201/Tl. This effect of grisorixin was found to be dose dependent, with an optimal dose of 60 microgram/kg. The myocardial-to-background ratio, which was 1.92 in the control dogs, rose to 4.45. The increase in the absolute myocardial uptake was demonstrated in guinea pigs that received /sup 201/Tl after similar pretreatment with grisorixin. In the animals treated with 500 microgram/kg, the uptake of /sup 201/Tl by the heart was 35% over the control value. With 60 microgram/kg grisorixin, the coronary blood flow increased from 40 to 176 ml/min 5 min after the injection. This dose, optimal for imaging, induced the maximum vasodilator effect with only a very slight concomitant increase in the left-ventricular pressure and myocardial contractility. Above 60 microgram/kg, grisorixin appeared to be a potent inotropic agent, whereas below this dose it showed only coronary vasodilator properties. Some evidence for an ionophore effect of this compound was found in dogs pretreated with 60 microgram/kg. In these the radionuclide was injected when the coronary vasodilatation had become insignificant, but a significant improvement of the M/B ratio was still evident.

  4. Oxymatrine protects against myocardial injury via inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 signaling in rat septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghao; Wang, Xiuyu; Wang, Xiumei; Hou, Xiaolin; Teng, Peng; Jiang, Yideng; Zhang, Linna; Yang, Xiaoling; Tian, Jue; Li, Guizhong; Cao, Jun; Xu, Hua; Li, Yunhong; Wang, Yin

    2013-04-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT), an alkaloid extracted from Sophora japonica (kushen), is used to treat inflammatory diseases and various types of cancer in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the anti‑inflammatory activity of OMT remain poorly understood. The present study explored the protective effect of OMT on myocardial injury in rats with septic shock by inhibiting the activation of the janus kinase‑signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway. OMT treatment was found to significantly inhibit the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in myocardial tissue. It also attenuated the expression of pro‑inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin‑1β and tumor necrosis factor‑α. In addition, OMT exhibited anti‑inflammatory properties as heart function and myocardial contractility was improved and pathological and ultrastructural injury was prevented in myocardial tissue induced by septic shock. The results indicate that OMT exhibits substantial therapeutic potential for the treatment of septic shock‑induced myocardial injury through inhibition of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:23404057

  5. Quantitative assessment of myocardial strain with displacement encoding with stimulated echoes MRI in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Hideki; Nagata, Motonori; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Kato, Shingo; Takase, Shinichi; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Ishida, Masaki; Dohi, Kaoru; Ito, Masaaki; Sakuma, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance and reproducibility of strain assessment with displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in identifying contractile abnormalities in myocardial segments with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). DENSE CMR was obtained on short-axis planes of the left ventricle (LV) in 24 patients with suspected coronary artery disease. e1 and e2 strains of LV wall were quantified. Cine MRI was acquired to determine percent systolic wall thickening (%SWT), followed by (LGE) CMR. The diagnostic performance of e1, e2 and %SWT for predicting the presence of LGE was evaluated by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Myocardial scar on LGE CMR was observed in 91 (24 %) of 384 segments. The area under ROC curve for predicting the segments with LGE was 0.874 by e1, 0.916 by e2 and 0.828 by %SWT (p = 0.001 between e2 and %SWT). Excellent inter-observer reproducibility was found for strain [Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.962 for e1, 0.955 for e2] as compared with %SWT (ICC = 0.790). DENSE CMR can be performed as a part of routine CMR study and allows for quantification of myocardial strain with high inter-observer reproducibility. Myocardial strain, especially e2 is useful in detecting altered abnormal systolic contraction in the segments with myocardial scar.

  6. Chronic cardiac reactions. I. Assessment of ventricular and myocardial work capacity in the hypertrophied and dilated ventricle.

    PubMed

    Jacob, R; Vogt, M; Noma, K

    1987-01-01

    The end-systolic and end-diastolic pressure-volume or stress-length curves define the margins of the various conceivable courses of pressure-volume or stress-length loops. Although the end-systolic pressure-volume and stress-length relations of isovolumetric and afterloaded contractions are not entirely identical, the area between isovolumetric maxima- and end-diastolic minima curves in the pressure-volume or stress-length diagram can be taken as a measure of potential ventricular and myocardial work under different yet defined mechanical conditions. The normalized stress-length area, as derived from the left ventricular pressure-volume diagram and myocardial mass, renders a rational basis for global quantitative evaluation of myocardial work capacity. The area obtained is independent of ventricular mass and size and as such is invaluable for assessing hypertrophied and/or dilated hearts, and thus interindividual comparison of myocardial contractile capability based on physical principles. However, this measure should be supplemented by considering time dependent parameters (e.g. maximum rate of stress development as a function of end-diastolic stress). The principle set here for evaluating ventricular and myocardial performance should always be borne in mind, especially when referring to more empirical parameters.

  7. Myocardial fibre calcification.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, J; Pieterse, A S; Pounder, D J; Smith, P S

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of myocardial fibre calcification found at post-mortem examination are described. In one case there was antemortem hypercalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia and the case was clearly an example of metastatic calcification. In the other two cases there was ischaemic myocardial necrosis and calcification was seen in fibres which were not overtly necrotic, but which were both in proximity to (the majority) and remote from the necrotic zones. Since renal failure with hyperphosphataemia was present in both cases, these were considered to be examples of augmented (by the hyperphosphataemia) dystrophic calcification. The histological, histochemical and ultrastructural features were identical in the three cases. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed initially in mitochondria, followed by spillage of crystals into the cytosol and ultimately into the interstitium. It is suggested that the fundamental lesion is a dysfunction of the fibre membrane; the similarity of this reaction with the calcification seen in skeletal muscle fibres in various myopathies is noted and a unifying hypothesis of the mechanism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibre calcification is thereby suggested. Images PMID:7309897

  8. Valsartan after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Sadi

    2014-12-01

    One of the important problems of the patients undergoing acute myocardial infarction (MI) is early development of heart failure. It has been revealed in various studies that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has a significant role in this process. The studies conducted with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have resulted in decreased mortality rate. Another RAAS blocker which was discovered about ten years later than other ACE inhibitors in historical process is angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) inhibiting the efficiency of angiotensin 2 by binding to angiotensin 1 receptor. Valsartan is one of the molecules of this group, which has higher number of large-scale randomized clinical studies. In this review, following presentation of a general overview on heart failure after acute MI, the efficiency of ARBs in this patient group will be discussed. This discussion will mostly emphasize the construction, outcomes and clinical importance of VALIANT (VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion), which is the study on valsartan after acute MI heart failure. PMID:25604205

  9. Trauma induced myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lolay, Georges A; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed K

    2016-01-15

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction.

  10. Multiple effects of sibutramine on ejaculation and on vas deferens and seminal vesicle contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Nojimoto, Fernanda D.; Piffer, Renata C.; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo de A.; Lameu, Claudiana; Camargo, Antonio C.M. de; Pupo, Andre S.

    2009-09-15

    Sibutramine is an inhibitor of norepinephrine and 5-HT reuptake largely used in the management of obesity. Although a fairly safe drug, postmarketing adverse effects of sibutramine were reported including abnormal ejaculation in men. This study investigates the effects of sibutramine on ejaculation and vas deferens and seminal vesicle contractility. Adult male rats received sibutramine (5; 20; or 50 mg kg{sup -1}, ip) and after 60 min were exposed to receptive females for determination of ejaculation parameters. The vasa deferentia and seminal vesicles of untreated rats were mounted in isolated organ baths for recording of isometric contractions and HEK293 cells loaded with fluorescent calcium indicator were used to measure intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transients. Sibutramine 5 and 20 mg kg{sup -1} reduced ejaculation latency whereas 50 mg kg{sup -1} increased ejaculation latency. Sibutramine 3 to 30 {mu}M greatly increased the sensitivity of the seminal vesicle and vas deferens to norepinephrine, but at concentrations higher than 10 {mu}M there were striking depressions of maximal contractions induced by norepinephrine, carbachol and CaCl{sub 2}. In HEK293 cells, sibutramine 10 to 100 {mu}M inhibited intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transients induced by carbachol. Depending on the doses, sibutramine either facilitates or inhibits ejaculation. Apart from its actions in the central nervous system, facilitation of ejaculation may result from augmented sensitivity of smooth muscles to norepinephrine while reductions of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} may be involved in the delayed ejaculation observed with high doses of sibutramine.

  11. Thin filament incorporation of an engineered cardiac troponin C variant (L48Q) enhances contractility in intact cardiomyocytes from healthy and infarcted hearts.

    PubMed

    Feest, Erik R; Steven Korte, F; Tu, An-Yue; Dai, Jin; Razumova, Maria V; Murry, Charles E; Regnier, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Many current pharmaceutical therapies for systolic heart failure target intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) metabolism, or cardiac troponin C (cTnC) on thin filaments, and can have significant side-effects, including arrhythmias or adverse effects on diastolic function. In this study, we tested the feasibility of directly increasing the Ca(2+) binding properties of cTnC to enhance contraction independent of [Ca(2+)]i in intact cardiomyocytes from healthy and myocardial infarcted (MI) hearts. Specifically, cardiac thin filament activation was enhanced through adenovirus-mediated over-expression of a cardiac troponin C (cTnC) variant designed to have increased Ca(2+) binding affinity conferred by single amino acid substitution (L48Q). In skinned cardiac trabeculae and myofibrils we and others have shown that substitution of L48Q cTnC for native cTnC increases Ca(2+) sensitivity of force and the maximal rate of force development. Here we introduced L48Q cTnC into myofilaments of intact cardiomyocytes via adeno-viral transduction to deliver cDNA for the mutant or wild type (WT) cTnC protein. Using video-microscopy to monitor cell contraction, relaxation, and intracellular Ca(2+) transients (Fura-2), we report that incorporation of L48Q cTnC significantly increased contractility of cardiomyocytes from healthy and MI hearts without adversely affecting Ca(2+) transient properties or relaxation. The improvements in contractility from L48Q cTnC expression are likely the result of enhanced contractile efficiency, as intracellular Ca(2+) transient amplitudes were not affected. Expression and incorporation of L48Q cTnC into myofilaments was confirmed by Western blot analysis of myofibrils from transduced cardiomyocytes, which indicated replacement of 18±2% of native cTnC with L48Q cTnC. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of directly targeting cardiac thin filament proteins to enhance cardiomyocyte contractility that is impaired following MI.

  12. Phosphatidic acid increases intracellular free Ca2+ and cardiac contractile force.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Panagia, V; Shao, Q; Wang, X; Dhalla, N S

    1996-08-01

    Although phosphatidic acid (PA) is mainly formed due to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by myocardial phospholipase D, its functional significance in the heart is not fully understood. The present study was designed to determine the effects of PA on intracellular free Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) in freshly isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes by using fura 2-acextoxmethylester and free fura 2 technique. Addition of PA at concentrations of 1-200 microM produced a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i from the basal level of 117 +/- 8 nM; maximal increase in [Ca2+]i was 233 +/- 50 nM, whereas median effective concentration (EC50) for PA was 45 +/- 1.2 microM. This increase in [Ca2+]i was abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca2+ with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid and was partially attenuated by Ca2+ channel blockers, verapamil or diltiazem. Preincubation of cardiomyocytes with cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin or with ryanodine [to deplete sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+] attenuated the PA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i by 66, 37, and 43%, respectively. Furthermore, the response of [Ca2+]i to PA was blunted by 2-nitro-4 carboxyphenylcarbonate, an inhibitor of phospholipase C, but was unaffected by staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor. PA was also observed to induce Ca2+ efflux from the myocytes. In addition, an injection of PA (0.34 microgram/100 g body wt i.v.) in rats produced a significant increase of the left ventricular developed pressure as well as the maximum rates of cardiac contraction and relaxation within 5 min. These data suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in cardiomyocytes is a consequence of both Ca2+ influx from the extracellular source and Ca2+ release from the intracellular SR stores. Furthermore, these in vitro data suggest the possibility that PA may regulate [Ca2+]i and contractile parameters in the heart.

  13. Cleavage furrow: timing of emergence of contractile ring actin filaments and establishment of the contractile ring by filament bundling in sea urchin eggs.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, I

    1994-07-01

    Cleavage furrow formation at the first cell division of sea urchin and sand dollar eggs was investigated in detail by fluorescence staining of actin filaments with rhodamine-phalloidin of either whole eggs or isolated egg cortices. Cortical actin filaments were clustered at anaphase and then the clusters became fibrillar at the end of anaphase. The timing when the contractile ring actin filaments appear was precisely determined in the course of mitosis: accumulation of the contractile ring actin filaments at the equatorial cell cortex is first noticed at the beginning of telophase (shortly before furrow formation), when the chromosomal vesicles are fusing with each other. The accumulated actin filaments were not well organized at the early stage but were organized into parallel bundles as the furrowing progressed. The bundles were finally fused into a tightly packed filament belt. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-binding sites were distributed on the surface of the egg in a manner similar to the actin filaments after anaphase. The WGA-binding sites became accumulated in the contractile ring together with the contractile ring actin filaments, indicating an intimate relationship between these sites and actin filament-anchoring sites on the plasma membrane. Myosin also appeared in the contractile ring together with the actin filaments. The 'cleavage stimulus', a signal hypothesized by Rappaport (reviewed by R. Rappaport (1986) Int. Rev. Cytol. 105, 245-281) was suggested to induce aggregation or bundling of the actin filaments in the cortical layer.

  14. Paroxetine Is a Direct Inhibitor of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Increases Myocardial Contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Homan, Kristoff T.; Chen, Jun; Wu, Emily K.; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Huang, Z. Maggie; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Sklar, Larry A.; Koch, Walter J.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a well-established therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. In this paper we identify the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine as a selective inhibitor of GRK2 activity both in vitro and in living cells. In the crystal structure of the GRK2·paroxetine–Gβγ complex, paroxetine binds in the active site of GRK2 and stabilizes the kinase domain in a novel conformation in which a unique regulatory loop forms part of the ligand binding site. Isolated cardiomyocytes show increased isoproterenol-induced shortening and contraction amplitude in the presence of paroxetine, and pretreatment of mice with paroxetine before isoproterenol significantly increases left ventricular inotropic reserve in vivo with no significant effect on heart rate. Neither is observed in the presence of the SSRI fluoxetine. Our structural and functional results validate a widely available drug as a selective chemical probe for GRK2 and represent a starting point for the rational design of more potent and specific GRK2 inhibitors.

  15. Cortical actin regulation modulates vascular contractility and compliance in veins

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J; Gao, Yuan Z; Lin, Qian Qian; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The literature on arterial mechanics is extensive, but far less is known about mechanisms controlling mechanical properties of veins. We use here a multi-scale approach to identify subcellular sources of venous stiffness. Portal vein tissue displays a severalfold decrease in passive stiffness compared to aortic tissues. The α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) increased tissue stress and stiffness, both attenuated by cytochalasin D (CytoD) and PP2, inhibitors of actin polymerization and Src activity, respectively. We quantify, for the first time, cortical cellular stiffness in freshly isolated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells using magnetic microneedle technology. Cortical stiffness is significantly increased by PE and CytoD inhibits this increase but, surprisingly, PP2 does not. No detectable change in focal adhesion size, measured by immunofluorescence of FAK and zyxin, accompanies the PE-induced changes in cortical stiffness. Probing with phospho-specific antibodies confirmed activation of FAK/Src and ERK pathways and caldesmon phosphorylation. Thus, venous tissue stiffness is regulated both at the level of the smooth muscle cell cortex, via cortical actin polymerization, and by downstream smooth muscle effectors of Src/ERK signalling pathways. These findings identify novel potential molecular targets for the modulation of venous capacitance and venous return in health and disease. Key points Most cardiovascular research focuses on arterial mechanisms of disease, largely ignoring venous mechanisms. Here we examine ex vivo venous stiffness, spanning tissue to molecular levels, using biomechanics and magnetic microneedle technology, and show for the first time that venous stiffness is regulated by a molecular actin switch within the vascular smooth muscle cell in the wall of the vein. This switch connects the contractile apparatus within the cell to adhesion structures and facilitates stiffening of the vessel wall, regulating blood flow return

  16. Pharmacological effect on the average rates of development of the contractile and relaxation phases of the acetylcholine contractile effect in the smooth muscles of guinea-pig caecum.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, R

    1976-01-01

    The average rates of development of the contractile and relaxation phases and their relative dependence in the acetylcholine contractile effect, after treatment with papaverine, prostaglandines E1 and F2 alpha and BaCl2, are tested on longitudinal and circular smooth muscles of guinea-pig caecum. Changes are observed in the effect on the phase rates of the contractile process caused by acetylcholine in the two muscles under the effect of the different drugs. In both muscles the relative dependence between the phase velocities is lowered by papaverine and raised by BaCl2. It is assumed that the interaction of the pharmacological substances with the calcium ions plays a role in the rate of manifestation of the pharmacological effect.

  17. Effect of trimebutine maleate on the contractile response of the isolated ileum from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, M; Iwata, T; Takagi, S; Sugiyama, Y; Ishitani, K; Honda, H; Sakai, Y

    1994-05-01

    1. Tension of the isolated ileum from diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin was measured isometrically to study the mode of action of trimebutine maleate (TMB). 2. The hyperreactivity of contractile response to KCl was observed in the isolated ileum from diabetic rats. TMB inhibited the contraction induced by KCl and acetylcholine (ACh) in normal solution. 3. In Ca2+ free solution, the hyperreactivity of contractile response to KCl was attenuated, and TMB did not inhibit the contraction induced by KCl. In contrast, TMB inhibited the contraction induced by ACh even in Ca2+ free solution. 4. These results suggest that the hyperreactivity of contractile response to KCl in the ileum from diabetic rats is due to the enhancement of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel and that TMB inhibits the hyperreactivity of contractile response through the inhibition of Ca2+ movement by the cell. PMID:7926598

  18. Smooth muscle architecture within cell-dense vascular tissues influences functional contractility.

    PubMed

    Win, Zaw; Vrla, Geoffrey D; Steucke, Kerianne E; Sevcik, Emily N; Hald, Eric S; Alford, Patrick W

    2014-12-01

    The role of vascular smooth muscle architecture in the function of healthy and dysfunctional vessels is poorly understood. We aimed at determining the relationship between vascular smooth muscle architecture and contractile output using engineered vascular tissues. We utilized microcontact printing and a microfluidic cell seeding technique to provide three different initial seeding conditions, with the aim of influencing the cellular architecture within the tissue. Cells seeded in each condition formed confluent and aligned tissues but within the tissues, the cellular architecture varied. Tissues with a more elongated cellular architecture had significantly elevated basal stress and produced more contractile stress in response to endothelin-1 stimulation. We also found a correlation between the contractile phenotype marker expression and the cellular architecture, contrary to our previous findings in non-confluent tissues. Taken with previous results, these data suggest that within cell-dense vascular tissues, smooth muscle contractility is strongly influenced by cell and tissue architectures.

  19. Assembling the myofibril: coordinating contractile cable construction with calcium.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michael B; Podugu, Sireesha; Eskew, Jeffery D

    2006-01-01

    Over the last half century, major theoretical and experimental advances have been made in understanding the molecular architecture (e.g., sarcomeric organization) and biophysics (e.g., excitation-contraction coupling) of striated muscle. Studies of how the contractile apparatus is assembled have a shorter history, but our understanding has deepened considerably over the last decade. This review focuses on spontaneous intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signals and their role in skeletal muscle myofibrillogenesis. In embryonic skeletal muscle, several classes of spontaneous Ca2+ signal occur both in vivo and in culture, and blocking their production prevents de novo sarcomere assembly. This review includes a brief overview of myofibrillogenesis, discussion of spontaneous Ca2+ signals produced in embryonic skeletal muscle, the Xenopus model system, the role of Ca2+ signals in regulating assembly of the three major filament systems (actin, titin, and myosin), integration of physiological and biochemical approaches to the problem, and the clinical relevance of basic research in this area. Interspersed throughout are suggestions for future directions and citations for reviews in closely related areas not covered herein.

  20. Magnetically shaped cell aggregates: from granular to contractile materials.

    PubMed

    Frasca, G; Du, V; Bacri, J-C; Gazeau, F; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2014-07-28

    In recent decades, significant advances have been made in the description and modelling of tissue morphogenesis. By contrast, the initial steps leading to the formation of a tissue structure, through cell-cell adhesion, have so far been described only for small numbers of interacting cells. Here, through the use of remote magnetic forces, we succeeded at creating cell aggregates of half million cells, instantaneously and for several cell types, not only those known to form spheroids. This magnetic compaction gives access to the cell elasticity, found in the range of 800 Pa. The magnetic force can be removed at any time, allowing the cell mass to evolve spontaneously thereafter. The dynamics of contraction of these cell aggregates just after their formation (or, in contrast, their spreading for non-interacting monocyte cells) provides direct information on cell-cell interactions and allows retrieving the adhesion energy, in between 0.05 and 2 mJ m(-2), depending on the cell type tested, and in the case of cohesive aggregates. Thus, we show, by probing a large number of cell types, that cell aggregates behave like complex materials, undergoing a transition from a wet granular to contractile network, and that this transition is controlled by cell-cell interactions. PMID:24710948

  1. The actions of neurotensin in rat bladder detrusor contractility

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xingyou; Bai, Xinyu; Zhao, Jiang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Longkun

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the expression, distribution and function of neurotensin (NTs) and two main neurotensin receptors (NTSR), NTSR1 and NTSR2 in normal rat urinary bladders. NTs is primarily located in the suburothelium and the interstitium of smooth muscle bundles. The NTSR1 and NTSR2 receptor subtypes are found to co-localize with smooth muscle cells (SMCs). NTs not only can directly act on bladder SMCs to induce intracellular calcium mobilization by activating the phospholipase C/inositol triphosphate (PLC/IP3) pathway, promoting extracellular calcium influx through a non-selective cation channels, but may be also involved in the modulation of the cholinergic system. Nowadays, the selective antimuscarinic drugs (solifenacin) and the selective beta 3-adrenergic agonist (mirabegron) are used as the first-line pharmacotherapy for overactive bladder (OAB), but without satisfactory treatment benefits in some patients. This study provided evidence suggesting that bladder NTs may play an important role in the regulation of micturition. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of NTs on bladder contractility and the underlying mechanism, which might reveal that the administration of NTSR antagonists can potentially relieve the symptoms of OAB by coordination with antimuscarinic pharmacotherapy. PMID:26053252

  2. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Polymeric Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Charles; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2009-06-16

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  3. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Hoying, James B.; Deymier, Pierre A.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling. PMID:27196735

  4. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-11-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  5. Structure of the Type VI secretion system contractile sheath

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Brackmann, Maximilian; Scherer, Sebastian; Maier, Timm; Baker, David; DiMaio, Frank; Stahlberg, Henning; Egelman, Edward H.; Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria use rapid contraction of a long sheath of the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) to deliver effectors into a target cell. Here we present an atomic resolution structure of a native contracted Vibrio cholerae sheath determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The sheath subunits, composed of tightly interacting proteins VipA and VipB, assemble into a six-start helix. The helix is stabilized by a core domain assembled from four β-strands donated by one VipA and two VipB molecules. The fold of inner and middle layers is conserved between T6SS and phage sheaths. However, the structure of the outer layer is distinct and suggests a mechanism of interaction of the bacterial sheath with an accessory ATPase, ClpV, that facilitates multiple rounds of effector delivery. Our results provide a mechanistic insight into assembly of contractile nanomachines that bacteria and phages use to translocate macromolecules across membranes. PMID:25723169

  6. A myopathy-related actin mutation increases contractile function.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Johan; Pénisson-Besnier, Isabelle; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Li, Meishan; Yagi, Naoto; Ochala, Julien

    2012-05-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is the most common congenital myopathy and is caused by mutations in various genes including NEB (nebulin), TPM2 (beta-tropomyosin), TPM3 (gamma-tropomyosin), and ACTA1 (skeletal alpha-actin). 20-25% of NM cases carry ACTA1 defects and these particular mutations usually induce substitutions of single residues in the actin protein. Despite increasing clinical and scientific interest, the contractile consequences of these subtle amino acid substitutions remain obscure. To decipher them, in the present study, we originally recorded and analysed the mechanics as well as the X-ray diffraction patterns of human membrane-permeabilized single muscle fibres with a particular peptide substitution in actin, i.e. p.Phe352Ser. Results unravelled an unexpected cascade of molecular and cellular events. During contraction, p.Phe352Ser greatly enhances the strain of individual cross-bridges. Paradoxically, p.Phe352Ser also slightly lowers the number of cross-bridges by altering the rate of myosin head attachment to actin monomers. Overall, at the cell level, these divergent mechanisms conduct to an improved steady-state force production. Such results provide new surprising scientific insights and crucial information for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22358459

  7. Contractile vacuole complex--its expanding protein inventory.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The contractile vacuole complex (CVC) of some protists serves for the osmotic equilibration of water and ions, notably Ca(2+), by chemiosmotic exploitation of a H(+) gradient generated by the organelle-resident V-type H(+)-ATPase. Ca(2+) is mostly extruded, but there is also some reflux into the cytosol via Ca(2+)-release channels. Most data available are from Dictyostelium and Paramecium. In Paramecium, the major parts of CVC contain several v-/R-SNARE (synaptobrevins) and t-/Q-SNARE (syntaxins) proteins. This is complemented by Rab-type GTPases (shown in Tetrahymena) and exocyst components (Chlamydomonas). All this reflects a multitude of membrane interactions and fusion processes. Ca(2+)/H(+) and other exchangers are to be postulated, as are aquaporins and mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels. From the complexity of the organelle, many more proteins may be expected. For instance, the pore is endowed with its own set of proteins. We may now envisage the regulation of membrane dynamics (reversible tubulation) and the epigenetic control of organelle shape, size and positioning. New aspects about organelle function and biogenesis are sketched in Section 7. The manifold regulators currently known from CVC suggest the cooperation of widely different mechanisms to maintain its dynamic function and to drive its biogenesis.

  8. Intravital imaging of intestinal lacteals unveils lipid drainage through contractility

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Kibaek; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Park, Intae; Kim, Yeseul; Ahn, Soyeon; Park, Dae-Young; Hong, Young-Kwon; Alitalo, Kari; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Lacteals are lymphatic vessels located at the center of each intestinal villus and provide essential transport routes for lipids and other lipophilic molecules. However, it is unclear how absorbed molecules are transported through the lacteal. Here, we used reporter mice that express GFP under the control of the lymphatic-specific promoter Prox1 and a custom-built confocal microscope and performed intravital real-time visualization of the absorption and transport dynamics of fluorescence-tagged fatty acids (FAs) and various exogenous molecules in the intestinal villi in vivo. These analyses clearly revealed transepithelial absorption of these molecules via enterocytes, diffusive distribution over the lamina propria, and subsequent transport through lacteals. Moreover, we observed active contraction of lacteals, which seemed to be directly involved in dietary lipid drainage. Our analysis revealed that the smooth muscles that surround each lacteal are responsible for contractile dynamics and that lacteal contraction is ultimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system. These results indicate that the lacteal is a unique organ-specific lymphatic system and does not merely serve as a passive conduit but as an active pump that transports lipids. Collectively, using this efficient imaging method, we uncovered drainage of absorbed molecules in small intestinal villus lacteals and the involvement of lacteal contractibility. PMID:26436648

  9. Contractile Force of Human Extraocular Muscle: A Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongmei; Gao, Zhipeng; Chen, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The length-contractile force relationships of six human extraocular muscles (EOMs) in primary innervations should be determined during eye movement modeling and surgery of clinical EOMs. This study aims to investigate these relationships. Method. The proposal is based on the assumption that six EOMs have similar constitutive relationships, with the eye suspended in the primary position. The constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained by optimizing from previous experimental data and the theory of mechanical equilibrium using traditional model. Further, simulate the existing experiment of resistance force, and then compare the simulated results with the existing experimental results. Finally, the mechanical constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained. Results. The results show that the simulated resistance forces from the other four EOMs except for the horizontal recti well agree with previous experimental results. Conclusion. The mechanical constitutive relationships of six EOMs in primary innervations are obtained, and the rationality of the constitutive relationships is verified. Whereafter, the active stress-strain relationships of the six EOMs in the primary innervations are obtained. The research results can improve the eye movement model to predict the surgical amounts of EOMs before EOM surgery more precisely. PMID:27087774

  10. Cannabinoid-induced actomyosin contractility shapes neuronal morphology and growth

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Alexandre B; Ricobaraza, Ana; Carrel, Damien; Jordan, Benjamin M; Rico, Felix; Simon, Anne; Humbert-Claude, Marie; Ferrier, Jeremy; McFadden, Maureen H; Scheuring, Simon; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are recently recognized regulators of brain development, but molecular effectors downstream of type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R)-activation remain incompletely understood. We report atypical coupling of neuronal CB1Rs, after activation by endo- or exocannabinoids such as the marijuana component ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol, to heterotrimeric G12/G13 proteins that triggers rapid and reversible non-muscle myosin II (NM II) dependent contraction of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, through a Rho-GTPase and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). This induces rapid neuronal remodeling, such as retraction of neurites and axonal growth cones, elevated neuronal rigidity, and reshaping of somatodendritic morphology. Chronic pharmacological inhibition of NM II prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of dendritic development in vitro and leads, similarly to blockade of endocannabinoid action, to excessive growth of corticofugal axons into the sub-ventricular zone in vivo. Our results suggest that CB1R can rapidly transform the neuronal cytoskeleton through actomyosin contractility, resulting in cellular remodeling events ultimately able to affect the brain architecture and wiring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03159.001 PMID:25225054

  11. Coordination of contractility, adhesion and flow in migrating Physarum amoebae

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Owen L.; Zhang, Shun; Guy, Robert D.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between spatio-temporal coordination of intracellular flow and traction stress and the speed of amoeboid locomotion of microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum. We simultaneously perform particle image velocimetry and traction stress microscopy to measure the velocity of cytoplasmic flow and the stresses applied to the substrate by migrating Physarum microamoebae. In parallel, we develop a mathematical model of a motile cell which includes forces from the viscous cytosol, a poro-elastic, contractile cytoskeleton and adhesive interactions with the substrate. Our experiments show that flow and traction stress exhibit back-to-front-directed waves with a distinct phase difference. The model demonstrates that the direction and speed of locomotion are determined by this coordination between contraction, flow and adhesion. Using the model, we identify forms of coordination that generate model predictions consistent with experiments. We demonstrate that this coordination produces near optimal migration speed and is insensitive to heterogeneity in substrate adhesiveness. While it is generally thought that amoeboid motility is robust to changes in extracellular geometry and the nature of extracellular adhesion, our results demonstrate that coordination of adhesive forces is essential to producing robust migration. PMID:25904525

  12. Citron, a Rho target that affects contractility during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Madaule, P; Furuyashiki, T; Eda, M; Bito, H; Ishizaki, T; Narumiya, S

    2000-04-15

    The small GTPase Rho, which regulates cell shape, is thought to contribute to cytokinesis. Recently, Citron was characterized as a Rho target. This large protein contains a Ser/Thr kinase domain related to that of ROCK, another Rho effector. Both endogenous Citron and recombinant Citron localize to the cleavage furrow in dividing cells and to the midbody in post-mitotic cells. Moreover, overexpression of Citron deleted from its C-terminal sequence caused abnormal contractions specifically during cytokinesis, resulting in the formation of multinucleated cells. Cell shape, F-actin, intermediate filaments, and microtubules appeared essentially normal in these cells during interphase. Thus, Citron is a Rho effector that appears to function during cytokinesis, modulating its contractile process. In brain, however, Citron is highly expressed in a subset of neurons as a brain-specific isoform that lacks a kinase domain, Citron-N. This protein accumulates in synapses and associates to the NMDA receptor via interaction with the adaptor protein PSD95, suggesting that the function of Citron is specialized in the neurons.

  13. Vibromyographic quantification of voluntary isometric contractile force in the brachioradialis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jason P; Madhavan, Guruprasad; McLeod, Kenneth J

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of vibromyography (VMG) to accurately represent voluntary forearm muscle contractile force during attempted-isometric contraction of the brachioradialis. VMG signals were collected from the brachioradialis of healthy adult men (mean age, 26.6+/-9.8 years, N=24) during attempted-isometric contraction over a force range of 4.45 N to maximum sustained load. The VMG signals were decomposed using wavelet packet analysis techniques, and the corresponding wavelet packets were utilized in a multiple regression model for parameter reduction and identification of signal components which best correlated to muscle force. It was observed that just two wavelet components were sufficient to accurately predict muscle force (R2=0.984, P<0.0001). The signal force relationship observed is monotonic, though quadratic in form. More importantly, the wavelet data was able to predict absolute force output of the brachioradialis without normalization or prior knowledge of a subject's maximum voluntary force. These data show that VMG recordings are capable of providing a monotonic relationship between VMG signal and muscle force. Moreover, in contrast to EMG technology which can only provide relative force levels, VMG appears to be capable of reporting absolute force levels, an observation which is expected to lead to numerous applications in medicine and rehabilitation. PMID:17946062

  14. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... daylight are shorter; for example, during winter months. Bipolar disorder (also called manic depression or bipolar depression) is ... to a Therapist Anxiety Disorders Cutting Word! Depression Bipolar Disorder Why Am I So Sad? Sadness and Depression ...

  15. A method to measure myocardial calcium handling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Na; Badie, Nima; Yu, Lin; Abraham, Dennis; Cheng, Heping; Bursac, Nenad; Rockman, Howard A.; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    observed in mammalian myocardium. A mutation in Drosophila that causes an enlarged cardiac chamber and impaired contractile function is associated with abnormalities in the cytosolic Ca2+ transient as well as changes in transcript levels of proteins associated with Ca2+ handling. This new methodology has the potential to permit an examination of evolutionarily conserved myocardial Ca2+ handing mechanisms by applying the vast resources available in the fly genomics community to conduct genetic screens to identify new genes involved in generated Ca2+ transients and arrhythmias. PMID:21493892

  16. Thoracic epidural anesthesia improves functional recovery from myocardial stunning in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Rolf, N; Van de Velde, M; Wouters, P F; Möllhoff, T; Weber, T P; Van Aken, H K

    1996-11-01

    The effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on the contractile performance of ischemic and postischemic myocardium have not been well investigated. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of TEA on severity and duration of myocardial stunning in an experimental model for sublethal acute myocardial ischemia. Seven dogs were chronically instrumented for measurement of heart rate (HR), left atrial (LAP), aortic and left ventricular pressure (LVP), LV dP/dtmax' and myocardial wall-thickening fraction (WTF). An occluder around the left anterior descending artery (LAD) allowed induction of reversible LAD ischemia. TEA was performed with lidocaine 4 mg/kg through a chronically implanted epidural catheter at the second thoracic level. Regional myocardial blood flow was determined with colored microspheres. Two experiments were performed in a cross-over design on separate days: Experiment 1, induction of 10 min of LAD ischemia without TEA; and Experiment 2, induction of 10 min of LAD ischemia with TEA. WTF was measured at baseline (BL) and predetermined time points until complete recovery from ischemic dysfunction occurred. LAD ischemia caused a significant decrease of LAD-WTF with (-28% +/- 5.1% versus BL) and without TEA (-15.5% +/- 5.3% versus BL). After 3 h of reperfusion, WTF as percent of BL values was significantly higher with TEA (P < 0.001). BL values of WTF were reached after 24 h with TEA and after more than 48 h without TEA (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), LVP, LAP, and LVdP/dtmax between the groups during ischemia and reperfusion. In nonischemic myocardium TEA caused an increase of subendocardial blood flow. During ischemia neither the subendocardial/subepicardial nor the occluded/ normal zone blood flow was affected by TEA. TEA attenuates myocardial stunning in conscious dogs. This finding is consistent with data regarding a reduction of infarct size due to TEA. PMID

  17. Asymmetric division of contractile domains couples cell positioning and fate specification.

    PubMed

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Turlier, Hervé; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Eismann, Björn; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2016-08-18

    During pre-implantation development, the mammalian embryo self-organizes into the blastocyst, which consists of an epithelial layer encapsulating the inner-cell mass (ICM) giving rise to all embryonic tissues. In mice, oriented cell division, apicobasal polarity and actomyosin contractility are thought to contribute to the formation of the ICM. However, how these processes work together remains unclear. Here we show that asymmetric segregation of the apical domain generates blastomeres with different contractilities, which triggers their sorting into inner and outer positions. Three-dimensional physical modelling of embryo morphogenesis reveals that cells internalize only when differences in surface contractility exceed a predictable threshold. We validate this prediction using biophysical measurements, and successfully redirect cell sorting within the developing blastocyst using maternal myosin (Myh9)-knockout chimaeric embryos. Finally, we find that loss of contractility causes blastomeres to show ICM-like markers, regardless of their position. In particular, contractility controls Yap subcellular localization, raising the possibility that mechanosensing occurs during blastocyst lineage specification. We conclude that contractility couples the positioning and fate specification of blastomeres. We propose that this ensures the robust self-organization of blastomeres into the blastocyst, which confers remarkable regulative capacities to mammalian embryos. PMID:27487217

  18. Cell contractility arising from topography and shear flow determines human mesenchymal stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Sonam, Surabhi; Sathe, Sharvari R.; Yim, Evelyn K.F.; Sheetz, Michael P.; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) influences intracellular tension and is known to regulate stem cell fate. However, little is known about the physiological conditions in the bone marrow, where external forces such as fluid shear stress, apart from the physical characteristics of the ECM, influence stem cell response. Here, we hypothesize that substrate topography and fluid shear stress alter the cellular contractile forces, influence the genetic expression of the stem cells and hence alter their lineage. When fluid shear stress was applied, human MSCs with higher contractility (seeded on 1 μm wells) underwent osteogenesis, whereas those with lower contractility (seeded on 2 μm gratings) remained multipotent. Compared to human MSCs seeded on gratings, those seeded on wells exhibited altered alignment and an increase in the area and number of focal adhesions. When actomyosin contractility was inhibited, human MSCs did not exhibit differentiation, regardless of the topographical feature they were being cultured on. We conclude that the stresses generated by the applied fluid flow impinge on cell contractility to drive the stem cell differentiation via the contractility of the stem cells. PMID:26879739

  19. Effect of flosequinan (BTS 49465) on myocardial oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S; Touhey, B; Paul, J

    1990-06-01

    BTS 49465 (flosequinan), a putative selective, balanced arterial and venous vasodilator, displays positive inotropic effects in doses lower than those producing vasodilation. Thus rather than unloading the myocardium, flosequinan may increase myocardial work and oxygen consumption (MVO2), and may adversely affect the patient with myocardial ischemia or compromised coronary blood flow. This study compared the effects of flosequinan with milrinone, a mixed positive inotropic agent and vasodilator, and with nitroprusside (SNP), a standard direct-acting vasodilator, on myocardial dP/dT, MVO2, and myocardial energetics in the normal pentobartital-anesthetized dog. The effect of flosequinan on myocardial work was also evaluated in the dog with propranolol-induced heart failure (PIHF). Fifteen minutes after intraduodenal (id) administration of flosequinan (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg) to seven dogs, mean myocardial dP/dT was increased by 11%, 27%, and 54%, respectively, whereas stroke MVO2 was increased by 10%, 24%, and 47%, respectively. Doses of flosequinan greater than 0.3 mg/kg decreased left ventricular (LV) work but LV efficiency decreased in a dose-related manner. Milrinone (0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg, id) increased LV dp/dt by 34%, 68%, and 104% above basal values, while increasing stroke MVO2 by 24%, 106%, and 249%, respectively (n = 7). LV work and LV efficiency decreased after each dose of milrinone. SNP (0.001, 0.003, and 0.01 mg/kg/min, intravenously) did not increase dP/dT but decreased LV work by 28%, 42%, and 46% (n = 5). In animals with PIHF, flosequinan (1 and 3 mg/kg, id) increased LV dP/dT 58% and 87% and increased LV work by 58% and 76% above control values. It was concluded that (1) flosequinan is a positive inotropic agent as well as a vasodilator; (2) in the normal animal the energy cost of positive inotropic activity is less with flosequinan than with milrinone, despite the lesser vasodilating action of the former; and (3) in the animal with a depressed

  20. Anterior ST depression with acute transmural inferior infarction due to posterior infarction. A vectorcardiographic and scintigraphic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mukharji, J.; Murray, S.; Lewis, S.E.; Croft, C.H.; Corbett, J.R.; Willerson, J.T.; Rude, R.E.

    1984-07-01

    The hypothesis that anterior ST segment depression represents concomitant posterior infarction was tested in 49 patients admitted with a first transmural inferior myocardial infarction. Anterior ST depression was defined as 0.1 mV or more ST depression in leads V1, V2 or V3 on an electrocardiogram recorded within 18 hours of infarction. Serial vectorcardiograms and technetium pyrophosphate scans were obtained. Eighty percent of the patients (39 of 49) had anterior ST depression. Of these 39 patients, 34% fulfilled vectorcardiographic criteria for posterior infarction, and 60% had pyrophosphate scanning evidence of posterior infarction. Early anterior ST depression was neither highly sensitive (84%) nor specific (20%) for the detection of posterior infarction as defined by pyrophosphate imaging. Of patients with persistent anterior ST depression (greater than 72 hours), 87% had posterior infarction detected by pyrophosphate scan. In patients with inferior myocardial infarction, vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction correlated poorly with pyrophosphate imaging data. Right ventricular infarction was present on pyrophosphate imaging in 40% of patients with pyrophosphate changes of posterior infarction but without vectorcardiographic evidence of posterior infarction. It is concluded that: 1) the majority of patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction have anterior ST segment depression; 2) early anterior ST segment depression in such patients is not a specific marker for posterior infarction; and 3) standard vectorcardiographic criteria for transmural posterior infarction may be inaccurate in patients with concomitant transmural inferior myocardial infarction or right ventricular infarction, or both.

  1. Optimism and death: predicting the course and consequences of depression trajectories in response to heart attack.

    PubMed

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2014-12-01

    The course of depression in relation to myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as heart attack, and the consequences for mortality are not well characterized. Further, optimism may predict both the effects of MI on depression as well as mortality secondary to MI. In the current study, we utilized a large population-based prospective sample of older adults (N=2,147) to identify heterogeneous trajectories of depression from 6 years prior to their first-reported MI to 4 years after. Findings indicated that individuals were at significantly increased risk for mortality when depression emerged after their first-reported MI, compared with resilient individuals who had no significant post-MI elevation in depression symptomatology. Individuals with chronic depression and those demonstrating pre-event depression followed by recovery after MI were not at increased risk. Further, optimism, measured before MI, prospectively differentiated all depressed individuals from participants who were resilient.

  2. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ken T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances.

  3. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ken T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances. PMID:27508064

  4. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Ken T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca) regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1) the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2) the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3) newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4) the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances. PMID:27508064

  5. Non-invasive technology that improves cardiac function after experimental myocardial infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz).

    PubMed

    Uryash, Arkady; Bassuk, Jorge; Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R; Adams, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  6. Non-Invasive Technology That Improves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz)

    PubMed Central

    Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  7. Myocardial function improved by electromagnetic field induction of stress protein hsp70.

    PubMed

    George, Isaac; Geddis, Matthew S; Lill, Zachary; Lin, Hana; Gomez, Teodoro; Blank, Martin; Oz, Mehmet C; Goodman, Reba

    2008-09-01

    Studies on myocardial function have shown that hsp70, stimulated by an increase in temperature, leads to improved survival following ischemia-reperfusion (I-R). Low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) also induce the stress protein hsp70, but without elevating temperature. We have examined the hemodynamic changes in concert with EMF pre-conditioning and the induction of hsp70 to determine whether improved myocardial function occurs following I-R injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were exposed to EMF (60 Hz, 8 microT) for 30 min prior to I-R. Ischemia was then induced by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) for 30 min, followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Blood and heart tissue levels for hsp70 were determined by Western blot and RNA transcription by rtPCR. Significant upregulation of the HSP70 gene and increased hsp70 levels were measured in response to EMF pre-exposures. Invasive hemodynamics, as measured using a volume conductance catheter, demonstrated significant recovery of systolic contractile function after 30 min of reperfusion following EMF exposure. Additionally, isovolemic relaxation, a measure of ventricular diastolic function, was markedly improved in EMF-treated animals. In conclusion, non-invasive EMF induction of hsp70 preserved myocardial function and has the potential to improve tolerance to ischemic injury.

  8. Sex-dependent effects of sleep deprivation on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah L; Fry, Megan E; Johnson, Brandon L; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether the effects of sleep deprivation are limited to increasing the likelihood of experiencing a myocardial infarction or if sleep deprivation also increases the extent of myocardial injury. In this study, rats were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 96 h using the platform-over-water method. Control rats were subjected to the same condition except the control platform was large enough for the rats to sleep. Hearts from sleep deprived and control rats were subjected to 20 min ischemia on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Infarct size and post ischemic recovery of contractile function were unaffected by sleep deprivation in male hearts. In contrast, hearts from sleep-deprived females exhibited significantly larger infarcts than hearts from control females. Post ischemic recovery of rate pressure product and + dP/dT were significantly attenuated by sleep deprivation in female hearts, and post ischemic recovery of end diastolic pressure was significantly elevated in hearts from sleep deprived females compared to control females, indicating that post ischemic recovery of both systolic and diastolic function were worsened by sleep deprivation. These data provide evidence that sleep deprivation increases the extent of ischemia-induced injury in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26953626

  9. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  10. [IMPROVING THE EFFICACY OF THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION COMPLICATED BY CIRCULATORY FAILURE].

    PubMed

    Zhenilo, V M; Avsaragova, A Z; Astakhova, Z T

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of drug remaxol inclusion in the scheme of treatment of patients with myocardial infarction on the background of degree III - III acute cardiac insufficiency was evaluated by the analysis of clinical and laboratory data of 126 patients with newly diagnosed acute myocardial infarction including ST-segment elevation on the background of acute cardiac insufficiency. Depending on the regimen, patients were divided into two groups. The first (control) group included 60 patients who received conventional thrombolytic therapy; the second (main) group included 66 patients which, after thrombolytic therapy, received remaxol (single daily intravenous administration, 400 mL at 3 - 4 mL/min rate) with controlled central venous pressure, arterial pressure, and diuresis. The course lasted for 3 - 5 days, depending on the severity of condition. A high efficiency of the treatment regimen including remaxol was established as characterized by more rapid (in comparison to conventional therapy) stabilization of disturbed systemic hemodynamics and recovery of weakened myocardial contractility, decreased risk of cardiac arrhythmias, and relieved hyperhomocysteinemia that, in turn, reduced the risk of complications such as thrombosis and thromboembolism. PMID:27455573

  11. Airway contractility and remodeling: links to asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Syyong, Harley T; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D; Murphy, Thomas M; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are initially responsible for ASM activation. However, the extent of narrowing of the airway lumen due to ASM shortening can be influenced by many factors and it remains a real challenge to decipher the exact role of ASM in causing asthmatic symptoms. Innovative tools, such as the forced oscillation technique, continue to develop and have been proven useful to assess some features of ASM function in vivo. Despite these technologic advances, it is still not clear whether excessive narrowing in asthma is driven by ASM abnormalities, by other alterations in non-muscle factors or simply because of the overexpression of spasmogens. This is because a multitude of forces are acting on the airway wall, and because not only are these forces constantly changing but they are also intricately interconnected. To counteract these limitations, investigators have utilized in vitro and ex vivo systems to assess and compare asthmatic and non-asthmatic ASM contractility. This review describes: 1- some muscle and non-muscle factors that are altered in asthma that may lead to airway narrowing and asthma symptoms; 2- some technologies such as the forced oscillation technique that have the potential to unveil the role of ASM in airway narrowing in vivo; and 3- some data from ex vivo and in vitro methods that probe the possibility that airway hyperresponsiveness is due to the altered environment surrounding the ASM or, alternatively, to a hypercontractile ASM phenotype that can be either innate or acquired.

  12. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: alterations in contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Riley, D. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the contractile properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle before and during recovery from fatigue, to relate the observed functional changes to alterations in specific steps in the crossbridge model of muscle contraction, and to determine how fatigue affects the force-frequency relationship. The frog ST (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. The fatigue protocol reduced peak twitch (Pt) and tetanic (Po) force to 32 and 8.5% of initial force, respectively. The decline in Pt was less than Po, in part due to a prolongation in the isometric contraction time (CT), which increased to 300% of the initial value. The isometric twitch duration was greatly prolonged as reflected by the lengthened CT and the 800% increase in the one-half relaxation time (1/2RT). Both Pt and Po showed a biphasic recovery, a rapid initial phase (2 min) followed by a slower (40 min) return to the prefatigue force. CT and 1/2RT also recovered in two phases, returning to 160 and 265% of control in the first 5 min. CT returned to the prefatigue value between 35 and 40 min, whereas even at 60 min 1/2RT was 133% of control. The maximal velocity of shortening, determined by the slack test, was significantly reduced [from 6.7 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 0.4 optimal muscle length/s] at fatigue. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to the left, so that optimal frequency for generating Po was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Purinergic and cholinergic components of bladder contractility and flow.

    PubMed

    Theobald, R J

    1995-01-01

    The role of ATP as a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the urinary tract has been the subject of much study, particularly whether ATP has a functional role in producing urine flow. Recent studies suggested significant species variation, specifically a variation between cat and other species. This study was performed to determine the in vivo response of cat urinary bladder to pelvic nerve stimulation (PNS) and to the exogenous administration of cholinergic and purinergic agents. In anesthetized cats, bladder contractions and fluid expulsion was measured in response to PNS and to the exogenous administration of cholinergic and purinergic agents. Fluid was instilled into the bladder and any fluid expelled by bladder contractions induced by PNS or exogenous agents was collected in a beaker. The volume was measured in a graduated cylinder and recorded. PNS, carbachol and APPCP produced sustained contractions with significant expulsion of fluid. ATP, ACh and hypogastric nerve stimulation did not produce any significant expulsion of fluid. Atropine, a cholinergic antagonist, inhibited PNS contractions and fluid expulsion with no effect on purinergic actions. There was a significant relationship between the magnitude of the contraction, duration of the contractions and volume of fluid expelled. The data and information from other studies, strongly suggests a functional role for ATP as a cotransmitter in the lower urinary tract different from ACh's role. ATP stimulation of a specific purinergic receptor plays a role in initiation of bladder contractions and perhaps in the initiation of urine flow from the bladder. ACh's role is functionally different and appears to be more involved in maintenance of contractile activity and flow. PMID:7830505

  14. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  15. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  16. Spontaneous Formation of a Globally Connected Contractile Network in a Microtubule-Motor System.

    PubMed

    Torisawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Daisuke; Ishihara, Shuji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-26

    Microtubule (MT) networks play key roles in cell division, intracellular transport, and cell motility. These functions of MT networks occur through interactions between MTs and various associated proteins, notably motor proteins that bundle and slide MTs. Our objective in this study was to address the question of how motors determine the nature of MT networks. We conducted in vitro assays using homotetrameric kinesin Eg5, a motor protein involved in the formation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. The mixing of Eg5 and MTs produced a range of spatiotemporal dynamics depending on the motor/filament ratio. Low motor/filament ratios produced globally connected static MT networks with sparsely distributed contractile active nodes (motor-accumulating points with radially extending MTs). Increasing the motor/filament ratio facilitated the linking of contractile active nodes and led to a global contraction of the network. When the motor/filament ratio was further increased, densely distributed active nodes formed local clusters and segmented the network into pieces with their strong contractile forces. Altering the properties of the motor through the use of chimeric Eg5, which has kinesin-1 heads, resulted in the generation of many isolated asters. These results suggest that the spatial distribution of contractile active nodes determines the dynamics of MT-motor networks. We then developed a coarse-grained model of MT-motor networks and identified two essential features for reproducing the experimentally observed patterns: an accumulation of motors that form the active nodes necessary to generate contractile forces, and a nonlinear dependency of contractile force on motor densities. Our model also enabled us to characterize the mechanical properties of the contractile network. Our study provides insight into how local motor-MT interactions generate the spatiotemporal dynamics of macroscopic network structures. PMID:27463139

  17. Stable, Covalent Attachment of Laminin to Microposts Improves the Contractility of Mouse Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical output of contracting cardiomyocytes, the muscle cells of the heart, relates to healthy and disease states of the heart. Culturing cardiomyocytes on arrays of elastomeric microposts can enable inexpensive and high-throughput studies of heart disease at the single-cell level. However, cardiomyocytes weakly adhere to these microposts, which limits the possibility of using biomechanical assays of single cardiomyocytes to study heart disease. We hypothesized that a stable covalent attachment of laminin to the surface of microposts improves cardiomyocyte contractility. We cultured cells on polydimethylsiloxane microposts with laminin covalently bonded with the organosilanes 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. We measured displacement of microposts induced by the contractility of mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, which attach better than mature cardiomyocytes to substrates. We observed time-dependent changes in contractile parameters such as micropost deformation, contractility rates, contraction and relaxation speeds, and the times of contractions. These parameters were affected by the density of laminin on microposts and by the stability of laminin binding to micropost surfaces. Organosilane-mediated binding resulted in higher laminin surface density and laminin binding stability. 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane provided the highest laminin density but did not provide stable protein binding with time. Higher surface protein binding stability and strength were observed with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde. In cultured cardiomyocytes, contractility rate, contraction speeds, and contraction time increased with higher laminin stability. Given these variations in contractile function, we conclude that binding of laminin to microposts via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with glutaraldehyde improves contractility observed by an increase in beating rate and contraction speed as it occurs during the

  18. How reliable is myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Willerson, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial scintigraphic techniques available presently allow a sensitive and relatively specific diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction when they are used correctly, although every technique has definite limitations. Small myocardial infarcts (less than 3 gm.) may be missed, and there are temporal limitations in the usefulness of the scintigraphic techniques. The development of tomographic methodology that may be used with single-photon radionuclide emitters (including technetium and /sup 201/Tl will allow the detection of relatively small abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and regions of myocardial infarction and will help to provide a more objective interpretation of the myocardial scintigrams. The use of overlay techniques allowing simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion, infarct-avid imaging, and radionuclide ventriculograms will provide insight into the relevant aspects of the extent of myocardial damage, the relationship of damage to myocardial perfusion, and the functional impact of myocardial infarction on ventricular performance.

  19. Reactivation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha is associated with contractile dysfunction in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Young, M E; Laws, F A; Goodwin, G W; Taegtmeyer, H

    2001-11-30

    In pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, the heart increases its reliance on glucose as a fuel while decreasing fatty acid oxidation. A key regulator of this substrate switching in the hypertrophied heart is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). We tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of PPARalpha is an essential component of cardiac hypertrophy at the levels of increased mass, gene expression, and metabolism by pharmacologically reactivating PPARalpha. Pressure overload (induced by constriction of the ascending aorta for 7 days in rats) resulted in cardiac hypertrophy, increased expression of fetal genes (atrial natriuretic factor and skeletal alpha-actin), decreased expression of PPARalpha and PPARalpha-regulated genes (medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4), and caused substrate switching (measured ex vivo in the isolated working heart preparation). Treatment of rats with the specific PPARalpha agonist WY-14,643 (8 days) did not affect the trophic response or atrial natriuretic factor induction to pressure overload. However, PPARalpha activation blocked skeletal alpha-actin induction, reversed the down-regulation of measured PPARalpha-regulated genes in the hypertrophied heart, and prevented substrate switching. This PPARalpha reactivation concomitantly resulted in severe depression of cardiac power and efficiency in the hypertrophied heart (measured ex vivo). Thus, PPARalpha down-regulation is essential for the maintenance of contractile function of the hypertrophied heart. PMID:11574533

  20. [ROLE OF THROMBOXANE AND LEUKOTRIENES IN MECHANISMS OF CONTRACTILE REACTIONS OF PORTAL VEIN, INDUCED BY ACETYLCHLINE AND PHENYLEPHRINE].

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, O O; Yanchuk, P I; Pasichnichenko, O M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of picotamide and zileuton on tonic contractile activity of the rat portal vein preparations, induced by acetylcholine (2.10(-5) mol/1) and phenylephrine (5.10(-7) mol/1) were investigated. Conversion of arachidonic acid products (prostaglandins, leukotrienes) synthesized by endothelial cells, plays an important role in the local regulation of vascular tone. The compounds formed in a cascade of enzymatic transformations can modulate the effect of other vasoactive factors. Picotamide (6,5.10(-5) mol/1) - thromboxane receptor and thromboxane -synthase blocker - depress acetylcholine-induction tonic contraction of isolated segments of portal vein with intact endothelium by 29% and norepinephrine-induction reduction of 45% relative to the control values. The obtained results indicate a participation of thromboxane and/or endoperoxide H2 in this reaction. Partial inhibition of the contractions by 5-lipoxygenase blocker zileuton(4,2.10(-5) mol/1) at 23% relative to control values suggests, that products of lipoxigenase pathways of arachidonic acid conversion are involved in mechanisms of specified reactions. These data indicate complex mechanisms of regulation of vascular tone of the portal vein, which play an important role eicosanoids. Further study of these mechanisms is necessary for the formation of basic knowledge, as well as to elucidate the mechanisms of occurrence and development of pathological conditions of vessels and the development of methods of their correction.

  1. Contractile properties, fiber types, and myosin isoforms in fast and slow muscles of hyperactive Japanese waltzing mice.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, Gerhard; Schmalbruch, Ina; Soukup, Tomás; Pette, Dirk

    2003-12-01

    This study focuses on the effects of neuromuscular hyperactivity on the contractile properties, fiber type composition, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscles in Japanese waltzing mice (JWM) of the C57BL/6J-v2J strain. The same properties were studied in the homologous muscle of control CBA/J mice (CM). In comparison to CM, the JWM exhibited (i) longer activity periods, prolonged bouts of running and a higher food intake, (ii) slower twitch and tetanic contractions of both EDL and SOL muscles, decreased cold and post-tetanic potentiation of the EDL, as well as increased cold and post-tetanic depressions of the SOL. Electrophoretic analyses of MHC isoform revealed a shift toward slower isoforms in both EDL and SOL muscles of JWM as compared to the homologous muscles of CM, namely, a shift from the fastest MHCIIb to the MHCIId/x isoform in the EDL muscle and a shift from MHCIIa to MHCI in the SOL muscle. The latter also contained a higher percentage of type I fibers and displayed a higher capillary density than the SOL muscle of CM. These findings show that the inherently enhanced motor activity of the JWM leads to fiber type transitions in the direction of slower phenotypes. JWM thus represent a suitable model for studying fast-to-slow fiber transitions under the influence of spontaneous motor hyperactivity.

  2. Myocardial contusion caused by a baseball.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, M; Hirose, K; Mori, T; Kusukawa, J; Tomioka, N; Watanabe, Y

    1996-10-01

    Myocardial contusion is a rare type of sports injury. We report a case of myocardial contusion caused by a baseball. In this patient, arrhythmias were induced by an exercise test 1 week after injury. That patients with myocardial contusion but without arrhythmias at rest need to be treated carefully is emphasized.

  3. Electrocardiograms Corresponding to the Development of Myocardial Infarction in Anesthetized WHHLMI Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), an Animal Model for Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether features indicative of myocardial ischemia occur in the electrocardiograms (ECG) in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for human familial hypercholesterolemia. ECG were recorded in 110 anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (age, 10 to 39 mo) by using unipolar and bipolar limb leads with or without chest leads. We noted the following electrocardiographic changes: T wave inversion (37.4%), ST segment depression (31.8%), deep Q wave (16.3%), reduced R wave amplitude (7.3%), ST segment elevation (2.7%), and high T wave (1.8%). These ECG changes resembled those in human patients with coronary heart disease. Histopathologic examination revealed that the left ventricular wall showed acute myocardial lesions, including loss of cross-striations, vacuolar degeneration, coagulation necrosis of cardiac myocytes, and edema between myofibrils, in addition to chronic myocardial lesions such as myocardial fibrosis. The coronary arteries that caused these ECG changes were severely stenosed due to atherosclerotic lesions. Ischemic ECG changes corresponded to the locations of the myocardial lesions. Normal ECG waveforms were similar between WHHLMI rabbits and humans, in contrast to the large differences between rabbits and mice or rats. In conclusion, ischemic ECG changes in WHHLMI rabbits reflect the location of myocardial lesions, making this model useful for studying coronary heart disease. PMID:23114045

  4. Electrocardiograms corresponding to the development of myocardial infarction in anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), an animal model for familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether features indicative of myocardial ischemia occur in the electrocardiograms (ECG) in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for human familial hypercholesterolemia. ECG were recorded in 110 anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (age, 10 to 39 mo) by using unipolar and bipolar limb leads with or without chest leads. We noted the following electrocardiographic changes: T wave inversion (37.4%), ST segment depression (31.8%), deep Q wave (16.3%), reduced R wave amplitude (7.3%), ST segment elevation (2.7%), and high T wave (1.8%). These ECG changes resembled those in human patients with coronary heart disease. Histopathologic examination revealed that the left ventricular wall showed acute myocardial lesions, including loss of cross-striations, vacuolar degeneration, coagulation necrosis of cardiac myocytes, and edema between myofibrils, in addition to chronic myocardial lesions such as myocardial fibrosis. The coronary arteries that caused these ECG changes were severely stenosed due to atherosclerotic lesions. Ischemic ECG changes corresponded to the locations of the myocardial lesions. Normal ECG waveforms were similar between WHHLMI rabbits and humans, in contrast to the large differences between rabbits and mice or rats. In conclusion, ischemic ECG changes in WHHLMI rabbits reflect the location of myocardial lesions, making this model useful for studying coronary heart disease. PMID:23114045

  5. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C; McClure, Marisa C; Smith, Margaret A; Abel, Peter W; Bradley, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar) but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were found in isolated myometrium

  6. Myocardial protection by simple systemic hypothermia without aortic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Susilo, A W; Rocher, A; Mohan, R; van der Laarse, A

    1990-01-01

    Systemic hypothermia at 25 degrees-28 degrees C without chemical cardioplegia was used in 908 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Local coronary artery flow was interrupted only during grafting of a distal anastomosis. Systemic perfusion pressure was maintained at 80-100 mmHg, hematocrit at 20%-25%, and pCO2 and pH were monitored during hypothermia according to the alpha-stat principle, while the left ventricle was vented routinely. Proximal anastomoses were performed just before extracorporeal circulation was started by only partially occluding the ascending aorta. Preoperatively 61.9% of the patients had had a myocardial infarction, and 44% had unstable angina. In 14% a severe lesion of the main stem of the left coronary artery was present. Left ventricular function was moderately depressed in 25% and severely depressed in 8% of the patients. Forty-eight patients (5.3%) were aged 70 years or older. The mean number of grafts placed per patient was 3.3. Perioperative myocardial infarction occurred in 3%. Death due to left ventricular failure occurred in 0.4%. No left ventricular assist devices were needed; an intra-aortic balloon pump was used in 1%; positive inotropic support was required in 3.8% of the patients. These results indicate that systemic hypothermia alone provides safe myocardial protection and in certain cases may be the method of choice, particularly if aortic cross clamping or administration of cardioplegic solution is contraindicated. In addition, this method provides rapid revascularization of a severely ischemic zone, as present after unsuccessful PTCA procedures.

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Myocardial Homeostasis, Self-Regeneration and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Marco; Papini, Gaia; Ciofini, Enrica; Barile, Lucio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The adult myocardium has limited capacity to preserve, renew or rejuvenate itself. The local microenvironment may induce epigenetic changes affecting the survival, proliferation, function and senescence of cardiac cells at rest and following the exposure to different stressors. The cellular response to microenvironment is characterized by the release of ions, oxygen free radicals, auto/paracrine factors and RNAs that drive the magnitude of gene reprogramming through the interaction with specific promoters. The epigenetic alterations may act at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level and change cardiac physiological traits. The abnormal DNA methylation underlies the progressive decay of contractile function and the angiogenic ability; while, the histone acetylation promotes the survival, function and proliferation of cardiac cells in the presence of ischemic microenvironment. At least, the expression and secretion of microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs may regulate the threshold to stress tolerance of adult cardiac cells and induce the matrix turnover as well. Natural or synthetic active compounds effectively modulate the epigenetic state of cardiac cells. Plant foods contain many active compounds with epigenetic properties and might assume a clinical significance as natural cardiac regenerators or rejuvenators. Our review describes novel epigenetic mechanisms that underpin myocardial remodeling, repair/ regeneration or senescence in order to support the development of most effective and reproducible rescue therapy of adult heart. PMID:26122032

  8. [Effect of D-(-)-norgestrel on uterine contractility in the puerperium (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Romero-Salinas, G; La Torre-Rasguido, F; Vera-Cáceres, R; Escalera-Villarreal, G; Bandera-Gonzalez, B

    1981-01-01

    It is usual for women to ask for temporary control of fertility during the puerperium. When hormonal therapy is administered, the selection of the adequate pill is very important. The effect of D-(-)-norgestrel 300mg was studied on uterine contractility values during puerperium is seven patients breast feeding and was compared with a control group of 26. The 33 patients had the following characteristics: multiparous during puerperium without recent episiotomy, with healthy cervix, absence of genital septic focus, uterine tumours or malformations; all of them breast feeding. In the hypothesis, it was considered that the endogenous oxytocin increases and stimulates the mammary mioepithelium and uterine contractilities. For recording uterine contractility, the technique of Jaumandreu and Hendricks was used. The recordings were made during 24 hours postpartum, and at 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 days with a duration 2 to 3 hours. All the studies were longitudinal. The changes of the human uterine contractility during normal puerperium were estimated. The range of the tonus was 22--41 mm Hg, the intensity 5--18 mm Hg, the frequency 17--23 contractions in 10 minutes, and the uterine activity 102--223 Montevideo Units. In the control group the following results were obtained: The range of the tonus was 24--34 mm Hg, the intensity 9--16 mm Hg, the frequency 17--37 contractions in 10 minutes, and the uterine contractility 137--524 Montevideo Units. In the comparative study Student's t test was used and p estimated.

  9. Generation of contractile actomyosin bundles depends on mechanosensitive actin filament assembly and disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Tojkander, Sari; Gateva, Gergana; Husain, Amjad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion and morphogenesis of many non-muscle cells are guided by contractile actomyosin bundles called ventral stress fibers. While it is well established that stress fibers are mechanosensitive structures, physical mechanisms by which they assemble, align, and mature have remained elusive. Here we show that arcs, which serve as precursors for ventral stress fibers, undergo lateral fusion during their centripetal flow to form thick actomyosin bundles that apply tension to focal adhesions at their ends. Importantly, this myosin II-derived force inhibits vectorial actin polymerization at focal adhesions through AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of VASP, and thereby halts stress fiber elongation and ensures their proper contractility. Stress fiber maturation additionally requires ADF/cofilin-mediated disassembly of non-contractile stress fibers, whereas contractile fibers are protected from severing. Taken together, these data reveal that myosin-derived tension precisely controls both actin filament assembly and disassembly to ensure generation and proper alignment of contractile stress fibers in migrating cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06126.001 PMID:26652273

  10. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-06-30

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity.

  11. In vitro contractile effects of agents used in the clinical management of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John J; Crosby, David A; Crankshaw, Denis J

    2016-10-15

    Uterine atony is a major cause of postpartum haemorrhage and maternal mortality. However, the comparative pharmacology of agents used to treat this condition is poorly understood. This study evaluates, using human pregnant myometrium in vitro, a range of contractile parameters for agents used in the clinical treatment of atonic postpartum haemorrhage. The effects of oxytocin, carbetocin, ergometrine, carboprost, syntometrine and misoprostol were investigated in 146 myometrial strips from 19 donors. The potency and maximal response values were obtained, and compared, using both maximal amplitude and mean contractile force as indices of contraction. Single, EC50 concentrations of the agents were administered and both force and contraction peak parameters were compared during a 15-min exposure. Differences were considered significant when P<0.05. There were no significant differences in the peak amplitude of response between agents, except for misoprostol, which was inactive. There was a wide difference in potencies using both measures of contractility, with oxytocin and carbetocin being the most potent. The most important difference between the agents was in their ability to increase the mean contractile force, with oxytocin superior to all agents except syntometrine. In single dose experiments, mean contractile force was the parameter that separated the agents. In this respect, oxytocin was not statistically different from carboprost or syntometrine, but was superior to all other agents. These findings support a clear role for oxytocin as the first line agent for treatment of postpartum haemorrhage and raise doubts about the potential clinical usefulness of misoprostol. PMID:27423315

  12. Generation of contractile actomyosin bundles depends on mechanosensitive actin filament assembly and disassembly.

    PubMed

    Tojkander, Sari; Gateva, Gergana; Husain, Amjad; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion and morphogenesis of many non-muscle cells are guided by contractile actomyosin bundles called ventral stress fibers. While it is well established that stress fibers are mechanosensitive structures, physical mechanisms by which they assemble, align, and mature have remained elusive. Here we show that arcs, which serve as precursors for ventral stress fibers, undergo lateral fusion during their centripetal flow to form thick actomyosin bundles that apply tension to focal adhesions at their ends. Importantly, this myosin II-derived force inhibits vectorial actin polymerization at focal adhesions through AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of VASP, and thereby halts stress fiber elongation and ensures their proper contractility. Stress fiber maturation additionally requires ADF/cofilin-mediated disassembly of non-contractile stress fibers, whereas contractile fibers are protected from severing. Taken together, these data reveal that myosin-derived tension precisely controls both actin filament assembly and disassembly to ensure generation and proper alignment of contractile stress fibers in migrating cells. PMID:26652273

  13. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  14. Cocaine directly augments the alpha-adrenergic contractile response of the pregnant rabbit uterus.

    PubMed

    Hurd, W W; Robertson, P A; Riemer, R K; Goldfien, A; Roberts, J M

    1991-01-01

    Cocaine use in pregnancy is associated with a premature labor rate as high as 50%, but little is known about its effect on uterine contractility. To determine whether cocaine directly augments pregnant uterus contractility, uterine strips from 27-day pregnant New Zealand White rabbits (term, 31 days) were exposed to cocaine alone (30 mumol/L) or cocaine plus epinephrine (10(-9) to 10(-5) mol/L) or oxytocin (10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/L). Cocaine alone produced no contractions, but increased the epinephrine sensitivity by 51% and the maximal response by 33%. When beta-adrenoceptors were blocked with DL-propranolol (2 mumol/L), the contractile response to epinephrine was increased, and cocaine's effect was blocked. In the presence of the stereoisomer D-propranolol (2 mumol/L) with no beta-adrenergic antagonist activity, the contractile response to epinephrine was unchanged, but the effect of cocaine was still blocked. We conclude that cocaine directly augments the alpha-adrenergic contractile response of the pregnant rabbit uterus by a mechanism that is blocked by the non-beta-adrenergic effects of propranolol.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Pyloric Cholinergic Muscle Contractility of Rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Sun, Hong-Xu; Chu, Min; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-08-31

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) selectively cleaves synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and results in inhibition of the fusion of synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters with the presynaptic membrane to undergo exocytosis and release. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BTX-A inhibited the pyloric smooth muscle contractility induced by acetylcholine (ACh) after BTX-A-mediated cleavage of SNAP-25 antagonized by toosendanin (TSN). Three groups of rat pyloric muscle strips were studied in vitro. All strips were allowed to equilibrate for 52 min under a basal loading tension of 1 g in Krebs solution and spontaneous contractile waves were recorded as their own controls before adding each drug. According to experimental protocols, 100 μM ACh, 1 μM atropine, 29.6 μM TSN and 10 U/ml BTX-A was added, respectively. BTX-A directly inhibited pyloric spontaneous contraction and ACh-induced contractile response. Addition of 10 U/ml BTX-A still inhibited pyloric smooth muscle contractility following incubation of TSN, while subsequent administration of 100 μM ACh had no effect. BTX-A inhibits pyloric smooth muscle contractility in our study suggesting BTX-A inhibits not only ACh release from cholinergic nerves but also muscarinic cholinergic muscular transmission. PMID:27426259

  16. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  17. Cardio-protection by Ginkgo biloba extract 50 in rats with acute myocardial infarction is related to Na⁺-Ca²⁺ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Hua; Bao, Yi-Min; Wang, Xing-Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba has been used for medical purposes for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine. Ginkgo biloba extract 50 (GBE50) is a new standardized GBE product that matches the standardized German product as EGb761. This paper is aimed at studying the cardio-protection effects of GBE50 Salvia miltiorrhiza on myocardial function, area at risk, myocardial ultra-structure, and expression of calcium handling proteins in rat ischemic myocardium. Myocardium ischemia was induced by the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery occlusion and myocardial function was recorded by a transducer advanced into the left ventricle on a computer system. In vitro myocardial infarction was measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and Evans blue staining of heart sections. Morphological change was evaluated by electric microscopy and Western blotting was used for protein expression. Hemodynamic experiments in vivo showed that postischemic cardiac contractile function was reduced in ischemic rats. Salvia miltiorrhiza (7.5 g/kg/d×7) and Ginkgo biloba extract 50 (GBE50) (100 mg/kg/d×7) improved post-schemic cardiac diastolic dysfunction while not affecting the systolic function. In hearts of GBE50 group and Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) group, the area at risk was significantly reduced and myocardial structure was better-preserved. Moreover, Na⁺-Ca²⁺ exchanger (NCX) expression increase and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPase 2 (SERCA2), LTCC, and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) expression decreases were smaller than those in ischemia group. There was a significant difference between the GBE50 and ischemia group in NCX expression. GBE50 could improve recovery in contractile function and prevent myocardium from ischemia damage, which may be caused by attenuating the abnormal expression of NCX.

  18. Morphological aspects of myocardial bridges.

    PubMed

    Lujinović, Almira; Kulenović, Amela; Kapur, Eldan; Gojak, Refet

    2013-11-01

    Although some myocardial bridges can be asymptomatic, their presence often causes coronary disease either through direct compression of the "tunnel" segment or through stimulation and accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the segment proximally to the myocardial bridge. The studied material contained 30 human hearts received from the Department of Anatomy. The hearts were preserved 3 to 5 days in 10% formalin solution. Thereafter, the fatty tissue was removed and arterial blood vessels prepared by careful dissection with special reference to the presence of the myocardial bridges. Length and thickness of the bridges were measured by the precise electronic caliper. The angle between the myocardial bridge fibre axis and other axis of the crossed blood vessel was measured by a goniometer. The presence of the bridges was confirmed in 53.33% of the researched material, most frequently (43.33%) above the anterior interventricular branch. The mean length of the bridges was 14.64 ± 9.03 mm and the mean thickness was 1.23 ± 1.32 mm. Myocardial bridge fibres pass over the descending blood vessel at the angle of 10-90 degrees. The results obtained on a limited sample suggest that the muscular index of myocardial bridge is the highest for bridges located on RIA, but that the difference is not significant in relation to bridges located on other branches. The results obtained suggest that bridges located on other branches, not only those on RIA, could have a great contractive power and, consequently, a great compressive force, which would be exerted on the wall of a crossed blood vessel.

  19. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  20. Depression: What We Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobel, Brana; Hirschfeld, Robert M. A.

    This booklet is concerned with the area of clinical depression. Questions about clinical depression are briefly answered in an overview section and are examined in greater detail in the five chapters that follow. In chapter 1, depression is defined and various types of depression are identified. The origins of depression are explored in the second…

  1. Depression and Suicidality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Suicidality ratings for 90 patients in a voluntary psychiatric hospital ward are correlated with five possible indices of depression: self-ratings of depression, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Depression scale scores, depressive diagnosis, and alcohol and drug use. Both depression and suicidality emerges in the factor structure as…

  2. [Fatigue and depression].

    PubMed

    Hell, Daniel

    2015-04-22

    Fatigue is characterised in an overview of the literature as a specific phenomenon of depression. Its differential diagnosis is discussed. Distinctions and correspondences to burnout are elaborated. Fatigue is not an obligatory symptom of depressive episodes, although it can contribute to depressive developments. The importance of fatigue in depressive episodes and its therapy is shown with the help of a circular model of depression.

  3. Cardiomyocyte VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B induces compensatory hypertrophy and preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zentilin, Lorena; Puligadda, Uday; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Zacchigna, Serena; Collesi, Chiara; Pattarini, Lucia; Ruozi, Giulia; Camporesi, Silvia; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Pepe, Martino; Recchia, Fabio A; Giacca, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that the function of members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family extends beyond blood vessel formation. Here, we show that the prolonged intramyocardial expression of VEGF-A(165) and VEGF-B(167) on adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery determined a marked improvement in cardiac function after myocardial infarction in rats, by promoting cardiac contractility, preserving viable cardiac tissue, and preventing remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) over time. Consistent with this functional outcome, animals treated with both factors showed diminished fibrosis and increased contractile myocardium, which were more pronounced after expression of the selective VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) ligand VEGF-B, in the absence of significant induction of angiogenesis. We found that cardiomyocytes expressed VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, and neuropilin-1 and that, in particular, VEGFR-1 was specifically up-regulated in hypoxia and on exposure to oxidative stress. VEGF-B exerted powerful antiapoptotic effect in both cultured cardiomyocytes and after myocardial infarction in vivo. Finally, VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B was found to elicit a peculiar gene expression profile proper of the compensatory, hypertrophic response, consisting in activation of alphaMHC and repression of betaMHC and skeletal alpha-actin, and an increase in SERCA2a, RYR, PGC1alpha, and cardiac natriuretic peptide transcripts, both in cultured cardiomyocytes and in infarcted hearts. The finding that VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B prevents loss of cardiac mass and promotes maintenance of cardiac contractility over time has obvious therapeutic implications.

  4. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  5. Natural and unnatural triggers of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Previous analyses have suggested that factors that stimulate the sympathetic nervous system and catecholamine release can trigger acute myocardial infarction. The wake-up time, Mondays, winter season, physical exertion, emotional upset, overeating, lack of sleep, cocaine, marijuana, anger, and sexual activity are some of the more common triggers. Certain natural disasters such as earthquakes and blizzards have also been associated with an increase in cardiac events. Certain unnatural triggers may play a role including the Holiday season. Holiday season cardiac events peak on Christmas and New Year. A number of hypotheses have been raised to explain the increase in cardiac events during the holidays, including overeating, excessive use of salt and alcohol, exposure to particulates, from fireplaces, a delay in seeking medical help, anxiety or depression related to the holidays, and poorer staffing of health care facilities at this time. War has been associated with an increase in cardiac events. Data regarding an increase in cardiac events during the 9/11 terrorist attack have been mixed. Understanding the cause of cardiovascular triggers will help in developing potential therapies.

  6. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development. PMID:27283037

  7. Contractile properties are disrupted in Becker muscular dystrophy, but not in limb girdle type 2I.

    PubMed

    Løkken, Nicoline; Hedermann, Gitte; Thomsen, Carsten; Vissing, John

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether a linear relationship between muscle strength and cross-sectional area (CSA) is preserved in calf muscles of patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, n = 14) and limb-girdle type 2I muscular dystrophy (LGMD2I, n = 11), before and after correcting for muscle fat infiltration. The Dixon magnetic resonance imaging technique was used to quantify fat and calculate a fat-free contractile CSA. Strength was assessed by dynamometry. Muscle strength/CSA relationships were significantly lower in patients versus controls. The strength/contractile-CSA relationship was still severely lowered in BMD, but was almost normalized in LGMD2I. Our findings suggest close to intact contractile properties in LGMD2I, which are severely disrupted in BMD. Ann Neurol 2016;80:466-471. PMID:27463532

  8. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies.

    PubMed

    Dasbiswas, K; Alster, E; Safran, S A

    2016-06-10

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range "macroscopic modes" in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development.

  9. Cholinoceptor Activation Subserving the Effects of Interferon Gamma on the Contractility of Rat Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Rodriguez, Martin; de Bracco, Maria M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant rat interferon γ stimulated the contractility of isolated rat ileum at doses of 4–12 units/ml. Muscarinic cholinoceptors were involved, as treatment of the tissue with atropine prevented the contractile response of the ileum. Furthermore, interferon γ increased the affinity of carbachol for the cholinoceptors and did not change its maximum effect. Neurogenic pathways were also involved since pretreatment of ileum with hexamethonium, hemicholinium or tetrodotoxin impaired the contractile effect of interferon γ. In contrast to the action of exogenous carbachol, the effects of interferon γ are indirect. They appear to involve a G protein regulating phosphoinositide turnover and cytoskeletal structures since they could not be induced in ileum strips that were pretreated with pertussis toxin, phospholipase C inhibitors (2-nitro-carboxyphenyl, NN-diphenyl carbamate and neomycin), cytochalasine B or colchicine. PMID:18475595

  10. Three-Dimensional Balance of Cortical Tension and Axial Contractility Enables Fast Amoeboid Migration

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Meili, Ruedi; Bastounis, Effie; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Fast amoeboid migration requires cells to apply mechanical forces on their surroundings via transient adhesions. However, the role these forces play in controlling cell migration speed remains largely unknown. We used three-dimensional force microscopy to measure the three-dimensional forces exerted by chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells, and examined wild-type cells as well as mutants with defects in contractility, internal F-actin crosslinking, and cortical integrity. We showed that cells pull on their substrate adhesions using two distinct, yet interconnected mechanisms: axial actomyosin contractility and cortical tension. We found that the migration speed increases when axial contractility overcomes cortical tension to produce the cell shape changes needed for locomotion. We demonstrated that the three-dimensional pulling forces generated by both mechanisms are internally balanced by an increase in cytoplasmic pressure that allows cells to push on their substrate without adhering to it, and which may be relevant for amoeboid migration in complex three-dimensional environments. PMID:25692587

  11. Mechanobiological induction of long-range contractility by diffusing biomolecules and size scaling in cell assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasbiswas, K.; Alster, E.; Safran, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanobiological studies of cell assemblies have generally focused on cells that are, in principle, identical. Here we predict theoretically the effect on cells in culture of locally introduced biochemical signals that diffuse and locally induce cytoskeletal contractility which is initially small. In steady-state, both the concentration profile of the signaling molecule as well as the contractility profile of the cell assembly are inhomogeneous, with a characteristic length that can be of the order of the system size. The long-range nature of this state originates in the elastic interactions of contractile cells (similar to long-range “macroscopic modes” in non-living elastic inclusions) and the non-linear diffusion of the signaling molecules, here termed mechanogens. We suggest model experiments on cell assemblies on substrates that can test the theory as a prelude to its applicability in embryo development where spatial gradients of morphogens initiate cellular development.

  12. The CLEC-2–podoplanin axis controls fibroblastic reticular cell contractility and lymph node microarchitecture

    PubMed Central

    Astarita, Jillian L.; Cremasco, Viviana; Fu, Jianxin; Darnell, Max C.; Peck, James R.; Nieves-Bonilla, Janice M.; Song, Kai; Woodruff, Matthew C.; Gogineni, Alvin; Onder, Lucas; Ludewig, Burkhard; Weimer, Robby M.; Carroll, Michael C.; Mooney, David J.; Xia, Lijun; Turley, Shannon J.

    2014-01-01

    In lymph nodes, fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form a collagen-based reticular network that supports migratory dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells and transports lymph. A hallmark of FRCs is their propensity to contract collagen, yet this function is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that podoplanin (PDPN) regulated actomyosin contractility in FRCs. Under resting conditions, when FRCs are unlikely to encounter mature DCs expressing the PDPN receptor, CLEC-2, PDPN endowed FRCs with contractile function and exerted tension within the reticulum. Upon inflammation, CLEC-2 on mature DCs potently attenuated PDPN-mediated contractility, resulting in FRC relaxation and reduced tissue stiffness. Disrupting PDPN function altered the homeostasis and spacing of FRCs and T cells, resulting in an expanded reticular network and enhanced immunity. PMID:25347465

  13. Update on gene therapy for myocardial ischaemia and left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure.

    PubMed

    Roncalli, Jerome; Tongers, Jörn; Losordo, Douglas W

    2010-01-01

    Despite considerable advances in pharmacological, surgical and technology-based cardiovascular therapy, left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure are increasingly prevalent health problems. Recent studies suggest that angiogenic gene therapy can restore perfusion in ischaemic myocardial tissue, and that the transfer of nonangiogenic genes may correct defects in calcium handling that contribute to abnormal contractile function in patients with heart failure; however, large clinical trials of gene therapy for treatment of left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure have yet to be completed, and only a small number of genes have been evaluated in patients. Researchers continue to investigate new genes, combinations of genes and approaches that combine gene and cell therapy, and to develop novel expression vectors and delivery systems; collectively, these refinements promise to improve both patient response and safety.

  14. [Effectiveness of the physical training of post-myocardial infarction patients with differing exertion tolerances].

    PubMed

    Barats, S S; Lipchenko, A A; Vetrov, A V

    1986-01-01

    A total of 159 men after myocardial infarction were examined. Of them 73 were engaged in physical training for 11 mos. Its efficacy was analysed after the results of bicycle ergometry taking account of initial exercise tolerance. A positive effect of physical training was noted both in the patients with high and low exercise tolerance. Raised physical working capacity was observed in parallel with the improved indices of the left ventricular contractility in accordance with the results of two-dimensional echocardiography. The authors also observed a favorable effect of physical training on lipoprotein metabolism, in particular a decrease in the value of the apo B/apo AI ratio was noted that might suggest a decrease in the inflow of cholesterol to the vascular wall and an enhanced outflow from it.

  15. [Metformin and left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction: molecular mechanisms and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    Paneni, Francesco; Costantino, Sarah; Cosentino, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Despite clear advances in reperfusion therapy and pharmacological treatment, a large proportion of patients with an acute myocardial infarction will die of its consequences. In this regard, it is very important to understand the molecular processes underpinning ischemia-reperfusion injury and occurrence of left ventricular dysfunction, with the aim to develop mechanism-based therapeutic strategies. Experimental evidence indicates that metformin, a biguanide often used in the treatment of diabetes, has favorable effects on left ventricular function. This effect is largely mediated by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key molecule orchestrating many biochemical processes such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, oxidation of free fatty acids and mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes significantly contribute to raise ATP levels and restore myocardial contractile efficiency. AMPK also activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and promotes autophagy, thus preventing inflammation and cellular death. These basic studies prompted many researchers to test the cardioprotective effects of metformin in the clinical setting. In diabetic patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), retrospective analyses showed that metformin is associated with reduced infarct size as compared to non-metformin-based strategies, implicating beneficial effects beyond glucose control. A recent randomized trial, the GIPS-III study, has postulated that metformin may improve left ventricular function following STEMI even in patients without diabetes. Metformin (500 mg twice/day), administered 3h after percutaneous coronary intervention, did not result in improved left ventricular ejection fraction after 4-month follow-up. Based on these results, it remains unclear whether metformin exerts a cardioprotective effect regardless of glycemic control. Further randomized studies in diabetic and nondiabetic patients are required to address these important questions. The present

  16. Cardioprotection by systemic dosing of thymosin beta four following ischemic myocardial injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Weike; Ballard, Victoria L.; Needle, Saul; Hoang, Bao; Lenhard, Stephen C.; Tunstead, James R.; Jucker, Beat M.; Willette, Robert N.; Pipes, G. Teg

    2013-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) was previously shown to reduce infarct size and improve contractile performance in chronic myocardial ischemic injury via two phases of action: an acute phase, just after injury, when Tβ4 preserves ischemic myocardium via antiapoptotic or anti-inflammatory mechanisms; and a chronic phase, when Tβ4 activates the growth of vascular or cardiac progenitor cells. In order to differentiate between the effects of Tβ4 during the acute and during the chronic phases, and also in order to obtain detailed hemodynamic and biomarker data on the effects of Tβ4 treatment suitable for use in clinical studies, we tested Tβ4 in a rat model of chronic myocardial ischemia using two dosing regimens: short term dosing (Tβ4 administered only during the first 3 days following injury), and long term dosing (Tβ4 administered during the first 3 days following injury and also every third day until the end of the study). Tβ4 administered throughout the study reduced infarct size and resulted in significant improvements in hemodynamic performance; however, chamber volumes and ejection fractions were not significantly improved. Tβ4 administered only during the first 3 days following injury tended to reduce infarct size, chamber volumes and improve hemodynamic performance. Plasma biomarkers of myocyte injury were significantly reduced by Tβ4 treatment during the acute injury period, and plasma ANP levels were significantly reduced in both dosing groups. Surprisingly, neither acute nor chronic Tβ4 treatment significantly increased blood vessel density in peri-infarct regions. These results suggest the following: repeated dosing may be required to achieve clinically measureable improvements in cardiac function post-myocardial infarction (MI); improvement in cardiac function may be observed in the absence of a high degree of angiogenesis; and that plasma biomarkers of cardiac function and myocardial injury are sensitive pharmacodynamic biomarkers of the effects of T

  17. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  18. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    PDD; Chronic depression; Depression - chronic ... The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also ...

  19. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs.

  20. Relationship between membrane Cl− conductance and contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles

    PubMed Central

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Broch-Lips, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2013-01-01

    Resting skeletal muscle fibres have a large membrane Cl− conductance (GCl) that dampens their excitability. Recently, however, muscle activity was shown to induce PKC-mediated reduction in GCl in rat muscles of 40–90%. To examine the physiological significance of this PKC-mediated GCl reduction for the function of muscles, this study explored effects of GCl reductions on contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles. Contractile endurance was assessed from the ability of muscle to maintain force during prolonged stimulation under conditions when GCl was manipulated by: (i) inhibition of PKC, (ii) reduction of solution Cl− or (iii) inhibition of ClC-1 Cl− channels using 9-anthracene-carboxylic acid (9-AC). Experiments showed that contractile endurance was optimally preserved by reductions in GCl similar to what occurs in active muscle. Contrastingly, further GCl reductions compromised the endurance. The experiments thus show a biphasic relationship between GCl and contractile endurance in which partial GCl reduction improves endurance while further GCl reduction compromises endurance. Intracellular recordings of trains of action potentials suggest that this biphasic dependency of contractile endurance on GCl reflects that lowering GCl enhances muscle excitability but low GCl also increases the depolarisation of muscle fibres during excitation and reduces their ability to re-accumulate K+ lost during excitation. If GCl becomes very low, the latter actions dominate causing reduced endurance. It is concluded that the PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition in active muscle reduces GCl to a level that optimises contractile endurance during intense exercise. PMID:23045345

  1. Relationship between membrane Cl- conductance and contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Broch-Lips, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2013-01-15

    Resting skeletal muscle fibres have a large membrane Cl(-) conductance (G(Cl)) that dampens their excitability. Recently, however, muscle activity was shown to induce PKC-mediated reduction in G(Cl) in rat muscles of 40-90%. To examine the physiological significance of this PKC-mediated G(Cl) reduction for the function of muscles, this study explored effects of G(Cl) reductions on contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles. Contractile endurance was assessed from the ability of muscle to maintain force during prolonged stimulation under conditions when G(Cl) was manipulated by: (i) inhibition of PKC, (ii) reduction of solution Cl(-) or (iii) inhibition of ClC-1 Cl(-) channels using 9-anthracene-carboxylic acid (9-AC). Experiments showed that contractile endurance was optimally preserved by reductions in G(Cl) similar to what occurs in active muscle. Contrastingly, further G(Cl) reductions compromised the endurance. The experiments thus show a biphasic relationship between G(Cl) and contractile endurance in which partial G(Cl) reduction improves endurance while further G(Cl) reduction compromises endurance. Intracellular recordings of trains of action potentials suggest that this biphasic dependency of contractile endurance on G(Cl) reflects that lowering G(Cl) enhances muscle excitability but low G(Cl) also increases the depolarisation of muscle fibres during excitation and reduces their ability to re-accumulate K(+) lost during excitation. If G(Cl) becomes very low, the latter actions dominate causing reduced endurance. It is concluded that the PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition in active muscle reduces G(Cl) to a level that optimises contractile endurance during intense exercise.

  2. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs. PMID:27558729

  3. Skeletal muscle morphology and contractile function in relation to muscle denervation in diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Major, Brendan; Kimpinski, Kurt; Doherty, Timothy J.; Rice, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effects of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) on muscle contractile properties in humans, and how these changes are related to alterations in muscle morphology and denervation. Patients with DPN (n = 12) were compared with age- and sex-matched controls (n = 12). Evoked and voluntary contractile properties, including stimulated twitch responses and maximal voluntary contractions, of the dorsiflexor muscles were assessed using an isometric ankle dynamometer. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) of the tibialis anterior (TA) were performed via quantitative electromyography and decomposition-enhanced spike-triggered averaging. Peak tibialis anterior (TA) cross-sectional area (CSA; cm2), and relative proportion of contractile to noncontractile tissue (%) was determined from magnetic resonance images. Patients with DPN demonstrated decreased strength (−35%) and slower (−45%) dorsiflexion contractile properties for both evoked and voluntary contractions (P < 0.05). These findings were not accounted for by differences in voluntary activation (P > 0.05) or antagonist coactivation (P > 0.05). Additionally, patients with DPN were weaker when strength was normalized to TA total CSA (−30%; P < 0.05) or contractile tissue CSA (−26%; P < 0.05). In the DPN patient group, TA MUNEs were negatively related to both % noncontractile tissue (P < 0.05; r = 0.72) and twitch half-relaxation time (P < 0.05; r = 0.60), whereas no relationships were found between these variables in controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that patients with DPN demonstrated reduced strength and muscle quality as well as contractile slowing. This process may contribute to muscle power loss and functional impairments reported in patients with DPN, beyond the loss of strength commonly observed. PMID:24356519

  4. Contractile forces generated by striae distensae fibroblasts embedded in collagen lattices.

    PubMed

    Viennet, Céline; Bride, Jacqueline; Armbruster, Vincent; Aubin, François; Gabiot, Anne-Claude; Gharbi, Tijani; Humbert, Philippe

    2005-07-01

    Striae distensae are characterized by linear, smooth bands of atrophic-appearing skin that are reddish at first and finally white. They are due to stretching of the skin, as in rapid weight gain, or mechanical stress, as in weight lifting. The pathogenesis of striae distensae is unknown but probably relates to changes in the fibroblast phenotype. In order to characterize striae distensae fibroblasts, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and contractile forces were studied. Five healthy women with early erythematous striae and five healthy women with older striae were selected. Paired biopsies were taken from the center of lesional striae and adjacent normal skin. Fibroblasts were obtained by an explant technique and expanded in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Contractile forces generated by fibroblasts in collagen lattices were measured with the Glasbox device developed in our laboratory. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was studied by immunofluorescence labeling of cells and by flow cytometry. Fibroblasts from early striae distensae were the richest cells in alpha-smooth muscle actin filaments and generated the highest contractile forces. Their peak contractile force was 26% greater than normal fibroblasts. There was a 150% higher level of alpha-smooth muscle actin content in fibroblasts from early striae distensae compared with fibroblasts from normal skin. In contrast, there was no significant difference in force generation between old striae fibroblasts and normal fibroblasts with cells expressing no alpha-smooth muscle actin. The contractile properties of fibroblasts from striae distensae varies depending on the stage of the disease. In early striae distensae, fibroblasts acquire a more contractile phenotype, corresponding to that of myofibroblasts.

  5. Physiological response of cardiac tissue to bisphenol a: alterations in ventricular pressure and contractility

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Daina; Chandra, Akhil; Jaimes, Rafael; Sarvazyan, Narine; Kay, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Biomonitoring studies have indicated that humans are routinely exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that is commonly used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Epidemiological studies have shown that BPA exposure in humans is associated with cardiovascular disease; however, the direct effects of BPA on cardiac physiology are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that BPA exposure slows atrioventricular electrical conduction, decreases epicardial conduction velocity, and prolongs action potential duration in excised rat hearts. In the present study, we tested if BPA exposure also adversely affects cardiac contractile performance. We examined the impact of BPA exposure level, sex, and pacing rate on cardiac contractile function in excised rat hearts. Hearts were retrogradely perfused at constant pressure and exposed to 10−9-10−4 M BPA. Left ventricular developed pressure and contractility were measured during sinus rhythm and during pacing (5, 6.5, and 9 Hz). Ca2+ transients were imaged from whole hearts and from neonatal rat cardiomyocyte layers. During sinus rhythm in female hearts, BPA exposure decreased left ventricular developed pressure and inotropy in a dose-dependent manner. The reduced contractile performance was exacerbated at higher pacing rates. BPA-induced effects on contractile performance were also observed in male hearts, albeit to a lesser extent. Exposure to BPA altered Ca2+ handling within whole hearts (reduced diastolic and systolic Ca2+ transient potentiation) and neonatal cardiomyocytes (reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolonged Ca2+ transient release time). In conclusion, BPA exposure significantly impaired cardiac performance in a dose-dependent manner, having a major negative impact upon electrical conduction, intracellular Ca2+ handing, and ventricular contractility. PMID:25980024

  6. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex enhances ventricular contractility in awake dogs: a mathematical analysis study.

    PubMed

    Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Moslehpour, Mohsen; Hammond, Robert L; Ichinose, Masashi; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Evan, Sell; O'Leary, Donal S; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2014-08-15

    The cardiopulmonary baroreflex responds to an increase in central venous pressure (CVP) by decreasing total peripheral resistance and increasing heart rate (HR) in dogs. However, the direction of ventricular contractility change is not well understood. The aim was to elucidate the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility during normal physiological conditions via a mathematical analysis. Spontaneous beat-to-beat fluctuations in maximal ventricular elastance (Emax), which is perhaps the best available index of ventricular contractility, CVP, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and HR were measured from awake dogs at rest before and after β-adrenergic receptor blockade. An autoregressive exogenous input model was employed to jointly identify the three causal transfer functions relating beat-to-beat fluctuations in CVP to Emax (CVP → Emax), which characterizes the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, ABP to Emax, which characterizes the arterial baroreflex control of ventricular contractility, and HR to Emax, which characterizes the force-frequency relation. The CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.037 ± 0.010 ml(-1) (different from zero; P < 0.05) and an overall time constant of 3.2 ± 1.2 s. Hence, Emax would increase and reach steady state in ∼16 s in response to a step increase in CVP, without any change to ABP or HR, due to the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. Following β-adrenergic receptor blockade, the CVP → Emax transfer function showed a static gain of 0.0007 ± 0.0113 ml(-1) (different from control; P < 0.10). Hence, Emax would change little in steady state in response to a step increase in CVP. Stimulation of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex increases ventricular contractility through β-adrenergic receptor system mediation.

  7. [The action of nitroglycerine on digitalis induced ST depression in patients with coronary disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H U; Witt, E; Hochrein, H

    1979-04-01

    The influence of therapeutic digitalisation on ST depression due to myocardial ischemia was investigated in 11 patients, average age 53.6 years, with coronary heart disease, compared with the effectiveness of nitroglycerine. Therapeutic digitalis led to an average increase of ischaemic ST depression from -0.53 to -0.73 mV. The mean pulmonary arterial and pulmonary capillary pressure decreased slightly, the frequency of pectanginous attacks increased. Independent of the digitalis effect nitroglycerine had an opposing action on these parameters. In decompensated patients with coronary heart disease (n = 4) both digitalis and nitroglycerine produced a shift of the left ventricular function curve as an expression of improved cardiac action. This could not be observed in patients with compensated ventricular function (n = 7). In sufficient ventricular function digitalis led to a further increase of myocardial ischaemic ST depression. In ventricular insufficiency no uniform behaviour was apparent. ST depression induced by digitalis could be reversibly influenced by nitroglycerine. PMID:108065

  8. Myocardial revascularization in Jehovah Witnesses.

    PubMed

    Seifert, P E; Auer, J E; Hohensee, P

    1989-04-01

    The refusal of certain patients to accept blood transfusions need not be a deterrent to surgery. We report on nine Jehovah's Witnesses who over a one-year period underwent myocardial revascularization without significant blood loss or decrease in hematocrit values. PMID:2786287

  9. [Myocardial infarction in young population].

    PubMed

    Shklovskii, B L; Prokhorchik, A A; Koltunov, A N; Lishchuk, A N; Ryzhman, N N; Ivanov, A V; Navaznov, V V; Baksheev, V I

    2015-03-01

    Description of clinical observation and literature review. Myocardial infarction in patients younger than 45 years is rare, but it is an important clinical, organizational and psychological problem. A case of myocardial infarction in 19-years old patient, who suffered since 6 years from kidney disease, is described. Transmural left-ventricular myocardial infarction has developed on the background of chronic glomerulonephritis, excessive exercise, and traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Coronary venous bypass with the benefit-pleasing outcome is performed. When analysing the literature, the authors emphasize that in comparison with elderly patients, young people have different profiles of risk factors, clinical manfestations and prognosis of myocardial infarction. It is emphasized that kidney chronic disease, regardless the stage, worsen short-term and long-term outcomes of cardiovascular disease. Early stabilization is possible under the condition of risk stratification and-early revascularization, which leads to better clinical outcomes. Particular attention should be given to a comprehensive assessment, it prognostic criteria, risk factor modification, secondary prevention of major and associated diseases, clinical- and -dynamic observation, including patients with asymptomatic course of the disease.

  10. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  11. Myocardial infarction following sternal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, R. K.; Morrison, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of myocardial infarction in a 32-year-old man undergoing sternal surgery. Thrombotic occlusion of the right coronary artery with no underlying atheromatous disease was demonstrated angiographically and successfully treated with intracoronary thrombolysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8796219

  12. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice.

  13. Autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury through the clearance of CLP36

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chao; Gu, Lei; Wang, Lina; Shang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiong; Wan, Junyi; Shi, Jian; Wang, Fang; Xu, Zhiliang; Ji, Guangju

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of the death worldwide. An increasing number of studies have found that autophagy is involved in the progression or prevention of CVD. However, the precise mechanism of autophagy in CVD, especially the myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury (MI/R injury), is unclear and controversial. Here, we show that the cardiomyocyte-specific disruption of autophagy by conditional knockout of Atg7 leads to severe contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and vacuolar cardiomyocytes. A negative cytoskeleton organization regulator, CLP36, was found to be accumulated in Atg7-deficient cardiomyocytes. The cardiomyocyte-specific knockout of Atg7 aggravates the MI/R injury with cardiac hypertrophy, contractile dysfunction, myofibrillar disarray and severe cardiac fibrosis, most probably due to CLP36 accumulation in cardiomyocytes. Altogether, this work reveals autophagy may protect cardiomyocytes from the MI/R injury through the clearance of CLP36, and these findings define a novel relationship between autophagy and the regulation of stress fibre in heart. PMID:27512143

  14. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart.

  15. Myeloid-derived growth factor (C19orf10) mediates cardiac repair following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Reboll, Marc R; Klede, Stefanie; Brod, Torben; Pich, Andreas; Polten, Felix; Napp, L Christian; Bauersachs, Johann; Ganser, Arnold; Brinkmann, Eva; Reimann, Ines; Kempf, Tibor; Niessen, Hans W; Mizrahi, Jacques; Schönfeld, Hans-Joachim; Iglesias, Antonio; Bobadilla, Maria; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C

    2015-02-01

    Paracrine-acting proteins are emerging as a central mechanism by which bone marrow cell-based therapies improve tissue repair and heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). We carried out a bioinformatic secretome analysis in bone marrow cells from patients with acute MI to identify novel secreted proteins with therapeutic potential. Functional screens revealed a secreted protein encoded by an open reading frame on chromosome 19 (C19orf10) that promotes cardiac myocyte survival and angiogenesis. We show that bone marrow-derived monocytes and macrophages produce this protein endogenously to protect and repair the heart after MI, and we named it myeloid-derived growth factor (MYDGF). Whereas Mydgf-deficient mice develop larger infarct scars and more severe contractile dysfunction compared to wild-type mice, treatment with recombinant Mydgf reduces scar size and contractile dysfunction after MI. This study is the first to assign a biological function to MYDGF, and it may serve as a prototypical example for the development of protein-based therapies for ischemic tissue repair. PMID:25581518

  16. Real-Time Visualization and Quantification of Contractile Ring Proteins in Single Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Reshma; Liu, Yajun; Gerien, Kenneth S; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell microscopy provides a powerful tool to visualize cellular and subcellular processes in wild-type and mutant cells by observing fluorescently tagged proteins. Here, we describe three simple methods to visualize fission yeast cells: gelatin slides, coverslip-bottom dishes, and tetrad fluorescence microscopy. These imaging methods and data analysis using free software make it possible to quantify protein localization, dynamics, and concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. In fission yeast, the actomyosin contractile ring is essential for cytokinesis. We use the visualization and quantification of contractile ring proteins as an example to demonstrate how to use these methods.

  17. Loss of anti-contractile effect of perivascular adipose tissue in offspring of obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaborska, K E; Wareing, M; Edwards, G; Austin, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Maternal obesity pre-programmes offspring to develop obesity and associated cardiovascular disease. Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) exerts an anti-contractile effect on the vasculature, which is reduced in hypertension and obesity. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal obesity pre-programmes offspring to develop PVAT dysfunction in later life. Methods: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 10% (control) or 45% fat (high fat diet, HFD) for 12 weeks prior to mating and during pregnancy and lactation. Male offspring were killed at 12 or 24 weeks of age and tension in PVAT-intact or -denuded mesenteric artery segments was measured isometrically. Concentration–response curves were constructed to U46619 and norepinephrine. Results: Only 24-week-old HFD offspring were hypertensive (P<0.0001), although the anti-contractile effect of PVAT was lost in vessels from HFD offspring of each age. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with 100 μM l-NMMA attenuated the anti-contractile effect of PVAT and increased contractility of PVAT-denuded arteries (P<0.05, P<0.0001). The increase in contraction was smaller in PVAT-intact than PVAT-denuded vessels from 12-week-old HFD offspring, suggesting decreased PVAT-derived NO and release of a contractile factor (P<0.07). An additional, NO-independent effect of PVAT was evident only in norepinephrine-contracted vessels. Activation of AMP-activated kinase (with 10 μM A769662) was anti-contractile in PVAT-denuded (P<0.0001) and -intact (P<0.01) vessels and was due solely to NO in controls; the AMPK effect was similar in HFD offspring vessels (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively) but was partially NO-independent. Conclusions: The diminished anti-contractile effects of PVAT in offspring of HFD dams are primarily due to release of a PVAT-derived contractile factor and reduced NO bioavailability. PMID:27102050

  18. Validation of an in vitro contractility assay using canine ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harmer, A.R. Abi-Gerges, N.; Morton, M.J.; Pullen, G.F.; Valentin, J.P.; Pollard, C.E.

    2012-04-15

    Measurement of cardiac contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical safety assessment in a drug discovery project, particularly if a risk has been identified or is suspected based on the primary- or non-target pharmacology. However, there are limited validated assays available that can be used to screen several compounds in order to identify and eliminate inotropic liability from a chemical series. We have therefore sought to develop an in vitro model with sufficient throughput for this purpose. Dog ventricular myocytes were isolated using a collagenase perfusion technique and placed in a perfused recording chamber on the stage of a microscope at ∼ 36 °C. Myocytes were stimulated to contract at a pacing frequency of 1 Hz and a digital, cell geometry measurement system (IonOptix™) was used to measure sarcomere shortening in single myocytes. After perfusion with vehicle (0.1% DMSO), concentration–effect curves were constructed for each compound in 4–30 myocytes taken from 1 or 2 dog hearts. The validation test-set was 22 negative and 8 positive inotropes, and 21 inactive compounds, as defined by their effect in dog, cynolomolgous monkey or humans. By comparing the outcome of the assay to the known in vivo contractility effects, the assay sensitivity was 81%, specificity was 75%, and accuracy was 78%. With a throughput of 6–8 compounds/week from 1 cell isolation, this assay may be of value to drug discovery projects to screen for direct contractility effects and, if a hazard is identified, help identify inactive compounds. -- Highlights: ► Cardiac contractility is an important physiological function of the heart. ► Assessment of contractility is a logical part of pre-clinical drug safety testing. ► There are limited validated assays that predict effects of compounds on contractility. ► Using dog myocytes, we have developed an in vitro cardiac contractility assay. ► The assay predicted the in vivo contractility with a good level of accuracy.

  19. Mechanisms of Discoordination of Contractile Activity in the Gastroduodenal Zone during Psychogenic Stress in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikov, V I; Berezina, T P; Shemerovskii, K A

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of the contractile activity of the stomach induced by psychogenic stress persisted after blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors and α2 and β1/β2-adrenergic receptors. Stress-induced increase in contractile activity in the proximal part of the duodenum persisted during blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors, β1/β2-adrenergic receptors. At the same time, blockade of the above cholinergic and adrenergic receptors eliminated the stress-induced increase in contractive activity in the distal part of the duodenum.

  20. Is action potential duration of the intact dog heart related to contractility or stimulus rate?

    PubMed

    Drake, A J; Noble, M I; Schouten, V; Seed, A; Ter Keurs, H E; Wohlfart, B

    1982-10-01

    1. The contractility (maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure) and action potential duration were measured in intact closed-chest anaesthetized dogs with complete atrioventricular dissociation and beta-adrenergic blockade.2. Measurements were confined to test beats following a 1 sec interval. Prior to the test interval (priming period) a variety of potentiating stimulus trains were introduced.3. When the frequency of stimulation was increased in the priming period (frequency potentiation), there was an inverse relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.4. When the test beat was potentiated by a single beat terminating the priming period with one short interval (post-extrasystolic potentiation), there was no relationship between the action potential duration and contractility of the test beat.5. Paired pulse stimulation was used for any given frequency to vary contractility by short interval potentiation. For any given frequency of stimulation there was no relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat. For any given value of contractility, action potential duration decreased with increased frequency of stimulation.6. The introduction of a high frequency train caused a step decrease in action potential duration on the first beat of the train. This was followed by a further slow decline in action potential duration with a time course of over 3 min. These two changes could be dissociated by the introduction during the train of one second interval test pulses, which only showed the slow shortening.7. The lack of a consistent relationship between action potential duration and contractility of the test beat disagrees with the hypothesis that repolarization is controlled by the activator calcium responsible for the contractility. The action potential shortening associated with increased frequency is related to the frequency change per se.8. The slow time course of change in action

  1. Rat Heterotopic Heart Transplantation Model to Investigate Unloading-Induced Myocardial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuebin; Segiser, Adrian; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Most, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Unloading of the failing left ventricle in order to achieve myocardial reverse remodeling and improvement of contractile function has been developed as a strategy with the increasing frequency of implantation of left ventricular assist devices in clinical practice. But, reverse remodeling remains an elusive target, with high variability and exact mechanisms still largely unclear. The small animal model of heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTX) in rodents has been widely implemented to study the effects of complete and partial unloading on cardiac failing and non-failing tissue to better understand the structural and molecular changes that underlie myocardial recovery. We herein review the current knowledge on the effects of volume unloading the left ventricle via different methods of hHTX in rats, differentiating between changes that contribute to functional recovery and adverse effects observed in unloaded myocardium. We focus on methodological aspects of heterotopic transplantation, which increase the correlation between the animal model and the setting of the failing unloaded human heart. Last, but not least, we describe the late use of sophisticated techniques to acquire data, such as small animal MRI and catheterization, as well as ways to assess unloaded hearts under “reloaded” conditions. While giving regard to certain limitations, heterotopic rat heart transplantation certainly represents the crucial model to mimic unloading-induced changes in the heart and as such the intricacies and challenges deserve highest consideration. Careful translational research will further improve our knowledge of the reverse remodeling process and how to potentiate its effect in order to achieve recovery of contractile function in more patients. PMID:27807535

  2. Multiscale Characterization of Impact of Infarct Size on Myocardial Remodeling in an Ovine Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Li, Tielou; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-01-01

    The surviving myocardium initially compensates the loss of injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) and gradually becomes progressively dysfunctional. There have been limited studies of the influence of infarct size on temporal and spatial alteration of myocardium during progressive myocardial remodeling. MI with three infarct sizes (15%, 25% and 35% of left ventricular wall) was created in an ovine infarction model. The progressive LV remodeling over a 12 week period was studied. Echocardiography, sonomicrometry, histological and molecular analyses were carried out to evaluate cardiac function, regional tissue contractile function and structural remodeling, and regional cardiomycyte hypertrophy and calcium handling proteins. The 15%, 25% and 35% MI groups at 12 weeks after MI had normalized LV end diastole volumes of 1.4±0.2, 1.7±0.3 and 2.0±0.4 mL/Kg, normalized end systole volumes of 1.0±0.1, 1.0±0.2 and 1.3±0.3 mL/Kg and LV ejection fractions of 43%±3%, 42%±6% and 34%±4%, respectively. They all differed from a sham group (p<0.05). All the three MI groups exhibited larger wall areal expansion (remodeling strain), larger cardiomyocyte size and altered expression of calcium handing proteins in the adjacent myocardium compared to the remote counterpart from the infarct. Significant correlation was found between myocardiocyte size and remodeling strain in the adjacent zone. A comparative analysis among the three MI groups showed that a larger infarct size (35% vs. 15% MI) was associated with larger remodeling strain, impairment severity of cellular structure and composition, and regional contractile function at regional tissue level and LV cardiac function at organ level. PMID:26540290

  3. Multiscale Characterization of Impact of Infarct Size on Myocardial Remodeling in an Ovine Infarct Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Li, Tielou; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-01-01

    The surviving myocardium initially compensates the loss of injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) and gradually becomes progressively dysfunctional. There have been limited studies on the effect of infarct size on temporal and spatial alterations in the myocardium during progressive myocardial remodeling. MI with three infarct sizes, i.e. 15, 25 and 35% of the left ventricular (LV) wall, was created in an ovine infarction model. The progressive LV remodeling over a 12-week period was studied. Echocardiography, sonomicrometry, and histological and molecular analyses were carried out to evaluate cardiac function, regional tissue contractile function, structural remodeling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and calcium handling proteins. Twelve weeks after MI, the 15, 25 and 35% MI groups had normalized LV end diastole volumes of 1.4 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg, normalized end systole volumes of 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.3 ml/kg and LV ejection fractions of 43 ± 3, 42 ± 6 and 34 ± 4%, respectively. They all differed from the sham group (p < 0.05). All the three MI groups exhibited larger wall areal expansion (remodeling strain), larger cardiomyocyte size and altered expression of calcium handing proteins in the adjacent myocardium compared to the remote counterpart from the infarct. A significant correlation was found between cardiomyocyte size and remodeling strain in the adjacent zone. A comparative analysis among the three MI groups showed that a larger infarct size (35 vs. 15% MI) was associated with larger remodeling strain, more serious impairment in the cellular structure and composition, and regional contractile function at regional tissue level and LV function at organ level.

  4. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  5. Myocardial disarray. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, A E; Caruso, G

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial disarray or disorganisation is at present a contentious topic, not least because its value as a clinical marker for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has changed considerably over the years. Initially observed as one of the features of asymmetric septal hypertrophy, disarray has since been promoted as its pathognomonic histological feature, regarded by some observers as the morphological manifestation of a genetically transmitted myocardial defect. Recently, however, it has become evident that myocardial disarray is not limited to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, but is encountered in hearts with both congenital and acquired conditions, and is also observed in normal hearts. The specificity of disarray for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is thus seriously questioned. Latterly, it has been suggested that disarray, judged from through-and-through sections of the ventricular midseptum is a highly specific and sensitive marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when considered in quantitative rather than qualitative fashion. The present study sets out to answer the question whether disarray could be the histological expression of the normal but intricate fibre architecture of the heart, a consideration also initiated by debatable definitions of normality and abnormality of myocardial histology. Gross fibre dissections in five normal hearts showed that many sites occurred in which disarray was a natural phenomenon. In five more hearts it was found that the plane of section of a tissue block might profoundly influence the histology. In fact, tissue cubicles sampled from different faces showed a change in histology in the vast majority. Thus the diagnostic significance of myocardial disarray as a marker of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the clinical setting almost vanishes; a change in orientation of a tissue section may actually turn "normality" into "disarray". Images PMID:7044398

  6. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Geza S

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  7. Regional myocardial metabolism in patients with acute myocardial infarction assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaiger, M.; Brunken, R.; Grover-McKay, M.; Krivokapich, J.; Child, J.; Tillisch, J.H.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1986-10-01

    Positron emission tomography has been shown to distinguish between reversible and irreversible ischemic tissue injury. Using this technique, 13 patients with acute myocardial infarction were studied within 72 hours of onset of symptoms to evaluate regional blood flow and glucose metabolism with nitrogen (N)-13 ammonia and fluorine (F)-18 deoxyglucose, respectively. Serial noninvasive assessment of wall motion was performed to determine the prognostic value of metabolic indexes for functional tissue recovery. Segmental blood flow and glucose utilization were evaluated using a circumferential profile technique and compared with previously established semiquantitative criteria. Relative N-13 ammonia uptake was depressed in 32 left ventricular segments. Sixteen segments demonstrated a concordant decrease in flow and glucose metabolism. Regional function did not change over time in these segments. In contrast, 16 other segments with reduced blood flow revealed maintained F-18 deoxyglucose uptake consistent with remaining viable tissue. The average wall motion score improved significantly in these segments (p less than 0.01), yet the degree of recovery varied considerably among patients. Coronary anatomy was defined in 9 of 13 patients: patent infarct vessels supplied 8 of 10 segments with F-18 deoxyglucose uptake, while 10 of 13 segments in the territory of an occluded vessel showed concordant decreases in flow and metabolism (p less than 0.01). Thus, positron emission tomography reveals a high incidence of residual tissue viability in ventricular segments with reduced flow and impaired function during the subacute phase of myocardial infarction. Absence of residual tissue metabolism is associated with irreversible injury, while preservation of metabolic activity identifies segments with a variable outcome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri; Howard, Margaret; Salisbury, Amy; Zlotnick, Caron

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects up to 15% of mothers. Recent research has identified several psychosocial and biologic risk factors for PPD. The negative short-term and long-term effects on child development are well-established. PPD is under recognized and under treated. The obstetrician and pediatrician can serve important roles in screening for and treating PPD. Treatment options include psychotherapy and antidepressant medication. Obstacles to compliance with treatment recommendations include access to psychotherapists and concerns of breastfeeding mothers about exposure of the infant to antidepressant medication. Further research is needed to examine systematically the short-term and long-term effect of medication exposure through breastmilk on infant and child development. PMID:19318144

  9. Gullied Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies formed in the wall of a depression located on the floor of Rabe Crater west of the giant impact basin, Hellas Planitia. Gullies such as these are common features on Mars, but the process by which they are formed is not fully understood. The debate centers on the role and source of fluids in the genesis of these features.

    Location near: 44.1oS, 325.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

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